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Sample records for egf-r antibodies mediate

  1. Radiolabeling and biological evaluation of DOTA-Ph-Al derivative conjugated to anti-EGFR antibody ior egf/r3 for targeted tumor imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Pnwar, Puja; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Mishra, Pushpa; Srivastava, Vibha; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Chandra, Ramesh; Mishra, Anil K

    2005-08-01

    An appropriate bifunctional chelating agent namely DOTA-Ph-Al was developed for the conjugation with biological vectors (anti EGFr antibody). We hereby report the synthesis of p-bromoacetamidobenzyl derivative of DOTA and its conjugation to monoclonal antibody anti-EGFR ior egf/r3. Immunoconjugate was prepared by conjugation of p-bromoacetamidobenzyl derivative of DOTA with ior egf/r3. Modified antibody was purified by size exclusion chromatography. DOTA-Ph-Al-ior egf/r3 exhibited quantitative 99mTc-labeling (>96%) with specific activity 10-20 mCi/mg of protein and 90Y-labeling with specific activity 2-5 mCi/mg. Immunoreactivity was determined by flow cytometry. Receptor ligand assay on murine cell line EAT and human tumor cell line U-87MG showed Kd = 2.87 nM and 4.86 nM respectively. The stability in serum indicated that 99mTc remained bound to antibodies up to 24h and 98% 90Y was associated with the mAb for five days. Biodistribution characteristics of Ab-conjugate radiolabeled to 99mTc and 90Y radionuclide was examined in BALB/c mice grafted with EAT and athymic mice with U-87MG cell line demonstrated high tumor uptake with 5.5 +/- 1.3 and 7.85 +/- 1.2%ID/g at four and 24 h for 99mTc- DOTA-Ph-AI-ior egf/r3 in EAT tumors after post injection respectively. Maximal radiotracer uptake peaked 17.6 +/- 2.5%ID/g in EAT tumor and 12.89 +/- 0.66% ID/g in U-87MG tumor at 48h for 90Y. The drug excreted through renal routes as the activity in the kidneys was 13.42 +/- 0.33%ID/g at 1 h and 4.51 +/- 1.2%ID/g at 4 h for 99mTc- DOTA-Ph-Al-ior egf/r3.

  2. Integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling and allometric scaling for optimizing the dosage regimen of the monoclonal ior EGF/r3 antibody.

    PubMed

    Duconge, Jorge; Castillo, Rubén; Crombet, Tania; Alvarez, Daniel; Matheu, Janet; Vecino, Gloria; Alonso, Katia; Beausoleil, Irene; Valenzuela, Carmen; Becquer, Maria A; Fernández-Sánchez, Eduardo

    2004-02-01

    The multiple-dose strategy with the monoclonal ior EGF/r3 antibody, in xenograft bearing nude mice, was supported upon the basis of its integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship, according to both the temporal (K(e0)=0.0015+/-0.000035h(-1)) and the time-independent sensitivity (C(50%)(ss), 9.23+/-0.17microg/ml; C(max,eff)(ss), 12.5microg/ml) components of its tumor growth delay action. This relationship was consistent with a sigmoidal E(max) pharmacodynamic model postulating a hypothetical effect compartment that permits us to estimate an effective steady-state concentration range (7.5-12microg/ml). Using this information we calculated both the cumulative and non-cumulative dosage regimens to compare their response patterns with respect to the control group. It follows that the differences in the estimated tumor growth inhibition ratio were statistically significant between the control group and either of the treated ones (P<0.05). The median survival time in treated mice under non-cumulative regimen (72+/-10 days), predicted an increase in this parameter as compared to the control one (55+/-6 days). Finally, using the allometric paradigm, the empiric power equation for dose scaling across mammalian species allowed the calculation of the dosage schedule for further clinical trial. The estimated maintenance dose in human (70kg) was 200mg/m(2) to be given weekly, and the corresponding loading dose was 600mg/m(2).

  3. Growth of hormone-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells is promoted by constitutive caveolin-1 whose expression is lost in an EGF-R-mediated manner during development of tamoxifen resistance.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nicholas B P; Hutcheson, Iain R; Campbell, Lee; Gee, Julia; Taylor, Kathryn M; Nicholson, Robert I; Gumbleton, Mark

    2010-02-01

    Caveolin-1 displays both tumour-suppressor and tumour-promoter properties in breast cancer. Using characterised preclinical cell models for the transition of oestrogen-sensitive (WT-MCF-7 cells) to a tamoxifen-resistant (TAM-R cells) phenotype we examined the role caveolin-1 in the development of hormone-resistant breast cancer. The WT-MCF-7 cells showed abundant expression of caveolin-1 which potentiated oestrogen-receptor (ERalpha) signalling and promoted cell growth despite caveolin-1 mediating inhibition of ERK signalling. In TAM-R cells caveolin-1 expression was negligible, repressed by EGF-R/ERK signalling. Pharmacological inhibition of EGFR/ERK in TAM-R cells restored caveolin-1 and also resulted in the emergence of pools of phosphorylated caveolin-1. WT-MCF-7 cells exposed to tamoxifen for upto 12 weeks displayed increased caveolin-1 (peaking by week 2) followed (after week 8) by a marked decrease as the cells progress to develop a stable tamoxifen-resistant phenotype. The targeted down-regulation (siRNA) of caveolin-1 in WT-MCF-7 cells reduced growth but did not affect their sensitivity to tamoxifen, suggesting loss of caveolin-1 alone is not sufficient to confer tamoxifen-resistance. Hyperactivation of EGFR/ERK is a feature of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells, a principal driver of cell growth. Recombinant expression of caveolin-1 in TAM-R cells did not affect EGFR/ERK activity, potentially due to mislocalisation of caveolin-1 through hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway or altered caveolin-1 phosphorylation. This work defines a novel role for caveolin-1 with implications for the clinical course of breast cancer and identifies caveolin-1 as a potential drug target for the treatment of early oestrogen-dependent breast cancers. Further, the loss of caveolin-1 may have benefit as a molecular signature for tamoxifen resistance.

  4. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  5. A screen for dominant mutations applied to components in the Drosophila EGF-R pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Annabel; Srinivasan, Shaila; Zimm, Georgianna; Bier, Ethan

    2002-01-01

    The Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) controls many critical cell fate choices throughout development. Several proteins collaborate to promote localized EGF-R activation, such as Star and Rhomboid (Rho), which act sequentially to ensure the maturation and processing of inactive membrane-bound EGF ligands. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying Rho and Star function, we developed a mutagenesis scheme to isolate novel overexpression activity (NOVA) alleles. In the case of rho, we isolated a dominant neomorphic allele, which interferes with Notch signaling, as well as a dominant-negative allele, which produces RNA interference-like flip-back transcripts that reduce endogenous rho expression. We also obtained dominant-negative and neomorphic Star mutations, which have phenotypes similar to those of rho NOVA alleles, as well as dominant-negative Egf-r alleles. The isolation of dominant alleles in several different genes suggests that NOVA mutagenesis should be widely applicable and emerge as an effective tool for generating dominant mutations in genes of unknown function. PMID:11904431

  6. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  7. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis.

  8. Antibody-mediated resistance against plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Safarnejad, Mohammad Reza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Tabatabaie, Meisam; Twyman, Richard M; Schillberg, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Plant diseases have a significant impact on the yield and quality of crops. Many strategies have been developed to combat plant diseases, including the transfer of resistance genes to crops by conventional breeding. However, resistance genes can only be introgressed from sexually-compatible species, so breeders need alternative measures to introduce resistance traits from more distant sources. In this context, genetic engineering provides an opportunity to exploit diverse and novel forms of resistance, e.g. the use of recombinant antibodies targeting plant pathogens. Native antibodies, as a part of the vertebrate adaptive immune system, can bind to foreign antigens and eliminate them from the body. The ectopic expression of antibodies in plants can also interfere with pathogen activity to confer disease resistance. With sufficient knowledge of the pathogen life cycle, it is possible to counter any disease by designing expression constructs so that pathogen-specific antibodies accumulate at high levels in appropriate sub-cellular compartments. Although first developed to tackle plant viruses and still used predominantly for this purpose, antibodies have been targeted against a diverse range of pathogens as well as proteins involved in plant-pathogen interactions. Here we comprehensively review the development and implementation of antibody-mediated disease resistance in plants.

  9. Neuronal Surface Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linnoila, Jenny J.; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, many autoimmune encephalitides have been identified, with specific clinical syndromes and associated antibodies against neuronal surface antigens. There is compelling evidence that many of these antibodies are pathogenic and most of these encephalitides are highly responsive to immunotherapies. The clinical spectra of some of these antibody-mediated syndromes, especially those reported in only a few patients, are evolving. Others, such as anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, are well characterized. Diagnosis involves recognizing the specific syndromes and identifying the antibody in a patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or serum. These syndromes are associated with variable abnormalities in CSF, magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalography. Treatment is often multidisciplinary and should be focused upon neutralizing the effects of antibodies and eliminating their source. Overlapping disorders have been noted, with some patients having more than one neurologic autoimmune disease. In other patients, viral infections such as herpes simplex virus encephalitis trigger robust antineuronal autoimmune responses. PMID:25369441

  10. Antibody-Mediated Rejection: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Jorge Carlos; Giusti, Sixto; Staffeld-Coit, Catherine; Bohorquez, Humberto; Cohen, Ari J.; Loss, George E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic antibody injury is a serious threat to allograft outcomes and is therefore the center of active research. In the continuum of allograft rejection, the development of antibodies plays a critical role. In recent years, an increased recognition of molecular and histologic changes has provided a better understanding of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), as well as potential therapeutic interventions. However, several pathways are still unknown, which accounts for the lack of efficacy of some of the currently available agents that are used to treat rejection. Methods: We review the current diagnostic criteria for AMR; AMR paradigms; and desensitization, treatment, and prevention strategies. Results: Chronic antibody-mediated endothelial injury results in transplant glomerulopathy, manifested as glomerular basement membrane duplication, double contouring, or splitting. Clinical manifestations of AMR include proteinuria and a rise in serum creatinine. Current strategies for the treatment of AMR include antibody depletion with plasmapheresis (PLEX), immunoadsorption (IA), immunomodulation with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and T cell– or B cell–depleting agents. Some treatment benefits have been found in using PLEX and IA, and some small nonrandomized trials have identified some benefits in using rituximab and the proteasome inhibitor-based therapy bortezomib. More recent histologic follow-ups of patients treated with bortezomib have not shown significant benefits in terms of allograft outcomes. Furthermore, no specific treatment approaches have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Other agents used for more difficult rejections include bortezomib and eculizumab (an anti-C5 monoclonal antibody). Conclusion: AMR is a fascinating field with ample opportunities for research and progress in the future. Despite the use of advanced techniques for the detection of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) or non-HLA donor-specific antibodies

  11. Tumor targeting using anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (ior egf/r3) immunoconjugate with a tetraaza macrocyclic agent (DO3A-EA).

    PubMed

    Mishra, Gauri; Panwar, Puja; Mishra, Anil K

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling inhibition represents a highly promising arena for the application of molecularly targeted cancer therapies. EGFR conjugated metal chelates have been proposed as potential imaging agents for cancers that overexpress EGFR receptors. Through improved understanding of EGFR biology in human cancers, there is anticipation that more tumor-selective therapy approaches with diminished collateral normal tissue toxicity can be advanced. We report here on the results with a thermodynamically stable chelate, 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl)-10-(2-aminoethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (DO3A-EA) and anti-EGFr (ior egf/r3) conjugate to develop immunospecific imaging agent. Conjugation and labelling with anti-EGFr was performed using standard procedure and subjected to purification on size exclusion chromatography. The conjugated antibodies were labeled with a specific activity 20-30 mCi/mg of protein. Labeling efficiencies were measured by ascending paper chromatography on ITLC-SG strips. Radiolabeling of the immunoconjugate was found to be 98.5 ± 0.30%. (99m)Tc-DO3A-EA-EGFr conjugate was studied in athymic mice bearing U-87MG, MDA-MB-468 tumors following intravenous injection. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies confirmed long circulation times (t(1/2)(fast)  =  45 min and t1/2(slow)  = 4 hours 40 min) and efficient accumulation in tumors. Biodistribution studies in athymic mice grafted with U-87MG human glioblastoma multiforme and Hela human cervical carcinoma tumors revealed significant localization of (99m)Tc-labeled antibodies conjugate in tumors and reduced accumulation in normal organs. This new chelating agent is promising for immunoscintigraphy since good tumour-to-normal organ contrast could be demonstrated. These properties can be exploited for immunospecifc contrast agents in nuclear medicine and SPECT imaging.

  12. Pathogenesis and mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Willy A

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical consequences of antibodies to red blood cells (RBC) have been studied for a century. Most clinically relevant antibodies can be detected by sensitive in vitro assays. Several mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis are well understood. Such hemolysis following transfusion is reliably avoided in a donor/recipient pair, if one individual is negative for the cognate antigen to which the other has the antibody. Study design and results Mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis were reviewed based on a presentation at the Strategies to Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions Workshop addressing intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and ABO antibodies. The presented topics included the rates of intravascular and extravascular hemolysis; IgM and IgG isoagglutinins; auto- and alloantibodies; antibody specificity; A, B, A,B and A1 antigens; A1 versus A2 phenotypes; monocytes/macrophages, other immune cells and complement; monocyte monolayer assay (MMA); antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC); and transfusion reactions due to ABO and other antibodies. Conclusion Several clinically relevant questions remained unresolved, and diagnostic tools were lacking to routinely and reliably predict the clinical consequences of RBC antibodies. Most hemolytic transfusion reactions associated with IVIG were due to ABO antibodies. Reducing the titers of such antibodies in IVIG may lower the frequency of this kind of adverse event. The only way to stop these events is to have no anti-A or anti-B antibodies in the IVIG products. PMID:26174897

  13. Acute antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott; Cooper, James E

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has now been recognized as one of the most important causes of graft loss. Transplantation across HLA barriers and nonadherence can result in acute antibody-mediated rejection, which is associated with particularly worse graft outcomes. New technologies, including genomic studies and assays to detect and define donor-specific antibodies, have provided important insights into the pathophysiology and diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection but have engendered many questions about the clinical application of these tests in the prognosis and prevention of this protean disease process. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of acute antibody-mediated rejection, the evolving diagnostic criteria, and specific challenges related to its prognosis, treatment, and prevention.

