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Sample records for egf-r antibodies mediate

  1. EGF-R small inhibitors and anti-EGF-R antibodies: advantages and limits of a new avenue in anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Caraglia, Michele; Marra, Monica; Meo, Giuseppina; Addeo, Santolo R; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Budillon, Alfredo

    2006-06-01

    Cellular receptors for the Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF-R) are members of the ErbB receptor family and are considered important targets for the experimental treatment of human cancer. Monoclonal antibodies as well as small tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed and have undergone extensive evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies based on the general idea that EGF-R plays a critical role on the growth and survival of human tumors. This assumption has been derived by the successful development of BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors in human chronic myeloid leukemia as well as on the activity of therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in breast cancer and lymphoproliferative diseases. It is now becoming clear that factors regulating sensitivity to kinase inhibitors may differ from monoclonal antibodies and that the molecules targeted by interfering drugs must be prioritaire for growth and survival of those specific tumors in order to achieve valuable results. In this article, we will describe the signal transduction pathways regulated by EGF-R and the principal pharmacological and biotechnological agents directed against EGF-R. We will discuss the significance of targeting the EGF-R driven survival pathways and the compensatory intracellular survival mechanisms that counteract the specific EGF-R inhibition and are the cause of the poor clinical results derived from study based on the use of these agents. We will describe new multipotent TKIs that target also other members of ErbB family (i.e. ErbB2) blocking one of the compensatory mechanism that can be triggered in cancer cells. Moreover, we will report new patent on bispecific mAbs that bind EGF-R and immune effectors in order to increase the immunological function of this agent that could be the basis of the different clinical results achieved with the use of TKI and mAbs. Finally, we will propose a pharmacological model able to make cancer cells dependent on EGF-R for their survival and

  2. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  3. Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalopathies and Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, Matteo; Thouin, Anaïs; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years it has become clear that rare but highly recognizable diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including newly identified forms of limbic encephalitis and other encephalopathies, are likely to be mediated by antibodies (Abs) to CNS proteins. The Abs are directed against membrane receptors and ion channel-associated proteins that are expressed on the surface of neurons in the CNS, such as N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein like 2, that are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels. The diseases are not invariably cancer-related and are therefore different from the classical paraneoplastic neurological diseases that are associated with, but not caused by, Abs to intracellular proteins. Most importantly, the new antibody-associated diseases almost invariably respond to immunotherapies with considerable and sometimes complete recovery, and there is convincing evidence of their pathogenicity in the relatively limited studies performed so far. Treatments include first-line steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasma exchange, and second-line rituximab and cyclophosphamide, followed in many cases by steroid-sparing agents in the long-term. This review focuses mainly on N-methyl D-aspartate receptor- and voltage-gated potassium channel complex-related Abs in adults, the clinical phenotypes, and treatment responses. Pediatric cases are referred to but not reviewed in detail. As there have been very few prospective studies, the conclusions regarding immunotherapies are based on retrospective studies. PMID:26692392

  4. SOCS36E, a novel Drosophila SOCS protein, suppresses JAK/STAT and EGF-R signalling in the imaginal wing disc.

    PubMed

    Callus, Bernard A; Mathey-Prevot, Bernard

    2002-07-18

    We have cloned a novel SOCS gene from Drosophila, socs36E, which is most homologous to the mammalian socs-5 gene. Socs36E is expressed zygotically, predominantly during embryogenesis, in a highly dynamic pattern. In vivo expression of SOCS36E in transgenic flies results in several adult phenotypes. Engrailed-GAL4 directed expression causes loss of the wing anterior cross vein, humeral outgrowths, absence of halteres and eye pigmentation defects. Expression of SOCS36E under apterous-GAL4 control resulted in outstretched wings. Full penetrance of these phenotypes required the presence of the SH2 and SOCS-box domains of SOCS36E. The observed phenotypes were consistent with defects in JAK/STAT or EGF-R signalling and were exacerbated in flies heterozygous for either the d-jak (hopscotch), d-stat (stat92E) or d-egf-r (der) genes. Conversely, inactivating one copy of the d-cbl gene, a negative regulator of the d-EGF-R, partially rescued the wing phenotypes. These genetic interactions imply that SOCS36E can suppress activities of the JAK/STAT and EGF-R signalling pathways in the wing disc and suggest that SOCS36E interacts with multiple pathways in vivo.

  5. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:27683635

  6. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-09-24

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:27683635

  7. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation.

  8. Antibody-mediated Xenograft Injury: Mechanisms and Protective Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Richard N.

    2009-01-01

    The use of porcine organs for clinical transplantation is a promising potential solution to the shortage of human organs. Preformed anti-pig antibody is the primary cause of hyperacute rejection, while elicited antibody can contribute to subsequent “delayed” xenograft rejection. This article will review recent progress to overcome antibody mediated xenograft rejection, through modification of the host immunity and use of genetically engineered pig organs. PMID:19376229

  9. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  10. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    PubMed

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  11. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the emerging field of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer as an alternative vaccine for infectious disease, with a specific focus on HIV. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV-1; the general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets like hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. This approach is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. With vector-mediated gene transfer, the antibody gene is delivered to the host, via a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector; this in turn results in long-term endogenous antibody expression from the injected muscle that confers protective immunity. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can rapidly move existing, potent broadly cross-neutralizing HIV-1-specific antibodies into the clinic. The gene transfer products demonstrate a potency and breadth identical to the original product. This strategy eliminates the need for immunogen design and interaction with the adaptive immune system to generate protection, a strategy that so far has shown limited promise.

  12. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease.

  13. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  14. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T.; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  15. Antibody-Mediated Pathogen Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Peschen, Dieter; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The methods described in this chapter were developed in order to produce transgenic plants expressing pathogen-specific single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies fused to antifungal peptides (AFPs), conferring resistance against fungal pathogens. We describe the selection from a phage display library of avian scFv antibodies that recognize cell surface proteins on fungi from the genus Fusarium, and the construction of scFv-AFP fusion protein constructs followed by their transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana spp.) plants and stable expression in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Using these techniques, the antibody fusion with the most promising in vitro activity can be used to generate transgenic plants that are resistant to pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae.

  16. Principles of antibody-mediated TNF receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Wajant, H

    2015-01-01

    From the beginning of research on receptors of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), agonistic antibodies have been used to stimulate TNFRSF receptors in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, CD95, one of the first cloned TNFRSF receptors, was solely identified as the target of cell death-inducing antibodies. Early on, it became evident from in vitro studies that valency and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) binding of antibodies targeting TNFRSF receptors can be of crucial relevance for agonistic activity. TNFRSF receptor-specific antibodies of the IgM subclass and secondary cross-linked or aggregation prone dimeric antibodies typically display superior agonistic activity compared with dimeric antibodies. Likewise, anchoring of antibodies to cell surface-expressed FcγRs potentiate their ability to trigger TNFRSF receptor signaling. However, only recently has the relevance of oligomerization and FcγR binding for the in vivo activity of antibody-induced TNFRSF receptor activation been straightforwardly demonstrated in vivo. This review discusses the crucial role of oligomerization and/or FcγR binding for antibody-mediated TNFRSF receptor stimulation in light of current models of TNFRSF receptor activation and especially the overwhelming relevance of these issues for the rational development of therapeutic TNFRSF receptor-targeting antibodies. PMID:26292758

  17. Antibody-Mediated Clearance of Alphavirus Infection from Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Beth; Hardwick, J. Marie; Trapp, Bruce D.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Bollinger, Robert C.; Griffin, Diane E.

    1991-11-01

    Humoral immunity is important for protection against viral infection and neutralization of extracellular virus, but clearance of virus from infected tissues is thought to be mediated solely by cellular immunity. However, in a SCID mouse model of persistent alphavirus encephalomyelitis, adoptive transfer of hyperimmune serum resulted in clearance of infectious virus and viral RNA from the nervous system, whereas adoptive transfer of sensitized T lymphocytes had no effect on viral replication. Three monoclonal antibodies to two different epitopes on the E2 envelope glycoprotein mediated viral clearance. Treatment of alphavirus-infected primary cultured rat neurons with these monoclonal antibodies to E2 resulted in decreased viral protein synthesis, followed by gradual termination of mature infectious virion production. Thus, antibody can mediate clearance of alphavirus infection from neurons by restricting viral gene expression.

  18. Antibody-mediated cofactor-driven reactions

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions capable of being rate-enhanced by auxiliary species which interact with the reactants but do not become chemically bound to them in the formation of the final product are performed in the presence of antibodies which promote the reactions. The antibodies contain regions within their antigen binding sites which recognize the auxiliary species in a conformation which promotes the reaction. The antigen binding site frequently recognizes a particular transition state complex or other high energy complex along the reaction coordinate, thereby promoting the progress of the reaction along the desired route as opposed to other less favorable routes. Various classes of reaction together with appropriate antigen binding site specificities tailored for each are disclosed.

  19. Pharmacological intervention in antibody mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Coutts, S M; Plunkett, M L; Iverson, G M; Barstad, P A; Berner, C M

    1996-04-01

    The use of single signal anergy to inactive pathological B cells in an antigen-specific manner is discussed. Cross-linking surface immunoglobulin, with a construct which contains oligovalent B cell epitopes on a non-immunogenic molecular framework can be used to inactivate the target B cells if the construct lacks T cells epitopes. An example of such a B cell toleragen is LJP 394, which inactivates anti-dsDNA-specific B cells in vivo in murine immunized and spontaneous disease models. The drug enhances survival and lowers renal pathology in BXSB mice. Appropriate definition of epitopes of pathological (auto) antibodies thus offers an opportunity for pharmacological intervention.

  20. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  1. Id-1 expression induces androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R).

    PubMed

    Ling, Ming-Tat; Wang, Xianghong; Lee, Davy T; Tam, P C; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Wong, Yong-Chuan

    2004-04-01

    The failure of prostate cancer treatment is largely due to the development of androgen independence, since the androgen depletion therapy remains the front-line option for this cancer. Previously, we reported that over-expression of the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1 was associated with progression of prostate cancer and ectopic expression of Id-1 induced serum-independent proliferation in prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated if exogenous Id-1 expression in the androgen sensitive LNCaP cells had any effect on androgen-dependent cell growth and studied the molecular mechanisms involved. Using stable Id-1 transfectants, we found that expression of Id-1 was able to reduce androgen-stimulated growth and S phase fraction of the cell cycle in LNCaP cells, indicating that Id-1 may be involved in the development of androgen independence in these cells. The Id-1-induced androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth was correlated with up-regulation of EGF-R (epidermal growth factor-receptor) and PSA (prostate specific antigen) expression, as confirmed by western blotting analysis and luciferase assays. In contrast, down-regulation of Id-1 in androgen-independent DU145 cells by its antisense oligonucleotides resulted in suppression of EGF-R expression at both transcriptional and protein levels. In addition, the results from immunohistochemistry study showed that Id-1 expression was significantly elevated in hormone refractory prostate cancer tissues when compared with the hormone-dependent tumours. Our results suggest that up-regulation of Id-1 in prostate cancer cells may be one of the mechanisms responsible for developing androgen independence and this process may be regulated through induction of EGF-R expression. Inactivation of Id-1 may provide a potential therapeutic strategy leading to inhibition of androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth.

  2. Natural Killer Cell Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Tumor Immunotherapy with Therapeutic Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Ursula J. E.; Schlegel, Patrick; Lang, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade several therapeutic antibodies have been Federal Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMEA) approved. Although their mechanisms of action in vivo is not fully elucidated, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by natural killer (NK) cells is presumed to be a key effector function. A substantial role of ADCC has been demonstrated in vitro and in mouse tumor models. However, a direct in vivo effect of ADCC in tumor reactivity in humans remains to be shown. Several studies revealed a predictive value of FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphism in monoclonal antibody treatment, indicating a potential effect of ADCC on outcome for certain indications. Furthermore, the use of therapeutic antibodies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an interesting option. Studying the role of the FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphism and the influence of Killer-cell Immunoglobuline-like Receptor (KIR) receptor ligand incompatibility on ADCC in this approach may contribute to future transplantation strategies. Despite the success of approved second-generation antibodies in the treatment of several malignancies, efforts are made to further augment ADCC in vivo by antibody engineering. Here, we review currently used therapeutic antibodies for which ADCC has been suggested as effector function. PMID:23543707

  3. Novel antimalarial antibodies highlight the importance of the antibody Fc region in mediating protection.

    PubMed

    Pleass, Richard J; Ogun, Solabomi A; McGuinness, David H; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Holder, Anthony A; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-12-15

    Parasite drug resistance and difficulties in developing effective vaccines have precipitated the search for alternative therapies for malaria. The success of passive immunization suggests that immunoglobulin (Ig)-based therapies are effective. To further explore the mechanism(s) by which antibody mediates its protective effect, we generated human chimeric IgG1 and IgA1 and a single-chain diabody specific for the C-terminal 19-kDa region of Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP119), a major target of protective immune responses. These novel human reagents triggered in vitro phagocytosis of merozoites but, unlike their parental mouse IgG2b, failed to protect against parasite challenge in vivo. Therefore, the Fc region appears critical for mediating protection in vivo, at least for this MSP119 epitope. Such antibodies may serve as prototype therapeutic agents, and as useful tools in the development of in vitro neutralization assays with Plasmodium parasites.

  4. Role of complement and NK cells in antibody mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Takurin; Hirohashi, Tsutomu; Alessandrini, Alessandro; Chase, Catherine M; Farkash, Evan A; Neal Smith, R; Madsen, Joren C; Russell, Paul S; Colvin, Robert B

    2012-12-01

    Despite extensive research on T cells and potent immunosuppressive regimens that target cellular mediated rejection, few regimens have been proved to be effective on antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), particularly in the chronic setting. C4d deposition in the graft has been proved to be a useful marker for AMR; however, there is an imperfect association between C4d and AMR. While complement has been considered as the main player in acute AMR, the effector mechanisms in chronic AMR are still debated. Recent studies support the role of NK cells and direct effects of antibody on endothelium cells in a mechanism suggesting the presence of a complement-independent pathway. Here, we review the history, currently available systems and progress in experimental animal research. Although there are consistent findings from human and animal research, transposing the experimental results from rodent to human has been hampered by the differences in endothelial functions between species. We briefly describe the findings from patients and compare them with results from animals, to propose a combined perspective.

  5. Molecular basis of antibody-mediated neutralization and protection against flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lianpan; Wang, Qihui; Qi, Jianxun; Shi, Yi; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2016-10-01

    Antibody-mediated humoral immunity plays a pivotal role in flavivirus control. Neutralizing antibodies targeting viral envelope (E) protein, provide protection against flaviviruses in vivo but can also promote virus infection by antibody-dependent enhancement when antibodies are weakly neutralizing or in subneutralizing concentrations. The molecular basis for antibody-mediated virus neutralization can be revealed by structural studies of monoclonal antibodies complexed with the E protein or virion. In addition, the flavivirus non-structural protein NS1 can also induce host antibody production, and some of these antibodies can provide protection against virus challenge. In this review, we summarize the known structures of flavivirus neutralizing or protective antibodies bound to their epitopes and describe the underlying molecular mechanisms. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):783-791, 2016.

  6. Molecular basis of antibody-mediated neutralization and protection against flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lianpan; Wang, Qihui; Qi, Jianxun; Shi, Yi; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2016-10-01

    Antibody-mediated humoral immunity plays a pivotal role in flavivirus control. Neutralizing antibodies targeting viral envelope (E) protein, provide protection against flaviviruses in vivo but can also promote virus infection by antibody-dependent enhancement when antibodies are weakly neutralizing or in subneutralizing concentrations. The molecular basis for antibody-mediated virus neutralization can be revealed by structural studies of monoclonal antibodies complexed with the E protein or virion. In addition, the flavivirus non-structural protein NS1 can also induce host antibody production, and some of these antibodies can provide protection against virus challenge. In this review, we summarize the known structures of flavivirus neutralizing or protective antibodies bound to their epitopes and describe the underlying molecular mechanisms. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):783-791, 2016. PMID:27604155

  7. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI) antibody activity does not correlate with risk of HIV-1 superinfection

    PubMed Central

    FORTHAL, Donald N.; LANDUCCI, Gary; CHOHAN, Bhavna; RICHARDSON, Barbra A.; MCCLELLAND, R. Scott; JAOKO, Walter; BLISH, Catherine; OVERBAUGH, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of HIV-infected women with high risk behavior have indicated that neither neutralizing antibody nor cellular immunity elicited by an initial HIV-1 infection is associated with protection against superinfection with a different HIV-1 strain. Here, we measured antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI) antibody activity in the plasma of 12 superinfected cases and 36 singly infected matched controls against 2 heterologous viruses. We found no association between plasma ADCVI activity and superinfection status. ADCVI antibody activity against heterologous virus elicited by the original infection may not contribute to preventing a superinfecting HIV-1. PMID:23344546

  8. Diagnostic criteria of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Mosquera Reboredo, J M; Vázquez Martul, E

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of anti-donor antibody-mediated rejection or humoral rejection (ABMR) is one of the main discussions at the moment in kidney transplantation. The search for histopathological markers that help us to diagnose ABMR has been more problematic, in contrast to the histological expression of cellular or tubulointerstitial rejection. Although the relationship between post-transplant anti-donor antibodies and the allograft's prognosis has been a topic of discussion for a long time, led in the main by P.Terasaki, it was not until the beginning of 1990s when P. Halloran studied the humoral mechanisms of rejection in greater depth. Feutch described the importance of C4d deposits as a marker that shows a humoral mechanism of allograft rejection in 1993. As a result of many studies carried out, the Banff consensus group established some diagnostic histopathological criteria of acute (ABMR) in 2003. These have been modified slightly in later meetings of the group. Furthermore, in 2005 this same working group looked at the physiopathological mechanisms causing chronic allograft failure in more detail and established the criteria defining chronic humoral rejection. In this review, we are trying to update any useful histopathological criteria for diagnosing acute and chronic ABMR.

  9. Postoperative rebound of antiblood type antibodies and antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible living-related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideki; Kondo, Tsunenori; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Nozaki, Taiji; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound is attributed to kidney allograft rejection in ABO blood type-incompatible (ABO-I) living-related kidney transplantation (KTx). A total of 191 ABO-I recipients who received ABO-I living-related KTx between 2001 and 2013 were divided into two groups: Group 1 consisted of low rebound [(≦1:32), N = 170] and Group 2 consisted of high rebound [(≧1:64), N = 21], according to the levels of the rebounded antiblood type antibodies within 1 year after transplantation. No prophylactic treatment for rejection was administered for elevated antiblood type antibodies, regardless of the levels of the rebounded antibodies. Within 1 year after transplantation, T-cell-mediated rejection was observed in 13 of 170 recipients (13/170, 8%) in Group 1 and in 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Group 2 (Groups 1 vs. 2, P = 0.432). Antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 15 of 170 recipients (15/170, 9%) and 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.898). In this study, we found no correlation between the postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound and the incidence of acute rejection. We concluded that no treatment is necessary for rebounded antiblood type antibodies.

  10. Antibody-mediated modulation of arthritis induced by Chlamydia.

    PubMed Central

    Rank, R. G.; Ramsey, K. H.; Hough, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the role of the humoral immune response in the production of arthritis in mice immunized with the chlamydial agent of mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) (Chlamydia trachomatis biovar). Mice were made B cell deficient (BCD) by treatment with rabbit antiserum to murine IgM. Control mice included animals treated similarly with normal rabbit serum or phosphate-buffered saline. Male mice were immunized with MoPn inactivated with ultraviolet irradiation while female mice were immunized by genital tract infection with viable chlamydiae. Arthritis was elicited in all mice by intra-articular inoculation of inactivated MoPn. When knee joints were examined for pathologic changes at varying times after challenge, a marked enhancement of the arthritis was observed in both male and female BCD mice when compared with controls at all time points. These data indicated that the humoral immune response is not essential for the production of arthritic disease in this model but may have some role in the modulation of the process in immunologically intact animals. Persistence of chlamydial antigen in joint tissue of BCD mice suggested that antibody may play a role in the elimination of antigen, thus decreasing the stimulus for the development of cell-mediated immunologic injury. Regulatory role for T suppressor cells cannot be ruled out however, because B cell deficient mice have been shown to lack certain T suppressor cell subsets. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 PMID:3400779

  11. JC polyomavirus mutants escape antibody-mediated neutralization.

    PubMed

    Ray, Upasana; Cinque, Paola; Gerevini, Simonetta; Longo, Valeria; Lazzarin, Adriano; Schippling, Sven; Martin, Roland; Buck, Christopher B; Pastrana, Diana V

    2015-09-23

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) persistently infects the urinary tract of most adults. Under conditions of immune impairment, JCV causes an opportunistic brain disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCV strains found in the cerebrospinal fluid of PML patients contain distinctive mutations in surface loops of the major capsid protein, VP1. We hypothesized that VP1 mutations might allow the virus to evade antibody-mediated neutralization. Consistent with this hypothesis, neutralization serology revealed that plasma samples from PML patients neutralized wild-type JCV strains but failed to neutralize patient-cognate PML-mutant JCV strains. This contrasted with serological results for healthy individuals, most of whom robustly cross-neutralized all tested JCV variants. Mice administered a JCV virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine initially showed neutralizing "blind spots" (akin to those observed in PML patients) that closed after booster immunization. A PML patient administered an experimental JCV VLP vaccine likewise showed markedly increased neutralizing titer against her cognate PML-mutant JCV. The results indicate that deficient humoral immunity is a common aspect of PML pathogenesis and that vaccination may overcome this humoral deficiency. Thus, vaccination with JCV VLPs might prevent the development of PML.

  12. Mechanism of human antibody-mediated neutralization of Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Flyak, Andrew I; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Murin, Charles D; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Slaughter, James C; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-26

    The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of antibody-GP complexes reveal that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP, but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV-neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition. PMID:25723164

  13. A Highly Conserved Residue of the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Is Important for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Responses Mediated by Anti-cluster A Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shilei; Veillette, Maxime; Coutu, Mathieu; Prévost, Jérémie; Scharf, Louise; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ferrari, Guido; Robinson, James E.; Stürzel, Christina; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank; Lewis, George K.; Pazgier, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sera from HIV-1-infected individuals contain antibodies able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). These antibodies preferentially recognize envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitopes induced upon CD4 binding. Here, we show that a highly conserved tryptophan at position 69 of the gp120 inner domain is important for ADCC mediated by anti-cluster A antibodies and sera from HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:26637462

  14. Nanoliposome-mediated targeting of antibodies to tumors: IVIG antibodies as a model.

    PubMed

    Nikpoor, Amin Reza; Tavakkol-Afshari, Jalil; Gholizadeh, Zahra; Sadri, Kayvan; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Badiee, Ali; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-11-10

    Monoclonal antibodies are routinely used as tools in immunotherapies against solid tumors. However, administration of monoclonal antibodies may cause undesired side effects due to their accumulation in non-targeted organs. Nanoliposomes of less than 200 nm can target antibodies to tumors by enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) mechanisms. To direct monoclonal antibodies to tumors, nanoliposomes encapsulating intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) as a model antibody were prepared. The liposomes had average diameters of 100 nm and encapsulation efficiencies of 31 to 46%. They showed less than 10% release in plasma at 37°C up to seven days. The secondary and tertiary structures of liposome-encapsulated antibodies were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The near and far-UV spectra analyses revealed no obvious conformational changes in the structures of the encapsulated antibodies. The biodistribution of free and liposome-encapsulated iodinated antibodies was investigated in mice bearing C-26 colon carcinoma tumors. The accumulation of liposome-encapsulated antibodies in tumors was significantly greater than that of free antibodies due to the EPR effect. The PEGylated liposomes were more efficient in the delivery of antibodies to the tumor site than non-PEGylated liposomes. We conclude that administration of monoclonal antibodies in PEGylated liposomes is more efficient than administration of non-encapsulated monoclonal antibodies for solid tumor immunotherapy. PMID:26302860

  15. Gamma Interferon Is Required for Optimal Antibody-Mediated Immunity against Genital Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Naglak, Elizabeth K.; Morrison, Sandra G.

    2016-01-01

    Defining the mechanisms of immunity conferred by the combination of antibody and CD4+ T cells is fundamental to designing an efficacious chlamydial vaccine. Using the Chlamydia muridarum genital infection model of mice, which replicates many features of human C. trachomatis infection and avoids the characteristic low virulence of C. trachomatis in the mouse, we previously demonstrated a significant role for antibody in immunity to chlamydial infection. We found that antibody alone was not protective. Instead, protection appeared to be conferred through an undefined antibody-cell interaction. Using gene knockout mice and in vivo cellular depletion methods, our data suggest that antibody-mediated protection is dependent on the activation of an effector cell population in genital tract tissues by CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, the CD4+ T cell-secreted cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was found to be a key component of the protective antibody response. The protective function of IFN-γ was not related to the immunoglobulin class or to the magnitude of the Chlamydia-specific antibody response or to recruitment of an effector cell population to genital tract tissue. Rather, IFN-γ appears to be necessary for activation of the effector cell population that functions in antibody-mediated chlamydial immunity. Our results confirm the central role of antibody in immunity to chlamydia reinfection and demonstrate a key function for IFN-γ in antibody-mediated protection. PMID:27600502

  16. A monoclonal antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 which mediates cellular cytotoxicity and neutralization.

    PubMed Central

    Broliden, P A; Ljunggren, K; Hinkula, J; Norrby, E; Akerblom, L; Wahren, B

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120. One MAb, P4/D10, was found to mediate highly efficient antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and virus neutralization. The reactivity was located to a major neutralizing region (amino acids 304 to 323) on gp120. Five other MAbs with a similar epitopic reactivity did not show any antibody-dependent cellulan cytotoxicity activity but had a virus-neutralizing capacity. PMID:2296090

  17. A game of numbers: the stoichiometry of antibody-mediated neutralization of flavivirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Theodore C.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The humoral response contributes to the protection against viral pathogens. Although antibodies have the potential to inhibit viral infections via several mechanisms, an ability to neutralize viruses directly may be particularly important. Neutralizing antibody titers are commonly used as predictors of protection from infection, especially in the context of vaccine responses and immunity. Despite the simplicity of the concept, how antibody binding results in virus inactivation is incompletely understood despite decades of research. Flaviviruses have been an attractive system in which to seek a structural and quantitative understanding of how antibody interactions with virions modulate infection because of the contribution of antibodies to both protection and pathogenesis. This review will present a stoichiometric model of antibody-mediated neutralization of flaviviruses and discuss how these concepts can inform the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:25595803

  18. Anti-DNA antibody mediated catalysis is isotype dependent.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Zhang, Qiuting; Cowburn, David; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus, and participate in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with multiple renal antigens. Previously, using a panel of murine anti-DNA IgGs that share identical variable regions but that differ in the constant regions, we demonstrated that the cross-reaction and renal pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. In this study, we investigated the catalytic potential of this anti-DNA antibody panel, and determined its isotype dependency. The three isotype switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) and the parent IgG3 PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies were compared in their catalysis of 500 base pair linear double stranded DNA and a 12-mer peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP), by gel analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to double stranded DNA and peptide antigens were assessed by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. We found that the PL9-11 antibody isotypes vary significantly in their potential to catalyze the cleavage of both linear and double stranded DNA and the proteolysis of peptides. The degree of the cleavage and proteolysis increases with the incubation temperature and time. While different PL9-11 isotypes have the same initial attack sites within the ALWPPNLHAWVP peptide, there was no correlation between binding affinity to the peptide and proteolysis rates. In conclusion, the catalytic properties of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. This finding provides further evidence that antibodies that share the same variable region, but which have different constant regions, are functionally distinct. The catalytic effects modulated by antibody constant regions need to be considered in the design of therapeutic antibodies (abzymes) and peptides designed to block pathogenic autoantibodies. PMID:26655427

  19. Anti-DNA antibody mediated catalysis is isotype dependent.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Zhang, Qiuting; Cowburn, David; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus, and participate in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with multiple renal antigens. Previously, using a panel of murine anti-DNA IgGs that share identical variable regions but that differ in the constant regions, we demonstrated that the cross-reaction and renal pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. In this study, we investigated the catalytic potential of this anti-DNA antibody panel, and determined its isotype dependency. The three isotype switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) and the parent IgG3 PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies were compared in their catalysis of 500 base pair linear double stranded DNA and a 12-mer peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP), by gel analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to double stranded DNA and peptide antigens were assessed by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. We found that the PL9-11 antibody isotypes vary significantly in their potential to catalyze the cleavage of both linear and double stranded DNA and the proteolysis of peptides. The degree of the cleavage and proteolysis increases with the incubation temperature and time. While different PL9-11 isotypes have the same initial attack sites within the ALWPPNLHAWVP peptide, there was no correlation between binding affinity to the peptide and proteolysis rates. In conclusion, the catalytic properties of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. This finding provides further evidence that antibodies that share the same variable region, but which have different constant regions, are functionally distinct. The catalytic effects modulated by antibody constant regions need to be considered in the design of therapeutic antibodies (abzymes) and peptides designed to block pathogenic autoantibodies.

  20. Epidermal growth factor receptor distribution in burn wounds. Implications for growth factor-mediated repair.

    PubMed Central

    Wenczak, B A; Lynch, J B; Nanney, L B

    1992-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) along with several related peptide growth factors has been shown both in vivo and in vitro to accelerate events associated with epidermal wound repair. EGF and transforming growth factor alpha act by binding to a common EGF receptor tyrosine kinase thereby initiating a series of events which ultimately regulate cell proliferation. This study examined the immunohistochemical localization of EGF receptor (EGF-R) in burn wound margins, adjacent proliferating epithelium, and closely associated sweat ducts, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles. Tissue specimens removed during surgical debridement were obtained from full and partial thickness burn wounds in 32 patients with total body surface area burns ranging from 2 to 88%. In the early postburn period (days 2-4), prominent staining for EGF-R was found in undifferentiated, marginal keratinocytes, adjacent proliferating, hypertrophic epithelium, and both marginal and nonmarginal hair follicles, sweat ducts, and sebaceous glands. During the late postburn period (days 5-16), EGF-R was depleted along leading epithelial margins; however, immunoreactive EGF-R remained intensely positive in the hypertrophic epithelium and all skin appendages. Increased detection of immunoreactive EGF-R and the presence of [125I]EGF binding in the hypertrophic epithelium correlated positively with proliferating cell nuclear antigen distributions. Thus, the presence of EGF-R in the appropriate keratinocyte populations suggests a functional role for this receptor during wound repair. Dynamic modulation in EGF receptor distribution during the temporal sequence of repair provides further evidence that an EGF/transforming growth factor alpha/EGF-R-mediated pathway is activated during human wound repair. Images PMID:1361495

  1. Vaccination for invasive canine meningioma induces in situ production of antibodies capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Brian M; Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Seiler, Charles E; Goulart, Michelle R; SantaCruz, Karen S; Schutten, Melissa M; Meints, Joyce P; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Bentley, R Timothy; Packer, Rebecca A; Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Faissler, Dominik; Chen, Wei; Hunt, Matthew A; Olin, Michael R; Ohlfest, John R

    2013-05-15

    Malignant and atypical meningiomas are resistant to standard therapies and associated with poor prognosis. Despite progress in the treatment of other tumors with therapeutic vaccines, this approach has not been tested preclinically or clinically in these tumors. Spontaneous canine meningioma is a clinically meaningful but underutilized model for preclinical testing of novel strategies for aggressive human meningioma. We treated 11 meningioma-bearing dogs with surgery and vaccine immunotherapy consisting of autologous tumor cell lysate combined with toll-like receptor ligands. Therapy was well tolerated, and only one dog had tumor growth that required intervention, with a mean follow up of 585 days. IFN-γ-elaborating T cells were detected in the peripheral blood of 2 cases, but vaccine-induced tumor-reactive antibody responses developed in all dogs. Antibody responses were polyclonal, recognizing both intracellular and cell surface antigens, and HSP60 was identified as one common antigen. Tumor-reactive antibodies bound allogeneic canine and human meningiomas, showing common antigens across breed and species. Histologic analysis revealed robust infiltration of antibody-secreting plasma cells into the brain around the tumor in posttreatment compared with pretreatment samples. Tumor-reactive antibodies were capable of inducing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity to autologous and allogeneic tumor cells. These data show the feasibility and immunologic efficacy of vaccine immunotherapy for a large animal model of human meningioma and warrant further development toward human trials.

  2. Antibody-mediated reduction of {alpha}-ketoamides

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, P.G.; Gallop, M.A.

    1998-06-09

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an {alpha}-ketoamide to the corresponding {alpha}-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  3. Antibody-mediated reduction of .alpha.-ketoamides

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Gallop, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an .alpha.-ketoamide to the corresponding .alpha.-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  4. B cells mediate chronic allograft rejection independently of antibody production.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Ng, Yue-Harn; Singh, Tripti; Jiang, Ke; Sheriff, Khaleefathullah A; Ippolito, Renee; Zahalka, Salwa; Li, Qi; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Ramaswami, Balathiripurasundari; Lund, Frances E; Chalasani, Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Chronic rejection is the primary cause of long-term failure of transplanted organs and is often viewed as an antibody-dependent process. Chronic rejection, however, is also observed in mice and humans with no detectable circulating alloantibodies, suggesting that antibody-independent pathways may also contribute to pathogenesis of transplant rejection. Here, we have provided direct evidence that chronic rejection of vascularized heart allografts occurs in the complete absence of antibodies, but requires the presence of B cells. Mice that were deficient for antibodies but not B cells experienced the same chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which is a pathognomonic feature of chronic rejection, as WT mice; however, mice that were deficient for both B cells and antibodies were protected from CAV. B cells contributed to CAV by supporting splenic lymphoid architecture, T cell cytokine production, and infiltration of T cells into graft vessels. In chimeric mice, in which B cells were present but could not present antigen, both T cell responses and CAV were markedly reduced. These findings establish that chronic rejection can occur in the complete absence of antibodies and that B cells contribute to this process by supporting T cell responses through antigen presentation and maintenance of lymphoid architecture.

  5. Impact of viral attachment factor expression on antibody-mediated neutralization of flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Obara, Christopher J; Dowd, Kimberly A; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Pierson, Theodore C

    2013-03-01

    Neutralization of flaviviruses requires engagement of the virion by antibodies with a stoichiometry that exceeds a required threshold. Factors that modulate the number of antibodies bound to an individual virion when it contacts target cells impact neutralization potency. However, the contribution of cellular factors to the potency of neutralizing antibodies has not been explored systematically. Here we investigate the relationship between expression level of a viral attachment factor on cells and the neutralizing potency of antibodies. Analysis of the attachment factor DC-SIGNR on cells in neutralization studies failed to identify a correlation between DC-SIGNR expression and antibody-mediated protection. Furthermore, neutralization potency was equivalent on a novel Jurkat cell line induced to express DC-SIGNR at varying levels. Finally, blocking virus-attachment factor interactions had no impact on neutralization activity. Altogether, our studies suggest that cellular attachment factor expression is not a significant contributor to the potency of neutralizing antibodies to flaviviruses.

  6. Lung injury mediated by antibodies to endothelium. II. Study of the effect of repeated antigen-antibody interactions in rabbits tolerant to heterologous antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G.; Caldwell, P. R.; Andres, G.; Brentjens, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of repeated interactions of antibodies with cell surface antigens have been examined in in vitro, but not in in vivo systems. In this study are described the results of multiple antibody-cell surface antigen interactions in vivo. Rabbits were given repeated intravenous injections of goat antibodies to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), an antigen expressed on the surface of lung endothelial cells. For prevention of anaphylactic reactions, which would have been induced by multiple injections of heterologous immune or nonimmune IgG, the rabbits were made neonatally tolerant to goat IgG. Divalent immune IgG given daily for 21 days induced chronic antigenic modulation (antigen disappearance) with resistance to antibody-mediated inflammatory lesions. The rabbits, however, developed degenerative changes of alveolar endothelial and epithelial cells. Administration of immune IgG every other day for 43 days allowed partial reexpression of ACE and was associated with intravascular, but not interstitial, inflammatory changes. In contrast, repeated administration of monovalent immune Fab did not induce antigenic modulation but caused severe, lethal, interstitial pneumonitis. Thus, in this experimental model the development of acute interstitial inflammatory changes correlates with persistence of antigen and is abrogated by disappearance of antigen induced by divalent antibodies. Further, repeated endothelial antigen antibody interactions fail to induce chronic inflammatory or sclerosing lung lesions. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:3034065

  7. Macrophage-Mediated Trogocytosis Leads to Death of Antibody-Opsonized Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Ramraj; Challa, Dilip K; Ram, Sripad; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the complex behavior of effector cells such as monocytes or macrophages in regulating cancerous growth is of central importance for cancer immunotherapy. Earlier studies using CD20-specific antibodies have demonstrated that the Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated transfer of the targeted receptors from tumor cells to these effector cells through trogocytosis can enable escape from antibody therapy, leading to the viewpoint that this process is protumorigenic. In the current study, we demonstrate that persistent trogocytic attack results in the killing of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Further, antibody engineering to increase FcγR interactions enhances this tumoricidal activity. These studies extend the complex repertoire of activities of macrophages to trogocytic-mediated cell death of HER2-overexpressing target cells and have implications for the development of effective antibody-based therapies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1879-89. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27226489

  8. Iron as the Key Modulator of Hepcidin Expression in Erythroid Antibody-Mediated Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, J. C.; Garrido, P.; Ribeiro, S.; Rocha-Pereira, P.; Bronze-da-Rocha, E.; Belo, L.; Costa, E.; Reis, F.; Santos-Silva, A.

    2014-01-01

    Erythroid hypoplasia (EH) is a rare complication associated with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapies, due to development of anti-rHuEPO antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly clarified. Our aim was to manage a rat model of antibody-mediated EH induced by rHuEPO and study the impact on iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Wistar rats treated during 9 weeks with a high rHuEPO dose (200 IU) developed EH, as shown by anemia, reduced erythroblasts, reticulocytopenia, and plasmatic anti-rHuEPO antibodies. Serum iron was increased and associated with mRNA overexpression of hepatic hepcidin and other iron regulatory mediators and downregulation of matriptase-2; overexpression of divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin was observed in duodenum and liver. Decreased EPO expression was observed in kidney and liver, while EPO receptor was overexpressed in liver. Endogenous EPO levels were normal, suggesting that anti-rHuEPO antibodies blunted EPO function. Our results suggest that anti-rHuEPO antibodies inhibit erythropoiesis causing anemia. This leads to a serum iron increase, which seems to stimulate hepcidin expression despite no evidence of inflammation, thus suggesting iron as the key modulator of hepcidin synthesis. These findings might contribute to improving new therapeutic strategies against rHuEPO resistance and/or development of antibody-mediated EH in patients under rHuEPO therapy. PMID:25580431

  9. Enhanced antigen-antibody binding affinity mediated by an anti-idiotypic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Sawutz, D.G.; Koury, R.; Homcy, C.J.

    1987-08-25

    The authors previously described the production of four monoclonal antibodies to the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor antagonist alprenolol. One of these antibodies, 5B7 (IgG/sub 2a/, kappa), was used to raise anti-idiotypic antisera in rabbits. In contrast to the expected results, one of the anti-idiotypic antisera (R9) promotes (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopinodolol (ICYP) binding to antibody 5B7. In the presence of R9, the dissociation constant decreases 100-fold from 20 to 0.3 nM. This increase in binding affinity of antibody 5B7 for ICYP is not observed in the presence of preimmune, rabbit anti-mouse or anti-idiotypic antisera generated to a monoclonal antibody of a different specificity. Furthermore, R9 in the absence of 5B7 does not bind ICYP. The F(ab) fragments of 5B7 and T9 behaved in a similar manner, and the soluble complex responsible for the high-affinity interaction with ICYP can be identified by gel filtration chromatography. The elution position of the complex is consistent with a 5B7 F(ab)-R9 F(ab) dimer, indicating that polyvalency is not responsible for the enhanced ligand binding. Kinetic analysis of ICYP-5B7 binding revealed that the rate of ICYP dissociation from 5B7 in the presence of R9 is approximately 100 times slower than in the absence of R9, consistent with the 100-fold change in binding affinity of 5B7 for ICYP. The available data best fit a model in which an anti-idiotypic antibody binds at or near the binding site of the idiotype participating in the formation of a hybrid ligand binding site. This would allow increased contact of the ligand with the idiotype-anti-idiotype complex and result in an enhanced affinity of the ligand interaction.

  10. Diversification of the Primary Antibody Repertoire by AID-Mediated Gene Conversion.

    PubMed

    Lanning, Dennis K; Knight, Katherine L

    2015-01-01

    Gene conversion, mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), has been found to contribute to generation of the primary antibody repertoire in several vertebrate species. Generation of the primary antibody repertoire by gene conversion of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes occurs primarily in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) and is best described in chicken and rabbit. Here, we discuss current knowledge of the mechanism of gene conversion as well as the contribution of the microbiota in promoting gene conversion of Ig genes. Finally, we propose that the antibody diversification strategy used in GALT species, such as chicken and rabbit, is conserved in a subset of human and mouse B cells.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of antibody-mediated neutralisation of flavivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Theodore C; Diamond, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    Flaviviruses are a group of positive-stranded RNA viruses that cause a spectrum of severe illnesses globally in more than 50 million individuals each year. While effective vaccines exist for three members of this group (yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses), safe and effective vaccines for several other flaviviruses of clinical importance, including West Nile and dengue viruses, remain in development. An effective humoral immune response is critical for protection against flaviviruses and an essential goal of vaccine development. The effectiveness of virus-specific antibodies in vivo reflects their capacity to inhibit virus entry and spread through several mechanisms, including the direct neutralisation of virus infection. Recent advances in our understanding of the structural biology of flaviviruses, coupled with the use of small-animal models of flavivirus infection, have promoted significant advances in our appreciation of the factors that govern antibody recognition and inhibition of flaviviruses in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we discuss the properties that define the potency of neutralising antibodies and the molecular mechanisms by which they inhibit virus infection. How recent advances in this area have the potential to improve the development of safe and effective vaccines and immunotherapeutics is also addressed. PMID:18471342

  12. Molecular mechanisms of antibody-mediated neutralisation of flavivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Theodore C; Diamond, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    Flaviviruses are a group of positive-stranded RNA viruses that cause a spectrum of severe illnesses globally in more than 50 million individuals each year. While effective vaccines exist for three members of this group (yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses), safe and effective vaccines for several other flaviviruses of clinical importance, including West Nile and dengue viruses, remain in development. An effective humoral immune response is critical for protection against flaviviruses and an essential goal of vaccine development. The effectiveness of virus-specific antibodies in vivo reflects their capacity to inhibit virus entry and spread through several mechanisms, including the direct neutralisation of virus infection. Recent advances in our understanding of the structural biology of flaviviruses, coupled with the use of small-animal models of flavivirus infection, have promoted significant advances in our appreciation of the factors that govern antibody recognition and inhibition of flaviviruses in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we discuss the properties that define the potency of neutralising antibodies and the molecular mechanisms by which they inhibit virus infection. How recent advances in this area have the potential to improve the development of safe and effective vaccines and immunotherapeutics is also addressed.

  13. Effective protein inhibition in intact mouse oocytes through peptide nanoparticle-mediated antibody transfection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruichao; Jin, Zhen; Gao, Leilei; Liu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Female meiosis is a fundamental area of study in reproductive medicine, and the mouse oocyte model of in vitro maturation (IVM) is most widely used to study female meiosis. To investigate the probable role(s) of an unknown protein in female meiosis, the method traditionally used involves microinjecting a specific antibody into mouse oocytes. Recently, in studies on somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated antibody transfection has become a popular tool because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, untill now no researchers have tried using this technique on mouse oocytes because the zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane) is usually thought or proved to be a tough barrier to macromolecules such as antibodies and proteins. Therefore, we attempted to introduce an antibody into mouse oocytes using a peptide nanoparticle. Here we show for the first time that with our optimized method, an antibody can be effectively delivered into mouse oocytes and inhibit its target protein with high specificity. We obtained significant results using small GTPase Arl2 as a test subject protein. We propose peptide nanoparticle-mediated antibody transfection to be a superior alternative to antibody microinjection for preliminary functional studies of unknown proteins in mouse oocytes. PMID:27114861

  14. The use of antibody to complement protein C5 for salvage treatment of severe antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Locke, J E; Magro, C M; Singer, A L; Segev, D L; Haas, M; Hillel, A T; King, K E; Kraus, E; Lees, L M; Melancon, J K; Stewart, Z A; Warren, D S; Zachary, A A; Montgomery, R A

    2009-01-01

    Desensitized patients are at high risk of developing acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). In most cases, the rejection episodes are mild and respond to a short course of plasmapheresis (PP) / low-dose IVIg treatment. However, a subset of patients experience severe AMR associated with sudden onset oliguria. We previously described the utility of emergent splenectomy in rescuing allografts in patients with this type of severe AMR. However, not all patients are good candidates for splenectomy. Here we present a single case in which eculizumab, a complement protein C5 antibody that inhibits the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was used combined with PP/IVIg to salvage a kidney undergoing severe AMR. We show a marked decrease in C5b-C9 (MAC) complex deposition in the kidney after the administration of eculizumab.

  15. Reactive oxygen species induced by therapeutic CD20 antibodies inhibit natural killer cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against primary CLL cells.

    PubMed

    Werlenius, Olle; Aurelius, Johan; Hallner, Alexander; Akhiani, Ali A; Simpanen, Maria; Martner, Anna; Andersson, Per-Ola; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B

    2016-05-31

    The antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of natural killer (NK) cells is assumed to contribute to the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other hematopoietic malignancies of B cell origin. We sought to determine whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing monocytes regulate the ADCC of NK cells against primary CLL cells using anti-CD20 as the linking antibody. The monoclonal CD20 antibodies rituximab and ofatumumab were found to trigger substantial release of ROS from monocytes. Antibody-exposed monocytes induced NK cell apoptosis and restricted NK cell-mediated ADCC against autologous CLL cells. The presence of inhibitors of ROS formation and scavengers of ROS preserved NK cell viability and restored NK cell-mediated ADCC against primary CLL cells. We propose that limiting the antibody-induced induction of immunosuppressive ROS may improve the anti-leukemic efficacy of anti-CD20 therapy in CLL. PMID:27097113

  16. Antibody-mediated targeting of the Orai1 calcium channel inhibits T cell function.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer H; Hussell, Scott; Søndergaard, Henrik; Roepstorff, Kirstine; Bui, John-Vu; Deer, Jen Running; Zhang, Jun; Li, Zhan-Guo; Lamberth, Kasper; Kvist, Peter Helding; Padkjær, Søren; Haase, Claus; Zahn, Stefan; Odegard, Valerie H

    2013-01-01

    Despite the attractiveness of ion channels as therapeutic targets, there are no examples of monoclonal antibodies directed against ion channels in clinical development. Antibody-mediated inhibition of ion channels could offer a directed, specific therapeutic approach. To investigate the potential of inhibiting ion channel function with an antibody, we focused on Orai1, the pore subunit of the calcium channel responsible for store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in T cells. Effector T cells are key drivers of autoimmune disease pathogenesis and calcium signaling is essential for T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production. We show here the generation of a specific anti-human Orai1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) against an extracellular loop of the plasma membrane-spanning protein. The anti-Orai1 mAb binds native Orai1 on lymphocytes and leads to cellular internalization of the channel. As a result, T cell proliferation, and cytokine production is inhibited in vitro. In vivo, anti-Orai1 mAb is efficacious in a human T cell-mediated graft-versus host disease (GvHD) mouse model. This study demonstrates the feasibility of antibody-mediated inhibition of Orai1 function and, more broadly, reveals the possibility of targeting ion channels with biologics for the treatment of autoimmunity and other diseases. PMID:24376610

  17. An integrative structure-based framework for predicting biological effects mediated by antipeptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C

    2015-12-01

    A general framework is presented for predicting quantitative biological effects mediated by antipeptide antibodies, primarily on the basis of antigen structure (possibly featuring intrinsic disorder) analyzed to estimate epitope-paratope binding affinities, which in turn is considered within the context of dose-response relationships as regards antibody concentration. This is illustrated mainly using an approach based on protein structural energetics, whereby expected amounts of solvent-accessible surface area buried upon epitope-paratope binding are related to the corresponding binding affinity, which is estimated from putative B-cell epitope structure with implicit treatment of paratope structure, for antipeptide antibodies either reacting with peptides or cross-reacting with cognate protein antigens. Key methods described are implemented in SAPPHIRE/SUITE (Structural-energetic Analysis Program for Predicting Humoral Immune Response Epitopes/SAPPHIRE User Interface Tool Ensemble; publicly accessible via http://freeshell.de/~badong/suite.htm). Representative results thus obtained are compared with published experimental data on binding affinities and quantitative biological effects, with special attention to loss of paratope sidechain conformational entropy (neglected in previous analyses) and in light of key in-vivo constraints on antigen-antibody binding affinity and antibody-mediated effects. Implications for further refinement of B-cell epitope prediction methods are discussed as regards envisioned biomedical applications including the development of prophylactic and therapeutic antibodies, peptide-based vaccines and immunodiagnostics. PMID:26410103

  18. Modalities for treatment of antisperm antibody mediated infertility: novel perspectives.

    PubMed

    Naz, Rajesh K

    2004-05-01

    Immunoinfertility because of antisperm antibodies (ASA) is an important cause of infertility in humans. The incidence of ASA in infertile couples is 9-36% depending on the reporting center. Early claims regarding the incidence and involvement of ASA in involuntary infertility were probably overemphasized, which has resulted in subsequent confusion, doubt, and underestimation of their clinical significance. No immunoglobulin that binds to sperm should be called an antisperm antibody in a strict sense unless it is directed against a sperm antigen that plays a role in fertilization and fertility. ASA directed against the fertilization-related antigens are more relevant to infertility than the immunoglobulins that bind to sperm associated antigens. Several methods have been reported for treatment of immunoinfertility. These include: immunosuppressive therapies using corticosteroids or cyclosporine; assisted reproductive technologies such as intrauterine insemination, gamete intrafallopian transfer, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection; laboratory techniques such as sperm washing, immunomagnetic sperm separation, proteolytic enzyme treatment, and use of immunobeads. Most of the available techniques have side effects, are invasive and expensive, have low efficacy, or provide conflicting results. Recent findings using defined sperm antigens that have a role in fertilization/fertility have provided animal models and innovative novel perspectives for studying the mechanism of immunoinfertility and possible modalities for treatment. The better understanding of local immunity and latest advances in hybridoma and recombinant technologies, proteomics and genomics leading to characterization of sperm antigens relevant to fertility will help to clarify the controversy and to establish the significance of ASA in infertility. PMID:15212677

  19. Antibody Fc engineering improves frequency and promotes kinetic boosting of serial killing mediated by NK cells.

    PubMed

    Romain, Gabrielle; Senyukov, Vladimir; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Kelton, William; Liadi, Ivan; Mahendra, Ankit; Charab, Wissam; Georgiou, George; Roysam, Badrinath; Lee, Dean A; Varadarajan, Navin

    2014-11-20

    The efficacy of most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tumor antigens results primarily from their ability to elicit potent cytotoxicity through effector-mediated functions. We have engineered the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) mAb, HuM195, targeting the leukemic antigen CD33, by introducing the triple mutation Ser293Asp/Ala330Leu/Ile332Glu (DLE), and developed Time-lapse Imaging Microscopy in Nanowell Grids to analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity kinetics of thousands of individual natural killer (NK) cells and mAb-coated target cells. We demonstrate that the DLE-HuM195 antibody increases both the quality and the quantity of NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity by endowing more NK cells to participate in cytotoxicity via accrued CD16-mediated signaling and by increasing serial killing of target cells. NK cells encountering targets coated with DLE-HuM195 induce rapid target cell apoptosis by promoting simultaneous conjugates to multiple target cells and induce apoptosis in twice the number of target cells within the same period as the wild-type mAb. Enhanced target killing was also associated with increased frequency of NK cells undergoing apoptosis, but this effect was donor-dependent. Antibody-based therapies targeting tumor antigens will benefit from a better understanding of cell-mediated tumor elimination, and our work opens further opportunities for the therapeutic targeting of CD33 in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

  20. Antibody Fc engineering improves frequency and promotes kinetic boosting of serial killing mediated by NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Romain, Gabrielle; Senyukov, Vladimir; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Kelton, William; Liadi, Ivan; Mahendra, Ankit; Charab, Wissam; Georgiou, George; Roysam, Badrinath; Lee, Dean A.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tumor antigens results primarily from their ability to elicit potent cytotoxicity through effector-mediated functions. We have engineered the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) mAb, HuM195, targeting the leukemic antigen CD33, by introducing the triple mutation Ser293Asp/Ala330Leu/Ile332Glu (DLE), and developed Time-lapse Imaging Microscopy in Nanowell Grids to analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity kinetics of thousands of individual natural killer (NK) cells and mAb-coated target cells. We demonstrate that the DLE-HuM195 antibody increases both the quality and the quantity of NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity by endowing more NK cells to participate in cytotoxicity via accrued CD16-mediated signaling and by increasing serial killing of target cells. NK cells encountering targets coated with DLE-HuM195 induce rapid target cell apoptosis by promoting simultaneous conjugates to multiple target cells and induce apoptosis in twice the number of target cells within the same period as the wild-type mAb. Enhanced target killing was also associated with increased frequency of NK cells undergoing apoptosis, but this effect was donor-dependent. Antibody-based therapies targeting tumor antigens will benefit from a better understanding of cell-mediated tumor elimination, and our work opens further opportunities for the therapeutic targeting of CD33 in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:25232058

  1. Antibody Fc engineering improves frequency and promotes kinetic boosting of serial killing mediated by NK cells.

    PubMed

    Romain, Gabrielle; Senyukov, Vladimir; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Kelton, William; Liadi, Ivan; Mahendra, Ankit; Charab, Wissam; Georgiou, George; Roysam, Badrinath; Lee, Dean A; Varadarajan, Navin

    2014-11-20

    The efficacy of most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tumor antigens results primarily from their ability to elicit potent cytotoxicity through effector-mediated functions. We have engineered the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) mAb, HuM195, targeting the leukemic antigen CD33, by introducing the triple mutation Ser293Asp/Ala330Leu/Ile332Glu (DLE), and developed Time-lapse Imaging Microscopy in Nanowell Grids to analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity kinetics of thousands of individual natural killer (NK) cells and mAb-coated target cells. We demonstrate that the DLE-HuM195 antibody increases both the quality and the quantity of NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity by endowing more NK cells to participate in cytotoxicity via accrued CD16-mediated signaling and by increasing serial killing of target cells. NK cells encountering targets coated with DLE-HuM195 induce rapid target cell apoptosis by promoting simultaneous conjugates to multiple target cells and induce apoptosis in twice the number of target cells within the same period as the wild-type mAb. Enhanced target killing was also associated with increased frequency of NK cells undergoing apoptosis, but this effect was donor-dependent. Antibody-based therapies targeting tumor antigens will benefit from a better understanding of cell-mediated tumor elimination, and our work opens further opportunities for the therapeutic targeting of CD33 in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:25232058

  2. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J.; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  3. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  4. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediating antibodies from an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial target multiple epitopes and preferentially use the VH1 gene family.

    PubMed

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Pollara, Justin; Moody, M Anthony; Alpert, Michael D; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gilbert, Peter B; Huang, Ying; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kozink, Daniel M; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Lewis, George K; DeVico, Anthony; Evans, David T; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2012-11-01

    The ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX-B/E RV144 vaccine trial showed an estimated efficacy of 31%. RV144 secondary immune correlate analysis demonstrated that the combination of low plasma anti-HIV-1 Env IgA antibodies and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) inversely correlate with infection risk. One hypothesis is that the observed protection in RV144 is partially due to ADCC-mediating antibodies. We found that the majority (73 to 90%) of a representative group of vaccinees displayed plasma ADCC activity, usually (96.2%) blocked by competition with the C1 region-specific A32 Fab fragment. Using memory B-cell cultures and antigen-specific B-cell sorting, we isolated 23 ADCC-mediating nonclonally related antibodies from 6 vaccine recipients. These antibodies targeted A32-blockable conformational epitopes (n = 19), a non-A32-blockable conformational epitope (n = 1), and the gp120 Env variable loops (n = 3). Fourteen antibodies mediated cross-clade target cell killing. ADCC-mediating antibodies displayed modest levels of V-heavy (VH) chain somatic mutation (0.5 to 1.5%) and also displayed a disproportionate usage of VH1 family genes (74%), a phenomenon recently described for CD4-binding site broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Maximal ADCC activity of VH1 antibodies correlated with mutation frequency. The polyclonality and low mutation frequency of these VH1 antibodies reveal fundamental differences in the regulation and maturation of these ADCC-mediating responses compared to VH1 bNAbs. PMID:22896626

  5. Vaccine induced antibodies to the first variable loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120, mediate antibody-dependent virus inhibition in macaques.

    PubMed

    Bialuk, Izabela; Whitney, Stephen; Andresen, Vibeke; Florese, Ruth H; Nacsa, Janos; Cecchinato, Valentina; Valeri, Valerio W; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Gordon, Shari; Parks, Robyn Washington; Montefiori, David C; Venzon, David; Demberg, Thorsten; Guroff, Marjorie Robert-; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-12-01

    The role of antibodies directed against the hyper variable envelope region V1 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has not been thoroughly studied. We show that a vaccine able to elicit strain-specific non-neutralizing antibodies to this region of gp120 is associated with control of highly pathogenic chimeric SHIV(89.6P) replication in rhesus macaques. The vaccinated animal that had the highest titers of antibodies to the amino terminus portion of V1, prior to challenge, had secondary antibody responses that mediated cell killing by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as early as 2 weeks after infection and inhibited viral replication by antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), by 4 weeks after infection. There was a significant inverse correlation between virus level and binding antibody titers to the envelope protein, (R=-0.83, p=0.015), and ADCVI (R=-0.84 p=0.044). Genotyping of plasma virus demonstrated in vivo selection of three SHIV(89.6P) variants with changes in potential N-linked glycosylation sites in V1. We found a significant inverse correlation between virus levels and titers of antibodies that mediated ADCVI against all the identified V1 virus variants. A significant inverse correlation was also found between neutralizing antibody titers to SHIV(89.6) and virus levels (R=-0.72 p=0.0050). However, passive inoculation of purified immunoglobulin from animal M316, the macaque that best controlled virus, to a naïve macaque, resulted in a low serum neutralizing antibodies and low ADCVI activity that failed to protect from SHIV(89.6P) challenge. Collectively, while our data suggest that anti-envelope antibodies with neutralizing and non-neutralizing Fc(R-dependent activities may be important in the control of SHIV replication, they also demonstrate that low levels of these antibodies alone are not sufficient to protect from infection.

  6. The Complement System and Antibody-Mediated Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Stites, Erik; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Thurman, Joshua M

    2015-12-15

    Complement activation is an important cause of tissue injury in patients with Ab-mediated rejection (AMR) of transplanted organs. Complement activation triggers a strong inflammatory response, and it also generates tissue-bound and soluble fragments that are clinically useful markers of inflammation. The detection of complement proteins deposited within transplanted tissues has become an indispensible biomarker of AMR, and several assays have recently been developed to measure complement activation by Abs reactive to specific donor HLA expressed within the transplant. Complement inhibitors have entered clinical use and have shown efficacy for the treatment of AMR. New methods of detecting complement activation within transplanted organs will improve our ability to diagnose and monitor AMR, and they will also help guide the use of complement inhibitory drugs.

  7. The Complement System and Antibody-Mediated Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Stites, Erik; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Thurman, Joshua M

    2015-12-15

    Complement activation is an important cause of tissue injury in patients with Ab-mediated rejection (AMR) of transplanted organs. Complement activation triggers a strong inflammatory response, and it also generates tissue-bound and soluble fragments that are clinically useful markers of inflammation. The detection of complement proteins deposited within transplanted tissues has become an indispensible biomarker of AMR, and several assays have recently been developed to measure complement activation by Abs reactive to specific donor HLA expressed within the transplant. Complement inhibitors have entered clinical use and have shown efficacy for the treatment of AMR. New methods of detecting complement activation within transplanted organs will improve our ability to diagnose and monitor AMR, and they will also help guide the use of complement inhibitory drugs. PMID:26637661

  8. Sialylated intravenous immunoglobulin suppress anti-ganglioside antibody mediated nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Massaad, Cynthia A; Gao, Tong; Pillai, Laila; Bogdanova, Nataliia; Ghauri, Sameera; Sheikh, Kazim A

    2016-08-01

    The precise mechanisms underlying the efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in autoimmune neurological disorders including Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) are not known. Anti-ganglioside antibodies have been reported to be pathogenic in some variants of GBS, and we have developed passive transfer animal models to study anti-ganglioside antibody mediated-endoneurial inflammation and associated neuropathological effects and to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches. Some studies indicate that IVIg's anti-inflammatory activity resides in a minor sialylated IVIg (sIVIg) fractions and is dependent on an innate Th2 response via binding to a specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin related 1 receptor (SIGN-R1). Therefore the efficacy of IVIg, IVIg fractions with various IgG Fc sialylation status, and the involvement of Th2 pathway were examined in one of our animal model of antibody-mediated inhibition of axonal regeneration. We demonstrate that both IVIg and sIVIg ameliorated anti-glycan antibody mediated-pathological effect, whereas, the unsialylated fractions of IVIg were not beneficial in our model. Tenfold lower doses of sIVIg compared to whole IVIg provided equivalent efficacy in our studies. Moreover, we found that whole IVIg and sIVIg significantly upregulates the gene expression of IL-33, which itself can provide protection from antibody-mediated nerve injury in our model. Our results support that the SIGN-R1-Th2 pathway is involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of IVIg on endoneurium in our model and elements of this pathway including IL-33 can provide novel therapeutics in inflammatory neuropathies. PMID:27208700

  9. Augmentation of antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity following in vivo therapy with recombinant interleukin 2.

    PubMed

    Hank, J A; Robinson, R R; Surfus, J; Mueller, B M; Reisfeld, R A; Cheung, N K; Sondel, P M

    1990-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAB) with tumor specificity are able to enhance the immunological specificity of interleukin 2 (IL-2)-activated lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells. Antibodies may also be used to broaden the range of tumor types susceptible to immune mediated cytotoxicity by the activated LAK cells. In these studies, mAB with relative tumor specificity were used to target immunologically activated effector cells in an in vitro antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. The mAB included: 3F8 and 14.G2a, which are both specific for neuroblastoma and melanoma and recognize ganglioside GD2, and mAB ING-1, a mouse-human chimeric antibody with constant regions from human IgG1 and kappa chains and variable regions from a mouse mAB that binds to a broad range of human adenocarcinomas. Each of these mAB was able to mediate ADCC with fresh effector cells and antibody binding targets. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from cancer patients prior to and following in vivo therapy with interleukin 2, a significant increase was noted in ADCC activity by peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained following IL-2 therapy. Inclusion of IL-2 in the medium during the cytotoxic assay with mAB further boosted ADCC. The total activity seen was often greater than the sum of the independent LAK activity and standard ADCC activity. The cells responsible for this ADCC had the CD16+ Fc receptor. Combining IL-2 with mAB in clinical tumor therapy may lead to a wider range of tumor types being responsive to immunotherapy and may also enhance the efficacy of therapy by specifically targeting activated effector cells to tumor cells recognized by mAB. Our results provide strong support for the testing of these hypotheses in clinical trials by combining in vivo treatment with IL-2 and mAB able to mediate ADCC.

  10. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Single Class I MHC-Disparate Cardiac Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Yusuke; Bucy, R. Pat; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Baldwin, William M.; Fairchild, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Murine CCR5−/− recipients produce high titers of antibody to complete MHC-mismatched heart and renal allografts. To study mechanisms of class I MHC antibody-mediated allograft injury, we tested the rejection of heart allografts transgenically expressing a single class I MHC disparity in wild-type C57BL/6 (H-2b) and B6.CCR5−/− recipients. Donor-specific antibody titers in CCR5−/− recipients were 30-fold higher than in wild-type recipients. B6.Kd allografts survived longer than 60 days in wild-type recipients whereas CCR5−/− recipients rejected all allografts within 14 days. Rejection was accompanied by infiltration of CD8 T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages and C4d deposition in the graft capillaries. B6.Kd allografts were rejected by CD8−/−/CCR5−/−, but not μMT−/−/CCR5−/−, recipients indicating the need for antibody but not CD8 T cells. Grafts retrieved at day 10 from CCR5−/− and CD8−/−/CCR5−/− recipients and from RAG-1−/− allograft recipients injected with anti-Kd antibodies expressed high levels of perforin, myeloperoxidase and CCL5 mRNA. These studies indicate that the continual production of anti-donor class I MHC antibody can mediate allograft rejection, that donor-reactive CD8 T cells synergize with the antibody to contribute to rejection, and that expression of three biomarkers during rejection can occur in the absence of this CD8 T cell activity. PMID:22578247

  11. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  12. The Fc and not CD4 Receptor Mediates Antibody Enhancement of HIV Infection in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsy, Jacques; Meyer, Mia; Tateno, Masatoshi; Clarkson, Sarah; Levy, Jay A.

    1989-06-01

    Antibodies that enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity have been found in the blood of infected individuals and in infected or immunized animals. These findings raise serious concern for the development of a safe vaccine against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To address the in vivo relevance and mechanism of this phenomenon, antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity in peripheral blood macrophages, lymphocytes, and human fibroblastoid cells was studied. Neither Leu3a, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD4 receptor, nor soluble recombinant CD4 even at high concentrations prevented this enhancement. The addition of monoclonal antibody to the Fc receptor III (anti-FcRIII), but not of antibodies that react with FcRI or FcRII, inhibited HIV type 1 and HIV type 2 enhancement in peripheral blood macrophages. Although enhancement of HIV infection in CD4+ lymphocytes could not be blocked by anti-FcRIII, it was inhibited by the addition of human immunoglobulin G aggregates. The results indicate that the FcRIII receptor on human macrophages and possibly another Fc receptor on human CD4+ lymphocytes mediate antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity and that this phenomenon proceeds through a mechanism independent of the CD4 protein.

  13. AAVrh.10-Mediated Expression of an Anti-Cocaine Antibody Mediates Persistent Passive Immunization That Suppresses Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; Hicks, Martin J.; De, Bishnu P.; Pagovich, Odelya; Frenk, Esther; Janda, Kim D.; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George F.; Hackett, Neil R.; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Worgall, Stefan; Tignor, Nicole; Mezey, Jason G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cocaine addiction is a major problem affecting all societal and economic classes for which there is no effective therapy. We hypothesized an effective anti-cocaine vaccine could be developed by using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vector as the delivery vehicle to persistently express an anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody in vivo, which would sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to cognate receptors in the brain. To accomplish this, we constructed AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab, an AAVrh.10 gene transfer vector expressing the heavy and light chains of the high affinity anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody GNC92H2. Intravenous administration of AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab to mice mediated high, persistent serum levels of high-affinity, cocaine-specific antibodies that sequestered intravenously administered cocaine in the blood. With repeated intravenous cocaine challenge, naive mice exhibited hyperactivity, while the AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab-vaccinated mice were completely resistant to the cocaine. These observations demonstrate a novel strategy for cocaine addiction by requiring only a single administration of an AAV vector mediating persistent, systemic anti-cocaine passive immunity. PMID:22486244

  14. Antibody-directed complement-mediated cytotoxicity to hepatocytes from patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, T I; Lau, J Y; McFarlane, B M; Alexander, G J; Eddleston, A L; Williams, R

    1995-01-01

    The susceptibility of hepatocytes from patients with chronic hepatitis B to complement-dependent cytotoxicity mediated by heterologous antibodies to hepatitis B virus core (anti-HBc) and surface (anti-HBs) antigens and to hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor was examined using a microcytotoxicity assay. The anti-HBc-induced cytotoxicity was found to be markedly enhanced against hepatocytes isolated from patients with chronic active hepatitis (72.6 +/- 9.5% (mean +/- s.e.m.); n = 6) over that against hepatocytes from individuals with chronic persistent hepatitis or inactive liver cirrhosis (40.6 +/- 18.6%; n = 4) (P = 0.019). Overall, values of the anti-HBc-directed cytotoxicity were higher in patients positive for HBcAg in hepatocytes and seropositive for hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg). Hepatocytotoxicity was also exerted by anti-HBs and anti-asialoglycoprotein receptor antibodies in the presence of complement, but it was not seemingly related to disease activity. These results indicate that hepatitis B virus core and surface antigens and asialoglycoprotein receptor at the hepatocyte surface can be recognized by antibodies, and raise the possibility that complement-dependent cytolysis may contribute to the injury of hepatitis B virus-infected hepatocytes. The data also suggest that liver cells of patients with severe chronic hepatitis might be more susceptible to anti-HBc antibody-directed complement-mediated cytotoxicity than those with inactive liver histology. PMID:7743660

  15. Measurement of Anti-Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent IgG4 Antibody as an Indicator of Antibody-Mediated Pure Red Cell Aplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weeraratne, Dohan K.; Kuck, Andrew J.; Chirmule, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    Patients treated with erythropoietin-based erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) can develop a rare but life-threatening condition called antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (amPRCA). The antibody characteristics in a nephrology patient with amPRCA include high antibody concentrations with neutralizing activity and a mixed IgG subclass including anti-ESA IgG4 antibodies. In contrast, anti-ESA IgG4 antibody is generally not detected in baseline samples and antibody-positive non-PRCA patients. Therefore, we validated a highly sensitive immunoassay on the ImmunoCAP 100 instrument to quantitate anti-ESA IgG4 antibodies using a human recombinant anti-epoetin alfa (EPO) IgG4 antibody as a calibrator. The biotinylated ESA was applied to a streptavidin ImmunoCAP, and bound anti-ESA IgG4 antibodies were detected using a β-galactosidase-conjugated mouse anti-human IgG4 antibody. The validated assay was used to detect anti-ESA IgG4 in amPRCA and non-PRCA patients. The immunoassay detected 15 ng/ml of human anti-EPO IgG4 antibody in the presence of a 200 M excess of human anti-ESA IgG1, IgG2, or IgM antibody and tolerated 2 μg/ml of soluble erythropoietin. All patient samples with confirmed amPRCA had measurable anti-ESA IgG4 antibodies. In addition, 94% (17/18) of non-PRCA patient samples were antibody negative or had below 15 ng/ml of anti-ESA IgG4 antibodies. This novel immunoassay can measure low-nanogram quantities of human anti-ESA IgG4 antibodies in the presence of other anti-ESA antibodies. An increased concentration of anti-ESA IgG4 antibody is associated with the development of amPRCA. We propose that the measurement of anti-ESA specific IgG4 antibodies may facilitate early detection of amPRCA in patients receiving all ESAs structurally related to human erythropoietin. PMID:23114696

  16. Mediation of macrophage cytolytic and phagocytic activities by antibodies of different classes and class-specific Fc-receptors.

    PubMed

    Walker, W S

    1977-08-01

    The classes of antibodies that mediate the phagocytosis and cytolysis of 51Cr-labeled chicken erythrocytes by IC-21 macrophages, an established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages, were identified. The phagocytic activity of IC-21 macrophages, as determined by a functional inhibition assay with mouse myeloma proteins, depended mainly on IgM and IgG2a antibodies and to a lesser extent on IgG2b antibodies. Extracellular cytolysis of target cells was mediated solely by IgG2b antibodies. These results correlate with the previously documented specificities of discrete Fc-receptors for IgG2a and IgG2b immunoglobulins on IC-21 cells. Thus, phagocytosis and cytolysis appear to be mediated by antibodies of different classes operating through separate and distinct sites on the surface of IC-21 macrophages. PMID:886183

  17. Novel mutations in Marburg virus glycoprotein associated with viral evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Masahiro; Nakayama, Eri; Marzi, Andrea; Igarashi, Manabu; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2013-04-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus, members of the family Filoviridae, cause lethal haemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. Although the outbreaks are concentrated mainly in Central Africa, these viruses are potential agents of imported infectious diseases and bioterrorism in non-African countries. Recent studies demonstrated that non-human primates passively immunized with virus-specific antibodies were successfully protected against fatal filovirus infection, highlighting the important role of antibodies in protective immunity for this disease. However, the mechanisms underlying potential evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure are not well understood. To analyse possible mutations involved in immune evasion in the MARV envelope glycoprotein (GP) which is the major target of protective antibodies, we selected escape mutants of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) expressing MARV GP (rVSVΔG/MARVGP) by using two GP-specific mAbs, AGP127-8 and MGP72-17, which have been previously shown to inhibit MARV budding. Interestingly, several rVSVΔG/MARVGP variants escaping from the mAb pressure-acquired amino acid substitutions in the furin-cleavage site rather than in the mAb-specific epitopes, suggesting that these epitopes are recessed, not exposed on the uncleaved GP molecule, and therefore inaccessible to the mAbs. More surprisingly, some variants escaping mAb MGP72-17 lacked a large proportion of the mucin-like region of GP, indicating that these mutants efficiently escaped the selective pressure by deleting the mucin-like region including the mAb-specific epitope. Our data demonstrate that MARV GP possesses the potential to evade antibody mediated immune pressure due to extraordinary structural flexibility and variability.

  18. HIV-specific CD4-induced Antibodies Mediate Broad and Potent Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activity and are Commonly Detected in Plasma from HIV-infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Katherine L.; Cortez, Valerie; Dingens, Adam S.; Gach, Johannes S.; Rainwater, Stephanie; Weis, Julie F.; Chen, Xuemin; Spearman, Paul; Forthal, Donald N.; Overbaugh, Julie

    2015-01-01

    HIV-specific antibodies (Abs) can reduce viral burden by blocking new rounds of infection or by destroying infected cells via activation of effector cells through Fc–FcR interaction. This latter process, referred to as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), has been associated with viral control and improved clinical outcome following both HIV and SIV infections. Here we describe an HIV viral-like particle (VLP)-based sorting strategy that led to identification of HIV-specific memory B cells encoding Abs that mediate ADCC from a subtype A-infected Kenyan woman at 914 days post-infection. Using this strategy, 12 HIV-envelope-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were isolated and three mediated potent ADCC activity when compared to well-characterized ADCC mAbs. The ADCC-mediating Abs also mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), which provides a net measure of Fc receptor-triggered effects against replicating virus. Two of the three ADCC-mediating Abs targeted a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope also bound by the mAb C11; the third antibody targeted the N-terminus of V3. Both CD4i Abs identified here demonstrated strong cross-clade breadth with activity against 10 of 11 envelopes tested, including those from clades A, B, C, A/D and C/D, whereas the V3-specific antibody showed more limited breadth. Variants of these CD4i, C11-like mAbs engineered to interrupt binding to FcγRs inhibited a measurable percentage of the donor's ADCC activity starting as early as 189 days post-infection. C11-like antibodies also accounted for between 18–78% of ADCC activity in 9 chronically infected individuals from the same cohort study. Further, the two CD4i Abs originated from unique B cells, suggesting that antibodies targeting this epitope can be commonly produced. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that CD4i, C11-like antibodies develop within the first 6 months of infection and they can arise from unique B-cell lineages in the

  19. Specialized proresolving mediators enhance human B cell differentiation to antibody secreting cells1

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Sesquile; Gao, Fei; Serhan, Charles N.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    The resolution of inflammation is an active and dynamic process critical in maintaining homeostasis. Newly identified lipid mediators have been recognized as key players during the resolution phase. These specialized proresolving mediators (SPM) constitute separate families that include lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins each derived from essential polyunsaturated fatty acids. New results demonstrate that SPM regulate aspects of the immune response, including reduction of neutrophil infiltration, decreased T cell cytokine production and stimulation of macrophage phagocytic activity. The actions of SPM on B lymphocytes remain unknown. Our study shows for the first time that the novel SPM 17-hydroxydosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA), resolvin D1 (RvD1) and protectin D1 (PD1) are present in the spleen. Interestingly, 17-HDHA, RvD1 but not PD1, strongly increase activated human B cell IgM and IgG production. Furthermore, increased antibody production by 17-HDHA is due to augmented B cell differentiation towards a CD27+CD38+ antibody-secreting cell phenotype. 17-HDHA did not affect proliferation and was non-toxic to cells. Increase of plasma cell differentiation and antibody production supports the involvement of SPM during the late stages of inflammation and pathogen clearance. The present study provides new evidence for SPM activity in the humoral response. These new findings highlight the potential applications of SPM as endogenous and non-toxic adjuvants, and as anti-inflammatory therapeutic molecules. PMID:22711890

  20. Persistent expression of biologically active anti-HER2 antibody by AAVrh.10-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Qiu, J; Wang, R; Krause, A; Boyer, J L; Hackett, N R; Crystal, R G

    2010-08-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against an extracellular region of the human epidermal growth-factor receptor type 2 (HER2) protein. We hypothesized that a single adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated genetic delivery of an anti-HER2 antibody should be effective in mediating long-term production of anti-HER2 and in suppressing the growth of human tumors in a xenograft model in nude mice. The adeno-associated virus gene transfer vector AAVrh.10alphaHER2 was constructed based on a non-human primate AAV serotype rh.10 to express the complementary DNAs for the heavy and light chains of mAb 4D5, the murine precursor to trastuzumab. The data show that genetically transferred anti-HER2 selectively bound human HER2 protein and suppressed the proliferation of HER2(+) tumor cell lines. A single administration of AAVrh.10alphaHER2 provided long-term therapeutic levels of anti-HER2 antibody expression without inducing an anti-idiotype response, suppressed the growth of HER2(+) tumors and increased the survival of tumor bearing mice. In the context that trastuzumab therapy requires frequent and repeated administration, this strategy might be developed as an alternate platform for delivery of anti-HER2 therapy.

  1. Oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia induces antibody-mediated complement-dependent cancer cell lysis in humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Breitbach, Caroline J; Moon, Anne; Heo, Jeong; Lee, Yu Kyoung; Cho, Mong; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Seong-Geun; Kang, Dae Hwan; Bell, John C; Park, Byeong Ho; Kirn, David H; Hwang, Tae-Ho

    2013-05-15

    Oncolytic viruses cause direct cytolysis and cancer-specific immunity in preclinical models. The goal of this study was to demonstrate induction of functional anticancer immunity that can lyse target cancer cells in humans. Pexa-Vec (pexastimogene devacirepvec; JX-594) is a targeted oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus engineered to express human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Pexa-Vec demonstrated replication, GM-CSF expression, and tumor responses in previous phase 1 trials. We now evaluated whether Pexa-Vec induced functional anticancer immunity both in the rabbit VX2 tumor model and in patients with diverse solid tumor types in phase 1. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent cancer cell cytotoxicity (CDC) was induced by intravenous Pexa-Vec in rabbits; transfer of serum from Pexa-Vec-treated animals to tumor-bearing animals resulted in tumor necrosis and improved survival. In patients with diverse tumor types treated on a phase 1 trial, CDC developed within 4 to 8 weeks in most patients; normal cells were resistant to the cytotoxic effects. T lymphocyte activation in patients was evidenced by antibody class switching. We determined that patients with the longest survival duration had the highest CDC activity, and identified candidate target tumor cell antigens. Thus, we demonstrated that Pexa-Vec induced polyclonal antibody-mediated CDC against multiple tumor antigens both in rabbits and in patients with diverse solid tumor types.

  2. Cloned transgenic farm animals produce a bispecific antibody for T cell-mediated tumor cell killing.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Müller, Sigrid; Minoia, Rosa; Wolf, Eckhard; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wenigerkind, Hendrik; Lassnig, Caroline; Besenfelder, Urban; Müller, Mathias; Lytton, Simon D; Jung, Gundram; Brem, Gottfried

    2004-05-01

    Complex recombinant antibody fragments for modulation of immune function such as tumor cell destruction have emerged at a rapid pace and diverse anticancer strategies are being developed to benefit patients. Despite improvements in molecule design and expression systems, the quantity and stability, e.g., of single-chain antibodies produced in cell culture, is often insufficient for treatment of human disease, and the costs of scale-up, labor, and fermentation facilities are prohibitive. The ability to yield mg/ml levels of recombinant antibodies and the scale-up flexibility make transgenic production in plants and livestock an attractive alternative to mammalian cell culture as a source of large quantities of biotherapeutics. Here, we report on the efficient production of a bispecific single-chain antibody in the serum of transgenic rabbits and a herd of nine cloned, transgenic cattle. The bispecific protein, designated r28M, is directed to a melanoma-associated proteoglycan and the human CD28 molecule on T cells. Purified from the serum of transgenic animals, the protein is stable and fully active in mediating target cell-restricted T cell stimulation and tumor cell killing.

  3. Current and future challenges in therapy for antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nandini; Ball, Timothy; Uber, Patricia A; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2011-06-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to present a challenge for the survival of the cardiac allograft. AMR appears to be on the rise, likely secondary to changing trends in clinical practice, including selection of patients for transplantation on mechanical circulatory support and development of more effective combinations of immunosuppressive drugs against acute cellular rejection. Most current strategies are aimed at treating acute AMR, but the treatment of chronic AMR is still not well defined. Clinically, AMR can often be more severe than cellular rejection and more difficult to treat, often not responding to typical protocols of increased immunosuppression. Complex steps involved in the antibody response allows for several potential targets for therapeutic intervention, including suppression of T and B cells, elimination of circulating antibodies, and inhibition of residual antibodies. Existing evidence suggests a multiregimen approach is the best option. Sustenance of accommodation and induction of tolerance could be viewed as viable options if adequate immune surveillance can be achieved in this setting. This review discusses the challenges in treating AMR and provides a critical analysis of current and possible future therapies.

  4. Current and future challenges in therapy for antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nandini; Ball, Timothy; Uber, Patricia A; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2011-06-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to present a challenge for the survival of the cardiac allograft. AMR appears to be on the rise, likely secondary to changing trends in clinical practice, including selection of patients for transplantation on mechanical circulatory support and development of more effective combinations of immunosuppressive drugs against acute cellular rejection. Most current strategies are aimed at treating acute AMR, but the treatment of chronic AMR is still not well defined. Clinically, AMR can often be more severe than cellular rejection and more difficult to treat, often not responding to typical protocols of increased immunosuppression. Complex steps involved in the antibody response allows for several potential targets for therapeutic intervention, including suppression of T and B cells, elimination of circulating antibodies, and inhibition of residual antibodies. Existing evidence suggests a multiregimen approach is the best option. Sustenance of accommodation and induction of tolerance could be viewed as viable options if adequate immune surveillance can be achieved in this setting. This review discusses the challenges in treating AMR and provides a critical analysis of current and possible future therapies. PMID:21474341

  5. Quantitative evaluation of fucose reducing effects in a humanized antibody on Fcγ receptor binding and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activities.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shan; Quarmby, Valerie; Gao, Xiaoying; Ying, Yong; Lin, Linda; Reed, Chae; Fong, Chris; Lau, Wendy; Qiu, Zhihua J; Shen, Amy; Vanderlaan, Martin; Song, An

    2012-01-01

    The presence or absence of core fucose in the Fc region N-linked glycans of antibodies affects their binding affinity toward FcγRIIIa as well as their antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. However, the quantitative nature of this structure-function relationship remains unclear. In this study, the in vitro biological activity of an afucosylated anti-CD20 antibody was fully characterized. Further, the effect of fucose reduction on Fc effector functions was quantitatively evaluated using the afucosylated antibody, its "regular" fucosylated counterpart and a series of mixtures containing varying proportions of "regular" and afucosylated materials. Compared with the "regular" fucosylated antibody, the afucosylated antibody demonstrated similar binding interactions with the target antigen (CD20), C1q and FcγRIa, moderate increases in binding to FcγRIIa and IIb, and substantially increased binding to FcγRIIIa. The afucosylated antibodies also showed comparable complement-dependent cytotoxicity activity but markedly increased ADCC activity. Based on EC 50 values derived from dose-response curves, our results indicate that the amount of afucosylated glycan in antibody samples correlate with both FcγRIIIa binding activity and ADCC activity in a linear fashion. Furthermore, the extent of ADCC enhancement due to fucose depletion was not affected by the FcγRIIIa genotype of the effector cells.

  6. Photosensitizers form in histidine buffer and mediate the photodegradation of a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Stroop, Steven D; Conca, David M; Lundgard, Robert P; Renz, Mark E; Peabody, Lynn M; Leigh, Scott D

    2011-12-01

    Fluorescent light (FL) photodegradation of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulated in histidine buffer is mediated by histidine-derived photosensitizers that accumulate and greatly increase with light exposure. Histidine-derived photosensitizers are the primary mediators of Trp photooxidation. FL-photodegradation requires light exposure and is pH dependent. It is significantly reduced or eliminated by buffer exchanges, by oxygen depletion, or at pH values greater than 7. Antibody-fragment MS ion counts reveal that oxidation of a single light chain Trp in CDR1 correlates with binding loss. Multiple heavy chain methionines oxidize, but poorly correlate with binding loss. Photosensitizers extracted from photo-aged histidine buffer are potent mediators of FL-photodegradation including oxidation and, to a lesser degree, fragmentation and aggregation of the mAb. These photosensitizers absorb visible light and have neutral mass of 187.1- 386.1 Da. They are also fluorescent with ex/em at 360/450 nm. When spiked into histidine or MES buffered mAb formulations they produce a concentration dependent and pronounced increase in FL-photodegradation; however, no oxidation or loss of antibody function occurs in the dark and hydrogen peroxide does not oxidize Trp. The major component is consistent with histidine oxidation to 6a-hydroxy-2-oxo-octahydro-pyrollo[2,3-d]imidazole-5-carboxylic acid. Photosensitizer levels measured in the formulation prior to light exposure, are linearly related to the FL-photodegradation observed and can predict degradation in photostability testing.

  7. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) -Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sanne Skov; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Rasmussen, Line Dahlerup; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated the ability of effector cells and antibodies to mediate ADCC separately and in combination using the ADCC-PanToxiLux assay. The ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mediate ADCC was significantly higher in individuals who had been treated with ART before seroconversion, compared to the individuals initiating ART at a low CD4+ T cell count (<350 cells/μl blood) and the ART-naïve individuals. The frequency of CD16 expressing natural killer (NK) cells correlated with both the duration of ART and Granzyme B (GzB) activity. In contrast, the plasma titer of antibodies mediating ADCC declined during ART. These findings suggest improved cytotoxic function of the NK cells if initiating ART early during infection, while the levels of ADCC mediating antibodies declined during ART.

  8. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) -Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Sanne Skov; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Rasmussen, Line Dahlerup; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated the ability of effector cells and antibodies to mediate ADCC separately and in combination using the ADCC-PanToxiLux assay. The ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mediate ADCC was significantly higher in individuals who had been treated with ART before seroconversion, compared to the individuals initiating ART at a low CD4+ T cell count (<350 cells/μl blood) and the ART-naïve individuals. The frequency of CD16 expressing natural killer (NK) cells correlated with both the duration of ART and Granzyme B (GzB) activity. In contrast, the plasma titer of antibodies mediating ADCC declined during ART. These findings suggest improved cytotoxic function of the NK cells if initiating ART early during infection, while the levels of ADCC mediating antibodies declined during ART. PMID:26696395

  9. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Transplantation: Current Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Schinstock, Carrie; Stegall, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is recognized as a major cause of graft loss in renal transplant recipients. Early acute AMR in the first few days after transplantation occurs primarily in sensitized renal transplant recipients with donor-specific alloantibody at the time of transplant and is a relatively “pure” form of acute AMR. Late acute AMR occurs months to years after transplantation and is commonly a mixed cellular and humoral rejection. While there is no consensus regarding optimum treatment, we contend that rational therapeutic approaches are emerging and the acute episode can be managed in most instances. However, new therapies are needed to prevent ongoing chronic injury in these patients.

  10. p53 protein, EGF receptor, and anti-p53 antibodies in serum from patients with occupationally derived lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J; Presek, P; Braun, A; Bauer, P; Konietzko, N; Wiesner, B; Woitowitz, H J

    1999-08-01

    The oncogene product epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R), the tumour suppressor gene product p53 and anti-p53 antibodies are detectable in the serum of certain cancer patients. Increased levels of some of these products were reported in lung cancer patients after occupational asbestos exposure and after exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or vinylchloride. In the first step, this study investigated the possible diagnostic value of serum EGF-R, p53-protein and anti-p53 antibodies, measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in lung tumour patients. In addition to being investigated on a molecular epidemiological basis, these parameters were examined as biomarkers of carcinogenesis, especially with regard to asbestos incorporation effects or of radon-induced lung cancers. Also, a possible effect of cigarette smoking and age dependence were studied. A total of 116 male patients with lung or pleural tumours were examined. The histological classification was four small-cell cancers, six large-cell cancers, 32 adenocarcinomas, 47 squamous carcinomas, 12 mixed lung carcinomas, five diffuse malignant mesotheliomas and ten lung metastasis of extrapulmonary tumours. Twenty-two lung cancers and all mesotheliomas were related to asbestos, 22 lung cancers were related to ionizing radiation and 61 patients had cigarette smoke-related lung cancer. Besides these patients 50 male patients with non-malignant lung or pleural diseases were included; of the latter eight subjects suffered from asbestosis. Controls were 129 male subjects without any lung disease. No significantly elevated or decreased serum values for p53 protein, EGF-R, or anti-p53 antibodies as a function of histological tumour type, age, or degree and type of exposure (asbestos, smoking, ionizing radiation) could be found. The utility of p53-protein, EGF-R and anti-p53 antibodies as routine biomarkers for screening occupationally derived lung cancers is limited.

  11. Social Support Mediates Loneliness and Human Herpesvirus Type 6 (HHV-6) Antibody Titers

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Denise; Cruess, Stacy; Kilbourn, Kristin; Klimas, Nancy; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Ironson, Gail; Baum, Andrew; Schneiderman, Neil; Antoni, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    The current study investigated the impact of a severe environmental stressor and the role that declining social integration played in mediating its effect on loneliness and immune status. Increased loneliness and decreased social support in the months following the stressor (storm) were significantly associated with increased HHV-6 antibody titers, reflecting poorer control over the virus. Poorer social integration mediated the relationship between loneliness and HHV-6, even after controlling for nonspecific polyclonal B-cell activation, disease status (CD3+CD4+ cell counts), living arrangements, acute social losses (bereavement), and potential disruptions in social-support resources. These findings suggest that specific elements of social support may explain the oft-noted negative effects of loneliness on the immune system, and generalized to a medically vulnerable population. PMID:20407593

  12. An engineered substance P variant for receptor-mediated delivery of synthetic antibodies into tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Shahir S; Luchniak, Anna; Uysal, Serdar; Brawley, Crista M; Rock, Ronald S; Kossiakoff, Anthony A

    2009-07-01

    We have developed and tested a robust delivery method for the transport of proteins to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells without compromising the integrity of the cell membrane. This receptor-mediated delivery (RMD) technology utilizes a variant of substance P (SP), a neuropeptide that is rapidly internalized upon interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R). Cargos in the form of synthetic antibody fragments (sABs) were conjugated to the engineered SP variant (SPv) and efficiently internalized by NK1R-expressing cells. The sABs used here were generated to bind specific conformational forms of actin. The internalized proteins appear to escape the endosome and retain their binding activity within the cells as demonstrated by co-localization with the actin cytoskeleton. Further, since the NK1R is over-expressed in many cancers, SPv-mediated delivery provides a highly specific method for therapeutic utilization of affinity reagents targeting intracellular processes in diseased tissue.

  13. Protein disulfide isomerases are antibody targets during immune-mediated tumor destruction

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Catia; Soiffer, Robert; Ho, Vincent; Vanneman, Matthew; Jinushi, Masahisa; Ritz, Jerome; Neuberg, Donna; Stone, Richard; DeAngelo, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The identification of cancer antigens that contribute to transformation and are linked with immune-mediated tumor destruction is an important goal for immunotherapy. Toward this end, we screened a murine renal cell carcinoma cDNA expression library with sera from mice vaccinated with irradiated tumor cells engineered to secrete granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Multiple nonmutated, overexpressed proteins that function in tumor cell migration, protein/nucleic acid homeostasis, metabolism, and stress responses were detected. Among these, the most frequently recognized clone was protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). High titer antibodies to human PDI were similarly induced in an acute myeloid leukemia patient who achieved a complete response after vac-cination with irradiated, autologous GM-CSF–secreting tumor cells in the setting of nonmyeloablative allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Moreover, ERp5, a closely related disulfide isomerase involved in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related protein A (MICA) shedding, also evoked potent humoral reactions in diverse solid and hematologic malignancy patients who responded to GM-CSF–secreting tumor cell vaccines or antibody blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4). Together, these findings reveal the unexpected immunogenicity of PDIs and raise the possibility that these gene products might serve as targets for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:19008459

  14. Target-mediated drug disposition model and its approximations for antibody-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Gibiansky, Leonid; Gibiansky, Ekaterina

    2014-02-01

    Antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) is a complex structure composed of an antibody linked to several molecules of a biologically active cytotoxic drug. The number of ADC compounds in clinical development now exceeds 30, with two of them already on the market. However, there is no rigorous mechanistic model that describes pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of these compounds. PK modeling of ADCs is even more complicated than that of other biologics as the model should describe distribution, binding, and elimination of antibodies with different toxin load, and also the deconjugation process and PK of the released toxin. This work extends the target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) model to describe ADCs, derives the rapid binding (quasi-equilibrium), quasi-steady-state, and Michaelis-Menten approximations of the TMDD model as applied to ADCs, derives the TMDD model and its approximations for ADCs with load-independent properties, and discusses further simplifications of the system under various assumptions. The developed models are shown to describe data simulated from the available clinical population PK models of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), one of the two currently approved ADCs. Identifiability of model parameters is also discussed and illustrated on the simulated T-DM1 examples.

  15. Recombinant-antibody-mediated resistance against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Safarnejad, Mohammad Reza; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a geminivirus species whose members cause severe crop losses in the tropics and subtropics. We report the expression of a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody that protected Nicotiana benthamiana plants from a prevalent Iranian isolate of the virus (TYLCV-Ir). Two recombinant antibodies (scFv-ScRep1 and scFv-ScRep2) interacting with the multifunctional replication initiator protein (Rep) were obtained from phage display libraries and expressed in plants, both as stand-alone proteins and as N-terminal GFP fusions. Initial results indicated that both scFvs and both fusions accumulated to a detectable level in the cytosol and nucleus of plant cells. Transgenic plants challenged with TYLCV-Ir showed that the scFv-ScRep1, but more so the fusion proteins, were able to suppress TYLCV-Ir replication. These results show that expression of a scFv-ScRep1-GFP fusion protein can attenuate viral DNA replication and prevent the development of disease symptoms. The present article describes the first successful application of a recombinant antibody-mediated resistance approach against a plant DNA virus. PMID:19234665

  16. Enzyme-mediated site-specific bioconjugation of metal complexes to proteins: sortase-mediated coupling of copper-64 to a single-chain antibody.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Brett M; Alt, Karen; Jeffery, Charmaine M; Price, Roger I; Jagdale, Shweta; Rigby, Sheena; Williams, Charlotte C; Peter, Karlheinz; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Donnelly, Paul S

    2014-06-10

    The enzyme-mediated site-specific bioconjugation of a radioactive metal complex to a single-chain antibody using the transpeptidase sortase A is reported. Cage amine sarcophagine ligands that were designed to function as substrates for the sortase A mediated bioconjugation to antibodies were synthesized and enzymatically conjugated to a single-chain variable fragment. The antibody fragment scFv(anti-LIBS) targets ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS) on the glycoprotein receptor GPIIb/IIIa, which is present on activated platelets. The immunoconjugates were radiolabeled with the positron-emitting isotope (64)Cu. The new radiolabeled conjugates were shown to bind selectively to activated platelets. The diagnostic potential of the most promising conjugate was demonstrated in an in vivo model of carotid artery thrombosis using positron emission tomography. This approach gives homogeneous products through site-specific enzyme-mediated conjugation and should be broadly applicable to other metal complexes and proteins. PMID:24777818

  17. Oncolytic reovirus enhances rituximab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Parrish, C; Scott, G B; Migneco, G; Scott, K J; Steele, L P; Ilett, E; West, E J; Hall, K; Selby, P J; Buchanan, D; Varghese, A; Cragg, M S; Coffey, M; Hillmen, P; Melcher, A A; Errington-Mais, F

    2015-09-01

    The naturally occurring oncolytic virus (OV), reovirus, replicates in cancer cells causing direct cytotoxicity, and can activate innate and adaptive immune responses to facilitate tumour clearance. Reovirus is safe, well tolerated and currently in clinical testing for the treatment of multiple myeloma, in combination with dexamethasone/carfilzomib. Activation of natural killer (NK) cells has been observed after systemic delivery of reovirus to cancer patients; however, the ability of OV to potentiate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is unexplored. This study elucidates the potential of oncolytic reovirus for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), both as a direct cytotoxic agent and as an immunomodulator. We demonstrate that reovirus: (i) is directly cytotoxic against CLL, which requires replication-competent virus; (ii) phenotypically and functionally activates patient NK cells via a monocyte-derived interferon-α (IFNα)-dependent mechanism; and (iii) enhances ADCC-mediated killing of CLL in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. Our data provide strong preclinical evidence to support the use of reovirus in combination with anti-CD20 immunotherapy for the treatment of CLL.

  18. Compromised NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Chronic SIV/SHIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuan; Li, Dan; Luo, Zhenwu; Liang, Hua; Peng, Hong; Zhao, Yangyang; Wang, Nidan; Liu, Donghua; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang; Yan, Huimin; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributes to the control of HIV/SIV infection. However, little is known about the ADCC function of natural killer (NK) cells in non-human primate model. Here we demonstrated that ADCC function of NK cells was significantly compromised in chronic SIV/SHIV infection, correlating closely with the expression of FcγRIIIa receptor (CD16) on NK cells. CD32, another class of IgG Fc receptors, was identified on NK cells with higher expression in the infected macaques and the blockade of CD32 impacted the ability of NK cells to respond to antibody-coated target cells. The inhibition of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), a group of enzymes normally involved in tissue/receptor remodeling, could restore NK cell-mediated ADCC with increased CD16 expression on macaque NK cells. These data offer a clearer understanding of NK cell-mediated ADCC in rhesus macaques, which will allow us to evaluate the ADCC repertoire arising from preclinical vaccination studies in non-human primates and inform us in the future design of effective HIV vaccination strategies. PMID:23424655

  19. Antibody-mediated neutralization of myelin-associated EphrinB3 accelerates CNS remyelination.

    PubMed

    Syed, Yasir A; Zhao, Chao; Mahad, Don; Möbius, Wiebke; Altmann, Friedrich; Foss, Franziska; Sentürk, Aycan; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Lubec, Gert; Lilley, Kathryn; Franklin, Robin J M; Nave, Klaus-A; Kotter, Mark R N

    2016-02-01

    Remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions often remains incomplete despite the presence of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Amongst other factors, successful remyelination depends on the phagocytic clearance of myelin debris. However, the proteins in myelin debris that act as potent and selective inhibitors on OPC differentiation and inhibit CNS remyelination remain unknown. Here, we identify the transmembrane signalling protein EphrinB3 as important mediator of this inhibition, using a protein analytical approach in combination with a primary rodent OPC assay. In the presence of EphrinB3, OPCs fail to differentiate. In a rat model of remyelination, infusion of EphrinB3 inhibits remyelination. In contrast, masking EphrinB3 epitopes using antibodies promotes remyelination. Finally, we identify EphrinB3 in MS lesions and demonstrate that MS lesion extracts inhibit OPC differentiation while antibody-mediated masking of EphrinB3 epitopes promotes it. Our findings suggest that EphrinB3 could be a target for therapies aiming at promoting remyelination in demyelinating disease.

  20. Antibody-mediated neutralization of myelin-associated EphrinB3 accelerates CNS remyelination.

    PubMed

    Syed, Yasir A; Zhao, Chao; Mahad, Don; Möbius, Wiebke; Altmann, Friedrich; Foss, Franziska; Sentürk, Aycan; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Lubec, Gert; Lilley, Kathryn; Franklin, Robin J M; Nave, Klaus-A; Kotter, Mark R N

    2016-02-01

    Remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions often remains incomplete despite the presence of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Amongst other factors, successful remyelination depends on the phagocytic clearance of myelin debris. However, the proteins in myelin debris that act as potent and selective inhibitors on OPC differentiation and inhibit CNS remyelination remain unknown. Here, we identify the transmembrane signalling protein EphrinB3 as important mediator of this inhibition, using a protein analytical approach in combination with a primary rodent OPC assay. In the presence of EphrinB3, OPCs fail to differentiate. In a rat model of remyelination, infusion of EphrinB3 inhibits remyelination. In contrast, masking EphrinB3 epitopes using antibodies promotes remyelination. Finally, we identify EphrinB3 in MS lesions and demonstrate that MS lesion extracts inhibit OPC differentiation while antibody-mediated masking of EphrinB3 epitopes promotes it. Our findings suggest that EphrinB3 could be a target for therapies aiming at promoting remyelination in demyelinating disease. PMID:26687980

  1. Outcome of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients with preformed donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Suberbielle-Boissel, C; Hill, G S; Lefaucheur, C; Anglicheau, D; Zuber, J; Martinez, F; Thervet, E; Méjean, A; Charron, D; Duong van Huyen, J P; Bruneval, P; Legendre, C; Nochy, D

    2009-11-01

    This study describes clinical relevance of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (SAMR) in a cohort of 54 DSA-positive kidney transplant recipients receiving a deceased donor. In 3 months screening biopsies, 31.1% of patients met the criteria of SAMR. A total of 48.9% had an incomplete form of SAMR (g+/ptc+/C4d-negative) whereas 20% had no humoral lesions. Patients with SAMR at 3 months had at 1 year: a higher C4d score, ptc score, and arteriosclerosis score, higher rate of IFTA (100% vs. 33.3%, p < 0.01) and a higher rate of transplant glomerulopathy (43% vs. 0%, p = 0.02) compared to patients without 3-month SAMR. Patients with SAMR at 3 months exhibited at 1 year a higher class II MFImax-DSA and a lower mGFR compared to patients without SAMR (39.2 +/- 13.9 vs. 61.9 +/- 19.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) respectively, p < 0.01). The group of patients with C4d-negative SAMR at 3 months developed more ptc and IFTA lesions, and lower GFR at 1 year in comparison to biopsies without humoral lesions. SAMR is a frequent entity in KTR with preexisting DSAs and promotes subsequent GFR impairment and development of chronic AMR. C4d-negative SAMR patients displayed an intermediate course between the no-SAMR group and the C4d+ SAMR group. Screening biopsies may be useful to recognize patients more likely to develop SAMR. PMID:19775320

  2. NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Erbe, Amy K; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Morris, Zachary S; Sondel, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in cancer immunotherapies that involve tumor-antigen targeting by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). NK cells express a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors that serve to regulate the function and activity of the cells. In the context of targeting cells, NK cells can be "specifically activated" through certain Fc receptors that are expressed on their cell surface. NK cells can express FcγRIIIA and/or FcγRIIC, which can bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, transmitting activating signals within NK cells. Once activated through Fc receptors by antibodies bound to target cells, NK cells are able to lyse target cells without priming, and secrete cytokines like interferon gamma to recruit adaptive immune cells. This antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of tumor cells is utilized in the treatment of various cancers overexpressing unique antigens, such as neuroblastoma, breast cancer, B cell lymphoma, and others. NK cells also express a family of receptors called killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which regulate the function and response of NK cells toward target cells through their interaction with their cognate ligands that are expressed on tumor cells. Genetic polymorphisms in KIR and KIR-ligands, as well as FcγRs may influence NK cell responsiveness in conjunction with mAb immunotherapies. This review focuses on current therapeutic mAbs, different strategies to augment the anti-tumor efficacy of ADCC, and genotypic factors that may influence patient responses to antibody-dependent immunotherapies.

  3. Immune-Mediated Necrotizing Myopathy, Associated With Antibodies to Signal Recognition Particle, Together With Lupus Nephritis: Case Presentation and Management

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, John; Harty, Len; Mayer, Nick; Critcher, Val; Ryan, John

    2015-01-01

    A male patient with limb weakness, myalgia and edema was subsequently found to have an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) on biopsy. Targeted myopathic antibody analysis revealed antibodies to signal recognition particle (SRP). Anti-SRP-associated necrotizing myopathy was diagnosed. This case was complicated by the concurrent development of class III lupus nephritis. We discuss an interesting case progression and development as well as the management of these difficult to treat conditions. PMID:25883715

  4. Eculizumab for the Treatment of Severe Antibody-Mediated Rejection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Anne; Collette, Suzon; Senécal, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    In renal transplantation, treatment options for antibody-mediated rejection are limited. Here, we report a case of severe AMR treated with eculizumab. A 50-year-old woman known for end stage kidney disease secondary to IgA nephropathy received a kidney transplant from a 50-year-old deceased donor. At 5 months after transplantation, she presented with acute graft dysfunction and biopsy showed a severe antibody-mediated rejection associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. Despite an aggressive conventional immunosuppressive regimen, signs of rejection persisted and the patient was treated with 3 doses of eculizumab. Following the therapy, markers of TMA improved and graft function stabilized. However, ongoing signs of rejection remained in the repeated biopsy. In kidney transplantation, eculizumab is an expensive treatment and its role in the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection remains to be determined. PMID:27478676

  5. Ibrutinib interferes with the cell-mediated anti-tumor activities of therapeutic CD20 antibodies: implications for combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Roit, Fabio Da; Engelberts, Patrick J.; Taylor, Ronald P.; Breij, Esther C.W.; Gritti, Giuseppe; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Introna, Martino; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Beurskens, Frank J.; Golay, Josée

    2015-01-01

    The novel Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib and phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-δ inhibitor idelalisib are promising drugs for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, either alone or in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. We investigated the possible positive or negative impact of these drugs on all known mechanisms of action of both type I and type II anti-CD20 antibodies. Pretreatment with ibrutinib for 1 hour did not increase direct cell death of cell lines or chronic lymphocytic leukemia samples mediated by anti-CD20 antibodies. Pre-treatment with ibrutinib did not inhibit complement activation or complement-mediated lysis. In contrast, ibrutinib strongly inhibited all cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies rituximab, ofatumumab or obinutuzumab, either in purified systems or whole blood assays. Activation of natural killer cells, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by these cells, as well as phagocytosis by macrophages or neutrophils were inhibited by ibrutinib with a half maximal effective concentration of 0.3–3 μM. Analysis of anti-CD20 mediated activation of natural killer cells isolated from patients on continued oral ibrutinib treatment suggested that repeated drug dosing inhibits these cells in vivo. Finally we show that the phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-δ inhibitor idelalisib similarly inhibited the immune cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies, although the effects of this drug at 10 μM were weaker than those observed with ibrutinib at the same concentration. We conclude that the design of combined treatment schedules of anti-CD20 antibodies with these kinase inhibitors should consider the multiple negative interactions between these two classes of drugs. PMID:25344523

  6. Antibody-mediated immunity in CFW mice infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium. Humoral immune response in murine leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Casoluengo-Méndez, M; Díaz, G V

    1976-01-01

    A depression in antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) measured both in terms of circulating antibody and plaque-forming cells in the spleen was observed in CFW mice infected with M. lepraemurium when sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and human gammaglobulin (HGG) were used as antigens. The impairment in AMI was evident only after 75 days of infection thereafter the antibody response to SRBC antigen progressively decreased until the last day of experimentation (135 days). Within the first 60 days of infection no alteration in AMI was observed with the HGG antigen while the response to the SRBC antigen was significantly higher in the infected animals than in uninfected controls. PMID:795574

  7. A systematic review of the role of C4d in the diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Sapir-Pichhadze, Ruth; Curran, Simon P; John, Rohan; Tricco, Andrea C; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Laupacis, Andreas; Tinckam, Kathryn; Sis, Banu; Beyene, Joseph; Logan, Alexander G; Kim, S Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we conducted a systematic review of the literature to re-evaluate the role of C4d in the diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection of kidney allografts. Electronic databases were searched until September 2013. Eligible studies allowed derivation of diagnostic tables for the performance of C4d by immunofluorescence or immunohistochemistry with comparison to histopathological features of acute antibody-mediated rejection and/or donor-specific antibody (DSA) assays. Of 3492 unique abstracts, 29 studies encompassing 3485 indication and 868 surveillance biopsies were identified. Assessment of C4d by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry exhibited slight to moderate agreement with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, solid-phase DSA assays, DSA with glomerulitis, and DSA with peritubular capillaritis. The sensitivity and specificity of C4d varied as a function of C4d and comparator test thresholds. Prognostically, the presence of C4d was associated with inferior allograft survival compared with DSA or histopathology alone. Thus, our findings support the presence of complement-dependent and -independent phenotypes of acute antibody-mediated rejection. Whether the presence of C4d in combination with histopathology or DSA should be considered for the diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection warrants further study. PMID:24827778

  8. Understanding the causes of kidney transplant failure: the dominant role of antibody-mediated rejection and nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; de Freitas, D G; Mengel, M; Reeve, J; Einecke, G; Sis, B; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K; Matas, A; Halloran, P F

    2012-02-01

    We prospectively studied kidney transplants that progressed to failure after a biopsy for clinical indications, aiming to assign a cause to every failure. We followed 315 allograft recipients who underwent indication biopsies at 6 days to 32 years posttransplant. Sixty kidneys progressed to failure in the follow-up period (median 31.4 months). Failure was rare after T-cell-mediated rejection and acute kidney injury and common after antibody-mediated rejection or glomerulonephritis. We developed rules for using biopsy diagnoses, HLA antibody and clinical data to explain each failure. Excluding four with missing information, 56 failures were attributed to four causes: rejection 36 (64%), glomerulonephritis 10 (18%), polyoma virus nephropathy 4 (7%) and intercurrent events 6 (11%). Every rejection loss had evidence of antibody-mediated rejection by the time of failure. Among rejection losses, 17 of 36 (47%) had been independently identified as nonadherent by attending clinicians. Nonadherence was more frequent in patients who progressed to failure (32%) versus those who survived (3%). Pure T-cell-mediated rejection, acute kidney injury, drug toxicity and unexplained progressive fibrosis were not causes of loss. This prospective cohort indicates that many actual failures after indication biopsies manifest phenotypic features of antibody-mediated or mixed rejection and also underscores the major role of nonadherence.

  9. Activation of NLRC4 downregulates TLR5-mediated antibody immune responses against flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yang, Jingyi; Zhang, Ejuan; Zhong, Maohua; Xiao, Yang; Yu, Jie; Zhou, Dihan; Cao, Yuan; Yang, Yi; Li, Yaoming; Yan, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial flagellin is a unique pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP), which can be recognized by surface localized Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) and the cytosolic NOD-like receptor (NLR) protein 4 (NLRC4) receptors. Activation of the TLR5 and/or NLRC4 signaling pathways by flagellin and the resulting immune responses play important roles in anti-bacterial immunity. However, it remains unclear how the dual activities of flagellin that activate the TLR5 and/or NLRC4 signaling pathways orchestrate the immune responses. In this study, we assessed the effects of flagellin and its mutants lacking the ability to activate TLR5 and NLRC4 alone or in combination on the adaptive immune responses against flagellin. Flagellin that was unable to activate NLRC4 induced a significantly higher antibody response than did wild-type flagellin. The increased antibody response could be eliminated when macrophages were depleted in vivo. The activation of NLRC4 by flagellin downregulated the flagellin-induced and TLR5-mediated immune responses against flagellin. PMID:25914934

  10. Late acute antibody mediated rejection after nine years of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Halim, Medhat Abdel; Al-Otaibi, Torki; Al-Waheeb, Salah; Tawab, Khaled Abdel; El Kholy, Osama; Nair, Prasad; Said, Tarek; Narayanan Nampoory, M R

    2010-11-01

    Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is rarely reported as a long-term com-plication of renal transplantation, and it can present on top of another chronic pathology affecting the graft. A 45-year-old gentleman with chronic kidney disease due to unknown etiology received renal transplantation from his sister with 4 HLA mismatches. He received antithymocte globulin induction therapy and was maintained on steroids, azathioprine (AZA) and cyclosporine A (CsA). Up to eight years post-transplantation he was clinically and biochemically stable. He lost follow-up for about one year, and then presented with nephritic nephrotic syndrome and rise of serum creatinine (SCr.) to 210 μmol/L. Graft biopsy revealed picture suggestive of acute AMR on top of de novo membranoprolipherative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) with focal crescent formation, diffuse immune complex deposition and peritubular capillaries C4d positivity. Anti-HLA donor specific antibodies were highly positive for B and T cells class I and class II. The patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and anti-CD20 (rituximab). AZA was changed to mycophenolate mofetil and CsA to tacrolimus. He had partial response, but SCr. continued at 220 μmol/L.

  11. Antibody-Mediated Oligodendrocyte Remyelination Promotes Axon Health in Progressive Demyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Watzlawik, Jens O; Warrington, Arthur E; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-10-01

    Demyelination underlies early neurological symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, axonal damage is considered critical for permanent chronic deficits. The precise mechanisms by which axonal injury occurs in MS are unclear; one hypothesis is the absence or failure of remyelination, suggesting that promoting remyelination may protect axons from death. This report provides direct evidence that promoting oligodendrocyte remyelination protects axons and maintains transport function. Persistent Theiler's virus infection of Swiss Jim Lambert (SJL)/J mice was used as a model of MS to assess the effects of remyelination on axonal injury following demyelination in the spinal cord. Remyelination was induced using an oligodendrocyte/myelin-specific recombinant human monoclonal IgM, rHIgM22. The antibody is endowed with strong anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative effects on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. We used (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at the brainstem to measure N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) as a surrogate of neuronal health and spinal cord integrity. We found increased brainstem NAA concentrations at 5 weeks post-treatment with rHIgM22, which remained stable out to 10 weeks. Detailed spinal cord morphology studies revealed enhanced remyelination in the rHIgM22-treated group but not in the isotype control antibody- or saline-treated groups. Importantly, we found rHIgM22-mediated remyelination protected small- and medium-caliber mid-thoracic spinal cord axons from damage despite similar demyelination and inflammation across all experimental groups. The most direct confirmation of remyelination-mediated protection of descending neurons was an improvement in retrograde transport. Treatment with rHIgM22 significantly increased the number of retrograde-labeled neurons in the brainstem, indicating that preserved axons are functionally competent. This is direct validation that remyelination preserves spinal cord axons and protects functional axon integrity

  12. Incidence of erythropoietin antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia: the Prospective Immunogenicity Surveillance Registry (PRIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Macdougall, Iain C.; Casadevall, Nicole; Locatelli, Francesco; Combe, Christian; London, Gerard M.; Di Paolo, Salvatore; Kribben, Andreas; Fliser, Danilo; Messner, Hans; McNeil, John; Stevens, Paul; Santoro, Antonio; De Francisco, Angel L.M.; Percheson, Paul; Potamianou, Anna; Foucher, Arnaud; Fife, Daniel; Mérit, Véronique; Vercammen, Els

    2015-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous administration of Eprex® (epoetin alfa) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) was contraindicated in the European Union between 2002 and 2006 after increased reports of anti-erythropoietin antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). The Prospective Immunogenicity Surveillance Registry (PRIMS) was conducted to estimate the incidence of antibody-mediated PRCA with subcutaneous administration of a new coated-stopper syringe presentation of Eprex® and to compare this with the PRCA incidence with subcutaneous NeoRecormon® (epoetin beta) and Aranesp® (darbepoetin alfa). Methods PRIMS was a multicentre, multinational, non-interventional, parallel-group, immunogenicity surveillance registry. Adults with CKD receiving or about to initiate subcutaneous Eprex®, NeoRecormon® or Aranesp® for anaemia were enrolled and followed for up to 3 years. Unexplained loss or lack of effect (LOE), including suspected PRCA, was reported, with antibody testing for confirmation of PRCA. Results Of the 15 333 patients enrolled, 5948 received Eprex® (8377 patient-years) and 9356 received NeoRecormon®/Aranesp® (14 286 patient-years). No treatment data were available for 29 patients. Among 23 patients with LOE, five cases of PRCA were confirmed (Eprex®, n = 3; NeoRecormon®, n = 1; Aranesp®, n = 1). Based on exposed time, PRCA incidence was 35.8/100 000 patient-years (95% CI 7.4–104.7) for Eprex® versus 14.0/100 000 patient-years (95% CI 1.7–50.6) for NeoRecormon®/Aranesp®. The incidence of PRCA with Eprex® was not significantly different versus comparator ESAs (rate ratio: 2.56; 95% CI 0.43–15.31). An analysis based on observed time produced similar findings. Conclusion This large, prospective registry demonstrates that PRCA is rare with subcutaneous administration of either the new coated-stopper syringe presentation of Eprex®, or NeoRecormon® or Aranesp®. PMID:25239637

  13. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of an anti-V antigen monoclonal antibody protects mice against a lethal Yersinia pestis challenge.

    PubMed

    Sofer-Podesta, Carolina; Ang, John; Hackett, Neil R; Senina, Svetlana; Perlin, David; Crystal, Ronald G; Boyer, Julie L

    2009-04-01

    Pneumonic plague, caused by inhalation of Yersinia pestis, represents a major bioterrorism threat for which no vaccine is available. Based on the knowledge that genetic delivery of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors results in rapid, high-level antibody expression, we evaluated the hypothesis that Ad-mediated delivery of a neutralizing antibody directed against the Y. pestis V antigen would protect mice against a Y. pestis challenge. MAbs specific for the Y. pestis V antigen were generated, and the most effective in protecting mice against a lethal intranasal Y. pestis challenge was chosen for further study. The coding sequences for the heavy and light chains were isolated from the corresponding hybridoma and inserted into a replication-defective serotype 5 human Ad gene transfer vector (AdalphaV). Western analysis of AdalphaV-infected cell supernatants demonstrated completely assembled antibodies reactive with V antigen. Following AdalphaV administration to mice, high levels of anti-V antigen antibody titers were detectable as early as 1 day postadministration, peaked by day 3, and remained detectable through a 12-week time course. When animals that received AdalphaV were challenged with Y. pestis at day 4 post-AdalphaV administration, 80% of the animals were protected, while 0% of control animals survived (P < 0.01). Ad-mediated delivery of a V antigen-neutralizing antibody is an effective therapy against plague in experimental animals and could be developed as a rapidly acting antiplague therapeutic.

  14. Decitabine enhances anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody BI 836858–mediated natural killer ADCC against AML blasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Sumithira; He, Shun; Cheney, Carolyn; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lozanski, Gerard; Mo, Xiaokui; Groh, Veronica; Whitman, Susan P.; Konopitzky, Renate; Kössl, Christian; Bucci, Donna; Lucas, David M.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Blum, William; Adam, Paul J.; Borges, Eric; Rueter, Bjoern; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia, affecting older individuals at a median age of 67 years. Resistance to intensive induction chemotherapy is the major cause of death in elderly AML; hence, novel treatment strategies are warranted. CD33-directed antibody-drug conjugates (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) have been shown to improve overall survival, validating CD33 as a target for antibody-based therapy of AML. Here, we report the in vitro efficacy of BI 836858, a fully human, Fc-engineered, anti-CD33 antibody using AML cell lines and primary AML blasts as targets. BI 836858–opsonized AML cells significantly induced both autologous and allogeneic natural killer (NK)-cell degranulation and NK-cell–mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro treatment of AML blasts with decitabine (DAC) or 5-azacytidine, 2 hypomethylating agents that show efficacy in older patients, did not compromise BI 836858–induced NK-cell–mediated ADCC. Evaluation of BI 836858–mediated ADCC in serial marrow AML aspirates in patients who received a 10-day course of DAC (pre-DAC, days 4, 11, and 28 post-DAC) revealed significantly higher ADCC in samples at day 28 post-DAC when compared with pre-DAC treatment. Analysis of ligands to activating receptors (NKG2D) showed significantly increased NKG2D ligand [NKG2DL] expression in day 28 post-DAC samples compared with pre-DAC samples; when NKG2DL receptor was blocked using antibodies, BI 836858–mediated ADCC was significantly decreased, suggesting that DAC enhances AML blast susceptibility to BI 836858 by upregulating NKG2DL. These data provide a rationale for combination therapy of Fc-engineered antibodies such as BI 836858 with azanucleosides in elderly patients with AML. PMID:27013443

  15. Antibody-Mediated Targeting of Tau In Vivo Does Not Require Effector Function and Microglial Engagement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hye; Le Pichon, Claire E; Adolfsson, Oskar; Gafner, Valérie; Pihlgren, Maria; Lin, Han; Solanoy, Hilda; Brendza, Robert; Ngu, Hai; Foreman, Oded; Chan, Ruby; Ernst, James A; DiCara, Danielle; Hotzel, Isidro; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Hansen, David V; Atwal, Jasvinder; Lu, Yanmei; Bumbaca, Daniela; Pfeifer, Andrea; Watts, Ryan J; Muhs, Andreas; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Ayalon, Gai

    2016-08-01

    The spread of tau pathology correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. In vitro, tau antibodies can block cell-to-cell tau spreading. Although mechanisms of anti-tau function in vivo are unknown, effector function might promote microglia-mediated clearance. In this study, we investigated whether antibody effector function is required for targeting tau. We compared efficacy in vivo and in vitro of two versions of the same tau antibody, with and without effector function, measuring tau pathology, neuron health, and microglial function. Both antibodies reduced accumulation of tau pathology in Tau-P301L transgenic mice and protected cultured neurons against extracellular tau-induced toxicity. Only the full-effector antibody enhanced tau uptake in cultured microglia, which promoted release of proinflammatory cytokines. In neuron-microglia co-cultures, only effectorless anti-tau protected neurons, suggesting full-effector tau antibodies can induce indirect toxicity via microglia. We conclude that effector function is not required for efficacy, and effectorless tau antibodies may represent a safer approach to targeting tau. PMID:27475227

  16. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-12-01

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a `handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the `handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing

  17. Antibodies directed against Integration Host Factor Mediate Biofilm Clearance from Nasopore®

    PubMed Central

    Brandstetter, Kathleyn A.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Goodman, Steven D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Das, Subinoy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Intranasal resorbable packing, such as Nasopore®, is commonly used during sinus surgery despite a paucity of evidence that demonstrates clinical benefit. We theorized that Nasopore supports bacterial growth and biofilm formation. The DNABII family of bacterial nucleic acid binding proteins stabilizes the extracellular polymeric substance of the biofilm, thus protecting bacteria from host defenses and traditional antibiotics. We tested the hypothesis that use of anti-IHF antibodies in conjunction with antibiotics would enhance biofilm eradication from Nasopore. Study Design In vitro experiments. Methods Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) biofilms were grown on Nasopore. Following 24-hour incubation, biofilms were incubated for an additional 16 hours with either: medium alone, naïve rabbit serum, rabbit anti-IHF serum, amoxicillin/clavulanate or anti-IHF serum + amoxicillin/clavulanate. COMSTAT analysis was performed on images of biofilms obtained via confocal microscopy. Results NTHI readily formed a biofilm on Nasopore. Treatment with amoxicillin/clavulanate alone mediated an increase in biomass by 92% to 6.63 μ2/μ3 compared to incubation in sterile medium alone (3.46 μ2/μ3). Treatment with anti-IHF alone reduced the biomass by 77% to 1.29 μ2/μ3 compared to incubation with naïve rabbit serum (5.53 μ2/μ3). Anti-IHF + amoxicillin/clavulanate reduced biomass by 88% to 0.66 μ2/μ3 (p<0.02) compared to incubation with naïve rabbit serum. Conclusion Antibiotics alone were ineffective in eradicating NTHI biofilms that had formed on Nasopore in vitro. Anti-IHF antibodies plus amoxicillin/clavulanate therapy synergistically reduced biofilm biomass by 88%. These data support clinical studies for the use of anti-IHF combined with antibiotics to reduce biofilm formation on intranasal packing. PMID:23670606

  18. Treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection using bortezomib: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yong-Hun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Joon Seok; Lee, Jin Ho; Kim, Seong Min; Kim, Joong Kyung

    2015-07-01

    Here we report the successful treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) with bortezomib. Bortezomib rescue treatment was administered after a 42-year-old woman failed to respond to steroid pulse and plasmapheresis with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The patient underwent a second renal transplantation with a deceased donor kidney. She was treated pre-operatively with rituximab (200 mg/body) and underwent plasmapheresis twice (day-1 and operation day) because ELISA screening revealed that her pre-operative peak panel reactive antibody (PRA) composition was 100% class I and 100% class II and 15 times of cross-match positive history during the waiting period for transplantation. The patients received induction therapy with Simulect (an IL-2-blocking agent). A 1-hour protocol biopsy revealed C4d-positivity and mild peritubular capillary inflammation. This was suggestive of early AMR-associated changes. After transplantation, the patient underwent plasmaphereses (nine times) with low-dose IVIG (2 mg/kg). Despite this treatment regimen, serum creatinine levels increased to 3.4 mg/dL on post-transplant day 15. A second graft biopsy was performed, which showed overt AMR with glomerulitis, peritubular capillary inflammation and no C4d deposition. On post-operative day (POD) 22, treatment with four doses of bortezomib (1.3 mg/m(2) ) was initiated with the patient's consent. On POD 55, renal function had recovered and serum creatinine was 1.5 mg/dL. In summary, bortezomib was administered as a rescue treatment for a patient who developed AMR that was refractory to a combination of plasmaphereses with low-dose IVIG and preemptive administration of rituximab.

  19. Histopathologic insights into the mechanism of anti-non-Gal antibody-mediated pig cardiac xenograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Guerard W; Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Tazelaar, Henry D; Ekser, Burcin; Pierson, Richard N; Robson, Simon C; Cooper, David K C; McGregor, Christopher G A

    2013-01-01

    The histopathology of cardiac xenograft rejection has evolved over the last 20 yr with the development of new modalities for limiting antibody-mediated injury, advancing regimens for immune suppression, and an ever-widening variety of new donor genetics. These new technologies have helped us progress from what was once an overwhelming anti-Gal-mediated hyperacute rejection to a more protracted anti-Gal-mediated vascular rejection to what is now a more complex manifestation of non-Gal humoral rejection and coagulation dysregulation. This review summarizes the changing histopathology of Gal- and non-Gal-mediated cardiac xenograft rejection and discusses the contributions of immune-mediated injury, species-specific immune-independent factors, transplant and therapeutic procedures, and donor genetics to the overall mechanism(s) of cardiac xenograft rejection. PMID:25098626

  20. Naturally occurring anti-band-3 antibodies and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, H.U.; Bussolino, F.; Flepp, R.; Fasler, S.; Stammler, P.; Kazatchkine, M.D.; Arese, P.

    1987-11-01

    Treatment of erythrocytes with the thiol-specific oxidant azodicarboxylic acid bis(dimethylamide) (diamide) enhances their phagocytosis by adherent monocytes. Phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes required that the cells were opsonized with whole serum, since complement inactivation abolished phagocytosis. Opsonization with whole serum containing 20-100 times the physiological concentration of naturally occurring anti-band-3- antibodies enhanced phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes. High inputs of anti-band-3 also restored phagocytosis of erythrocytes that had been incubated with complement-inactivated serum. Elevated concentrations of anti-spectrin antibodies were ineffective in whole and complement-inactivated serum. Specific recognition of diamide-treated erythrocytes by anti-band-3 antibodies may be due to generation of anti-band-3 reactive protein oligomers on intact diamide-treated erythrocytes. Generation of such oligomers was dose-dependent with respect to diamide. Bound anti-band-3 alone was not sufficient to mediate phagocytosis. It resulted in deposition of complement component C3b on the cells through activation of the alternative complement pathway in amounts exceeding that of bound antibodies by two orders of magnitude. Thus, anti-band-3 and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed erythrocytes, which simulate senescent erythrocytes with respect to bound antibody and complement.

  1. Anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by hyperimmune bovine colostrum IgG.

    PubMed

    Kramski, Marit; Lichtfuss, Gregor F; Navis, Marjon; Isitman, Gamze; Wren, Leia; Rawlin, Grant; Center, Rob J; Jaworowski, Anthony; Kent, Stephen J; Purcell, Damian F J

    2012-10-01

    Antibodies with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity play an important role in protection against HIV-1 infection, but generating sufficient amounts of antibodies to study their protective efficacy is difficult. HIV-specific IgG can be easily and inexpensively produced in large quantities using bovine colostrum. We previously vaccinated cows with HIV-1 envelope gp140 and elicited high titers of anti-gp140-binding IgG in colostrum. In the present study, we determined whether bovine antibodies would also demonstrate specific cytotoxic activity. We found that bovine IgG bind to Fcγ-receptors (FcγRs) on human neutrophils, monocytes, and NK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Antibody-dependent killing was observed in the presence of anti-HIV-1 colostrum IgG but not nonimmune colostrum IgG. Killing was dependent on Fc and FcγR interaction since ADDC activity was not seen with F(ab')(2) fragments. ADCC activity was primarily mediated by CD14(+) monocytes with FcγRIIa (CD32a) as the major receptor responsible for monocyte-mediated ADCC in response to bovine IgG. In conclusion, we demonstrate that bovine anti-HIV colostrum IgG have robust HIV-1-specific ADCC activity and therefore offer a useful source of antibodies able to provide a rapid and potent response against HIV-1 infection. This could assist the development of novel Ab-mediated approaches for prevention of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:22730083

  2. Nitric oxide hinders antibody clearance from the surface of Trypanoplasma borreli and increases susceptibility to complement-mediated lysis.

    PubMed

    Forlenza, Maria; Nakao, Miki; Wibowo, Indra; Joerink, Maaike; Arts, Joop A J; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Wiegertjes, Geert F

    2009-10-01

    Trypanoplasma borreli is an extracellular blood parasite of carp belonging to the same Order (Kinetoplastida) as African trypanosomes. These mammalian parasites have developed different strategies to evade the host immune system including antigenic variation, immunosuppression and clearance of surface-bound antibodies. The latter mechanism allows trypanosomes to use their swimming movement to cause surface-bound antibodies to 'sail' and accumulate at the posterior end of the parasite, to be internalized via the flagellar pocket and be degraded. There is no evidence that T. borreli shows antigenic variation, but during the late phases of infection NO-mediated immunosuppression is observed. High levels of nitric oxide (NO) lead to extensive tissue nitration whereas the parasite itself is not affected. Therefore, the induction of NO has thus far been considered a parasite-driven response with immunosuppressive effects. In the present study, we show that the induction of NO, particularly during the early phase of T. borreli infections, should be re-considered an effective part of the host immune response. We show that T. borreli rapidly removes surface-bound IgM. In addition, moderate concentrations of NO, by hindering surface antibody clearance, maintain high the concentrations of membrane-bound IgM, thereby favoring antibody-dependent complement-mediated parasite lysis. We performed a comprehensive quantitative gene expression analysis of in total seven different complement factors involved in all three activation pathways, differentiating between 1 and 4 isoforms for each complement gene. Our gene expression analysis supports an important role for antibody-dependent complement-mediated lysis of T. borreliin vivo. To our knowledge, NO-dependent inhibition of antibody clearance from the surface of kinetoplastid parasites has not been investigated. Our data support a role for NO as an important player in host-parasite interactions, not only as immune suppressor (late

  3. Cefditoren and Ceftriaxone Enhance Complement-Mediated Immunity in the Presence of Specific Antibodies against Antibiotic-Resistant Pneumococcal Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Rodríguez-Sosa, Cinthya; Cafini, Fabio; Giménez, Maria-Jose; Navarro, Ana; Sevillano, David; Alou, Luis; García, Ernesto; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Yuste, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Background Specific antibodies mediate humoral and cellular protection against invading pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae by activating complement mediated immunity, promoting phagocytosis and stimulating bacterial clearance. The emergence of pneumococcal strains with high levels of antibiotic resistance is of great concern worldwide and a serious threat for public health. Methodology/Principal Findings Flow cytometry was used to determine whether complement-mediated immunity against three antibiotic-resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates is enhanced in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefditoren and ceftriaxone. The binding of acute phase proteins such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component, and of complement component C1q, to pneumococci was enhanced in the presence of serum plus either of these antibiotics. Both antibiotics therefore trigger the activation of the classical complement pathway against S. pneumoniae. C3b deposition was also increased in the presence of specific anti-pneumococcal antibodies and sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefditoren and ceftriaxone confirming that the presence of these antibiotics enhances complement-mediated immunity to S. pneumoniae. Conclusions/Significance Using cefditoren and ceftriaxone to promote the binding of acute phase proteins and C1q to pneumococci, and to increase C3b deposition, when anti-pneumococcal antibodies are present, might help reduce the impact of antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae infections. PMID:22957048

  4. The specialized proresolving mediator 17-HDHA enhances the antibody-mediated immune response against influenza virus: Anew class of adjuvant?a

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Sesquile; Baker, Steven F.; Sahler, Julie M.; Kim, Nina; Feldsott, Eric A.; Serhan, Charles N.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses remain a critical global health concern. More efficacious vaccines are needed to protect against influenza virus, yet few adjuvants are approved for routine use. Specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) are powerful endogenous bioactive regulators of inflammation, with great clinical translational properties. Here, we investigated the ability of the SPM 17-HDHA to enhance the adaptive immune response using an OVA immunization model and a pre-clinical influenza vaccination mouse model. Our findings revealed that mice immunized with OVA plus 17-HDHA or with H1N1-derived HA protein plus 17-HDHA increased antigen-specific antibody titers. 17-HDHA increased the number of antibody-secreting cells in vitro as well as the number of HA-specific antibody secreting cells present in the bone marrow. Importantly, the 17-HDHA-mediated increased antibody production was more protective against live pH1N1 influenza infection in mice. This is the first report on the biological effects of omega-3-derived SPMs on the humoral immune response. These findings illustrate a previously unknown biological link between proresolution signals and the adaptive immune system. Furthermore, this work has important implications for the understanding of B cell biology, as well as the development of new potential vaccine adjuvants. PMID:25392529

  5. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif A; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR. PMID:27606122

  6. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saif A.; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR.