  14. Mechanisms involved in antibody- and complement-mediated allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has become critical clinically because this form of rejection is usually unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, and therefore, it has been recognized as a major cause of allograft loss. Our group developed experimental animal models of vascularized organ transplantation to study pathogenesis of antibody- and complement-mediated endothelial cell injury leading to graft rejection. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft rejection resulting from activation of complement by C1q- and MBL (mannose-binding lectin)-dependent pathways and interactions with a variety of effector cells, including macrophages and monocytes through Fcγ receptors and complement receptors. PMID:20135240

  15. Not All Antibodies Are Created Equal: Factors That Influence Antibody Mediated Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Carrie L.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Thomas, Kimberly A.

    2017-01-01

    Consistent with Dr. Paul Terasaki's “humoral theory of rejection” numerous studies have shown that HLA antibodies can cause acute and chronic antibody mediated rejection (AMR) and decreased graft survival. New evidence also supports a role for antibodies to non-HLA antigens in AMR and allograft injury. Despite the remarkable efforts by leaders in the field who pioneered single antigen bead technology for detection of donor specific antibodies, a considerable amount of work is still needed to better define the antibody attributes that are associated with AMR pathology. This review highlights what is currently known about the clinical context of pre and posttransplant antibodies, antibody characteristics that influence AMR, and the paths after donor specific antibody production (no rejection, subclinical rejection, and clinical dysfunction with AMR). PMID:28373996

  16. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  17. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    PubMed

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  18. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the emerging field of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer as an alternative vaccine for infectious disease, with a specific focus on HIV. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV-1; the general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets like hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. This approach is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. With vector-mediated gene transfer, the antibody gene is delivered to the host, via a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector; this in turn results in long-term endogenous antibody expression from the injected muscle that confers protective immunity. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can rapidly move existing, potent broadly cross-neutralizing HIV-1-specific antibodies into the clinic. The gene transfer products demonstrate a potency and breadth identical to the original product. This strategy eliminates the need for immunogen design and interaction with the adaptive immune system to generate protection, a strategy that so far has shown limited promise.

  19. Antibody-mediated immunity against tuberculosis: implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Achkar, Jacqueline M; Casadevall, Arturo

    2013-03-13

    There is an urgent need for new and better vaccines against tuberculosis (TB). Current vaccine design strategies are generally focused on the enhancement of cell-mediated immunity. Antibody-based approaches are not being considered, mostly due to the paradigm that humoral immunity plays little role in the protection against intracellular pathogens. Here, we reappraise and update the increasing evidence for antibody-mediated immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, discuss the complexity of antibody responses to mycobacteria, and address mechanism of protection. Based on these findings and discussions, we challenge the common belief that immunity against M. tuberculosis relies solely on cellular defense mechanisms, and posit that induction of antibody-mediated immunity should be included in TB vaccine development strategies.

  20. Preformed donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies mediate acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jolly, E C; Key, T; Rasheed, H; Morgan, H; Butler, A; Pritchard, N; Taylor, C J; Clatworthy, M R

    2012-10-01

    Donor-specific HLA alloantibodies may cause acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and significantly compromise allograft survival. The clinical relevance of antibodies directed against some HLA class II antigens, particularly HLA-DP, is less clear with conflicting reports on their pathogenicity. We report two patients with high levels of pretransplant donor-specific HLA-DP antibodies who subsequently developed recurrent acute AMR and graft failure. In both cases, there were no other donor-specific HLA alloantibodies, suggesting that the HLA-DP-specific antibodies may be directly pathogenic.

  1. Antibody-Mediated Clearance of Alphavirus Infection from Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Beth; Hardwick, J. Marie; Trapp, Bruce D.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Bollinger, Robert C.; Griffin, Diane E.

    1991-11-01

    Humoral immunity is important for protection against viral infection and neutralization of extracellular virus, but clearance of virus from infected tissues is thought to be mediated solely by cellular immunity. However, in a SCID mouse model of persistent alphavirus encephalomyelitis, adoptive transfer of hyperimmune serum resulted in clearance of infectious virus and viral RNA from the nervous system, whereas adoptive transfer of sensitized T lymphocytes had no effect on viral replication. Three monoclonal antibodies to two different epitopes on the E2 envelope glycoprotein mediated viral clearance. Treatment of alphavirus-infected primary cultured rat neurons with these monoclonal antibodies to E2 resulted in decreased viral protein synthesis, followed by gradual termination of mature infectious virion production. Thus, antibody can mediate clearance of alphavirus infection from neurons by restricting viral gene expression.

  2. Antibody-mediated cofactor-driven reactions

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions capable of being rate-enhanced by auxiliary species which interact with the reactants but do not become chemically bound to them in the formation of the final product are performed in the presence of antibodies which promote the reactions. The antibodies contain regions within their antigen binding sites which recognize the auxiliary species in a conformation which promotes the reaction. The antigen binding site frequently recognizes a particular transition state complex or other high energy complex along the reaction coordinate, thereby promoting the progress of the reaction along the desired route as opposed to other less favorable routes. Various classes of reaction together with appropriate antigen binding site specificities tailored for each are disclosed.

  3. Platelets in Early Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Fan, Ran; Dvorina, Nina; Chiesa-Vottero, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is a major complication in renal transplantation. The pathologic manifestations of acute antibody-mediated rejection that has progressed to functional impairment of a renal transplant have been defined in clinical biopsy specimens. However, the initial stages of the process are difficult to resolve with the unavoidable variables of clinical studies. We devised a model of renal transplantation to elucidate the initial stages of humoral rejection. Kidneys were orthotopically allografted to immunodeficient mice. After perioperative inflammation subsided, donor-specific alloantibodies were passively transferred to the recipient. Within 1 hour after a single transfer of antibodies, C4d was deposited diffusely on capillaries, and von Willebrand factor released from endothelial cells coated intravascular platelet aggregates. Platelet-transported inflammatory mediators platelet factor 4 and serotonin accumulated in the graft at 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations compared with other platelet-transported chemokines. Activated platelets that expressed P-selectin attached to vascular endothelium and macrophages. These intragraft inflammatory changes were accompanied by evidence of acute endothelial injury. Repeated transfers of alloantibodies over 1 week sustained high levels of platelet factor 4 and serotonin. Platelet depletion decreased platelet mediators and altered the accumulation of macrophages. These data indicate that platelets augment early inflammation in response to donor-specific antibodies and that platelet-derived mediators may be markers of evolving alloantibody responses. PMID:25145937

  4. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  5. Late antibody-mediated rejection by de novo donor HLA-DP-specific antibody after renal transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cippà, Pietro E; Gaspert, Ariana; Etter, Christoph; Guenduez, Zehra; Ferrari-Lacraz, Sylvie; Rüsi, Barbara; Fehr, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The role of donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies after renal transplantation is controversial, and only preformed HLA-DP-specific antibodies have been shown to mediate rejection. Here we present a case of late humoral rejection mediated by de novo donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies in a non-sensitized recipient. This unique case demonstrates the pathogenic role of de novo anti-DP antibodies and suggests that HLA-DP matching might be relevant for renal transplantation.

  6. Antibody-mediated Hsp70 protein therapy.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James E; Sohn, William; Kim, Charles; Chang, Sophia S; Huang, Natalie C; Santos, Donaldson G; Chan, Grace; Weisbart, Richard H; Nishimura, Robert N

    2006-05-09

    Intracellular Hsp70 provides cytoprotection against a variety of stressful stimuli, and an effective means of increasing intracellular Hsp70 levels could prove beneficial in the prevention and treatment of a variety of human diseases. A novel protein transduction domain consisting of the single chain Fv fragment of an anti-DNA antibody known to penetrate into living cells and tissues, mAb 3E10, has recently been used to deliver functional proteins to cells. The ability of the single chain Fv fragment to deliver Hsp70 into living cells was tested by generating an Fv-Hsp70 fusion protein. Fv-Hsp70 was produced as a secreted protein in both COS-7 cells and the methylotropic yeast strain Pichia pastoris and was shown capable of penetrating into COS-7 cells and primary rat cortical neurons. Pre-treatment with Fv-Hsp70 protected both COS-7 cells and primary rat cortical neurons against subsequent exposure to hydrogen peroxide. These results provide the first evidence that the Fv fragment of mAb 3E10 is capable of delivering proteins to neurons and indicate its potential in the development of Hsp70 protein therapy.

  7. Antibody-mediated inhibition of ricin toxin retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Yermakova, Anastasiya; Klokk, Tove Irene; Cole, Richard; Sandvig, Kirsten; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-04-08

    Ricin is a member of the ubiquitous family of plant and bacterial AB toxins that gain entry into the cytosol of host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and retrograde traffic through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). While a few ricin toxin-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been identified, the mechanisms by which these antibodies prevent toxin-induced cell death are largely unknown. Using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and a TGN-specific sulfation assay, we demonstrate that 24B11, a MAb against ricin's binding subunit (RTB), associates with ricin in solution or when prebound to cell surfaces and then markedly enhances toxin uptake into host cells. Following endocytosis, however, toxin-antibody complexes failed to reach the TGN; instead, they were shunted to Rab7-positive late endosomes and LAMP-1-positive lysosomes. Monovalent 24B11 Fab fragments also interfered with toxin retrograde transport, indicating that neither cross-linking of membrane glycoproteins/glycolipids nor the recently identified intracellular Fc receptor is required to derail ricin en route to the TGN. Identification of the mechanism(s) by which antibodies like 24B11 neutralize ricin will advance our fundamental understanding of protein trafficking in mammalian cells and may lead to the discovery of new classes of toxin inhibitors and therapeutics for biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. IMPORTANCE Ricin is the prototypic member of the AB family of medically important plant and bacterial toxins that includes cholera and Shiga toxins. Ricin is also a category B biothreat agent. Despite ongoing efforts to develop vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics against ricin, very little is known about the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize this toxin. In general, it is thought that antibodies simply prevent toxins from attaching to cell surface receptors or promote their clearance through Fc receptor (FcR)-mediated uptake

  8. Molecular Communication Modeling of Antibody-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan; Koucheryavy, Yevgeni

    2015-07-01

    Antibody-mediated Drug Delivery Systems (ADDS) are emerging as one of the most encouraging therapeutic solutions for treating several diseases such as human cancers. ADDS use small molecules (antibodies) that propagate in the body and bind selectively to their corresponding receptors (antigens) expressed at the surface of the diseased cells. In this paper, the Molecular Communication (MC) paradigm, where information is conveyed through the concentration of molecules, is advocated for the engineering of ADDS and modeling their complex behavior, to provide a realistic model without the over-complication of system biology models, and the limitations of experimental approaches. The peculiarities of antibodies, including their anisotropic transport and complex electrochemical structure, are taken into account to develop an analytical model of the ADDS transport and antigen-binding kinetics. The end-to-end response of ADDS, from the drug injection to the drug absorption, is mathematically derived based on the geometry of the antibody molecule, the electrochemical structure of the antibody-antigen complex, and the physiology of the patient. The accuracy of the MC model is validated by finite-element (COMSOL) simulations. The implications of the complex interplay between the transport and kinetics parameters on the performance of ADDS are effectively captured by the proposed MC model. The MC model of ADDS will enable the discovery and optimization of drugs in a versatile, cost-efficient, and reliable manner.

  9. Aggregation of hapten-bearing liposomes mediated by specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lee, K D; Kantor, A B; Nir, S; Owicki, J C

    1993-03-01

    We studied specific membrane-membrane interactions mediated by ligand-receptor binding in a model system, which consisted of (a) FG3P, the fluorescein hapten attached to a phospholipid by a peptidyl spacer as described previously (Petrossian, A., A.B. Kantor, and J.C. Owicki. 1985. J. Lipid Res. 26:767-773), (b) antifluorescein monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), and (c) phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) into which the FG3P was incorporated. The aggregation of the hapten-bearing liposomes by four MAbs was studied by differential centrifugation. The ability of the MAbs to induce vesicle aggregation varied considerably and correlated inversely with affinity. Aggregation by one of the MAbs was studied in more detail by turbidimetry and freeze-fracture electron microscopy of samples frozen throughout the course of the aggregation. Rapid freezing was achieved with a double propane-jet apparatus. The aggregate morphologies and the time evolution of the aggregate size distribution were obtained from the two-dimensional fracture views with a stereological correction. The aggregation kinetics were simulated by considering dynamical aggregation according to a mass-action model with two parameters, the rate constants for antibody-mediated vesicle aggregation and disaggregation. Both rate constants were orders of magnitude lower than the rate constants for the corresponding interactions of antibodies with haptens either in solution or on vesicles under nonaggregating conditions.

  10. Acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pape, Lars; Becker, Jan U; Immenschuh, Stephan; Ahlenstiel, Thurid

    2015-03-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection is a diagnostic challenge in renal transplantation medicine. However, it is an important diagnosis to make, since chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) is the main cause of long-term graft loss. Antibody-mediated rejection is diagnosed by detecting donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) in the blood in combination with observing typical histomorphological signs in kidney biopsy, as described in the Banff classification. Therapy is based on the removal of DSAs by administering intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs), plasmapheresis, or immunoadsorption. Reoccurrence of antibodies is diminished by the use of rituximab, increased immunosuppression, and in some cases additional experimental substances. A combination of these techniques has been shown to be successful in the majority of cases of acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection. Routine DSA monitoring is warranted for early detection of antibody-mediated rejection.