  7. Anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody promotes bone fracture healing through regulating IL-20-mediated osteoblastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Chiu, Yi-Shu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Jou, I-Ming; Wu, Po-Tin; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Ming-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and skeletal fragility in bone fracture are caused by an imbalance in bone remodeling. The current challenge in bone fracture healing is to promote osteoblastogenesis and bone formation. We aimed to explore the role of IL-20 in osteoblastogenesis, osteoblast differentiation and bone fracture. Serum IL-20 was significantly correlated with serum sclerostin in patients with bone fracture. In a mouse model, anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 7E increased bone formation during fracture healing. In vitro, IL-20 inhibited osteoblastogenesis by upregulating sclerostin, and downregulating osterix (OSX), RUNX2, and osteoprotegerin (OPG). IL-20R1 deficiency attenuated IL-20-mediated inhibition of osteoblast differentiation and maturation and reduced the healing time after a bone fracture. We conclude that IL-20 affects bone formation and downregulates osteoblastogenesis by modulating sclerostin, OSX, RUNX2, and OPG on osteoblasts. Our results demonstrated that IL-20 is involved in osteoregulation and anti-IL-20 mAb is a potential therapeutic for treating bone fracture or metabolic bone diseases. PMID:27075747

  8. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saif A.; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR. PMID:27606122

  9. Banff 2011 Meeting report: new concepts in antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Mengel, M; Sis, B; Haas, M; Colvin, R B; Halloran, P F; Racusen, L C; Solez, K; Cendales, L; Demetris, A J; Drachenberg, C B; Farver, C F; Rodriguez, E R; Wallace, W D; Glotz, D

    2012-03-01

    The 11th Banff meeting was held in Paris, France, from June 5 to 10, 2011, with a focus on refining diagnostic criteria for antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). The major outcome was the acknowledgment of C4d-negative ABMR in kidney transplants. Diagnostic criteria for ABMR have also been revisited in other types of transplants. It was recognized that ABMR is associated with heterogeneous phenotypes even within the same type of transplant. This highlights the necessity of further refining the respective diagnostic criteria, and is of particular significance for the design of randomized clinical trials. A reliable phenotyping will allow for definition of robust end-points. To address this unmet need and to allow for an evidence-based refinement of the Banff classification, Banff Working Groups presented multicenter data regarding the reproducibility of features relevant to the diagnosis of ABMR. However, the consensus was that more data are necessary and further Banff Working Group activities were initiated. A new Banff working group was created to define diagnostic criteria for ABMR in kidneys independent of C4d. Results are expected to be presented at the 12th Banff meeting to be held in 2013 in Brazil. No change to the Banff classification occurred in 2011. PMID:22300494

  10. Antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae-infected and bacterin-vaccinated pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Furesz, S E; Mallard, B A; Bossé, J T; Rosendal, S; Wilkie, B N; MacInnes, J I

    1997-01-01

    Current porcine pleuropneumonia bacterins afford only partial protection by decreasing mortality but not morbidity. In order to better understand the type(s) of immune response associated with protection, antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses (CMIR) were compared for piglets before and after administration of a commercial bacterin, which confers partial protection, or a low-dose (10(5) CFU/ml) aerosol challenge with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae CM5 (LD), which induces complete protection. Control groups received phosphate-buffered saline or adjuvant. Serum antibody response, antibody avidity, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), and lymphocyte blastogenic responses were measured and compared among treatment groups to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), capsular polysaccharide (CPS), hemolysin (HLY), and outer membrane proteins (OMP) of A. pleuropneumoniae. Peripheral blood lymphocytes and sera were collected prior to and following primary and secondary immunization-infection and high-dose A. pleuropneumoniae CM5 (10(7) CFU/ml) aerosol challenge. Serum antibody and DTH, particularly that to HLY, differed significantly between treatment groups, and increases were associated with protection. LD-infected piglets had higher antibody responses (P < or = 0.01) and antibody avidity (P < or = 0.10) than bacterin-vaccinated and control groups. Anti-HLY antibodies were consistently associated with protection, whereas anti-LPS and anti-CPS antibodies were not. LD-infected animals had higher DTH responses, particularly to HLY, than bacterin-vaccinated pigs (P < or = 0.03). The LD-infected group maintained consistent blastogenic responses to HLY, LPS, CPS, and OMP over the course of infection, unlike the bacterin-vaccinated and control animals. These data suggest that the immune responses induced by a commercial bacterin are very different from those induced by LD aerosol infection and that current bacterins may be modified, for instance, by addition of HLY, so as to

  11. Conformational Masking and Receptor-Dependent Unmasking of Highly Conserved Env Epitopes Recognized by Non-Neutralizing Antibodies That Mediate Potent ADCC against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Finzi, Andrés; DeVico, Anthony L; Pazgier, Marzena

    2015-09-01

    The mechanism of antibody-mediated protection is a major focus of HIV-1 vaccine development and a significant issue in the control of viremia. Virus neutralization, Fc-mediated effector function, or both, are major mechanisms of antibody-mediated protection against HIV-1, although other mechanisms, such as virus aggregation, are known. The interplay between virus neutralization and Fc-mediated effector function in protection against HIV-1 is complex and only partially understood. Passive immunization studies using potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) show that both neutralization and Fc-mediated effector function provides the widest dynamic range of protection; however, a vaccine to elicit these responses remains elusive. By contrast, active immunization studies in both humans and non-human primates using HIV-1 vaccine candidates suggest that weakly neutralizing or non-neutralizing antibodies can protect by Fc-mediated effector function, albeit with a much lower dynamic range seen for passive immunization with bnAbs. HIV-1 has evolved mechanisms to evade each type of antibody-mediated protection that must be countered by a successful AIDS vaccine. Overcoming the hurdles required to elicit bnAbs has become a major focus of HIV-1 vaccine development. Here, we discuss a less studied problem, the structural basis of protection (and its evasion) by antibodies that protect only by potent Fc-mediated effector function. PMID:26393642

  12. Influence of IgG Subclass on Human Antimannan Antibody-Mediated Resistance to Hematogenously Disseminated Candidiasis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nishiya, Casey T; Boxx, Gayle M; Robison, Kerry; Itatani, Carol; Kozel, Thomas R; Zhang, Mason X

    2015-11-16

    Candida albicans is a yeast-like pathogen and can cause life-threatening systemic candidiasis. Its cell surface is enriched with mannan that is resistant to complement activation. Previously, we developed the recombinant human IgG1 antimannan antibody M1g1. M1g1 was found to promote complement activation and phagocytosis and protect mice from systemic candidiasis. Here, we evaluate the influence of IgG subclass on antimannan antibody-mediated protection. Three IgG subclass variants of M1g1 were constructed: M1g2, M1g3, and M1g4. The IgG subclass identity for each variant was confirmed with DNA sequence and subclass-specific antibodies. These variants contain identical M1 Fabs and exhibited similar binding affinities for C. albicans yeast and purified mannan. Yeast cells and hyphae recovered from the kidney of antibody-treated mice with systemic candidiasis showed uniform binding of each variant, indicating constitutive expression of the M1 epitope and antibody opsonization in the kidney. All variants promoted deposition of both murine and human C3 onto the yeast cell surface, with M1g4 showing delayed activation, as determined by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. M1g4-mediated complement activation was found to be associated with its M1 Fab that activates the alternative pathway in an Fc-independent manner. Treatment with each subclass variant extended the survival of mice with systemic candidiasis (P < 0.001). However, treatment with M1g1, M1g3, or M1g4, but not with M1g2, also reduced the kidney fungal burden (P < 0.001). Thus, the role of human antimannan antibody in host resistance to systemic candidiasis is influenced by its IgG subclass.

  13. Chimeric Antibody c.8B6 to O-Acetyl-GD2 Mediates the Same Efficient Anti-Neuroblastoma Effects as Therapeutic ch14.18 Antibody to GD2 without Antibody Induced Allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Cochonneau, Denis; Chaumette, Tanguy; Xiao, Wenhua; Diccianni, Mitchell B.; Barbet, Jacques; Yu, Alice L.; Paris, François; Sorkin, Linda S.; Birklé, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti-GD2 antibody is a proven therapy for GD2-postive neuroblastoma. Monoclonal antibodies against GD2, such as chimeric mAb ch14.18, have become benchmarks for neuroblastoma therapies. Pain, however, can limit immunotherapy with anti-GD2 therapeutic antibodies like ch14.18. This adverse effect is attributed to acute inflammation via complement activation on GD2-expressing nerves. Thus, new strategies are needed for the development of treatment intensification strategies to improve the outcome of these patients. Methodology/Principal Findings We established the mouse-human chimeric antibody c.8B6 specific to OAcGD2 in order to reduce potential immunogenicity in patients and to fill the need for a selective agent that can kill neuroblastoma cells without inducing adverse neurological side effects caused by anti-GD2 antibody immunotherapy. We further analyzed some of its functional properties compared with anti-GD2 ch14.18 therapeutic antibody. With the exception of allodynic activity, we found that antibody c.8B6 shares the same anti-neuroblastoma attributes as therapeutic ch14.18 anti-GD2 mAb when tested in cell-based assay and in vivo in an animal model. Conclusion/Significance The absence of OAcGD2 expression on nerve fibers and the lack of allodynic properties of c.8B6–which are believed to play a major role in mediating anti-GD2 mAb dose-limiting side effects–provide an important rationale for the clinical application of c.8B6 in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. PMID:24520328

  14. LGR5 expressing cells of hair follicle as potential targets for antibody mediated anti-cancer laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris V.

    2013-02-01

    Near infrared laser immunotherapy becomes now a new promising research field to cure the patients with cancers. One of the critical limitation in medical application of this treatment is availability of the specific markers for delivery of laser-sensitive nanoparticles. When coupled to antibodies to the cancer stem cells markers these nanoparticles may be delivered to the cancer tissue and mediate the laser induced thermolysis of the cancer stem cells that initiate and drive growth of cancer. This paper addresses the Lgr5 cell surface marker mediating the Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction as a potential target for anti-cancer laser immunotherapy of skin cancers.

  15. C6 knock-out Mice Are Protected from Thrombophilia Mediated by Antiphospholipid Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Carrera-Marín Ana; Zurina, Romay-Penabad; Elizabeth, Papalardo; Elba, Reyes-Maldonado; Ethel, Garcia-Latorre; Gracie, Vargas; Tuya, Shilagard; Silvia, Pierangeli

    2013-01-01

    Background Complement activation plays a role in pathogenesis of the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS), but the involvement of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex (MAC) is unknown. Here we studied the effects of human polyclonal antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies on thrombosis and tissue factor (TF) up-regulation in C6 deficient (C6-/-) mice. Methods C6-/- or the wild-type (C3H/HeJ) C6+/+ mice were injected twice with IgG-APS (n=2) or IgM-APS (n=1) isolated from APS patients or with the corresponding control Igs (IgG-NHS or IgM-NHS). Then, the size of induced thrombi in the femoral vein were determined 72 hours after the first injection. Tissue factor was determined in homogenates of carotid arteries and in peritoneal macrophages. Results Thrombus sizes were significantly larger in C6+/+ treated with IgG-APS1 or with IgG-APS2 or with IgM-APS when compared with C6+/+ mice treated with IgG-NHS or with IgM-NHS, respectively. The sizes of thrombi were significantly smaller in the C6-/- mice injected with IgG-APS1, IgG-APS2 or IgM-APS (p<0.001), compared to their C6+/+ counterparts showing an important abrogation of thrombus formation in mice lacking C6. The TF expression and activity in the C6-/- mice treated with IgG-APS were diminished when compared to C6+/+ treated with the same immunoglobulins. All mice injected with IgG-APS and IgM-APS had medium-high titers of aCL and aβ2GPI antibodies. Conclusions These data indicate that the C6 component of the complement system mediates aPL-thrombogenic effects, underscoring an important pathogenic mechanism and indicating the possibility of inhibiting complement to ameliorate APS-related manifestations. PMID:22933620

  16. Coincidence of cellular and antibody mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients - preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Zakliczyński, Michał; Nożyński, Jerzy; Konecka-Mrówka, Dominika; Babińska, Agnieszka; Flak, Bożena; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-03-01

    Antibody mediated rejection (AMR) can significantly influence the results of orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). However, AMR and cellular rejection (CR) coexistence is poorly described. Therefore we performed a prospective pilot study to assess AMR/CR concomitance in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) obtained electively in 27 OHT recipients (21 M/6 F, 45.4 ± 14.4 y/o). Biopsy samples were paraffin embedded and processed typically with hematoxylin/eosin staining to assess CR, and, if a sufficient amount of material remained, treated with immunohistochemical methods to localize particles C3d and C4d as markers of antibody dependent complement activation. With this approach 80 EMBs, including 41 (51%) harvested within the first month after OHT, were qualified for the study. Among them 14 (18%) were C3d+, 37 (46%) were C4d+, and 12 (15%) were both C3d and C4d positive. At least one C3d+, C4d+, and C3d/C4d+ EMB was found in 10 (37%), 17 (63%), and 8 (30%) patients, respectively. Among 37 CR0 EMBs C3d was observed in 4 (11%), C4d in 17 (46%), and both C3d/C4d in 3 (8%) cases. Among 28 CR1 EMBs C3d was observed in 3 (11%), C4d in 11 (39%), and C3d/C4d in 3 (11%) cases. Among 15 CR2 EMBs C3d was observed in 7 (47%), C4d in 9 (60%), and C3d/C4d in 6 (40%) cases. Differences in C3d and C3d/C4d occurrence between grouped CR0-1 EMBs and CR2 EMBs (7/65 - 11% vs. 7/15 - 47%; 6/65 - 9% vs. 6/15 - 40%) were significant (p = 0.0035 and p = 0.0091, respectively, χ(2) test). In conclusion, apparently frequent CR and AMR coexistence demonstrated in this preliminary study warrants further investigation in this field. PMID:26336395

  17. Coincidence of cellular and antibody mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients – preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Nożyński, Jerzy; Konecka-Mrówka, Dominika; Babińska, Agnieszka; Flak, Bożena; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Antibody mediated rejection (AMR) can significantly influence the results of orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). However, AMR and cellular rejection (CR) coexistence is poorly described. Therefore we performed a prospective pilot study to assess AMR/CR concomitance in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) obtained electively in 27 OHT recipients (21 M/6 F, 45.4 ± 14.4 y/o). Biopsy samples were paraffin embedded and processed typically with hematoxylin/eosin staining to assess CR, and, if a sufficient amount of material remained, treated with immunohistochemical methods to localize particles C3d and C4d as markers of antibody dependent complement activation. With this approach 80 EMBs, including 41 (51%) harvested within the first month after OHT, were qualified for the study. Among them 14 (18%) were C3d+, 37 (46%) were C4d+, and 12 (15%) were both C3d and C4d positive. At least one C3d+, C4d+, and C3d/C4d+ EMB was found in 10 (37%), 17 (63%), and 8 (30%) patients, respectively. Among 37 CR0 EMBs C3d was observed in 4 (11%), C4d in 17 (46%), and both C3d/C4d in 3 (8%) cases. Among 28 CR1 EMBs C3d was observed in 3 (11%), C4d in 11 (39%), and C3d/C4d in 3 (11%) cases. Among 15 CR2 EMBs C3d was observed in 7 (47%), C4d in 9 (60%), and C3d/C4d in 6 (40%) cases. Differences in C3d and C3d/C4d occurrence between grouped CR0-1 EMBs and CR2 EMBs (7/65 – 11% vs. 7/15 – 47%; 6/65 – 9% vs. 6/15 – 40%) were significant (p = 0.0035 and p = 0.0091, respectively, χ2 test). In conclusion, apparently frequent CR and AMR coexistence demonstrated in this preliminary study warrants further investigation in this field. PMID:26336395

  18. Anti-Sp17 monoclonal antibody with antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity activities against human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Jia-xi; Cao, Wang-li; Li, Fang-qiu; Shi, Li-ning; Jia, Xuan

    2012-12-01

    Sperm protein 17 (Sp17) is a cancer testis antigen that has been shown to be overexpressed in a variety of gynecologic malignancies, in particular ovarian cancer. Emerging evidences indicate that Sp17 is involved in tumorigenesis and in the migration of malignant cells. It has been proposed as a useful target for tumor-vaccine strategies and a novel marker to define tumor subsets and predict drug response. However, the antitumor activity of anti-Sp17 monoclonal antibody (anti-Sp17 mAb) has not been investigated. In this study, the in vitro cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) activities of anti-Sp17 mAb were evaluated using Sp17-positive ovarian cancer cells as targets, Sp17-negative ovarian cancer cells as the control, and healthy human peripheral blood monocytes and healthy human serum as effectors. Our preliminary results indicate that the direct cytotoxicity of anti-Sp17 mAb against the investigated ovarian cancer cells was very weak. However, the cytotoxicity of anti-Sp17 mAb, mediated by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as ADCC, or by human serum, as CDC, was relatively strong in the Sp17-positive ovarian cancer cells. This finding suggested that anti-Sp17 mAb could be a useful tool against ovarian cancer and may provide insight into the development of low side-effect targeting therapy for this malignant disease.

  19. Enhanced killing of chordoma cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity employing the novel anti-PD-L1 antibody avelumab.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Rika; Friedman, Eitan R; Richards, Jacob; Tsang, Kwong Y; Heery, Christopher R; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W

    2016-06-01

    Chordoma, a rare bone tumor derived from the notochord, has been shown to be resistant to conventional therapies. Checkpoint inhibition has shown great promise in immune-mediated therapy of diverse cancers. The anti-PD-L1 mAb avelumab is unique among checkpoint inhibitors in that it is a fully human IgG1 capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of PD-L1-expressing tumor cells. Here, we investigated avelumab as a potential therapy for chordoma. We examined 4 chordoma cell lines, first for expression of PD-L1, and in vitro for ADCC killing using NK cells and avelumab. PD-L1 expression was markedly upregulated by IFN-γ in all 4 chordoma cell lines, which significantly increased sensitivity to ADCC. Brachyury is a transcription factor that is uniformly expressed in chordoma. Clinical trials are ongoing in which chordoma patients are treated with brachyury-specific vaccines. Co-incubating chordoma cells with brachyury-specific CD8+ T cells resulted in significant upregulation of PD-L1 on the tumor cells, mediated by the CD8+ T cells' IFN-γ production, and increased sensitivity of chordoma cells to avelumab-mediated ADCC. Residential cancer stem cell subpopulations of chordoma cells were also killed by avelumab-mediated ADCC to the same degree as non-cancer stem cell populations. These findings suggest that as a monotherapy for chordoma, avelumab may enable endogenous NK cells, while in combination with T-cell immunotherapy, such as a vaccine, avelumab may enhance NK-cell killing of chordoma cells via ADCC.

  20. Enhanced killing of chordoma cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity employing the novel anti-PD-L1 antibody avelumab

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Rika; Friedman, Eitan R.; Richards, Jacob; Tsang, Kwong Y.; Heery, Christopher R.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Chordoma, a rare bone tumor derived from the notochord, has been shown to be resistant to conventional therapies. Checkpoint inhibition has shown great promise in immune-mediated therapy of diverse cancers. The anti-PD-L1 mAb avelumab is unique among checkpoint inhibitors in that it is a fully human IgG1 capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of PD-L1-expressing tumor cells. Here, we investigated avelumab as a potential therapy for chordoma. We examined 4 chordoma cell lines, first for expression of PD-L1, and in vitro for ADCC killing using NK cells and avelumab. PD-L1 expression was markedly upregulated by IFN-γ in all 4 chordoma cell lines, which significantly increased sensitivity to ADCC. Brachyury is a transcription factor that is uniformly expressed in chordoma. Clinical trials are ongoing in which chordoma patients are treated with brachyury-specific vaccines. Co-incubating chordoma cells with brachyury-specific CD8+ T cells resulted in significant upregulation of PD-L1 on the tumor cells, mediated by the CD8+ T cells' IFN-γ production, and increased sensitivity of chordoma cells to avelumab-mediated ADCC. Residential cancer stem cell subpopulations of chordoma cells were also killed by avelumab-mediated ADCC to the same degree as non-cancer stem cell populations. These findings suggest that as a monotherapy for chordoma, avelumab may enable endogenous NK cells, while in combination with T-cell immunotherapy, such as a vaccine, avelumab may enhance NK-cell killing of chordoma cells via ADCC. PMID:27172898

  1. Markers of Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition: Evidence for Antibody-Endothelium Interaction during Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Recipients.

    PubMed

    Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; Peltier, Julie; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Suberbielle-Boissel, Caroline; Djamali, Arjang; Reese, Shannon; Mooney, Nuala; Keuylian, Zela; Lion, Julien; Ouali, Nacéra; Levy, Pierre P; Jouanneau, Chantal; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a leading cause of allograft loss. Treatment efficacy depends on accurate diagnosis at an early stage. However, sensitive and reliable markers of antibody-endothelium interaction during ABMR are not available for routine use. Using immunohistochemistry, we retrospectively studied the diagnostic value of three markers of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47, for ABMR in 53 renal transplant biopsy specimens, including 20 ABMR specimens, 24 cell-mediated rejection specimens, and nine normal grafts. We validated our results in an independent set of 74 unselected biopsy specimens. Endothelial cells of the peritubular capillaries in grafts with ABMR expressed fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47 strongly, whereas those from normal renal grafts did not. The level of EndMT marker expression was significantly associated with current ABMR criteria, including capillaritis, glomerulitis, peritubular capillary C4d deposition, and donor-specific antibodies. These markers allowed us to identify C4d-negative ABMR and to predict late occurrence of disease. EndMT markers were more specific than capillaritis for the diagnosis and prognosis of ABMR and predicted late (up to 4 years after biopsy) renal graft dysfunction and proteinuria. In the independent set of 74 renal graft biopsy specimens, the EndMT markers for the diagnosis of ABMR had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85%. Fascin1 expression in peritubular capillaries was also induced in a rat model of ABMR. In conclusion, EndMT markers are a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for detecting endothelial activation during ABMR and predicting late loss of allograft function.

  2. Markers of Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition: Evidence for Antibody-Endothelium Interaction during Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Recipients.

    PubMed

    Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; Peltier, Julie; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Suberbielle-Boissel, Caroline; Djamali, Arjang; Reese, Shannon; Mooney, Nuala; Keuylian, Zela; Lion, Julien; Ouali, Nacéra; Levy, Pierre P; Jouanneau, Chantal; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a leading cause of allograft loss. Treatment efficacy depends on accurate diagnosis at an early stage. However, sensitive and reliable markers of antibody-endothelium interaction during ABMR are not available for routine use. Using immunohistochemistry, we retrospectively studied the diagnostic value of three markers of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47, for ABMR in 53 renal transplant biopsy specimens, including 20 ABMR specimens, 24 cell-mediated rejection specimens, and nine normal grafts. We validated our results in an independent set of 74 unselected biopsy specimens. Endothelial cells of the peritubular capillaries in grafts with ABMR expressed fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47 strongly, whereas those from normal renal grafts did not. The level of EndMT marker expression was significantly associated with current ABMR criteria, including capillaritis, glomerulitis, peritubular capillary C4d deposition, and donor-specific antibodies. These markers allowed us to identify C4d-negative ABMR and to predict late occurrence of disease. EndMT markers were more specific than capillaritis for the diagnosis and prognosis of ABMR and predicted late (up to 4 years after biopsy) renal graft dysfunction and proteinuria. In the independent set of 74 renal graft biopsy specimens, the EndMT markers for the diagnosis of ABMR had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85%. Fascin1 expression in peritubular capillaries was also induced in a rat model of ABMR. In conclusion, EndMT markers are a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for detecting endothelial activation during ABMR and predicting late loss of allograft function. PMID:25995444

  3. Disialoganglioside GD2 on human neuroblastoma cells: target antigen for monoclonal antibody-mediated cytolysis and suppression of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Mujoo, K; Cheresh, D A; Yang, H M; Reisfeld, R A

    1987-02-15

    A murine monoclonal antibody 14.18 specifically recognizes disialoganglioside GD2, the major ganglioside expressed on the surface of human neuroblastoma cells. This monoclonal antibody (Mab) is of immunoglobulin G3 isotype, has an affinity constant (KA) of 3.5 X 10(8) M-1, and reacts preferentially with tumor cells and fresh frozen tumor tissues of neuroectodermal origin in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoperoxidase assays, respectively. Mab 14.18 effectively lyses a number of human neuroblastoma cell lines by two distinct mechanisms, i.e., antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. There is a good correlation between the average number of antibody-binding sites per neuroblastoma cell and the amount of cell lysis observed in complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In addition, Mab 14.18 suppresses establishment as well as growth of progressively growing, established human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice when injected 24 h and 9 days, respectively, after the initial s.c. inoculation of tumor cells. These data suggest that Mab 14.18 can mediate tumor cell killing in vivo and in vitro and may thereby prove useful for immunotherapy of human neuroblastoma.

  4. Antibody-Mediated Fcγ Receptor-Based Mechanisms of HIV Inhibition: Recent Findings and New Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Holl, Vincent; Peressin, Maryse; Moog, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic is one of the most devastating pandemics worldwide. Today, the major route of infection by HIV is sexual transmission. One of the most promising strategies for vaccination against HIV sexual infection is the development of a mucosal vaccine, which should be able to induce strong local and systemic protective immunity. It is believed that both humoral and cellular immune responses are needed for inducing a sterilizing protection against HIV. Recently, passive administration of monoclonal neutralizing antibodies in macaques infected by vaginal challenge demonstrated a crucial role of FcγRs in the protection afforded by these antibodies. This questioned about the role of innate and adaptive immune functions, including ADCC, ADCVI, phagocytosis of opsonized HIV particles and the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, in the mechanism of HIV inhibition in vivo. Other monoclonal antibodies - non-neutralizing inhibitory antibodies - which recognize immunogenic epitopes, have been shown to display potent FcγRs-dependent inhibition of HIV replication in vitro. The potential role of these antibodies in protection against sexual transmission of HIV and their biological relevance for the development of an HIV vaccine therefore need to be determined. This review highlights the potential role of FcγRs-mediated innate and adaptive immune functions in the mechanism of HIV protection. PMID:21994593

  5. Enzyme-mediated methodology for the site-specific radiolabeling of antibodies based on catalyst-free click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zeglis, Brian M; Davis, Charles B; Aggeler, Robert; Kang, Hee Chol; Chen, Aimei; Agnew, Brian J; Lewis, Jason S

    2013-06-19

    An enzyme- and click chemistry-mediated methodology for the site-selective radiolabeling of antibodies on the heavy chain glycans has been developed and validated. To this end, a model system based on the prostate specific membrane antigen-targeting antibody J591, the positron-emitting radiometal (89)Zr, and the chelator desferrioxamine has been employed. The methodology consists of four steps: (1) the removal of sugars on the heavy chain region of the antibody to expose terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues; (2) the incorporation of azide-modified N-acetylgalactosamine monosaccharides into the glycans of the antibody; (3) the catalyst-free click conjugation of desferrioxamine-modified dibenzocyclooctynes to the azide-bearing sugars; and (4) the radiolabeling of the chelator-modified antibody with (89)Zr. The site-selective labeling methodology has proven facile, reproducible, and robust, producing (89)Zr-labeled radioimmunoconjguates that display high stability and immunoreactivity in vitro (>95%) in addition to highly selective tumor uptake (67.5 ± 5.0%ID/g) and tumor-to-background contrast in athymic nude mice bearing PSMA-expressing subcutaneous LNCaP xenografts. Ultimately, this strategy could play a critical role in the development of novel well-defined and highly immunoreactive radioimmunoconjugates for both the laboratory and clinic.

  6. The role of apoptosis in bispecific antibody-mediated T-cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Kroesen, B. J.; Wellenberg, G. J.; Bakker, A.; Helfrich, W.; The, T. H.; de Leij, L.

    1996-01-01

    In this report we describe the role of apoptosis in the process of tumour cell killing by bispecific monoclonal antibody (BsMAb)-redirected cytolytic T cells. The BsMAb used, BIS-1, has dual specificity for the CD3 complex on T cells and the pancarcinoma-associated 38 kDa transmembrane antigen EGP-2. BIS-1 allows activated T cells to specifically recognise and kill EGP-2-positive but not EGP-2-negative target cells. An assay was developed to quantify apoptosis in cells by separation of 3H-thymidine-labelled low-molecular, i.e. fragmented, from high-molecular, i.e. non-fragmented DNA. The presence of low molecular weight DNA was measured both within the target cells and in the cell-free supernatant. After exposure to BIS-1-redirected, -activated T cells, apoptosis was observed in EGP-2-positive target cells but not in EGP-2-negative target cells. Also no DNA fragmentation proved to be induced in the activated effector cells during assay. The degree of EGP-2-positive target DNA fragmentation depended on the concentration of BsMAb, the E/T ratio and the incubation time. Using a low E/T ratio (1/1), DNA fragmentation in and 51Cr release from target cells showed similar characteristics and kinetics. At higher E/T ratio (20/1), the 51Cr release from the target cells increased to a greater extent than the percentage fragmented target cell DNA. Inhibitors of DNA fragmentation added to the cytotoxicity assay inhibited not only DNA fragmentation, but also the release of chromium-51 from the target cells, suggesting that apoptosis and cell lysis are closely related in BsMAb-mediated cell killing. Images Figure 1 PMID:8611371

  7. A type I interferon signature characterizes chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rascio, Federica; Pontrelli, Paola; Accetturo, Matteo; Oranger, Annarita; Gigante, Margherita; Castellano, Giuseppe; Gigante, Maddalena; Zito, Anna; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Ranieri, Elena; Stallone, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) represents the main cause of kidney graft loss. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, we characterized the molecular signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and, separately, of CD4(+) T lymphocytes isolated from CAMR patients, compared to kidney transplant recipients with normal graft function and histology. We enrolled 29 patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, 29 stable transplant recipients (controls), and 8 transplant recipients with clinical and histological evidence of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. Messenger RNA and microRNA profiling of PBMCs and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was performed using Agilent microarrays in eight randomly selected patients per group from CAMR and control subjects. Results were evaluated statistically and by functional pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) and validated in the remaining subjects. In PBMCs, 45 genes were differentially expressed between the two groups, most of which were up-regulated in CAMR and were involved in type I interferon signalling. In the same patients, 16 microRNAs were down-regulated in CAMR subjects compared to controls: four were predicted modulators of six mRNAs identified in the transcriptional analysis. In silico functional analysis supported the involvement of type I interferon signalling. To further confirm this result, we investigated the transcriptomic profiles of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in an independent group of patients, observing that the activation of type I interferon signalling was a specific hallmark of CAMR. In addition, in CAMR patients, we detected a reduction of circulating BDCA2(+) dendritic cells, the natural type I interferon-producing cells, and their recruitment into the graft along with increased expression of MXA, a type I interferon-induced protein, at the tubulointerstitial and vascular level. Finally, interferon alpha mRNA expression was significantly increased in CAMR compared to control

  8. Bispecific-antibody-mediated targeting of radiolabeled bivalent haptens: theoretical, experimental and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Le Doussal, J M; Barbet, J; Delaage, M

    1992-01-01

    Chemically conjugated bispecific (anti-cell surface antigen, anti-hapten) Fab'-Fab antibodies (Bs-MAbs) have been used to target 125I-, 111In- and 99mTc-labeled haptens to cell sub-sets. In vitro, bivalent haptens were found to bind more strongly than their monovalent analogs to the Bs-MAbs bound to ("ordered" on) the cell surface, or than to free ("disordered") Bs-MAbs: they are selective for cell-bound Bs-MAbs. In tumor-grafted nude mice models, the sequential injections of microgram amounts of Bs-MAb, and 1 day later, of microC amounts of bivalent haptens permits to sharply delineate small tumors (using a gamma camera), hours after injection. Further, the isotope biodistribution was found to be at least 3 times more selective for the tumor than that obtained with directly labeled anti-CEA F(ab)'2 or with monovalent haptens. This better in vivo selectivity of the 2-step targeting of bivalent haptens was also demonstrated in a pharmacokinetic study using therapeutic amounts of reagents. In primary-colon-carcinoma patients, a similar comparative immunoscintigraphy study confirmed the better selectivity of bivalent hapten targeting over direct targeting, on the basis of image quality and ex vivo tissue counting. In patients with medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, bivalent hapten targeting allowed us to confirm tumor extension and to find occult lesions. Interestingly, radio-immunoguided surgery was necessary to resect these small lesions. These experimental results, together with technological and theoretical considerations, suggest that Bs-MAb-mediated targeting of isotopes (or other agents) is one of the major ways to increase the clinical performance of MAb-based targeting diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

  9. Antibody-Mediated Enhancement of Parvovirus B19 Uptake into Endothelial Cells Mediated by a Receptor for Complement Factor C1q

    PubMed Central

    von Kietzell, Kristina; Pozzuto, Tanja; Heilbronn, Regine; Grössl, Tobias; Fechner, Henry

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite its strong host tropism for erythroid progenitor cells, human parvovirus B19 (B19V) can also infect a variety of additional cell types. Acute and chronic inflammatory cardiomyopathies have been associated with a high prevalence of B19V DNA in endothelial cells of the myocardium. To elucidate the mechanisms of B19V uptake into endothelium, we first analyzed the surface expression of the well-characterized primary B19V receptor P antigen and the putative coreceptors α5β1 integrins and Ku80 antigen on primary and permanent endothelial cells. The receptor expression pattern and also the primary attachment levels were similar to those in the UT7/Epo-S1 cell line regarded as functional for B19V entry, but internalization of the virus was strongly reduced. As an alternative B19V uptake mechanism in endothelial cells, we demonstrated antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), with up to a 4,000-fold increase in B19V uptake in the presence of B19V-specific human antibodies. ADE was mediated almost exclusively at the level of virus internalization, with efficient B19V translocation to the nucleus. In contrast to monocytes, where ADE of B19V has been described previously, enhancement does not rely on interaction of the virus-antibody complexes with Fc receptors (FcRs), but rather, involves an alternative mechanism mediated by the heat-sensitive complement factor C1q and its receptor, CD93. Our results suggest that ADE represents the predominant mechanism of endothelial B19V infection, and it is tempting to speculate that it may play a role in the pathogenicity of cardiac B19V infection. IMPORTANCE Both efficient entry and productive infection of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) seem to be limited to erythroid progenitor cells. However, in vivo, the viral DNA can also be detected in additional cell types, such as endothelial cells of the myocardium, where its presence has been associated with acute and chronic inflammatory cardiomyopathies. In this study, we

  10. Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity to Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Viruses After Influenza Vaccination in Humans.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weimin; Liu, Feng; Wilson, Jason R; Holiday, Crystal; Li, Zhu-Nan; Bai, Yaohui; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Stevens, James; York, Ian A; Levine, Min Z

    2016-04-01

    Background.  Detection of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) to influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) antigens by conventional serological assays is currently the main immune correlate of protection for influenza vaccines However, current prepandemic avian influenza vaccines are poorly immunogenic in inducing nAbs despite considerable protection conferred. Recent studies show that Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to HA antigens are readily detectable in the sera of healthy individuals and patients with influenza infection. Methods.  Virus neutralization and ADCC activities of serum samples from individuals who received either seasonal or a stock-piled H5N1 avian influenza vaccine were evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition assay, microneutralization assay, and an improved ADCC natural killer (NK) cell activation assay. Results.  Immunization with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine led to strong expansion of both nAbs and ADCC-mediating antibodies (adccAbs) to H3 antigen of the vaccine virus in 24 postvaccination human sera. In sharp contrast, 18 individuals vaccinated with the adjuvanted H5N1 avian influenza vaccine mounted H5-specific antibodies with strong ADCC activities despite moderate virus neutralization capacity. Strength of HA-specific ADCC activities is largely associated with the titers of HA-binding antibodies and not with the fine antigenic specificity of anti-HA nAbs. Conclusions.  Detection of both nAbs and adccAbs may better reflect protective capacity of HA-specific antibodies induced by avian influenza vaccines. PMID:27419174

  11. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein mediates tumor cell resistance to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M K; Sauer, S J; Nath, S; Robinson, T J; Morse, M A; Devi, G R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the deadliest, distinct subtype of breast cancer. High expression of epidermal growth factor receptors [EGFR or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] in IBC tumors has prompted trials of anti-EGFR/HER2 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit oncogenic signaling; however, de novo and acquired therapeutic resistance is common. Another critical function of these antibodies is to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which enables immune effector cells to engage tumors and deliver granzymes, activating executioner caspases. We hypothesized that high expression of anti-apoptotic molecules in tumors would render them resistant to ADCC. Herein, we demonstrate that the most potent caspase inhibitor, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), overexpressed in IBC, drives resistance to ADCC mediated by cetuximab (anti-EGFR) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2). Overexpression of XIAP in parental IBC cell lines enhances resistance to ADCC; conversely, targeted downregulation of XIAP in ADCC-resistant IBC cells renders them sensitive. As hypothesized, this ADCC resistance is in part a result of the ability of XIAP to inhibit caspase activity; however, we also unexpectedly found that resistance was dependent on XIAP-mediated, caspase-independent suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which otherwise occurs during ADCC. Transcriptome analysis supported these observations by revealing modulation of genes involved in immunosuppression and oxidative stress response in XIAP-overexpressing, ADCC-resistant cells. We conclude that XIAP is a critical modulator of ADCC responsiveness, operating through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These results suggest that strategies targeting the effects of XIAP on caspase activation and ROS suppression have the potential to enhance the activity of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26821068

  12. Identification of Aleutian Mink Disease Parvovirus Capsid Sequences Mediating Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Infection, Virus Neutralization, and Immune Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Marshall E.; Best, Sonja M.; Hayes, Stanley F.; Wells, Richard D.; Wolfinbarger, James B.; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2001-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) causes a persistent infection associated with circulating immune complexes, immune complex disease, hypergammaglobulinemia, and high levels of antiviral antibody. Although antibody can neutralize ADV infectivity in Crandell feline kidney cells in vitro, virus is not cleared in vivo, and capsid-based vaccines have proven uniformly ineffective. Antiviral antibody also enables ADV to infect macrophages, the target cells for persistent infection, by Fc-receptor-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The antibodies involved in these unique aspects of ADV pathogenesis may have specific targets on the ADV capsid. Prominent differences exist between the structure of ADV and other, more-typical parvoviruses, which can be accounted for by short peptide sequences in the flexible loop regions of the capsid proteins. In order to determine whether these short sequences are targets for antibodies involved in ADV pathogenesis, we studied heterologous antibodies against several peptides present in the major capsid protein, VP2. Of these antibodies, a polyclonal rabbit antibody to peptide VP2:428-446 was the most interesting. The anti-VP2:428-446 antibody aggregated virus particles into immune complexes, mediated ADE, and neutralized virus infectivity in vitro. Thus, antibody against this short peptide can be implicated in key facets of ADV pathogenesis. Structural modeling suggested that surface-exposed residues of VP2:428-446 are readily accessible for antibody binding. The observation that antibodies against a single target peptide in the ADV capsid can mediate both neutralization and ADE may explain the failure of capsid-based vaccines. PMID:11602751

  13. Anti-huCD20 Antibody Therapy for Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Allografts in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Toyofumi; Ishii, Daisuke; Gorbacheva, Victoria; Kohei, Naoki; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Dvorina, Nina; Nonomura, Norio; Takahara, Shiro; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M.; Fairchild, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    We have reported that B6.CCR5−/− mice reject renal allografts with high serum donor-specific antibody (DSA) titers and marked C4d deposition in grafts, features consistent with AMR. B6.huCD20/CCR5−/− mice, where human CD20 expression is restricted to B cells, rejected A/J renal allografts by day 26 post-transplant with DSA first detected in serum on day 5 post-transplant and increased thereafter. Recipient treatment with anti-huCD20 mAb prior to the transplant and weekly up to 7 weeks post-transplant promoted long-term allograft survival (> 100 days) with low DSA titers. To investigate the effect of B cell depletion at the time serum DSA was first detected, recipients were treated with anti-huCD20 mAb on days 5, 8 and 12 post-transplant. This regimen significantly reduced DSA titers and graft inflammation on day 15 post-transplant and prolonged allograft survival > 60 days. However, DSA returned to the titers observed in control treated recipients by day 30 post-transplant and histological analyses on day 60 post-transplant indicated severe interstitial fibrosis. These results indicate that anti-huCD20 mAb had the greatest effect as a prophylactic treatment and that the distinct kinetics of DSA responses accounts for acute renal allograft failure versus the development of fibrosis. PMID:25731734

  14. Small CD4 Mimetics Prevent HIV-1 Uninfected Bystander CD4 + T Cell Killing Mediated by Antibody-dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Ding, Shilei; Zoubchenok, Daria; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Coutu, Mathieu; Brassard, Nathalie; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R.; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sodroski, Joseph; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Finzi, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes a progressive depletion of CD4 + T cells. Despite its importance for HIV-1 pathogenesis, the precise mechanisms underlying CD4 + T-cell depletion remain incompletely understood. Here we make the surprising observation that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediates the death of uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells in cultures of HIV-1-infected cells. While HIV-1-infected cells are protected from ADCC by the action of the viral Vpu and Nef proteins, uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells bind gp120 shed from productively infected cells and are efficiently recognized by ADCC-mediating antibodies. Thus, gp120 shedding represents a viral mechanism to divert ADCC responses towards uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells. Importantly, CD4-mimetic molecules redirect ADCC responses from uninfected bystander cells to HIV-1-infected cells; therefore, CD4-mimetic compounds might have therapeutic utility in new strategies aimed at specifically eliminating HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:26870823

  15. Small CD4 Mimetics Prevent HIV-1 Uninfected Bystander CD4 + T Cell Killing Mediated by Antibody-dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Ding, Shilei; Zoubchenok, Daria; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Coutu, Mathieu; Brassard, Nathalie; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Sodroski, Joseph; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Finzi, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes a progressive depletion of CD4 + T cells. Despite its importance for HIV-1 pathogenesis, the precise mechanisms underlying CD4 + T-cell depletion remain incompletely understood. Here we make the surprising observation that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediates the death of uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells in cultures of HIV-1-infected cells. While HIV-1-infected cells are protected from ADCC by the action of the viral Vpu and Nef proteins, uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells bind gp120 shed from productively infected cells and are efficiently recognized by ADCC-mediating antibodies. Thus, gp120 shedding represents a viral mechanism to divert ADCC responses towards uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells. Importantly, CD4-mimetic molecules redirect ADCC responses from uninfected bystander cells to HIV-1-infected cells; therefore, CD4-mimetic compounds might have therapeutic utility in new strategies aimed at specifically eliminating HIV-1-infected cells.

  16. C-C chemokine receptor-7 mediated endocytosis of antibody cargoes into intact cells.

    PubMed

    Charest-Morin, Xavier; Pépin, Rémy; Gagné-Henley, Angélique; Morissette, Guillaume; Lodge, Robert; Marceau, François

    2013-01-01

    The C-C chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7) is a G protein coupled receptor that has a role in leukocyte homing, but that is also expressed in aggressive tumor cells. Preclinical research supports that CCR7 is a valid target in oncology. In view of the increasing availability of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that carry cytotoxic cargoes, we studied the feasibility of forcing intact cells to internalize known monoclonal antibodies by exploiting the cycle of endocytosis and recycling triggered by the CCR7 agonist CCL19. Firstly, an anti-CCR7 antibody (CD197; clone 150503) labeled surface recombinant CCR7 expressed in intact HEK 293a cells and the fluorescent antibody was internalized following CCL19 treatment. Secondly, a recombinant myc-tagged CCL19 construction was exploited along the anti-myc monoclonal antibody 4A6. The myc-tagged ligand was produced as a conditioned medium of transfected HEK 293a cells that contained the equivalent of 430 ng/ml of immunoreactive CCL19 (average value, ELISA determination). CCL19-myc, but not authentic CCL19, carried the fluorophore-labeled antibody 4A6 into other recipient cells that expressed recombinant CCR7 (microscopy, cytofluorometry). The immune complexes were apparent in endosomal structures, co-localized well with the small GTPase Rab5 and progressed toward Rab7-positive endosomes. A dominant negative form of Rab5 (GDP-locked) inhibited this endocytosis. Further, endosomes in CCL19-myc- or CCL19-stimulated cells were positive for β-arrestin2, but rarely for β-arrestin1. Following treatment with CCL19-myc and the 4A6 antibody, the melanoma cell line A375 that expresses endogenous CCR7 was specifically stained using a secondary peroxidase-conjugated antibody. Agonist-stimulated CCR7 can transport antibody-based cargoes, with possible therapeutic applications in oncology.

  17. Evidence of T-cell mediated neuronal injury in stiff-person syndrome with anti-amphiphysin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Poh, Mervyn Q W; Simon, Neil G; Buckland, Michael E; Salisbury, Elizabeth; Watson, Shaun

    2014-02-15

    Paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome (SPS) has been associated with antibodies against amphiphysin. Current evidence supports a pathogenic role for anti-amphiphysin antibodies. A 74-year-old female was diagnosed with amphiphysin-associated paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome and associated encephalomyelitis. She had initial response to IVIG, however her symptoms worsened after two months and were resistant to further treatment. Subsequently the patient died and a post-mortem was performed. Neuropathology revealed perivascular and parenchymal lymphocytic infiltrates, with neuronophagia mediated by CD8+ T cells and microglia in brainstem, spinal cord, and mesial temporal lobe structures. These findings suggest a pathogenic role of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells, with potential implication for therapy of future patients.

  18. Bispecific Antibodies that Mediate Killing of Cells Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus of Any Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Jorg; Lotscher, Erika; Steimer, Kathelyn S.; Capon, Daniel J.; Baenziger, Jurg; Jack, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1991-06-01

    Although AIDS patients lose human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T cells, their remaining CD8-positive T lymphocytes maintain cytotoxic function. To exploit this fact we have constructed bispecific antibodies that direct cytotoxic T lymphocytes of any specificity to cells that express gp120 of HIV. These bispecific antibodies comprise one heavy/light chain pair from an antibody to CD3, linked to a heavy chain whose variable region has been replaced with sequences from CD4 plus a second light chain. CD3 is part of the antigen receptor on T cells and is responsible for signal transduction. In the presence of these bispecific antibodies, T cells of irrelevant specificity effectively lyse HIV-infected cells in vitro.

  19. Hormone Conjugated with Antibody to CD3 Mediates Cytotoxic T Cell Lysis of Human Melanoma Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Margaret Ann; Nussbaum, Samuel R.; Eisen, Herman N.

    1988-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be activated by antibodies to their antigen-specific receptor complex (TCR-CD3) to destroy target cells, regardless of the specificity of the cytotoxic T cells. A novel hormone-antibody conjugate, consisting of an analog of melanocyte-stimulating hormone chemically coupled to a monoclonal antibody to CD3, the invariant component of the T cell receptor complex, was used to target human melanoma cells for destruction by human cytotoxic T lymphocytes that bear no specificity for the tumor cells. As targeting components of such anti-CD3 conjugates, hormones or growth factors are expected to prove more effective than antibodies to tumor-associated antigens in focusing the destructive activity of cytotoxic T cells on tumor target cells.

  20. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Prevents Murine Antibody-Mediated Acute Lung Injury at the Level of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production

    PubMed Central

    Semple, John W.; Kim, Michael; Hou, Jing; McVey, Mark; Lee, Young Jin; Tabuchi, Arata; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Chai, Zhong-Wei; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality that can occur with any type of transfusion and is thought to be primarily due to donor antibodies activating pulmonary neutrophils in recipients. Recently, a large prospective case controlled clinical study of cardiac surgery patients demonstrated that despite implementation of male donors, a high incidence of TRALI still occurred and suggested a need for additional interventions in susceptible patient populations. To examine if intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) may be effective, a murine model of antibody-mediated acute lung injury that approximates human TRALI was examined. When BALB/c mice were injected with the anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody 34-1-2s, mild shock (reduced rectal temperature) and respiratory distress (dyspnea) were observed and pre-treatment of the mice with 2 g/kg IVIg completely prevented these symptoms. To determine IVIg's usefulness to affect severe lung damage, SCID mice, previously shown to be hypersensitive to 34-1-2s were used. SCID mice treated with 34-1-2s underwent severe shock, lung damage (increased wet/dry ratios) and 40% mortality within 2 hours. Treatment with 2 g/kg IVIg 18 hours before 34-1-2s administration completely protected the mice from all adverse events. Treatment with IVIg after symptoms began also reduced lung damage and mortality. While the prophylactic IVIg administration did not affect 34-1-2s-induced pulmonary neutrophil accumulation, bone marrow-derived neutrophils from the IVIg-treated mice displayed no spontaneous ROS production nor could they be stimulated in vitro with fMLP or 34-1-2s. These results suggest that IVIg prevents murine antibody-mediated acute lung injury at the level of neutrophil ROS production and thus, alleviating tissue damage. PMID:22363629

  1. Protein Delivery of Thymidylate Kinase Mediated by Tumor-Specific Antibody-Precoated Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh-Vardin, Mohammad; Panahpour, Hamdollah; Golmohammadi, Mohammad Ghasem; Sagha, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Molecular targeted therapy is an important, novel approach in the treatment of cancer because it interferes with certain molecules involved in carcinogenesis and tumor growth. Examples include monoclonal antibodies, microvesicles, and suicide genes. Several studies have focused on targeted therapies in prostate cancer, which is a serious cause of cancer death in men. We hypothesize that antibody-coated microvesicles can deliver thymidylate kinase, a suicide protein, to prostate cancer cells, potentiating them to death following azidothymidine (AZT) treatment. PMID:27278881

  2. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  3. Antisperm antibody-mediated alterations in the cellular activity of human trophoblast cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Sinha, D; Chattopadhyay, S

    1994-04-01

    Immune recognition of the fetus is well documented, yet the immunological basis of pregnancy loss awaits elucidation. Identification of trophoblast membrane epitopes as non-self either by preformed immunoglobulins or by circulating immunocompetent cells would lead to immunological rejection of the tissue. Such an event may occur in cases of cross-reacting antibodies developed as a consequence of exposure of sperm surface antigens. This hypothesis was tested by developing specific antibodies in rabbits against intact sperm surface antigens. These were subjected to different schedules of IgG purification and characterization. By means of nuclide precursor incorporation, the effect of antisperm antibody on DNA, RNA and protein synthesis of trophoblast cells in culture were studied. The results showed that the antibody inhibits incorporation into cells but after a delay of 72 hours some cells gradually recover. The interaction also led to a reduced rate of hCG production. Lysosomal enzyme activity was inhibited in the spent medium of antibody-treated cells but lysosome rich fractions showed no effect. This indicated that the major effect of the antibody was growth inhibitory rather than cytolytic. PMID:7520885

  4. Spontaneous rupture of atrioventricular valve tensor apparatus as late manifestation of anti-Ro/SSA antibody-mediated cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, Bettina F; Fruitman, Deborah; Benson, D Woodrow; Ngan, Bo-Yee; Liske, Michael R; Wahren-Herlineus, Marie; Ho, S Yen; Jaeggi, Edgar

    2011-03-01

    Atrioventricular (AV) block and endocardial fibroelastosis associated with dilated cardiomyopathy are the most common clinical manifestations of anti-Ro/SSA-mediated fetal cardiac disease. Valvar dysfunction has not been a prominent feature of this disease; however, recent anecdotal cases have suggested an association between rupture of the AV valve tensor apparatus and maternal anti-Ro/SSA antibodies. In the present study, we have described the clinical and laboratory findings and reviewed the published data for infants of anti-Ro/SSA-positive pregnancies with AV valve insufficiency due to chordal rupture from the papillary muscles. The histopathologic features of the papillary muscle and ventricular free wall and septum biopsy specimens were examined and compared to the sections of AV leaflets from 6 autopsied fetuses with anti-Ro/SSA-mediated complete AV block without chordal disruption. Specific epitopes to the p200 region of Ro52, and Ro60 antibodies were evaluated in cases with chordal rupture. Severe AV valve insufficiency was detected prenatally (as early as 34 weeks of gestation) or postnatally (as late as 182 days) after areas of patchy echogenicity were noted in the papillary muscle at 19 to 22 weeks of gestation. Postnatally, urgent valve surgery was performed in 5 of 6 patients; 1 of 6 patients died preoperatively. All patients tested positive for Ro52. Valve leaflet tissue from the autopsy specimens was normal. The ventricular free wall and septum biopsy specimens from a patient with chordal rupture showed normal tissue; however, the papillary muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated severe atrophy with near total replacement of myocytes by fibrosis and dystrophic calcifications, and negative immunochemistry findings. In conclusion, these findings have defined an underappreciated complication of fetal antibody-mediated cardiac inflammation.

  5. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) on switching from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta: what are the implications?

    PubMed Central

    Assunção, José; Vinhas, José

    2008-01-01

    We report the development of antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) in a 63-year-old man with end-stage renal disease following a switch from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta. Haemoglobin levels began to decrease 6 months after the switch. Increasing the epoetin beta dose produced no response and regular blood transfusions were required; PRCA was confirmed and epoetin beta was discontinued. The patient responded positively to immunosuppression; after 2 months on prednisone and cyclophosphamide, haemoglobin levels stabilized and no further transfusions were required. This case highlights the difficulty in establishing a cause-effect relationship where more than one erythropoiesis-stimulating agent is involved. PMID:25983889

  6. Co-expression of epidermal growth factor-receptor and c-erb B-2 proto-oncogene product in human salivary-gland adenocarcinoma cell line HSG and the implications for HSG cell autocrine growth.

    PubMed

    Kyakumoto, S; Kurokawa, R; Hoshino, M; Ota, M

    1994-07-01

    The autonomous proliferation of HSG cells is mediated by an autocrine growth factor, a 46K epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like molecule. The receptor for this molecule was investigated. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting revealed the expression of two possible receptor molecules, EGF-R and p185erbB-2, in HSG cells. Northern blotting also revealed the co-expression of 5.6-kb EGF-R mRNA and 4.6-kb c-erb B-2 mRNA. When the purified EGF-like molecule was added to the cultures, EGF-R but not p185erbB-2 was autophosphorylated. These results suggest that, although both EGF-R and p185erbB-2 are co-expressed in HSG cells, the EGF-R is the genuine receptor for the EGF-like molecule. However, there is a possibility that p185erB-2 is involved in the signal transduction system. This possibility was examined by using specific antibodies to human EGF-R (hEGF-R), p185erbB-2, and EGF to inhibit the functions of these molecules. Addition of these three antibodies to the cultures inhibited the growth of HSG cells. The antibodies to EGF-R and p185erbB-2 also caused morphological changes such as disturbances of the plasma membrane, and some cell death. Surprisingly, the effect of the anti-p185erbB-2 antibody on growth inhibition and morphology was stronger than that of the anti-hEGF-R antibody. Thus, p185erB-2 expressed in HSG cells has an important function in the signal transduction of HSG cell growth.

  7. The CD25-binding antibody Daclizumab High-Yield Process has a distinct glycosylation pattern and reduced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in comparison to Zenapax®

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Bishu; Balasa, Balaji; Efros, Lyubov; Hinton, Paul R.; Hartman, Stephen; Thakur, Archana; Xiong, Joanna M.; Schmidt, Brian; Robinson, Randy R.; Sornasse, Thierry; Vexler, Vladimir; Sheridan, James P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CD25-binding antibody daclizumab high-yield process (DAC HYP) is an interleukin (IL)-2 signal modulating antibody that shares primary amino acid sequence and CD25 binding affinity with Zenapax®, a distinct form of daclizumab, which was approved for the prevention of acute organ rejection in patients receiving renal transplants as part of an immunosuppressive regimen that includes cyclosporine and corticosteroids. Comparison of the physicochemical properties of the two antibody forms revealed the glycosylation profile of DAC HYP differs from Zenapax in both glycan distribution and the types of oligosaccharides, most notably high-mannose, galactosylated and galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) oligosaccharides, resulting in a DAC HYP antibody material that is structurally distinct from Zenapax. Although neither antibody elicited complement-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro, DAC HYP antibody had significantly reduced levels of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The ADCC activity required natural killer (NK) cells, but not monocytes, suggesting the effects were mediated through binding to Fc-gamma RIII (CD16). Incubation of each antibody with peripheral blood mononuclear cells also caused the down-modulation of CD16 expression on NK cells and the CD16 down-modulation was greater for Zenapax in comparison to that observed for DAC HYP. The substantive glycosylation differences between the two antibody forms and corresponding greater Fc-mediated effector activities by Zenapax, including cell killing activity, manifest as a difference in the biological function and pharmacology between DAC HYP and Zenapax. PMID:27367933

  8. Clinically effective monoclonal antibody 3F8 mediates nonoxidative lysis of human neuroectodermal tumor cells by polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Kushner, B H; Cheung, N K

    1991-09-15

    Most studies of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) have supported oxidative lytic processes. This may be because the studies used nonhuman or nonneoplastic cells that were highly sensitive to reactive oxygen species or were small enough to be phagocytosed by PMN. We therefore investigated whether oxygen radicals participate in PMN cytotoxicity toward human neuroectodermal solid tumor cells sensitized by 3F8, which is an anti-ganglioside GD2 murine IgG3 monoclonal antibody with documented anticancer activity in humans. A 4-h 51Cr release assay was used to assess tumor cell lysis by hydrogen peroxide, superoxide, and hypochlorite. Nine of 11 GD2(+) human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines had equal or greater resistance to these oxidants as compared to a GD2(-) human carcinoma line (SKBr1-III) found by others (and confirmed by us) to be significantly more resistant to oxidative lysis than a murine cell line (P388D1) representative of those commonly used in cytotoxicity assays. To facilitate detection of oxidant-mediated lysis, subsequent studies of 3F8-mediated ADCC used GD2(+) targets that were relatively sensitive and others that were relatively resistant to oxygen radicals. Normal PMN and PMN obtained from children with chronic granulomatous disease, which do not generate reactive oxygen species, were equally effective in ADCC. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, which primes oxidative responses of normal but not of chronic granulomatous disease PMN, enhanced ADCC by both kinds of PMN. During ADCC of 3F8-sensitized targets, with or without granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, GD2(-) "innocent bystander" tumor cells (including P388D1) were not lysed, a finding consistent with unimportant extracellular release of cytotoxic mediators. Finally, antioxidant and antimyeloperoxidase moieties did not block ADCC. We conclude that oxidants are not key factors in 3F8-mediated lysis by PMN of

  9. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    PubMed

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses.

  10. Dashboard systems: Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic mediated dose optimization for monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Dubinsky, Marla C

    2015-03-01

    Many marketed drugs exhibit high variability in exposure and response. While these drugs are efficacious in their approved indications, finding appropriate dose regimens for individual patients is not straightforward. Similar dose adjustment problems are also seen with drugs that have a complex relationship between exposure and response and/or a narrow therapeutic window. This is particularly true for monoclonal antibodies, where prolonged dosing at a sub-therapeutic dose can also elicit anti-drug antibodies which will further compromise safety and efficacy. Thus, finding appropriate doses quickly would represent a substantial improvement in healthcare. Dashboard systems, which are decision-support tools, offer an improved, convenient means of tailoring treatment for individual patients. This article reviews the clinical need for this approach, particularly with monoclonal antibodies, the design, development, and testing of such systems, and the likely benefits of dashboard systems in clinical practice. We focus on infliximab for reference.

  11. Antibody mediated therapy targeting CD47 inhibits tumor progression of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhenyu; Chung, Haniee; Banan, Babak; Manning, Pamela T.; Ott, Katherine C.; Lin, Shin; Capoccia, Benjamin J.; Subramanian, Vijay; Hiebsch, Ronald R.; Upadhya, Gundumi A.; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Frazier, William A.; Lin, Yiing; Chapman, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a high rate of tumor recurrence and metastasis, resulting in shortened survival times. The efficacy of current systemic therapies for HCC is limited. In this study, we used xenograft tumor models to investigate the use of antibodies that block CD47 and inhibit HCC tumor growth. Immunostaining of tumor tissue and HCC cell lines demonstrated CD47 over-expression in HCC as compared to normal hepatocytes. Macrophage phagocytosis of HCC cells was increased after treatment with CD47 antibodies (CD47mAbs) that block CD47 binding to SIRPα. Further, CD47 blockade inhibited tumor growth in both heterotopic and orthotopic models of HCC, and promoted the migration of macrophages into the tumor mass. Our results demonstrate that targeting CD47 by specific antibodies has potential immunotherapeutic efficacy in human HCC. PMID:25721088

  12. Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of the Exotoxin Mycolactone, the Main Virulence Factor Produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Gersbach, Philipp; Hug, Melanie N.; Bieri, Raphael; Bomio, Claudio; Li, Jun; Huber, Sylwia; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycolactone, the macrolide exotoxin produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans, causes extensive tissue destruction by inducing apoptosis of host cells. In this study, we aimed at the production of antibodies that could neutralize the cytotoxic activities of mycolactone. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the B cell hybridoma technology, we generated a series of monoclonal antibodies with specificity for mycolactone from spleen cells of mice immunized with the protein conjugate of a truncated synthetic mycolactone derivative. L929 fibroblasts were used as a model system to investigate whether these antibodies can inhibit the biological effects of mycolactone. By measuring the metabolic activity of the fibroblasts, we found that anti-mycolactone mAbs can completely neutralize the cytotoxic activity of mycolactone. Conclusions/Significance The toxin neutralizing capacity of anti-mycolactone mAbs supports the concept of evaluating the macrolide toxin as vaccine target. PMID:27351976

  13. HA Antibody-Mediated FcγRIIIa Activity Is Both Dependent on FcR Engagement and Interactions between HA and Sialic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Freek; Kwaks, Ted; Brandenburg, Boerries; Koldijk, Martin H.; Klaren, Vincent; Smal, Bastiaan; Korse, Hans J. W. M.; Geelen, Eric; Tettero, Lisanne; Zuijdgeest, David; Stoop, Esther J. M.; Saeland, Eirikur; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H. E.; Koudstaal, Wouter; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with receptors for the Fc region of IgG (FcγRs) have been shown to contribute to the in vivo protection against influenza A viruses provided by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that bind to the viral hemagglutinin (HA) stem. In particular, Fc-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been shown to contribute to protection by stem-binding bnAbs. Fc-mediated effector functions appear not to contribute to protection provided by strain-specific HA head-binding antibodies. We used a panel of anti-stem and anti-head influenza A and B monoclonal antibodies with identical human IgG1 Fc domains and investigated their ability to mediate ADCC-associated FcγRIIIa activation. Antibodies which do not interfere with sialic acid binding of HA can mediate FcγRIIIa activation. However, the FcγRIIIa activation was inhibited when a mutant HA, unable to bind sialic acids, was used. Antibodies which block sialic acid receptor interactions of HA interfered with FcγRIIIa activation. The inhibition of FcγRIIIa activation by HA head-binding and sialic acid receptor-blocking antibodies was confirmed in plasma samples of H5N1 vaccinated human subjects. Together, these results suggest that in addition to Fc–FcγR binding, interactions between HA and sialic acids on immune cells are required for optimal Fc-mediated effector functions by anti-HA antibodies. PMID:27746785

  14. A model-based approach to predicting the human pharmacokinetics of a monoclonal antibody exhibiting target-mediated drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Luu, Kenneth T; Bergqvist, Simon; Chen, Enhong; Hu-Lowe, Dana; Kraynov, Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    In the drug discovery and development setting, the ability to accurately predict the human pharmacokinetics (PK) of a candidate compound from preclinical data is critical for informing the effective design of the first-in-human trial. PK prediction is especially challenging for monoclonal antibodies exhibiting nonlinear PK attributed to target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD). Here, we present a model-based method for predicting the PK of PF-03446962, an IgG2 antibody directed against human ALK1 (activin receptor-like kinase 1) receptor. Systems parameters as determined experimentally or obtained from the literature, such as binding affinity (k(on) and k(off)), internalization of the drug-target complex (k(int)), target degradation rate (k(deg)), and target abundance (R(0)), were directly integrated into the modeling and prediction. NONMEM 7 was used to model monkey PK data and simulate human PK profiles based on the construct of a TMDD model using a population-based approach. As validated by actual patient data from a phase I study, the human PK of PF-03446962 were predicted within 1- to 2-fold of observations. Whereas traditional approaches fail, this approach successfully predicted the human PK of a monoclonal antibody exhibiting nonlinearity because of TMDD. PMID:22414855

  15. A model-based approach to predicting the human pharmacokinetics of a monoclonal antibody exhibiting target-mediated drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Luu, Kenneth T; Bergqvist, Simon; Chen, Enhong; Hu-Lowe, Dana; Kraynov, Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    In the drug discovery and development setting, the ability to accurately predict the human pharmacokinetics (PK) of a candidate compound from preclinical data is critical for informing the effective design of the first-in-human trial. PK prediction is especially challenging for monoclonal antibodies exhibiting nonlinear PK attributed to target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD). Here, we present a model-based method for predicting the PK of PF-03446962, an IgG2 antibody directed against human ALK1 (activin receptor-like kinase 1) receptor. Systems parameters as determined experimentally or obtained from the literature, such as binding affinity (k(on) and k(off)), internalization of the drug-target complex (k(int)), target degradation rate (k(deg)), and target abundance (R(0)), were directly integrated into the modeling and prediction. NONMEM 7 was used to model monkey PK data and simulate human PK profiles based on the construct of a TMDD model using a population-based approach. As validated by actual patient data from a phase I study, the human PK of PF-03446962 were predicted within 1- to 2-fold of observations. Whereas traditional approaches fail, this approach successfully predicted the human PK of a monoclonal antibody exhibiting nonlinearity because of TMDD.

  16. Everolimus inhibits anti-HLA I antibody-mediated endothelial cell signaling, migration and proliferation more potently than sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y-P; Valenzuela, N M; Ziegler, M E; Rozengurt, E; Reed, E F

    2014-04-01

    Antibody (Ab) crosslinking of HLA I molecules on the surface of endothelial cells triggers proliferative and pro-survival intracellular signaling, which is implicated in the process of chronic allograft rejection, also known as transplant vasculopathy (TV). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in HLA I Ab-induced signaling cascades. Everolimus provides a tool to establish how the mTOR signal network regulates HLA I-mediated migration, proliferation and survival. We found that everolimus inhibits mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) by disassociating Raptor from mTOR, thereby preventing class I-induced phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6K, S6RP and 4E-BP1, and resultant class I-stimulated cell migration and proliferation. Furthermore, we found that everolimus inhibits class I-mediated mTORC2 activation (1) by disassociating Rictor and Sin1 from mTOR; (2) by preventing class I-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and (3) by preventing class I-mediated ERK phosphorylation. These results suggest that everolimus is more effective than sirolimus at antagonizing both mTORC1 and mTORC2, the latter of which is critical in endothelial cell functional changes leading to TV in solid organ transplantation after HLA I crosslinking. Our findings point to a potential therapeutic effect of everolimus in prevention of chronic Ab-mediated rejection. PMID:24580843

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulins and rituximab therapy for severe transplant glomerulopathy in chronic antibody-mediated rejection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bachelet, Thomas; Nodimar, Celine; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Lepreux, Sebastien; Moreau, Karine; Morel, Delphine; Guidicelli, Gwendaline; Couzi, Lionel; Merville, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    Outcome of patients with transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is poor. Using B-cell targeting molecules represent a rational strategy to treat TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection. In this pilot study, 21 patients with this diagnosis received four doses of intravenous immunoglobulins and two doses of rituximab (IVIG/RTX group). They were retrospectively compared with a untreated control group of 10 patients. At 24 months post-biopsy, graft survival was similar and poor between the treated and the untreated group, 47% vs. 40%, respectively, p = 0.69. This absence of response of IVIG/RTX treatment was observed, regardless the phenotype of TG. Baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and decline in eGFR during the first six months after the treatment were risk factors associated with 24-month graft survival. The IVIG/RTX therapy had a modest effect on the kinetics of donor-specific alloantibodies at M24, compared to the untreated group, not associated with an improvement in graft survival. The mean number of adverse events per patient was higher in the IVIG/RTX group than in the control group (p = 0.03). Taken together, IVIG/RTX treatment for severe TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection does not seem to change the natural history of TG and is associated with a high incidence of adverse events.

  18. Hapten mediated display and pairing of recombinant antibodies accelerates assay assembly for biothreat countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Laura J; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A bottle-neck in recombinant antibody sandwich immunoassay development is pairing, demanding protein purification and modification to distinguish captor from tracer. We developed a simple pairing scheme using microliter amounts of E. coli osmotic shockates bearing site-specific biotinylated antibodies and demonstrated proof of principle with a single domain antibody (sdAb) that is both captor and tracer for polyvalent Marburgvirus nucleoprotein. The system could also host pairs of different sdAb specific for the 7 botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes, enabling recognition of the cognate serotype. Inducible supE co-expression enabled sdAb populations to be propagated as either phage for more panning from repertoires or expressed as soluble sdAb for screening within a single host strain. When combined with streptavidin-g3p fusions, a novel transdisplay system was formulated to retrofit a semi-synthetic sdAb library which was mined for an anti-Ebolavirus sdAb which was immediately immunoassay ready, thereby speeding up the recombinant antibody discovery and utilization processes. PMID:23150778

  19. Hapten Mediated Display and Pairing of Recombinant Antibodies Accelerates Assay Assembly for Biothreat Countermeasures

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Laura J.; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A bottle-neck in recombinant antibody sandwich immunoassay development is pairing, demanding protein purification and modification to distinguish captor from tracer. We developed a simple pairing scheme using microliter amounts of E. coli osmotic shockates bearing site-specific biotinylated antibodies and demonstrated proof of principle with a single domain antibody (sdAb) that is both captor and tracer for polyvalent Marburgvirus nucleoprotein. The system could also host pairs of different sdAb specific for the 7 botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes, enabling recognition of the cognate serotype. Inducible supE co-expression enabled sdAb populations to be propagated as either phage for more panning from repertoires or expressed as soluble sdAb for screening within a single host strain. When combined with streptavidin-g3p fusions, a novel transdisplay system was formulated to retrofit a semi-synthetic sdAb library which was mined for an anti-Ebolavirus sdAb which was immediately immunoassay ready, thereby speeding up the recombinant antibody discovery and utilization processes. PMID:23150778

  20. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  1. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Three Monoclonal Antibodies Raised against the Epidermal Growth Factor and Its Receptor in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Their Potential Use in the Selection of Patients for Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rengifo, Charles E.; Blanco, Rancés; Blanco, Damián; Cedeño, Mercedes; Frómeta, Milagros; Calzado, Enrique Rengifo

    2013-01-01

    Adequate methods to identify which lung cancer patients are most likely to benefit from the targeted drugs against both epidermal growth factor receptor/epidermal growth factor (EGFR/EGF) are needed. For this reason, we evaluated both the tissue reactivity of ior egf/r3 monoclonal antibody (Mab) in human lung carcinomas and its biological activity in NCI-H125 cells. Additionally, we assessed the tissue expression of EGF using two Mabs, CB-EGF1 and CB-EGF2. The overexpression of EGFR was detected in 33.33% and 62.71% of small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), respectively. The ability of ior egf/r3 Mab to bind the extracellular domain of EGFR inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in NCI-H125 cells was also demonstrated. The EGF expression was observed in about 17% and 70% of SCLC and NSCLC, respectively. However, differences in the reactivity of CB-EGF1 and CB-EGF2 were evidenced. A dual expression of EGFR and EGF was observed in 16.67% and 57.63% of SCLC and NSCLC patients, respectively. But, a correlation between them was only obtained in NSCLC. Our results permit to recommend the development of diagnostic kits using ior egf/r3 and/or CB-EGF1 Mabs in order to achieve a better selection of patients to EGFR/EGF-targeting treatment. PMID:26317020

  2. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Three Monoclonal Antibodies Raised against the Epidermal Growth Factor and Its Receptor in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Their Potential Use in the Selection of Patients for Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rengifo, Charles E; Blanco, Rancés; Blanco, Damián; Cedeño, Mercedes; Frómeta, Milagros; Calzado, Enrique Rengifo

    2013-01-01

    Adequate methods to identify which lung cancer patients are most likely to benefit from the targeted drugs against both epidermal growth factor receptor/epidermal growth factor (EGFR/EGF) are needed. For this reason, we evaluated both the tissue reactivity of ior egf/r3 monoclonal antibody (Mab) in human lung carcinomas and its biological activity in NCI-H125 cells. Additionally, we assessed the tissue expression of EGF using two Mabs, CB-EGF1 and CB-EGF2. The overexpression of EGFR was detected in 33.33% and 62.71% of small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), respectively. The ability of ior egf/r3 Mab to bind the extracellular domain of EGFR inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in NCI-H125 cells was also demonstrated. The EGF expression was observed in about 17% and 70% of SCLC and NSCLC, respectively. However, differences in the reactivity of CB-EGF1 and CB-EGF2 were evidenced. A dual expression of EGFR and EGF was observed in 16.67% and 57.63% of SCLC and NSCLC patients, respectively. But, a correlation between them was only obtained in NSCLC. Our results permit to recommend the development of diagnostic kits using ior egf/r3 and/or CB-EGF1 Mabs in order to achieve a better selection of patients to EGFR/EGF-targeting treatment.

  3. Host Anti-antibody Responses Following Adeno-associated Virus-mediated Delivery of Antibodies Against HIV and SIV in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Navio, José M; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Pedreño-López, Sònia; Rakasz, Eva G; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2016-02-01

    Long-term delivery of antibodies against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is a promising approach for the prevention or treatment of HIV infection. However, host antibody responses to the delivered antibody are a serious concern that could significantly limit the applicability of this approach. Here, we describe the dynamics and characteristics of the anti-antibody responses in monkeys that received either rhesus anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) antibodies (4L6 or 5L7) in prevention trials or a combination of rhesusized human anti-HIV antibodies (1NC9/8ANC195/3BNC117 or 10-1074/10E8/3BNC117) in therapy trials, all employing AAV1 delivery of IgG1. Eight out of eight monkeys that received the anti-HIV antibodies made persisting antibody responses to all three antibodies in the mix. Six out of six uninfected monkeys that received the anti-SIV antibody 4L6 and three out of six of those receiving anti-SIV antibody 5L7 also generated anti-antibodies. Both heavy and light chains were targeted, predominantly or exclusively to variable regions, and reactivity to complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 peptide could be demonstrated. There was a highly significant correlation of the magnitude of anti-antibody responses with the degree of sequence divergence of the delivered antibody from germline. Our results suggest the need for effective strategies to counteract the problem of antibody responses to AAV-delivered antibodies.

  4. Lapatinib enhances trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity via upregulation of HER2 in malignant mesothelioma cells

    PubMed Central

    OKITA, RIKI; SHIMIZU, KATSUHIKO; NOJIMA, YUJI; YUKAWA, TAKURO; MAEDA, AI; SAISHO, SHINSUKE; NAKATA, MASAO

    2015-01-01

    EGFR/HER2 are frequently expressed in MPM tissues, however, no studies have shown the clinical benefit of using EGFR/HER2-targeting drugs in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). It was reported that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) lapatinib enhanced trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in HER2-positive breast cancer, suggesting that this combination is a promising strategy for MPM treatment. The aim of the present study was to explore the possibility of a TKI combined with trastuzumab to enhance ADCC in MPM cells. Five MPM cell lines were used to test the effects of TKIs targeting EGFR (gefitinib, afatinib and lapatinib) on cell proliferation and the expression of the HER family receptor. The combined effects of TKI with trastuzumab on ADCC were evaluated using the LDH release assay. Additionally, MPM cells were isolated from patients and evaluated for lapatinib-induced upregulation of HER family receptors and trastuzumab- or cetuximab-mediated ADCC. In MPM cell lines, HER2 expression was upregulated by lapatinib, downregulated by afatinib and unaffected by gefitinib. As expected, more trastuzumab bound to MPM cells pretreated with lapatinib than untreated cells, resulting in the enhancement of trastuzumab-mediated ADCC in MPM cells. In patient-derived MPM cells, both HER2 and EGFR were upregulated by lapatinib, resulting in the enhancement of both trastuzumab- and cetuximab-mediated ADCC. Of the three TKIs, only lapatinib enhanced trastuzumab-mediated ADCC via the upregulation of HER2 expression in MPM cells, suggesting that sequential combination of lapatinib and trastuzumab may be a promising strategy for MPM treatment. PMID:26503698

  5. Lapatinib enhances trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity via upregulation of HER2 in malignant mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Okita, Riki; Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Nojima, Yuji; Yukawa, Takuro; Maeda, Ai; Saisho, Shinsuke; Nakata, Masao

    2015-12-01

    EGFR/HER2 are frequently expressed in MPM tissues, however, no studies have shown the clinical benefit of using EGFR/HER2-targeting drugs in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). It was reported that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) lapatinib enhanced trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in HER2-positive breast cancer, suggesting that this combination is a promising strategy for MPM treatment. The aim of the present study was to explore the possibility of a TKI combined with trastuzumab to enhance ADCC in MPM cells. Five MPM cell lines were used to test the effects of TKIs targeting EGFR (gefitinib, afatinib and lapatinib) on cell proliferation and the expression of the HER family receptor. The combined effects of TKI with trastuzumab on ADCC were evaluated using the LDH release assay. Additionally, MPM cells were isolated from patients and evaluated for lapatinib-induced upregulation of HER family receptors and trastuzumab- or cetuximab‑mediated ADCC. In MPM cell lines, HER2 expression was upregulated by lapatinib, downregulated by afatinib and unaffected by gefitinib. As expected, more trastuzumab bound to MPM cells pretreated with lapatinib than untreated cells, resulting in the enhancement of trastuzumab-mediated ADCC in MPM cells. In patient-derived MPM cells, both HER2 and EGFR were upregulated by lapatinib, resulting in the enhancement of both trastuzumab- and cetuximab-mediated ADCC. Of the three TKIs, only lapatinib enhanced trastuzumab-mediated ADCC via the upregulation of HER2 expression in MPM cells, suggesting that sequential combination of lapatinib and trastuzumab may be a promising strategy for MPM treatment. PMID:26503698

  6. Evaluation of reduction-mediated labelling of antibodies with technetium-99m.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z M; Ballinger, J R; Sheldon, K; Boxen, I

    1992-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies can be labelled with technetium-99m by prereduction of the antibody with 2-mercaptoethanol, then reduction of pertechnetate with an aliquot of a stannous kit, resulting in greater than 97% labelling without the need for further purification. The present work shows that equally high labelling can be obtained with a variety of weak ligands and that the optimum quantity of stannous chloride is 2-4 micrograms. Although the label was stable to challenge with excess DTPA, cysteine was able to remove a portion of the label. We have also shown that this technique works with the IgG2a isotype in addition to the previously reported IgG1 isotype. This approach is simple, convenient and reproducible, and warrants further clinical evaluation.

  7. Banff 2013 meeting report: inclusion of c4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection and antibody-associated arterial lesions.

    PubMed

    Haas, M; Sis, B; Racusen, L C; Solez, K; Glotz, D; Colvin, R B; Castro, M C R; David, D S R; David-Neto, E; Bagnasco, S M; Cendales, L C; Cornell, L D; Demetris, A J; Drachenberg, C B; Farver, C F; Farris, A B; Gibson, I W; Kraus, E; Liapis, H; Loupy, A; Nickeleit, V; Randhawa, P; Rodriguez, E R; Rush, D; Smith, R N; Tan, C D; Wallace, W D; Mengel, M

    2014-02-01

    The 12th Banff Conference on Allograft Pathology was held in Comandatuba, Brazil, from August 19-23, 2013, and was preceded by a 2-day Latin American Symposium on Transplant Immunobiology and Immunopathology. The meeting was highlighted by the presentation of the findings of several working groups formed at the 2009 and 2011 Banff meetings to: (1) establish consensus criteria for diagnosing antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in the presence and absence of detectable C4d deposition; (2) develop consensus definitions and thresholds for glomerulitis (g score) and chronic glomerulopathy (cg score), associated with improved inter-observer agreement and correlation with clinical, molecular and serological data; (3) determine whether isolated lesions of intimal arteritis ("isolated v") represent acute rejection similar to intimal arteritis in the presence of tubulointerstitial inflammation; (4) compare different methodologies for evaluating interstitial fibrosis and for performing/evaluating implantation biopsies of renal allografts with regard to reproducibility and prediction of subsequent graft function; and (5) define clinically and prognostically significant morphologic criteria for subclassifying polyoma virus nephropathy. The key outcome of the 2013 conference is defining criteria for diagnosis of C4d-negative ABMR and respective modification of the Banff classification. In addition, three new Banff Working Groups were initiated. PMID:24472190

  8. Tumor gene therapy by MVA-mediated expression of T-cell-stimulating antibodies.

    PubMed

    Paul, Stephane; Regulier, Etienne; Rooke, Ronald; Stoeckel, Fabienne; Geist, Michel; Homann, Horst; Balloul, Jean-Marc; Villeval, Dominique; Poitevin, Yves; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Acres, R Bruce

    2002-05-01

    Immune responses to tumor-associated antigens are often dampened by a tumor-induced state of immune anergy. Previous work has attempted to overcome tumor-induced T-cell anergy by the direct injection of vectors carrying the genes encoding one of a variety of cytokines. We hypothesised that the polyclonal stimulation of T cells, preferably through the TCR complex, would result in a cascade of cytokines associated with T-cell activation and would be best able to overcome T-cell anergy. Here we use the highly attenuated MVA poxvirus to express on tumor cells, in vitro and in vivo, either of three membrane-bound monoclonal antibodies specific for murine TCR complex. Using this system, we have expressed antibodies specific for the CD3 epsilon chain (KT3), TCR alpha/beta complex (H57-597), and V beta 7 chain (TR310). Tumor cells bristling with these antibodies are capable of inducing murine T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. When injected into growing tumors (P815, RenCa, and B16F10), these constructs induce the activation of immune effector cells and result in the rejection of the tumor. Histological and FACS analysis of tumor-infiltrating leukocytes reveal that the injection of recombinant virus-expressing antibodies specific for the TCR complex attracts and activates (CD25(+), CD69(+)) CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. This approach represents a novel strategy to overcome T-cell anergy in tumors and allow the stimulation of tumor-specific T cells. PMID:11961670

  9. Sequences in antibody molecules important for receptor-mediated transport into the chicken egg yolk.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Sherie L; Mohammed, Mansoor S; Wims, Letitia A; Trinh, Ryan; Etches, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Large quantities of antibodies are transported into the yolk of the chicken's egg. We have identified several regions within the antibody molecule important for its uptake into the egg yolk. An intact Fc and hinge region but not the Fc-associated carbohydrate are required for transport. Our data suggest that the C(H)2/C(H)3 interface is recognized by the receptor responsible for immunoglobulin (Ig) transport. At this interface, residues 251-254 form an exposed loop on the surface of C(H)2. Chicken IgY (cIgY) has the sequence LYIS and human IgG (hIgG) has the sequence LMIS at these positions; mutation of MIS to glycines results in an IgG that is not transported. A second site important for transport is at positions 429-432 within C(H)3. All transported antibodies have the sequence HEAL, whereas, murine IgG2b (mIgG2b) with the sequence HEGL and cIgA with the sequence HDGI fail to be transported. hIgA has the HEAL sequence and is transported.

  10. Antibody-mediated neutralization of Ebola virus can occur by two distinct mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Bailey, Michael A.; Popernack, Paul M.; Cunningham, James M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sullivan, Nancy J.

    2010-06-05

    Human Ebola virus causes severe hemorrhagic fever disease with high mortality and there is no vaccine or treatment. Antibodies in survivors occur early, are sustained, and can delay infection when transferred into nonhuman primates. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from survivors exhibit potent neutralizing activity in vitro and are protective in rodents. To better understand targets and mechanisms of neutralization, we investigated a panel of mAbs shown previously to react with the envelope glycoprotein (GP). While one non-neutralizing mAb recognized a GP epitope in the nonessential mucin-like domain, the rest were specific for GP1, were neutralizing, and could be further distinguished by reactivity with secreted GP. We show that survivor antibodies, human KZ52 and monkey JP3K11, were specific for conformation-dependent epitopes comprising residues in GP1 and GP2 and that neutralization occurred by two distinct mechanisms; KZ52 inhibited cathepsin cleavage of GP whereas JP3K11 recognized the cleaved, fusion-active form of GP.

  11. Interleukin 1 and tumour necrosis factor alpha may be responsible for the lytic mechanism during anti-tumour antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Pullyblank, A. M.; Guillou, P. J.; Monson, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Antibodies are thought to bring about tumour cell lysis by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), but the exact mechanism is not well elucidated. Monocytes are known to be important mediators of anti-tumour ADCC and are also known to secrete the cytokines tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta), both of which have been shown to bring about tumour cell lysis. We examined the release of these cytokines during ADCC and attempted to elucidate which components of the ADCC reaction were necessary for cytokine production. We measured TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta in supernatants collected from a standard ADCC assay using each of the anti-colorectal antibodies m17-1A, c17-1A and cSF25. We found that there was significant TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta release during ADCC mediated by each of these three antibodies and that the magnitude of cytokine release seemed to reflect the degree of tumour cell lysis produced by each antibody. Furthermore, we found that effector cells, target cells and a specific anti-tumour antibody were necessary for this to occur. The presence of only some of the components of the reaction or of an irrelevant antibody produced little or no TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta. We conclude that TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta are released when an effector and tumour target cell are united by a specific tumour antibody and that these cytokines may be important in bringing about tumour cell lysis during the ADCC reaction. PMID:7669568

  12. Synthesis and antibody-mediated detection of oligonucleotides containing multiple 2,4-dinitrophenyl reporter groups.

    PubMed Central

    Grzybowski, J; Will, D W; Randall, R E; Smith, C A; Brown, T

    1993-01-01

    A series of non-nucleoside-based 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) phosphoramidites have been prepared and used in the multiple labelling of oligonucleotides during solid-phase synthesis. The length of spacer arm between the DNP label and the oligonucleotide phosphate backbone, and the number of attached DNP groups have both been varied in order to determine the optimum conditions for anti-DNP antibody binding. Detection using enzyme-linked colorimetric techniques showed sensitivity equivalent to that obtainable using biotinylated oligonucleotides. Images PMID:8493087

  13. Multi-Dimensional Measurement of Antibody-Mediated Heterosubtypic Immunity to Influenza.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiong; Hilchey, Shannon P; Hyrien, Ollivier; Huertas, Nelson; Perry, Sheldon; Ramanunninair, Manojkumar; Bucher, Doris; Zand, Martin S

    2015-01-01

    The human immune response to influenza vaccination depends in part on preexisting cross-reactive (heterosubtypic) immunity from previous infection by, and/or vaccination with, influenza strains that share antigenic determinants with the vaccine strains. However, current methods for assessing heterosubtypic antibody responses against influenza, including the hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) assay and ELISA, are time and labor intensive, and require moderate amounts of serum and reagents. To address these issues we have developed a fluorescent multiplex assay, mPlex-Flu, that rapidly and simultaneously measures strain specific IgG, IgA, and IgM antibodies against influenza hemagglutinin (HA) from multiple viral strains. We cloned, expressed and purified HA proteins from 12 influenza strains, and coupled them to multiplex beads. Assay validation showed that minimal sample volumes (<5 μl of serum) were needed, and the assay had a linear response over a four Log10 range. The assay detected nanogram levels of anti-influenza specific antibodies, had high accuracy and reproducibility, with an average percentage coefficient of variation (%CV) of 9.06 for intra-assay and 12.94 for inter-assay variability. Pre- and post-intramuscular trivalent influenza vaccination levels of virus specific Ig were consistent with HAI titer and ELISA measurements. A significant advantage of the mPLEX-Flu assay over the HAI assay is the ability to perform antigenic cartography, determining the antigenic distances between influenza HA's, without mathematical correction for HAI data issues. For validation we performed antigenic cartography on 14 different post-influenza infection ferret sera assayed against 12 different influenza HA's. Results were in good agreement with a phylogenetic tree generated from hierarchical clustering of the genomic HA sequences. This is the first report of the use of a multiplex method for antigenic cartography using ferret sera. Overall, the mPlex-Flu assay

  14. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by endowing IgG with FcαRI (CD89) binding

    PubMed Central

    Borrok, M Jack; Luheshi, Nadia M; Beyaz, Nurten; Davies, Gareth C; Legg, James W; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Tsui, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Fc effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) are crucial to the efficacy of many antibody therapeutics. In addition to IgG, antibodies of the IgA isotype can also promote cell killing through engagement of myeloid lineage cells via interactions between the IgA-Fc and FcαRI (CD89). Herein, we describe a unique, tandem IgG1/IgA2 antibody format in the context of a trastuzumab variable domain that exhibits enhanced ADCC and ADCP capabilities. The IgG1/IgA2 tandem Fc format retains IgG1 FcγR binding as well as FcRn-mediated serum persistence, yet is augmented with myeloid cell-mediated effector functions via FcαRI/IgA Fc interactions. In this work, we demonstrate anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibodies with the unique tandem IgG1/IgA2 Fc can better recruit and engage cytotoxic polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells than either the parental IgG1 or IgA2. Pharmacokinetics of IgG1/IgA2 in BALB/c mice are similar to the parental IgG, and far surpass the poor serum persistence of IgA2. The IgG1/IgA2 format is expressed at similar levels and with similar thermal stability to IgG1, and can be purified via standard protein A chromatography. The tandem IgG1/IgA2 format could potentially augment IgG-based immunotherapeutics with enhanced PMN-mediated cytotoxicity while avoiding many of the problems associated with developing IgAs. PMID:25970007

  15. Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response in mice is primarily dependent on the Ah phenotype of lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Silkworth, J B; Antrim, L A; Sack, G

    1986-12-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons act through the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in mice to produce a series of toxic effects of the immune system. The receptor protein is a product of the Ah gene locus. Ah responsive (Ahb/Ahb) mice express a high affinity receptor in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues whereas nonresponsive Ahd/Ahd mice express a poor affinity receptor. To determine the role of the Ah receptor of lymphoid tissue relative to that of nonlymphoid tissue in the induction of immune impairment, bone marrow was used to reconstitute lethally irradiated mice of the same or opposite Ah phenotype. All mice were given 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (35 and 350 mumol/kg) ip 2 days before immunization with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). The immune response to this T dependent antigen and organ weights were determined 5 or 7 days later in normal or chimeric mice, respectively. Monoclonal Lyt 1.1 and Lyt 1.2 antibodies were used to establish the origin of the cells which repopulated the chimeric thymuses. The immune responses of both BALB/cBy (Ahb/Ahb) and the BALB/cBy X DBA/2 hybrid, CByD2F1 (Ahb/Ahd), were significantly suppressed but DBA/2 mice were unaffected. The immune responses of chimeric BALB/cBy----BALB/cBy and BALB/cBy----DBA/2 (donor----recipient) mice were also significantly suppressed and thymic atrophy was observed in both cases. The serum anti-SRBC antibody titers of DBA/2----BALB/cBy chimeras were also significantly decreased although not to the same extent as in BALB/cBy----DBA/2 mice. Chimeric DBA/2----DBA/2 mice were not affected. These results indicate that the sensitivity to Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response is primarily determined by the Ah phenotype of the lymphoid tissue.

  16. Malachite green mediates homodimerization of antibody VL domains to form a fluorescent ternary complex with singular symmetric interfaces.

    PubMed

    Szent-Gyorgyi, Chris; Stanfield, Robyn L; Andreko, Susan; Dempsey, Alison; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Capek, Sarah; Waggoner, Alan S; Wilson, Ian A; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2013-11-15

    We report that a symmetric small-molecule ligand mediates the assembly of antibody light chain variable domains (VLs) into a correspondent symmetric ternary complex with novel interfaces. The L5* fluorogen activating protein is a VL domain that binds malachite green (MG) dye to activate intense fluorescence. Crystallography of liganded L5* reveals a 2:1 protein:ligand complex with inclusive C2 symmetry, where MG is almost entirely encapsulated between an antiparallel arrangement of the two VL domains. Unliganded L5* VL domains crystallize as a similar antiparallel VL/VL homodimer. The complementarity-determining regions are spatially oriented to form novel VL/VL and VL/ligand interfaces that tightly constrain a propeller conformer of MG. Binding equilibrium analysis suggests highly cooperative assembly to form a very stable VL/MG/VL complex, such that MG behaves as a strong chemical inducer of dimerization. Fusion of two VL domains into a single protein tightens MG binding over 1000-fold to low picomolar affinity without altering the large binding enthalpy, suggesting that bonding interactions with ligand and restriction of domain movements make independent contributions to binding. Fluorescence activation of a symmetrical fluorogen provides a selection mechanism for the isolation and directed evolution of ternary complexes where unnatural symmetric binding interfaces are favored over canonical antibody interfaces. As exemplified by L5*, these self-reporting complexes may be useful as modulators of protein association or as high-affinity protein tags and capture reagents.

  17. Diagnosis of early pancreas graft failure via antibody-mediated rejection: single-center experience with 256 pancreas transplantations.

    PubMed

    de Kort, H; Mallat, M J K; van Kooten, C; de Heer, E; Brand-Schaaf, S H; van der Wal, A M; Roufosse, C; Roelen, D L; Bruijn, J A; Claas, F H; de Fijter, J W; Bajema, I M

    2014-04-01

    Early pancreas graft loss is usually attributed to technical failure while the possibility of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is generally overlooked. To investigate the role of AMR in early pancreas graft loss, we retrospectively assessed 256 patients with simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) between 1985 and 2010 at our institute. We included 33 SPK patients who lost their pancreas graft <1 year after transplantation. AMR was diagnosed based on donor-specific antibodies, C4d and histology in 7 cases, 8 cases were suspicious for AMR and 18 pancreas graft losses were not due to AMR. Acute AMR occurred >1 month after transplantation in 6/7 cases, whereas all other causes typically led to loss <1 month after transplantation. Thrombotic lesions occurred equally among the 33 cases. In 12/18 concurrent kidney specimens, the diagnostic results paralleled those of the pancreas graft. All patients with acute AMR of the pancreas graft lost their renal grafts <1 year after transplantation. In the setting of a thrombotic event, histopathological analysis of early pancreas graft loss is advisable to rule out the possibility of AMR, particularly because a diagnosis of acute AMR has important consequences for renal graft outcomes.

  18. MP-4 Contributes to Snake Venom Neutralization by Mucuna pruriens Seeds through an Indirect Antibody-mediated Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Chitra; Nair, Deepak T; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2016-05-20

    Mortality due to snakebite is a serious public health problem, and available therapeutics are known to induce debilitating side effects. Traditional medicine suggests that seeds of Mucuna pruriens can provide protection against the effects of snakebite. Our aim is to identify the protein(s) that may be important for snake venom neutralization and elucidate its mechanism of action. To this end, we have identified and purified a protein from M. pruriens, which we have named MP-4. The full-length polypeptide sequence of MP-4 was obtained through N-terminal sequencing of peptide fragments. Sequence analysis suggested that the protein may belong to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor family and therefore may potentially neutralize the proteases present in snake venom. Using various structural and biochemical tools coupled with in vivo assays, we are able to show that MP-4 does not afford direct protection against snake venom because it is actually a poor inhibitor of serine proteases. Further experiments showed that antibodies generated against MP-4 cross-react with the whole venom and provide protection to mice against Echis carinatus snake venom. This study shows that the MP-4 contributes significantly to the snake venom neutralization activity of M. pruriens seeds through an indirect antibody-mediated mechanism. PMID:26987900

  19. Gene therapy for colorectal cancer using adenovirus-mediated full-length antibody, cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Man; Wang, Xiang; Chi, Yudan; Zhou, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Cetuximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody, approved to treat patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) for years. It functions by blocking the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) from receiving signals or interacting with other proteins. Although the demand for cetuximab for the treatment of cancer patients in clinics is increasing, the complicated techniques involved and its high cost limit its wide applications. Here, a new, cheaper form of cetuximab was generated for cancer gene therapy. This was achieved by cloning the full-length cetuximab antibody into two serotypes of adenoviral vectors, termed as AdC68-CTB and Hu5-CTB. In vivo studies showed that a single dose of AdC68-CTB or Hu5-CTB induced sustained cetuximab expression and dramatically suppressed tumor growth in NCI-H508– or DiFi-inoculated nude mice. In conclusion, gene therapy using adenovirus expressing full-length cetuximab could be a novel alternative method for the effective treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:27058423

  20. Naturally Acquired HMW1- and HMW2-Specific Serum Antibodies in Adults and Children Mediate Opsonophagocytic Killing of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Linda E.

    2015-01-01

    The HMW1 and HMW2 proteins are highly immunogenic adhesins expressed by approximately 75% of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) strains, and HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies can mediate opsonophagocytic killing of NTHi. In this study, we assessed the ability of HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies in sera from healthy adults and convalescent-phase sera from children with NTHi otitis media to mediate killing of homologous and heterologous NTHi. The serum samples were examined pre- and postadsorption on HMW1 and HMW2 affinity columns, and affinity-purified antibodies were assessed for ability to mediate killing of homologous and heterologous strains. Adult serum samples mediated the killing of six prototype NTHi strains at titers of <1:10 to 1:1,280. HMW1- and HMW2-adsorbed sera demonstrated unchanged to 8-fold decreased opsonophagocytic titers against the homologous strains. Each affinity-purified antibody preparation mediated the killing of the respective homologous strain at titers of <1:10 to 1:320 and of the five heterologous strains at titers of <1:10 to 1:320, with most preparations killing most heterologous strains to some degree. None of the acute-phase serum samples from children mediated killing, but each convalescent-phase serum sample mediated killing of the infecting strain at titers of 1:40 to 1:640. HMW1- and HMW2-adsorbed convalescent-phase serum samples demonstrated ≥4-fold decreases in titer. Three of four affinity-purified antibody preparations mediated killing of the infecting strain at titers of 1:20 to 1:320, but no killing of representative heterologous strains was observed. HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies capable of mediating opsonophagocytic killing are present in the serum from normal adults and develop in convalescent-phase sera of children with NTHi otitis media. Continued investigation of the HMW1 and HMW2 proteins as potential vaccine candidates for the prevention of NTHi disease is warranted. PMID:26512048

  1. Mediation of cytotoxic functions by classes and subclasses of sheep antibody reactive with cell surface immunoglobulin idiotypic and constant region determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, F K; Elliott, E V

    1978-01-01

    Sheep antibodies, reactive with either the idiotypic or constant region antigenic determinants of the immunoglobulin light chain on guinea-pig L2C leukaemic cells, were separated into IgM and into the two subclasses of IgG, IgG1 and IgG2. Antibody of both IgG subclasses inhibited the migration of L2C cells along plastic surfaces; IgM was only weakly inhibitory. Antibody of class IgM and of subclass IgG1 mediated complement cytotoxicity against the L2C cells whereas only that of subclass IgG2 mediated K-cell cytotoxicity; the effector arms were rabbit complement and sheep peripheral leucocytes, respectively. PMID:75184

  2. Neutralization of Clostridium difficile Toxin B Mediated by Engineered Lactobacilli That Produce Single-Domain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kasper Krogh; Strokappe, Nika M.; Hultberg, Anna; Truusalu, Kai; Smidt, Imbi; Mikelsaar, Raik-Hiio; Mikelsaar, Marika; Verrips, Theo; Hammarström, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the primary cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the Western world. The major virulence factors of C. difficile are two exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which cause extensive colonic inflammation and epithelial damage manifested by episodes of diarrhea. In this study, we explored the basis for an oral antitoxin strategy based on engineered Lactobacillus strains expressing TcdB-neutralizing antibody fragments in the gastrointestinal tract. Variable domain of heavy chain-only (VHH) antibodies were raised in llamas by immunization with the complete TcdB toxin. Four unique VHH fragments neutralizing TcdB in vitro were isolated. When these VHH fragments were expressed in either secreted or cell wall-anchored form in Lactobacillus paracasei BL23, they were able to neutralize the cytotoxic effect of the toxin in an in vitro cell-based assay. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of two strains of engineered L. paracasei BL23 expressing two neutralizing anti-TcdB VHH fragments (VHH-B2 and VHH-G3) delayed killing in a hamster protection model where the animals were challenged with spores of a TcdA− TcdB+ strain of C. difficile (P < 0.05). Half of the hamsters in the treated group survived until the termination of the experiment at day 5 and showed either no damage or limited inflammation of the colonic mucosa despite having been colonized with C. difficile for up to 4 days. The protective effect in the hamster model suggests that the strategy could be explored as a supplement to existing therapies for patients. PMID:26573738

  3. A clinico-radiological phenotype of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody-mediated disorder presenting with seizures and basal ganglia changes.

    PubMed

    Hacohen, Yael; Wright, Sukhvir; Siddiqui, Ata; Pandya, Nikki; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming

    2012-12-01

    In childhood, central nervous system (CNS) presentations associated with antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex include limbic encephalitis, status epilepticus, epileptic encephalopathy, and autistic regression. We report the cases of two individuals (a 6-year-old male and an 11-year-old female) who presented with an acute-onset explosive seizure disorder with positive VGKC complex antibodies and bilateral basal ganglia changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both patients made a complete clinical recovery, without immunotherapy, with resolution of the MRI changes and normalization of the antibody levels. Extended antibody testing, including testing for leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1), contactin-associated protein 2, and contactin-2 was negative. This could suggest that the clinico-radiological phenotype in our patients may in fact be associated with a novel autoreactive target(s) within the VGKC complex, as may be the case in other children with VGKC complex-mediated CNS disorders.

  4. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC’s regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9−/−) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9−/−. We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9−/−, which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9−/−. Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  5. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2−/− mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates. PMID:26857577

  6. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Cole, Leah E; Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Anosova, Natalie G; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2(-/-)mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates. PMID:26857577

  7. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Cole, Leah E; Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Anosova, Natalie G; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2(-/-)mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates.

  8. Rebmab200, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the sodium phosphate transporter NaPi2b displays strong immune mediated cytotoxicity against cancer: a novel reagent for targeted antibody therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Lopes dos Santos, Mariana; Yeda, Fernanda Perez; Tsuruta, Lilian Rumi; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Pimenta, Alécio A; Degaki, Theri Leica; Soares, Ibere C; Tuma, Maria Carolina; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Alves, Venancio A F; Old, Lloyd J; Ritter, Gerd; Moro, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    NaPi2b, a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, is highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and is recognized by the murine monoclonal antibody MX35. The antibody had shown excellent targeting to ovarian cancer in several early phase clinical trials but being murine the antibody's full therapeutic potential could not be explored. To overcome this impediment we developed a humanized antibody version named Rebmab200, expressed in human PER.C6® cells and cloned by limiting dilution. In order to select a clone with high therapeutic potential clones were characterized using a series of physicochemical assays, flow cytometry, real-time surface plasmon resonance, glycosylation analyses, immunohistochemistry, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement-dependent-cytotoxicity assays and quantitative PCR. Comparative analyses of Rebmab200 and MX35 monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that the two antibodies had similar specificity for NaPi2b by flow cytometry with a panel of 30 cell lines and maintained similar kinetic parameters. Robust and high producer cell clones potentially suitable for use in manufacturing were obtained. Rebmab200 antibodies were assessed by immunohistochemistry using a large panel of tissues including human carcinomas of ovarian, lung, kidney and breast origin. An assessment of its binding towards 33 normal human organs was performed as well. Rebmab200 showed selected strong reactivity with the tested tumor types but little or no reactivity with the normal tissues tested confirming its potential for targeted therapeutics strategies. The remarkable cytotoxicity shown by Rebmab200 in OVCAR-3 cells is a significant addition to the traits of stability and productivity displayed by the top clones of Rebmab200. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated toxicity functionality was confirmed in repeated assays using cancer cell lines derived from ovary, kidney and lung as targets. To explore use of this antibody in clinical trials, GMP production of Rebmab

  9. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab administered at approved doses may delay development of trastuzumab resistance by additively enhancing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Gábor; Szöőr, Árpád; Simon, László; Yarden, Yosef; Szöllősi, János; Vereb, György

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the recently concluded CLEOPATRA trial showed clinical benefits of combining trastuzumab and pertuzumab for treating HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, trastuzumab monotherapy is still the mainstay in adjuvant settings. Since trastuzumab resistance occurs in over half of these cancers, we examined the mechanisms by which treatment of intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant and -sensitive tumors can benefit from the combination of these antibodies. F(ab′)2 of both trastuzumab and pertuzumab were generated and validated in order to separately analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC)-based and direct biological effects of the antibodies. Compared to monotherapy, combination of the two antibodies at clinically permitted doses enhanced the recruitment of natural killer cells responsible for ADCC, and significantly delayed the outgrowth of xenografts from intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant JIMT-1 cells. Antibody dose-response curves of in vitro ADCC showed that antibody-mediated killing can be saturated, and the two antibodies exert an additive effect at sub-saturation doses. Thus, the additive effect in vivo indicates that therapeutic tissue levels likely do not saturate ADCC. Additionally, isobole studies with the in vitro trastuzumab-sensitive BT-474 cells showed that the direct biological effect of combined treatment is additive, and surpasses the maximum effect of either monotherapy. Our results suggest the combined therapy is expected to give results that are superior to monotherapy, whatever the type of HER2-positive tumor may be. The combination of both antibodies at maximum clinically approved doses should thus be administered to patients to recruit maximum ADCC and cause maximum direct biological growth inhibition. PMID:27380003

  10. Anti-4-1BB monoclonal antibodies attenuate concanavalin A-induced immune-mediated liver injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Guangtao; Wu, Sensen; Zhang, Yuanchao

    2016-01-01

    Effective therapies for the treatment of immune-mediated liver disease are currently lacking. As a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, 4-1BB has a key role in T-cell activation and has been implicated in the development of autoimmune disorders. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic or preventive function of an anti-4-1BB monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a mouse model of concanavalin (Con) A-induced immune-mediated liver injury. A mouse model of immune-mediated liver injury was established by tail vein injection of Con A (20 mg/kg). 4-1BB mAb (100 µg), with or without methylprednisolone (MEP; 3 mg/kg), was intraperitoneally injected into the tail vein 2 h prior to or 2 h following Con A injection. Con A induced marked hepatocyte necrosis, significantly reduced CD 4+/CD25+ T-cell levels, and increased the serum levels of aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT), in addition to the percentage of 4-1BB+ T-cells, compared with the control (all P<0.05). The administration of 4-1BB mAb prior to or following Con A injection was able to attenuate Con A-induced liver tissue damage and significantly reduce serum AST and ALT levels (P<0.05). A combination of MEP and 4-1BB mAb further reduced serum AST and ALT levels, compared with either treatment alone. In addition, administration of 4-1BB mAb and MEP alone or in combination significantly increased CD4+/CD25+ T-cell levels, compared with the control (P<0.05). These results suggested that 4-1BB mAb was able to attenuate liver injury and preserve liver function in a mouse model of Con A-induced immune-mediated liver injury by promoting the expansion of CD4+/CD25+ T-cells. Furthermore, a combination of 4-1BB mAb with MEP was associated with greater beneficial effects than either treatment alone. The clinical significance of 4-1BB mAb in immune-mediated liver disease remains to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27588047

  11. Quantifying variation in the potential for antibody-mediated apparent competition among nine genotypes of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi☆

    PubMed Central

    Fairlie-Clarke, Karen J.; Allen, Judith E.; Read, Andrew F.; Graham, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Within-host competition among parasite genotypes affects epidemiology as well as the evolution of virulence. In the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi, competition among genotypes, as well as clone-specific and clone-transcending immunity are well documented. However, variation among genotypes in the induction of antibodies is not well understood, despite the important role of antibodies in the clearance of malaria infection. Here, we quantify the potential for antibodies induced by one clone to bind another (i.e., to cause antibody-mediated apparent competition) for nine genetically distinct P. chabaudi clones. We hypothesised that clones would vary in the strength of antibody induction, and that the propensity for clone-transcending immunity between a pair of clones would increase with increasing genetic relatedness at key antigenic loci. Using serum collected from mice 35 days post-infection, we measured titres of antibody to an unrelated antigen, Keyhole Limpet Haemocyanin (KLH), and two malaria antigens: recombinant Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA-1) and Merozoite Surface Protein-119 (MSP-119). Amino acid sequence homology within each antigenic locus was used as a measure of relatedness. We found significant parasite genetic variation for the strength of antibody induction. We also found that relatedness at MSP-119 but not AMA-1 predicted clone-transcending binding. Our results help explain the outcome of chronic-phase mixed infections and generate testable predictions about the pairwise competitive ability of P. chabaudi clones. PMID:24056014

  12. Complement-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV-1 infection in vitro is characterized by increased protein and RNA syntheses and infectious virus release.

    PubMed

    Robinson, W E; Montefiori, D C; Gillespie, D H; Mitchell, W M

    1989-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in vitro has been described recently and was shown to occur by two mechanisms: either participation of the alternative pathway of complement or to involve an Fc receptor-mediated, complement-independent mechanism. Complement-mediated ADE results in an accelerated cytopathic effect in target cells that can abrogate the protective properties of neutralizing antibodies. This study characterizes the surface antigens of MT-2 cells using flow cytometric analysis and shows that these cells express high levels of both CD4 and complement receptor type 2 (CR2) while several CD4+ cell lines that do not demonstrate complement-mediated ADE lack high levels of complement receptors. Further, utilizing MT-2 cell cultures, it is demonstrated that complement-mediated ADE of HIV-1 infection is conferred by the sera from more than 80% of HIV-1 antibody-positive individuals (N = 85). Complement-mediated ADE of HIV-1 infection causes an acceleration of several parameters indicative of HIV-1 infection in vitro including increased HIV-1 antigen synthesis as detected by indirect immunofluorescence, RNA accumulation as measured by a solution hybridization protocol, reverse transcriptase release, and progeny virus production. PMID:2465404

  13. Antibody-mediated opsonization of red blood cells in parvovirus B19 infection.

    PubMed

    Chehadeh, Wassim; Halim, Medhat A; Al-Nakib, Widad

    2009-07-20

    Red blood cells (RBCs) express abundantly parvovirus B19 receptor, and their role in the dissemination or clearance of B19 infection is unknown. In this study, we report that in early, acute or persistent infection, B19 viremia is mostly associated with RBCs. The capacity of different patients' plasma or IgG to opsonize RBCs collected from patients with early B19 infection, was investigated. The highest opsonization activity was observed with plasma or IgG fractions from patients with past B19 infection. In contrast, IgG samples from patients with acute or persistent infection showed no or little opsonization activity. The depletion of antibodies specific to B19 VP1, but not VP2, from IgG samples, resulted in a significant suppression of opsonization. Furthermore, IgG samples preincubated with heated B19 particles exposing VP1-unique (VP1u) region were unable to opsonize RBCs. These observations clearly suggest a role for anti-VP1u IgG in the opsonization of RBC-bound B19 particles.

  14. Intein-mediated one-step purification of Escherichia coli secreted human antibody fragments.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wan-Yi; Miller, Keith D.; Coolbaugh, Michael; Wood, David W.

    2011-02-25

    In this work, we apply self-cleaving affinity tag technology to several target proteins secreted into the Escherichia coli periplasm, including two with disulfide bonds. The target proteins were genetically fused to a self-cleaving chitin-binding domain intein tag for purification via a chitin agarose affinity resin. By attaching the intein-tagged fusion genes to the PelB secretion leader sequence, the tagged target proteins were secreted to the periplasmic space and could be recovered in active form by simple osmotic shock. After chitin-affinity purification, the target proteins were released from the chitin-binding domain tag via intein self-cleaving. This was induced by a small change in pH from 8.5 to 6.5 at room temperature, allowing direct elution of the cleaved target protein from the chitin affinity resin. The target proteins include the E. coli maltose-binding protein and b-lactamase enzyme, as well as two human antibody fragments that contain disulfide bonds. In all cases, the target proteins were purified with good activity and yield, without the need for refolding. Overall, this work demonstrates the compatibility of the DI-CM intein with the PelB secretion system in E. coli, greatly expanding its potential to more complex proteins.

  15. Removal of terminal alpha-galactosyl residues from xenogeneic porcine endothelial cells. Decrease in complement-mediated cytotoxicity but persistence of IgG1-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Watier, H; Guillaumin, J M; Piller, F; Lacord, M; Thibault, G; Lebranchu, Y; Monsigny, M; Bardos, P

    1996-07-15

    To determine the role of the terminal alpha-galactosyl residue in the endothelial damage mediated by human xenoreactive natural antibodies (IgM and IgG), we treated porcine endothelial cells in culture with green coffee bean alpha-galactosidase. A practically complete removal of terminal alpha-Gal residues (as evaluated by flow cytometry with Bandeiraea simplicifolia isolectin B4) and concomitant exposure of N-acetyllactosamine were obtained without altering cell viability. A dramatic decrease in IgM and IgG binding (from a pool of human sera) was observed, confirming the key role of the alpha-galactosyl residues. The enzyme treatment did not induce any nonspecific immunoglobulin binding sites, but led to the exposure of new epitopes for a minor fraction of IgM. The main residual IgM and IgG binding could be due to xenoantigens other than the alpha-galactosyl residues. When alpha-galactosidase-treated endothelial cells were used as targets in cytotoxicity experiments, they were less susceptible than untreated cells to complement-mediated cytotoxicity induced by fresh human serum. In contrast, they did not acquire resistance to human IgG-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, despite the decrease in IgG binding. Because it is known that antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mediated by CD16+ NK cells is dependent on IgG1 and IgG3, and not on IgG2 or IgG4, which was confirmed by blocking experiments, we studied the binding of all four subclasses to intact and alpha-galactosidase-treated endothelial cells. Two major subclasses, IgG1 and IgG2, bound to untreated endothelial cells, whereas IgG3 binding was low and IgG4 binding was negligible. A decrease in IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 binding was observed upon alpha-galactosidase treatment, indicating that antibodies belonging to these three subclasses recognize alpha-galactosyl residues. The decrease in IgG2 binding was more pronounced than the decrease in IgG1 binding. Collectively, these data indicate that IgG1 xenoreactive natural

  16. DNA-based vaccine against La Crosse virus: protective immune response mediated by neutralizing antibodies and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Schuh, T; Schultz, J; Moelling, K; Pavlovic, J

    1999-07-01

    La Crosse virus (LACV)-mediated encephalitis is the most frequently reported arboviral disease in the United States, but to date no vaccine against this virus is available. We have established a new animal model, genetically targeted mice lacking a functional interferon type I receptor (IFNAR-1). These mice show an age-independent susceptibility to LACV and develop an acute encephalitis within 6 days of infection, thereby allowing the evaluation of vaccines against LACV. Taking advantage of this knockout mouse model, we have assessed the feasibility of DNA vaccination against this viral disease. Plasmid DNAs, encoding either the virus surface glycoproteins G1 and G2 or the internal nucleocapsid protein N, were used to immunize IFNAR-1-deficient mice. Mice vaccinated with DNA encoding the glycoproteins G1 and G2 produced neutralizing antibodies and exhibited a high degree of protection against challenge with high doses of LACV. Depletion of CD4+ T cells in mice vaccinated with DNA encoding G1/G2 reduced their capacity to control the infection. Virus titration and immunohistological analysis revealed that the protected mice showed no evidence of LACV particles in the brain. This indicates that the vaccine-induced immune response efficiently blocked viral spreading from the primary replication site to the brain. In contrast, immunization with DNA encoding protein N yielded only a partial protective effect that can be attributed to the cellular immune response. Taken together, this study shows that DNA vaccines can be designed to efficiently induce a protective immune response based on neutralizing antibodies and CD4+ T cells.

  17. Anti-β₂M monoclonal antibodies kill myeloma cells via cell- and complement-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingjun; Qian, Jianfei; Lan, Yongsheng; Lu, Yong; Li, Haiyan; Hong, Bangxing; Zheng, Yuhuan; He, Jin; Yang, Jing; Yi, Qing

    2014-09-01

    Our previous studies showed that anti-β2M monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) at high doses have direct apoptotic effects on myeloma cells, suggesting that anti-β2M mAbs might be developed as a novel therapeutic agent. In this study, we investigated the ability of the mAbs at much lower concentrations to indirectly kill myeloma cells by utilizing immune effector cells or molecules. Our results showed that anti-β2M mAbs effectively lysed MM cells via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), which were correlated with and dependent on the surface expression of β2M on MM cells. The presence of MM bone marrow stromal cells or addition of IL-6 did not attenuate anti-β2M mAb-induced ADCC and CDC activities against MM cells. Furthermore, anti-β2M mAbs only showed limited cytotoxicity toward normal B cells and nontumorous mesenchymal stem cells, indicating that the ADCC and CDC activities of the anti-β2M mAbs were more prone to the tumor cells. Lenalidomide potentiated in vitro ADCC activity against MM cells and in vivo tumor inhibition capacity induced by the anti-β2M mAbs by enhancing the activity of NK cells. These results support clinical development of anti-β2M mAbs, both as a monotherapy and in combination with lenalidomide, to improve MM patient outcome.

  18. Rituximab in Combination With Bortezomib, Plasmapheresis, and High-Dose IVIG to Treat Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Waiser, Johannes; Duerr, Michael; Schönemann, Constanze; Rudolph, Birgit; Wu, Kaiyin; Halleck, Fabian; Budde, Klemens; Lachmann, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Background Current treatment strategies for antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection (AMR) are not sufficiently effective. In most centers, “standard of care” treatment includes plasmapheresis (PPH) and IVIG preparations. Since several years, modern therapeutics targeting B cells and plasma cells have become available. We investigated, whether combined administration of rituximab and bortezomib in addition to PPH and high-dose IVIG is useful. Methods Between November 2011 and January 2013, we treated 10 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven AMR with rituximab (500 mg), bortezomib (4× 1.3 mg/m2), PPH (6×), and high-dose IVIG (1.5 g/kg) (group A). This group was compared with a group of 11 consecutive patients treated with an identical regimen without rituximab between July 2010 and November 2011 (group B). Results Median follow-up was 41(33-46) months in group A and 55(47-63) months in group B. At 40 months after treatment, graft survival was 60% in group A and 64% in group B, respectively (P = 0.87). Before and after treatment, serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and proteinuria were not different between groups. A significant reduction in donor-specific HLA antibody mean fluorescence intensity was observed in group A (25.2%, P = 0.046) and B (38.3%, P = 0.01) at 3 months posttreatment. In group A, more patients suffered from side effects compared with group B (infections: 70% vs 18%, P = 0.02). Conclusions The addition of rituximab to bortezomib, PPH, and high-dose IVIG did not further improve graft survival. Instead, we observed an increase of side effects. Therefore, combined administration of bortezomib and rituximab in addition to PPH and IVIG should be regarded with caution.

  19. Importance of (antibody-dependent) complement-mediated serum killing in protection against Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Geurtsen, Jeroen; Fae, Kellen C; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P J M

    2014-10-01

    Pertussis is a highly contagious respiratory disease that is caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite being vaccine preventable, pertussis rates have been rising steadily over the last decades, even in areas with high vaccine uptake. Recently, experiments with infant baboons indicated that although vaccination with acellular pertussis vaccines prevented disease, no apparent effect was observed on infection and transmission. One explanation may be that current acellular pertussis vaccines do not induce high levels of opsonophagocytic and/or bactericidal activity, implying that engineering of vaccines that promote bacterial killing may improve efficacy. Here, we discuss the importance of complement-mediated killing in vaccine-induced protection against B. pertussis. We first examine how B. pertussis may have evolved different complement evasion strategies. Second, we explore the benefits of opsonophagocytic and/or bactericidal killing in vaccine-induced protection and discuss whether or not inclusion of new opsonophagocytic or bactericidal target antigens in pertussis vaccines may benefit efficacy.

  20. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  1. Mechanisms mediating enhanced neutralization efficacy of staphylococcal enterotoxin B by combinations of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Kaushik; Varshney, Avanish K; Franklin, Matthew C; Goger, Michael; Wang, Xiaobo; Fries, Bettina C

    2015-03-13

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a superantigen that cross-links the major histocompatibility complex class II and specific V-β chains of the T-cell receptor, thus forming a ternary complex. Developing neutralizing mAb to disrupt the ternary complex and abrogate the resulting toxicity is a major therapeutic challenge because SEB is effective at very low concentrations. We show that combining two SEB-specific mAbs enhances their efficacy, even though one of the two mAbs by itself has no effect on neutralization. Crystallography was employed for fine-mapping conformational epitopes in binary and ternary complexes between SEB and Fab fragments. NMR spectroscopy was used to validate and identify subtle allosteric changes induced by mAbs binding to SEB. The mapping of epitopes established that a combination of different mAbs can enhance efficacy of mAb-mediated protection from SEB induced lethal shock by two different mechanisms: one mAb mixture promoted clearance of the toxin both in vitro and in vivo by FcR-mediated cross-linking and clearance, whereas the other mAb mixture induced subtle allosteric conformational changes in SEB that perturbed formation of the SEB·T-cell receptor·major histocompatibility complex class II trimer. Finally structural information accurately predicted mAb binding to other superantigens that share conformational epitopes with SEB. Fine mapping of conformational epitopes is a powerful tool to establish the mechanism and optimize the action of synergistic mAb combinations. PMID:25572397

  2. Combination of antibody targeting and PTD-mediated intracellular toxin delivery for colorectal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Meong Cheol; Zhang, Jian; Min, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Kyuri; Moon, Cheol; Balthasar, Joseph P; Yang, Victor C

    2014-11-28

    The bottlenecks of current chemotherapy in the treatment of colorectal cancer lie in the ineffectiveness of the existing anti-cancer small molecule drugs as well as the dose-limiting toxicity caused by the nonselective action on normal tissues by such drugs. To address these problems, we introduce a novel therapeutic strategy based on tumor targeting using a non-internalizing anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and intracellular delivery of the extremely potent yet cell-impermeable protein toxin gelonin via the aid of a cell-penetrating peptide (also termed as protein transduction domain; PTD). A chimeric TAT-gelonin fusion protein was genetically engineered, and it displayed remarkably enhanced anti-cancer activity against human colorectal cancer cells, with IC50 values being several orders of magnitude lower than the unmodified gelonin. On the other hand, a chemically synthesized conjugate of heparin and a murine anti-CEA mAb, T84.66 (termed T84.66-Hep) was found able to bind highly specifically to CEA over-expressing LS174T colorectal cancer cells. When mixing together, TAT-gelonin and T84.66-Hep could associate tightly and automatically through an electrostatic interaction between the cationic TAT and anionic heparin. In preliminary in vivo studies using LS174T s.c. xenograft tumor bearing mouse, selective and significantly augmented (58-fold) delivery of TAT-gelonin to the tumor target was observed, when compared with administration of TAT-gelonin alone. More importantly, efficacy studies also revealed that only the TAT-gelonin/T84.66-Hep complex yielded a significant inhibition of tumor growth (46%) without causing gelonin-induced systemic toxicity. Overall, this study suggested a generic strategy to effectively yet safely deliver potent PTD-modified protein toxins to the tumor.

  3. Maternal Antibody-Mediated Disease Enhancement in Type I Interferon-Deficient Mice Leads to Lethal Disease Associated with Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jian Hang; Binte Aman, Siti Amanlina; Libau, Eshele Anak; Lee, Pei Xuan; St. John, Ashley L.; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that most of the severe dengue cases occur upon a secondary heterologous infection. Furthermore, babies born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk of developing severe disease upon primary infection with a heterologous or homologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype when maternal antibodies reach sub-neutralizing concentrations. These observations have been explained by the antibody mediated disease enhancement (ADE) phenomenon whereby heterologous antibodies or sub-neutralizing homologous antibodies bind to but fail to neutralize DENV particles, allowing Fc-receptor mediated entry of the virus-antibody complexes into host cells. This eventually results in enhanced viral replication and heightened inflammatory responses. In an attempt to replicate this ADE phenomenon in a mouse model, we previously reported that upon DENV2 infection 5-week old type I and II interferon (IFN) receptors-deficient mice (AG129) born to DENV1-immune mothers displayed enhancement of disease severity characterized by increased virus titers and extensive vascular leakage which eventually led to the animals’ death. However, as dengue occurs in immune competent individuals, we sought to reproduce this mouse model in a less immunocompromised background. Here, we report an ADE model that is mediated by maternal antibodies in type I IFN receptor-deficient A129 mice. We show that 5-week old A129 mice born to DENV1-immune mothers succumbed to a DENV2 infection within 4 days that was sub-lethal in mice born to naïve mothers. Clinical manifestations included extensive hepatocyte vacuolation, moderate vascular leakage, lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Anti-TNFα therapy totally protected the mice and correlated with healthy hepatocytes. In contrast, blocking IL-6 did not impact the virus titers or disease outcome. This A129 mouse model of ADE may help dissecting the mechanisms involved in dengue pathogenesis and evaluate the efficacy of vaccine and

  4. Maternal Antibody-Mediated Disease Enhancement in Type I Interferon-Deficient Mice Leads to Lethal Disease Associated with Liver Damage.

    PubMed

    Martínez Gómez, Julia María; Ong, Li Ching; Lam, Jian Hang; Binte Aman, Siti Amanlina; Libau, Eshele Anak; Lee, Pei Xuan; St John, Ashley L; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that most of the severe dengue cases occur upon a secondary heterologous infection. Furthermore, babies born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk of developing severe disease upon primary infection with a heterologous or homologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype when maternal antibodies reach sub-neutralizing concentrations. These observations have been explained by the antibody mediated disease enhancement (ADE) phenomenon whereby heterologous antibodies or sub-neutralizing homologous antibodies bind to but fail to neutralize DENV particles, allowing Fc-receptor mediated entry of the virus-antibody complexes into host cells. This eventually results in enhanced viral replication and heightened inflammatory responses. In an attempt to replicate this ADE phenomenon in a mouse model, we previously reported that upon DENV2 infection 5-week old type I and II interferon (IFN) receptors-deficient mice (AG129) born to DENV1-immune mothers displayed enhancement of disease severity characterized by increased virus titers and extensive vascular leakage which eventually led to the animals' death. However, as dengue occurs in immune competent individuals, we sought to reproduce this mouse model in a less immunocompromised background. Here, we report an ADE model that is mediated by maternal antibodies in type I IFN receptor-deficient A129 mice. We show that 5-week old A129 mice born to DENV1-immune mothers succumbed to a DENV2 infection within 4 days that was sub-lethal in mice born to naïve mothers. Clinical manifestations included extensive hepatocyte vacuolation, moderate vascular leakage, lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Anti-TNFα therapy totally protected the mice and correlated with healthy hepatocytes. In contrast, blocking IL-6 did not impact the virus titers or disease outcome. This A129 mouse model of ADE may help dissecting the mechanisms involved in dengue pathogenesis and evaluate the efficacy of vaccine and

  5. Urinary C-X-C Motif Chemokine 10 Independently Improves the Noninvasive Diagnosis of Antibody-Mediated Kidney Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rabant, Marion; Amrouche, Lucile; Lebreton, Xavier; Aulagnon, Florence; Benon, Aurélien; Sauvaget, Virginia; Bonifay, Raja; Morin, Lise; Scemla, Anne; Delville, Marianne; Martinez, Frank; Timsit, Marc Olivier; Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Legendre, Christophe; Terzi, Fabiola; Anglicheau, Dany

    2015-11-01

    Urinary levels of C-X-C motif chemokine 9 (CXCL9) and CXCL10 can noninvasively diagnose T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) of renal allografts. However, performance of these molecules as diagnostic/prognostic markers of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is unknown. We investigated urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels in a highly sensitized cohort of 244 renal allograft recipients (67 with preformed donor-specific antibodies [DSAs]) with 281 indication biopsy samples. We assessed the benefit of adding these biomarkers to conventional models for diagnosing/prognosing ABMR. Urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels, normalized to urine creatinine (Cr) levels (CXCL9:Cr and CXCL10:Cr) or not, correlated with the extent of tubulointerstitial (i+t score; all P<0.001) and microvascular (g+ptc score; all P<0.001) inflammation. CXCL10:Cr diagnosed TCMR (area under the curve [AUC]=0.80; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68 to 0.92; P<0.001) and ABMR (AUC=0.76; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.82; P<0.001) with high accuracy, even in the absence of tubulointerstitial inflammation (AUC=0.70; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.79; P<0.001). Although mean fluorescence intensity of the immunodominant DSA diagnosed ABMR (AUC=0.75; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.82; P<0.001), combining urinary CXCL10:Cr with immunodominant DSA levels improved the diagnosis of ABMR (AUC=0.83; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.89; P<0.001). At the time of ABMR, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio was independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. In conclusion, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio associates with tubulointerstitial and microvascular inflammation of the renal allograft. Combining the urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio with DSA monitoring significantly improves the noninvasive diagnosis of ABMR and the stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss.

  6. Neutrophil-mediated killing of Dipetalonema viteae microfilariae: simultaneous presence of IgE, IgG antibodies and complement is required.

    PubMed Central

    Aime, N; Haque, A; Bonnel, B; Torpier, G; Capron, A

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils from the peripheral washings of normal rats in the presence of sera obtained from rats immune to circulating microfilariae adhered to and killed the microfilariae of Dipetalonema viteae in vitro within 16-24 hr. No significant adherence or cytotoxicity was mediated by sera collected from animals with a high microfilaraemia or from normal rats. Ultrastructural studies show that neutrophils, which are bigger than microfilariae, can easily internalize the small larvae resulting in the disintegration of the parasite. Immunoadsorption and inhibition experiments showed that the adherence-promoting activity resides both in IgG and IgE classes of antibody. However, the mere participation of these two antibodies is not sufficient to effect neutrophil adherence towards microfilariae, the presence of complement is also required. Samples of fresh immune rat serum (fIRS) depleted in alternative pathway components of complement by treatment with zymosan A failed to mediate cell adherence to the parasite. fIRS inactivated for the classical pathway of complement by the chelating agent EGTA partially retains its activity in mediating cytotoxicity to microfilariae. The striking antigenic specificity of D. viteae antibodies was shown by their ability to mediate cytotoxicity only to D. viteae but not towards Brugia malayi microfilariae. Images Figure 2 PMID:6538183

  7. IRES-mediated Tricistronic vectors for enhancing generation of high monoclonal antibody expressing CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ho, Steven C L; Bardor, Muriel; Feng, Huatao; Mariati; Tong, Yen Wah; Song, Zhiwei; Yap, Miranda G S; Yang, Yuansheng

    2012-01-01

    A Tricistronic vector utilizing internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements to express the light chain (LC), heavy chain (HC), and a neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT) selection marker from one transcript is designed for generation of mAb expressing CHO cell lines. As compared to the commonly used vectors, benefits of this design include: (1) minimized non-expressing clones, (2) enhanced stable mAb productivity without gene amplification, (3) control of LC and HC expression at defined ratios, and (4) consistent product quality. After optimization of the LC and HC arrangement and increasing selection stringency by weakening the NPT selection marker, this Tricistronic vector is able to generate stably transfected pools with specific productivity (qmAb) greater than 5pg/cell/day (pcd) and titers over 150mg/L. 5% of clones from these pools have qmAb greater than 20pcd and titers ranging from 300 to more than 500mg/L under non-optimized shake flask batch cultures using commercially available protein-free medium. The mAb produced by these clones have low aggregation and consistent glycosylation profiles. The entire process of transfection to high-expressing clones requires only 6 months. The IRES-mediated Tricistronic vector provides an attractive alternative to commonly used vectors for fast generation of mAb CHO cell lines with high productivity. PMID:22024589

  8. Engineered antibody domains with significantly increased transcytosis and half-life in macaques mediated by FcRn

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianlei; Wang, Yanping; Feng, Yang; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Gong, Rui; Wang, Lili; Crowder, Karalyne; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2015-01-01

    Engineered antibody domains (eAds) are promising candidate therapeutics but their half-life is relatively short partly due to weak or absent binding to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). We developed a novel approach to increase the eAd binding to FcRn based on a combination of structure-based design, computational modeling and phage display methodologies. By using this approach, we identified 2 IgG1 CH2-derived eAds fused to a short FcRn-binding motif derived from IgG1 CH3 that exhibited greatly enhanced FcRn binding with strict pH dependency. Importantly, the increased affinity resulted in significantly enhanced FcRn-mediated epithelial transcytosis and prolonged elimination half-life (mean 44.1 hours) in cynomolgus macaques. These results demonstrate for the first time that the half-life of isolated eAds can be prolonged (optimized) by increasing their binding to FcRn while maintaining their small size, which has important implications for development of therapeutics, including eAd-drug conjugates with enhanced penetration in solid tissues. PMID:26179052

  9. Evaluation of B cell maturation antigen as a target for antibody drug conjugate mediated cytotoxicity in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lydia; Bounds, Danton; Paterson, Jennifer; Herledan, Gaelle; Sully, Katherine; Seestaller-Wehr, Laura M; Fieles, William E; Tunstead, James; McCahon, Lee; Germaschewski, Fiona M; Mayes, Patrick A; Craigen, Jenny L; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Yong, Kwee L

    2016-09-01

    B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA, also termed TNFRSF17) is an attractive therapeutic target due to its restricted expression on normal and malignant plasma cells (PC). GSK2857916 (or J6M0-MMAF) is a BCMA-specific antibody conjugated to the microtubule-disrupting agent monomethyl auristatin F (MMAF) via a protease-resistant linker. To evaluate the clinical potential of this agent, tumour cells from seventy multiple myeloma (MM) patients were assessed for BCMA expression by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. All patients tested expressed BCMA, at varying levels, and both surface and intracellular expression were observed. BCMA expression is maintained through relapse, extramedullary spread and in residual disease post therapy. BCMA levels may also be prognostically useful as higher levels of BCMA were associated with poorer outcomes, even taking into account genetic risk. We observed rapid internalization of surface BCMA and newly expressed protein by 1 h, suggesting a mechanism for J6M0-MMAF activity even with low surface antigen. J6M0-MMAF mediated cytotoxicity of MM cells varied with dose and antigen levels, with clonogenic progenitors killed at lower doses than mature cells. In comparison, J6M0-MMAF killing of primary CD138(+) myeloma cells occurred with slower kinetics. Our observations support BCMA to be a promising therapeutic target in MM for novel therapies such as J6M0-MMAF. PMID:27313079

  10. Engineered antibody domains with significantly increased transcytosis and half-life in macaques mediated by FcRn.

    PubMed

    Ying, Tianlei; Wang, Yanping; Feng, Yang; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Gong, Rui; Wang, Lili; Crowder, Karalyne; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2015-01-01

    Engineered antibody domains (eAds) are promising candidate therapeutics but their half-life is relatively short partly due to weak or absent binding to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). We developed a novel approach to increase the eAd binding to FcRn based on a combination of structure-based design, computational modeling and phage display methodologies. By using this approach, we identified 2 IgG1 CH2-derived eAds fused to a short FcRn-binding motif derived from IgG1 CH3 that exhibited greatly enhanced FcRn binding with strict pH dependency. Importantly, the increased affinity resulted in significantly enhanced FcRn-mediated epithelial transcytosis and prolonged elimination half-life (mean 44.1 hours) in cynomolgus macaques. These results demonstrate for the first time that the half-life of isolated eAds can be prolonged (optimized) by increasing their binding to FcRn while maintaining their small size, which has important implications for development of therapeutics, including eAd-drug conjugates with enhanced penetration in solid tissues.