  11. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Human Orthotopic Liver Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. Jake; Jaffe, Ron; Tzakis, A.; Ramsey, Glenn; Todo, S.; Belle, Steven; Esquivel, Carlos; Shapiro, Ron; Markus, Bernd; Mroczek, Elizabeth; Van Thiel, D. H.; Sysyn, Greg; Gordon, Robert; Makowka, Leonard; Starzl, Tom

    1988-01-01

    A clinicopathologic analysis of liver transplantation across major ABO blood group barriers was carried out 1) to determine if antibody-mediated (humoral) rejection was a cause of graft failure and if humoral rejection can be identified, 2) to propose criteria for establishing the diagnosis, and 3) to describe the clinical and pathologic features of humoral rejection. A total of 51 (24 primary) ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) liver grafts were transplanted into 49 recipients. There was a 46% graft failure rate during the first 30 days for primary ABO-I grafts compared with an 11% graft failure rate for primary ABO compatible (ABO-C), crossmatch negative, age, sex and priority-matched control patients (P < 0.02). A similarly high early graft failure rate (60%) was seen for nonprimary ABO-I grafts during the first 30 days. Clinically, the patients experienced a relentless rise in serum transaminases, hepatic failure, and coagulopathy during the first weeks after transplant. Pathologic examination of ABO-I grafts that failed early demonstrated widespread areas of geographic hemorrhagic necrosis with diffuse intraorgan coagulation. Prominent arterial deposition of antibody and complement components was demonstrated by immunoflourescent staining. Elution studies confirmed the presence of tissue-bound, donor-specific isoagglutinins within the grafts. No such deposition was seen in control cases. These studies confirm that antibody mediated rejection of the liver occurs and allows for the development of criteria for establishing the diagnosis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:3046369

  12. Identifying Subphenotypes of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Merino Lopez, M; Barreto Pereira, A

    2016-03-01

    The key lesions in antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection (ABMR) are microcirculation inflammation (peritubular capillaritis and/or glomerulitis lesions, abbreviated "pg") and glomerular double contours (cg lesions). We used these features to explore subphenotypes in 164 indication biopsies with ABMR-related diagnoses: 137 ABMR (109 pure and 28 mixed with T cell-mediated rejection [TCMR]) and 27 transplant glomerulopathy (TG), identified from prospective multicenter studies. The lesions indicated three ABMR subphenotypes: pgABMR, cgABMR, and pgcgABMR. Principal component analysis confirmed these subphenotypes and showed that TG can be reclassified as pgcgABMR (n = 17) or cgABMR (n = 10). ABMR-related biopsies included 45 pgABMR, 90 pgcgABMR, and 25 cgABMR, with four unclassifiable. Dominating all time intervals was the subphenotype pgcgABMR. The pgABMR subphenotype presented earliest (median <2 years), frequently mixed with TCMR, and was most associated with nonadherence. The cgABMR subphenotype presented late (median 9 years). Subphenotypes differed in their molecular changes, with pgABMR having the most histologic-molecular discrepancies (i.e. potential errors). Donor-specific antibody (DSA) was not identified in 29% of pgcgABMR and 46% of cgABMR, but failure rates and molecular findings were similar to cases where DSA was known to be positive. Thus, ABMR presents distinct subphenotypes, early pg-dominant, late cg-dominant, and combined pgcg phenotype, differing in time, molecular features, accompanying TCMR, HLA antibody, and probability of nonadherence.

  13. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function.

  14. Molecular diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in human kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; Reeve, J; Loupy, A; Mengel, M; Sis, B; Skene, A; de Freitas, D G; Kreepala, C; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K S; Halloran, P F

    2013-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the major cause of kidney transplant failure, but the histology-based diagnostic system misses most cases due to its requirement for C4d positivity. We hypothesized that gene expression data could be used to test biopsies for the presence of antibody-mediated rejection. To develop a molecular test, we prospectively assigned diagnoses, including C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection, to 403 indication biopsies from 315 patients, based on histology (microcirculation lesions) and donor-specific HLA antibody. We then used microarray data to develop classifiers that assigned antibody-mediated rejection scores to each biopsy. The transcripts distinguishing antibody-mediated rejection from other conditions were mostly expressed in endothelial cells or NK cells, or were IFNG-inducible. The scores correlated with the presence of microcirculation lesions and donor-specific antibody. Of 45 biopsies with scores>0.5, 39 had been diagnosed as antibody-mediated rejection on the basis of histology and donor-specific antibody. High scores were also associated with unanimity among pathologists that antibody-mediated rejection was present. The molecular score also strongly predicted future graft loss in Cox regression analysis. We conclude that microarray assessment of gene expression can assign a probability of ABMR to transplant biopsies without knowledge of HLA antibody status, histology, or C4d staining, and predicts future failure.

  15. Treatment Options and Strategies for Antibody Mediated Rejection after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Matthew H.

    2011-01-01

    Antibody mediated rejection is a significant clinical problem encountered in a subset of renal transplant recipients. This type of rejection has a variable pathogenesis from the presence of donor specific antibodies with no overt disease to immediate hyperacute rejection and many variations between. Antibody mediated rejection is more common in human leukocyte antigen sensitized patients. In general, transplant graft survival after antibody mediated rejection is jeopardized, with less than 50% graft survival 5 years after this diagnosis. A variety of agents have been utilized singly and in combinations to treat antibody mediated rejection with differing results and significant research efforts are being placed on developing new targets for intervention. These same agents have been used in desensitization protocols with some success. In this review, we describe the biology of antibody mediated rejection, review the available agents to treat this form of rejection, and highlight areas of ongoing and future research into this difficult clinical problem. PMID:21940179

  16. Antibody-dependent SARS coronavirus infection is mediated by antibodies against spike proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Fan; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Yen, Chia-Hung; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Tsao, Ching-Han; Shen, Chun-Wei; Chen, Kuan-Hsuan; Liu, Fu-Tong; Liu, Wu-Tse; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Huang, Jason C

    2014-08-22

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) still carries the potential for reemergence, therefore efforts are being made to create a vaccine as a prophylactic strategy for control and prevention. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is a mechanism through which dengue viruses, feline coronaviruses, and HIV viruses take advantage of anti-viral humoral immune responses to infect host target cells. Here we describe our observations of SARS-CoV using ADE to enhance the infectivity of a HL-CZ human promonocyte cell line. Quantitative-PCR and immunofluorescence staining results indicate that SARS-CoV is capable of replication in HL-CZ cells, and of displaying virus-induced cytopathic effects and increased levels of TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-6 two days post-infection. According to flow cytometry data, the HL-CZ cells also expressed angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2, a SARS-CoV receptor) and higher levels of the FcγRII receptor. We found that higher concentrations of anti-sera against SARS-CoV neutralized SARS-CoV infection, while highly diluted anti-sera significantly increased SARS-CoV infection and induced higher levels of apoptosis. Results from infectivity assays indicate that SARS-CoV ADE is primarily mediated by diluted antibodies against envelope spike proteins rather than nucleocapsid proteins. We also generated monoclonal antibodies against SARS-CoV spike proteins and observed that most of them promoted SARS-CoV infection. Combined, our results suggest that antibodies against SARS-CoV spike proteins may trigger ADE effects. The data raise new questions regarding a potential SARS-CoV vaccine, while shedding light on mechanisms involved in SARS pathogenesis.

  17. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng; Cruz Jr, Ruy J; Cai, Jun-Chao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence, risk factors and clinical outcomes of acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) after intestinal transplantation (ITx). METHODS A retrospective single-center analysis was performed to identify cases of acute ABMR after ITx, based on the presence of donor-specific antibody (DSA), acute tissue damage, C4d deposition, and allograft dysfunction. RESULTS Acute ABMR was identified in 18 (10.3%) out of 175 intestinal allografts with an average occurrence of 10 d (range, 4-162) after ITx. All acute ABMR cases were presensitized to donor human leukocyte antigens class I and/or II antigens with a detectable DSA. A positive cross-match was seen in 14 (77.8%) cases and twelve of 18 patients (66.7%) produced newly-formed DSA following ITx. Histological characteristics of acute ABMR include endothelial C4d deposits, interstitial hemorrhage, and severe congestion with focal fibrin thrombin in the lamina propria capillaries. Multivariate analysis identified a liver-free graft and high level of panel reactive antibody as a significant independent risk factor. Despite initial improvement after therapy, eleven recipients (61.1%) lost transplant secondary to rejection. Of those, 9 (50%) underwent graft removal and 4 (22.2%) received second transplantation following acute ABMR. At an average follow-up of 32.3 mo (range, 13.3-76.4), 8 (44.4%) recipients died. CONCLUSION Our results indicate that acute ABMR is an important cause of intestine graft dysfunction, particularly in a liver-exclusive graft and survivors are at an increased risk of developing refractory acute rejection and chronic rejection. More effective strategies to prevent and manage acute ABMR are needed to improve outcomes. PMID:28058223

  18. What is antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA)?

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Nicole

    2005-05-01

    Antibody (Ab)-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is an immunological pathology associated with the production of neutralizing Abs that inhibit the erythropoietic activity of endogenous erythropoietin (EPO) and recombinant erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Although this disorder occurs very rarely, the number of reported cases has increased dramatically in recent years, predominantly in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anaemia receiving subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of one particular formulation of recombinant epoetin-alpha. This disorder is differentiated from classic forms of PRCA that are caused by chemical toxaemia (i.e. erythroblastopenia induced by chemical compounds), lymphoproliferative neoplasms, thymoma, human parvovirus B19 and certain autoimmune disorders. Patients with Ab-mediated PRCA develop resistance to EPO and severe anaemia that follows a period of successful erythropoietic response, and exhibit characteristic decreases in blood haemoglobin (Hb) level and in the number of circulating reticulocytes. However, it is not yet possible to predict which patients will develop PRCA or when in the course of their treatments PRCA may develop. Laboratory confirmation of Ab-mediated PRCA requires bone marrow examination demonstrating few or no erythroid precursors and the presence of serum anti-EPO Abs using a validated assay. These neutralizing anti-EPO Abs recognize the protein core of the EPO molecule; carbohydrate groups on EPO can affect the binding of Abs but are themselves not immunological determinants. Animal models are being developed to increase further our understanding of the immunological mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of Ab-mediated PRCA.

  19. Diagnostic criteria of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Mosquera Reboredo, J M; Vázquez Martul, E

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of anti-donor antibody-mediated rejection or humoral rejection (ABMR) is one of the main discussions at the moment in kidney transplantation. The search for histopathological markers that help us to diagnose ABMR has been more problematic, in contrast to the histological expression of cellular or tubulointerstitial rejection. Although the relationship between post-transplant anti-donor antibodies and the allograft's prognosis has been a topic of discussion for a long time, led in the main by P.Terasaki, it was not until the beginning of 1990s when P. Halloran studied the humoral mechanisms of rejection in greater depth. Feutch described the importance of C4d deposits as a marker that shows a humoral mechanism of allograft rejection in 1993. As a result of many studies carried out, the Banff consensus group established some diagnostic histopathological criteria of acute (ABMR) in 2003. These have been modified slightly in later meetings of the group. Furthermore, in 2005 this same working group looked at the physiopathological mechanisms causing chronic allograft failure in more detail and established the criteria defining chronic humoral rejection. In this review, we are trying to update any useful histopathological criteria for diagnosing acute and chronic ABMR.

  20. Comparison of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Virus Neutralization by HIV-1 Env-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    von Bredow, Benjamin; Arias, Juan F.; Heyer, Lisa N.; Moldt, Brian; Le, Khoa; Robinson, James E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein have been studied extensively for their ability to block viral infectivity, little data are currently available on nonneutralizing functions of these antibodies, such as their ability to eliminate virus-infected cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). HIV-1 Env-specific antibodies of diverse specificities, including potent broadly neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies, were therefore tested for ADCC against cells infected with a lab-adapted HIV-1 isolate (HIV-1NL4-3), a primary HIV-1 isolate (HIV-1JR-FL), and a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) adapted for pathogenic infection of rhesus macaques (SHIVAD8-EO). In accordance with the sensitivity of these viruses to neutralization, HIV-1NL4-3-infected cells were considerably more sensitive to ADCC, both in terms of the number of antibodies and magnitude of responses, than cells infected with HIV-1JR-FL or SHIVAD8-EO. ADCC activity generally correlated with antibody binding to Env on the surfaces of virus-infected cells and with viral neutralization; however, neutralization was not always predictive of ADCC, as instances of ADCC in the absence of detectable neutralization, and vice versa, were observed. These results reveal incomplete overlap in the specificities of antibodies that mediate these antiviral activities and provide insights into the relationship between ADCC and neutralization important for the development of antibody-based vaccines and therapies for combating HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE This study provides fundamental insights into the relationship between antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and virus neutralization that may help to guide the development of antibody-based vaccines and immunotherapies for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27122574

  1. Quantifying renal allograft loss following early antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Orandi, B J; Chow, E H K; Hsu, A; Gupta, N; Van Arendonk, K J; Garonzik-Wang, J M; Montgomery, J R; Wickliffe, C; Lonze, B E; Bagnasco, S M; Alachkar, N; Kraus, E S; Jackson, A M; Montgomery, R A; Segev, D L

    2015-02-01

    Unlike antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) with clinical features, it remains unclear whether subclinical AMR should be treated, as its effect on allograft loss is unknown. It is also uncertain if AMR's effect is homogeneous across donor (deceased/live) and (HLA/ABO) antibody types. We compared 219 patients with AMR (77 subclinical, 142 clinical) to controls matched on HLA/ABO-compatibility, donor type, prior transplant, panel reactive antibody (PRA), age and year. One and 5-year graft survival in subclinical AMR was 95.9% and 75.7%, compared to 96.8% and 88.4% in matched controls (p = 0.0097). Subclinical AMR was independently associated with a 2.15-fold increased risk of graft loss (95% CI: 1.19-3.91; p = 0.012) compared to matched controls, but not different from clinical AMR (p = 0.13). Fifty three point two percent of subclinical AMR patients were treated with plasmapheresis within 3 days of their AMR-defining biopsy. Treated subclinical AMR patients had no difference in graft loss compared to matched controls (HR 1.73; 95% CI: 0.73-4.05; p = 0.21), but untreated subclinical AMR patients did (HR 3.34; 95% CI: 1.37-8.11; p = 0.008). AMR's effect on graft loss was heterogeneous when stratified by compatible deceased donor (HR = 4.73; 95% CI: 1.57-14.26; p = 0.006), HLA-incompatible deceased donor (HR = 2.39; 95% CI: 1.10-5.19; p = 0.028), compatible live donor (no AMR patients experienced graft loss), ABO-incompatible live donor (HR = 6.13; 95% CI: 0.55-67.70; p = 0.14) and HLA-incompatible live donor (HR = 6.29; 95% CI: 3.81-10.39; p < 0.001) transplant. Subclinical AMR substantially increases graft loss, and treatment seems warranted.