  11. Analysis of lysine clipping of a humanized Lewis-Y specific IgG antibody and its relation to Fc-mediated effector function.

    PubMed

    Antes, Bernhard; Amon, Sabine; Rizzi, Andreas; Wiederkum, Susi; Kainer, Manuela; Szolar, Oliver; Fido, Markus; Kircheis, Ralf; Nechansky, Andreas

    2007-06-01

    During the analytical characterization of the humanized Lewis-Y specific monoclonal antibody IGN311 (IgG1/kappa) used for passive anti-cancer therapy in humans, isoelectric focusing (IEF) experiments revealed that IGN311 batches produced in serum-containing and serum-free medium, respectively, displayed different banding patterns. The additional bands in the IEF pattern correlated with additional peaks observed by subsequent cation exchange (CEX)-HPLC analysis. Since the IEF pattern is one of the specification criteria in the quality control of monoclonal antibodies and a non-matching pattern may be indicative for lot-to-lot inconsistency, this phenomenon was investigated in detail. First, we investigated whether a difference in antibody glycosylation was the cause for the observed charge heterogeneity. De-N-glycosylation experiments demonstrated that charge heterogeneity observed in the IEF pattern is not a consequence of glycosylation. In contrast, sample treatment by carboxypeptidase B, removing the carboxy-terminal lysine residues from the two heavy chains of the antibody, resulted in reduced charge heterogeneity eliminating the two most basic bands observed in IEF. These data were supported by reversed phase HPLC-MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of enzymatically cleaved peptides of the antibody as well as by carboxy-terminal sequencing of the heavy chains. It was demonstrated that the differences in the IEF banding pattern were due to lysine clipping occurring during the production of the antibody. The antibody batch produced under serum-free conditions was less affected by lysine clipping. Both antibody variants--clipped and unclipped--elicited the same potency in a complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay demonstrating that lysine clipping of IGN311 does not impair Fc-mediated effector functions.

  12. ApoE Receptor 2 mediates trophoblast dysfunction and pregnancy complications induced by antiphospholipid antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Victoria; Gelber, Shari E.; Vukelic, Milena; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Herz, Joachim; Urbanus, Rolf T.; de Groot, Philip G.; Natale, David R.; Harihara, Anirudha; Redecha, Patricia; Abrahams, Vikki M.; Shaul, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pregnancies in women with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are frequently complicated by fetal loss and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). How circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) cause pregnancy complications in APS is poorly understood. We sought to determine if the LDL receptor family member apoE receptor 2 (apoER2) mediates trophoblast dysfunction and pregnancy complications induced by aPL. Methods Placental and trophoblast apoER2 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Normal human IgG (NHIgG) and aPL were purified from healthy individuals and APS patients, respectively. The role of apoER2 in aPL-induced changes in trophoblast proliferation, migration and kinase activation was assessed using RNA interference in HTR-8/SVneo cells. The participation of apoER2 in aPL-induced pregnancy loss and IUGR was evaluated in pregnant apoER2+/+ and apoER2−/− mice injected with aPL or NHIgG. Results We found that apoER2 is abundant in human and mouse placental trophoblasts, and in multiple trophoblast-derived cell lines including HTR-8/SVneo cells. ApoER2 and its interaction with the cell surface protein β2-glycoprotein I were required for aPL-induced inhibition of cultured trophoblast proliferation and migration. In parallel, aPL antagonism of Akt kinase activation by EGF in trophoblasts was mediated by apoER2. Furthermore, in a murine passive transfer model of pregnancy complications of APS, apoER2−/− mice were protected from both aPL-induced fetal loss and aPL-induced IUGR. Conclusion ApoER2 plays a major role in the attenuation of trophoblast function by aPL, and the receptor mediates aPL-induced pregnancy complications in vivo in mice. ApoER2-directed interventions can now potentially be developed to combat the pregnancy complications associated with APS. PMID:26474194

  13. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    PubMed Central

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  14. Anti-Glycoprotein G Antibodies of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Contribute to Complete Protection after Vaccination in Mice and Induce Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Mediated Cytolysis

    PubMed Central

    Görander, Staffan; Ekblad, Maria; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2) of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC) activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials. PMID:25398047

  15. Capillary C4d and Kidney Allograft Outcome in Relation to Morphologic Lesions Suggestive of Antibody-Mediated Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Kikić, Željko; Kainz, Alexander; Kozakowski, Nicolas; Oberbauer, Rainer; Regele, Heinz; Bond, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Recent studies highlighting a role of C4d− antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) have debated whether C4d staining has independent value as a rejection marker. Considering the presumed role of complement as an important effector of graft injury, this study hypothesized that capillary C4d, a footprint of antibody-triggered complement activation, indicates a particularly severe manifestation of ABMR. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This large retrospective clinicopathologic study sought to assess the clinical predictive value of C4d staining in relation to ABMR morphology. Overall, 885 renal allograft recipients who underwent transplantation between 1999 and 2006 (median duration of follow-up, 63.3 [interquartile range, 40.6–93.5] months; 206 graft losses) were included if they had had one or more indication biopsies. A total of 1976 biopsy specimens were reevaluated for capillary C4d staining (C4d data were available for 825 patients) and distinct morphologic lesions suggestive of ABMR, including glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, capillary microthrombi, transplant glomerulopathy, and severe intimal arteritis. Results C4d+ patients, with or without ABMR features, had worse death-censored 8-year graft survival (53% or 67%) than C4d− patients (66% or 81%; P<0.001). In Cox regression analysis, C4d was associated with a risk of graft loss independently of baseline confounders and ABMR morphology (hazard ratio, 1.85 [95% confidence interval, 1.34 to 2.57]; P<0.001). The risk was higher than that observed for C4d− patients, a finding that reached statistical significance in patients showing fewer than two different ABMR lesions. Moreover, in a mixed model, C4d was independently associated with a steeper decline of eGFR (slope per year, −8.23±3.97 ml/min per 1.73 m2; P<0.001). Conclusions These results suggest that detection of intragraft complement activation has strong independent value as an additional indicator of

  16. Incorporating target-mediated drug disposition in a minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanguang

    2014-01-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) usually accounts for nonlinear pharmacokinetics (PK) of drugs whose distribution and/or clearance are affected by their targets owing to high affinity and limited capacity. TMDD is frequently reported for monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for such reason. Minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models (mPBPK), which accommodate the unique PK behaviors of mAb, provide a general approach for analyzing mAbs PK and predicting mAb interstitial concentrations in two groups of tissues. This study assessed the feasibility of incorporating TMDD into mPBPK models to consider target-binding in either plasma (cTMDD) or interstitial fluid (ISF) (pTMDD). The dose-related signature profiles of the pTMDD model reveal a parallel early decay phase, in contrast with the cTMDD model that exhibits a faster initial decline for low doses. The parallel early phase in the pTMDD model is associated with the slow perivascular extravasation of mAb, which restricts the initial decline regardless of interstitial target-mediated elimination. The cTMDD and pTMDD models both preserve the long terminal phase that is typically perceived in conventional two-compartment (2CM) and TMDD models. Having TMDD in ISF impacts the typical relationships between plasma concentrations and receptor occupancy, and between saturation of apparent nonlinear clearance and saturation of receptors. The vascular reflection coefficient (σv) was found to affect receptor occupancy in ISF. In the cTMDD model, saturation of nonlinear clearance is equivalent to saturation of receptors. However, in the pTMDD model, they are no longer equal and all parameters pertaining to receptors or receptor binding (Rtotal, KD, Kss, kint) shifts such relationships. Different TMDD models were utilized in analyzing PK for seven mAbs from digitized literature data. When the target is in plasma, the cTMDD model performed similarly to the 2CM and TMDD models, but with one less system parameter. When the

  17. Dextrose-mediated aggregation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human plasma: Implication of isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are clinically administered through intravenous infusion after mixing with a diluent, e.g., saline, 5% dextrose. Such a clinical setting increases the likelihood of interactions among mAb molecules, diluent, and plasma components, which may adversely affect product safety and efficacy. Avastin® (bevacizumab) and Herceptin® (trastuzumab), but not Remicade® (infliximab), were shown to undergo rapid aggregation upon dilution into 5% dextrose when mixed with human plasma in vitro; however, the biochemical pathways leading to the aggregation were not clearly defined. Here, we show that dextrose-mediated aggregation of Avastin or Herceptin in plasma involves isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we found that dextrose-induced insoluble aggregates were composed of mAb itself and multiple abundant plasma proteins, namely complement proteins C3, C4, factor H, fibronectin, and apolipoprotein. These plasma proteins, which are characterized by an isoelectronic point of 5.5-6.7, lost solubility at the resulting pH in the mixture with formulated Avastin (pH 6.2) and Herceptin (pH 6.0). Notably, switching formulation buffers for Avastin (pH 6.2) and Remicade (pH 7.2) reversed their aggregation profiles. Avastin formed little, if any, insoluble aggregates in dextrose-plasma upon raising the buffer pH to 7.2 or above. Furthermore, dextrose induced pH-dependent precipitation of plasma proteins, with massive insoluble aggregates being detected at pH 6.5-6.8. These data show that isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins is a prerequisite of dextrose-induced aggregation of mAb in human plasma. This finding highlights the importance of assessing the compatibility of a therapeutic mAb with diluent and human plasma during product development. PMID:26338058

  18. Glomerular expression of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and interleukin-1 beta genes in antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, F. W.; Smith, J.; Cashman, S. J.; Wang, Y.; Thompson, E. M.; Rees, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a powerful proinflammatory cytokine whose function is modulated by a natural IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). There are few data about kinetics of in vivo synthesis of IL-1ra at tissue level, except in response to bacterial endotoxin. The purpose of this study was to examine the kinetics of local expression of IL-1ra gene in relation to IL-1 beta gene in a model of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis. Rats were killed in groups of 5 or 6 at 0, 4, 6, 24, 48, and 96 hours after induction of glomerulonephritis. Messenger RNA for IL-1ra and IL-1 beta was undetectable by Northern blot in normal glomeruli but increased markedly 4 to 6 hours after induction of nephritis. The increase in IL-1ra mRNA was more sustained than that of IL-1 beta mRNA. In situ hybridization showed that IL-1 beta mRNA increased diffusely within glomeruli, while IL-1ra mRNA was expressed more discretely. Expression of these mRNA in noninflamed tissues, spleens and lungs, was different, particularly increase in IL-1ra mRNA was more substantial than that of IL-1 beta. These observations suggest that differential expression of IL-1ra and IL-1 beta might focus inflammation in glomeruli while protecting more distant sites. They also raise the possibility of reducing glomerular injury by therapeutic measures that upregulate glomerular synthesis of IL-1ra while reducing that of IL-1 beta. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8030744

  19. Dextrose-mediated aggregation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human plasma: Implication of isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are clinically administered through intravenous infusion after mixing with a diluent, e.g., saline, 5% dextrose. Such a clinical setting increases the likelihood of interactions among mAb molecules, diluent, and plasma components, which may adversely affect product safety and efficacy. Avastin® (bevacizumab) and Herceptin® (trastuzumab), but not Remicade® (infliximab), were shown to undergo rapid aggregation upon dilution into 5% dextrose when mixed with human plasma in vitro; however, the biochemical pathways leading to the aggregation were not clearly defined. Here, we show that dextrose-mediated aggregation of Avastin or Herceptin in plasma involves isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we found that dextrose-induced insoluble aggregates were composed of mAb itself and multiple abundant plasma proteins, namely complement proteins C3, C4, factor H, fibronectin, and apolipoprotein. These plasma proteins, which are characterized by an isoelectronic point of 5.5-6.7, lost solubility at the resulting pH in the mixture with formulated Avastin (pH 6.2) and Herceptin (pH 6.0). Notably, switching formulation buffers for Avastin (pH 6.2) and Remicade (pH 7.2) reversed their aggregation profiles. Avastin formed little, if any, insoluble aggregates in dextrose-plasma upon raising the buffer pH to 7.2 or above. Furthermore, dextrose induced pH-dependent precipitation of plasma proteins, with massive insoluble aggregates being detected at pH 6.5-6.8. These data show that isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins is a prerequisite of dextrose-induced aggregation of mAb in human plasma. This finding highlights the importance of assessing the compatibility of a therapeutic mAb with diluent and human plasma during product development.

  20. Membrane-bound hemagglutinin mediates antibody and complement-dependent lysis of influenza virus-treated human platelets in autologous serum.

    PubMed Central

    Kazatchkine, M D; Lambré, C R; Kieffer, N; Maillet, F; Nurden, A T

    1984-01-01

    Influenza A virus-treated human platelets were lyzed in autologous serum. Lysis required the presence of antibody and occurred predominantly through activation of the classical complement pathway. Binding of the virus followed by its elution at 37 degrees C resulted in a dose-dependent desialation of the cells with a maximal release of 45% of total platelet sialic acid. In contrast, platelets that had been treated with Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase and from which 55% of total sialic acid had been removed were not lyzed in autologous serum and did not bind C3 as shown in binding assays using radiolabeled monoclonal anti-C3 antibody. Thus, the immune-mediated lysis of virus-treated platelets in autologous serum did not involve neoantigens expressed by desialated cells. To assess the effect of viruses on the platelet surface, treated platelets were incubated with galactose oxidase and sodium [3H]borohydride prior to separation and analysis of the labeled glycoproteins by SDS-PAGE. Viral treatment resulted in a desialation of each of the surface glycoproteins. At the same time, a labeled component of Mr 72,000 (nonreduced) and Mr 55,000 (reduced) was observed that was not present when V. cholerae-desialated platelets were examined in the same way. Immunoblotting experiments performed using antiwhole virus and anti-hemagglutinin antibodies demonstrated this component to be viral hemagglutinin. Involvement of membrane-bound hemagglutinin in antibody and in complement-mediated lysis of virus-treated platelets in autologous serum was supported by the increased lytic activity of a postvaccinal serum containing an elevated titer of complement fixing anti-hemagglutinin antibodies. Binding of a viral protein to the platelet surface provides a model for immune thrombocytopenias occurring during acute viral infections at the time of the specific immune response. Images PMID:6470149

  1. Effect of sialylation of lipopolysaccharide of Neisseria gonorrhoeae on recognition and complement-mediated killing by monoclonal antibodies directed against different outer-membrane antigens.

    PubMed

    de la Paz, H; Cooke, S J; Heckels, J E

    1995-04-01

    Growth of gonococci in the presence of CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NANA) has previously been shown to induce resistance to the bactericidal effect of normal human serum and is accompanied by sialylation of the gonococcal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We have used monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to compare the effect of LPS sialylation on recognition of gonococci and complement-mediated killing by antibodies directed either against LPS or against defined epitopes on outer-membrane protein PI. Despite differences in binding to sialylated LPS on Western blots, all three mAbs directed against LPS showed considerably reduced binding to gonococci grown in the presence of CMP-NANA and a concomitant reduction in ability to promote complement-mediated killing. In contrast, mAbs directed against previously defined epitopes on a surface exposed loop of PI showed little difference in binding between sialylated and non-sialylated gonococci and promoted killing of the sialylated gonococci. Similarly a mAb directed against an epitope on a loop of the outer-membrane Rmp protein, which had previously been shown to block killing by antibodies directed against other surface antigens, also exerted a blocking effect with sialylated gonococci. Thus in the present study the continued biological effect of mAbs was correlated with the ability of the antibody to recognize surface-exposed epitopes on sialylated gonococci. Despite the presence of the sialylation which is likely to occur in vivo, it should be possible to induce complement-mediated killing by focusing the immune response to those surface-exposed epitopes which are least susceptible to the potential inhibitory effect of LPS sialylation.

  2. Humanizing murine IgG3 anti-GD2 antibody m3F8 substantially improves antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity while retaining targeting in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Guo, Hongfen; Hu, Jian; Tassev, Dimiter V.; Cheung, Irene Y.

    2012-01-01

    Murine IgG3 anti-GD2 antibody m3F8 has shown anti-neuroblastoma activity in Phase I/II studies, where antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) played a key role. Humanization of m3F8 should circumvent human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) response and enhance its ADCC properties to reduce dosing and pain side effect. Chimeric 3F8 (ch3F8) and humanized 3F8 (hu3F8-IgG1 and hu3F8-IgG4) were produced and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. In vitro comparison was made with m3F8 and other anti-GD2 antibodies in binding, cytotoxicity, and cross-reactivity assays. In GD2 binding studies by SPR, ch3F8 and hu3F8 maintained KD comparable to m3F8. Unlike other anti-GD2 antibodies, m3F8, ch3F8 and hu3F8 had substantially slower koff.. Similar to m3F8, both ch3F8 and hu3F8 inhibited tumor cell growth in vitro, while cross-reactivity with other gangliosides was comparable to that of m3F8. Both peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-ADCC and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)-ADCC of ch3F8 and hu3F8-IgG1 were more potent than m3F8. This superiority was consistently observed in ADCC assays, irrespective of donors or NK-92MI-transfected human CD16 or CD32, whereas complement mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) was reduced. As expected, hu3F8-IgG4 had near absent PBMC-ADCC and CMC. Hu3F8 and m3F8 had similar tumor-to-non tumor ratios in biodistribution studies. Anti-tumor effect against neuroblastoma xenografts was better with hu3F8-IgG1 than m3F8. In conclusion, humanizing m3F8 produced next generation anti-GD2 antibodies with substantially more potent ADCC in vitro and anti-tumor activity in vivo. By leveraging ADCC over CMC, they may be clinically more effective, while minimizing pain and HAMA side effects. A Phase I trial using hu3F8-IgG1 is ongoing. PMID:22754766

  3. Yeast-Derived β-Glucan Augments the Therapeutic Efficacy Mediated by Anti–Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Monoclonal Antibody in Human Carcinoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Carolina; Li, Bing; Hansen, Richard; Cramer, Daniel E.; Kong, Maiying; Jun, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Bevacizumab is a recombinant IgG1humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Its proposed mechanism of action is independent of immune effector functions. Many human carcinomas not only secrete VEGF but also express membrane-bound VEGF. In addition, VEGF receptors are expressed on tumor cells. It is hypothesized that bevacizumab could bind membrane-bound VEGF or VEGF-VEGF receptor complexes on tumors, thereby initiating potential immunologic consequences. We previously showed that yeast-derived β-glucan functions with antitumor antibodies that activate complement to recruit complement receptor 3– expressing leukocytes capable of mediating complement receptor 3– dependent cellular cytotoxicity of tumors opsonized with iC3b. In the current study, the therapeutic efficacy mediated by combining bevacizumab with yeast-derived β-glucan was studied in human carcinoma xenograft models. Experimental Design Human tumor cell lines were screened for membrane-bound VEGF expression both in vitro and in vivo. Complement activation mediated by bevacizumab was examined. Tumor cell lines positive or negative for membrane-bound VEGF expression were implanted in severe combined immunodeficient mice to establish xenograft models. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with different regimens. Tumor regression and long-term survival were recorded. Results Human ovarian carcinoma SKOV-3 cells expressed membrane-bound VEGF both in vitro and in vivo. Bevacizumab was bound to membrane-bound VEGF, activated complement, and synergized with β-glucan to elicit cellular cytotoxicity in vitro. In vivo study showed that β-glucan could significantly augment the therapeutic efficacy mediated by bevacizumab. Conclusions Yeast-derived β-glucan can synergize with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab for the treatment of cancer with membrane-bound VEGF expression. PMID:18281559

  4. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Takeo; Kaori, Takaki; Enomoto, Ikumi; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2013-01-01

    The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of non-human primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb) B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7,900-, 1,000-, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody. PMID:23717307

  5. Chediak-Higashi gene in humans. II. The selectivity of the defect in natural- killer and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity function

    PubMed Central

    Klein, M; Roder, J; Haliotis, T; Korec, S; Jett; Herberman, RB; Katz, P; Fauci, AS

    1980-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytolysis (ADCC) of human tumor cells by FcR(+) nonadherent effector lymphocytes as well as natural killer (NK) activity was markedly impaired in Chediak-Steinbrinck-Higashi Syndrome (C-HS) patients. Compared to a more than 400-fold defect in NK activity in terms of lytic units, the abnormal ADCC response in C-HS donors was 24-fold below normal suggesting a partial but not complete overlap of lymphocytes or lytic mechanisms responsible for ADCC and NK. The ADCC mechanism against erythrocyte targets, however, was normal, thereby suggesting a qualitative difference in these two forms of ADCC. Other effector-cell functions against tumor-cell targets were normal as measured by (a) spontaneous cytolysis mediated by monocytes, (b) spontaneous cytostasis mediated by neutrophils, and (c) lectin-dependent cytolysis mediated by neutrophils. Although one C-HS patient was low in lectin-dependent cytolysis mediated by lymphocytes, the other C-HS patient was normal, thereby suggesting that cytolytic T function was not linked to the NK-ADCC defect. In addition, the proliferative response to T-dependent mitogens was also relatively normal. These results, combined with other studies showing normal cell-mediated and humoral immunity in these same patients, suggest that patients with C-HS have an immunodeficiency which is selective for NK and ADCC activity. PMID:6966316

  6. Immobilized surfactant-nanotube complexes support selectin-mediated capture of viable circulating tumor cells in the absence of capture antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael J; Castellanos, Carlos A; King, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells from the primary site to anatomically distant organs leads to a poor patient prognosis. Increasing evidence has linked adhesive interactions between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells to metastatic dissemination. Microscale biomimetic flow devices hold promise as a diagnostic tool to isolate CTCs and develop metastatic therapies, utilizing E-selectin (ES) to trigger the initial rolling adhesion of tumor cells under flow. To trigger firm adhesion and capture under flow, such devices also typically require antibodies against biomarkers thought to be expressed on CTCs. This approach is challenged by the fact that CTCs are now known to exhibit heterogeneous expression of conventional biomarkers. Here, we describe surfactant-nanotube complexes to enhance ES-mediated capture and isolation of tumor cells without the use of capture antibodies. While the majority of tumor cells exhibited weaker rolling adhesion on halloysite nanotubes (HNT) coated with ES, HNT functionalization with the sodium dodecanoate (NaL) surfactant induced a switch to firm cellular adhesion under flow. Conversely, surfactant-nanotube complexes significantly reduced the number of primary human leukocytes captured via ES-mediated adhesion under flow. The switch in tumor cell adhesion was exploited to capture and isolate tumor cells in the absence of EpCAM antibodies, commonly utilized as the gold standard for CTC isolation. Additionally, HNT-NaL complexes were shown to capture tumor cells with low to negligible EpCAM expression, that are not efficiently captured using conventional approaches.

  7. An anti–PR1/HLA-A2 T-cell receptor–like antibody mediates complement-dependent cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sergeeva, Anna; Alatrash, Gheath; He, Hong; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Lu, Sijie; Wygant, James; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Ma, Qing; Li, Dan; St John, Lisa; Clise-Dwyer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    PR1 (VLQELNVTV) is a human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2)–restricted leukemia-associated peptide from proteinase 3 (P3) and neutrophil elastase (NE) that is recognized by PR1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes that contribute to cytogenetic remission of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We report a novel T-cell receptor (TCR)–like immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) antibody (8F4) with high specific binding affinity (dissociation constant [KD] = 9.9nM) for a combined epitope of the PR1/HLA-A2 complex. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy of 8F4-labeled cells showed significantly higher PR1/HLA-A2 expression on AML blasts compared with normal leukocytes (P = .046). 8F4 mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of AML blasts and Lin−CD34+CD38− leukemia stem cells (LSCs) but not normal leukocytes (P < .005). Although PR1 expression was similar on LSCs and hematopoietic stem cells, 8F4 inhibited AML progenitor cell growth, but not normal colony-forming units from healthy donors (P < .05). This study shows that 8F4, a novel TCR-like antibody, binds to a conformational epitope of the PR1/HLA-A2 complex on the cell surface and mediates specific lysis of AML, including LSCs. Therefore, this antibody warrants further study as a novel approach to targeting leukemia-initiating cells in patients with AML. PMID:21296998

  8. Immobilized Surfactant-Nanotube Complexes Support Selectin-Mediated Capture of Viable Circulating Tumor Cells in the Absence of Capture Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Castellanos, Carlos A.; King, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells from the primary site to anatomically distant organs leads to a poor patient prognosis. Increasing evidence has linked adhesive interactions between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells to metastatic dissemination. Microscale biomimetic flow devices hold promise as a diagnostic tool to isolate CTCs and develop metastatic therapies, utilizing E-selectin (ES) to trigger the initial rolling adhesion of tumor cells under flow. To trigger firm adhesion and capture under flow, such devices also typically require antibodies against biomarkers thought to be expressed on CTCs. This approach is challenged by the fact that CTCs are now known to exhibit heterogeneous expression of conventional biomarkers. Here, we describe surfactant-nanotube complexes to enhance ES-mediated capture and isolation of tumor cells without the use of capture antibodies. While the majority of tumor cells exhibited weaker rolling adhesion on halloysite nanotubes (HNT) coated with ES, HNT functionalization with the sodium dodecanoate (NaL) surfactant induced a switch to firm cellular adhesion under flow. Conversely, surfactant-nanotube complexes significantly reduced the number of primary human leukocytes captured via ES-mediated adhesion under flow. The switch in tumor cell adhesion was exploited to capture and isolate tumor cells in the absence of EpCAM antibodies, commonly utilized as the gold standard for CTC isolation. Additionally, HNT-NaL complexes were shown to capture tumor cells with low to negligible EpCAM expression, that are not efficiently captured using conventional approaches. PMID:25761664

  9. Construction of an immunotoxin by linking a monoclonal antibody against the human epidermal growth factor receptor and a hemolytic toxin.

    PubMed

    Avila, Ana D; Calderón, Carlos F; Pérez, Rita M; Pons, Carmen; Pereda, Celia M; Ortiz, Ana R

    2007-01-01

    Hybrid molecules obtained through conjugation of monoclonal antibodies and toxins constitute an approach under exploration to generate potential agents for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. A frequently employed toxic component in the construction of such immunotoxins is ricin, a plant toxin which inhibits protein synthesis at ribosomal level and so requires to be internalized by the cell. A hemolytic toxin isolated from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, which is active at the cell membrane level, was linked through a disulfide bond to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody ior egf/r3. The resulting immunotoxin did not exhibit hemolytic activity except under reducing conditions. It was toxic for H125 cells that express the human epidermal growth factor receptor, but non-toxic for U1906 cells that do not express this receptor. PMID:18064354

  10. Antibody-Mediated and Cellular Immune Responses Induced in Naive Volunteers by Vaccination with Long Synthetic Peptides Derived from the Plasmodium vivax Circumsporozoite Protein

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Soto, Liliana; Perlaza, Blanca Liliana; Céspedes, Nora; Vera, Omaira; Lenis, Ana Milena; Bonelo, Anilza; Corradin, Giampietro; Herrera, Sócrates

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite (CS) protein is a leading malaria vaccine candidate. We describe the characterization of specific immune responses induced in 21 malaria-naive volunteers vaccinated with long synthetic peptides derived from the CS protein formulated in Montanide ISA 720. Both antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses were analyzed. Antibodies were predominantly of IgG1 and IgG3 isotypes, recognized parasite proteins on the immunofluorescent antibody test, and partially blocked sporozoite invasion of hepatoma cell lines in vitro. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from most volunteers (94%) showed IFN-γ production in vitro upon stimulation with both long signal peptide and short peptides containing CD8+ T-cell epitopes. The relatively limited sample size did not allow conclusions about HLA associations with the immune responses observed. In summary, the inherent safety and tolerability together with strong antibody responses, invasion blocking activity, and the IFN-γ production induced by these vaccine candidates warrants further testing in a phase II clinical trial. PMID:21292876

  11. Antibody-dependent antitumor cytotoxicity by human monocytes cultured with recombinant macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Induction of efficient antibody-mediated antitumor cytotoxicity not detected by isotope release assays.

    PubMed

    Munn, D H; Cheung, N K

    1989-08-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is known to stimulate proliferation of monocyte/macrophage progenitors and enhance in vitro antitumor cytotoxicity by murine macrophages. In this paper we have shown that recombinant human M-CSF causes human peripheral blood monocytes to differentiate in culture into metabolically active macrophage-like cells. These cells mediate very efficient antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines in the presence of two murine IgG3 mAbs (3F8 and R24). They also mediate antibody-independent cytotoxicity (or cytostasis) to a lesser extent. Human serum had an inconsistent effect on ADCC, but often induced similar high levels of ADCC. Cytotoxicity was measured using a novel ELISA to detect surviving tumor cells after ADCC. Two conventional isotope-release assays (51Cr and [3H]TdR) underestimated or entirely failed to detect ADCC by M-CSF-activated monocytes. Optimal activation occurred with 100-300 U/ml of M-CSF, and required 9-11 d for completion. Most of the M-CSF cultured monocytes expressed the low-affinity Fc receptor (CD16). ADCC by cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage using murine IgG3 mAbs may have significance for the immunotherapy of human malignancies.

  12. Antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection inhibits RLR-mediated Type-I IFN-independent signalling through upregulation of cellular autophagy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinwei; Yue, Yaofei; Li, Duo; Zhao, Yujiao; Qiu, Lijuan; Chen, Junying; Pan, Yue; Xi, Juemin; Wang, Xiaodan; Sun, Qiangming; Li, Qihan

    2016-01-01

    Antibody dependent enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus (DENV) infection is identified as the main risk factor of severe Dengue diseases. Through opsonization by subneutralizing or non-neutralizing antibodies, DENV infection suppresses innate cell immunity to facilitate viral replication. However, it is largely unknown whether suppression of type-I IFN is necessary for a successful ADE infection. Here, we report that both DENV and DENV-ADE infection induce an early ISG (NOS2) expression through RLR-MAVS signalling axis independent of the IFNs signaling. Besides, DENV-ADE suppress this early antiviral response through increased autophagy formation rather than induction of IL-10 secretion. The early induced autophagic proteins ATG5-ATG12 participate in suppression of MAVS mediated ISGs induction. Our findings suggest a mechanism for DENV to evade the early antiviral response before IFN signalling activation. Altogether, these results add knowledge about the complexity of ADE infection and contribute further to research on therapeutic strategies. PMID:26923481

  13. Response to abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy in postmenopausal woman with anti-yo antibody mediated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amita; Bhushan, Bharat; Kasundra, Gaurav M; Shubhakaran, Khichar; Pujar, Guruprasad S; Banakar, Basavaraj

    2014-07-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by a widespread loss of Purkinje cells associated with a progressive pancerebellar dysfunction. PCD often precedes the cancer diagnosis by months to years. Here, we report a case of 44-year old postmenopausal woman who presented with PCD symptoms and high levels of anti-Yo antibodies titer since 8 months. We failed to conclude any neoplastic focus after thorough laboratory and imaging study. She minimally responded to methylprednisolone and immunoglobulin therapies. Despite therapy she was severely disabled. Planned abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (AHBSO) was done, histology revealed grade IIA borderline serous papillary carcinoma of ovary. Her neurological deficit responded dramatically to AHBSO. It is first case report who emphasize the response of AHBSO with presentation of anti-Yo antibody-mediated PCD and hidden nidus in post menopausal women.

  14. Antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection inhibits RLR-mediated Type-I IFN-independent signalling through upregulation of cellular autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xinwei; Yue, Yaofei; Li, Duo; Zhao, Yujiao; Qiu, Lijuan; Chen, Junying; Pan, Yue; Xi, Juemin; Wang, Xiaodan; Sun, Qiangming; Li, Qihan

    2016-01-01

    Antibody dependent enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus (DENV) infection is identified as the main risk factor of severe Dengue diseases. Through opsonization by subneutralizing or non-neutralizing antibodies, DENV infection suppresses innate cell immunity to facilitate viral replication. However, it is largely unknown whether suppression of type-I IFN is necessary for a successful ADE infection. Here, we report that both DENV and DENV-ADE infection induce an early ISG (NOS2) expression through RLR-MAVS signalling axis independent of the IFNs signaling. Besides, DENV-ADE suppress this early antiviral response through increased autophagy formation rather than induction of IL-10 secretion. The early induced autophagic proteins ATG5-ATG12 participate in suppression of MAVS mediated ISGs induction. Our findings suggest a mechanism for DENV to evade the early antiviral response before IFN signalling activation. Altogether, these results add knowledge about the complexity of ADE infection and contribute further to research on therapeutic strategies. PMID:26923481

  15. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  16. Antibody-mediated complement C3b/iC3b binding to group B Streptococcus in paired mother and baby serum samples in a refugee population on the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Jenny; Thomas, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Turner, Claudia; Turner, Paul; Nosten, Francois; Le Doare, Kirsty; Hudson, Michael; Heath, Paul T; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. In this study, we determined antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b onto the bacterial cell surface of GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V. This was determined for 520 mother and umbilical cord serum sample pairs obtained at the time of birth from a population on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b was detected to at least one serotype in 91% of mothers, despite a known carriage rate in this population of only 12%. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition corresponded to known carriage rates, with the highest levels of complement deposition observed onto the most prevalent serotype (serotype II) followed by serotypes Ia, III, V, and Ib. Finally, neonates born to mothers carrying serotype II GBS at the time of birth showed higher antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against serotype II GBS than neonates born to mothers with no serotype II carriage. Assessment of antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against GBS may provide insights into the seroepidemiology of anti-GBS antibodies in mothers and infants in different populations. PMID:25589553

  17. Antibody-Mediated Complement C3b/iC3b Binding to Group B Streptococcus in Paired Mother and Baby Serum Samples in a Refugee Population on the Thailand-Myanmar Border

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Jenny; Thomas, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Turner, Claudia; Turner, Paul; Nosten, Francois; Le Doare, Kirsty; Hudson, Michael; Heath, Paul T.; Gorringe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. In this study, we determined antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b onto the bacterial cell surface of GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V. This was determined for 520 mother and umbilical cord serum sample pairs obtained at the time of birth from a population on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b was detected to at least one serotype in 91% of mothers, despite a known carriage rate in this population of only 12%. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition corresponded to known carriage rates, with the highest levels of complement deposition observed onto the most prevalent serotype (serotype II) followed by serotypes Ia, III, V, and Ib. Finally, neonates born to mothers carrying serotype II GBS at the time of birth showed higher antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against serotype II GBS than neonates born to mothers with no serotype II carriage. Assessment of antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against GBS may provide insights into the seroepidemiology of anti-GBS antibodies in mothers and infants in different populations. PMID:25589553

  18. Baculovirus-mediated gene transfer in butterfly wings in vivo: an efficient expression system with an anti-gp64 antibody

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Candidate genes for color pattern formation in butterfly wings have been known based on gene expression patterns since the 1990s, but their functions remain elusive due to a lack of a functional assay. Several methods of transferring and expressing a foreign gene in butterfly wings have been reported, but they have suffered from low success rates or low expression levels. Here, we developed a simple, practical method to efficiently deliver and express a foreign gene using baculovirus-mediated gene transfer in butterfly wings in vivo. Results A recombinant baculovirus containing a gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was injected into pupae of the blue pansy butterfly Junonia orithya (Nymphalidae). GFP fluorescence was detected in the pupal wings and other body parts of the injected individuals three to five days post-injection at various degrees of fluorescence. We obtained a high GFP expression rate at relatively high virus titers, but it was associated with pupal death before color pattern formation in wings. To reduce the high mortality rate caused by the baculovirus treatment, we administered an anti-gp64 antibody, which was raised against baculovirus coat protein gp64, to infected pupae after the baculovirus injection. This treatment greatly reduced the mortality rate of the infected pupae. GFP fluorescence was observed in pupal and adult wings and other body parts of the antibody-treated individuals at various degrees of fluorescence. Importantly, we obtained completely developed wings with a normal color pattern, in which fluorescent signals originated directly from scales or the basal membrane after the removal of scales. GFP fluorescence in wing tissues spatially coincided with anti-GFP antibody staining, confirming that the fluorescent signals originated from the expressed GFP molecules. Conclusions Our baculovirus-mediated gene transfer system with an anti-gp64 antibody is reasonably efficient, and it can be an invaluable tool to transfer

  19. Sortase Enzyme-Mediated Generation of Site-Specifically Conjugated Antibody Drug Conjugates with High In Vitro and In Vivo Potency

    PubMed Central

    Beerli, Roger R.; Hell, Tamara; Merkel, Anna S.; Grawunder, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) have recently been proven to be highly potent anti-tumor drugs, typically exceeding the efficacy of conventional monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). ADCs are currently produced by chemical conjugation of a small-molecule toxin to the mAb through lysine or cysteine side chains. This leads to heterogeneous mixtures of ADCs in which variable numbers of drugs are conjugated to individual antibodies and in which the site of conjugation cannot be defined. Consequently, there is currently significant interest in further development of drug conjugation technologies, with a particular focus on site-specific payload conjugation. Here, we present an enzymatic conjugation platform based on the S. aureus sortase A-mediated transpeptidation reaction, allowing the efficient generation of ADCs with toxins conjugated to pre-defined sites at pre-defined drug-to-antibody ratios. For this, two modifications were introduced: first, immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) and light (IgL) chains were modified at their C-termini by addition of the sortase A recognition motif LPETG, and second, the small molecule tubulin polymerization inhibitors monomethylauristatin E (MMAE) and maytansine were modified by addition of a pentaglycine peptide, thus making them suitable substrates for sortase A-mediated transpeptidation. We demonstrate efficient generation and characterization of the anti-CD30 ADC Ac10-vcPAB-MMAE, an enzymatically conjugated counterpart of brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris), as well as several anti-HER-2 ADCs including trastuzumab-maytansine, the counterpart of trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla). ADCs generated in this manner were found to display in vitro cell killing activities indistinguishable from the classic conjugates. Further, when tested in vivo in a HER-2-overexpressing ovarian cancer xenograft mouse model, enzymatically generated trastuzumab-maytansine was found to lead to complete regression of established tumors, similar to Kadcyla. PMID:26132162

  20. Conserved natural IgM antibodies mediate innate and adaptive immunity against the opportunistic fungus Pneumocystis murina.

    PubMed

    Rapaka, Rekha R; Ricks, David M; Alcorn, John F; Chen, Kong; Khader, Shabaana A; Zheng, Mingquan; Plevy, Scott; Bengtén, Eva; Kolls, Jay K

    2010-12-20

    Host defense against opportunistic fungi requires coordination between innate and adaptive immunity for resolution of infection. Antibodies generated in mice vaccinated with the fungus Pneumocystis prevent growth of Pneumocystis organisms within the lungs, but the mechanisms whereby antibodies enhance antifungal host defense are poorly defined. Nearly all species of fungi contain the conserved carbohydrates β-glucan and chitin within their cell walls, which may be targets of innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we show that natural IgM antibodies targeting these fungal cell wall carbohydrates are conserved across many species, including fish and mammals. Natural antibodies bind fungal organisms and enhance host defense against Pneumocystis in early stages of infection. IgM antibodies influence recognition of fungal antigen by dendritic cells, increasing their migration to draining pulmonary lymph nodes. IgM antibodies are required for adaptive T helper type 2 (Th2) and Th17 cell differentiation and guide B cell isotype class-switch recombination during host defense against Pneumocystis. These experiments suggest a novel role for the IgM isotype in shaping the earliest steps in recognition and clearance of this fungus. We outline a mechanism whereby serum IgM, containing ancient specificities against conserved fungal antigens, bridges innate and adaptive immunity against fungal organisms.

  1. The Ch14.18-GM-CSF fusion protein is effective at mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Batova, A; Kamps, A; Gillies, S D; Reisfeld, R A; Yu, A L

    1999-12-01

    Granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is very effective at enhancing antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by granulocytes and monocytes. Recently, a fusion protein consisting of GM-CSF and chimeric human/mouse anti-ganglioside G(D2) antibody Ch14.18 (Ch14.18-GM-CSF) has been generated to improve the effectiveness of immunotherapy by directing GM-CSF to the tumor microenvironment and prolonging its relatively short half-life. In this study, we examined the ability of this fusion protein to enhance the in vitro killing of G(D2)-expressing human neuroblastoma cells by granulocytes and mononuclear cells, as well as by complement. The Ch14.18-GM-CSF fusion protein was equally effective as the combination of equivalent amounts of free Ch14.18 and GM-CSF in mediating the killing of NMB7 neuroblastoma cells by granulocytes from seven of eight neuroblastoma patients. The fusion protein was also equally effective as the combination of Ch14.18 and GM-CSF in mediating ADCC by neuroblastoma patients' mononuclear cells. In addition, the fusion protein was as effective as Ch14.18 alone in directing complement-dependent cytotoxicity against NMB7 cells. Our results demonstrate that the biological activities expressed by ADCC and complement-dependent cytotoxicity of both monoclonal antibody Ch14.18 and GM-CSF are retained by the Ch14.18-GM-CSF fusion protein and lend further support for future clinical trials of this fusion protein in patients with neuroblastoma.

  2. Fenretinide sensitizes multidrug-resistant human neuroblastoma cells to antibody-independent and ch14.18-mediated NK cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shibina, Anastasia; Seidel, Diana; Somanchi, Srinivas S; Lee, Dean A; Stermann, Alexander; Maurer, Barry J; Lode, Holger N; Reynolds, C Patrick; Huebener, Nicole

    2013-04-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. Combining passive immunotherapy with an antibody to the disialoganglioside GD2 (ch14.18/SP2/0) and cytokines with 13-cis-retinoic acid for post-myeloablative maintenance therapy increased survival in high-risk NB, but the overall prognosis for these children is still in need of improvement. Fenretinide (4-HPR) is a synthetic retinoid that has shown clinical activity in recurrent NB and is cytotoxic to a variety of cancer cells, in part via the accumulation of dihydroceramides, which are precursors of GD2. We investigated the effect of 4-HPR on CHO-derived, ch14.18-mediated anti-NB effector functions, complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), and antibody-dependent and antibody-independent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and AICC, respectively). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that pretreatment of fenretinide-resistant NB cells with 4-HPR significantly enhanced ch14.18/CHO-mediated CDC and ADCC and AICC by both human natural killer cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Treatment with 4-HPR increased GD2 and death receptor (DR) expression in resistant NB cells and induced an enhanced granzyme B and perforin production by effector cells. Blocking of ganglioside synthesis with a glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor abrogated the increased ADCC response but had no effect on the AICC, indicating that GD2 induced by 4-HPR mediates the sensitization of NB cells for ADCC. We also showed that 4-HPR induced increased GD2 and DR expression in a resistant NB xenograft model that was associated with an increased ADCC and AICC response using explanted tumor target cells from 4-HPR-treated mice. In summary, these findings provide an important baseline for the combination of 4-HPR and passive immunotherapy with ch14.18/CHO in future clinical trials for high-risk NB patients.

  3. Anti-neuroblastoma effect of ch14.18 antibody produced in CHO cells is mediated by NK-cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Fest, Stefan; Kunert, Renate; Katinger, Hermann; Pistoia, Vito; Michon, Jean; Lewis, Gillan; Ladenstein, Ruth; Lode, Holger N

    2005-07-01

    Successful treatment of stage 4 neuroblastoma remains a major challenge in pediatric oncology. In order to improve the outcome, passive immunotherapy using human-mouse chimeric monoclonal anti-disialoganglioside GD2 antibody ch14.18 has been evaluated in early phase clinical trials with promising results in progressing stage 4 neuroblastoma patients. In preparation of European phase III clinical trial (HR-NBL-1/ESIOP), the cell line used for production of ch14.18 was changed. Specifically, the plasmid encoding for ch14.18 antibody was recloned into CHO cells. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo anti-neuroblastoma activity of antibody ch14.18 produced in CHO cells (ch14.18/CHO) compared to that of ch14.18 manufactured from SP2/0 (ch14.18/SP2/0) and NS0 cells (ch14.18/NS0). First, we demonstrate identical binding of ch14.18/CHO to the nominal antigen disialoganglioside GD2 in vitro compared to ch14.18/SP2/0 and ch14.18/NS0. Binding was GD2-specific, since all precursor- and metabolite-gangliosides of GD2 tested were not recognized by ch14.18/CHO. Second, the functional properties of ch14.18/CHO were determined in complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) reactions against GD2 positive neuroectodermal tumor cell lines in vitro. There was no difference in CDC mediated specific tumor cell lysis among the three different ch14.18 antibody preparations. Interestingly, ch14.18/CHO showed superior ADCC activity at low antibody concentrations. Third, the efficacy of ch14.18/CHO was evaluated in the NXS2 neuroblastoma model in vivo. Importantly, the ch14.18/CHO preparation was effective in suppression of experimental liver metastasis in this model. In vivo depletion of NK-cells completely abrogated this effect, suggesting that the mechanism involved in the ch14.18/CHO induced anti-neuroblastoma effect is mediated by NK-dependent ADCC.

  4. Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of Human Rhinovirus 14 Explored by Means of Cryoelectron Microscopy and X-Ray Crystallography of Virus-Fab Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Che, Zhiwei; Olson, Norman H.; Leippe, Donna; Lee, Wai-ming; Mosser, Anne G.; Rueckert, Roland R.; Baker, Timothy S.; Smith, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    The structures of three different human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14)-Fab complexes have been explored with X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy procedures. All three antibodies bind to the NIm-IA site of HRV14, which is the β-B–β-C loop of the viral capsid protein VP1. Two antibodies, Fab17-IA (Fab17) and Fab12-IA (Fab12), bind bivalently to the virion surface and strongly neutralize viral infectivity whereas Fab1-IA (Fab1) strongly aggregates and weakly neutralizes virions. The structures of the two classes of virion-Fab complexes clearly differ and correlate with observed binding neutralization differences. Fab17 and Fab12 bind in essentially identical, tangential orientations to the viral surface, which favors bidentate binding over icosahedral twofold axes. Fab1 binds in a more radial orientation that makes bidentate binding unlikely. Although the binding orientations of these two antibody groups differ, nearly identical charge interactions occur at all paratope-epitope interfaces. Nucleotide sequence comparisons suggest that Fab17 and Fab12 are from the same progenitor cell and that some of the differing residues contact the south wall of the receptor binding canyon that encircles each of the icosahedral fivefold vertices. All of the antibodies contact a significant proportion of the canyon region and directly overlap much of the receptor (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM-1]) binding site. Fab1, however, does not contact the same residues on the upper south wall (the side facing away from fivefold axes) at the receptor binding region as do Fab12 and Fab17. All three antibodies cause some stabilization of HRV14 against pH-induced inactivation; thus, stabilization may be mediated by invariant contacts with the canyon. PMID:9573224

  5. Immune-mediated myopathy related to anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase antibodies as an emerging cause of necrotizing myopathy induced by statins.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Clément; Beaufrére, Anne Marie; Boyer, Olivier; Drouot, Laurent; Soubrier, Martin; Tournadre, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) associated with statin use and anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibody is a new and emerging entity that supports a link between statin use and IMNM and raises the questions of distinct clinical phenotypes and treatment strategy. We describe the clinical and histopathological characteristics of a patient and discuss the spectrum of IMNM and statin-induced myopathies. A 65-year-old man was suffering from proximal muscle weakness and elevated CK levels, following exposure to statin therapy. The symptoms worsened despite discontinuation of the drug. At that point, no myositis-specific or -associated antibodies were detected. Malignancy screening did not reveal abnormalities. Muscle biopsy demonstrated a predominantly necrotizing myopathy with minimal lymphocytic infiltrates, MHC class I expression in necrotic muscle fibers, and complement deposition on scattered non-necrotic muscle fibers. Muscle protein analysis by western blot was normal. The patient did not improve with steroid and methotrexate and required monthly intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Muscle strength gradually improved, CK levels normalized and IVIG were stopped 1 year later. Screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies, not available at the time of presentation, was highly positive. Identification of anti-HMGCR antibodies in statin-exposed patients with myopathy appears to be helpful both for differential diagnosis and for treatment strategy. In patients who did not improve after discontinuation of the statin treatment, a muscle biopsy should be performed as well as screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies. Patients with this disorder require aggressive immunosuppressive treatment.

  6. The Effect of Daily Co-Trimoxazole Prophylaxis on Natural Development of Antibody-Mediated Immunity against P. falciparum Malaria Infection in HIV-Exposed Uninfected Malawian Children

    PubMed Central

    Longwe, Herbert; Jambo, Kondwani C.; Phiri, Kamija S.; Mbeye, Nyanyiwe; Gondwe, Thandile; Hall, Tom; Tetteh, Kevin K. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Co-trimoxazole prophylaxis, currently recommended in HIV-exposed, uninfected (HEU) children as protection against opportunistic infections, also has some anti-malarial efficacy. We determined whether daily co-trimoxazole prophylaxis affects the natural development of antibody-mediated immunity to blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection. Methods Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we measured antibodies to 8Plasmodium falciparum antigens (AMA-1, MSP-119, MSP-3, PfSE, EBA-175RII, GLURP R0, GLURP R2 and CSP) in serum samples from 33 HEU children and 31 HIV-unexposed, uninfected (HUU) children, collected at 6, 12 and 18 months of age. Results Compared to HIV-uninfected children, HEU children had significantly lower levels of specific IgG against AMA-1 at 6 months (p = 0.001), MSP-119 at 12 months (p = 0.041) and PfSE at 6 months (p = 0.038), 12 months (p = 0.0012) and 18 months (p = 0.0097). No differences in the IgG antibody responses against the rest of the antigens were observed between the two groups at all time points. The breadth of specificity of IgG response was reduced in HEU children compared to HUU children during the follow up period. Conclusions Co-trimoxazole prophylaxis seems to reduce IgG antibody responses to P. falciparum blood stage antigens, which could be as a result of a reduction in exposure of those children under this regime. Although antibody responses were regarded as markers of exposure in this study, further studies are required to establish whether these responses are correlated in any way to clinical immunity to malaria. PMID:25807475

  7. Structure and function of broadly reactive antibody PG16 reveal an H3 subdomain that mediates potent neutralization of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pejchal, Robert; Walker, Laura M.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Phogat, Sanjay K.; Koff, Wayne C.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-11-15

    Development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 will likely require elicitation of broad and potent neutralizing antibodies against the trimeric surface envelope glycoprotein (Env). Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) PG9 and PG16 neutralize {approx}80% of HIV-1 isolates across all clades with extraordinary potency and target novel epitopes preferentially expressed on Env trimers. As these neutralization properties are ideal for a vaccine-elicited antibody response to HIV-1, their structural basis was investigated. The crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of PG16 at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution revealed its unusually long, 28-residue, complementarity determining region (CDR) H3 forms a unique, stable subdomain that towers above the antibody surface. A 7-residue 'specificity loop' on the 'hammerhead' subdomain was identified that, when transplanted from PG16 to PG9 and vice versa, accounted for differences in the fine specificity and neutralization of these two mAbs. The PG16 electron density maps also revealed that a CDR H3 tyrosine was sulfated, which was confirmed for both PG9 (doubly) and PG16 (singly) by mass spectral analysis. We further showed that tyrosine sulfation plays a role in binding and neutralization. An N-linked glycan modification is observed in the variable light chain, but not required for antigen recognition. Further, the crystal structure of the PG9 light chain at 3.0 {angstrom} facilitated homology modeling to support the presence of these unusual features in PG9. Thus, PG9 and PG16 use unique structural features to mediate potent neutralization of HIV-1 that may be of utility in antibody engineering and for high-affinity recognition of a variety of therapeutic targets.

  8. Immune-mediated steroid-responsive epileptic spasms and epileptic encephalopathy associated with VGKC-complex antibodies.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Jehan; Brenner, Tanja; Gill, Deepak; Troedson, Christopher; Sinclair, Adriane J; Brilot, Fabienne; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Dale, Russell C

    2011-11-01

    Autoantibodies that bind to voltage-gated potassium-channel complex proteins (VGKC-complex antibodies) occur frequently in adults with limbic encephalitis presenting with cognitive impairment and seizures. Recently, VGKC-complex antibodies have been described in a few children with limbic encephalitis, and children with unexplained encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus. We report a case of infantile-onset epileptic spasms and developmental delay compatible with epileptic encephalopathy. Our patient was a female infant, aged 4 months at presentation. She had evidence of immune activation in the central nervous system with elevated cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and mirrored oligoclonal bands, which prompted testing for autoantibodies. VGKC-complex antibodies were elevated (201 pmol/L, normal<100), but extended antibody testing, including leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2), was negative. The patient showed a partial response to steroid treatment, which was started late in the disease course. On review at 13 months of age, her development was consistent with an age of 5 to 6 months. These results suggest that VGKC-complex antibodies might represent a marker of immune therapy responsiveness in a subgroup of patients with infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

  9. Platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pulkrabek, S M

    1996-12-01

    The proper diagnosis of patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias can be accomplished by using the advances made in the field of platelet serology. These techniques range from solid phase red cell adherence to sequencing platelet antigen amino acids by polymerase chain reaction. This article describes platelet antigens, the clinical tests available to detect platelet antigens and antibodies, and the value of these tests in supporting clinical diagnoses.

  10. Molecular determinants of dengue virus 2 envelope protein important for virus entry in FcγRIIA-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Chotiwan, Nunya; Roehrig, John T.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2014-05-15

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection may cause severe illness in patients suffering a secondary infection by a heterologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype. During ADE of infection, cross-reactive non- or poorly-neutralizing antibodies form infectious virus-Ab complexes with the newly infecting serotype and enhance virus infection by binding to the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) on FcγR-bearing cells. In this study, we determined that molecular determinants of DENV2 envelope protein critical for virus entry during non-ADE infection are also required for ADE infection mediated by FcγRIIA, and binding of virus-Ab complexes with FcγRIIA alone is not sufficient for ADE of infection. The FcγRIIA mainly plays an auxiliary role in concentrating the virus–Ab complex to the cell surface, and other primary cellular receptors are required for virus entry. Understanding the viral entry pathway in ADE of DENV infection will greatly facilitate rational designs of anti-viral therapeutics against severe dengue disease associated with ADE. - Highlights: • KKK305/307/310 in DENV2 E-DIII is critical for virus attachment in ADE and non-ADE infection. • Binding of DENV2–Ab complex with FcγRII alone is not sufficient for virus entry in ADE infection. • Other primary receptors were required for DENV2 internalization during FcγRII–mediated ADE. • G104 and L135 of DENV2 E are critical for virus-mediated membrane fusion. • DENV2 virus-mediated membrane fusion is required for both ADE and non-ADE infection.

  11. Donor antibodies to HNA-3a implicated in TRALI reactions prime neutrophils and cause PMN-mediated damage to human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells in a two-event in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Silliman, Christopher C; Curtis, Brian R; Kopko, Patricia M; Khan, Samina Y; Kelher, Marguerite R; Schuller, Randy M; Sannoh, Baindu; Ambruso, Daniel R

    2007-02-15

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Antibodies to HNA-3a are commonly implicated in TRALI. We hypothesized that HNA-3a antibodies prime neutrophils (PMNs) and cause PMN-mediated cytotoxicity through a two-event pathogenesis. Isolated HNA-3a+ or HNA-3a- PMNs were incubated with plasma containing HNA-3a antibodies implicated in TRALI, and their ability to prime the oxidase was measured. Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) were activated with endotoxin or buffer, HNA-3a+ or HNA-3a- PMNs were added, and the coculture was incubated with plasma+/-antibodies to HNA-3a. PMN-mediated damage was measured by counting viable HMVECs/mm2. Plasma containing HNA-3a antibodies primed the fMLP-activated respiratory burst of HNA-3a+, but not HNA-3a-, PMNs and elicited PMN-mediated damage of LPS-activated HMVECs when HNA-3a+, but not HNA-3a-, PMNs were used. Thus, antibodies to HNA-3a primed PMNs and caused PMN-mediated HMVEC cytotoxicity in a two-event model identical to biologic response modifiers implicated in TRALI. PMID:17038531

  12. Growth inhibition in a brain metastasis model by antibody delivery using focused ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Kobus, Thiele; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Zhang, Yongzhi; McDannold, Nathan J

    2016-09-28

    HER2-targeting antibodies (i.e. trastuzumab and pertuzumab) prolong survival in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with extracranial metastases. However, the response of brain metastases to these drugs is poor, and it is hypothesized that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits drug delivery to the brain. We investigated whether we could improve the response by temporary disruption of the BBB using focused ultrasound in combination with microbubbles. To study this, we inoculated 30 nude rats with HER2-positive cells derived from a brain metastasis of a breast cancer patient (MDA-MB-361). The animals were divided into three groups: a control-group that received no treatment; an antibody-only group that received six weekly treatments of trastuzumab and pertuzumab; and an ultrasound+antibody group that received trastuzumab and pertuzumab in combination with six weekly sessions of BBB disruption using focused ultrasound. In two animals, the leakiness of the tumors before disruption was evaluated using contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and found that the tumors were not leaky. The same technique was used to evaluate the effectiveness of BBB disruption, which was successful in all sessions. The tumor in the control animals grew exponentially with a growth constant of 0.042±0.011mm(3)/day. None of the antibody-only animals responded to the treatment and the growth constant was 0.033±0.009mm(3)/day during the treatment period. Four of the ten animals in the ultrasound+antibody-group showed a response to the treatment with an average growth constant of 0.010±0.007mm(3)/day, compared to a growth constant 0.043±0.013mm(3)/day for the six non-responders. After the treatment period, the tumors in all groups grew at similar rates. As the tumors were not leaky before BBB disruption and there were no responders in the antibody-only group, these results show that at least in some cases disruption of the BBB is necessary for a response to the antibodies in

  13. A-CAM: a 135-kD receptor of intercellular adherens junctions. II. Antibody-mediated modulation of junction formation

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Intercellular adherens junctions between cultured lens epithelial cells are highly Ca2+-dependent and are readily dissociated upon chelation of extracellular Ca2+ ions. Addition of Ca2+ to EGTA-treated cells results in the recovery of cell-cell junctions including the reorganization of adherens junction-specific cell adhesion molecule (A-CAM), vinculin, and actin (Volk, T., and B. Geiger, 1986, J. Cell Biol., 103:000-000). Incubation of cells during the recovery phase with Fab' fragments of anti-A-CAM specifically inhibited the re-formation of cell-cell adherens junctions. This inhibition was accompanied by remarkable changes in microfilament organization manifested by an apparent deterioration of stress fibers and the appearance of fragmented actin bundles throughout the cytoplasm. Incubation of EGTA-dissociated cells with intact divalent anti-A-CAM antibodies in normal medium had no apparent inhibitory effect on junction formation and did not affect the assembly of actin microfilament bundles. Moreover, adherens junctions formed in the presence of the divalent antibodies became essentially Ca2+-independent, suggesting that cell-cell adhesion between them was primarily mediated by the antibodies. These studies suggest that A-CAM participates in intercellular adhesion in adherens-type junctions and point to its involvement in microfilament bundle assembly. PMID:3095334

  14. 15 years of ATTEMPTS: a macromolecular drug delivery system based on the CPP-mediated intracellular drug delivery and antibody targeting.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junxiao; Shin, Meong Cheol; Liang, Qiuling; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C

    2015-05-10

    Traditionally, any drug intended for combating the tumor would distribute profoundly to other organs and tissues as lack of targeting specificity, thus resulting in limited therapeutic effects toward the tumor but severe drug-induced toxic side effects. To prevail over this obstacle of drug-induced systemic toxicity, a novel approach termed "ATTEMPTS" (antibody targeted triggered electrically modified prodrug type strategy) was designed, which directly introduces both of the targeting and prodrug features onto the protein drugs. The ATTEMPTS system is composed of the antibody targeting component consisting of antibodies linked with heparin, and the cell penetrating peptide (CPP) modified drug component. The two components mentioned above self-assembled into a tight complex via the charge to charge interaction between the anionic heparin and cationic CPP. Once accumulated at the targeting site, the CPP modified drug is released from the blockage by a second triggering agent, while remaining inactive in the circulation during tumor targeting thus aborting its effect on normal tissues. We utilized the heparin-induced inhibition on the cell-penetrating activity of CPP to create the prodrug feature, and subsequently the protamine-induced reversal of heparin inhibition to resume cell transduction of the protein drug via the CPP function. Our approach is the first known system to overcome this selectivity issue, enabling CPP-mediated cellular drug delivery to be practically applicable clinically. In this review, we thoroughly discussed the historical and novel progress of the "ATTEMPTS" system.

  15. Antibodies to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 block dendritic cell-mediated enterovirus 71 transmission and prevent virus-induced cells death.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Xin; Li, Chuan; Xiong, Si-Dong; Huang, Zhong; Wang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Hai-Bo

    2015-01-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) has been proved to serve as the functional receptor for enterovirus 71 (EV71). We found the abundant expression of PSGL-1 on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). However, we have previously demonstrated that MDDCs did not support efficient replication of EV71. Dendritic cells (DCs) have been described to be subverted by various viruses including EV71 for viral dissemination, we thus explore the potential contribution of PSGL-1 on DC-mediated EV71 transmission. We found that the cell-surface-expressing PSGL-1 on MDDCs mediated EV71 binding, and intriguingly, these loaded-viruses on MDDCs could be transferred to encountered target cells; Prior-treatment with PSGL-1 antibodies or interference with PSGL-1 expression diminished MDDC-mediated EV71 transfer and rescued virus-induced cell death. Our data uncover a novel role of PSGL-1 in DC-mediated EV71 spread, and provide an insight into blocking primary EV71 infection.

  16. Oral immunotherapy induces IgG antibodies that act via FcγRIIb to suppress IgE-mediated hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Oliver T.; Logsdon, Stephanie L.; Zhou, Joseph S.; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Abdel-Gadir, Azza; Rivas, Magali Noval; Koleoglou, Kyle J.; Chatila, Talal A.; Schneider, Lynda C.; Rachid, Rima; Umetsu, Dale T.; Oettgen, Hans C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Food anaphylaxis is triggered by specific IgE antibodies. Paradoxically, some individuals with significant IgE levels can ingest allergenic foods without incident. Similarly, subjects completing oral immunotherapy (OIT) tolerate food challenges despite persistent high-titer food-specific IgE. Objective To test whether IgG antibodies induced by food immunotherapy prevent food-induced anaphylaxis, and whether this occurs via the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb. Methods Food allergy-susceptible Il4raF709 mice were enterally sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). Similarly sensitized IgE-deficient Il4raF709/IgE−/− mice, which can ingest OVA without anaphylaxis, were subjected to a high-dose enteral OVA desensitization protocol (OIT). Sera from both groups were tested for the ability to activate or inhibit bone marrow mast cells (BMMC) exposed to allergen, or to passively transfer allergy to naïve hosts. In parallel experiments, sera obtained from peanut allergic patients before and after undergoing OIT were interrogated for their ability to enhance or suppress peanut-induced activation in an indirect assay using basophils from non-allergic donors. Results Il4raF709 mice exhibited strong OVA-specific IgE responses. Their sera efficiently sensitized BMMC for activation by antigen challenge. Sera from Il4raF709/IgE−/− mice subjected to OVA OIT suppressed BMMC responses. This inhibition was IgG-mediated and FcγRIIb-dependent. Similarly, pre-OIT, but not post-OIT sera from patients efficiently sensitized basophils for peanut-induced activation. IgG antibodies in post-OIT sera suppressed basophil activation by pre-OIT sera. This inhibition was blocked by antibodies against FcγRII. Conclusion Food-specific IgG antibodies, such as those induced during OIT, inhibit IgE-mediated reactions. Strategies that favor IgG responses might prove useful in the management of food allergy. PMID:25042981

  17. Accelerated Tumor Growth Mediated by Sub-lytic Levels of Antibody-Induced Complement Activation is Associated with Activation of the PI3K/AKT Survival Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaohong; Ragupathi, Govind; Panageas, Katherine; Hong, Feng; Livingston, Philip O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We addressed the possibility that low levels of tumor cell bound antibodies targeting gangliosides might accelerate tumor growth. Experimental Design To test this hypothesis, we treated mice with a range of mAb doses against GM2, GD2, GD3 and CD20 after challenge with tumors expressing these antigens and tested the activity of the same mAbs in-vitro. We also explored the mechanisms behind the complement-mediated tumor growth acceleration that we observed and an approach to overcome it. Results Serologically detectable levels of IgM-mAb against GM2 are able to delay or prevent tumor growth of high GM2-expressing cell lines both in-vitro and in a SCID mouse model, while very low levels of this mAb resulted in slight but consistent acceleration of tumor growth in both settings. Surprisingly, this is not restricted to IgM antibodies targeting GM2 but consistent against IgG-mAb targeting GD3 as well. These findings were mirrored by in-vitro studies with antibodies against these antigens as well as GD2 and CD20 (with Rituxan), and shown to be complement-dependent in all cases. Complement-mediated accelerated growth of cultured tumor cell lines initiated by low mAb levels was associated with activation of the PI3K/AKT survival pathway and significantly elevated levels of both p-AKT and p-PRAS40. This complement-mediated PI3K-activation and accelerated tumor growth in-vitro and in-vivo are eliminated by PI3K-inhibitors NVP-BEZ235 and Wortmannin. These PI3K-inhibitors also significantly increased efficacy of high doses of these 4 mAbs. Conclusion Our findings suggest that manipulation of the PI3K/AKT pathway and its signaling network can significantly increase the potency of passively administered mAbs and vaccine-induced-antibodies targeting a variety of tumor-cell-surface-antigens. PMID:23833306

  18. Supraagonistic, bispecific single-chain antibody purified from the serum of cloned, transgenic cows induces T-cell-mediated killing of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Wick, Wolfgang; Minoia, Rosa; Weller, Michael; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Brem, Gottfried; Jung, Gundram

    2005-12-20

    Here we characterize the antitumor activity of a recombinant bispecific single-chain antibody isolated from the serum of cloned transgenic cows. The antibody, termed r28M, is directed to a melanoma-associated proteoglycan, also expressed on glioblastoma cells, and to human CD28. Bound to tumor cells, r28M induced exceedingly efficient supraagonistic T-cell activation via the CD28 molecule without an additional stimulus via the TCR/CD3 complex. In vitro, T cells and NK cells contributed to tumor cell killing after r28M-mediated activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, NK activity depended on T-cell-derived cytokines. In vivo, r28M markedly inhibited the growth of human glioblastoma cells in nude mice. The serum half-life of the protein after i.v. injection was approximately 6 hr. Thus, r28M is unique not only in inducing supraagonistic CD28-mediated T-cell activation against tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, it also meets 2 additional requirements that are critical for clinical application: a relatively long serum half-life and the possibility of obtaining large amounts of active material from cloned transgenic livestock.

  19. Survival of residual neutrophils and accelerated myelopoiesis limit the efficacy of antibody-mediated depletion of Ly-6G+ cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Moses, Katrin; Klein, Johanna C; Männ, Linda; Klingberg, Anika; Gunzer, Matthias; Brandau, Sven

    2016-06-01

    Expansion of Ly-6G(+) myeloid cells has been reported in most murine cancer models. However, divergent findings exist regarding the role and effect of these cells on host immunity and tumor progression. Antibody-mediated depletion of Ly-6G(+) cells is a common technique to assess the in vivo relevance of these cells. Interpretation of results crucially depends on the efficacy and course of depletion. We established murine head and neck cancer models and analyzed the efficacy of antibody-mediated depletion by flow cytometry, conventional histology, and intravital imaging with a novel Ly-6G-transgenic mouse model. The first phase of depletion was characterized by effective elimination of Ly-6G(+) cells from the peripheral blood. Nevertheless, viable, resistant cells were found to reside in the tumor tissue and spleen. This peripheral depletion phase was associated with high systemic levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and KC and enhanced splenic production of Ly-6G(+) cells. Even under sustained treatment with either αGr-1 or αLy-6G antibodies, peripheral blood depletion ended after approximately 1 wk and was followed by reappearance of immature Ly-6G(+) cells with an immunoregulatory phenotype. Reappearance of these depletion-resistant immature cells was enhanced in tumor-bearing, compared with naïve, control mice. Collectively, our data suggest that depletion of Ly-6G(+) myeloid cells in tumor-bearing mice is counteracted by the persistence of intratumoral cells, enhanced extramedullary granulopoiesis, and accelerated reappearance of immature cells. Hence, extensive monitoring of in vivo kinetics and tissue distribution of Ly-6G(+) cells is required in depletion studies.

  20. Neutralizing Antibodies against IFN-[Beta] in Multiple Sclerosis: Antagonization of IFN-[Beta] Mediated Suppression of MMPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilli, Francesca; Bertolotto, Antonio; Sala, Arianna; Hoffmann, Francine; Capobianco, Marco; Malucchi, Simona; Glass, Tracy; Kappos, Ludwig; Lindberg, Raija L. P.; Leppert, David

    2004-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against interferon-[Beta] (IFN-Beta) develop in about a third of treated multiple sclerosis patients and are believed to reduce therapeutic efficacy of IFN-[Beta] on clinical and MRI measures. The expression of the interferon acute-response protein, myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA) is a sensitive measure of the…

  1. Successful treatment of a noninhibitory antibody-mediated acquired factor X deficiency in a patient with marginal-zone lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Meenhuis, Annemarie; van Vliet, Rianne; Hudig, Francisca; Ypma, Paula F; Schipperus, Martin R; Hollestelle, Martine J

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Prolonged clotting times were observed in a patient with spontaneous hemorrhage. Analysis showed severe factor X deficiency due to clearance by a noninhibitory antibody. Lymphadenopathy identified on imaging led to diagnosis of marginal B-cell lymphoma. Treatment of lymphoma with rituximab and chlorambucil resulted in complete disappearance of the bleeding disorder. PMID:26273448

  2. Antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity in sera from patients with HIV-1 infection is controlled by CD55 and CD59.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, J; Zimmer, J P; Kluxen, B; Aries, S; Bögel, M; Gigli, I; Schmitz, H

    1995-01-01

    Various immune mechanisms have been reported to contribute to the progressive destruction of Th cells in HIV-1-infected patients. Among these, complement mediated lysis of infected cells has been suggested. An increased sensitivity of lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected patients to lysis by monoclonal antibodies directed to MHC class I antigen and complement has been directly correlated with a decreased expression of the decay accelerating factor (CD55). It also has been reported that the expression of the membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis (CD59) is decreased during HIV-1 infection. We examined the effect of antibodies in the serum of HIV-1-positive individuals and normal human serum (NHS) as source of complement on several HIV-1-infected cell lines differing in their expression of CD55 and CD59. When HIV-1-infected target cells without membrane expression of CD55 and CD59 were used, a highly significant cytotoxic effect was observed in the presence of heat inactivated anti-HIV-1-positive sera and NHS, while heat-inactivated anti-HIV-1-negative sera and NHS were unable to induce cytolysis. Similar results were obtained using purified IgG isolated from HIV-1-positive sera and either NHS or guinea pig serum as source of complement. Lysis of HIV-1-infected cells correlated with expression of viral antigens on the cell surface. HIV-1-infected CD55 and CD59 positive target cells showed specific lysis, when the function of these molecules was abrogated by blocking antibodies to CD55 and CD59. The finding of anti-HIV-1-specific cytotoxic antibodies in sera from HIV-1-infected patients should be considered in the pathogenesis of the HIV-1-infection. PMID:7544808

  3. Human seminal plasma inhibition of antibody complement-mediated killing and opsonization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and other gram-negative organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G F; Lammel, C J; Petersen, B H; Stites, D P

    1981-01-01

    Seminal plasma diluted 1:5-1:1,000 gave marked inhibition of serum antibody complement-mediated bactericidal and opsonic effects against Neisseria gonorrhoeae and other gram-negative organisms. Serum that was bactericidal at a dilution of 1:5,120 was not bactericidal at a dilution of 1:10 when seminal plasma was added. Bactericidal action of immune human or rabbit sera, or purified immunoglobulin (Ig)G or IgM plus complement for six strains of N. gonorrhoeae, serogroups A, B, C, and Y of Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli and other gram-negative rods was inhibited by seminal plasma. Using C8- or C7-deficient sera as antibody and complement sources, opsonization, phagocytosis, and killing of N. gonorrhoeae and E. coli 014-K7 were inhibited by seminal plasma. Opsonization, phagocytosis, and killing of Staphylococcus aureus 502A was not inhibited. For the gram-negative organisms, the early phase of the opsonization process, probably complement activation, appeared to be inhibited rather than the ingestion or polymorphonuclear leukocyte killing steps; addition of seminal plasma yielded a significant reduction in the percentage of polymorphonuclear cells with associated bacteria. Seminal plasma did not prevent attachment of IgG, IgM, or IgA antibodies to gonococci. It reduced serum hemolytic whole complement activity by 25%. The seminal plasma inhibitor was of low molecular weight and was stable at 56 degrees C for 30 min, but inhibitory activity was lost after heating to 100 degrees C for 10 min. It is likely that the inhibitory factor(s) is a low-molecular weight protease or protease inhibitor. Seminal plasma probably has an important role in inhibition of complement and antibody functions in the genital tract. It may enhance pathogenesis of agents of sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:6785314

  4. Complement mediates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of a human T cell line in a CD4- and antibody-independent fashion.

    PubMed

    Boyer, V; Desgranges, C; Trabaud, M A; Fischer, E; Kazatchkine, M D

    1991-05-01

    Incubation of the human T cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB and HTLV-RF strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with normal seronegative human serum under conditions that allow complement activation resulted in enhancement of infection of the MT2 human T cell line cultured in the presence of low amounts of virus. Infection of MT2 cells was assessed by measuring reverse transcriptase activity in supernatants at day 9 of culture. Complement activation by viral suspensions occurred through the alternative pathway. Opsonization of HTLV-RF viral particles with complement was sufficient to allow a productive infection to occur in cells exposed to suboptimal amounts of virus. Infection of MT2 cells with suboptimal amounts of serum-opsonized HIV-1 was suppressed by blocking the C3dg receptor (CR2, CD21) on MT2 cells with monoclonal anti-CR2 antibody and rabbit F(ab')2 anti-mouse immunoglobulin antibodies. Blocking of the gp120-binding site on CD4 under similar experimental conditions had no inhibitory effect on infection of MT2 cells with opsonized virus. Opsonization of HIV-1 with seronegative serum also resulted in a CR2-mediated enhancement of the infection of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells and T lymphocytes. These results indicate that complement in the absence of antibody may enhance infection of C3 receptor-bearing T cells with HIV-1, and that the interaction of opsonized virus with the CR2 receptor may result by itself in the infection of target T cells in a CD4- and antibody-independent fashion. PMID:1827139

  5. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antibody Mediated Neurologic Relapse Post Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Sarah; Walsh, Aoibhinn; King, Mary D; Lynch, Bryan; Webb, David; Twomey, Eilish; Ronan Leahy, T; Butler, Karina; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Despite the advent of antiviral therapy, herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) remains a devastating condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Neurologic relapse after initial improvement is generally attributed to herpes simplex virus reactivation. In 2013, inflammation caused by anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies was reported in association with cases of neurologic relapse after herpes simplex encephalitis. We present 3 such cases and discuss diagnostic and management dilemmas.

  6. Anti-Yo antibody-mediated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a female patient with pleural malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Meydan, Nezih; Barutca, Sabri; Ozsan, Nazan; Gurel, Duygu; Veral, Ali

    2013-05-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is a rare non-metastatic complication of malignancies. It presents with acute or subacute onset of ataxia, dysarthria and intention tremor. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is most commonly associated with malignancies of the ovary, breast and lung. The anti-Yo (anti-Purkinje cells) antibodies that specifically damage the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum are found in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Anti-Yo-related paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is most commonly found in women with gynecological and breast cancers, but it is reported in other malignancies. Patients with paraneoplastic syndromes most often present with neurologic symptoms before an underlying cancer is detected. We report a case of anti-Yo-related paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with pleural malignant mesothelioma in a 51-year-old female patient. She presented to our department with a 2-week history after the last chemotherapy of progressive dizziness related to head movement, nausea, vomiting, ataxia and unsteady gait. A western blot assay was negative for anti-Hu, anti-Ri, anti-Ma2, anti-CV2 and anti-amphiphysin paraneoplastic antibody markers but positive for anti-Yo. In conclusion, we report a case of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a patient with pleural malignant mesothelioma because of the rarity of this neurologic presentation after the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma and of the association with anti-Yo antibodies.

  7. Passive immunotherapy for anthrax toxin mediated by an adenovirus expressing an anti-protective antigen single-chain antibody.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Boyer, Julie L; Tan, Yadi; Alipui, D Olivier; Hackett, Neil R; Crystal, Ronald G

    2005-02-01

    In the 2001 U.S. bioterror attacks, 33,000 individuals required postexposure prophylaxis, 18 subjects contracted anthrax (11 inhalation, 7 cutaneous), and despite optimal medical therapy, 5 deaths resulted. Rapid protection against anthrax is required in a bioterrorism scenario; this study describes an in vivo gene transfer-based therapy that uses a human adenovirus (Ad)-based vector (AdalphaPAscAb) encoding a single-chain antibody directed against protective antigen (PA), a critical component of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Following AdalphaPAscAb administration to mice, anti-PA single-chain antibody and anti-PA neutralizing activity were detected in serum over a 2-week period. Substantial survival advantage from anthrax lethal toxin was conferred by AdalphaPAscAb following administration from 1 to 14 days prior to toxin challenge, compared to no survival associated with an Ad vector expressing a control single-chain antibody. Passive immunotherapy with an Ad-based vector may be a rapid, convenient approach for protecting a susceptible population against anthrax, including use as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy.

  8. Antibody responses to hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1: evidence for cross-reactivity and immune-mediated sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, M U; Cerino, A; Lisa, A; Brambilla, S; Segagni, L; Cividini, A; Bissolati, M; Missale, G; Bellati, G; Meola, A; Bruniercole, B; Nicosia, A; Galfrè, G; Silini, E

    1999-08-01

    Sequence heterogeneity of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is unevenly distributed along the genome, and maximal variation is confined to a short sequence of the HCV second envelope glycoprotein (E2), designated hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), whose biological function is still undefined. We prospectively studied serological responses to synthetic oligopeptides derived from HVR1 sequences of patients with acute and chronic HCV infection obtained at baseline and after a defined follow-up period. Extensive serological cross-reactivity for unrelated HVR1 peptides was observed in the majority of the patients. Antibody response was restricted to the IgG1 isotype and was focused on the carboxyterminal end of the HVR1 region. Cross-reactive antibodies could be readily elicited following immunization of mice with multiple antigenic peptides carrying HVR1 sequences derived from our patients. The vigor and heterogeneity of cross-reactive antibody responses were significantly higher in patients with chronic hepatitis compared with those with acute hepatitis and in patients infected with HCV type 2 compared with patients infected with other viral genotypes (predominantly type 1), which suggest that higher time-related HVR1 sequence diversification previously described for type 2 may result from immune selection. The finding of a statistically significant correlation between HVR1 sequence variation, and intensity, and cross-reactivity of humoral immune responses provided stronger evidence in support of the contention that HCV variant selection is driven by the host's immune pressure.

  9. Sortase A Induces Th17-Mediated and Antibody-Independent Immunity to Heterologous Serotypes of Group A Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Cui, Honglian; Hou, Baidong; Gao, Bin; Cleary, Paul Patrick; Wang, Beinan

    2014-01-01

    Group A streptococci (GAS) are associated with a variety of mucosal and invasive human infections. Recurrent infections by highly heterologous serotypes indicate that cross-serotype immunity is critical for prevention of GAS infections; however, mechanisms underlying serotype-independent protection are poorly understood. Here we report that intranasal vaccination of mice with Sortase A (SrtA), a conserved cell wall bound protein, reduced colonization of nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) by heterologous serotypes of GAS. Vaccination significantly increased CD4+ IL-17A+ cells in NALT and depletion of IL-17A by neutralizing antibody prevented GAS clearance from NALT which was dependent on immunization with SrtA. Vaccination also induced high levels of SrtA-specific antibodies; however, immunized, B cell-deficient mice cleared streptococcal challenges as efficiently as wild type mice, indicating that the cross-serotype protection is Th17-biased and antibody-independent. Furthermore, efficient GAS clearance from NALT was associated with a rapid neutrophil influx into NALT of immunized mice. These results suggest that serotype independent immune protection against GAS mucosal infection can be achieved by intranasal vaccination with SrtA and enhanced neutrophil function is critical for anti-GAS defense and might be a target for prevention of GAS infections. PMID:25232948

  10. Recombinant IL-21 and anti-CD4 antibodies cooperate in syngeneic neuroblastoma immunotherapy and mediate long-lasting immunity.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Valentina; Corrias, Maria Valeria; Orengo, Anna Maria; Brizzolara, Antonella; Emionite, Laura; Fenoglio, Daniela; Filaci, Gilberto; Croce, Michela; Ferrini, Silvano

    2014-05-01

    IL-21 is an immune-enhancing cytokine, which showed promising results in cancer immunotherapy. We previously observed that the administration of anti-CD4 cell-depleting antibody strongly enhanced the anti-tumor effects of an IL-21-engineered neuroblastoma (NB) cell vaccine. Here, we studied the therapeutic effects of a combination of recombinant (r) IL-21 and anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in a syngeneic model of disseminated NB. Subcutaneous rIL-21 therapy at 0.5 or 1 μg/dose (at days 2, 6, 9, 13 and 15 after NB induction) had a limited effect on NB development. However, coadministration of rIL-21 at the two dose levels and a cell-depleting anti-CD4 mAb cured 28 and 70 % of mice, respectively. Combined immunotherapy was also effective if started 7 days after NB implant, resulting in a 30 % cure rate. Anti-CD4 antibody treatment efficiently depleted CD4(+) CD25(high) Treg cells, but alone had limited impact on NB. Combination immunotherapy by anti-CD4 mAb and rIL-21 induced a CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte response, which resulted in tumor eradication and long-lasting immunity. CD4(+) T cells, which re-populated mice after combination immunotherapy, were required for immunity to NB antigens as indicated by CD4(+) T cell depletion and re-challenge experiments. In conclusion, these data support a role for regulatory CD4(+) T cells in a syngeneic NB model and suggest that rIL-21 combined with CD4(+) T cell depletion reprograms CD4(+) T cells from immune regulatory to anti-tumor functions. These observations open new perspectives for the use of IL-21-based immunotherapy in conjunction with transient CD4(+) T cell depletion, in human metastatic NB.

  11. Different antibody- and cytokine-mediated responses to Plasmodium falciparum parasite in two sympatric ethnic tribes living in Mali.

    PubMed

    Farouk, Salah E; Dolo, Amagana; Bereczky, Sàndor; Kouriba, Bourema; Maiga, Boubacar; Färnert, Anna; Perlmann, Hedvig; Hayano, Masashi; Montgomery, Scott M; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Troye-Blomberg, Marita

    2005-01-01

    The Fulani are known to be less susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria infections and to have lower parasitaemia despite living under similar malaria transmission intensity compared with other ethnic tribes. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the Fulani were more polarised towards Th2 as reflected by higher numbers of malaria-specific IL-4- and IL-10-producing cells and lower numbers of IFN-gamma- and IL-12-producing cells as compared to their neighbour ethnic tribe, the Dogon of Mali. Total IgE and both anti-malaria IgE and IgG antibodies were measured by ELISA and the numbers of IL-4-, IFN-gamma-, IL-10- and IL-12-producing cells were enumerated using enzyme-linked ImmunoSpot assay (ELISPOT). Numbers of parasite clones were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The study was performed outside the transmission period and all individuals included were asymptomatic. The results revealed that the Fulani were less parasitised, had fewer circulating parasite clones in their blood, had significantly higher anti-malaria IgG and IgE antibodies and higher proportions of malaria-specific IL-4- and IFN-gamma-producing cells compared to the Dogon. The higher antigen-specific production of IL-4 among the Fulani was statistically significant both before and after adjustment for level of spontaneous cytokine production, while greater IFN-gamma production only attained statistical significance after adjustment for spontaneous levels. Taken together, the association of higher anti-malarial IgE and IgG antibodies and increased numbers of specific IL-4- and IFN-gamma-producing cells compared to the ethnic sympatric tribe, the Dogon, may assist in explaining the lower susceptibility to malaria observed in the Fulani.

  12. Immune-mediated necrotising myopathy associated with antibodies to the signal recognition particle treated with a combination of rituximab and cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Fernandes das Neves, Marisa; Caetano, Joana; Oliveira, Susana; Delgado Alves, José

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with dysphagia and proximal muscle weakness. He was diagnosed with immune-mediated necrotising myopathy associated with antibodies to the signal recognition particle. After an initial response following treatment with high-dose steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin and methotrexate, there was a relapse of the immune condition. The clinical deterioration occurred less than 2 months after disease onset. The refractoriness of this disease was characterised by an increase of the already severe muscle wasting that led to respiratory failure and progressive dysphagia, regardless of the immunosuppressant treatment. At this time the patient was referred to our department. He was restarted on intravenous pulses of methylprednisolone associated with intravenous cyclophosphamide, but with no effect. After 3 weeks, rituximab was started with a dramatic and progressive improvement. There were no complications associated with rituximab/cyclophosphamide treatment and the disease has been kept in remission, for the last 3 years. PMID:26240092

  13. Immune-mediated necrotising myopathy associated with antibodies to the signal recognition particle treated with a combination of rituximab and cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Fernandes das Neves, Marisa; Caetano, Joana; Oliveira, Susana; Delgado Alves, José

    2015-08-03

    A 50-year-old man presented with dysphagia and proximal muscle weakness. He was diagnosed with immune-mediated necrotising myopathy associated with antibodies to the signal recognition particle. After an initial response following treatment with high-dose steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin and methotrexate, there was a relapse of the immune condition. The clinical deterioration occurred less than 2 months after disease onset. The refractoriness of this disease was characterised by an increase of the already severe muscle wasting that led to respiratory failure and progressive dysphagia, regardless of the immunosuppressant treatment. At this time the patient was referred to our department. He was restarted on intravenous pulses of methylprednisolone associated with intravenous cyclophosphamide, but with no effect. After 3 weeks, rituximab was started with a dramatic and progressive improvement. There were no complications associated with rituximab/cyclophosphamide treatment and the disease has been kept in remission, for the last 3 years.

  14. Sex Related Differences in the Risk of Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Subsequent Allograft Vasculopathy Post-Heart Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grupper, Avishay; Nestorovic, Emilija M.; Daly, Richard C.; Milic, Natasa M.; Joyce, Lyle D.; Stulak, John M.; Joyce, David L.; Edwards, Brooks S.; Pereira, Naveen L.; Kushwaha, Sudhir S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregnancies may result in antibodies against HLA, a risk factor for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and subsequent cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) after heart transplantation (HTx). The aim of this study was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of AMR events and subsequent risk of CAV among HTx recipients. Methods The study comprised 160 patients (51 [32%] women) who underwent HTx in 2008 to 2014. The cumulative effect of AMR events was calculated by AMR score (sum of myocardial biopsy grading divided by number of biopsies taken during 3 years post-HTx). Results Females had higher levels of anti-HLA I antibodies pre-HTx compared to males which was associated with a history of pregnancies, total number of children and with a higher AMR score at 6 months post-HTx (P < 0.05). Women demonstrated a significant increase in the total incidence of AMR events (27 vs. 7%, P = 0.001) and in AMR scores at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months post-HTx compared to men (P < 0.05). There were no differences in cellular rejection between the groups. A history of AMR events was associated with a significantly increased risk of severe CAV onset (hazard ratio, 7.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-31.5; P = 0.012). Conclusions Women are at higher risk for AMR post-HTx which subsequently increases their risk for CAV. Females recipients may benefit from closer surveillance to identify AMR at an earlier stage post-HTx, and targeted immunosuppressive therapy to attenuate the development of CAV.

  15. Anti-HMGCR antibodies as a biomarker for immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies: A history of statins and experience from a large international multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Musset, Lucile; Allenbach, Yves; Benveniste, Olivier; Boyer, Olivier; Bossuyt, Xavier; Bentow, Chelsea; Phillips, Joe; Mammen, Andrew; Van Damme, Philip; Westhovens, René; Ghirardello, Anna; Doria, Andrea; Choi, May Y; Fritzler, Marvin J; Schmeling, Heinrike; Muro, Yoshinao; García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Ortiz-Villalvazo, Miguel A; Bizzaro, Nicola; Infantino, Maria; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Peng, Qinglin; Wang, Guochun; Vencovský, Jiří; Klein, Martin; Krystufkova, Olga; Franceschini, Franco; Fredi, Micaela; Hue, Sophie; Belmondo, Thibaut; Danko, Katalin; Mahler, Michael

    2016-10-01

    In an effort to find naturally occurring substances that reduce cholesterol by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), statins were first discovered by Endo in 1972. With the widespread prescription and use of statins to decrease morbidity from myocardial infarction and stroke, it was noted that approximately 5% of all statin users experienced muscle pain and weakness during treatment. In a smaller proportion of patients, the myopathy progressed to severe morbidity marked by proximal weakness and severe muscle wasting. Remarkably, Mammen and colleagues were the first to discover that the molecular target of statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), is an autoantibody target in patients that develop an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). These observations have been confirmed in a number of studies but, until today, a multi-center, international study of IMNM, related idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), other auto-inflammatory conditions and controls has not been published. Accordingly, an international, multi-center study investigated the utility of anti-HMGCR antibodies in the diagnosis of statin-associated IMNM in comparison to different forms of IIM and controls. This study included samples from patients with different forms of IIM (n=1250) and patients with other diseases (n=656) that were collected from twelve sites and tested for anti-HMGCR antibodies by ELISA. This study confirmed that anti-HMGCR autoantibodies, when found in conjunction with statin use, characterize a subset of IIM who are older and have necrosis on muscle biopsy. Taken together, the data to date indicates that testing for anti-HMGCR antibodies is important in the differential diagnosis of IIM and might be considered for future classification criteria. PMID:27491568

  16. Target-mediated drug disposition and prolonged liver accumulation of a novel humanized anti-CD81 monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Vexler, Vladimir; Yu, Li; Pamulapati, Chandrasena; Garrido, Rosario; Grimm, Hans Peter; Sriraman, Priya; Bohini, Sandhya; Schraeml, Michael; Singh, Usha; Brandt, Michael; Ries, Stefan; Ma, Han; Klumpp, Klaus; Ji, Changhua

    2013-01-01

    CD81 is an essential receptor for hepatitis C virus (HCV). K21 is a novel high affinity anti-CD81 antibody with potent broad spectrum anti-HCV activity in vitro. The pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics and liver distribution of K21 were characterized in cynomolgus monkeys after intravenous (i.v.) administration of K21. Characteristic target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) was shown based on the PK profile of K21 and a semi-mechanistic TMDD model was used to analyze the data. From the TMDD model, the estimated size of the total target pool at baseline (Vc • Rbase) is 16 nmol/kg and the estimated apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (KM) is 4.01 nM. A simulation using estimated TMDD parameters indicated that the number of free receptors remains below 1% for at least 3 h after an i.v. bolus of 7 mg/kg. Experimentally, the availability of free CD81 on peripheral lymphocytes was measured by immunostaining with anti-CD81 antibody JS81. After K21 administration, a dose- and time-dependent reduction in free CD81 on peripheral lymphocytes was observed. Fewer than 3% of B cells could bind JS81 3 h after a 7 mg/kg dose. High concentrations of K21 were found in liver homogenates, and the liver/serum ratio of K21 increased time-dependently and reached ~160 at 168 h post-administration. The presence of K21 bound to hepatocytes was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The fast serum clearance of K21 and accumulation in the liver are consistent with TMDD. The TMDD-driven liver accumulation of the anti-CD81 antibody K21 supports the further investigation of K21 as a therapeutic inhibitor of HCV entry. PMID:23924796

  17. Nanoparticle mediated drug delivery of rolipram to tyrosine kinase B positive cells in the inner ear with targeting peptides and agonistic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Glueckert, Rudolf; Pritz, Christian O.; Roy, Soumen; Dudas, Jozsef; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Systemic pharmacotherapies have limitation due to blood-labyrinth barrier, so local delivery via the round window membrane opens a path for effective treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticle (NP)-mediated cell specific drug delivery may enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. Different NPs with ligands to target TrkB receptor were tested. Distribution, uptake mechanisms, trafficking, and bioefficacy of drug release of rolipram loaded NPs were evaluated. Methods: We tested lipid based nanocapsules (LNCs), Quantum Dot, silica NPs with surface modification by peptides mimicking TrkB or TrkB activating antibodies. Bioefficacy of drug release was tested with rolipram loaded LNCs to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. We established different cell culture models with SH-SY-5Y and inner ear derived cell lines and used neonatal and adult mouse explants. Uptake and trafficking was evaluated with FACS and confocal as well as transmission electron microscopy. Results: Plain NPs show some selectivity in uptake related to the in vitro system properties, carrier material, and NP size. Some peptide ligands provide enhanced targeted uptake to neuronal cells but failed to show this in cell cultures. Agonistic antibodies linked to silica NPs showed TrkB activation and enhanced binding to inner ear derived cells. Rolipram loaded LNCs proved as effective carriers to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Discussion: Most NPs with targeting ligands showed limited effects to enhance uptake. NP aggregation and unspecific binding may change uptake mechanisms and impair endocytosis by an overload of NPs. This may affect survival signaling. NPs with antibodies activate survival signaling and show effective binding to TrkB positive cells but needs further optimization for specific internalization. Bioefficiacy of rolipram release confirms LNCs as encouraging vectors for drug delivery of lipophilic agents to the inner ear with ideal release characteristics independent of endocytosis

  18. Anti-HMGCR antibodies as a biomarker for immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies: A history of statins and experience from a large international multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Musset, Lucile; Allenbach, Yves; Benveniste, Olivier; Boyer, Olivier; Bossuyt, Xavier; Bentow, Chelsea; Phillips, Joe; Mammen, Andrew; Van Damme, Philip; Westhovens, René; Ghirardello, Anna; Doria, Andrea; Choi, May Y; Fritzler, Marvin J; Schmeling, Heinrike; Muro, Yoshinao; García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Ortiz-Villalvazo, Miguel A; Bizzaro, Nicola; Infantino, Maria; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Peng, Qinglin; Wang, Guochun; Vencovský, Jiří; Klein, Martin; Krystufkova, Olga; Franceschini, Franco; Fredi, Micaela; Hue, Sophie; Belmondo, Thibaut; Danko, Katalin; Mahler, Michael

    2016-10-01

    In an effort to find naturally occurring substances that reduce cholesterol by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), statins were first discovered by Endo in 1972. With the widespread prescription and use of statins to decrease morbidity from myocardial infarction and stroke, it was noted that approximately 5% of all statin users experienced muscle pain and weakness during treatment. In a smaller proportion of patients, the myopathy progressed to severe morbidity marked by proximal weakness and severe muscle wasting. Remarkably, Mammen and colleagues were the first to discover that the molecular target of statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), is an autoantibody target in patients that develop an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). These observations have been confirmed in a number of studies but, until today, a multi-center, international study of IMNM, related idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), other auto-inflammatory conditions and controls has not been published. Accordingly, an international, multi-center study investigated the utility of anti-HMGCR antibodies in the diagnosis of statin-associated IMNM in comparison to different forms of IIM and controls. This study included samples from patients with different forms of IIM (n=1250) and patients with other diseases (n=656) that were collected from twelve sites and tested for anti-HMGCR antibodies by ELISA. This study confirmed that anti-HMGCR autoantibodies, when found in conjunction with statin use, characterize a subset of IIM who are older and have necrosis on muscle biopsy. Taken together, the data to date indicates that testing for anti-HMGCR antibodies is important in the differential diagnosis of IIM and might be considered for future classification criteria.

  19. CD147 monoclonal antibody mediated by chitosan nanoparticles loaded with α-hederin enhances antineoplastic activity and cellular uptake in liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chun-ge; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Zhi-qiang; Chen, Wei-liang; Yang, Shu-di; Li, Ji-zhao; Zhu, Wen-jing; Zhou, Xiao-feng; You, Ben-gang; Zhang, Xue-nong

    2015-01-01

    An antibody that specifically interacts with an antigen could be applied to an active targeting delivery system. In this study, CD147 antibody was coupled with α-hed chitosan nanoparticles (α-Hed-CS-NPs). α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs were round and spherical in shape, with an average particle size of 148.23 ± 1.75 nm. The half-maximum inhibiting concentration (IC50) of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs in human liver cancer cell lines HepG2 and SMMC-7721 was lower than that of free α-Hed and α-Hed-CS-NPs. α-Hed-induced cell death was mainly triggered by apoptosis. The increase in intracellular accumulation of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs was also related to CD147-mediated internalization through the Caveolae-dependent pathway and lysosomal escape. The higher targeting antitumor efficacy of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs than that α-Hed-CS-NPs was attributed to its stronger fluorescence intensity in the tumor site in nude mice. PMID:26639052

  20. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediated serotherapy against murine neuroblastoma. II. In vitro and in vivo treatment using effector cells from normal and X-irradiated humans.

    PubMed

    Byfield, J E; Zerubavel, R; Fonkalsrud, E W

    1983-01-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes (HLc) have been studied in vitro as possible effector cells in an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) reaction. HLc were found to be active against murine neuroblastoma cells (MNB) inoculated into the flank of syngeneic mice. Both the time of onset of tumor appearance and the mean survival time of tumor-bearing host mice were beneficially influenced. Occasional animals could be cured of up to 10(5) tumor cells (1--10 cells of MNB are lethal). This level of tumor cytotoxicity approaches that of tolerance-dose chemotherapy and is without demonstrable side-effects. HLc from patients who had just received = 3,000 rads fractionated therapeutic X-irradiation were equally effective as HLc from control non-irradiated donors when assayed at equivalent HLc : tumor cell ratios. HLc could also inhibit MNB tumor cell growth in the ascitic form, confirming in vivo activity. Overall, HLc appeared almost as active as rat spleen cells in mediating a useful anti-tumor ADCC. This approach may ultimately prove useful in man, especially in the peritoneal cavity, and is currently limited only by the need to develop appropriate antisera. It is proposed and emphasized that such antisera need not necessarily be directed at tumor-specific antigens. Organ-specific antibodies such are already known to develop spontaneously in some human auto-immune diseases might be equally useful and are a naturally occurring potential source of appropriately expressed genetic material.

  1. Neutralization capacity and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of separated IgG subclasses 1, 3 and 4 against herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Mathiesen, T; Persson, M A; Sundqvist, V A; Wahren, B

    1988-01-01

    IgG subclasses 1, 3 and 4 in sera from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) seropositive donors were separated and their functions assayed. The main neutralizing activity to HSV-1 was found in the IgG1 fractions. Both IgG3 and IgG4 possessed higher neutralizing titres than IgG1 in relation to the respective HSV IgG subclass enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titre. Addition of complement resulted in a strong enhancement of IgG3 neutralizing activity. HSV neutralizations by IgG1 and, surprisingly, IgG4 were also somewhat enhanced by complement. With the addition of complement, the contribution to neutralizing activity of IgG3 was calculated to increase from 31 to 40% of total IgG in HSV neutralization in native sera. The avidities of the IgG fractions to HSV glycoprotein C (gC) were estimated in a few sera but could not be correlated to neutralization results. Antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) was detectable mainly in IgG1 and 3 fractions of sera with high anti-HSV antibody titres. PMID:2842096

  2. Beyond Criteria and Definitions: Outcome of a Standardized Antibody-Mediated Rejection Protocol with a Diagnostic Schema Different from the Banff 2009 Criteria.

    PubMed

    Rendulic, TrisAnn; Ramon, Daniel S; Killen, Paul D; Samaniego-Picota, Milagros; Park, Jeong M

    2014-01-01

    A new clinical diagnostic schema is needed for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in kidney transplant recipients due to the limited utility of C4d staining, lack of standardized quantitative tests for donor specific antibodies, and potential new diagnostic markers. The treatment of AMR remains controversial because previous studies included heterogeneous treatment modalities, small sample sizes, and short follow-up time. At the University of Michigan Transplant Center, 26 patients were diagnosed with AMR based on our diagnostic protocol including C4d-negative AMR in thesetting of graft dysfunction and Banff tissue injury type II (capillaritis) or type III (arteritis). After diagnosis, these patients received six sessions of plasmapheresis (PP) and IVIG (100 mg/kg after the first to fifth PP and 500 mg/kg with the last PP). Our novel finding in this analysis was the association between persistent C1q detection and graft loss. We confirmed that C4d positivity at diagnosis is associated with worse outcomes. Also, we found that response to our treatment protocol is dependent on C4d staining and Banff tissue injury type.

  3. VEGFR2 targeted antibody fused with MICA stimulates NKG2D mediated immunosurveillance and exhibits potent anti-tumor activity against breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Liu, Fang; Wang, Youfu; Ren, Xueyan; Wang, Tong; Chen, Zhiguo; Tang, Mingying; Sun, Fumou; Li, Zhaoting; Wang, Min; Zhang, Juan

    2016-03-29

    Binding of MHC class I-related chain molecules A and B (MICA/B) to the natural killer (NK) cell receptor NK group 2, member D (NKG2D) is thought critical for activating NK-mediated immunosurveillance. Angiogenesis is important for tumor growth and interfering with angiogenesis using the fully human IgG1 anti-VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2) antibody (mAb04) can be effective in treating malignancy. In an effort to make mAb04 more effective we have generated a novel antibody fusion protein (mAb04-MICA) consisting of mAb04 and MICA. We found that mAb04-MICA maintained the anti-angiogenic and antineoplastic activities of mAb04, and also enhanced immunosurveillance activated by the NKG2D pathway. Moreover, in human breast tumor-bearing nude mice, mAb04-MICA demonstrated superior anti-tumor efficacy compared to combination therapy of mAb04 + Docetaxel or Avastin + Docetaxel, highlighting the immunostimulatory effect of MICA. In conclusion, mAb04-MICA provided new inspiration for anti-tumor treatment and had prospects for clinical application.

  4. Passive immunization with anti-glucosaminidase monoclonal antibodies protects mice from implant-associated osteomyelitis by mediating opsonophagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus megaclusters.

    PubMed

    Varrone, John J; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L; Bello-Irizarry, Sheila N; Nishitani, Kohei; Mack, Sarah; Hunter, Joshua G; Kates, Stephen L; Daiss, John L; Schwarz, Edward M

    2014-10-01

    Towards the development of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) vaccine we evaluated a neutralizing anti-glucosaminidase (Gmd) monoclonal antibody (1C11) in a murine model of implant-associated osteomyelitis, and compared its effects on LAC USA300 MRSA versus a placebo and a Gmd-deficient isogenic strain (ΔGmd). 1C11 significantly reduced infection severity, as determined by bioluminescent imaging of bacteria, micro-CT assessment of osteolysis, and histomorphometry of abscess numbers (p < 0.05). Histology also revealed infiltrating macrophages, and the complete lack of staphylococcal abscess communities (SAC), in marrow abscesses of 1C11 treated mice. In vitro, 1C11 had no direct effects on proliferation, but electron microscopy demonstrated that 1C11 treatment phenocopies ΔGmd defects in binary fission. Moreover, addition of 1C11 to MRSA cultures induced the formation of large bacterial aggregates (megaclusters) that sedimented out of solution, which was not observed in ΔGmd cultures or 1C11 treated cultures of a protein A-deficient strain (ΔSpa), suggesting that the combined effects of Gmd inhibition and antibody-mediated agglutination are required. Finally, we demonstrated that macrophage opsonophagocytosis of MRSA and megaclusters is significantly increased by 1C11 (p < 0.01). Collectively, these results suggest that the primary mechanism of anti-Gmd humoral immunity against MRSA osteomyelitis is macrophage invasion of Staphylococcal abscess communities (SAC) and opsonophagocytosis of megaclusters. . PMID:24992290

  5. Anti-Sclerostin antibody inhibits internalization of Sclerostin and Sclerostin-mediated antagonism of Wnt/LRP6 signaling.

    PubMed

    van Dinther, Maarten; Zhang, Juan; Weidauer, Stella E; Boschert, Verena; Muth, Eva-Maria; Knappik, Achim; de Gorter, David J J; van Kasteren, Puck B; Frisch, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D; ten Dijke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sclerosteosis is a rare high bone mass disease that is caused by inactivating mutations in the SOST gene. Its gene product, Sclerostin, is a key negative regulator of bone formation and might therefore serve as a target for the anabolic treatment of osteoporosis. The exact molecular mechanism by which Sclerostin exerts its antagonistic effects on Wnt signaling in bone forming osteoblasts remains unclear. Here we show that Wnt3a-induced transcriptional responses and induction of alkaline phosphatase activity, an early marker of osteoblast differentiation, require the Wnt co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6. Unlike Dickkopf1 (DKK1), Sclerostin does not inhibit Wnt-3a-induced phosphorylation of LRP5 at serine 1503 or LRP6 at serine 1490. Affinity labeling of cell surface proteins with [(125)I]Sclerostin identified LRP6 as the main specific Sclerostin receptor in multiple mesenchymal cell lines. When cells were challenged with Sclerostin fused to recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP) this was internalized, likely via a Clathrin-dependent process, and subsequently degraded in a temperature and proteasome-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of LRP6 greatly enhanced binding and cellular uptake of Sclerostin-GFP, which was reduced by the addition of an excess of non-GFP-fused Sclerostin. Finally, an anti-Sclerostin antibody inhibited the internalization of Sclerostin-GFP and binding of Sclerostin to LRP6. Moreover, this antibody attenuated the antagonistic activity of Sclerostin on canonical Wnt-induced responses.

  6. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, Erik W.; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-12-01

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp{sup H35} and Glu{sup L34} to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu{sup L34} to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10{sup 9}-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  7. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket.

    PubMed

    Debler, Erik W; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A

    2009-11-01

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp(H35) and Glu(L34) to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu(L34) to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10(9)-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  8. STAT3-mediated IGF-2 secretion in the tumour microenvironment elicits innate resistance to anti-IGF-1R antibody.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Sun; Kang, Ju-Hee; Boo, Hye-Jin; Hwang, Su-Jung; Hong, Sungyoul; Lee, Su-Chan; Park, Young-Jun; Chung, Tae-Moon; Youn, Hyewon; Lee, Seung Mi; Kim, Byoung Jae; Chung, June-Key; Chung, Yeonseok; William, William N; Shin, Young Kee; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Oh, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major impediment in medical oncology. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of the tumour microenvironment (TME) to innate resistance, to molecularly targeted therapies. In this study, we investigate the role of TME in resistance to cixutumumab, an anti-IGF-1R monoclonal antibody that has shown limited clinical efficacy. We show that treatment with cixutumumab accelerates tumour infiltration of stromal cells and metastatic tumour growth, and decreases overall survival of mice. Cixutumumab treatment stimulates STAT3-dependent transcriptional upregulation of IGF-2 in cancer cells and recruitment of macrophages and fibroblasts via paracrine IGF-2/IGF-2R activation, resulting in the stroma-derived CXCL8 production, and thus angiogenic and metastatic environment. Silencing IGF-2 or STAT3 expression in cancer cells or IGF-2R or CXCL8 expression in stromal cells significantly inhibits the cancer-stroma communication and vascular endothelial cells' angiogenic activities. These findings suggest that blocking the STAT3/IGF-2/IGF-2R intercellular signalling loop may overcome the adverse consequences of anti-IGF-1R monoclonal antibody-based therapies. PMID:26465273

  9. Antibodies mediate formation of neutrophil extracellular traps in the middle ear and facilitate secondary pneumococcal otitis media.

    PubMed

    Short, Kirsty R; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Langereis, Jeroen D; Chew, Keng Yih; Job, Emma R; Armitage, Charles W; Hatcher, Brandon; Fujihashi, Kohtaro; Reading, Patrick C; Hermans, Peter W; Wijburg, Odilia L; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A

    2014-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) (a middle ear infection) is a common childhood illness that can leave some children with permanent hearing loss. OM can arise following infection with a variety of different pathogens, including a coinfection with influenza A virus (IAV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). We and others have demonstrated that coinfection with IAV facilitates the replication of pneumococci in the middle ear. Specifically, we used a mouse model of OM to show that IAV facilitates the outgrowth of S. pneumoniae in the middle ear by inducing middle ear inflammation. Here, we seek to understand how the host inflammatory response facilitates bacterial outgrowth in the middle ear. Using B cell-deficient infant mice, we show that antibodies play a crucial role in facilitating pneumococcal replication. We subsequently show that this is due to antibody-dependent neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation in the middle ear, which, instead of clearing the infection, allows the bacteria to replicate. We further demonstrate the importance of these NETs as a potential therapeutic target through the transtympanic administration of a DNase, which effectively reduces the bacterial load in the middle ear. Taken together, these data provide novel insight into how pneumococci are able to replicate in the middle ear cavity and induce disease.

  10. Detection of anti-HLA antibodies in maternal blood in the second trimester to identify patients at risk for antibody-mediated maternal anti-fetal rejection and spontaneous preterm delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JoonHo; Romero, Roberto; Xu, Yi; Miranda, Jezid; Yoo, Wonsuk; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Tarca, Adi L.; Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Than, Nandor Gabor; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Kim, Chong Jai

    2014-01-01

    Problem Maternal anti-fetal rejection is a mechanism of disease in spontaneous preterm labor. The objective of this study was to determine whether the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) during the second trimester increases the risk for spontaneous preterm delivery. Methods of Study This longitudinal case-control study included pregnant women with spontaneous preterm deliveries (n=310) and control patients with normal term pregnancies (n=620), matched for maternal age and gravidity. Maternal plasma samples obtained at 14-16, 16-20, 20-24, and 24-28 weeks of gestation were analyzed for HLA Class I and Class II PRA positivity using flow cytometry. The fetal HLA genotype and maternal HLA alloantibody epitope were determined for a subset of patients with positive HLA PRA. Results 1) Patients with spontaneous preterm delivery were more likely to exhibit HLA Class I (adjusted OR=2.54, p<0.0001) and Class II (adjusted OR=1.98, p=0.002) PRA positivity than those delivering at term; 2) HLA Class I PRA positivity for patients with spontaneous preterm delivery between 28-34 weeks (adjusted OR=2.88; p=0.001) and after 34 weeks of gestation (adjusted OR=2.53; p<0.0001) was higher than for those delivering at term; 3) HLA Class II PRA positivity for patients with spontaneous preterm delivery after 34 weeks of gestation was higher than for those delivering at term (adjusted OR=2.04; p=0.002); 4) multiparous women were at higher risk for HLA Class I PRA positivity than nulliparous women (adjusted OR=0.097, p<0.0001 for nulliparity); 5) nulliparous women had a higher rate of HLA Class I PRA positivity with advancing gestational age (p=0.001); and 6) 78% of women whose fetuses were genotyped had allo-antibodies specific against fetal HLA class I antigens. Conclusions Pregnant women with positive HLA class I or class II PRA during the second trimester are at an increased risk for spontaneous preterm delivery due to antibody-mediated maternal

  11. Silica vesicles as nanocarriers and adjuvants for generating both antibody and T-cell mediated immune resposes to Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Mody, Karishma T; Mahony, Donna; Zhang, Jun; Cavallaro, Antonino S; Zhang, Bing; Popat, Amirali; Mahony, Timothy J; Yu, Chengzhong; Mitter, Neena

    2014-12-01

    Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) is widely distributed in cattle industries and causes significant economic losses worldwide annually. A limiting factor in the development of subunit vaccines for BVDV is the need to elicit both antibody and T-cell-mediated immunity as well as addressing the toxicity of adjuvants. In this study, we have prepared novel silica vesicles (SV) as the new generation antigen carriers and adjuvants. With small particle size of 50 nm, thin wall (~6 nm), large cavity (~40 nm) and large entrance size (5.9 nm for SV-100 and 16 nm for SV-140), the SV showed high loading capacity (∼ 250 μg/mg) and controlled release of codon-optimised E2 (oE2) protein, a major immunogenic determinant of BVDV. The in vivo functionality of the system was validated in mice immunisation trials comparing oE2 plus Quil A (50 μg of oE2 plus 10 μg of Quil A, a conventional adjuvant) to the oE2/SV-140 (50 μg of oE2 adsorbed to 250 μg of SV-140) or oE2/SV-140 together with 10 μg of Quil A. Compared to the oE2 plus Quil A, which generated BVDV specific antibody responses at a titre of 10(4), the oE2/SV-140 group induced a 10 times higher antibody response. In addition, the cell-mediated response, which is essential to recognise and eliminate the invading pathogens, was also found to be higher [1954-2628 spot forming units (SFU)/million cells] in mice immunised with oE2/SV-140 in comparison to oE2 plus Quil A (512-1369 SFU/million cells). Our study has demonstrated that SV can be used as the next-generation nanocarriers and adjuvants for enhanced veterinary vaccine delivery. PMID:25239045

  12. Immunotherapeutic effect of the lactobacillus vaccine, Solco Trichovac, in trichomoniasis is not mediated by antibodies cross reacting with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Gombosová, A; Demes, P; Valent, M

    1986-01-01

    According to the producers of the lactobacillus vaccine, Solco Trichovac, its therapeutic effect in trichomoniasis is achieved by antibodies that are induced by the vaccination and cross react with Trichomonas vaginalis. Common antigens of Lactobacillus acidophilus from Solco Trichovac vaccine and T vaginalis were therefore sought by three different seroreactions. Immune serum against Lacidophilus obtained by vaccinating two healthy human volunteers and two rabbits with the original Solco Trichovac vaccine, as well as hyperimmune rabbit antiserum to T vaginalis, were tested with each of the two micro-organisms. No evidence of antigenic similarity between L acidophilus and T vaginalis was obtained with either serum in any of the three serological tests. A non-specific immunostimulatory effect therefore seems to be a more probable explanation of the mode of action of Solco Trichovac vaccine. PMID:3522408

  13. Analysis of leukocyte populations in Canadian Holsteins classified as high or low immune responders for antibody- or cell-mediated immune response

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Brad C.; Cartwright, Shannon L.; Mallard, Bonnie A.

    2012-01-01

    Selection of dairy cattle for increased milk production with little or no emphasis on health traits leads to an increased prevalence of disease. A possible genetic solution to this problem is to combine production and immune response traits in a weighted selection index. In the current study, leukocyte populations in heifers identified as having a high antibody-mediated immune response (HiAMIR) or high cell-mediated immune response (HiCMIR) phenotype were compared before and after immunization in order to identify leukocyte population profiles associated with these phenotypes. The results demonstrated that the HiCMIR-phenotype animals had a higher baseline proportion of gamma-delta T-cells in peripheral blood. Also, the observed increase in the proportion of B-cells in peripheral blood in response to immunization was greater in the HiAMIR-phenotype animals. It is expected that identifying leukocyte population profiles associated with immune response phenotypes will improve our ability to identify animals with enhanced overall immune responsiveness. PMID:23024458

  14. Prenyltransferases regulate CD20 protein levels and influence anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody-mediated activation of complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Winiarska, Magdalena; Nowis, Dominika; Bil, Jacek; Glodkowska-Mrowka, Eliza; Muchowicz, Angelika; Wanczyk, Malgorzata; Bojarczuk, Kamil; Dwojak, Michal; Firczuk, Malgorzata; Wilczek, Ewa; Wachowska, Malgorzata; Roszczenko, Katarzyna; Miaczynska, Marta; Chlebowska, Justyna; Basak, Grzegorz Wladyslaw; Golab, Jakub

    2012-09-14

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are successfully used in the management of non-Hodgkin lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We have reported previously that statins induce conformational changes in CD20 molecules and impair rituximab-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Here we investigated in more detail the influence of farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) on CD20 expression and antitumor activity of anti-CD20 mAbs. Among all FTIs studied, L-744,832 had the most significant influence on CD20 levels. It significantly increased rituximab-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity against primary tumor cells isolated from patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas or chronic lymphocytic leukemia and increased CD20 expression in the majority of primary lymphoma/leukemia cells. Incubation of Raji cells with L-744,832 led to up-regulation of CD20 at mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that inhibition of farnesyltransferase activity was associated with increased binding of PU.1 and Oct-2 to the CD20 promoter sequences. These studies indicate that CD20 expression can be modulated by FTIs. The combination of FTIs with anti-CD20 mAbs is a promising therapeutic approach, and its efficacy should be examined in patients with B-cell tumors.

  15. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody-mediated neurological disease: results of a UK-based surveillance study in children

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Sukhvir; Hacohen, Yael; Jacobson, Leslie; Agrawal, Shakti; Gupta, Rajat; Philip, Sunny; Smith, Martin; Lim, Ming; Wassmer, Evangeline; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Objective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody (NMDAR-Ab) encephalitis is a well-recognised clinico-immunological syndrome that presents with neuropsychiatric symptoms cognitive decline, movement disorder and seizures. This study reports the clinical features, management and neurological outcomes of paediatric NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological disease in the UK. Design A prospective surveillance study. Children with NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological diseases were voluntarily reported to the British Neurological Surveillance Unit (BPNSU) from November 2010 to December 2011. Initial and follow-up questionnaires were sent out to physicians. Results Thirty-one children fulfilled the criteria for the study. Eight presented during the study period giving an incidence of 0.85 per million children per year (95% CI 0.64 to 1.06); 23 cases were historical. Behavioural change and neuropsychiatric features were present in 90% of patients, and seizures and movement disorders both in 67%. Typical NMDAR-Ab encephalitis was reported in 24 children and partial phenotype without encephalopathy in seven, including predominantly psychiatric (four) and movement disorder (three). All patients received steroids, 22 (71%) received intravenous immunoglobulin, 9 (29%) received plasma exchange,and 10 (32%) received second-line immunotherapy. Of the 23 patients who were diagnosed early, 18 (78%) made a full recovery compared with only 1 of 8 (13%) of the late diagnosed patients (p=0.002, Fisher's exact test). Seven patients relapsed, with four needing additional second-line immunotherapy. Conclusions Paediatric NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological disease appears to be similar to adult NMDAR-Ab encephalitis, but some presented with a partial phenotype. Early treatment was associated with a quick and often full recovery. PMID:25637141

  16. Mediation of Cryptosporidium parvum Infection In Vitro by Mucin-Like Glycoproteins Defined by a Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Cevallos, Ana María; Bhat, Najma; Verdon, Renaud; Hamer, Davidson H.; Stein, Barry; Tzipori, Saul; Pereira, Miercio E. A.; Keusch, Gerald T.; Ward, Honorine D.

    2000-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is a significant cause of diarrheal disease worldwide. Attachment to and invasion of host intestinal epithelial cells by C. parvum sporozoites are crucial steps in the pathogenesis of cryptosporidiosis. The molecular basis of these initial interactions is unknown. In order to identify putative C. parvum adhesion- and invasion-specific proteins, we raised monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to sporozoites and evaluated them for inhibition of attachment and invasion in vitro. Using this approach, we identified two glycoproteins recognized by 4E9, a MAb which neutralized C. parvum infection and inhibited sporozoite attachment to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. 4E9 recognized a 40-kDa glycoprotein named gp40 and a second, >220-kDa protein which was identified as GP900, a previously described mucin-like glycoprotein. Glycoproteins recognized by 4E9 are localized to the surface and apical region of invasive stages and are shed in trails from the parasite during gliding motility. The epitope recognized by 4E9 contains α-N-acetylgalactosamine residues, which are present in a mucin-type O-glycosidic linkage. Lectins specific for these glycans bind to the surface and apical region of sporozoites and block attachment to host cells. The surface and apical localization of these glycoproteins and the neutralizing effect of the MAb and α-N-acetylgalactosamine-specific lectins strongly implicate these proteins and their glycotopes as playing a role in C. parvum-host cell interactions. PMID:10948140

  17. Antibody-mediated neutralization and binding-reversal studies on alpha-neurotoxins from Micrurus nigrocinctus nigrocinctus (coral snake) venom.

    PubMed

    Alape-Giron, A; Stiles, B G; Gutierrez, J M

    1996-03-01

    An ELISA based, non-radioactive acetylcholine receptor (AchR) binding assay was used to detect the alpha-neurotoxins present in Micrurus nigrocinctus nigrocinctus venom. Sera from horses hyperimmunized against M. nigrocinctus venom contain antibodies which inhibit the binding of M. n. nigrocinctus alpha-neurotoxins to AchR and reverse the binding of toxins already complexed with the receptor. This result supports the importance of using antivenom therapeutically in M. n. nigrocinctus envenomations even after the onset of neurological symptoms. M. nigrocinctus antivenoms cross-reacted in an ELISA with several elapid alpha-neurotoxins and inhibited the binding of Bungarus multicinctus alpha-bungarotoxin and Naja naja oxiana neurotoxin II to AchR in vitro, suggesting the presence of short-chain and long-chain alpha-neurotoxins in M. nigrocinctus venom. In vivo neutralization experiments with M. nigrocinctus antivenom demonstrate that M. nigrocinctus venom contains short-chain alpha-neurotoxin(s) which share common neutralizing epitope(s) with Naja naja oxiana neurotoxin II.

  18. Increasing the clinical efficacy of NK and antibody-mediated cancer immunotherapy: potential predictors of successful clinical outcome based on observations in high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Koehn, Tony A; Trimble, Lori L; Alderson, Kory L; Erbe, Amy K; McDowell, Kimberly A; Grzywacz, Bartosz; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Disease recurrence is frequent in high-risk neuroblastoma (NBL) patients even after multi-modality aggressive treatment [a combination of chemotherapy, surgical resection, local radiation therapy, autologous stem cell transplantation, and cis-retinoic acid (CRA)]. Recent clinical studies have explored the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to disialoganglioside (GD(2)), highly expressed in NBL, as a means to enable immune effector cells to destroy NBL cells via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Preclinical data indicate that ADCC can be more effective when appropriate effector cells are activated by cytokines. Clinical studies have pursued this by administering anti-GD(2) mAb in combination with ADCC-enhancing cytokines (IL2 and GM-CSF), a regimen that has demonstrated improved cancer-free survival. More recently, early clinical studies have used a fusion protein that consists of the anti-GD(2) mAb directly linked to IL2, and anti-tumor responses were seen in the Phase II setting. Analyses of genes that code for receptors that influence ADCC activity and natural killer (NK) cell function [Fc receptor (FcR), killer immunoglublin-like receptor (KIR), and KIR-ligand (KIR-L)] suggest patients with anti-tumor activity are more likely to have certain genotype profiles. Further analyses will need to be conducted to determine whether these genotypes can be used as predictive markers for favorable therapeutic outcome. In this review, we discuss factors that affect response to mAb-based tumor therapies such as hu14.18-IL2. Many of our observations have been made in the context of NBL; however, we will also include some observations made with mAbs targeting other tumor types that are consistent with results in NBL. Therefore, we hypothesize that the NBL observations discussed here may also be relevant to mAb therapy for other cancers, in which ADCC is known to play a role.

  19. The interplay of non-specific binding, target-mediated clearance and FcRn interactions on the pharmacokinetics of humanized antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Datta-Mannan, Amita; Lu, Jirong; Witcher, Derrick R; Leung, Donmienne; Tang, Ying; Wroblewski, Victor J

    2015-01-01

    The application of protein engineering technologies toward successfully improving antibody pharmacokinetics has been challenging due to the multiplicity of biochemical factors that influence monoclonal antibody (mAb) disposition in vivo. Physiological factors including interactions with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and specific antigen binding properties of mAbs, along with biophysical properties of the mAbs themselves play a critical role. It has become evident that applying an integrated approach to understand the relative contribution of these factors is critical to rationally guide and apply engineering strategies to optimize mAb pharmacokinetics. The study presented here evaluated the influence of unintended non-specific interactions on the disposition of mAbs whose clearance rates are governed predominantly by either non-specific (FcRn) or target-mediated processes. The pharmacokinetics of 8 mAbs representing a diverse range of these properties was evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys. Results revealed complementarity-determining region (CDR) charge patch engineering to decrease charge-related non-specific binding can have a significant impact on improving the clearance. In contrast, the influence of enhanced in vitro FcRn binding was mixed, and related to both the strength of charge interaction and the general mechanism predominant in governing the clearance of the particular mAb. Overall, improved pharmacokinetics through enhanced FcRn interactions were apparent for a CDR charge-patch normalized mAb which was affected by non-specific clearance. The findings in this report are an important demonstration that mAb pharmacokinetics requires optimization on a case-by-case basis to improve the design of molecules with increased therapeutic application. PMID:26337808

  20. Antibodies in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs from one individual to another can incite the production of antibodies specific for foreign antigens, especially major histocompatibility antigens, in the graft. Antibodies specific for a graft provide an index of immunity and a potential trigger for injury and rejection. However, the index of immunity can sometimes miss antibody-mediated rejection and besides causing injury the antibodies against a graft can also protect a graft from injury by blocking immune recognition, called enhancement, regulating activation of complement, and inducing changes in the graft that resist damage. Reviewed here are potential limitations in the use of antibodies as an index of immunity and the ways antibodies cause and/or prevent injury. PMID:20807473

  1. Provirus activation plus CD59 blockage triggers antibody-dependent complement-mediated lysis of latently HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jie; Yang, Kai; Byrd, Daniel; Hu, Ningjie; Amet, Tohti; Shepherd, Nicole; Desai, Mona; Gao, Jimin; Gupta, Samir; Sun, Yongtao; Yu, Qigui

    2014-10-01

    Latently HIV-1-infected cells are recognized as the last barrier toward viral eradication and cure. To purge these cells, we combined a provirus stimulant with a blocker of human CD59, a key member of the regulators of complement activation, to trigger Ab-dependent complement-mediated lysis. Provirus stimulants including prostratin and histone deacetylase inhibitors such as romidepsin and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid activated proviruses in the latently HIV-1-infected T cell line ACH-2 as virion production and viral protein expression on the cell surface were induced. Romidepsin was the most attractive provirus stimulant as it effectively activated proviruses at nanomolar concentrations that can be achieved clinically. Antiretroviral drugs including two protease inhibitors (atazanavir and darunavir) and an RT inhibitor (emtricitabine) did not affect the activity of provirus stimulants in the activation of proviruses. However, saquinavir (a protease inhibitor) markedly suppressed virus production, although it did not affect the percentage of cells expressing viral Env on the cell surface. Provirus-activated ACH-2 cells expressed HIV-1 Env that colocalized with CD59 in lipid rafts on the cell surface, facilitating direct interaction between them. Blockage of CD59 rendered provirus-activated ACH-2 cells and primary human CD4(+) T cells that were latently infected with HIV-1 sensitive to Ab-dependent complement-mediated lysis by anti-HIV-1 polyclonal Abs or plasma from HIV-1-infected patients. Therefore, a combination of provirus stimulants with regulators of complement activation blockers represents a novel approach to eliminate HIV-1.

  2. Antibody-Mediated Inhibition of the FGFR1c Isoform Induces a Catabolic Lean State in Siberian Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Samms, Ricardo J; Lewis, Jo E; Lory, Alex; Fowler, Maxine J; Cooper, Scott; Warner, Amy; Emmerson, Paul; Adams, Andrew C; Luckett, Jeni C; Perkins, Alan C; Wilson, Dana; Barrett, Perry; Tsintzas, Kostas; Ebling, Francis J P

    2015-11-16

    Hypothalamic tanycytes are considered to function as sensors of peripheral metabolism. To facilitate this role, they express a wide range of receptors, including fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). Using a monoclonal antibody (IMC-H7) that selectively antagonizes the FGFR1c isoform, we investigated possible actions of FGFR1c in a natural animal model of adiposity, the Siberian hamster. Infusion of IMC-H7 into the third ventricle suppressed appetite and increased energy expenditure. Likewise, peripheral treatment with IMC-H7 decreased appetite and body weight and increased energy expenditure and fat oxidation. A greater reduction in body weight and caloric intake was observed in response to IMC-H7 during the long-day fat state as compared to the short-day lean state. This enhanced response to IMC-H7 was also observed in calorically restricted hamsters maintained in long days, suggesting that it is the central photoperiodic state rather than the peripheral adiposity that determines the response to FGFR1c antagonism. Hypothalamic thyroid hormone availability is controlled by deiodinase enzymes (DIO2 and DIO3) expressed in tanycytes and is the key regulator of seasonal cycles of energy balance. Therefore, we determined the effect of IMC-H7 on hypothalamic expression of these deiodinase enzymes. The reductions in food intake and body weight were always associated with decreased expression of DIO2 in the hypothalamic ependymal cell layer containing tanycytes. These data provide further support for the notion the tanycytes are an important component of the mechanism by which the hypothalamus integrates central and peripheral signals to regulate energy intake and expenditure.

  3. Targeted siRNA Delivery and mRNA Knockdown Mediated by Bispecific Digoxigenin-binding Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Britta; Grote, Michael; John, Matthias; Haas, Alexander; Bramlage, Birgit; lckenstein, Ludger M; Jahn-Hofmann, Kerstin; Bauss, Frieder; Cheng, Weijun; Croasdale, Rebecca; Daub, Karin; Dill, Simone; Hoffmann, Eike; Lau, Wilma; Burtscher, Helmut; Ludtke, James L; Metz, Silke; Mundigl, Olaf; Neal, Zane C; Scheuer, Werner; Stracke, Jan; Herweijer, Hans; Brinkmann, Ulrjch

    2012-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) that bind to cell surface antigens and to digoxigenin (Dig) were used for targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery. They are derivatives of immunoglobulins G (IgGs) that bind tumor antigens, such as Her2, IGF1-R, CD22, and LeY, with stabilized Dig-binding variable domains fused to the C-terminal ends of the heavy chains. siRNA that was digoxigeninylated at its 3′end was bound in a 2:1 ratio to the bsAbs. These bsAb–siRNA complexes delivered siRNAs specifically to cells that express the corresponding antigen as demonstrated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The complexes internalized into endosomes and Dig-siRNAs separated from bsAbs, but Dig-siRNA was not released into the cytoplasm; bsAb-targeting alone was thus not sufficient for effective mRNA knockdown. This limitation was overcome by formulating the Dig-siRNA into nanoparticles consisting of dynamic polyconjugates (DPCs) or into lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs). The resulting complexes enabled bsAb-targeted siRNA-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) knockdown with IC50 siRNA values in the low nanomolar range for a variety of bsAbs, siRNAs, and target cells. Furthermore, pilot studies in mice bearing tumor xenografts indicated mRNA knockdown in endothelial cells following systemic co-administration of bsAbs and siRNA formulated in LNPs that were targeted to the tumor vasculature. PMID:23344238

  4. Immune-mediated liver injury of the cancer therapeutic antibody catumaxomab targeting EpCAM, CD3 and Fcγ receptors.

    PubMed

    Borlak, Jürgen; Länger, Florian; Spanel, Reinhard; Schöndorfer, Georg; Dittrich, Christian

    2016-05-10

    The immunotherapeutic catumaxomab targets EpCAM positive cancers and is approved for the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis. To assess the safety of intravenous applications a phase 1 clinical trial was initiated. Treatment of EpCAM positive tumor patients with catumaxomab caused dose dependent hepatitis as evidenced by significant elevations in serum alanine- and aspartate aminotransferases, bilirubin, γGT and induction of the acute phase C-reactive protein (CRP) and the cytokines IL6 and IL8. The first patient receiving 10μg catumaxomab experienced fatal acute liver failure which led to the termination of the study. Immmunopathology revealed catumaxomab to bind via its Fc-fragment to FcγR-positive Kupffer cells to stimulate CRP, chemokine and cytokine release. The observed CD3+T-cell margination at activated hepatic macrophages exacerbated T-cell mediated cytotoxicity. Strikingly, the combined Kupffer/T-cell responses against liver cells did not require hepatocytes to be EpCAM-positive. Catumaxomab's off-target activity involved T-cell mediated lysis of the granzyme B cell death pathway and the molecular interaction of hepatic sinusoidal macrophages with T-cells induced cytolytic hepatitis. Although the bile ducts were surrounded by densely packed lymphocytes these rarely infiltrated the ducts to suggest an intrahepatic cholestasis as the cause of hyperbilirubinaemia. Lastly, evidence for the programming of memory T-cells was observed with one patient that succumbed to his cancer six weeks after the last catumaxomab infusion. In conclusion, our study exemplifies off-target hepatotoxicity with molecularly targeted therapy and highlights the complexities in the clinical development of immunotherapeutic antibodies. PMID:27058902

  5. Immune-mediated liver injury of the cancer therapeutic antibody catumaxomab targeting EpCAM, CD3 and Fcγ receptors

    PubMed Central

    Borlak, Jürgen; Länger, Florian; Spanel, Reinhard; Schöndorfer, Georg; Dittrich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The immunotherapeutic catumaxomab targets EpCAM positive cancers and is approved for the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis. To assess the safety of intravenous applications a phase 1 clinical trial was initiated. Treatment of EpCAM positive tumor patients with catumaxomab caused dose dependent hepatitis as evidenced by significant elevations in serum alanine- and aspartate aminotransferases, bilirubin, γGT and induction of the acute phase C-reactive protein (CRP) and the cytokines IL6 and IL8. The first patient receiving 10μg catumaxomab experienced fatal acute liver failure which led to the termination of the study. Immmunopathology revealed catumaxomab to bind via its Fc-fragment to FcγR-positive Kupffer cells to stimulate CRP, chemokine and cytokine release. The observed CD3+T-cell margination at activated hepatic macrophages exacerbated T-cell mediated cytotoxicity. Strikingly, the combined Kupffer/T-cell responses against liver cells did not require hepatocytes to be EpCAM-positive. Catumaxomab's off-target activity involved T-cell mediated lysis of the granzyme B cell death pathway and the molecular interaction of hepatic sinusoidal macrophages with T-cells induced cytolytic hepatitis. Although the bile ducts were surrounded by densely packed lymphocytes these rarely infiltrated the ducts to suggest an intrahepatic cholestasis as the cause of hyperbilirubinaemia. Lastly, evidence for the programming of memory T-cells was observed with one patient that succumbed to his cancer six weeks after the last catumaxomab infusion. In conclusion, our study exemplifies off-target hepatotoxicity with molecularly targeted therapy and highlights the complexities in the clinical development of immunotherapeutic antibodies. PMID:27058902

  6. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-12-16

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64(+) monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients' inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64(+) cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64(+) cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64(+) cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions.