  2. Effects of the orientation of anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibody immobilized on scaffold in antibody-mediated osseous regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Sahar; Freire, Marcelo; Choi, Moon G; Tavari, Azadeh; Almohaimeed, Mohammad; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Zadeh, Homayoun H

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can trap endogenous osteogenic BMP ligands, which can in turn mediate osteodifferentiation of progenitor cells. The effectiveness of this strategy requires the availability of the anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies antigen-binding sites for anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies to bind to the scaffold through a domain that will leave its antigen-binding region exposed and available for binding to an osteogenic ligand. We examined whether antibodies bound to a scaffold by passive adsorption versus through Protein G as a linker will exhibit differences in mediating bone formation. In vitro anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies was immobilized on absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) with Protein G as a linker to bind the antibody through its Fc region and implanted into rat calvarial defects. The biomechanical strength of bone regenerated by absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies immune complex was compared to ACS/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies or ACS/Protein G/isotype mAb control group. Results demonstrated higher binding of anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies/BMPs to C2C12 cells, when the mAb was initially attached to recombinant Protein G or Protein G-coupled microbeads. After eight weeks, micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses revealed increased bone formation within defects implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies compared with defects implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies (p < 0.05). Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) confirmed increased BMP-2, -4, and -7 detection in sites implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Biomechanical analysis revealed the regenerated bone in sites with Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies had higher mechanical strength in comparison to anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies. The negative control group, Protein G

  3. Postoperative rebound of antiblood type antibodies and antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible living-related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideki; Kondo, Tsunenori; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Nozaki, Taiji; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound is attributed to kidney allograft rejection in ABO blood type-incompatible (ABO-I) living-related kidney transplantation (KTx). A total of 191 ABO-I recipients who received ABO-I living-related KTx between 2001 and 2013 were divided into two groups: Group 1 consisted of low rebound [(≦1:32), N = 170] and Group 2 consisted of high rebound [(≧1:64), N = 21], according to the levels of the rebounded antiblood type antibodies within 1 year after transplantation. No prophylactic treatment for rejection was administered for elevated antiblood type antibodies, regardless of the levels of the rebounded antibodies. Within 1 year after transplantation, T-cell-mediated rejection was observed in 13 of 170 recipients (13/170, 8%) in Group 1 and in 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Group 2 (Groups 1 vs. 2, P = 0.432). Antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 15 of 170 recipients (15/170, 9%) and 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.898). In this study, we found no correlation between the postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound and the incidence of acute rejection. We concluded that no treatment is necessary for rebounded antiblood type antibodies.

  4. Probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Takahito; Yamamoto, Izumi; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kamejima, Sahoko; Katsumata, Haruki; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Furuya, Maiko; Mafune, Aki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies. A 44 year-old male was admitted to our hospital for a kidney transplant. The donor, his wife, was an ABO minor mismatch (blood type O to A) and had Gitelman syndrome. Graft function was delayed; his serum creatinine level was 10.1 mg/dL at 3 days after transplantation. Open biopsy was performed immediately; no venous thrombosis was observed during surgery. Histology revealed moderate peritubular capillaritis and mild glomerulitis without C4d immunoreactivity. Flow cytometric crossmatching was positive, but no panel-reactive antibodies against HLA or donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) were detected. Taken together, we diagnosed him with probable C4d-negative accelerated antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA, non-MICA antibodies, the patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day for 3 days), plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin (40 g/body), and rituximab (200 mg/body) were performed. Biopsy at 58 days after transplantation, at which time S-Cr levels were 1.56 mg/dL, found no evidence of rejection. This case, presented with a review of relevant literature, demonstrates that probable C4d-negative accelerated acute AMR can result from non-HLA antibodies.

  5. Antibody mediated transduction of therapeutic proteins into living cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James E; Weisbart, Richard H; Nishimura, Robert N

    2005-09-16

    Protein therapy refers to the direct delivery of therapeutic proteins to cells and tissues with the goal of ameliorating or modifying a disease process. Current techniques for delivering proteins across cell membranes include taking advantage of receptor-mediated endocytosis or using protein transduction domains that penetrate directly into cells. The most commonly used protein transduction domains are small cell-penetrating peptides derived from such proteins as the HIV-1 Tat protein. A novel protein transduction domain developed as the single chain fragment (Fv) of a murine anti-DNA autoantibody, mAb 3E10, has recently been developed and used to deliver biologically active proteins to living cells in vitro. This review will provide a brief overview of the development of the Fv fragment and provide a summary of recent studies using Fv to deliver therapeutic peptides and proteins (such as a C-terminal p53 peptide, C-terminal p53 antibody fragment, full-length p53, and micro-dystrophin) to cells.

  6. JC polyomavirus mutants escape antibody-mediated neutralization.

    PubMed

    Ray, Upasana; Cinque, Paola; Gerevini, Simonetta; Longo, Valeria; Lazzarin, Adriano; Schippling, Sven; Martin, Roland; Buck, Christopher B; Pastrana, Diana V

    2015-09-23

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) persistently infects the urinary tract of most adults. Under conditions of immune impairment, JCV causes an opportunistic brain disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCV strains found in the cerebrospinal fluid of PML patients contain distinctive mutations in surface loops of the major capsid protein, VP1. We hypothesized that VP1 mutations might allow the virus to evade antibody-mediated neutralization. Consistent with this hypothesis, neutralization serology revealed that plasma samples from PML patients neutralized wild-type JCV strains but failed to neutralize patient-cognate PML-mutant JCV strains. This contrasted with serological results for healthy individuals, most of whom robustly cross-neutralized all tested JCV variants. Mice administered a JCV virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine initially showed neutralizing "blind spots" (akin to those observed in PML patients) that closed after booster immunization. A PML patient administered an experimental JCV VLP vaccine likewise showed markedly increased neutralizing titer against her cognate PML-mutant JCV. The results indicate that deficient humoral immunity is a common aspect of PML pathogenesis and that vaccination may overcome this humoral deficiency. Thus, vaccination with JCV VLPs might prevent the development of PML.

  7. Late Failing Heart Allografts: Pathology of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy and Association With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Toquet, C; Rouvier, P; Beuscart, T; Bories, M C; Varnous, S; Guillemain, R; Pattier, S; Suberbielle, C; Leprince, P; Lefaucheur, C; Jouven, X; Bruneval, P; Duong Van Huyen, J P

    2016-01-01

    In heart transplantation, there is a lack of robust evidence of the specific causes of late allograft failure. We hypothesized that a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts may be associated with antibody-mediated injury and immune-mediated coronary arteriosclerosis. We included all patients undergoing a retransplantation for late terminal heart allograft failure in three referral centers. We performed an integrative strategy of heart allograft phenotyping by assessing the heart vascular tree including histopathology and immunohistochemistry together with circulating donor-specific antibodies. The main analysis included 40 explanted heart allografts patients and 402 endomyocardial biopsies performed before allograft loss. Overall, antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 19 (47.5%) failing heart allografts including 16 patients (40%) in whom unrecognized previous episodes of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection occurred 4.5 ± 3.5 years before allograft loss. Explanted allografts with evidence of antibody-mediated rejection demonstrated higher endothelitis and microvascular inflammation scores (0.89 ± 0.26 and 2.25 ± 0.28, respectively) compared with explanted allografts without antibody-mediated rejection (0.42 ± 0.11 and 0.36 ± 0.09, p = 0.046 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Antibody-mediated injury was observed in 62.1% of failing allografts with pure coronary arteriosclerosis and mixed (arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis) pattern, while it was not observed in patients with pure coronary atherosclerosis (p = 0.0076). We demonstrate that antibody-mediated rejection is operating in a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts and is associated with severe coronary arteriosclerosis. Unrecognized subclinical antibody-mediated rejection episodes may be observed years before allograft failure.

  8. Mechanism of human antibody-mediated neutralization of Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Flyak, Andrew I; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Murin, Charles D; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Slaughter, James C; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-26

    The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of antibody-GP complexes reveal that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP, but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV-neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition.

  9. Mechanism of Human Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of Marburg Virus

    PubMed Central

    Flyak, Andrew I.; Ilinykh, Philipp A.; Murin, Charles D.; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L.; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Slaughter, James C.; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Ward, Andrew B.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of Antibody-GP complexes reveals that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition. PMID:25723164

  10. [Antibody-mediated rejection of renal allograft and the update Banff classification 2013].

    PubMed

    Honsová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The view on the role of donor-specific antibodies in organ transplantation has been changed during the last several decades. Today, it is considered that the majority of cases of the late renal allograft dysfunction and loss are caused by the presence of donor-specific antibodies to HLA antigens. The real breakthrough in the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection was represented by the discovery of C4d, which enabled the determination of the diagnostic criteria of acute and later chronic antibody-mediated rejection. Although detection of C4d has been the cornerstone in the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection for over 10 years, it has become clear that some cases with similar morphological and clinical features do not have detectable C4d. Outcomes of key studies concerning presence of donor specific antibodies and morphological features in the graft biopsy samples resulted in the modification of Banff classification of 2013, which includes integrating C4d negative antibody-mediated rejection and also that acute vascular rejection (v1, v2) can be a part of the antibody-mediated rejection.

  11. A Highly Conserved Residue of the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Is Important for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Responses Mediated by Anti-cluster A Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shilei; Veillette, Maxime; Coutu, Mathieu; Prévost, Jérémie; Scharf, Louise; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ferrari, Guido; Robinson, James E.; Stürzel, Christina; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank; Lewis, George K.; Pazgier, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sera from HIV-1-infected individuals contain antibodies able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). These antibodies preferentially recognize envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitopes induced upon CD4 binding. Here, we show that a highly conserved tryptophan at position 69 of the gp120 inner domain is important for ADCC mediated by anti-cluster A antibodies and sera from HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:26637462

  12. Colostral antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immunity contributes to innate and antigen-specific immunity in piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunoglobulins and immune cells are critical components of colostral immunity; however, their transfer to and function in the neonate, especially maternal lymphocytes, is unclear. Cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immunity in sow blood and colostrum and piglet blood before (PS) and after (AS) suc...

  13. Gamma Interferon Is Required for Optimal Antibody-Mediated Immunity against Genital Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Naglak, Elizabeth K.; Morrison, Sandra G.

    2016-01-01

    Defining the mechanisms of immunity conferred by the combination of antibody and CD4+ T cells is fundamental to designing an efficacious chlamydial vaccine. Using the Chlamydia muridarum genital infection model of mice, which replicates many features of human C. trachomatis infection and avoids the characteristic low virulence of C. trachomatis in the mouse, we previously demonstrated a significant role for antibody in immunity to chlamydial infection. We found that antibody alone was not protective. Instead, protection appeared to be conferred through an undefined antibody-cell interaction. Using gene knockout mice and in vivo cellular depletion methods, our data suggest that antibody-mediated protection is dependent on the activation of an effector cell population in genital tract tissues by CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, the CD4+ T cell-secreted cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was found to be a key component of the protective antibody response. The protective function of IFN-γ was not related to the immunoglobulin class or to the magnitude of the Chlamydia-specific antibody response or to recruitment of an effector cell population to genital tract tissue. Rather, IFN-γ appears to be necessary for activation of the effector cell population that functions in antibody-mediated chlamydial immunity. Our results confirm the central role of antibody in immunity to chlamydia reinfection and demonstrate a key function for IFN-γ in antibody-mediated protection. PMID:27600502

  14. Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of bacteriophage lambda-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sapinoro, Ramil; Volcy, Ketna; Rodrigo, W W Shanaka I; Schlesinger, Jacob J; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-04-10

    Lambda phage vectors mediate gene transfer in cultured mammalian cells and in live mice, and in vivo phage-mediated gene expression is increased when mice are pre-immunized with bacteriophage lambda. We now show that, like eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage vectors are subject to Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in mammalian cells. Antibody-dependent enhancement of phage gene transfer required FcgammaRI, but not its associated gamma-chain, and was not supported by other FcgammaR family members (FcgammaRIIA, FcgammaRIIB, and FcgammaRIII). Studies using chlorpromazine and latrunculin A revealed an important role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (chlorpromazine) and actin filaments (latrunculin A) in antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. This was confirmed by experiments using inhibitors of endosomal acidification (bafilomycin A1, monensin) and by immunocytochemical colocalization of internalized phage particles with early endosome-associated protein-1 (EAA1). In contrast, microtubule-targeting agents (nocodazole, taxol) increased the efficiency of antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. These results reveal an unexpected antibody-dependent, FcgammaRI-mediated enhancement of phage transduction in mammalian cells, and suggest new approaches to improve bacteriophage-mediated gene transfer.