  7. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64(+) monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients' inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64(+) cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64(+) cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64(+) cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions. PMID:26670584

  8. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M.; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64+ monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients’ inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64+ cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64+ cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64+ cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions. PMID:26670584

  9. Neuropeptide-mediated regulation of hapten-specific IgE responses in mice. II. Mechanisms of substance P-mediated isotype-specific suppression of BPO-specific IgE antibody-forming cell responses induced in vitro.

    PubMed

    Carucci, J A; Herrick, C A; Durkin, H G

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that substance P (SP), injected into benzylpenicilloyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (BPO-KLH) sensitized mice at the peak of the benzylpenicilloyl (BPO)-specific IgE response, suppressed these responses in isotype-specific fashion within 48 h. These studies also showed that SP, but not neurotensin (NT), serotonin (5-HT), somatostatin (SOM) or gastrin, suppressed BPO-specific memory IgE antibody-forming cell (AFC) responses induced in vitro, also in isotype-specific fashion. To investigate the mechanisms by which SP suppressed BPO-specific IgE AFC responses were induced in vitro, these responses were induced by culturing spleen cells from BPO-KLH sensitized mice for 5 days with BPO-KLH with or without whole SP, amino terminal SP (SP 1-4: Arg-Lys-Pro-Lys), or carboxy terminal SP (SP 8-11: Phe-Gly-Leu-Met). In some experiments, the SP receptor antagonist (D-Pro2, D-Phe7, D-Trp9)-SP (D-SP) was included in culture. In other experiments anti-interferon monoclonal antibody (anti-IFN gamma mAb) was in culture. Whole SP and SP 8-11, but not SP 1-4, suppressed BPO-specific IgE AFC responses induced in vitro. The suppression obtained was IgE isotype-specific and dose-dependent. Inclusion of SP receptor antagonist (D-Pro2, D-Phe7, D-Trp9)-SP inhibited suppression of BPO-specific memory IgE AFC responses by SP or SP 8-11. The SP-mediated suppression of BPO-specific memory IgE responses appeared to involve interferon gamma (IFN gamma).

  10. Biosimilars in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases: initial lessons from the first approved biosimilar anti-tumour necrosis factor monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, J D; Cutolo, M; Keystone, E C; Park, W; Braun, J

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted biological therapies has revolutionised the management of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease. Following treatment with these therapies, many patients experience significant improvements in different aspects of their disease, including symptoms, work productivity and other outcomes relevant for individuals and society. However, due to the complexity of biological drug development and manufacturing processes, the costs of these therapies are relatively high. Indeed, the financial burden on healthcare systems due to biological therapies is considerable and lack of patient access to effective treatment remains a concern in many parts of the world. As many reference biological therapies have now reached or are near to patent expiry, a number of 'biosimilar' drugs have been developed for use in various clinical settings, and some of these drugs are already in use in several countries. While the potential pharmacoeconomic benefits of cost-effective biosimilars seem clear, several issues have been raised regarding, for example, the definition of biosimilarity and the validity of indication extrapolation, as well as the 'switchability' and relative immunogenicity of biosimilars and their reference drugs. In this review, these issues will be discussed with reference to CT-P13, a biosimilar of the anti-tumour necrosis factor monoclonal antibody infliximab, which is approved in Europe and elsewhere for the treatment of various IMIDs. Other important issues, including those related to data collection during nonclinical and clinical development of biosimilars, are also discussed. PMID:26403380

  11. Antibody-mediated targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles to the folate receptor alpha increases tumor cell association in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ndong, Christian; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Baker, Ian; Gerngross, Tillman U; Fiering, Steven N; Griswold, Karl E

    2015-01-01

    Active molecular targeting has become an important aspect of nanoparticle development for oncology indications. Here, we describe molecular targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to the folate receptor alpha (FOLRα) using an engineered antibody fragment (Ffab). Compared to control nanoparticles targeting the non-relevant botulinum toxin, the Ffab-IONP constructs selectively accumulated on FOLRα-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro, where they exhibited the capacity to internalize into intracellular vesicles. Similarly, Ffab-IONPs homed to FOLRα-positive tumors upon intraperitoneal administration in an orthotopic murine xenograft model of ovarian cancer, whereas negative control particles showed no detectable tumor accumulation. Interestingly, Ffab-IONPs built with custom 120 nm nanoparticles exhibited lower in vitro targeting efficiency when compared to those built with commercially sourced 180 nm nanoparticles. In vivo, however, the two Ffab-IONP platforms achieved equivalent tumor homing, although the smaller 120 nm IONPs were more prone to liver sequestration. Overall, the results show that Ffab-mediated targeting of IONPs yields specific, high-level accumulation within cancer cells, and this fact suggests that Ffab-IONPs could have future utility in ovarian cancer diagnostics and therapy. PMID:25878495

  12. Antibody-mediated targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles to the folate receptor alpha increases tumor cell association in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ndong, Christian; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Baker, Ian; Gerngross, Tillman U; Fiering, Steven N; Griswold, Karl E

    2015-01-01

    Active molecular targeting has become an important aspect of nanoparticle development for oncology indications. Here, we describe molecular targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to the folate receptor alpha (FOLRα) using an engineered antibody fragment (Ffab). Compared to control nanoparticles targeting the non-relevant botulinum toxin, the Ffab-IONP constructs selectively accumulated on FOLRα-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro, where they exhibited the capacity to internalize into intracellular vesicles. Similarly, Ffab-IONPs homed to FOLRα-positive tumors upon intraperitoneal administration in an orthotopic murine xenograft model of ovarian cancer, whereas negative control particles showed no detectable tumor accumulation. Interestingly, Ffab-IONPs built with custom 120 nm nanoparticles exhibited lower in vitro targeting efficiency when compared to those built with commercially sourced 180 nm nanoparticles. In vivo, however, the two Ffab-IONP platforms achieved equivalent tumor homing, although the smaller 120 nm IONPs were more prone to liver sequestration. Overall, the results show that Ffab-mediated targeting of IONPs yields specific, high-level accumulation within cancer cells, and this fact suggests that Ffab-IONPs could have future utility in ovarian cancer diagnostics and therapy.

  13. Strong Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)–specific Cell-mediated Immune Responses in the Absence of Viremia or Antibodies Among Uninfected Siblings of HCV Chronically Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    El-Karaksy, Hanaa; Shata, Mohamed T.; Sobhy, Maha; Helmy, Heba; El-Naghi, Suzan; Galal, Gehan; Ali, Zainab Z.; Esmat, Gamal; Abdelwahab, Sayed F.; Strickland, G. Thomas; El-Kamary, Samer S.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens in adults without seroconversion or viremia are biomarkers for prior transient infection. We investigated HCV-specific CMI responses in seronegative children living with HCV-infected siblings. Methods. Children 3–18 years of age living with HCV-infected siblings were screened for HCV antibodies and HCV RNA. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were evaluated for HCV-specific CMI responses by interferon γ (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot assay using 3 recombinant HCV protein antigens. Flow cytometry phenotypically characterized IFN-γ-secreting cells. Results. Forty-five seronegative children and 5 seropositive viremic siblings had functionally viable PBMCs. Among the 45 seronegative siblings, 15 (33.3%) had positive HCV-specific IFN-γ responses, and subsequent RNA testing revealed that 3 were viremic. Compared with the 5 seropositive viremic children, the median number of HCV-specific spot-forming units was significantly higher in the 12 seronegative aviremic children (P = .002) and in the 3 seronegative viremic children (P = .025). Flow cytometric analysis revealed that IFN-γ was synthesized mainly by CD4+ T cells. Conclusion. Strong HCV-specific CD4+ T cell responses were detectable in higher frequency among seronegative, aviremic children compared with persistently infected siblings. Further studies are needed to determine whether these immune responses are protective against HCV infection. PMID:21257736

  14. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Presence of MICA-DSA and Successful Renal Re-Transplant with Negative-MICA Virtual Crossmatch.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yingzi; Hu, Juan; Luo, Qizhi; Ding, Xiang; Luo, Weiguang; Zhuang, Quan; Zou, Yizhou

    2015-01-01

    The presence of donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) against the MICA antigen results in high risk for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of a transplanted kidney, especially in patients receiving a re-transplant. We describe the incidence of acute C4d+ AMR in a patient who had received a first kidney transplant with a zero HLA antigen mismatch. Retrospective analysis of post-transplant T and B cell crossmatches were negative, but a high level of MICA alloantibody was detected in sera collected both before and after transplant. The DSA against the first allograft mismatched MICA*018 was in the recipient. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity tests with five samples of freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells demonstrated the alloantibody nature of patient's MICA-DSA. Prior to the second transplant, a MICA virtual crossmatch and T and B cell crossmatches were used to identify a suitable donor. The patient received a second kidney transplant, and allograft was functioning well at one-year follow-up. Our study indicates that MICA virtual crossmatch is important in selection of a kidney donor if the recipient has been sensitized with MICA antigens.

  15. Studies of nontarget-mediated distribution of human full-length IgG1 antibody and its FAb fragment in cardiovascular and metabolic-related tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Pia; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Svensson, Lena; Ahnmark, Andrea; Flodin, Christine; Wanag, Ewa; Screpanti-Sundqvist, Valentina; Gennemark, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of full-length nontargeted antibody and its antigen-binding fragment (FAb) were evaluated for a range of tissues primarily of interest for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Mice were intravenously injected with a dose of 10 mg/kg of either human IgG1or its FAb fragment; perfused tissues were collected at a range of time points over 3 weeks for the human IgG1 antibody and 1 week for the human FAb antibody. Tissues were homogenized and antibody concentrations were measured by specific immunoassays on the Gyros system. Exposure in terms of maximum concentration (Cmax ) and area under the curve was assessed for all nine tissues. Tissue exposure of full-length antibody relative to plasma exposure was found to be between 1% and 10%, except for brain (0.2%). Relative concentrations of FAb antibody were the same, except for kidney tissue, where the antibody concentration was found to be ten times higher than in plasma. However, the absolute tissue uptake of full-length IgG was significantly higher than the absolute tissue uptake of the FAb antibody. This study provides a reference PK state for full-length whole and FAb antibodies in tissues related to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases that do not include antigen or antibody binding.

  16. Suppression of natural killer cell activity by rabbit antibody to human beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) is an Fc-mediated phenomenon and is not beta 2m specific.

    PubMed

    Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Patel, D; Scott, C S

    1991-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity constitutes an important component of the host immune defence system. The NK effector cell has been relatively well defined in terms of immunophenotypic characteristics, but in contrast to the functional T-cell receptor molecule associated with major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic activity, the NK cell receptor has not to date been defined. However, several studies have suggested that the beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) molecule is functionally associated with NK cell activity. Using various heterospecific and monoclonal antibodies, this study has shown that intact rabbit IgG antibody bound either directly or indirectly to peripheral mononuclear cell (PMNC) effector populations significantly reduced their lytic activity against K562 targets. Substitution of F(ab)2 fragments for rabbit IgG antibodies, or the use of monoclonal antibodies alone, failed to reduce peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PMNC) lytic activity. Addition of non-NK cell components labelled with rabbit anti-beta 2m to purified NK-enriched effector cell populations also suppressed K562 lysis. In contrast, pre-treatment of a NK-enriched PMNC fraction with rabbit anti-beta 2m enhanced target lysis. These results strongly suggest that antibody-induced suppression of PMNC NK activity is mediated via rabbit Fc attached to co-existing non-NK cells in the mononuclear fraction, and are inconsistent with the previously suggested functional association between NK activity and membrane beta 2m.

  17. Chimaeric Lym-1 monoclonal antibody-mediated cytolysis by neutrophils from G-CSF-treated patients: stimulation by GM-CSF and role of Fcγ-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ottonello, L; Epstein, A L; Mancini, M; Tortolina, G; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    2001-01-01

    Chimaeric Lym-1 (chLym-1) is a monoclonal antibody generated by fusing the variable region genes of murine Lym-1 to human γ1 and κ constant regions. Owing to its selectivity and avidity for human malignant B cells, it is an attractive candidate for developing immune-interventions in B-lymphomas. In the attempt to identify rational bases for optimizing potential chLym-1 related therapeutic approaches, we studied the ability of this ch-mAb to trigger neutrophil-mediated Raji cell cytolysis in cooperation with two neutrophil-related cytokines, G-CSF and GM-CSF. ChLym-1 triggered low levels of cytolysis by normal neutrophils but induced consistent cytolysis in neutrophils from individuals treated with G-CSF. When exposed to GM-CSF, neutrophils from subjects treated with G-CSF became potent effectors, also leading to 75% lysis. By using mAbs specific for distinct FcγRs, normal neutrophils were inhibited by mAb IV.3, suggesting the intervention of FcγRII, constitutively expressed on the cells. On the other hand, neutrophils from patients treated with G-CSF were inhibited by mAb IV.3 plus mAb 197, a finding consistent with a cooperative intervention of FCγRII and G-CSF-induced FcγRI. The anti-FcγRIII mAb 3G8 promoted significant enhancement of the neutrophil cytolytic efficiency. Therefore, neutrophil FcγRIII behaves as a down-regulator of the cytolytic potential. The present findings suggest new attempts to develop mAb-based and G-CSF/GM-CSF combined immune-interventions in B lymphomas. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11487281

  18. Combined Yeast β-Glucan and Antitumor Monoclonal Antibody Therapy Requires C5a-Mediated Neutrophil Chemotaxis via Regulation of Decay-Accelerating Factor CD55

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Allendorf, Daniel J.; Hansen, Richard; Marroquin, Jose; Cramer, Daniel E.; Harris, Claire L.; Yan, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Administration of a combination of yeast-derived β-glucan with antitumor monoclonal antibodies (mAb) has significant therapeutic efficacy in a variety of syngeneic murine tumor models. We have now tested this strategy using human carcinomas implanted in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficient mice. Combined immunotherapy was therapeutically effective in vivo against NCI-H23 human non–small-cell lung carcinomas, but this modality was surprisingly ineffective against SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinomas. Whereas NCI-H23 tumors responded to this combination therapy with increased intratumoral neutrophil infiltration and C5a production, these responses were lacking in treated SKOV-3 tumors. Further results suggested that SKOV-3 tumors were protected by up-regulation of the membrane complement regulatory protein CD55 (decay-accelerating factor). Blockade of CD55 in vitro led to enhanced deposition of C activation product C3b and increased cytotoxicity mediated by β-glucan–primed neutrophils. In vivo, administration of anti-CD55 mAb along with β-glucan and anti–Her-2/neu mAb caused tumor regression and greatly improved long-term survival in animals bearing the previously resistant SKOV-3 tumors. This was accompanied by increased intratumoral neutrophil accumulation and C5a production. We conclude that CD55 suppresses tumor killing by antitumor mAb plus β-glucan therapy (and, perhaps, in other circumstances). These results suggest a critical role for CD55 to regulate iC3b and C5a release and in turn to influence the recruitment of β-glucan–primed neutrophils eliciting killing activity. PMID:17671212

  19. Expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 in Renal Tissue of Patients with Chronic Active Antibody-mediated Renal Graft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitor of metallopropteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in the renal allografts of patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), and to explore their role in the pathogenesis of AMR. Methods Immunohistochemistry assay and computer-assisted image analysis were used to detect the expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 in the renal allografts with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) in 46 transplant recipients and 15 normal renal tissue specimens as the controls. The association of the expression level of either MMP-2 or TIMP-1 with the pathological grade of IF/TA in AMR was analyzed. Results The expression of either MMP-2 or TIMP-1 was significantly increased in the renal allografts of the recipients as compared with the normal renal tissue (P < 0.05). MMP-2 expression tended to decrease, while TIMP-1 and serum creatinine increased along with the increase of pathological grade of IF/TA (P < 0.05). In IF/TA groups, the expression of TIMP-1 was positively correlated to serum creatinine level (r = 0.718, P < 0.05). Conclusions It is suggested by the results that abnormal expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 might play roles in the development of renal fibrosis in chronic AMR. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1128474926172838 PMID:23057632

  20. Antibodies as natural adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies in complex with specific antigen can dramatically change the antibody response to this antigen. Depending on antibody class and type of antigen, >99 % suppression or >100-fold enhancement of the response can take place. IgM and IgG3 are efficient enhancers and operate via the complement system. In contrast, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b enhance antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to protein antigens via activating Fcγ-receptors. IgE also enhances antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to small proteins but uses the low-affinity receptor for IgE, CD23. Most likely, IgM and IgG3 work by increasing the effective concentration of antigen on follicular dendritic cells in splenic follicles. IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgE probably enhance antibody responses by increasing antigen presentation by dendritic cells to T helper cells. IgG antibodies of all subclasses have a dual effect, and suppress antibody responses to particulate antigens such as erythrocytes. This capacity is used in the clinic to prevent immunization of Rhesus-negative women to Rhesus-positive fetal erythrocytes acquired via transplacental hemorrage. IgG-mediated suppression in mouse models can take place in the absence of Fcγ-receptors and complement and to date no knock-out mouse strain has been found where suppression is abrogated.

  1. Activation of cellular cytotoxicity and complement-mediated lysis of melanoma and neuroblastoma cells in vitro by murine antiganglioside antibodies MB 3.6 and 14.G2a.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Handgretinger, R; Bruchelt, G; Schaber, B; Rassner, G; Fierlbeck, G

    1994-04-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies against tumour-associated gangliosides GD2 (14.G2a) and GD3 (MB 3.6) were tested to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) with various effector cells or complement-dependent cytolysis (CDC). We also evaluated the immunomodulating potential of interferons in combination with cellular cytotoxicity. Using effector:target (E/T) ratios of 40:1, ADCC with effector cells such as granulocytes or mononuclear blood cells was not detectable against melanoma cell lines GR, SK-MEL-28 and G-361 which preferentially express GD3 and bind antibody MB 3.6. Neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-LO, which was used for comparative purposes, mainly expressed GD2 and the tumour cells were killed effectively after labelling with antibody 14.G2a. Granulocytes did not show significant killing of melanoma cells by ADCC, but neuroblastoma cells were killed very efficiently. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) also failed to kill melanoma cells. Interferon-beta slightly stimulated PBMC and increased killing of neuroblastoma cells, but no additive effects with ADCC were detectable. Incubation of target cells with interferons produced no significant differences in susceptibility of the target cells to interferon-activated PBMC cytotoxicity. Despite the lack of effectiveness in mediating cellular cytotoxicity, GD3 antibody MB 3.6 showed strong complement-dependent cytolysis in the presence of human plasma. There were remarkable differences in individual activity and different susceptibility of the melanoma cell lines. We assume that CDC may have more activity against melanoma cells than cytotoxicity associated with various effector cells.

  2. CHO-S antibody titers >1 gram/liter using flow electroporation-mediated transient gene expression followed by rapid migration to high-yield stable cell lines.

    PubMed

    Steger, Krista; Brady, James; Wang, Weili; Duskin, Meg; Donato, Karen; Peshwa, Madhusudan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, researchers have turned to transient gene expression (TGE) as an alternative to CHO stable cell line generation for early-stage antibody development. Despite advances in transfection methods and culture optimization, the majority of CHO-based TGE systems produce insufficient antibody titers for extensive use within biotherapeutic development pipelines. Flow electroporation using the MaxCyte STX Scalable Transfection System is a highly efficient, scalable means of CHO-based TGE for gram-level production of antibodies without the need for specialized expression vectors or genetically engineered CHO cell lines. CHO cell flow electroporation is easily scaled from milligram to multigram quantities without protocol reoptimization while maintaining transfection performance and antibody productivity. In this article, data are presented that demonstrate the reproducibility, scalability, and antibody production capabilities of CHO-based TGE using the MaxCyte STX. Data show optimization of posttransfection parameters such as cell density, media composition, and feed strategy that result in secreted antibody titers >1 g/L and production of multiple grams of antibody within 2 weeks of a single CHO-S cell transfection. In addition, data are presented to demonstrate the application of scalable electroporation for the rapid generation of high-yield stable CHO cell lines to bridge the gap between early- and late-stage antibody development activities.

  3. Varicella-zoster virus-specific, cell-mediated immunity with interferon-gamma release assay after vaccination of college students with no or intermediate IgG antibody response.

    PubMed

    Terada, Kihei; Itoh, Yuri; Fujii, Akihide; Kitagawa, Seiko; Ogita, Satoko; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2015-02-01

    This study measured Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and antibodies to clarify immune response after vaccination in 68 college students with negative or intermediate IgG antibody status. The enrolled numbers of negative, intermediate, and positive VZV-IgG antibody were 27, 41, and 28 students, respectively. The positive rates of CMI were 3.7% (1/27), 41.5% (17/41), and 96.4% (27/28) before vaccination, respectively. After vaccination, the IgG antibody titers became significantly higher in the intermediate IgG group compared to those in the negative IgG group (P < 0.01), but CMI did not differ significantly between the two groups. Ninety-three percent (38/41) of the intermediate IgG antibody group and 41% (11/27) of the negative IgG antibody group became positive for the IgG antibody after vaccination (P < 0.0001). When subjects were divided into negative, intermediate, and positive CMI by interferon-gamma values before vaccination, the IgG antibody and interferon-gamma values increased significantly in the positive CMI group compared to the negative CMI group after vaccination (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). All (17/17) of positive CMI group and 61% (27/44) of negative CMI group became positive for the IgG antibody after vaccination (P < 0.01). Ninety-four percent (16/17) of positive CMI group and 59% (28/44) of negative CMI group became positive for CMI after vaccination (P < 0.05). Ninety-six percent (22/23) of the subjects with a history of vaccination became IgG seropositive after a second dose of vaccination, but 22% (5/23) of them remained negative for CMI. CMI is valuable information to identify potential non-responders to vaccination and to predict risk of clinical VZV infection.

  4. Conformational Epitope-Specific Broadly Neutralizing Plasma Antibodies Obtained from an HIV-1 Clade C-Infected Elite Neutralizer Mediate Autologous Virus Escape through Mutations in the V1 Loop

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shilpa; Kumar, Rajesh; Deshpande, Suprit; Samal, Sweety; Shrivastava, Tripti; Boliar, Saikat; Bansal, Manish; Chaudhary, Nakul Kumar; Srikrishnan, Aylur K.; Murugavel, Kailapuri G.; Solomon, Suniti; Simek, Melissa; Koff, Wayne C.; Goyal, Rajat; Chakrabarti, Bimal K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly neutralizing antibodies isolated from infected patients who are elite neutralizers have identified targets on HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoprotein that are vulnerable to antibody neutralization; however, it is not known whether infection established by the majority of the circulating clade C strains in Indian patients elicit neutralizing antibody responses against any of the known targets. In the present study, we examined the specificity of a broad and potent cross-neutralizing plasma obtained from an Indian elite neutralizer infected with HIV-1 clade C. This plasma neutralized 53/57 (93%) HIV pseudoviruses prepared with Env from distinct HIV clades of different geographical origins. Mapping studies using gp120 core protein, single-residue knockout mutants, and chimeric viruses revealed that G37080 broadly cross-neutralizing (BCN) plasma lacks specificities to the CD4 binding site, gp41 membrane-proximal external region, N160 and N332 glycans, and R166 and K169 in the V1-V3 region and are known predominant targets for BCN antibodies. Depletion of G37080 plasma with soluble trimeric BG505-SOSIP.664 Env (but with neither monomeric gp120 nor clade C membrane-proximal external region peptides) resulted in significant reduction of virus neutralization, suggesting that G37080 BCN antibodies mainly target epitopes on cleaved trimeric Env. Further examination of autologous circulating Envs revealed the association of mutation of residues in the V1 loop that contributed to neutralization resistance. In summary, we report the identification of plasma antibodies from a clade C-infected elite neutralizer that mediate neutralization breadth via epitopes on trimeric gp120 not yet reported and confer autologous neutralization escape via mutation of residues in the V1 loop. IMPORTANCE A preventive vaccine to protect against HIV-1 is urgently needed. HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins are targets of neutralizing antibodies and represent a key component for immunogen design

  5. Infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT-1: Evidence using antibodies specific to the receptor's large extracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Qingwen; Agrawal, Lokesh; VanHorn-Ali, Zainab; Alkhatib, Ghalib . E-mail: galkhati@iupui.edu

    2006-05-25

    To analyze HTLV-1 cytotropism, we developed a highly sensitive vaccinia virus-based assay measuring activation of a reporter gene upon fusion of two distinct cell populations. We used this system in a functional cDNA screening to isolate and confirm that the glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) is a receptor for HTLV-1. GLUT-1 is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane glycoprotein with 12 transmembrane domains and 6 extracellular loops (ECL). We demonstrate for the first time that peptide antibodies (GLUT-IgY) raised in chicken to the large extracellular loop (ECL1) detect GLUT-1 at the cell surface and inhibit envelope (Env)-mediated fusion and infection. Efficient GLUT-IgY staining was detected with peripheral blood CD4{sup +} lymphocytes purified by positive selection. Further, GLUT-IgY caused efficient inhibition of Env-mediated fusion and infection of CD4{sup +} T and significantly lower inhibition of CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes. The specificity of GLUT-IgY antibodies to GLUT-1 was demonstrated by ECL1 peptide competition studies. Grafting ECL1 of GLUT-1 onto the receptor-negative GLUT-3 conferred significant receptor activity. In contrast, grafting ECL1 of GLUT-3 onto GLUT-1 resulted in a significant loss of the receptor activity. The ECL1-mediated receptor activity was efficiently blocked with four different human monoclonal antibody (HMab) to HTLV-1 Env. The ECL1-derived peptide blocked HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion with several nonhuman mammalian cell lines. The results demonstrate the utilization of cell surface GLUT-1 in HTLV-1 infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes and implicate a critical role for the ECL1 region in viral tropism.

  6. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  7. Cationic liposomes enhance targeted delivery and expression of exogenous DNA mediated by N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine)-antibody conjugate in mouse lung endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Kennel, S; Huang, L

    1992-07-15

    A new and improved system for targeted gene delivery and expression is described. Transfection efficiency of N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine) (NPLL) conjugated with anti-thrombomodulin antibody 34A can be improved by adding to the system a lipophilic component, cationic liposomes. DNA, antibody conjugate and cationic liposomes form a ternary electrostatic complex which preserves the ability to bind specifically to the target cells. At the same time the addition of liposomes enhance the specific transfection efficiency of antibody-polylysine/DNA binary complex by 10 to 20-fold in mouse lung endothelial cells in culture.

  8. Evaluation of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity and cetuximab response in KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Lo Nigro, Cristiana; Ricci, Vincenzo; Vivenza, Daniela; Monteverde, Martino; Strola, Giuliana; Lucio, Francesco; Tonissi, Federica; Miraglio, Emanuela; Granetto, Cristina; Fortunato, Mirella; Merlano, Marco Carlo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic role of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in wild type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with cetuximab. METHODS: Forty-one KRAS wt mCRC patients, treated with cetuximab and irinotecan-based chemotherapy in II and III lines were analyzed. Genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)s in the FCGR2A, FCGR3A and in the 3’ untranslated regions of KRAS and mutational analysis for KRAS, BRAF and NRAS genes was determined either by sequencing or allelic discrimination assays. Enriched NK cells were obtained from lymphoprep-peripheral blood mononuclear cell and iNKT cells were defined by co-expression of CD3, TCRVα24, TCRVβ11. ADCC was evaluated as ex vivo NK-dependent activity, measuring lactate dehydrogenase release. RESULTS: At basal, mCRC patients performing ADCC activity above the median level (71%) showed an improved overall survival (OS) compared to patients with ADCC below (median 16 vs 8 mo; P = 0.026). We did not find any significant correlation of iNKT cells with OS (P = 0.19), albeit we observed a trend to a longer survival after 10 mo in patients with iNKT above median basal level (0.382 cells/microliter). Correlation of OS and progression-free survival (PFS) with interesting SNPs involved in ADCC ability revealed not to be significant. Patients carrying alleles both with A in FCGR2A and TT in FCGR3A presented a trend of longer PFS (median 9 vs 5 mo; P = 0.064). Chemotherapy impacted both iNKT cells and ADCC activity. Their prognostic values get lost when we analysed them after 2 and 4 mo of treatment. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest a link between iNKT cells, basal ADCC activity, genotypes in FCGR2A and FCGR3A, and efficacy of cetuximab in KRAS wt mCRC patients. PMID:26909137

  9. HIV-1 Tat Promotes Integrin-Mediated HIV Transmission to Dendritic Cells by Binding Env Spikes and Competes Neutralization by Anti-HIV Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Monini, Paolo; Cafaro, Aurelio; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Moretti, Sonia; Sharma, Victoria A.; Andreini, Claudia; Chiozzini, Chiara; Ferrantelli, Flavia; Cossut, Maria R. Pavone.; Tripiciano, Antonella; Nappi, Filomena; Longo, Olimpia; Bellino, Stefania; Picconi, Orietta; Fanales-Belasio, Emanuele; Borsetti, Alessandra; Toschi, Elena; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Bacigalupo, Ilaria; Kan, Elaine; Sernicola, Leonardo; Maggiorella, Maria T.; Montin, Katy; Porcu, Marco; Leone, Patrizia; Leone, Pasqualina; Collacchi, Barbara; Palladino, Clelia; Ridolfi, Barbara; Falchi, Mario; Macchia, Iole; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Buttò, Stefano; Sgadari, Cecilia; Magnani, Mauro; Federico, Maurizio P. M.; Titti, Fausto; Banci, Lucia; Dallocchio, Franco; Rappuoli, Rino; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Barnett, Susan W.; Garaci, Enrico; Ensoli, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Use of Env in HIV vaccine development has been disappointing. Here we show that, in the presence of a biologically active Tat subunit vaccine, a trimeric Env protein prevents in monkeys virus spread from the portal of entry to regional lymph nodes. This appears to be due to specific interactions between Tat and Env spikes that form a novel virus entry complex favoring R5 or X4 virus entry and productive infection of dendritic cells (DCs) via an integrin-mediated pathway. These Tat effects do not require Tat-transactivation activity and are blocked by anti-integrin antibodies (Abs). Productive DC infection promoted by Tat is associated with a highly efficient virus transmission to T cells. In the Tat/Env complex the cysteine-rich region of Tat engages the Env V3 loop, whereas the Tat RGD sequence remains free and directs the virus to integrins present on DCs. V2 loop deletion, which unshields the CCR5 binding region of Env, increases Tat/Env complex stability. Of note, binding of Tat to Env abolishes neutralization of Env entry or infection of DCs by anti-HIV sera lacking anti-Tat Abs, which are seldom present in natural infection. This is reversed, and neutralization further enhanced, by HIV sera containing anti-Tat Abs such as those from asymptomatic or Tat-vaccinated patients, or by sera from the Tat/Env vaccinated monkeys. Thus, both anti-Tat and anti-Env Abs are required for efficient HIV neutralization. These data suggest that the Tat/Env interaction increases HIV acquisition and spreading, as a mechanism evolved by the virus to escape anti-Env neutralizing Abs. This may explain the low effectiveness of Env-based vaccines, which are also unlikely to elicit Abs against new Env epitopes exposed by the Tat/Env interaction. As Tat also binds Envs from different clades, new vaccine strategies should exploit the Tat/Env interaction for both preventative and therapeutic interventions. PMID:23152803

  10. Chimeric mouse human IgG3 antibodies with an IgG4-like hinge region induce complement-mediated lysis more efficiently than IgG3 with normal hinge.

    PubMed

    Norderhaug, L; Brekke, O H; Bremnes, B; Sandin, R; Aase, A; Michaelsen, T E; Sandlie, I

    1991-10-01

    We have altered the amino acid sequence of the hinge and the first constant domain (CH1) of mouse/human chimeric IgG3 antibodies by site-directed mutagenesis, so as to make the sequences identical to those of IgG4. All the mutant antibodies with altered hinge region were more active in complement activation and complement-mediated lysis than native IgG3. The mutations in CH1, however, did not alter the activity. This demonstrates the importance of the hinge region in modulating this effector function. The results show that the primary structure of neither CH1 nor the hinge of IgG4 is responsible for the lack of complement activation shown by this subclass.

  11. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  13. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  14. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers. PMID:27341339

  15. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers. PMID:27341339

  16. Lung injury mediated by antibodies to endothelium. I. In the rabbit a repeated interaction of heterologous anti-angiotensin-converting enzyme antibodies with alveolar endothelium results in resistance to immune injury through antigenic modulation

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    To study the effects of relatively long-term interaction of antibodies with surface antigens of lung endothelium, rabbits were intravenously injected for a maximum of 4 d with goat anti-rabbit lung angiotensin- converting enzyme (Gt anti-RbACE) antibodies. On day 1 69%, on day 2 13%, and on days 3 and 4 of injection none of the rabbits developed lethal pulmonary edema. By immunofluorescence microscopy, deposits of GtIgG, frequently in association with RbC3, were found along the endothelium of alveolar capillary walls in all rabbits studied on day 1, in 57% on day 2, in 33% on day 3, and in none of them on day 4. While in vitro anti-ACE antibodies bound in a linear pattern to the lung endothelium, the binding pattern in vivo was distinctly granular. The in vivo interaction of antibodies with ACE also redistributed ACE in a granular pattern along capillary walls. In contrast to the granular deposition of injected anti-ACE IgG and F(ab')2 fragments of anti-ACE IgG, Fab fragments of anti-ACE IgG localized, without fixing C3, in a linear pattern along the endothelium of lung capillaries and did not modify the normal distribution of ACE. However, when the injection of Fab fragments of Gt anti-RbACE IgG was followed by an injection of Rb anti-GtIgG serum, granular deposits of Gt Fab fragments, RbIgG and RbC3 were seen along alveolar capillary walls. Biochemical measurement of ACE activity in lung homogenates provided data in agreement with those obtained by immunofluorescence microscopy, showing diminished activity to none on day 4, with some return of ACE activity on day 5, 24 h after the last injection of antibody, and normal values on day 21. The results obtained indicate that divalent antibodies to an antigen expressed on the plasma membrane of rabbit lung endothelial cells promotes a rapid redistribution of antigenic receptors, fixation of complement and, in surviving rabbits, disappearance of the antigen from the endothelial cells that are no longer susceptible to

  17. Cytotoxic activity against human neuroblastoma and melanoma cells mediated by IgM antibodies derived from peripheral blood of healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Mamidi, Srinivas; Plöger, Frank; Dill, Othmar; Blixt, Ola; Kirschfink, Michael; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard

    2016-06-15

    A small percentage of healthy donors identified in the Western population carry antibodies in their peripheral blood which convey cytotoxic activity against certain human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. We measured the cytotoxic activity of sera and plasmas from healthy donors on the human neuroblastoma cell line Kelly and various melanoma cell lines. Antibodies of IgM isotype, presumably belonging to the class of naturally occurring antibodies, exerted cytotoxic activity in a complement-dependent fashion. Apart from complement-dependent tumor cell lysis, we observed C3 opsonization in all tumor cell lines upon treatment with cytotoxic plasmas. Cell lines tested primarily expressed membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRP) CD46, CD55 and CD59 to various extents. Blocking of mCRPs by monoclonal antibodies enhanced cell lysis and opsonization, though some melanoma cells remained resistant to complement attack. Epitopes recognized by cytotoxic antibodies were represented by gangliosides such as GD2 and GD3, as evidenced by cellular sialidase pretreatment and enhanced expression of distinct gangliosides. It remains to be clarified why only a small fraction of healthy persons carry these antitumor cytotoxic antibodies. PMID:26830059

  18. Cytotoxic activity against human neuroblastoma and melanoma cells mediated by IgM antibodies derived from peripheral blood of healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Mamidi, Srinivas; Plöger, Frank; Dill, Othmar; Blixt, Ola; Kirschfink, Michael; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard

    2016-06-15

    A small percentage of healthy donors identified in the Western population carry antibodies in their peripheral blood which convey cytotoxic activity against certain human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. We measured the cytotoxic activity of sera and plasmas from healthy donors on the human neuroblastoma cell line Kelly and various melanoma cell lines. Antibodies of IgM isotype, presumably belonging to the class of naturally occurring antibodies, exerted cytotoxic activity in a complement-dependent fashion. Apart from complement-dependent tumor cell lysis, we observed C3 opsonization in all tumor cell lines upon treatment with cytotoxic plasmas. Cell lines tested primarily expressed membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRP) CD46, CD55 and CD59 to various extents. Blocking of mCRPs by monoclonal antibodies enhanced cell lysis and opsonization, though some melanoma cells remained resistant to complement attack. Epitopes recognized by cytotoxic antibodies were represented by gangliosides such as GD2 and GD3, as evidenced by cellular sialidase pretreatment and enhanced expression of distinct gangliosides. It remains to be clarified why only a small fraction of healthy persons carry these antitumor cytotoxic antibodies.

  19. Monoclonal antibody to the type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) receptor blocks IGF-I receptor-mediated DNA synthesis: clarification of the mitogenic mechanisms of IGF-I and insulin in human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Flier, J.S.; Usher, P.; Moses, A.C.

    1986-02-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I) stimulate an overlapping spectrum of biological responses in human skin fibroblasts. Although insulin and IGF-I are known to stimulate the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA in these cells, the identify of the receptor(s) that mediates this effect has not been fully clarified. The mouse anti-human IGF-I receptor antibody ..cap alpha..IR-3 binds with specificity to IGF-I but not to insulin receptors in human placental membranes; it also specifically inhibits the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-I but not /sup 125/I-labeled insulin to suspensions of human skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. ..cap alpha..IR-3 competitively inhibits IGF-I-mediated stimulation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into DNA. This inhibition is dependent on the concentration of ..cap alpha..IR-3 and in the presence of a fixed antibody concentration can be partially overcome by high concentrations of IGF-I. In contrast, at concentrations of < 1 ..mu..g/ml, the effect of insulin to stimulate (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation is not inhibited by ..cap alpha..IR-3. However, the incremental effects of higher concentrations (> 1 ..mu..g/ml) of insulin on (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation are inhibited by ..cap alpha..IR-3. ..cap alpha..IR-3 is a highly specific antagonist of IGF-I receptor-mediated mitogenesis in human skin fibroblasts. By using this antibody, it is shown directly that insulin can act through the IGF-I receptor to stimulate DNA synthesis but can also activate this effect through the insulin receptor itself.

  20. Decreased complement mediated binding of antibody//sup 3/-dsDNA immune complexes to the red blood cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P.; Horgan, C.; Buschbacher, R.; Brunner, C.M.; Hess, C.E.; O'Brien, W.M.; Wanebo, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The complement mediated binding of prepared antibody//sup 3/H-dsDNA immune complexes to the red blood cells obtained from a number of patient populations has been investigated. Patients with solid tumors have binding activity similar to that seen in a normal group of individuals. However, a significant fraction of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and hematologic malignancies have lowered binding activity compared with normal subjects. Quantitative studies indicate the lowered activity probably arises due to a decrease in complement receptors on the respective red blood cells. The potential importance and implications of these findings are briefly discussed.

  1. Antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeaux, Jennifer; Welsh, Allison W.; Agarwal, Seema; Killiam, Elizabeth; Baquero, Maria T.; Hanna, Jason A.; Anagnostou, Valsamo K.; Rimm, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most frequently used tools in basic science research and in clinical assays, but there are no universally accepted guidelines or standardized methods for determining the validity of these reagents. Furthermore, for commercially available antibodies, it is clear that what is on the label does not necessarily correspond to what is in the tube. To validate an antibody, it must be shown to be specific, selective, and reproducible in the context for which it is to be used. In this review, we highlight the common pitfalls when working with antibodies, common practices for validating antibodies, and levels of commercial antibody validation for seven vendors. Finally, we share our algorithm for antibody validation for immunohistochemistry and quantitative immunofluorescence. PMID:20359301

  2. Egr-1 is a critical regulator of EGF-receptor-mediated expansion of subventricular zone neural stem cells and progenitors during recovery from hypoxia–hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Alagappan, Dhivyaa; Balan, Murugabaskar; Jiang, Yuhui; Cohen, Rachel B.; Kotenko, Sergei V.; Levison, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    We recently established that the EGF-R (epidermal growth factor receptor) (EGF-R) is an essential regulator of the reactive expansion of SVZ (subventricular zone) NPs (neural precursors) that occurs during recovery from hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. The purpose of the current studies was to identify the conditions and the transcription factor (s) responsible for inducing the EGF-R. Here, we show that the increase in EGF-R expression and the more rapid division of the NPs can be recapitulated in in vitro by exposing SVZ NPs to hypoxia and hypoglycemia simultaneously, but not separately. The EGF-R promoter has binding sites for multiple transcription factors that includes the zinc finger transcription factor, Egr-1. We show that Egr-1 expression increases in NPs, but not astrocytes, following hypoxia and hypoglycemia where it accumulates in the nucleus. To determine whether Egr-1 is necessary for EGF-R expression, we used SiRNAs (small interfering RNA) specific for Egr-1 to decrease Egr-1 expression. Knocking-down Egr-1 decreased basal levels of EGF-R and it abolished the stress-induced increase in EGF-R expression. By contrast, HIF-1 accumulation did not contribute to EGF-R expression and FGF-2 only modestly induced EGF-R. These studies establish a new role for Egr-1 in regulating the expression of the mitogenic EGF-R. They also provide new information into mechanisms that promote NP expansion and provide insights into strategies for amplifying the numbers of stem cells for CNS (central nervous system) regeneration. PMID:23763269

  3. Particle generation, functionalization and sortase A-mediated modification with targeting of single-chain antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Alt, Karen; Johnston, Angus P R; Such, Georgina K; Ta, Hang T; Leung, Melissa K M; Prabhu, Sandeep; Wang, Xiaowei; Caruso, Frank; Peter, Karlheinz

    2015-01-01

    Antibody fusion to nonprotein materials such as contrast agents or radio-tracers, nano- or microparticles or small-molecule drugs is attracting major interest for molecular imaging and drug delivery. Nondirected bioconjugation techniques may impair antibody affinity, result in lower amounts of functional antibodies and generate multicomponent mixtures. We present a detailed protocol for the enzymatic bioconjugation of small recombinant antibodies to imaging particles, and we also describe the generation of and conjugation to a low-fouling capsule assembled for drug delivery from PEG and PVPON (poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) by a layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The single-chain variable fragment (scFv) is equipped with a short C-terminal LPETG tag and the fusion partners are functionalized with an N-terminal GGG nucleophilic group for sortase A conjugation. The LbL capsules are assembled through hydrogen bonding by depositing alkyne-modified poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and poly(methacrylic acid) layers on silica particles, followed by depositing alkyne-modified PEG. The generation of the antibodies and LbL capsules takes ∼1-2 weeks each. The conjugation and functional testing takes another 3-4 d. PMID:25502886

  4. Successful attenuation of humoral immunity to viral capsid and transgenic protein following AAV mediated gene transfer with a non-depleting CD4 antibody and cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Jenny; Cochrane, Melanie; Cobbold, Stephen; Waldmann, Herman; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Nathwani, Amit C.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of transient immunosuppression with a combination of a nondepleting anti-CD4 (NDCD4) antibody and Cyclosporine (CyA) to abrogate immune reactivity to both adeno-associated virus vector (AAV) and its transgene product was evaluated. This combination of immunosuppressants resulted in a 20-fold reduction in the resulting anti-AAV8 antibody titres, to levels in naïve mice, following intravenous administration of 2×1012 AAV8 vector particles/kg to immunocompetent mice. This allowed efficient transduction upon secondary challenge with vector pseudotyped with the same capsid. Persistent tolerance did not result, however, as an anti-AAV8 antibody response was elicited upon rechallenge with AAV8 without immunosuppression. The route of vector administration, vector dose, AAV serotype or the concomitant administration of adenoviral vector appeared to have little impact on the ability of the NDCD4 antibody and CyA combination to moderate the primary humoral response to AAV capsid proteins. The combination of NDCD4 and CyA also abrogated the humoral response to the transgene product, that otherwise invariably would occur, following intramuscular injection of AAV5, leading to stable transgene expression. These observations could significantly improve the prospects of using rAAV vectors for chronic disorders by allowing for repeated vector administration and avoiding the development of antibodies to the transgene product. PMID:21716299

  5. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, Daniela; Birzele, Fabian; Voss, Edgar; Nopora, Adam; Bader, Sabine; Friess, Thomas; Goller, Bernhard; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Weigand, Stefan; Runza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages) to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) of the malignant cells by macrophages. PMID:27463372

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies in Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Thomas A.

    1991-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been applied clinically to the diagnosis and therapy of an array of human disorders, including cancer and infectious diseases, and have been used for the modulation of immune responses. Effective therapy using unmodified monoclonal antibodies has, however, been elusive. Recently, monoclonal antibody-mediated therapy has been revolutionized by advances such as the definition of cell-surface structures on abnormal cells as targets for effective monoclonal antibody action, genetic engineering to create less immunogenic and more effective monoclonal antibodies, and the arming of such antibodies with toxins or radionuclides to enhance their effector function.

  7. Perceived Empathy of Service Providers Mediates the Association between Perceived Discrimination and Behavioral Intention to Take Up HIV Antibody Testing Again among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jing; Lau, Joseph T. F.; Wang, Zixin; Wu, Anise M. S.; Tan, Xuhui

    2015-01-01

    HIV antibody testing is a key measure of HIV prevention for men who have sex with men (MSM). The World Health Organization recommends sexually active and at-risk MSM to take up HIV antibody testing regularly. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of behavioral intention to take up HIV antibody testing in the next six months among Hong Kong MSM who were ever-testers. An anonymous cross-sectional survey recruited 326 MSM who had taken up HIV antibody testing from gay-friendly venues and internet in Hong Kong. Of the participants, 40.8% had had unprotected anal intercourse with regular or non-regular male sex partners in the last six months; they were at risk of HIV transmission despite experience in HIV antibody testing. Only 37.2% showed a strong intention to take up HIV antibody testing again in the next six months. Adjusted analysis showed that both perceived discrimination toward Hong Kong MSM (AOR = .60, 95% CI: .36–.98) and the CARE Measure assessing perceived empathy of service providers (AOR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02–1.08) were significantly associated with intention for retesting. Perceived discrimination, however, became statistically non-significant (AOR = .68, 95% CI: .41–1.14), when both CARE Measure and perceived discrimination entered into the adjusted model. It is warranted to increase HIV retesting rate by removing perceived discrimination and reducing the negative effect of perceived discrimination through enhancement of empathy of service providers. PMID:25693179

  8. Bovine Colostrum Contains Immunoglobulin G Antibodies against Intimin, EspA, and EspB and Inhibits Hemolytic Activity Mediated by the Type Three Secretion System of Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Vilte, Daniel A.; Larzábal, Mariano; Cataldi, Ángel A.; Mercado, Elsa C.

    2008-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is the main cause of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, an endemic disease in Argentina which had an incidence in 2005 of 13.9 cases per 100,000 children younger than 5 years old. Cattle appear to be a major reservoir of EHEC, and a serological response to EHEC antigens has been demonstrated in natural and experimental infections. In the current study, antibodies against proteins implicated in EHEC's ability to form attaching and effacing lesions, some of which are exported to the host cell via a type three secretion system (TTSS), were identified in bovine colostrum by Western blot analysis. Twenty-seven (77.0%) of the 35 samples examined contained immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the three proteins assayed in this study: EspA, EspB, and the carboxy-terminal 280 amino acids of γ-intimin, an intimin subtype associated mainly with O157:H7 and O145:H- serotypes. Every colostrum sample was able to inhibit, in a range between 45.9 and 96.7%, the TTSS-mediated hemolytic activity of attaching and effacing E. coli. The inhibitory effect was partially mediated by IgG and lactoferrin. In conclusion, we found that early colostrum from cows contains antibodies, lactoferrin, and other unidentified substances that impair TTSS function in attaching and effacing E. coli strains. Bovine colostrum might act by reducing EHEC colonization in newborn calves and could be used as a prophylactic measure to protect non-breast-fed children against EHEC infection in an area of endemicity. PMID:18562563

  9. Bovine colostrum contains immunoglobulin G antibodies against intimin, EspA, and EspB and inhibits hemolytic activity mediated by the type three secretion system of attaching and effacing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vilte, Daniel A; Larzábal, Mariano; Cataldi, Angel A; Mercado, Elsa C

    2008-08-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is the main cause of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, an endemic disease in Argentina which had an incidence in 2005 of 13.9 cases per 100,000 children younger than 5 years old. Cattle appear to be a major reservoir of EHEC, and a serological response to EHEC antigens has been demonstrated in natural and experimental infections. In the current study, antibodies against proteins implicated in EHEC's ability to form attaching and effacing lesions, some of which are exported to the host cell via a type three secretion system (TTSS), were identified in bovine colostrum by Western blot analysis. Twenty-seven (77.0%) of the 35 samples examined contained immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the three proteins assayed in this study: EspA, EspB, and the carboxy-terminal 280 amino acids of gamma-intimin, an intimin subtype associated mainly with O157:H7 and O145:H- serotypes. Every colostrum sample was able to inhibit, in a range between 45.9 and 96.7%, the TTSS-mediated hemolytic activity of attaching and effacing E. coli. The inhibitory effect was partially mediated by IgG and lactoferrin. In conclusion, we found that early colostrum from cows contains antibodies, lactoferrin, and other unidentified substances that impair TTSS function in attaching and effacing E. coli strains. Bovine colostrum might act by reducing EHEC colonization in newborn calves and could be used as a prophylactic measure to protect non-breast-fed children against EHEC infection in an area of endemicity. PMID:18562563

  10. CD40 agonist antibody mediated improvement of chronic Cryptosporidium infection in patients with X-linked hyper IgM syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHM) is a combined immune deficiency disorder caused by mutations in CD40 ligand. We tested CP-870,893, a human CD40 agonist monoclonal antibody, in the treatment of two XHM patients with biliary Cryptosporidiosis. CP-870,893 activated B cells and APCs in vitro, restori...

  11. Six Amino Acid Residues in a 1200 Å2 Interface Mediate Binding of Factor VIII to an IgG4κ Inhibitory Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jasper C.; Ettinger, Ruth A.; Schuman, Jason T.; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Wamiq-Adhami, Muhammad; Nguyen, Phuong-Cac T.; Nakaya-Fletcher, Shelley M.; Puranik, Komal; Thompson, Arthur R.; Pratt, Kathleen P.

    2015-01-01

    The development of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies complicates the treatment of many hemophilia A patients. The C-terminal C2 domain is a particularly antigenic FVIII region. A crystal structure of recombinant FVIII-C2 bound to an Fab fragment of the patient-derived monoclonal antibody BO2C11, which recognizes an immunodominant inhibitor epitope on FVIII and blocks its ability to bind von Willebrand factor (VWF) and phospholipids, revealed that 15 amino acids in FVIII contact this antibody. Forty-three recombinant FVIII-C2 proteins, each with a surface-exposed side chain mutated to alanine or another residue, were generated, and surface plasmon resonance studies were carried out to evaluate effects of these substitutions on BO2C11/FVIII-C2 binding affinity. Thermodynamic analysis of experiments carried out at three temperatures indicated that one beta hairpin turn at the antigen-antibody interface (FVIII-F2196, N2198, M2199 and F2200) plus two non-contiguous arginines (FVIII-R2215 and R2220), contributed appreciably to the affinity. B-domain-deleted (BDD) FVIII-F2196A, FVIII-F2196K and FVIII-M2199A were generated and characterized. Their pro-coagulant activities and binding to VWF were similar to those of WT-BDD-FVIII, and FVIII-F2196K avoided neutralization by BO2C11 and murine inhibitory mAb 1B5. This study suggests specific sites for amino acid substitutions to rationally design FVIII variants capable of evading immunodominant neutralizing anti-FVIII antibodies. PMID:25615825

  12. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc: Antibody Fragmentation for Molecular Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Victoria; García, María Fernanda; Alonso-Martínez, Luis Michel; Camachoc, Ximena; Goicochea, Enzo; Fernández, Marcelo; Castillo, Abmel Xiques; Díaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Montaña, René Leyva; Alonso, Omar; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Cabral, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Finally, fast blood clearance nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognise, with high specific affinity, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) which play an important role in the growth process associated with many solid tumors. In this work, the whole antibody was digested with papain in order to generate a Fab fragment, derivatized with NHS-HYNIC-Tfa and radiolabel with technetium-99m (99mTc) as a potential agent of molecular imaging of cancer. Both, whole and fragment radiolabels were in-vivo and in-vitro characterized. Radiolabeling conditions with Tricine as coligand and quality controls were assessed to confirm the integrity of the labeled fragment. Biodistribution and imaging studies in normal and spontaneous adenocarcinoma mice were performed at different times to determine the in-vivo characteristics of the radiolabel fragment. Tumor localization was visualized by conventional gamma camera imaging studies, and the results were compared with the whole antibody. Also, an immunoreactivity assay was carried out for both. The results showed clearly the integrity of the nimotuzumab fragment and the affinity by the receptor was verified. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC was obtained with high purity and a simple strategy of radiolabeling was performed. Finally, a fast blood clearance was observed in the biodistribution studies increasing the tumor uptake of Fab(nimotuzumab)- HYNIC-99mTc over time, with tumor/muscle ratios of 3.81 ± 0.50, 5.16 ± 1.97 and 6.32 ± 1.98 at 1 h, 4 h and 24 h post injection. Urinary excretion resulted in 32.89 ± 3.91 %ID eliminated at 24 h. Scintigraphy images showed uptake in the tumor and the activity in non-target organs was consistent with the biodistribution data at the same time points. Hence, these preliminary results showed important further characteristic of Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc as a molecular imaging agent of cancer. PMID:26961312

  13. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc: Antibody Fragmentation for Molecular Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Victoria; García, María Fernanda; Alonso-Martínez, Luis Michel; Camachoc, Ximena; Goicochea, Enzo; Fernández, Marcelo; Castillo, Abmel Xiques; Díaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Montaña, René Leyva; Alonso, Omar; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Cabral, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Finally, fast blood clearance nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognise, with high specific affinity, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) which play an important role in the growth process associated with many solid tumors. In this work, the whole antibody was digested with papain in order to generate a Fab fragment, derivatized with NHS-HYNIC-Tfa and radiolabel with technetium-99m (99mTc) as a potential agent of molecular imaging of cancer. Both, whole and fragment radiolabels were in-vivo and in-vitro characterized. Radiolabeling conditions with Tricine as coligand and quality controls were assessed to confirm the integrity of the labeled fragment. Biodistribution and imaging studies in normal and spontaneous adenocarcinoma mice were performed at different times to determine the in-vivo characteristics of the radiolabel fragment. Tumor localization was visualized by conventional gamma camera imaging studies, and the results were compared with the whole antibody. Also, an immunoreactivity assay was carried out for both. The results showed clearly the integrity of the nimotuzumab fragment and the affinity by the receptor was verified. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC was obtained with high purity and a simple strategy of radiolabeling was performed. Finally, a fast blood clearance was observed in the biodistribution studies increasing the tumor uptake of Fab(nimotuzumab)- HYNIC-99mTc over time, with tumor/muscle ratios of 3.81 ± 0.50, 5.16 ± 1.97 and 6.32 ± 1.98 at 1 h, 4 h and 24 h post injection. Urinary excretion resulted in 32.89 ± 3.91 %ID eliminated at 24 h. Scintigraphy images showed uptake in the tumor and the activity in non-target organs was consistent with the biodistribution data at the same time points. Hence, these preliminary results showed important further characteristic of Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc as a molecular imaging agent of cancer.

  14. A versatile approach for the site-specific modification of recombinant antibodies using a combination of enzyme-mediated bioconjugation and click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alt, Karen; Paterson, Brett M; Westein, Erik; Rudd, Stacey E; Poniger, Stan S; Jagdale, Shweta; Ardipradja, Katie; Connell, Timothy U; Krippner, Guy Y; Nair, Ashish K N; Wang, Xiaowei; Tochon-Danguy, Henri J; Donnelly, Paul S; Peter, Karlheinz; Hagemeyer, Christoph E

    2015-06-22

    A unique two-step modular system for site-specific antibody modification and conjugation is reported. The first step of this approach uses enzymatic bioconjugation with the transpeptidase Sortase A for incorporation of strained cyclooctyne functional groups. The second step of this modular approach involves the azide-alkyne cycloaddition click reaction. The versatility of the two-step approach has been exemplified by the selective incorporation of fluorescent dyes and a positron-emitting copper-64 radiotracer for fluorescence and positron-emission tomography imaging of activated platelets, platelet aggregates, and thrombi, respectively. This flexible and versatile approach could be readily adapted to incorporate a large array of tailor-made functional groups using reliable click chemistry whilst preserving the activity of the antibody or other sensitive biological macromolecules. PMID:25962581

  15. Simple and Efficient Method for Measuring Anti-Toxoplasma Immunoglobulin Antibodies in Human Sera Using Complement-Mediated Lysis of Transgenic Tachyzoites Expressing β-Galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Caroline; Gabriel, Katie E.; Remington, Jack S.; Parmley, Stephen F.

    2001-01-01

    A simple and efficient method using transgenic Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites expressing β-galactosidase was developed for detection of specific antibodies against the parasite in sera of patients. The titers obtained with the new test were similar to those obtained with the Sabin-Feldman dye test run in parallel. Although significant changes in endpoint titers were not observed when sera drawn sequentially at 2- to 3-week intervals were tested with both procedures, apparent differences in antibody affinity were observed with the new test which were not perceptible with the Sabin-Feldman dye test. Like the Sabin-Feldman dye test, the new test is based on complement lysis of tachyzoites, but it is much easier to perform and the reaction is read colorimetrically instead of visually. PMID:11376045

  16. The influence of the swine major histocompatibility genes on antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to immunization with an aromatic-dependent mutant of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, J S; Kennedy, B W; Mallard, B A; Wilkie, B N

    1993-01-01

    Eighty-two major histocompatibility complex (MHC) swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) defined miniature pigs from 16 litters were examined for serum agglutinating antibody titer and O-polysaccharide (O-ps) specific peripheral blood lymphocyte blastogenesis following two parenteral vaccinations with 1 x 10(8) aromatic-dependent (aroA) Salmonella typhimurium and following oral challenge with 1 x 10(12) virulent parent S. typhimurium. Least mean squares analysis allowed separate determinations of the effects of MHC genotype, dam, sire and litter. In most cases only litter significantly influenced both lymphocyte blastogenesis and antibody titer before and after vaccination and following challenge. However, pig SLA haplotype significantly influenced the degree of O-ps specific lymphocyte proliferation six days after the second vaccination (p < 0.004). Lymphocyte proliferation and serum agglutinating antibody response six days after primary vaccination were negatively correlated (r2 = -0.68, p < 0.001). In most cases, "dd" and "gg" homozygous and "dg" heterozygous pigs, having the same MHC class II region, behaved immunologically as a group distinct from the other genotypes. PMID:8431799

  17. Generation of new peptide-Fc fusion proteins that mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against different types of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sioud, Mouldy; Westby, Phuong; Olsen, Julie Kristine E.; Mobergslien, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key effector function for the clinical effectiveness of monoclonal antibodies, is triggered by the engagement of the antibody Fc domain with the Fcγ receptors expressed by innate immune cells such as natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages. Here, we fused cancer cell-binding peptides to the Fc domain of human IgG1 to engineer novel peptide-Fc fusion proteins with ADCC activity. The designed fusion proteins were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, followed by purification and characterization by western blots. One of the engineered variants (WN-Fc), bound with high affinity to a wide range of solid tumor cell lines (e.g., colon, lung, prostate, skin, ovarian, and mammary tumors). Treatment of cancer cells with the engineered peptide-Fc fusions in the presence of effector NK cells potentially enhanced cytotoxicity, degranulation, and interferon-γ production by NK cells when compared to cells treated with the Fc control. The presence of competing peptides inhibited NK cell activation. Furthermore, a bispecific peptide-Fc fusion protein activated NK cells against HER-1- and/or HER-2-expressing cancer cells. Collectively, the engineered peptide-Fc fusions constitute a new promising strategy to recruit and activate NK cells against tumor cells, a primary goal of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26605373

  18. Effect of yeast-derived products and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on antibody-mediated immune response and gene expression of pattern recognition receptors and cytokines in broiler chickens immunized with T-cell dependent antigens.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, M; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Echeverry, H; Crow, G H; Slominski, B A

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of yeast-derived products on innate and antibody mediated immune response in broiler chickens following immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). One-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were randomly assigned to 6 dietary treatments of 9 replicate cages of 5 birds each per treatment. Dietary treatments consisted of a Control diet without antibiotic, and diets containing 11 mg/kg of virginiamycin, 0.25% of yeast cell wall (YCW), 0.2% of a commercial product Maxi-Gen Plus containing processed yeast and nucleotides, 0.05% of nucleotides, or a diet containing 10% of DDGS. On days 21 and 28 post-hatching, 5 birds per treatment were immunized intramuscularly with both SRBC and BSA. One week after each immunization, blood samples were collected. Serum samples were analyzed by hemagglutination test for antibody response to SRBC, and by ELISA for serum IgM and IgG response to BSA. On d 35, 5 birds per treatment were euthanized and the tissue samples from the cecal tonsils were collected to assess the gene expression of toll-like receptors TLR2b, TLR4, and TLR21, monocyte mannose receptor (MMR), and cytokines IL-10, IL-13, IL-4, IL-12p35, and IFN-γ. The results for gene expression analysis demonstrated that the diet supplemented with YCW increased the expression of TLR2b and T-helper type 2 cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and IL-13 relative to the Control; and the expression of TLR4 and IL-13 was upregulated in the nucleotide-containing diet. However, the diets containing antibiotics or Maxi-Gen Plus downregulated the expression of IFN-γ compared to the control. The primary antibody response to SRBC was not affected by diets. However, the diet containing YCW increased the secondary antibody response to SRBC compared to the antibiotic treatment. Neither primary nor secondary IgG and IgM response against BSA were affected by diets. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with YCW stimulated Th2 cell-mediated

  19. Antibody-mediated depletion of lymphocyte-activation gene-3 (LAG-3(+) )-activated T lymphocytes prevents delayed-type hypersensitivity in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Poirier, N; Haudebourg, T; Brignone, C; Dilek, N; Hervouet, J; Minault, D; Coulon, F; de Silly, R V; Triebel, F; Blancho, G; Vanhove, B

    2011-05-01

    Lymphocyte-activation gene-3 (LAG-3, CD223) is a marker for recently activated effector T cells. Activated T lymphocytes are of major importance in many autoimmune diseases and organ transplant rejection. Therefore, specifically depleting LAG-3(+) T cells might lead to targeted immunosuppression that would spare resting T cells while eliminating pathogenic activated T cells. We have shown previously that anti-LAG-3 antibodies sharing depleting as well as modulating activities inhibit heart allograft rejection in rats. Here, we have developed and characterized a cytotoxic LAG-3 chimeric antibody (chimeric A9H12), and evaluated its potential as a selective therapeutic depleting agent in a non-human primate model of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). Chimeric A9H12 showed a high affinity to its antigen and depleted both cytomegalovirus (CMV)-activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) human T lymphocytes in vitro. In vivo, a single intravenous injection at either 1 or 0·1 mg/kg was sufficient to deplete LAG-3(+) -activated T cells in lymph nodes and to prevent the T helper type 1 (Th1)-driven skin inflammation in a tuberculin-induced DTH model in baboons. T lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration into the skin was also reduced. The in vivo effect was long-lasting, as several weeks to months were required after injection to restore a positive reaction after antigen challenge. Our data confirm that LAG-3 is a promising therapeutic target for depleting antibodies that might lead to higher therapeutic indexes compared to traditional immunosuppressive agents in autoimmune diseases and transplantation. PMID:21352204

  20. Biochemical and structural characterization of the interface mediating interaction between the influenza A virus non-structural protein-1 and a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Mok, Chee-Keng; Chow, Vincent Tak Kwong; Yuan, Y Adam; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that a non-structural protein 1 (NS1)-binding monoclonal antibody, termed as 2H6, can significantly reduce influenza A virus (IAV) replication when expressed intracellularly. In this study, we further showed that 2H6 binds stronger to the NS1 of H5N1 than A/Puerto Rico/8/1934(H1N1) because of an amino acid difference at residue 48. A crystal structure of 2H6 fragment antigen-binding (Fab) has also been solved and docked onto the NS1 structure to reveal the contacts between specific residues at the interface of antibody-antigen complex. In one of the models, the predicted molecular contacts between residues in NS1 and 2H6-Fab correlate well with biochemical results. Taken together, residues N48 and T49 in H5N1 NS1 act cooperatively to maintain a strong interaction with mAb 2H6 by forming hydrogen bonds with residues found in the heavy chain of the antibody. Interestingly, the pandemic H1N1-2009 and the majority of seasonal H3N2 circulating in humans since 1968 has N48 in NS1, suggesting that mAb 2H6 could bind to most of the currently circulating seasonal influenza A virus strains. Consistent with the involvement of residue T49, which is well-conserved, in RNA binding, mAb 2H6 was also found to inhibit the interaction between NS1 and double-stranded RNA.