  15. SARS CoV subunit vaccine: antibody-mediated neutralisation and enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jaume, M; Yip, M S; Kam, Y W; Cheung, C Y; Kien, F; Roberts, A; Li, P H; Dutry, I; Escriou, N; Daeron, M; Bruzzone, R; Subbarao, K; Peiris, J S M; Nal, B; Altmeyer, R

    2012-02-01

    1. A SARS vaccine was produced based on recombinant native full-length Spike-protein trimers (triSpike) and efficient establishment of a vaccination procedure in rodents. 2. Antibody-mediated enhancement of SARS-CoV infection with anti-SARS-CoV Spike immune-serum was observed in vitro. 3. Antibody-mediated infection of SARS-CoV triggers entry into human haematopoietic cells via an FcγR-dependent and ACE2-, pH-, cysteine-protease-independent pathways. 4. The antibody-mediated enhancement phenomenon is not a mandatory component of the humoral immune response elicited by SARS vaccines, as pure neutralising antibody only could be obtained. 5. Occurrence of immune-mediated enhancement of SARS-CoV infection raises safety concerns regarding the use of SARS-CoV vaccine in humans and enables new ways to investigate SARS pathogenesis (tropism and immune response deregulation).

  16. Anti-DNA antibody mediated catalysis is isotype dependent.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Zhang, Qiuting; Cowburn, David; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus, and participate in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with multiple renal antigens. Previously, using a panel of murine anti-DNA IgGs that share identical variable regions but that differ in the constant regions, we demonstrated that the cross-reaction and renal pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. In this study, we investigated the catalytic potential of this anti-DNA antibody panel, and determined its isotype dependency. The three isotype switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) and the parent IgG3 PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies were compared in their catalysis of 500 base pair linear double stranded DNA and a 12-mer peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP), by gel analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to double stranded DNA and peptide antigens were assessed by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. We found that the PL9-11 antibody isotypes vary significantly in their potential to catalyze the cleavage of both linear and double stranded DNA and the proteolysis of peptides. The degree of the cleavage and proteolysis increases with the incubation temperature and time. While different PL9-11 isotypes have the same initial attack sites within the ALWPPNLHAWVP peptide, there was no correlation between binding affinity to the peptide and proteolysis rates. In conclusion, the catalytic properties of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. This finding provides further evidence that antibodies that share the same variable region, but which have different constant regions, are functionally distinct. The catalytic effects modulated by antibody constant regions need to be considered in the design of therapeutic antibodies (abzymes) and peptides designed to block pathogenic autoantibodies.

  17. A new synthesis for antibody-mediated immunity

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2013-01-01

    The view that immunoglobulins function largely by potentiating neutralization, cytotoxicity or phagocytosis is being replaced by a new synthesis whereby antibodies participate in all aspects of the immune response, from protecting the host at the earliest time of encounter with a microbe to later challenges. Perhaps the most transformative concept is that immunoglobulins manifest emergent properties, from their structure and function as individual molecules to their interactions with microbial targets and the host immune system. Given that emergent properties are neither reducible to first principles nor predictable, there is a need for new conceptual approaches for understanding antibody function and mechanisms of antibody immunity. PMID:22179281

  18. Phagocytosis of breast cancer cells mediated by anti-MUC-1 monoclonal antibody, DF3, and its bispecific antibody.

    PubMed

    Akewanlop, C; Watanabe, M; Singh, B; Walker, M; Kufe, D W; Hayes, D F

    2001-05-15

    Human epithelial mucin, MUC-1, is commonly expressed in adenocarcinoma including 80% of breast cancers. erbB-2 is overexpressed in approximately 30% of breast cancers. Expression of MUC-1 and erbB-2 may be partially overlapping but discoordinate. Therefore, combined use of antibodies directed against these two antigens might increase the number of patients who benefit from immunotherapy. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) DF3 recognizes the MUC-1 tandem repeat. We investigated phagocytosis and cytolysis of cultured human breast cancer cells by monocyte-derived macrophages mediated by MAb DF3 and its bispecific antibody (BsAb) DF3xH22 with the second epitope directed against the Fc component of phagocytic cells. Purified monocytes from healthy donors were cultured with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor with or without IFN-gamma. antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays were performed with these macrophages and MUC-1-expressing target cells (ZR75-1) in the presence of MAb DF3 and BsAb DF3xH22. ADCP was measured by two-color fluorescence flow cytometry using PKH2 (green fluorescent dye) and R-phytoerythrin (RPE) (red)-conjugated MAb against human CD14 and CD11b and was confirmed by confocal microscopy. ADCC was measured by (51)Cr release assay. Immunohistochemical staining studies of MUC-1 and erbB-2 were performed on 67 primary breast cancer tissues. Expression of MUC-1 and erbB-2 was partially overlapping but discoordinate in 67 consecutive breast cancers. Both MAb DF3 and BsAb DF3xH22 mediated ADCP. However, ADCP mediated by MAb DF3 was greater than that mediated by BsAb DF3xH22. ADCC as detected by (51)Cr release was not seen with either antibody. The addition of IFN-gamma to monocyte-derived macrophage cultures inhibited ADCP compared to granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor alone. Given the partially overlapping but discoordinate expression of MUC-1 and erbB-2 in breast cancer

  19. Antibody-mediated reduction of .alpha.-ketoamides

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Gallop, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an .alpha.-ketoamide to the corresponding .alpha.-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  20. Antibody-mediated reduction of {alpha}-ketoamides

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, P.G.; Gallop, M.A.

    1998-06-09

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an {alpha}-ketoamide to the corresponding {alpha}-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  1. Characterization of in vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity of therapeutic antibodies - impact of effector cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shan; Lin, Yuwen L; Reed, Chae; Ng, Carl; Cheng, Zhijie Jey; Malavasi, Fabio; Yang, Jihong; Quarmby, Valerie; Song, An

    2014-05-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is an important mechanism of action implicated in the clinical efficacy of several therapeutic antibodies. In vitro ADCC assays employing effector cells capable of inducing lysis of target cells bound by antibodies are routinely performed to support the research and development of therapeutic antibodies. ADCC assays are commonly performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), natural killer (NK) cells or engineered cell lines as effector cells. In this study we evaluated the impact of different effector cell types including primary PBMCs, primary NK cells, engineered NK cell lines, and an engineered reporter cell line, on the in vitro ADCC activity of two glycoforms of a humanized IgG1 antibody. The results of this study show the differential effects on both the efficacy and potency of the antibodies by different effector cells and the finding that both the allotype and the expression level of CD16a affect the potency of effector cells in ADCC assays. Our results also show that engineered NK or reporter cell lines provide reduced variability compared to primary effector cells for in vitro ADCC assays.

  2. The role of complement in antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stegall, Mark D; Chedid, Marcio F; Cornell, Lynn D

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have suggested that the complement system has an active role in both acute and chronic allograft rejection. These studies have been facilitated by improved techniques to detect antibody-mediated organ rejection, including immunohistological staining for C4d deposition in the allograft and solid-phase assays that identify donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) in the serum of transplant recipients. Studies with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against complement component C5, have shown that activation of the terminal complement pathway is necessary for the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection in recipients of living-donor kidney allografts who have high levels of DSAs. The extent to which complement activation drives chronic antibody-mediated injury leading to organ rejection is less clear. In chronic antibody-mediated injury, early complement activation might facilitate chemotaxis of inflammatory cells into the allograft in a process that later becomes somewhat independent of DSA levels and complement factors. In this Review, we discuss the different roles that the complement system might have in antibody-mediated allograft rejection, with specific emphasis on renal transplantation.

  3. HIV-specific antibody immunity mediated through NK cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kramski, Marit; Parsons, Matthew S; Stratov, Ivan; Kent, Stephen J

    2013-07-01

    The partial success of the RV144 trial re-energized the field of HIV vaccine research, which had stalled after vaccines based on neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T cells had failed to induce protection. A large post-vaccine research effort has focused attention on the role of non-neutralizing antibodies in the protection afforded by the RV144 vaccine. These binding antibodies can initiate immune responses such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and combine elements of the adaptive and innate immune system in the form of antibodies and effector cells (including NK cells, monocytes and granulocytes). A complex interplay exists between the variable portion of the binding antibody and its HIV antigen target on one hand and the constant region of the antibody and the Fcγ-receptor of the effector cell on the other hand. Technical advances have revolutionized the abilities of scientist to detect the targets of non-neutralizing antibodies, including both envelope and non-envelope epitopes, and their role in forcing escape. Our understanding of the antibody characteristics (including IgG subclasses and Fc glycan profile) is providing valuable insights into their optimal structure and function. We expand on critical research on ADCC effector cells, particularly education of NK cells. We introduce the concept of HIV antibodydependent trogocytosis by monocytes as a potentially important aspect of HIV immunity. In summary, this review highlights recent advances in HIV-specific antibody immunity mediated through NK cells and monocytes.

  4. Chimeric mouse-human IgG1 antibody that can mediate lysis of cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, A Y; Robinson, R R; Hellström, K E; Murray, E D; Chang, C P; Hellström, I

    1987-01-01

    A chimeric mouse-human antibody has been created that recognizes an antigen found on the surface of cells from many carcinomas. Immunoglobulin constant (C) domains of the mouse monoclonal antibody L6, C gamma 2a and C kappa, were substituted by the human C gamma 1 and C kappa by recombining cDNA modules encoding variable or C domains. The cDNA constructs were transfected into lymphoid cells for antibody production. The chimeric antibody and mouse L6 antibody bound to carcinoma cells with equal affinity and mediated complement-dependent cytolysis. In the presence of human effector cells, the chimeric antibody gave antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity at 100 times lower concentration than that needed for the mouse L6 antibody. The chimeric antibody, but not the mouse L6 antibody, is effective against a melanoma line expressing small amounts of the L6 antigen. The findings point to the usefulness of the chimeric antibody approach for obtaining agents with strong antitumor activity for possible therapeutic use in man. PMID:3106970

  5. [Effect of pre-transplant donor specific antibody on antibody-mediated rejection and graft dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Li, Wei; Zhang, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    目的:研究肾移植受者的术前供者特异性抗体(donor specific antibody,DSA)与其术后发生抗体介导的体液排斥反应(antibody-mediated rejection,AMR)及移植肾功能的关系。方法:选取符合要求的肾移植受者88例。术前采用Luminex流式法对肾移植受者进行DSA检测,并将受者分为DSA阳性组(n=20)与DSA阴性组(n=68)。随访时间为2年。术后参照Banff 2005标准对移植肾病理形态进行评估分级,并观察移植肾的情况。结果: DSA阳性组与阴性组AMR发生率分别为20.0%和1.5%,移植物丢失发生率分别为15.0%和1.5%,两组比较差异均有统计学意义(分别P<0.01,P<0.05);AMR受者最高DSA的荧光指数中值(mean fluorescence intensity,MFI)较非AMR受者差异明显(P<0.01);受试者工作特征(receiver operating characteristic,ROC)曲线显示肾移植术后受者发展为AMR的最高MFI阈值为7909.5。两组移植肾功能延迟回复的发生相比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论:肾移植术前检测DSA水平,可以预测AMR的发生风险和移植肾功能状态。最高DSA值的MFI截点(7909.5)能够预测AMR发生的风险。.

  6. A case of chronic antibody-mediated rejection in the making.

    PubMed

    Bravou, Vasiliki; Galliford, Jack; McLean, Adam; Willicombe, Michelle; Taube, David; Cook, Herbert T; Roufosse, Candice

    2013-10-01

    A kidney transplant recipient developed chronic antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) with clinically significant transplant glomerulopathy while under careful clinical monitoring. The patient developed a de novo donor-specific antibody (DSA) posttransplantation, and a protocol renal biopsy showed C4d deposition with no histological evidence of rejection. Subsequently he developed peritubular capillary basement membrane multilayering, with negative C4d and DSA. Finally, he developed proteinuria and transplant glomerulopathy, with reappearance of DSA and C4d. Despite having a de novo antibody and progressive antibody-mediated damage, this patient under close histological and serological surveillance did not fulfill Banff criteria for acute or chronic ABMR until his disease was advanced. This case illustrates the limitations of current Banff criteria in this setting, due to the fluctuating nature of DSA and C4d staining.

  7. Epitope specificity plays a critical role in regulating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    He, Wenqian; Tan, Gene S; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Lee, Amanda J; Lam, Mannie Man Wai; Krammer, Florian; Henry, Carole; Wilson, Patrick C; Ashkar, Ali A; Palese, Peter; Miller, Matthew S

    2016-10-18

    The generation of strain-specific neutralizing antibodies against influenza A virus is known to confer potent protection against homologous infections. The majority of these antibodies bind to the hemagglutinin (HA) head domain and function by blocking the receptor binding site, preventing infection of host cells. Recently, elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies which target the conserved HA stalk domain has become a promising "universal" influenza virus vaccine strategy. The ability of these antibodies to elicit Fc-dependent effector functions has emerged as an important mechanism through which protection is achieved in vivo. However, the way in which Fc-dependent effector functions are regulated by polyclonal influenza virus-binding antibody mixtures in vivo has never been defined. Here, we demonstrate that interactions among viral glycoprotein-binding antibodies of varying specificities regulate the magnitude of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity induction. We show that the mechanism responsible for this phenotype relies upon competition for binding to HA on the surface of infected cells and virus particles. Nonneutralizing antibodies were poor inducers and did not inhibit antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Interestingly, anti-neuraminidase antibodies weakly induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and enhanced induction in the presence of HA stalk-binding antibodies in an additive manner. Our data demonstrate that antibody specificity plays an important role in the regulation of ADCC, and that cross-talk among antibodies of varying specificities determines the magnitude of Fc receptor-mediated effector functions.