  1. Biochemical and structural characterization of the interface mediating interaction between the influenza A virus non-structural protein-1 and a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Mok, Chee-Keng; Chow, Vincent Tak Kwong; Yuan, Y Adam; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that a non-structural protein 1 (NS1)-binding monoclonal antibody, termed as 2H6, can significantly reduce influenza A virus (IAV) replication when expressed intracellularly. In this study, we further showed that 2H6 binds stronger to the NS1 of H5N1 than A/Puerto Rico/8/1934(H1N1) because of an amino acid difference at residue 48. A crystal structure of 2H6 fragment antigen-binding (Fab) has also been solved and docked onto the NS1 structure to reveal the contacts between specific residues at the interface of antibody-antigen complex. In one of the models, the predicted molecular contacts between residues in NS1 and 2H6-Fab correlate well with biochemical results. Taken together, residues N48 and T49 in H5N1 NS1 act cooperatively to maintain a strong interaction with mAb 2H6 by forming hydrogen bonds with residues found in the heavy chain of the antibody. Interestingly, the pandemic H1N1-2009 and the majority of seasonal H3N2 circulating in humans since 1968 has N48 in NS1, suggesting that mAb 2H6 could bind to most of the currently circulating seasonal influenza A virus strains. Consistent with the involvement of residue T49, which is well-conserved, in RNA binding, mAb 2H6 was also found to inhibit the interaction between NS1 and double-stranded RNA. PMID:27633136

  2. A Nanoparticle Platform To Evaluate Bioconjugation and Receptor-Mediated Cell Uptake Using Cross-Linked Polyion Complex Micelles Bearing Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Florinas, Stelios; Liu, Marc; Fleming, Ryan; Van Vlerken-Ysla, Lilian; Ayriss, Joanne; Gilbreth, Ryan; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Gao, Changshou; Wu, Herren; Xu, Ze-Qi; Chen, Shaoyi; Dirisala, Anjaneyulu; Kataoka, Kazunori; Cabral, Horacio; Christie, R James

    2016-05-01

    Targeted nanomedicines are a promising technology for treatment of disease; however, preparation and characterization of well-defined protein-nanoparticle systems remain challenging. Here, we describe a platform technology to prepare antibody binding fragment (Fab)-bearing nanoparticles and an accompanying real-time cell-based assay to determine their cellular uptake compared to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Fabs. The nanoparticle platform was composed of core-cross-linked polyion complex (PIC) micelles prepared from azide-functionalized PEG-b-poly(amino acids), that is, azido-PEG-b-poly(l-lysine) [N3-PEG-b-PLL] and azido-PEG-b-poly(aspartic acid) [N3-PEG-b-PAsp]. These PIC micelles were 30 nm in size and contained approximately 10 polymers per construct. Fabs were derived from an antibody binding the EphA2 receptor expressed on cancer cells and further engineered to contain a reactive cysteine for site-specific attachment and a cleavable His tag for purification from cell culture expression systems. Azide-functionalized micelles and thiol-containing Fab were linked using a heterobifunctional cross-linker (FPM-PEG4-DBCO) that contained a fluorophenyl-maleimide for stable conjugation to Fabs thiols and a strained alkyne (DBCO) group for coupling to micelle azide groups. Analysis of Fab-PIC micelle conjugates by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, and UV-vis absorbance determined that each nanoparticle contained 2-3 Fabs. Evaluation of cellular uptake in receptor positive cancer cells by real-time fluorescence microscopy revealed that targeted Fab-PIC micelles achieved higher cell uptake than mAbs and Fabs, demonstrating the utility of this approach to identify targeted nanoparticle constructs with unique cellular internalization properties. PMID:27007881

  3. Cross-Neutralization Activity of Single-Chain Variable Fragment (scFv) Derived from Anti-V3 Monoclonal Antibodies Mediated by Post-Attachment Binding.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Yasuhiro; Kuwata, Takeo; Tanaka, Kazuki; Alam, Muntasir; Valdez, Kristel Paola Ramirez; Egami, Yoshika; Suwa, Yoshiaki; Morioka, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2016-09-21

    The V3 loop in the envelope (Env) of HIV-1 is one of the major targets of neutralizing antibodies. However, this antigen is hidden inside the Env trimer in most isolates and is fully exposed only during CD4-gp120 interaction. Thus, primary HIV-1 isolates are relatively resistant to anti-V3 antibodies because IgG is too large to access the V3 loop. To overcome this obstacle, we constructed single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) from anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies 0.5γ, 5G2, and 16G6. Enhanced neutralization by 0.5γ and 5G2 scFvs was observed in strains resistant to their IgG counterparts. Neutralization coverage by 0.5γ scFv reached up to 90% of the tested viruses (tier 2 and 3 classes). The temperature-regulated neutralization assay revealed that extensive cross-neutralization of 0.5γ scFv can be explained by post-attachment neutralization. Neutralization assay involving viruses carrying an inter-subunit disulfide bond (SOS virus) showed that the neutralization-susceptible timeframe after attachment was 60 to 120 min. These results indicate that the scFvs efficiently access the V3 loop and subsequently neutralize HIV-1, even after virus attachment to the target cells. Based on its broad and potent neutralizing activity, further development of anti-V3 scFv for therapeutic and preventive strategies is warranted.

  4. Biochemical and structural characterization of the interface mediating interaction between the influenza A virus non-structural protein-1 and a monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianping; Mok, Chee-Keng; Chow, Vincent Tak Kwong; Yuan, Y. Adam; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that a non-structural protein 1 (NS1)-binding monoclonal antibody, termed as 2H6, can significantly reduce influenza A virus (IAV) replication when expressed intracellularly. In this study, we further showed that 2H6 binds stronger to the NS1 of H5N1 than A/Puerto Rico/8/1934(H1N1) because of an amino acid difference at residue 48. A crystal structure of 2H6 fragment antigen-binding (Fab) has also been solved and docked onto the NS1 structure to reveal the contacts between specific residues at the interface of antibody-antigen complex. In one of the models, the predicted molecular contacts between residues in NS1 and 2H6-Fab correlate well with biochemical results. Taken together, residues N48 and T49 in H5N1 NS1 act cooperatively to maintain a strong interaction with mAb 2H6 by forming hydrogen bonds with residues found in the heavy chain of the antibody. Interestingly, the pandemic H1N1-2009 and the majority of seasonal H3N2 circulating in humans since 1968 has N48 in NS1, suggesting that mAb 2H6 could bind to most of the currently circulating seasonal influenza A virus strains. Consistent with the involvement of residue T49, which is well-conserved, in RNA binding, mAb 2H6 was also found to inhibit the interaction between NS1 and double-stranded RNA. PMID:27633136

  5. Trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab

    PubMed Central

    Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan; Brockhoff, Gero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab bivalently targets the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) on epithelial (tumor) cells and the T cell specific CD3 antigen, and its Fc region is selectively recognized by Fcγ type I/III receptor-positive immune cells. As a trifunctional immunoglobulin, ertumaxomab therefore not only targets Her2 on cancer cells, but also triggers immunological effector mechanisms mediated by T and accessory cells (e.g., macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells). Whether molecular effects, however, might contribute to the cellular antitumor efficiency of ertumaxomab are largely unknown. Methods: Potential molecular effects of ertumaxomab on Her2-overexpressing BT474 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells were evaluated. The dissociation constant Kd of ertumaxomab was calculated from titration curves that were recorded by flow cytometry. Treatment-induced changes in Her2 homodimerization were determined by flow cytometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements on a cell-by-cell basis. Potential activation / deactivation of Her2, ERK1/2, AKT and STAT3 were analyzed by western blotting, Immunochemistry and immunofluorescent cell staining. Results: The Kd of ertumaxomab for Her2-binding was determined at 265 nM and the ertumaxomab binding epitope was found to not overlap with that of the therapeutic anti-Her2 monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Ertumaxomab caused an increase in Her2 phosphorylation at higher antibody concentrations, but changed neither the rate of Her2-homodimerization /-phosphorylation nor the activation state of key downstream signaling proteins analyzed. Conclusions: The unique mode of action of ertumaxomab, which relies more on activation of immune-mediated mechanisms against tumor cells compared with currently available therapeutic antibodies for breast cancer treatment, suggests that modular or sequential treatment with the trifunctional bivalent antibody might complement

  6. Myosins 1 and 6, myosin light chain kinase, actin and microtubules cooperate during antibody-mediated internalisation and trafficking of membrane-expressed viral antigens in feline infectious peritonitis virus infected monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dewerchin, Hannah L; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Noppe, Ytse; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-02-12

    Monocytes infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus, a coronavirus, express viral proteins in their plasma membranes. Upon binding of antibodies, these proteins are quickly internalised through a new clathrin- and caveolae-independent internalisation pathway. By doing so, the infected monocytes can escape antibody-dependent cell lysis. In the present study, we investigated which kinases and cytoskeletal proteins are of importance during internalisation and subsequent intracellular transport. The experiments showed that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin 1 are crucial for the initiation of the internalisation. With co-localisation stainings, it was found that MLCK and myosin 1 co-localise with antigens even before internalisation started. Myosin 6 co-localised with the internalising complexes during passage through the cortical actin, were it might play a role in moving or disintegrating actin filaments, to overcome the actin barrier. One minute after internalisation started, vesicles had passed the cortical actin, co-localised with microtubules and association with myosin 6 was lost. The vesicles were further transported over the microtubules and accumulated at the microtubule organising centre after 10 to 30 min. Intracellular trafficking over microtubules was mediated by MLCK, myosin 1 and a small actin tail. Since inhibiting MLCK with ML-7 was so efficient in blocking the internalisation pathway, this target can be used for the development of a new treatment for FIPV.

  7. The effects of environmental enrichment and transport stress on the weights of lymphoid organs, cell-mediated immune response, heterophil functions and antibody production in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Matur, Erdal; Akyazi, İbrahim; Eraslan, Evren; Ergul Ekiz, Elif; Eseceli, Hüseyin; Keten, Mehmet; Metiner, Kemal; Aktaran Bala, Deniz

    2016-02-01

    The effects of environmental enrichment and transport stress on the immune system were investigated in laying hens. A total of 48 1-day-old chickens were used, half of the chickens were reared in conventional cages (RCC) and the rest in enriched cages (REC). Transport stress was applied in the 17th week. Liver weight decreased, spleen and bursa of Fabricius weights, white blood cell count, CD4+ and CD8+ cell proportions increased due to the transport. Environmental enrichment significantly increased antibody production and tended to increase monocyte percentage and CD8+ cell proportion. The effect of transport on, heterophil (H) and lymphocyte (L) percentages was not significant in RCC chickens. While heterophil percentage and H:L ratio increased, lymphocyte percentage decreased in REC chickens subjected to transport. Transport stress increased heterophil functions both in REC and RCC chickens, but the increase was higher in REC hens than in RCC hens. In conclusion, although environmental enrichment did not neutralize the effect of transport on lymphoid organs, it activated the non-specific immune system, cellular and the humoral branches of the specific immune system by increasing heterophil functions, CD8+ cells and antibody production, respectively. Therefore, environmental enrichment suggested for improving animal welfare may also be beneficial to improve the immune system of birds exposed to stress.

  8. Oral administration of Aloe vera gel, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory herbal remedy, stimulates cell-mediated immunity and antibody production in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bałan, Barbara Joanna; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Kocik, Janusz; Jung, Leszek; Skopiński, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Aloe barbadensis Mill) Liliaceae, succulent plant native to northern Africa, is presently cultivated in many regions of the world. Traditionally, its inner part of parenchyma, which contains aloe gel, was used for the treatment of minor wounds, inflammatory skin disorders, thermal and radiation burns and to alleviate chronic osteoarthritis pain. It also possesses some antimicrobial activity. Now, aloe gel is also increasingly consumed as a dietary supplement. Some data suggest its immunomodulatory properties. The aim of the study The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of orally administered aloe gel on some parameters of cellular and humoral immunity viz. mitogen-induced proliferation of splenic lymphocytes and their chemokinetic activity, and anti-sheep red blood cells (SRBC) antibody production in Balb/c mice. Results Daily treatment of mice for 14 and 21 days with 50 µl or 150 µl of aloe gel dose resulted in enhanced chemokinetic activity and stronger response of their splenic lymphocytes to mitogen PHA and enhancement of anti-SRBC antibody production. PMID:26155113

  9. Assessment of antibody mediated cytolysis of adult cardiocytes isolated by centrifugation in a continuous gradient of Percoll in patients with acute myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Maisch, B; Trostel-Soeder, R; Berg, P A; Kochsiek, K

    1981-01-01

    Principal objections to conventional cytotoxicity assays in cardiac disease with myocytes as target cells are the use of fetal or neonatal myocardium, the cell-membrane of which does not express all antigenic determinants, and the use of trypsin as enzyme for isolation of the cells, since this alters the myolemmal membrane considerably. An improved and rapid procedure for the isolation of intact adult cardiocytes with collaggenase was developed. by means of a performed continuous self-generating silica sol and gradient centrifugation average enrichment of 81% vital myocytes was achieved by a single isopycnic procedure. The yield was improved to 94 +/- 3% vital cells by identical second centrifugation. Cardiocytes isolated by this method were used as target cells in an assay measuring the cytolytic activity of antibodies in the presence of complement: sera of patients suffering from acute viral myocarditis (Coxsackie B- and influenza-virus) with complement fixing antisacrolemmal antibodies (ASA) of the IgG- and IgM-type showed significant cardiocytolysis. ASA are postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of acute Coxsackie B- and influenza-virus myocarditis. PMID:6268709

  10. Adoptive cell transfer of contact sensitivity-initiation mediated by nonimmune cells sensitized with monoclonal IgE antibodies. Dependence on host skin mast cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Ushio, H; Paliwal, V; Ptak, W; Askenase, P W

    1995-05-15

    A role for mast cell release of serotonin (5-HT), via Ag-specific factors derived from Thy-1+ B220+ lymphoid cells in the initiation of murine contact sensitivity (CS) has been suggested. However, because CS in mast cell-deficient mice was intact, a role for mast cells in CS initiation was unclear. Therefore, we examined whether CS could be initiated by i.v. injection of nonimmune mixed lymphoid cells that were sensitized in vitro with IgE. When naive mice received IgE-sensitized nonimmune spleen or lymph node cells, or IgE-sensitized purified mast cells, together with immune CS-effector B220- T cells, which therefore were depleted of CS-initiating, Thy-1+, B220+ cells, which could not transfer CS, then reconstitution of CS occurred. Mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice could not elicit this IgE-dependent CS ear swelling, but when mast cell deficiency was reversed by ear injection of normal bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells, then CS was restored. In vitro pretreatment with irrelevant monoclonal anti-OVA IgE prevented CS initiation mediated by Ag-specific, IgE mAb-sensitized cells, presumably by blocking sensitization with IgE. Thus Fc epsilon R on the normal lymphoid cells were involved. When ketanserin, a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, was injected i.v. before cell transfer, CS initiation via IgE-sensitized cells and CS were no longer elicited. Thus, in this system, IgE Abs bound to circulating IgE Fc epsilon R bearing lymphoid cells sensitized in vitro (most likely basophils), probably mediated early activation of these circulating basophils to release mediators, causing 5-HT release from cutaneous mast cells, to mediate CS initiation. PMID:7730614

  11. Impaired Clearance of Early Apoptotic Cells Mediated by Inhibitory IgG Antibodies in Patients with Primary Sjögren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Manoussakis, Menelaos N.; Fragoulis, George E.; Vakrakou, Aigli G.; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Deficient efferocytosis (i.e. phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells) has been frequently reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Todate, patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) have not been assessed for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells (ApoCell-phagocytosis) and of particulate targets (microbeads, MB-phagocytosis). Design ApoCell-phagocytosis and MB-phagocytosis were comparatively assessed by flow cytometry in peripheral blood specimens and monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) preparations from healthy blood donors (HBD) and consecutive SS, SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Cross-admixture ApoCell-phagocytosis experiments were also performed using phagocytes from HBD or patients, and apoptotic cells pretreated with whole sera or purified serum IgG derived from patients or HBD. Results Compared to HBD, approximately half of SS and SLE patients studied (but not RA) manifested significantly reduced ApoCell-phagocytosis (p<0.001) and MB-phagocytosis (p<0.003) by blood-borne phagocytes that correlated inversely with disease activity (p≤0.004). In cross-admixture assays, healthy monocytes showed significantly reduced ApoCell-phagocytosis when fed with apoptotic cells that were pretreated with sera or purified serum IgG preparations from SS and SLE patients (p<0.0001, compared to those from HBD or RA). Such aberrant effect of the SS and SLE sera and IgG preparations correlated linearly with their content of IgG antibodies against apoptotic cells (p≤0.0001). Phagocytic dysfunction maybe also present in certain SS and SLE patients, as supported by deficient capacity of MDM for ApoCell-phagocytosis and MB-phagocytosis under patients' serum-free conditions. Conclusion Similarly to SLE, efferocytosis is frequently impaired in SS and is primarily due to the presence of inhibitory IgG anti-ApoCell antibodies and secondarily to phagocytes' dysfunction. PMID:25396412

  12. T Cell Mediated Antibody lnvariance in an Immune Response Against A Bacterial Carbohydrate Antigen Requires CD28/B7–1 Costimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kölsch, Eckehart; Specht, Christoph

    2001-01-01

    The humoral immune response against α(1→3) dextran (Dex) in BALB/c mice is characterized by the formation of predominantly IgM antibodies bearing the J558 idiotype. IgG antibodies do not appear in euthymic mice. In athymic animals however, the response proceeds to a vigorous IgG production. In euthymic mice formation of IgG is suppressed by J558 idiotype- specific regulatory T cells recognizing in association with I-Ed and in cognate T/B interaction the VH CDR3 derived peptide of the J558 idiotpye. Only B-2 lymphocytes produce IgG whereas B-1 cells do not participate in the production of this Ig class. Using a novel synthetic all α(1→3)-D-gluco configurated tetrasaccharide the Dex-specific B cells can for the first time be analyzed in FACS. In experiments using this newly designed low molecular Dex no signs of B cell apoptosis can be found. This demonstrates a true silencing of persisting Bγ memory cells and supports previous by adoptive transfer experiments. In this suppression an involvement of CD28/B7–1 interaction can be demonstrated which is a necessary costimulatory suppression signal in addition to the cognate TCR/peptide-I-Ed interaction between J558 Id-specific T cells and J558 idiotype beating B cells. This results in an activation of 178–4 Ts cells, leading to an overall suppression of the Dex-specific IgG isotype production on the one hand and on the other hand provides a signal for the survival and clonal expansion of J558 Id-positive B cells. PMID:11785674

  13. Nuclear Factor κB is Required for Tumor Growth Inhibition Mediated by Enavatuzumab (PDL192), a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody to TweakR.

    PubMed

    Purcell, James W; Kim, Han K; Tanlimco, Sonia G; Doan, Minhtam; Fox, Melvin; Lambert, Peter; Chao, Debra T; Sho, Mien; Wilson, Keith E; Starling, Gary C; Culp, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    TweakR is a TNF receptor family member, whose natural ligand is the multifunctional cytokine TWEAK. The growth inhibitory activity observed following TweakR stimulation in certain cancer cell lines and the overexpression of TweakR in many solid tumor types led to the development of enavatuzumab (PDL192), a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody to TweakR. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of enavatuzumab's tumor growth inhibition and to provide insight into the biology behind TweakR as a cancer therapeutic target. A panel of 105 cancer lines was treated with enavatuzumab in vitro; and 29 cell lines of varying solid tumor backgrounds had >25% growth inhibition in response to the antibody. Treatment of sensitive cell lines with enavatuzumab resulted in the in vitro and in vivo (xenograft) activation of both classical (p50, p65) and non-classical (p52, RelB) NFκB pathways. Using NFκB DNA binding functional ELISAs and microarray analysis, we observed increased activation of NFκB subunits and NFκB-regulated genes in sensitive cells over that observed in resistant cell lines. Inhibiting NFκB subunits (p50, p65, RelB, p52) and upstream kinases (IKK1, IKK2) with siRNA and chemical inhibitors consistently blocked enavatuzumab's activity. Furthermore, enavatuzumab treatment resulted in NFκB-dependent reduction in cell division as seen by the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 both in vitro and in vivo. The finding that NFκB drives the growth inhibitory activity of enavatuzumab suggests that targeting TweakR with enavatuzumab may represent a novel cancer treatment strategy.

  14. Fc-glycosylation influences Fcγ receptor binding and cell-mediated anti-HIV activity of monoclonal antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Forthal, Donald N; Gach, Johannes S; Landucci, Gary; Jez, Jakub; Strasser, Richard; Kunert, Renate; Steinkellner, Herta

    2010-12-01

    Interactions between the Fc segment of IgG and FcγRs on a variety of cells are likely to play an important role in the anti-HIV activity of Abs. Because the nature of the glycan structure on the Fc domain is a critical determinant of Fc-FcγR binding, proper Fc glycosylation may contribute to Ab-mediated protection. We have generated five different glycoforms of the broadly HIV-1-neutralizing mAb 2G12 in wild-type and glycoengineered plants and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Plant-derived 2G12 exhibited highly homogeneous glycosylation profiles with a single dominant N-glycan species. Using flow cytometry with FcγR-expressing cell lines, all 2G12 glycoforms demonstrated similar binding to FcγRI, FcγRIIa, and FcγRIIb. In contrast, two glycoforms derived from glycoengineered plants that lack plant-specific xylose and core α1,3-fucose, and instead carry human-like glycosylation with great uniformity, showed significantly enhanced binding to FcγRIIIa compared with Chinese hamster ovary or wild-type plant-derived 2G12. Using surface plasmon resonance, we show that binding of 2G12 to FcγRIIIa is markedly affected by core fucose, irrespective of its plant-specific α1,3 or mammalian-type α1,6 linkage. Consistent with this finding, 2G12 glycoforms lacking core fucose (and xylose) mediated higher antiviral activity against HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus as measured by Ab-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that specific alterations of Fc glycosylation can improve antiviral activity. Such alterations may result in better immunotherapeutic reagents. Moreover, biasing vaccine-induced immune responses toward optimal Fc glycosylation patterns could result in improved vaccine efficacy. PMID:21041724

  15. Impact of the Maraviroc-Resistant Mutation M434I in the C4 Region of HIV-1 gp120 on Sensitivity to Antibody-Mediated Neutralization.

    PubMed

    Boonchawalit, Samatchaya; Harada, Shigeyoshi; Shirai, Noriko; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi; Matsushita, Shuzo; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa

    2016-05-20

    We previously reported that a maraviroc (MVC)-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1variant, generated using in vitro selection, exhibited high sensitivity to several neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NMAbs) and autologous plasma IgGs. The MVC-resistant variant acquired 4 sequential mutations in gp120: T297I, M434I, V200I, and K305R. In this study, we examined the mutation most responsible for conferring enhanced neutralization sensitivity of the MVC-resistant variant to several NMAbs and autologous plasma IgGs. The virus with the first resistant mutation, T297I, was sensitive to all NMAbs, whereas the passage control virus was not. The neutralization sensitivity of the variant greatly increased following its acquisition of the second mutation, M434I, in the C4 region. The M434I mutation conferred the greatest neutralizing sensitivity among the 4 MVC-resistant mutations. Additionally, the single M434I mutation was sufficient for the enhanced neutralization of the virus by NMAbs, autologous plasma IgGs, and heterologous sera relative to that of the parental virus.

  16. Design considerations for liposomal vaccines: influence of formulation parameters on antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to liposome associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Watson, Douglas S; Endsley, Aaron N; Huang, Leaf

    2012-03-16

    Liposomes (phospholipid bilayer vesicles) are versatile and robust delivery systems for induction of antibody and T lymphocyte responses to associated subunit antigens. In the last 15 years, liposome vaccine technology has matured and now several vaccines containing liposome-based adjuvants have been approved for human use or have reached late stages of clinical evaluation. Given the intensifying interest in liposome-based vaccines, it is important to understand precisely how liposomes interact with the immune system and stimulate immunity. It has become clear that the physicochemical properties of liposomal vaccines - method of antigen attachment, lipid composition, bilayer fluidity, particle charge, and other properties - exert dramatic effects on the resulting immune response. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the physicochemical properties of liposomal vaccines and how they influence immune responses. A discussion of novel and emerging immunomodulators that are suitable for inclusion in liposomal vaccines is also presented. Through a comprehensive analysis of the body of liposomal vaccine literature, we enumerate a series of principles that can guide the rational design of liposomal vaccines to elicit immune responses of a desired magnitude and quality. We also identify major unanswered questions in the field, pointing the direction for future study.

  17. HIV-1 Replication in Langerhans and Interstitial Dendritic Cells Is Inhibited by Neutralizing and Fc-Mediated Inhibitory Antibodies ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Peressin, M.; Holl, V.; Schmidt, S.; Decoville, T.; Mirisky, D.; Lederle, A.; Delaporte, M.; Xu, K.; Aubertin, A. M.; Moog, C.

    2011-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) and interstitial dendritic cells (IDCs) may be among the first human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) targets after sexual transmission. We generated cells of these types by differentiation of purified CD34+ cord blood cells. After in vitro infection with R5-tropic strains, we obtained similar percentages of infected cells for both dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Moreover, LC infection was not increased by blockage of langerin by antilangerin. These results indicate that, under our experimental conditions, there was no evidence of any preference of HIV replication in LCs versus IDCs. The inhibitory activity of HIV-1-specific IgAs and IgGs against HIV-1 replication in LCs and IDCs was analyzed. We found that neutralizing antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection of both DC subsets. Interestingly, HIV-1 was inhibited more efficiently by the IgGs than the corresponding IgA, due to an Fcγ receptor-dependent mechanism. Moreover, nonneutralizing inhibitory IgGs were able to inhibit infection of both LCs and IDCs. These results underline the importance of HIV-1 inhibition by the binding of the Fc part of IgGs to Fcγ receptors and suggest that the induction of neutralizing and nonneutralizing inhibitory IgGs in addition to neutralizing IgAs at mucosal sites may contribute to protection against sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:21084491

  18. Quantitative model of antibody- and soluble CD4-mediated neutralization of primary isolates and T-cell line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P J; Moore, J P

    1996-01-01

    Primary isolates (PI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considerably less sensitive than T-cell line-adapted strains to neutralization by soluble CD4 and by most cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies to the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein, as well as by postinfection and postvaccination sera (J. P. Moore and D. D. Ho, AIDS 9 [suppl. A]:5117-5136, 1995). We developed a quantitative model to explain the neutralization resistance of PI. The factors incorporated into the model are the dissociation constants for the binding of the neutralizing agent to native Env oligomers, the number of outer Env molecules on the viral surface (which decreases by shedding), and the minimum number of Env molecules required for attachment and fusion. We conclude that modest differences in all these factors can, when combined, explain a relative neutralization resistance of PI versus T-cell line-adapted strains that sometimes amounts to several orders of magnitude. The hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is due to the reduction below a minimum number of the Env molecules on a virion available for attachment and fusion is at odds with single- and few-hit neutralization theories. Our analysis of these ideas favors the hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is instead a competitive blocking of interactions with cellular factors, including adsorption receptors. PMID:8648701

  19. Design considerations for liposomal vaccines: Influence of formulation parameters on antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to liposome associated antigens

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Douglas S.; Endsley, Aaron N.; Huang, Leaf

    2012-01-01

    Liposomes (phospholipid bilayer vesicles) are versatile and robust delivery systems for induction of antibody and T lymphocyte responses to associated subunit antigens. In the last 15 years, liposome vaccine technology has matured and now several vaccines containing liposome-based adjuvants have been approved for human use or have reached late stages of clinical evaluation. Given the intensifying interest in liposome-based vaccines, it is important to understand precisely how liposomes interact with the immune system and stimulate immunity. It has become clear that the physicochemical properties of liposomal vaccines – method of antigen attachment, lipid composition, bilayer fluidity, particle charge, and other properties – exert dramatic effects on the resulting immune response. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the physicochemical properties of liposomal vaccines and how they influence immune responses. A discussion of novel and emerging immunomodulators that are suitable for inclusion in liposomal vaccines is also presented. Through a comprehensive analysis of the body of liposomal vaccine literature, we enumerate a series of principles that can guide the rational design of liposomal vaccines to elicit immune responses of a desired magnitude and quality. We also identify major unanswered questions in the field, pointing the direction for future study. PMID:22306376

  20. Complement-mediated bacteriolysis after binding of specific antibodies to drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: morphological changes observed by using a field emission scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Jun; Nakae, Takashi; Onoe, Takatoshi; Horiuchi, Yoshitaka; Miyamoto, Hiroyoshi; Adan-Kubo, Jun; Adachi, Hiroaki; Ono, Yasuo

    2010-12-01

    A bactericidal mechanism mediated by human serum was investigated by a field emission scanning electron microscope and a strain of drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. When the bacteria were treated with meropenem, a carbapenem antibiotic, spheroplasts and bulges (spheroidization) appeared after 1-3 h. When 40% serum was added to the bacteria, the bacteria agglutinated within 2 min and then lysed after 5-30 min. Immunoelectron micrographic analyses showed dispositions of complement component C9 molecules on the cell surface of lysed bacteria by the serum treatment that might suggest formation of a membrane attack complex. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) depletion from the serum diminished the lytic activity and adding human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) restored it, suggesting that lysis was induced by specific IgG binding to the bacteria. IVIG may help patients with less IgG against bacteria to overcome severe infection.

  1. Characterization of TLR4-mediated auto-antibody production in a mouse model of histidyl-tRNA synthetase-induced myositis.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Lisa; Fernandez, Irina; Soejima, Makoto; Ridgway, William M; Ascherman, Dana P

    2012-12-01

    We have previously shown that intramuscular immunization with a recombinant fragment of murine histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HRS) in the absence of exogenous adjuvant generates Ag-specific, IgG class switched Abs a murine model of myositis. Markedly diminished IgG anti-HRS auto-Ab responses in TLR4 signaling-deficient C3H/HeJ mice indicate that TLR4 is required for auto-Ab formation and/or class switching in this system. Comparative time course assessment of HRS-immunized C3H/HeOuJ (wild type) and C3H/HeJ (TLR4 mutant) mice shows here that despite significant impairment of class switched IgG anti-HRS responses in TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ mice, production of IgM anti-HRS auto-Abs is relatively preserved-suggesting that TLR4-mediated signals modulate IgG class switching rather than auto-Ab formation in this genetic background. In C57BL/6-derived knockout mice lacking either MyD88 (B6.MyD88(-/-)) or TRIF (B6.TRIF(-/-)) adaptor molecules, immunization studies indicate that TRIF exerts a dominant role in the generation of HRS-specific IgG auto-Abs. Complementing these analyses, in vitro stimulation of unfractionated, as well as T cell-depleted, C3H/HeOuJ splenocytes with recombinant murine HRS reveals that TLR4-mediated generation of class switched auto-Abs can occur independently of T cell help. Overall, these findings support a broader role for TLR4 in the breakdown of immune tolerance and development of autoimmunity.

  2. Immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy in Cuba: experiences with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment (1993-2013).

    PubMed

    Peña, Yamilé; Perera, Alejandro; Batista, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The availability of monoclonal antibodies in Cuba has facilitated development and application of innovative techniques (immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy) for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Objective Review immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy techniques and analyze their use in Cuba, based on the published literature. In this context, we describe the experience of Havana's Clinical Research Center with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment during the period 1993-2013. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION Basic concepts concerning cancer and monoclonal antibodies were reviewed, as well as relevant international and Cuban data. Forty-nine documents were reviewed, among them 2 textbooks, 34 articles by Cuban authors and 13 by international authors. All works published by the Clinical Research Center from 1993 through 2013 were included. Bibliography was obtained from the library of the Clinical Research Center and Infomed, Cuba's national health telematics network, using the following keywords: monoclonal antibodies, immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy. RESULTS Labeling the antibodies (ior t3, ior t1, ior cea 1, ior egf/r3, ior c5, h-R3, 14F7 and rituximab) with radioactive isotopes was a basic line of research in Cuba and has fostered their use as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The studies conducted demonstrated the good sensitivity and diagnostic precision of immunoscintigraphy for detecting various types of tumors (head and neck, ovarian, colon, breast, lymphoma, brain). Obtaining different radioimmune conjugates with radioactive isotopes such as 99mTc and 188Re made it possible to administer radioimmunotherapy to patients with several types of cancer (brain, lymphoma, breast). The objective of 60% of the clinical trials was to determine pharmacokinetics, internal dosimetry and adverse effects of monoclonal antibodies, as well as tumor response; there were few adverse effects, no damage to vital organs, and a positive

  3. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  4. B cell Rab7 mediates induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and class-switching in T-dependent and T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yuhui; Liu, Dongfang; Edinger, Aimee L; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the maturation of the Ab response because it diversifies Ab effector functions. Like somatic hypermutation, CSR requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), whose expression is restricted to B cells, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR-BCR engagement (primary CSR-inducing stimuli). By constructing conditional knockout Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice, we identified a B cell-intrinsic role for Rab7, a small GTPase involved in intracellular membrane functions, in mediating AID induction and CSR. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice displayed normal B and T cell development and were deficient in Rab7 only in B cells undergoing Igh(C)γ(1-cre) Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1-cre transcription, as induced--like Igh germline Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1 and Iε-Sε-Cε transcription--by IL-4 in conjunction with a primary CSR-inducing stimulus. These mice could not mount T-independent or T-dependent class-switched IgG1 or IgE responses while maintaining normal IgM levels. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells showed, in vivo and in vitro, normal proliferation and survival, normal Blimp-1 expression and plasma cell differentiation, as well as intact activation of the noncanonical NF-κB, p38 kinase, and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. They, however, were defective in AID expression and CSR in vivo and in vitro, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR1/2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, or TLR9-BCR engagement. In Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells, CSR was rescued by enforced AID expression. These findings, together with our demonstration that Rab7-mediated canonical NF-κB activation, as critical to AID induction, outline a novel role of Rab7 in signaling pathways that lead to AID expression and CSR, likely by promoting assembly of signaling complexes along intracellular membranes.

  5. CSL311, a novel, potent, therapeutic monoclonal antibody for the treatment of diseases mediated by the common β chain of the IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Panousis, Con; Dhagat, Urmi; Edwards, Kirsten M.; Rayzman, Veronika; Hardy, Matthew P.; Braley, Hal; Gauvreau, Gail M.; Hercus, Timothy R.; Smith, Steven; Sehmi, Roma; McMillan, Laura; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J.; Fabri, Louis J.; Vairo, Gino; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W.; Nash, Andrew D.; Wilson, Nicholas J.; Wilson, Michael J.; Owczarek, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The β common-signaling cytokines interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-5 stimulate pro-inflammatory activities of haematopoietic cells via a receptor complex incorporating cytokine-specific α and shared β common (βc, CD131) receptor. Evidence from animal models and recent clinical trials demonstrate that these cytokines are critical mediators of the pathogenesis of inflammatory airway disease such as asthma. However, no therapeutic agents, other than steroids, that specifically and effectively target inflammation mediated by all 3 of these cytokines exist. We employed phage display technology to identify and optimize a novel, human monoclonal antibody (CSL311) that binds to a unique epitope that is specific to the cytokine-binding site of the human βc receptor. The binding epitope of CSL311 on the βc receptor was defined by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis. CSL311 has picomolar binding affinity for the human βc receptor, and at therapeutic concentrations is a highly potent antagonist of the combined activities of IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 on primary eosinophil survival in vitro. Importantly, CSL311 inhibited the survival of inflammatory cells present in induced sputum from human allergic asthmatic subjects undergoing allergen bronchoprovocation. Due to its high potency and ability to simultaneously suppress the activity of all 3 β common cytokines, CSL311 may provide a new strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases where the human βc receptor is central to pathogenesis. The coordinates for the βc/CSL311 Fab complex structure have been deposited with the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB 5DWU). PMID:26651396

  6. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  7. Characterization of diverse subvariants of the meningococcal factor H (fH) binding protein for their ability to bind fH, to mediate serum resistance, and to induce bactericidal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seib, Kate L; Brunelli, Brunella; Brogioni, Barbara; Palumbo, Emmanuelle; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; DiMarcello, Federica; Marchi, Sara; van der Ende, Arie; Aricó, Beatrice; Savino, Silvana; Scarselli, Maria; Comanducci, Maurizio; Rappuoli, Rino; Giuliani, Marzia M; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2011-02-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a commensal of the human nasopharynx but is also a major cause of septicemia and meningitis. The meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) binds human factor H (fH), enabling downregulation of complement activation on the bacterial surface. fHbp is a component of two serogroup B meningococcal vaccines currently in clinical development. Here we characterize 12 fHbp subvariants for their level of surface exposure and ability to bind fH, to mediate serum resistance, and to induce bactericidal antibodies. Flow cytometry and Western analysis revealed that all strains examined expressed fHbp on their surface to different extents and bound fH in an fHbp-dependent manner. However, differences in fH binding did not always correlate with the level of fHbp expression, indicating that this is not the only factor affecting the amount of fH bound. To overcome the issue of strain variability in fHbp expression, the MC58ΔfHbp strain was genetically engineered to express different subvariants from a constitutive heterologous promoter. These recombinant strains were characterized for fH binding, and the data confirmed that each subvariant binds different levels of fH. Surface plasmon resonance revealed differences in the stability of the fHbp-fH complexes that ranged over 2 orders of magnitude, indicating that differences in residues between and within variant groups can influence fH binding. Interestingly, the level of survival in human sera of recombinant MC58 strains expressing diverse subvariants did not correlate with the level of fH binding, suggesting that the interaction of fHbp with fH is not the only function of fHbp that influences serum resistance. Furthermore, cross-reactive bactericidal activity was seen within each variant group, although the degree of activity varied, suggesting that amino acid differences within each variant group influence the bactericidal antibody response.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  9. Analyzing antibody-Fc-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk; Ravetch, Jeffrey V

    2008-01-01

    Cellular receptors for immunoglobulins (Fc-receptors; FcR) are central mediators of antibody-triggered effector functions. Immune complex (IC) binding to FcRs results in a variety of reactions such as the release of inflammatory mediators, antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis of ICs. Analyzing antibody-FcR (Ab-FcR) interactions in vitro is essential to determine the effector mechanisms, binding characteristics and affinity parameters that will impact and predict antibody activity in vivo. The methods described in this chapter include the generation of ICs and soluble FcR variants, as well as ELISA and FACS-based assays to study Ab-FcR interactions.

  10. Dual targeting strategies with bispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammatory and infectious diseases and other disorders. Most of the marketed antibodies are monospecific and therefore capable of interacting and interfering with a single target. However, complex diseases are often multifactorial in nature, and involve redundant or synergistic action of disease mediators or upregulation of different receptors, including crosstalk between their signaling networks. Consequently, blockade of multiple, different pathological factors and pathways may result in improved therapeutic efficacy. This result can be achieved by combining different drugs, or use of the dual targeting strategies applying bispecific antibodies that have emerged as an alternative to combination therapy. This review discusses the various dual targeting strategies for which bispecific antibodies have been developed and provides an overview of the established bispecific antibody formats. PMID:22453100

  11. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  12. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  13. Neuropeptide-mediated regulation of hapten-specific IgE responses in mice. I. Substance P-mediated isotype-specific suppression of BPO-specific IgE antibody-forming cell responses induced in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Carucci, J A; Auci, D L; Herrick, C A; Durkin, H G

    1995-01-01

    The ability of substance P (SP) to regulate peak benzyl-penicilloyl (BPO)-specific IgE antibody-forming cell (AFC) responses in vivo and the ability of SP and other neuropeptides to regulate BPO-specific memory IgE AFC responses induced in vitro was determined. SP injected subcutaneously into BPO-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (BPO-KLH)-sensitized mice at the time of peak IgE responses suppressed these responses within 48 h (> 90%). The suppression obtained was IgE isotype-specific, dose-dependent, and transient. When spleen cells from immunized mice were cultured for 5 days with BPO-KLH, peak memory IgE AFC responses were induced in vitro. Inclusion of either SP or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), but not neurotensin, serotonin, somatostatin, or gastrin, in cultures suppressed these responses in isotype-specific, dose-dependent fashion (approximately 70%). SP-, but not VIP-mediated suppression of IgE responses was abrogated by inclusion of anti-IFN gamma culture.

  14. Engineered antibody Fc variants with enhanced effector function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Greg A.; Dang, Wei; Karki, Sher; Vafa, Omid; Peng, Judy S.; Hyun, Linus; Chan, Cheryl; Chung, Helen S.; Eivazi, Araz; Yoder, Sean C.; Vielmetter, Jost; Carmichael, David F.; Hayes, Robert J.; Dahiyat, Bassil I.

    2006-03-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, a key effector function for the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibodies, is mediated primarily through a set of closely related Fc receptors with both activating and inhibitory activities. By using computational design algorithms and high-throughput screening, we have engineered a series of Fc variants with optimized Fc receptor affinity and specificity. The designed variants display >2 orders of magnitude enhancement of in vitro effector function, enable efficacy against cells expressing low levels of target antigen, and result in increased cytotoxicity in an in vivo preclinical model. Our engineered Fc regions offer a means for improving the next generation of therapeutic antibodies and have the potential to broaden the diversity of antigens that can be targeted for antibody-based tumor therapy. antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity | FcR | protein engineering | cancer

  15. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction. PMID:27438459

  16. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  17. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of 99mTc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor humanized monoclonal antibody R3 in rats.

    PubMed

    Iznaga Escobar, N; Morales, A M; Ducongé, J; Torres, I C; Fernández, E; Gómez, J A

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of 99mTc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-hEGF-r) humanized monoclonal antibody (MAb) R3 was investigated following intravenous injection in normal Wistar rats. Serum disappearance curves were best fit by a two-compartment model having a mean distribution half-life (t 1/2alpha) of 0.250 h and a mean elimination (t 1/2beta) of 13.89 h. Among the various organs, a little accumulation of the radiolabeled antibody was found only in kidneys. Biodistribution and dosimetry studies in humans were performed by extrapolation of the animal data to humans. Absorbed dose to normal organs and the remainder of the whole body were estimated using the medical internal radiation dose formula, and dose contributions from radioactivity in transit through the gastrointestinal tract were estimated using a compartment model. Extrapolated values of radiation absorbed dose to normal organs in rads per millicurie administered were whole body, 0.0085; lower large intestine wall, 0.0898; small intestine, 0.0530; upper large intestine wall, 0.0731; and kidneys, 0.0455. The effective dose equivalent predicted was 0.0162 rem/mCi and the effective dose was found to be 0.015 rem/mCi. On the basis of the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry information obtained in this study, a diagnostic phase I clinical trial with 99mTc-labeled humanized MAb R3 conjugate in patients should be supported.

  18. SUPPRESSION OF IDIOTYPIC SPECIFICITIES IN ADULT MICE BY ADMINISTRATION OF ANTIIDIOTYPIC ANTIBODY

    PubMed Central

    Hart, David A.; Wang, Ai-Lan; Pawlak, Laura L.; Nisonoff, Alfred

    1972-01-01

    It has previously been shown that there are extensive idiotypic cross-reactions among antiphenylarsonate antibodies of A/J mice. The present work indicates that administration, into normal, adult A/J mice, of rabbit antiidiotypic antibody directed to A/J antiphenylarsonate antibody suppresses almost completely the subsequent production of antibody of the corresponding idiotype. No effect was noted on the formation of antibodies to the protein carrier or of antiphenylarsonate antibody of a different idiotype. The data are consistent with central suppression of production of the idiotypic antibody mediated through interaction with immunoglobulin receptors on lymphocytes. PMID:4623607

  19. Cell-targeting antibodies in immunity to Ebola.

    PubMed

    Schmaljohn, Alan; Lewis, George K

    2016-06-01

    As the 2014-15 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa evolved from emergency to lesson, developers of both vaccines and therapeutic antibodies were left with the puzzlement of what kinds of anti-Ebola antibodies are predictably desirable in treating the afflicted, and what antibodies might account for the specific and lasting protection elicited by the more effective vaccines. The facile answer in virology is that neutralizing antibody (NAb) is desired and required. However, with Ebola and other filoviruses (as with many prior viral examples), there are multiple discordances in which neutralizing antibodies fail to protect animals, and others in which antibody-mediated protection is observed in the absence of measured virus neutralization. Explanation presumably resides in the protective role of antibodies that bind and functionally 'target' virus-infected cells, here called 'cell-targeting antibody', or CTAb. To be clear, many NAbs are also CTAbs, and in the case of Ebola the great majority of NAbs are likely CTAbs. Isotype, glycosylation, and other features of CTAbs are likely crucial in their capacity to mediate protection. Overall, results and analysis invite an increasingly complex view of antibody-mediated immunity to enveloped viruses. PMID:27005312

  20. Donor non-specific MICA antibodies in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sapák, Michal; Chreňová, Silvia; Tirpáková, Jana; Žilinská, Zuzana; Ďurmanová, Vladimíra; Shawkatová, Ivana; Jakuš, Vladimír; Kuba, Daniel; Buc, Milan

    2014-02-01

    Despite recent advances in solid organ transplantations, an antibody mediated rejection caused by donor specific antibodies is still a major problem in kidney graft survival. Besides HLA-induced humoral response, antibodies against MICA antigens have recently attracted attention because of their possible role in graft rejection. The aim of our study was to establish whether renal recipients produce antibodies against MICA molecules due to the transplantation and if they are specific for MICA antigens of the donors. MICA antibody screening was performed in 124 kidney recipient sera. 22 sera, that were found to be MICA antibody positive, were further examined for MICA antibody profiles and compared with donor MICA alleles. The analysis of MICA antibody positive sera showed mostly more complex reactivity patterns. A significant fraction of patient sera (59%) reacted not only with the donor MICA antigens, but also with other MICA patterns. A match between antibody specificities and MICA antigens was observed in 41% of renal recipients only. On the other hand, as much as in 36% of recipient sera were detected antibodies against their own MICA molecules. We did not prove a complete correlation between the recipient MICA antibody specificities and MICA antigens of the donor. We assume that MICA antibody induction occurs not only due to the allogeneic stimulation itself but also due to other factors that need to be elucidated.

  1. Anti-Sulfoglucuronosyl Paragloboside Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongpei; Usuki, Seigo; Quarles, Brandy; Rivner, Michael H.; Ariga, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Although the etiology of ALS is obscure, genetic studies of familiar ALS suggest a multifactorial etiology for this condition. Similarly, there probably are multiple causes for sporadic ALS. Autoimmune-mediated motor neuron dysfunction is one proposed etiology for sporadic ALS. In the present study, anti-glycolipid antibodies including GM1, GD1b, GD3, and sulfoglucuronosyl paragloboside (SGPG) were investigated in the sera of a large number of patient samples, including 113 ALS patients and 50 healthy controls, by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with affinity parametric complex criterion evaluation and thin-layer chromatography immunooverlay (immuno-TLC). Anti-SGPG antibodies were found in the sera of 13.3% ALS patients (15 out of 113). The highest titer reached 1:1600. The presence of anti-SGPG antibodies in the serum samples was also confirmed by immuno-TLC. Importantly, a multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of anti-SGPG antibody was positively correlated with age (p < .01) and negatively correlated with ALS Functional Rating Scale score (p < .05). Moreover, the localization of SGPG-immunoreactivity on the motor neurons of rat spinal cord and a mouse motor neuronal cell line, NSC-34 was observed by an immunofluorescence method. These data suggest that SGPG could represent a specific pathogenic antigen in those ALS patients. The presence of anti-SGPG antibodies in the serum of ALS patients should represent a diagnostic biomarker of ALS, and it could reflect the severity of the disease. PMID:27683876

  2. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  3. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah; O'Kennedy, Richard J

    2016-06-30

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  4. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  5. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page ... Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content ...

  6. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  7. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  8. Cell-targeting antibodies in immunity to Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Schmaljohn, Alan; Lewis, George K.

    2016-01-01

    As the 2014–15 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa evolved from emergency to lesson, developers of both vaccines and therapeutic antibodies were left with the puzzlement of what kinds of anti-Ebola antibodies are predictably desirable in treating the afflicted, and what antibodies might account for the specific and lasting protection elicited by the more effective vaccines. The facile answer in virology is that neutralizing antibody (NAb) is desired and required. However, with Ebola and other filoviruses (as with many prior viral examples), there are multiple discordances in which neutralizing antibodies fail to protect animals, and others in which antibody-mediated protection is observed in the absence of measured virus neutralization. Explanation presumably resides in the protective role of antibodies that bind and functionally ‘target’ virus-infected cells, here called ‘cell-targeting antibody’, or CTAb. To be clear, many NAbs are also CTAbs, and in the case of Ebola the great majority of NAbs are likely CTAbs. Isotype, glycosylation, and other features of CTAbs are likely crucial in their capacity to mediate protection. Overall, results and analysis invite an increasingly complex view of antibody-mediated immunity to enveloped viruses. PMID:27005312

  9. The Role of Complement in Antibody Therapy for Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wibroe, Peter P; Helvig, Shen Y; Moein Moghimi, S

    2014-04-01

    The complement system is part of the innate immune system, eliciting central immunoregulatory functions. Detection of foreign surfaces is either achieved through complement-specific patternrecognition molecules or mediated by antigen recognition of antibodies. Immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgG, and IgM all have the potential to initiate a complement response, with the efficiency and response development closely related to the antibody isotype, multimeric state, and degree of glycosylation. A group of serum proteins constitutes the central effector functions of complement, thus allowing direct cell lysis, opsonization, and inflammation. These effector functions can be used in antibody therapies, especially against infectious diseases, as the target membranes lack complement regulatory proteins. The relative contribution of each function and the interplay with direct antibody-mediated clearance is not fully exploited, thus suggesting an option for further rational optimization of antibody therapies.

  10. Distinct Therapeutic Mechanisms of Tau Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristen E.; Mirbaha, Hilda; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of Tau amyloids, and include Alzheimer disease and certain frontotemporal dementias. Trans-neuronal propagation of amyloid mediated by extracellular Tau may underlie disease progression. Consistent with this, active and passive vaccination studies in mouse models reduce pathology, although by unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that intracerebroventricular administration of three anti-Tau monoclonal antibodies (HJ8.5, HJ9.3, and HJ9.4) reduces pathology in a model overexpressing full-length mutant (P301S) human Tau. We now study effects of these three antibodies and a negative control antibody (HJ3.4) on Tau aggregate uptake into BV2 microglial-like cells and primary neurons. Antibody-independent Tau uptake into BV2 cells was blocked by heparin, consistent with a previously described role for heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Two therapeutic antibodies (HJ8.5 and HJ9.4) promoted uptake of full-length Tau fibrils into microglia via Fc receptors. Surprisingly, HJ9.3 promoted uptake of fibrils composed of the Tau repeat domain or Alzheimer disease-derived Tau aggregates, but failed to influence full-length recombinant Tau fibrils. Size fractionation of aggregates showed that antibodies preferentially promote uptake of larger oligomers (n ≥∼20-mer) versus smaller oligomers (n ∼10-mer) or monomer. No antibody inhibited uptake of full-length recombinant fibrils into primary neurons, but HJ9.3 blocked neuronal uptake of Tau repeat domain fibrils and Alzheimer disease-derived Tau. Antibodies thus have multiple potential mechanisms, including clearance via microglia and blockade of neuronal uptake. However these effects are epitope- and aggregate size-dependent. Establishing specific mechanisms of antibody activity in vitro may help in design and optimization of agents that are more effective in vivo. PMID:26126828

  11. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  12. Advances in Antibody Design.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Kathryn E; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics requires optimizing several of their key attributes. These include binding affinity and specificity, folding stability, solubility, pharmacokinetics, effector functions, and compatibility with the attachment of additional antibody domains (bispecific antibodies) and cytotoxic drugs (antibody-drug conjugates). Addressing these and other challenges requires the use of systematic design methods that complement powerful immunization and in vitro screening methods. We review advances in designing the binding loops, scaffolds, domain interfaces, constant regions, post-translational and chemical modifications, and bispecific architectures of antibodies and fragments thereof to improve their bioactivity. We also highlight unmet challenges in antibody design that must be overcome to generate potent antibody therapeutics. PMID:26274600

  13. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  14. Maternal antibody-mediated dyslexia? Evidence for a pathogenic serum factor in a mother of two dyslexic children shown by transfer to mice using behavioural studies and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Angela; Deacon, Robert; Dalton, Paola; Salmond, Claire; Blamire, Andrew M; Pendlebury, Sarah; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Rajogopalan, Bheeshma; Styles, Peter; Stein, John

    2002-09-01

    The causes of dyslexia are unknown, but previous studies have suggested an immunological basis in some cases. We hypothesised that maternal antibodies, which cross the placenta and bind to fetal antigens, could be responsible, particularly when the dyslexia recurs in consecutive pregnancies. We injected serum samples from five mothers of two or more children with dyslexia into pregnant mice, and tested the offspring for behavioural abnormalities and cerebellar metabolites by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Mice exposed in utero to serum factors from one woman with two dyslexic children, who had also had three spontaneous fetal losses, showed deficits in motor tests which correlated with cerebellar choline (Cho) and creatine (Cr) levels. These preliminary results are consistent with a role for maternal serum factors, probably antibodies, in causing some of the features of dyslexia, and possibly in other neurodevelopmental disorders.

  15. Identification of antibody glycosylation structures that predict monoclonal antibody Fc-effector function

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Amy W.; Crispin, Max; Pritchard, Laura; Robinson, Hannah; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Yu, Xiaojie; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Scanlan, Chris; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Alter, Galit

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine monoclonal antibody (mAb) features that predict fragment crystalizable (Fc)-mediated effector functions against HIV. Design Monoclonal antibodies, derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells or Epstein–Barr virus-immortalized mouse heteromyelomas, with specificity to key regions of the HIV envelope including gp120-V2, gp120-V3 loop, gp120-CD4+ binding site, and gp41-specific antibodies, were functionally profiled to determine the relative contribution of the variable and constant domain features of the antibodies in driving robust Fc-effector functions. Methods Each mAb was assayed for antibody-binding affinity to gp140SF162, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and for the ability to bind to FcgRIIa, FcgRIIb and FcgRIIIa receptors. Antibody glycan profiles were determined by HPLC. Results Neither the specificity nor the affinity of the mAbs determined the potency of Fc-effector function. FcgRIIIa binding strongly predicted ADCC and decreased galactose content inversely correlated with ADCP, whereas N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing structures exhibited enhanced ADCP. Additionally, the bi-antenary glycan arm onto which galactose was added predicted enhanced binding to FcgRIIIa and ADCC activity, independent of the specificity of the mAb. Conclusions Our studies point to the specific Fc-glycan structures that can selectively promote Fc-effector functions independently of the antibody specificity. Furthermore, we demonstrated antibody glycan structures associated with enhanced ADCP activity, an emerging Fc-effector function that may aid in the control and clearance of HIV infection. PMID:25160934

  16. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies. PMID:25048123

  17. Antibodies to prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, M L

    2012-06-01

    Research on antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and the thrombotic manifestations associated with these antibodies has grown since the description of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) by Harris and colleagues in the early 1980s. Antiprothrombin (aPT) antibodies are commonly detected by ELISA, using irradiated plates (aPT) or prothrombin in complex with phosphatidylserine (aPS/PT). Although aPT and/or aPS/PT are associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) -related clinical features and these antibodies correlate with each other, aPT and aPS/PT belong to different populations of autoantibodies even though they can both be present in the same patient. Early studies suggested that these antibodies might be the antigenic target of lupus anticoagulant (LA) and their correlation and clinical significance is being investigated. PMID:22635215

  18. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  19. Antibodies to cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, G M; Gentry, M K; Amende, L M; Blanchette-Mackie, E J; Alving, C R

    1988-01-01

    Cholesterol-dependent complement activation has been proposed as a factor that might influence the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Although antibodies to cholesterol conjugates have been reported, cholesterol is widely regarded as a poorly immunogenic substance. Monoclonal IgM complement-fixing antibodies to cholesterol were obtained in the present study after immunizing mice with liposomes containing high amounts of cholesterol (71 mol % relative to phosphatidylcholine) and lipid A as an adjuvant. Clones were selected for the ability of secreted antibodies to react with liposomes containing 71% cholesterol but not with liposomes containing 43% cholesterol. The antibodies also reacted with crystalline cholesterol in a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to the surface of crystalline cholesterol was demonstrated by electron microscopy by utilizing a second antibody (anti-IgM) labeled with colloidal gold. The immunization period required to induce monoclonal antibodies was very short (3 days) and a high fraction of the hybrid cells (at least 70%) were secreting detectable antibodies to cholesterol. The results demonstrate that cholesterol can be a highly immunogenic molecule and that complement-fixing antibodies to cholesterol can be readily obtained. Images PMID:3162316

  20. An immunosuppressive antibody-drug conjugate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongsheng E; Liu, Tao; Wang, Ying; Cao, Yu; Du, Jintang; Luo, Xiaozhou; Deshmukh, Vishal; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Lawson, Brian R; Tremblay, Matthew S; Young, Travis S; Kazane, Stephanie A; Wang, Feng; Schultz, Peter G

    2015-03-11

    We have developed a novel antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that can selectively deliver the Lck inhibitor dasatinib to human T lymphocytes. This ADC is based on a humanized antibody that selectively binds with high affinity to CXCR4, an antigen that is selectively expressed on hematopoietic cells. The resulting dasatinib-antibody conjugate suppresses T-cell-receptor (TCR)-mediated T-cell activation and cytokine expression with low nM EC50 and has minimal effects on cell viability. This ADC may lead to a new class of selective immunosuppressive drugs with improved safety and extend the ADC strategy to the targeted delivery of kinase inhibitors for indications beyond oncology.

  1. Role for antibodies in altering behavior and movement.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Fujinami, Robert S

    2010-08-01

    At the past meeting of INSAR, the role of autoimmunity was discussed in an educational session. This article summarizes this discussion. In immune-mediated diseases, antibodies can contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease and are sometimes the force that drives the disease process. This concept has not been established for autism. In autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antibodies are found to react with double-stranded DNA. These antibodies also cross-react with N-methyl-D aspartate receptors. Many SLE patients suffer neurologic syndromes of the central nervous system (CNS). Similarly individuals infected with Group A streptococcus (GAS) have antibodies against the GAS carbohydrate, which cross-react with tubulin and lysoganglioside GM1 on neurons. During the acute stage of infection, GAS-infected patients develop Syndenham chorea where the disease process is driven in part by these cross-reactive antibodies. As the antibody levels decrease, the clinical features of Syndenham chorea resolve. In these two immune-mediated diseases, antibodies clearly play a role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. There are reports that mothers of individuals with autism have antibodies that react with brain proteins and when these antibodies are passively transferred to pregnant non-human primates or rodents the offspring has behavioral and nervous system changes. It is still not clear whether the antibodies found in mothers of individuals with autism actually play a role in the disease. More studies need to be performed to identify the proteins recognized by the antibodies and to determine how these could affect development, behavior and changes within the CNS. PMID:20589715

  2. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  3. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  4. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  5. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  6. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  7. Engineered antibody Fc variants with enhanced effector function

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Greg A.; Dang, Wei; Karki, Sher; Vafa, Omid; Peng, Judy S.; Hyun, Linus; Chan, Cheryl; Chung, Helen S.; Eivazi, Araz; Yoder, Sean C.; Vielmetter, Jost; Carmichael, David F.; Hayes, Robert J.; Dahiyat, Bassil I.

    2006-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, a key effector function for the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibodies, is mediated primarily through a set of closely related Fcγ receptors with both activating and inhibitory activities. By using computational design algorithms and high-throughput screening, we have engineered a series of Fc variants with optimized Fcγ receptor affinity and specificity. The designed variants display >2 orders of magnitude enhancement of in vitro effector function, enable efficacy against cells expressing low levels of target antigen, and result in increased cytotoxicity in an in vivo preclinical model. Our engineered Fc regions offer a means for improving the next generation of therapeutic antibodies and have the potential to broaden the diversity of antigens that can be targeted for antibody-based tumor therapy. PMID:16537476

  8. Engineered antibody Fc variants with enhanced effector function.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Greg A; Dang, Wei; Karki, Sher; Vafa, Omid; Peng, Judy S; Hyun, Linus; Chan, Cheryl; Chung, Helen S; Eivazi, Araz; Yoder, Sean C; Vielmetter, Jost; Carmichael, David F; Hayes, Robert J; Dahiyat, Bassil I

    2006-03-14

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, a key effector function for the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibodies, is mediated primarily through a set of closely related Fcgamma receptors with both activating and inhibitory activities. By using computational design algorithms and high-throughput screening, we have engineered a series of Fc variants with optimized Fcgamma receptor affinity and specificity. The designed variants display >2 orders of magnitude enhancement of in vitro effector function, enable efficacy against cells expressing low levels of target antigen, and result in increased cytotoxicity in an in vivo preclinical model. Our engineered Fc regions offer a means for improving the next generation of therapeutic antibodies and have the potential to broaden the diversity of antigens that can be targeted for antibody-based tumor therapy.

  9. Affinity Purification of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M; McGarvey, Jeffery A

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that include antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant, or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facilitate assay reproducibility, economy, and reduced interference of nonspecific components as well as improved storage, stability, and bio-conjugation. Although not always necessary, the relative simplicity of antibody purification using commercially available protein-A, protein-G, or protein-L resins with basic chromatographic principles warrants purification when antibody source material is available in sufficient quantity. Here, we define three simple methods using immobilized (1) protein-A, (2) protein-G, and (3) protein-L agarose beads to yield highly purified antibody. PMID:26160561

  10. Mucosal priming of newborn mice with S. Typhi Ty21a expressing anthrax protective antigen (PA) followed by parenteral PA-boost induces B and T cell-mediated immunity that protects against infection bypassing maternal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Karina; Ditamo, Yanina; Galen, James E.; Baillie, Les W. J.; Pasetti, Marcela F.

    2010-01-01

    The currently licensed anthrax vaccine has several limitations and its efficacy has been proven only in adults. Effective immunization of newborns and infants requires adequate stimulation of their immune system, which is competent but not fully activated. We explored the use of the licensed live attenuated S. Typhi vaccine strain Ty21a expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen [Ty21a(PA)] followed PA-alum as a strategy for immunizing the pediatric population. Newborn mice primed with a single dose of Ty21a(PA) exhibited high frequencies of mucosal IgA-secreting B cells and IFN-γ-secreting T cells during the neonatal period, none of which was detected in newborns immunized with a single dose of PA-alum. Priming with Ty21a(PA) followed by PA-boost resulted in high levels of PA-specific IgG, toxin-neutralizing and opsonophagocytic antibodies and increased frequency of bone marrow IgG plasma cells and memory B cells compared with repeated immunization with PA-alum alone. Robust B and T cell responses developed even in the presence of maternal antibodies. The prime-boost protected against systemic and respiratory infection. Mucosal priming with a safe and effective S. Typhi-based anthrax vaccine followed by PA-boost could serve as a practical and effective prophylactic approach to prevent anthrax early in life. PMID:20619377

  11. Neutralization of HIV by Milk Expressed Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaocong; Pollock, Daniel; Duval, Mark; Lewis, Christopher; Joseph, Kristin; Meade, Harry; Cavacini, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Background In some areas of the world mother-to-child transmission of HIV remains a significant problem in part due to widespread breastfeeding which is essential due to scarce supply of a safe replacement, protection conferred by breast milk against many enteric illnesses, and cultural norms. We propose that sustained, adequate levels of protective antibodies in breast milk will prevent transmission of HIV. Methods The HIV neutralizing human monoclonal antibody b12 (IgG1) has been expressed as an IgA2 in CHO cells and shown to retain full immunoreactivity and neutralizing activity as the parental IgG1. The expression plasmids containing the b12 heavy and light chains were also used to construct milk specific expression vectors using the GTC goat β-casein expression vector to direct expression of linked genes to the mammary gland with subsequent secretion into the milk. Female transgenic mice were generated and following parturition, their milk was tested for antibody immunoreactivity with gp120 and neutralization of HIV. Results When compared to CHO derived b12 IgA2 (or IgG1), immunoreactivity was retained. When tested for neutralization, milk derived b12 IgA2 was at least comparable to CHO derived antibody and in some cases superior to CHO derived antibody. Furthermore, milk that expressed b12 IgA2 was significantly more effective at mediating antibody dependent cell killing. Conclusions These results suggest it is possible to achieve functional HIV-specific mAb in the milk of transgenic mice and further investigations are warranted to explore ways for inducing this type of antibody response in the breast milk of HIV infected women. PMID:23269241

  12. Clinically relevant interpretation of solid phase assays for HLA antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bettinotti, Maria P.; Zachary, Andrea A.; Leffell, Mary S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Accurate and timely detection and characterization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies are critical for pre-transplant and post-transplant immunological risk assessment. Solid phase immunoassays have provided increased sensitivity and specificity, but test interpretation is not always straightforward. This review will discuss the result interpretation considering technical limitations; assessment of relative antibody strength; and the integration of data for risk stratification from complementary testing and the patient's immunological history. Recent findings Laboratory and clinical studies have provided insight into causes of test failures – false positive reactions because of antibodies to denatured HLA antigens and false negative reactions resulting from test interference and/or loss of native epitopes. Test modifications permit detection of complement-binding antibodies and determination of the IgG subclasses. The high degree of specificity of single antigen solid phase immunoassays has revealed the complexity and clinical relevance of antibodies to HLA-C, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DP antigens. Determination of antibody specificity for HLA epitopes enables identification of incompatible antigens not included in test kits. Summary Detection and characterization of HLA antibodies with solid phase immunoassays has led to increased understanding of the role of those antibodies in graft rejection, improved treatment of antibody-mediated rejection, and increased opportunities for transplantation. However, realization of these benefits requires careful and accurate interpretation of test results. PMID:27200498

  13. The importance of non-HLA antibodies in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuheng; Reed, Elaine F

    2016-08-01

    The development of post-transplantation antibodies against non-HLA autoantigens is associated with rejection and decreased long-term graft survival. Although our knowledge of non-HLA antibodies is incomplete, compelling experimental and clinical findings demonstrate that antibodies directed against autoantigens such as angiotensin type 1 receptor, perlecan and collagen, contribute to the process of antibody-mediated acute and chronic rejection. The mechanisms that underlie the production of autoantibodies in the setting of organ transplantation is an important area of ongoing investigation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury, surgical trauma and/or alloimmune responses can result in the release of organ-derived autoantigens (such as soluble antigens, extracellular vesicles or apoptotic bodies) that are presented to B cells in the context of the transplant recipient's antigen presenting cells and stimulate autoantibody production. Type 17 T helper cells orchestrate autoantibody production by supporting the proliferation and maturation of autoreactive B cells within ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Conversely, autoantibody-mediated graft damage can trigger alloimmunity and the development of donor-specific HLA antibodies that can act in synergy to promote allograft rejection. Identification of the immunologic phenotypes of transplant recipients at risk of non-HLA antibody-mediated rejection, and the development of targeted therapies to treat such rejection, are sorely needed to improve both graft and patient survival. PMID:27345243

  14. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  15. [A spectrum of neurological diseases with anti-VGKC antibody].

    PubMed

    Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nagado, Tatsui

    2007-11-01

    Anti-VGKC antibody causing peripheral nerve hyperexcitability is already an established clinical entity. Recently, many patients with non-herpetic limbic encephalitis (NHLE) with anti-VGKC antibody have been reported. The characteristic clinical features are low serum Na+ concentration and good response to immunotherapy. Anti-VGK antibody positive NHLE is relatively frequent among immune-mediated NHLE. It is important to know that this disease is responsive to immunotherapy. Furthermore, anti-VGKC antibody is also positive in some intractable epilepsies. These findings suggest that anti-VGKC is correlated with hyperexcitability in both the peripheral and central nervous system and that the spectrum of anti-VGKC antibody syndrome is now expanding.

  16. Non-genetic inheritable potential of maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Hilmar; Hansen, Hinrich; Lange, Hans

    2003-07-28

    Maternal antibodies (IgG and IgA) not only provide passive protection against microbial infections, but also exert a variety of equally important active, idiotypically-mediated immunoregulatory functions. Since the generation of maternal antibodies depends entirely on the stimulation of the mother's immune system by external mainly thymus-dependent antigens, with long-lived antigen independent plasma cells in the bone marrow, maternal antibodies represent the mother's collective ontogenetic immunological experience. Although their stimulatory potential in mice is restricted to the neonatal imprinting period, maternal antibodies exert a life-long determinative influence which is even dominant over seemingly genetic predispositions. Therefore, the functional impact of maternal IgG antibodies appears phenotypically as a non-genetic inheritance.

  17. Generation of recombinant antibody fragments for membrane protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Mir, Syed H; Escher, Claudia; Kao, Wei-Chun; Birth, Dominic; Wirth, Christophe; Hunte, Carola

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are challenging targets for crystallization and structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Hurdles can be overcome by antibody-mediated crystallization. More than 25 unique structures of membrane protein:antibody complexes have already been determined. In the majority of cases, hybridoma-derived antibody fragments either in Fab or Fv fragment format were employed for these complexes. We will briefly introduce the background and current status of the strategy and describe in detail the current protocols of well-established methods for the immunization, the selection, and the characterization of antibodies, as well as the cloning, the production, and the purification of recombinant antibodies useful for structural analysis of membrane proteins.