  8. Glomerulonephritis mediated by antibody to glomerular basement membrane. Immunological, clinical, and histopathological characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    McPhaul, J J; Mullins, J D

    1976-01-01

    A prospective study was undertaken to establish the incidence of glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis and its histopathological characteristics in a clinical group of patients presenting with renal disease. Biopsies from 43 of 409 consecutive patients technically satisfactory for direct immunofluorescent (IF) examination had diffuse and generalized linear localization of host immunoglobulin (Ig); two other badly scarred kidneys tested negative to IF although GBM antibodies were eluted. Confirmatory evidence of GBM antibody-mediated disease in these patients came from whole kidney or biopsy elutions (15 patients), serologic assays for circulating GBM antibodies by indirect IF (9 of 38 patients), radioimmunoassay (26 of 34), and hemagglutination (31 of 32). Although sera were not tested from six patients, circulating antibodies were demonstrated by some test in 36 of 39 of the remainder. Histologically, half of the patients had minor and nonspecific glomerular abnormalities or mild focal proliferative glomerulonephritis. More severely involved kidneys had focal necrotizing (17%), rapidly progressive (7%), and chronic, usually sclerosing, glomerulonephritis (27%). Clinical courses of these patients comparably were quite variable, ranging from indolent microhematuria and/or gross hematuric bouts to progressive renal failure; nephrotic syndrome was observed in 11 patients. GBM antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis may be a relatively mild disease with apparently stable renal function, although 16 patients have experienced functional deterioration, and 11 have progressed to dialysis, renal transplantation, or death. Images PMID:56340

  9. Reviewing the pathogenesis of antibody-mediated rejection and renal graft pathology after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morozumi, Kunio; Takeda, Asami; Otsuka, Yasuhiro; Horike, Keiji; Gotoh, Norihiko; Narumi, Shunji; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2016-07-01

    The clinicopathological context of rejection after kidney transplantation was well recognized. Banff conferences greatly contributed to elucidate the pathogenesis and to establish the pathologic criteria of rejection after kidney transplantation. The most important current problem of renal transplantation is de novo donor-specific antibody (DSA) production leading chronic rejection and graft loss. Microvascular inflammation is considered as a reliable pathological marker for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the presence of DSA. Electron microscopic study allowed us to evaluate early changes in peritubular capillaries in T-lymphocyte mediated rejection and transition to antibody-mediated rejection. Severe endothelial injuries with edema and activated lymphocyte invaded into subendothelial space with early multi-layering of peritubular capillary basement membrane suggest T-lymphocyte mediated rejection induce an unbounded chain of antibody-mediated rejection. The risk factors of AMR after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation are important issues. Anti-ABO blood type antibody titre of IgG excess 32-fold before transplant operation is the only predictable factor for acute AMR. Characteristics of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAAMR) are one of the most important problems. Light microscopic findings and C4d stain of peritubular capillary and glomerular capillary are useful diagnostic criteria of CAAMR. Microvascular inflammation, double contour of glomerular capillary and thickening of peritubular capillary basement are good predictive factors of the presence of de novo DSA. C4d stain of linear glomerular capillary is a more sensitive marker for CAAMR than positive C4d of peritubular capillary. Early and sensitive diagnostic attempts of diagnosing CAAMR are pivotal to prevent chronic graft failure.

  10. Targeted Fcγ Receptor (FcγR)-mediated Clearance by a Biparatopic Bispecific Antibody.

    PubMed

    Kasturirangan, Srinath; Rainey, G Jonah; Xu, Linda; Wang, Xinwei; Portnoff, Alyse; Chen, Tracy; Fazenbaker, Christine; Zhong, Helen; Bee, Jared; Zeng, Zhutian; Jenne, Craig; Wu, Herren; Gao, Changshou

    2017-03-10

    Soluble ligands have commonly been targeted by antibody therapeutics for cancers and other diseases. Although monoclonal antibodies targeting such ligands can block their interactions with their cognate receptors, they can also significantly increase the half-life of their ligands by FcRn-mediated antibody recycling, thereby evading ligand renal clearance and requiring increasingly high antibody doses to neutralize the increasing pool of target. To overcome this issue, we generated a bispecific/biparatopic antibody (BiSAb) that targets two different epitopes on IL-6 to block IL-6-mediated signaling. The BiSAb formed large immune complexes with IL-6 that can bind Fcγ receptors on phagocytic cells and are rapidly internalized. In addition, rapid clearance of the BiSAb·IL-6 complex was observed in mice while the parental antibodies prolonged the serum half-life of IL-6. Intravital imaging of the liver in mice confirmed that the rapid clearance of these large immune complexes was associated with Fcγ receptor-dependent binding to Kupffer cells in the liver. The approach described here provides a general strategy for therapeutic antibodies with the ability to not only neutralize but also actively drive clearance of their soluble antigens.

  11. Targeted Fcγ Receptor (FcγR)-mediated Clearance by a Biparatopic Bispecific Antibody*

    PubMed Central

    Kasturirangan, Srinath; Rainey, G. Jonah; Xu, Linda; Wang, Xinwei; Portnoff, Alyse; Chen, Tracy; Fazenbaker, Christine; Zhong, Helen; Bee, Jared; Zeng, Zhutian; Jenne, Craig; Wu, Herren; Gao, Changshou

    2017-01-01

    Soluble ligands have commonly been targeted by antibody therapeutics for cancers and other diseases. Although monoclonal antibodies targeting such ligands can block their interactions with their cognate receptors, they can also significantly increase the half-life of their ligands by FcRn-mediated antibody recycling, thereby evading ligand renal clearance and requiring increasingly high antibody doses to neutralize the increasing pool of target. To overcome this issue, we generated a bispecific/biparatopic antibody (BiSAb) that targets two different epitopes on IL-6 to block IL-6-mediated signaling. The BiSAb formed large immune complexes with IL-6 that can bind Fcγ receptors on phagocytic cells and are rapidly internalized. In addition, rapid clearance of the BiSAb·IL-6 complex was observed in mice while the parental antibodies prolonged the serum half-life of IL-6. Intravital imaging of the liver in mice confirmed that the rapid clearance of these large immune complexes was associated with Fcγ receptor-dependent binding to Kupffer cells in the liver. The approach described here provides a general strategy for therapeutic antibodies with the ability to not only neutralize but also actively drive clearance of their soluble antigens. PMID:28100773

  12. Blocking by anti-idiotypic antibodies of monoclonal antibody-mediated protection against lethal Semliki Forest virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Oosterlaken, T A; Harmsen, M; Kraaijeveld, C A; Snippe, H

    1990-02-01

    Semliki Forest virus-(SEV) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), produced after fusion of spleen cells from BALB/c mice and myeloma cell line P3-X63-AG8. 653 or SP2/0, were used for anti-idiotypic immunization of female BALB/c mice. Two intracutaneous immunizations (2 x 40 micrograms per animal), 3 weeks apart, with keyhole limpet haemocyanin-conjugated MoAbs mixed with the saponin Quil A were sufficient to induce high levels of anti-idiotypic antibodies in the circulation of these mice with the capacity to block specifically in vitro MoAb-mediated virus neutralization. Anti-idiotypic antibodies against SFV-neutralizing MoAbs, either passively transferred or actively acquired by immunization, are also able to abrogate (specifically) passive immunity, mediated by critical protective doses of MoAb, in mice against infection with a lethal strain of SFV. Furthermore we confirmed by intervention with anti-idiotypic serum in vivo that an SFV-neutralizing MoAb exerts its greatest protective effect during the first 2 days of infection.

  13. Antibody-Mediated Phosphatidylserine Blockade Enhances the Antitumor Responses to CTLA-4 and PD-1 Antibodies in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Freimark, Bruce D; Gong, Jian; Ye, Dan; Gray, Michael J; Nguyen, Van; Yin, Shen; Hatch, Michaela M S; Hughes, Christopher C W; Schroit, Alan J; Hutchins, Jeff T; Brekken, Rolf A; Huang, Xianming

    2016-06-01

    In tumor-bearing animals, the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) suppresses immune responses, suggesting that PS signaling could counteract the antitumor effect of antibody-driven immune checkpoint blockade. Here, we show that treating melanoma-bearing mice with a PS-targeting antibody enhances the antitumor activity of downstream checkpoint inhibition. Combining PS-targeting antibodies with CTLA-4 or PD-1 blockade resulted in significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth than did single-agent therapy. Moreover, combination therapy enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte numbers; elevated the fraction of cells expressing the proinflammatory cytokines IL2, IFNγ, and TNFα; and increased the ratio of CD8 T cells to myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in tumors. Similar changes in immune cell profiles were observed in splenocytes. Taken together, these data show that antibody-mediated PS blockade enhances the antitumor efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibition. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 531-40. ©2016 AACR.

  14. The use of antibody to complement protein C5 for salvage treatment of severe antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Locke, J E; Magro, C M; Singer, A L; Segev, D L; Haas, M; Hillel, A T; King, K E; Kraus, E; Lees, L M; Melancon, J K; Stewart, Z A; Warren, D S; Zachary, A A; Montgomery, R A

    2009-01-01

    Desensitized patients are at high risk of developing acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). In most cases, the rejection episodes are mild and respond to a short course of plasmapheresis (PP) / low-dose IVIg treatment. However, a subset of patients experience severe AMR associated with sudden onset oliguria. We previously described the utility of emergent splenectomy in rescuing allografts in patients with this type of severe AMR. However, not all patients are good candidates for splenectomy. Here we present a single case in which eculizumab, a complement protein C5 antibody that inhibits the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was used combined with PP/IVIg to salvage a kidney undergoing severe AMR. We show a marked decrease in C5b-C9 (MAC) complex deposition in the kidney after the administration of eculizumab.

  15. Toxin-Mediated Paracellular Transport of Antitoxin Antibodies Facilitates Protection against Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z.; Chen, X.; Hernandez, L. D.; Lipari, P.; Flattery, A.; Chen, S.-C.; Kramer, S.; Polishook, J. D.; Racine, F.; Cape, H.; Kelly, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    The exotoxins TcdA and TcdB are the major virulence factors of Clostridium difficile. Circulating neutralizing antitoxin antibodies are protective in C. difficile infection (CDI), as demonstrated, in part, by the protective effects of actoxumab and bezlotoxumab, which bind to and neutralize TcdA and TcdB, respectively. The question of how systemic IgG antibodies neutralize toxins in the gut lumen remains unresolved, although it has been suggested that the Fc receptor FcRn may be involved in active antibody transport across the gut epithelium. In this study, we demonstrated that genetic ablation of FcRn and excess irrelevant human IgG have no impact on actoxumab-bezlotoxumab-mediated protection in murine and hamster models of CDI, suggesting that Fc-dependent transport of antibodies across the gut wall is not required for efficacy. Tissue distribution studies in hamsters suggest, rather, that the transport of antibodies depends on toxin-induced damage to the gut lining. In an in vitro two-dimensional culture system that mimics the architecture of the intestinal mucosal epithelium, toxins on the apical side of epithelial cell monolayers are neutralized by basolateral antibodies, and antibody transport across the cell layer is dramatically increased upon addition of toxin to the apical side. Similar data were obtained with F(ab′)2 fragments, which lack an Fc domain, consistent with FcRn-independent paracellular, rather than transcellular, transport of antibodies. Kinetic studies show that initial damage caused by apical toxin is required for efficient neutralization by basolateral antibodies. These data may represent a general mechanism of humoral response-mediated protection against enteric pathogens. PMID:25385797

  16. Antibody-Mediated Protection Against SHIV Challenge Includes Systemic Clearance of Distal Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyan; Ghneim, Khader; Sok, Devin; Bosche, William J.; Li, Yuan; Chipriano, Elizabeth; Berkemeier, Brian; Oswald, Kelli; Borducchi, Erica; Cabral, Crystal; Peter, Lauren; Brinkman, Amanda; Shetty, Mayuri; Jimenez, Jessica; Mondesir, Jade; Lee, Benjamin; Giglio, Patricia; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Abbink, Peter; Colantonio, Arnaud; Gittens, Courtney; Baker, Chantelle; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G.; Li, Wenjun; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) can protect rhesus monkeys against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. However, the site of antibody interception of virus and the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection remain unclear. We administered a fully protective dose of the bNAb PGT121 to rhesus monkeys and challenged them intravaginally with SHIV-SF162P3. In PGT121 treated animals, we detected low levels of viral RNA and viral DNA in distal tissues for several days following challenge. Viral RNA positive tissues showed transcriptomic changes indicative of innate immune activation, and cells from these tissues initiated infection following adoptive transfer into naïve hosts. These data demonstrate that bNAb mediated protection against a mucosal virus challenge can involve clearance of infectious virus in distal tissues. PMID:27540005

  17. [Immunosuppressive treatment after kidney transplant: the frontier of chronic antibody-mediated rejection].

    PubMed

    Biancone, Luigi; Lavacca, Antonio; Beltramo, Silvia; Ariaudo, Claudia; Gallo, Ester; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The recognition of antibody-mediated rejection as an important factor in the reduction of long-term renal graft survival represents a new challenge to the immunosuppressive strategies of recent years, which have been quite successful in reducing the acute rejection rates as well as the side effects of pharmacological immunosuppression. The search for an effective treatment of chronic anti-donor antibody disease has been pursued mostly through limited single-center experiences and therefore in a dispersed fashion, without leading to the definition of a consolidated approach. The most frequently used pharmacological approaches stem from the experience of antibody-mediated acute rejection. In this review we will critically analyze the results reported so far of various intervention strategies and we will discuss future pharmacological novelties targeting the humoral immune response.

  18. Antibody Fc engineering improves frequency and promotes kinetic boosting of serial killing mediated by NK cells.

    PubMed

    Romain, Gabrielle; Senyukov, Vladimir; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Kelton, William; Liadi, Ivan; Mahendra, Ankit; Charab, Wissam; Georgiou, George; Roysam, Badrinath; Lee, Dean A; Varadarajan, Navin

    2014-11-20

    The efficacy of most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tumor antigens results primarily from their ability to elicit potent cytotoxicity through effector-mediated functions. We have engineered the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) mAb, HuM195, targeting the leukemic antigen CD33, by introducing the triple mutation Ser293Asp/Ala330Leu/Ile332Glu (DLE), and developed Time-lapse Imaging Microscopy in Nanowell Grids to analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity kinetics of thousands of individual natural killer (NK) cells and mAb-coated target cells. We demonstrate that the DLE-HuM195 antibody increases both the quality and the quantity of NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity by endowing more NK cells to participate in cytotoxicity via accrued CD16-mediated signaling and by increasing serial killing of target cells. NK cells encountering targets coated with DLE-HuM195 induce rapid target cell apoptosis by promoting simultaneous conjugates to multiple target cells and induce apoptosis in twice the number of target cells within the same period as the wild-type mAb. Enhanced target killing was also associated with increased frequency of NK cells undergoing apoptosis, but this effect was donor-dependent. Antibody-based therapies targeting tumor antigens will benefit from a better understanding of cell-mediated tumor elimination, and our work opens further opportunities for the therapeutic targeting of CD33 in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

  19. Risk of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients with anti-HLA-C donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aubert, O; Bories, M-C; Suberbielle, C; Snanoudj, R; Anglicheau, D; Rabant, M; Martinez, F; Scemla, A; Legendre, C; Sberro-Soussan, R

    2014-06-01

    Anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) cause acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). However, the clinical relevance of anti-HLA-C antibodies remains unclear. We evaluated the clinical relevance of the presence of anti-HLA-C DSA at day 0 in renal transplant recipients. In this retrospective, case-controlled study, 608 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between August 2008 and March 2012 were screened for the presence of isolated anti-HLA-C DSA at day 0. A total of 22 renal transplant recipients were selected and followed for a period of 1 year. AMR was classified according to the Banff classification. The 22 patients were compared with 88 immunized patients. Acute AMR was diagnosed in six patients (27.3%). The median level of DSA at day 0 was 1179 (530-17,941). The mean fluorescence intensity in the anti-C group was 4966 (978-17,941) in the AMR group and 981 (530-8012) in the group of patients without AMR. Acute AMR was diagnosed less frequently in the 88 immunized individuals (9.1%) than in the DSA anti-C group (p = 0.033). The level of DSA at day 0 was predictive for AMR (p = 0.017). Patients with a high level of pretransplant anti-HLA-C DSAs are likely to develop acute AMR during the first year after transplantation.

  20. Early eradication of persistent Salmonella infection primes antibody-mediated protective immunity to recurrent infection.

    PubMed

    Johanns, Tanner M; Law, Calvin Y; Kalekar, Lokeshchandra A; O'Donnell, Hope; Ertelt, James M; Rowe, Jared H; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-04-01

    Typhoid fever is a systemic, persistent infection caused by host-specific strains of Salmonella. Although the use of antibiotics has reduced the complications associated with primary infection, recurrent infection remains an important cause of ongoing human morbidity and mortality. Herein, we investigated the impacts of antibiotic eradication of primary infection on protection against secondary recurrent infection. Using a murine model of persistent Salmonella infection, we demonstrate protection against recurrent infection is sustained despite early eradication of primary infection. In this model, protection is not mediated by CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells because depletion of these cells either alone or in combination prior to rechallenge does not abrogate protection. Instead, infection followed by antibiotic-mediated clearance primes robust levels of Salmonella-specific antibody that can adoptively transfer protection to naïve mice. Thus, eradication of persistent Salmonella infection primes antibody-mediated protective immunity to recurrent infection.

  1. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediating antibodies from an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial target multiple epitopes and preferentially use the VH1 gene family.

    PubMed

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Pollara, Justin; Moody, M Anthony; Alpert, Michael D; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gilbert, Peter B; Huang, Ying; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kozink, Daniel M; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Lewis, George K; DeVico, Anthony; Evans, David T; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2012-11-01

    The ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX-B/E RV144 vaccine trial showed an estimated efficacy of 31%. RV144 secondary immune correlate analysis demonstrated that the combination of low plasma anti-HIV-1 Env IgA antibodies and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) inversely correlate with infection risk. One hypothesis is that the observed protection in RV144 is partially due to ADCC-mediating antibodies. We found that the majority (73 to 90%) of a representative group of vaccinees displayed plasma ADCC activity, usually (96.2%) blocked by competition with the C1 region-specific A32 Fab fragment. Using memory B-cell cultures and antigen-specific B-cell sorting, we isolated 23 ADCC-mediating nonclonally related antibodies from 6 vaccine recipients. These antibodies targeted A32-blockable conformational epitopes (n = 19), a non-A32-blockable conformational epitope (n = 1), and the gp120 Env variable loops (n = 3). Fourteen antibodies mediated cross-clade target cell killing. ADCC-mediating antibodies displayed modest levels of V-heavy (VH) chain somatic mutation (0.5 to 1.5%) and also displayed a disproportionate usage of VH1 family genes (74%), a phenomenon recently described for CD4-binding site broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Maximal ADCC activity of VH1 antibodies correlated with mutation frequency. The polyclonality and low mutation frequency of these VH1 antibodies reveal fundamental differences in the regulation and maturation of these ADCC-mediating responses compared to VH1 bNAbs.

  2. Soluble Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers from a CD4-Independent HIV-1 Elicit Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Marta K.; Teran, Victor A.; Chapleau, Jean-Philippe; Wang, Baomin; Kim, Su Hyon; LaBranche, Celia C.; Richard, Jonathan; Montefiori, David C.

    2015-01-01

    CD4-independent HIV-1 variants can infect coreceptor-expressing cells lacking CD4. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins on these HIV-1 variants expose a coreceptor binding site that overlaps some CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes. Reports have demonstrated that CD4i antibodies mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Here we investigated the immunogenicity of soluble Env trimers (sgp140) from a CD4-independent HIV-1 in guinea pigs and found that the sgp140 elicited ADCC-mediating antibodies. Therefore, these sgp140 might be useful in vaccine regimens aimed at eliciting ADCC responses. PMID:26246571

  3. Role of monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of immune-mediated glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Joaquín; Cravedi, Paolo

    2014-05-21

    Non-specific immunosuppressants have represented for decades the only therapies for patients with immune-mediated glomerular diseases. These treatments, however, are associated with high rates of no-response and are burdened by toxicities that frequently offset the benefits of proteinuria reduction. Monoclonal antibodies targeting selective cell populations or mediators implicated in the pathophysiology of glomerular diseases have recently become available. Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the CD20 antigen on B cells, safely reduced proteinuria in patients with nephrotic syndrome secondary to membranous nephropathy, minimal change disease, or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Its ability to reduce auto-antibody formation has been instrumental to treat also ANCA-associated vasculitis, lupus nephritis, and mixed cryoglobulinemia. Many reports have also documented the efficacy of the anti-C5 humanized monoclonal antibody Eculizumab to treat atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 nephropathy, and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Thanks to these encouraging findings, monoclonals are becoming very helpful tools to treat patients with glomerular diseases. Moreover, thanks to their specific mechanism of action, these and other monoclonal antibodies are important in improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of glomerular diseases. Their still high costs, however, might represent a major hurdle for their widespread implementation for all patients in need.

  4. Antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation: a review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miae; Martin, Spencer T; Townsend, Keri R; Gabardi, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), also known as B-cell-mediated or humoral rejection, is a significant complication after kidney transplantation that carries a poor prognosis. Although fewer than 10% of kidney transplant patients experience AMR, as many as 30% of these patients experience graft loss as a consequence. Although AMR is mediated by antibodies against an allograft and results in histologic changes in allograft vasculature that differ from cellular rejection, it has not been recognized as a separate disease process until recently. With an improved understanding about the importance of the development of antibodies against allografts as well as complement activation, significant advances have occurred in the treatment of AMR. The standard of care for AMR includes plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin that remove and neutralize antibodies, respectively. Agents targeting B cells (rituximab and alemtuzumab), plasma cells (bortezomib), and the complement system (eculizumab) have also been used successfully to treat AMR in kidney transplant recipients. However, the high cost of these medications, their use for unlabeled indications, and a lack of prospective studies evaluating their efficacy and safety limit the routine use of these agents in the treatment of AMR in kidney transplant recipients.

  5. Dysfunction of nodes of Ranvier: a mechanism for anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Susuki, Keiichiro; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Schafer, Dorothy P.; Hirata, Koichi; Zhang, Gang; Funakoshi, Kei; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2011-01-01

    Autoantibodies against gangliosides GM1 or GD1a are associated with acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) and acute motor-sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), whereas antibodies to GD1b ganglioside are detected in acute sensory ataxic neuropathy (ASAN). These neuropathies have been proposed to be closely related and comprise a continuous spectrum, although the underlying mechanisms, especially for sensory nerve involvement, are still unclear. Antibodies to GM1 and GD1a have been proposed to disrupt the nodes of Ranvier in motor nerves via complement pathway. We hypothesized that the disruption of nodes of Ranvier is a common mechanism whereby various anti-ganglioside antibodies found in these neuropathies lead to nervous system dysfunction. Here, we show that the IgG monoclonal anti-GD1a/GT1b antibody injected into rat sciatic nerves caused deposition of IgG and complement products on the nodal axolemma and disrupted clusters of nodal and paranodal molecules predominantly in motor nerves, and induced early reversible motor nerve conduction block. Injection of IgG monoclonal anti-GD1b antibody induced nodal disruption predominantly in sensory nerves. In an ASAN rabbit model associated with IgG anti-GD1b antibodies, complement-mediated nodal disruption was observed predominantly in sensory nerves. In an AMAN rabbit model associated with IgG anti-GM1 antibodies, complement attack of nodes was found primarily in motor nerves, but occasionally in sensory nerves as well. Periaxonal macrophages and axonal degeneration were observed in dorsal roots from ASAN rabbits and AMAN rabbits. Thus, nodal disruption may be a common mechanism in immune-mediated neuropathies associated with autoantibodies to gangliosides GM1, GD1a, or GD1b, providing an explanation for the continuous spectrum of AMAN, AMSAN, and ASAN. PMID:22178332

  6. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  7. Near-IR Light-Mediated Cleavage of Antibody-Drug Conjugates Using Cyanine Photocages.

    PubMed

    Nani, Roger R; Gorka, Alexander P; Nagaya, Tadanobu; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Schnermann, Martin J

    2015-11-09

    Despite significant progress in the clinical application of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), novel cleavage strategies that provide improved selectivity are still needed. Herein is reported the first approach that uses near-IR light to cleave a small molecule from a biomacromolecule, and its application to the problem of ADC linkage. The preparation of cyanine antibody conjugates, drug cleavage mediated by 690 nm light, and initial in vitro and in vivo evaluation is described. These studies provide the critical chemical underpinning from which to develop this near-IR light cleavable linker strategy.

  8. Expanding the antibody-mediated component of plasma cell-rich acute rejection: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Uppin, M. S.; Gudithi, S.; Taduri, G.; Prayaga, A. K.; Raju, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Renal allograft rejection is mediated by T-cells (T-cell mediated rejection) or by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) (antibody mediated rejection, ABMR). Plasma cell-rich acute rejection (PCAR) is a unique entity due to its peculiar morphology and poor prognostic behavior. All allograft biopsies done at our center from January 2013 to October 2014 were reviewed, and seven were identified with a diagnosis of PCAR with antibody mediated rejection (ABMR). The allograft biopsies were classified as per the Banff 2007 schema. Immunohistochemistry with C4d, SV 40, CD3, CD20, CD138, kappa and lambda light chain was performed. Total 210 allograft biopsies were performed in the study period of which seven biopsies (3.3%) were diagnosed as PCAR with ABMR. All these were late ABMRs (more than 6 months) with median posttransplant duration of 17 months. The allograft biopsy showed features of PCAR along with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and positive C4d. DSA was positive in six patients. All the patients were treated with standard therapeutic measures of acute cellular rejection (ACR) and ABMR including steroids, plasma exchange, rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins. All the patients had persistent graft dysfunction or graft loss on follow-up. PMID:27194831

  9. The Fc and not CD4 Receptor Mediates Antibody Enhancement of HIV Infection in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsy, Jacques; Meyer, Mia; Tateno, Masatoshi; Clarkson, Sarah; Levy, Jay A.

    1989-06-01

    Antibodies that enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity have been found in the blood of infected individuals and in infected or immunized animals. These findings raise serious concern for the development of a safe vaccine against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To address the in vivo relevance and mechanism of this phenomenon, antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity in peripheral blood macrophages, lymphocytes, and human fibroblastoid cells was studied. Neither Leu3a, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD4 receptor, nor soluble recombinant CD4 even at high concentrations prevented this enhancement. The addition of monoclonal antibody to the Fc receptor III (anti-FcRIII), but not of antibodies that react with FcRI or FcRII, inhibited HIV type 1 and HIV type 2 enhancement in peripheral blood macrophages. Although enhancement of HIV infection in CD4+ lymphocytes could not be blocked by anti-FcRIII, it was inhibited by the addition of human immunoglobulin G aggregates. The results indicate that the FcRIII receptor on human macrophages and possibly another Fc receptor on human CD4+ lymphocytes mediate antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity and that this phenomenon proceeds through a mechanism independent of the CD4 protein.

  10. Ocaratuzumab, an Fc-engineered antibody demonstrates enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cheney, Carolyn M; Stephens, Deborah M; Mo, Xiaokui; Rafiq, Sarwish; Butchar, Jonathan; Flynn, Joseph M; Jones, Jeffrey A; Maddocks, Kami; O'Reilly, Adrienne; Ramachandran, Abhijit; Tridandapani, Susheela; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Byrd, John C

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is common in both developed and developing nations where the need for inexpensive and convenient administration of therapy is apparent. Ocaratuzumab is a novel Fc-engineered humanized IgG1 anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) designed for effective antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) at very low concentrations that may facilitate sub-cutaneous (vs. intravenous) dosing. Here, we report ocaratuzumab's potency against CLL cells. In vitro assessment of ocaratuzumab's direct cytotoxicity (DC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and ADCC was performed on CLL cells. Ocaratuzumab induced DC, CDC, and ADCP similarly to rituximab or ofatumumab (anti-CD20 mAbs). However, ocaratuzumab showed an advantage in NK cell-mediated ADCC over these antibodies. In allogeneic ADCC, [E:T (effector:target) ratios = 25:1, 12:1, 6:1], ocaratuzumab (10 µg/mL) improved ADCC by ~3-fold compared with rituximab or ofatumumab (P<0.001 all tested E:T ratios). Notably, the superiority of ocaratuzumab-induced ADCC was observed at low concentrations (0.1-10 ug/ml; P<0.03; allogeneic assays). In extended allogeneic ADCC E:T titration, ocaratuzumab (0.1 µg/mL) demonstrated 19.4% more cytotoxicity than rituximab (E:T = 0.38:1; P = 0.0066) and 21.5% more cytotoxicity than ofatumumab (E:T = 1.5:1; P = 0.0015). In autologous ADCC, ocaratuzumab (10 µg/mL) demonstrated ~1.5-fold increase in cytotoxicity compared with rituximab or ofatumumab at all E:T ratios tested (E:Ts = 25:1,12:1,6:1; all P<0.001). Obinutuzumab, a glyco-engineered anti-CD20 mAb, showed no improvement in ADCC activity compared with ocaratuzumab. The enhanced ADCC of ocaratuzumab suggests that it may be effective at low concentrations. If supported by clinical investigation, this feature could potentially allow for subcutaneous dosing at low doses that could expand the potential of administering chemoimmunotherapy in developing

  11. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption.

    PubMed

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Koefoed-Nielsen, Pernille; Bistrup, Claus

    2010-01-01

    ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody-mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation complicated by acute antibody-mediated rejection, caused by ABO antibodies, may successfully be treated with this regime.

  12. Antibiotics and immunity: effects of antibiotics on natural killer, antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M S; Maged, Z A; Haron, A; Khalil, R Y; Attallah, A M

    1987-12-01

    We studied the effects of antibiotics on natural killer (NK), antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and immunoglobulin production. When human peripheral blood lymphocytes were incubated overnight with the antibiotic before the assay, nitrofurantoin significantly reduced NK but not ADCC activity. Nitrofurantoin also suppressed both spontaneous and interferon-enhanced NK activities in a dose-dependent fashion. Though it did not affect spontaneous ADCC activity, nitrofurantoin suppressed interferon enhancement of ADCC. Chloramphenicol significantly decreased the number of plaque forming cells in mice. In addition to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, rifampicin, cephalothin, polymyxin B and nitrofurantoin reduced mitogen-induced polycloned immunoglobulin synthesis. Results of this study may have clinical relevance, especially in treating immunocompromised patients.

  13. Morphologic and immunohistochemical findings in antibody-mediated rejection of the cardiac allograft.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Fishbein, Michael C

    2012-12-01

    The recognition and acceptance of the entity of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organs has been slow to develop. Greatest acceptance and most information relates to cardiac transplantation. AMR is thought to represent antibody/complement mediated injury to the microvasculature of the graft that can result in allograft dysfunction, allograft loss, accelerated graft vasculopathy, and increased mortality. The morphologic hallmark is microvascular injury with immunoglobulin and complement deposition in capillaries, accumulation of intravascular macrophages, and in more severe cases, microvascular hemorrhage and thrombosis, with inflammation and edema of the affected organ. Understanding of the pathogenesis of AMR, criteria and methods for diagnosis, and treatment strategies are still in evolution, and will be addressed in this review.

  14. Challenges inherent to the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Nicholas; Westall, Glen; Paraskeva, Miranda; Ciciulla, John; Cantwell, Linda; Snell, Greg

    2015-01-01

    A bilateral sequential lung transplant was performed on a young female with cystic fibrosis-related bronchiectasis. She had negative prospective T- and B-cell crossmatch, and no known donor-specific antibodies. Post-transplantation, she developed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates of uncertain etiology, compounded by persistent tachycardia and questionable medication adherence. Despite aggressive intervention for suspected cellular rejection with high-dose intravenous corticosteroid, immunoglobulin, and anti-thymocyte globulin, her condition deteriorated to ultimately require ventilatory support. The eventual discovery of eplet donor-recipient mismatches on related DQB1 alleles raised the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection. Before plasmapheresis could be instituted, the patient rapidly succumbed to respiratory failure. Postmortem examination confirmed features of atypical allograft rejection, without evidence of classic acute cellular rejection. This is an unconventional case of antibody-mediated lung allograft rejection – an entity that is currently a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Prevention of donor-specific antibodies by correct donor-recipient matching, and optimizing adherence post-transplantation are most important. PMID:25802749

  15. Antidotes, antibody-mediated immunity and the future of pharmaceutical product development.

    PubMed

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C

    2013-02-01

    If new scientific knowledge is to be more efficiently generated and applied toward the advancement of health, human safety must be more effectively addressed in the conduct of research. Given the present difficulties of accurately predicting biological outcomes of novel interventions in vivo, the imperative of human safety suggests the development of novel pharmaceutical products in tandem with their prospective antidotes in anticipation of possible adverse events, to render the risks of initial clinical trials more acceptable from a regulatory standpoint. Antibody-mediated immunity provides a generally applicable mechanistic basis for developing antidotes to both biologicals and small-molecule drugs (such that antibodies may serve as antidotes to pharmaceutical agents as a class including other antibodies) and also for the control and prevention of both infectious and noninfectious diseases via passive or active immunization. Accordingly, the development of prophylactic or therapeutic passive-immunization strategies using antipeptide antibodies is a plausible prelude to the development of corresponding active-immunization strategies using peptide-based vaccines. In line with this scheme, global proliferation of antibody- and vaccine-production technologies, especially those that obviate dependence on the cold chain for storage and transport of finished products, could provide geographically distributed breakout capability against emerging and future health challenges.

  16. Antibody-mediated Impairment and Homeostatic Plasticity of Autonomic Ganglionic Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengbei; Low, Phillip A.; Vernino, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies against ganglionic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) are implicated as the cause of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG). To characterize ganglionic neurotransmission in an animal model of AAG, evoked and spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSP) were recorded from neurons in isolated mouse superior cervical ganglia (SCG). In vitro exposure of ganglia to IgG from AAG patients progressively inhibited synaptic transmission. After passive transfer of antibody to mice, evoked EPSP amplitude decreased, and some neurons showed no synaptic responses. EPSP amplitude recovered by day seven despite persistence of ganglionic AChR antibody in the mouse serum. There was a more persistent (at least 14 day) reduction in miniature EPSP amplitude consistent with antibody-mediated reduction in post-synaptic AChR. Although the quantal size was reduced, a progressive increase in the frequency of spontaneous synaptic events occurred, suggesting a compensatory increase in presynaptic efficacy. The quantal size returned to baseline by 21 days while the frequency remained increased for at least four weeks. Ganglionic AChR antibodies cause an impairment of autonomic ganglionic synaptic transmission. Homeostatic plasticity in autonomic neurotransmission could help explain the spontaneous clinical recovery seen in some AAG patients and may also play an important role in regulating normal autonomic reflexes. PMID:20044994

  17. Auto-antibodies as possible markers and mediators of ischemic, dilated, and rhythmic cardiopathies.

    PubMed

    Satta, Nathalie; Vuilleumier, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease leading to cardiovascular diseases responsible for a high level of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Increasing evidence tends to hold that humoral and cellular immune responses are a key component of human atherosclerosis development. Since the last decade, auto-antibodies have been identified as active mediators of cardiovascular disease, some presenting protective effects whereas others act as proatherogenic factors. This review presents an overview of the most relevant auto-antibodies with regards to their respective cardiovascular prognostic value in acute coronary syndrome, stroke and other cardiomyopathies, and their potential pathophysiologic implication in atherogenesis. Insights in the mechanisms of action of auto-antibodies show that they commonly modulate the innate immune system towards a pro- or anti-inflammatory response and/or affect the regulation of basal heart rate. The increased understanding of the auto-antibodies functional properties has led to the development of new therapeutic approaches targeting the innate immune system or the epitope-binding site. Some of these auto-antibodies have been reported to be independent prognostic factors of poor disease outcome. In addition to conventional risk factors, these autoantibodies could be helpful biomarkers to increase the sensitivity and specificity of the cardiovascular stratification tools.

  18. Auto-antibodies as emergent prognostic markers and possible mediators of ischemic cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Roux-Lombard, P; Pagano, S; Montecucco, F; Satta, N; Vuilleumier, N

    2013-02-01

    During the last 15 years, a growing body of evidence supported the fact that auto-antibodies represent not only emergent markers but also active mediators of cardiovascular disease (CVD), clinically represented mostly by acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and stroke. There is a contrasted relationship between auto-antibodies and CVD, some being protective, while others acting as potential risk factors. Therefore, we performed a review of the literature on the respective cardiovascular prognostic value of the most relevant auto-antibodies in ACS and stroke, and their putative pathophysiological properties in atherogenesis. This review highlights auto-antibodies as active modulators of the innate immune system in atherogenesis (either toward a pro- or anti-inflammatory response), or by affecting basal heart rate regulation (anti-apoA-1 IgG). Given their apparent prognostic independency towards traditional cardiovascular risk factors, the data available in the literature indicates that some of those auto-antibodies could be of valuable help for cardiovascular risk stratification in the future, especially because their deleterious effects have been shown to be potentially abrogated in vivo and in vitro by existing therapeutic modalities. Although evidence in humans is currently lacking, these studies may open innovative therapeutic perspectives for CVD in the future.

  19. Novel mutations in Marburg virus glycoprotein associated with viral evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Masahiro; Nakayama, Eri; Marzi, Andrea; Igarashi, Manabu; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2013-04-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus, members of the family Filoviridae, cause lethal haemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. Although the outbreaks are concentrated mainly in Central Africa, these viruses are potential agents of imported infectious diseases and bioterrorism in non-African countries. Recent studies demonstrated that non-human primates passively immunized with virus-specific antibodies were successfully protected against fatal filovirus infection, highlighting the important role of antibodies in protective immunity for this disease. However, the mechanisms underlying potential evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure are not well understood. To analyse possible mutations involved in immune evasion in the MARV envelope glycoprotein (GP) which is the major target of protective antibodies, we selected escape mutants of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) expressing MARV GP (rVSVΔG/MARVGP) by using two GP-specific mAbs, AGP127-8 and MGP72-17, which have been previously shown to inhibit MARV budding. Interestingly, several rVSVΔG/MARVGP variants escaping from the mAb pressure-acquired amino acid substitutions in the furin-cleavage site rather than in the mAb-specific epitopes, suggesting that these epitopes are recessed, not exposed on the uncleaved GP molecule, and therefore inaccessible to the mAbs. More surprisingly, some variants escaping mAb MGP72-17 lacked a large proportion of the mucin-like region of GP, indicating that these mutants efficiently escaped the selective pressure by deleting the mucin-like region including the mAb-specific epitope. Our data demonstrate that MARV GP possesses the potential to evade antibody mediated immune pressure due to extraordinary structural flexibility and variability.

  20. Effective therapy for acute antibody-mediated rejection with mild chronic changes: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gheith, Osama; Al-Otaibi, Torki; Nampoory, Narayanan; Halim, Medhat; Nair, Prasad; Saied, Tarek; Al-Waheeb, Salah; Muzeirei, Ibraheem; Ibraheim, Mona

    2012-08-01

    To reduce the long-term toxicities of immunosuppressant drugs, corticosteroid-sparing and calcineurin-inhibitor-sparing immunosuppression protocols have become increasingly popular in managing kidney transplant recipients. The most vexing clinical condition caused by antibodies in organ transplants is antibody-mediated rejection. Limitations of the current antibody-mediated rejection therapies include (1) antibody-mediated rejection reversal tends to be gradual rather than prompt, (2) expense, (3) rejection reversal rates below 80%, (4) common appearance of chronic rejection after antibody-mediated rejection treatment, and (5) long-term persistence of donor specific antibodies after therapy. Because these limitations may be due to a lack of effects on mature plasma cells, the effects of bortezomib on mature plasma cells may represent a quantum advance in antihumoral therapy. Our experiences represent the first clinical use of bortezomib as an antihumoral agent in renal allograft recipients in Kuwait. We present 2 cases with resistant-acute antibody-mediated rejection to the standard therapies that were managed successfully with bortezomib.

  1. HIV-specific CD4-induced Antibodies Mediate Broad and Potent Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activity and are Commonly Detected in Plasma from HIV-infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Katherine L.; Cortez, Valerie; Dingens, Adam S.; Gach, Johannes S.; Rainwater, Stephanie; Weis, Julie F.; Chen, Xuemin; Spearman, Paul; Forthal, Donald N.; Overbaugh, Julie

    2015-01-01

    HIV-specific antibodies (Abs) can reduce viral burden by blocking new rounds of infection or by destroying infected cells via activation of effector cells through Fc–FcR interaction. This latter process, referred to as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), has been associated with viral control and improved clinical outcome following both HIV and SIV infections. Here we describe an HIV viral-like particle (VLP)-based sorting strategy that led to identification of HIV-specific memory B cells encoding Abs that mediate ADCC from a subtype A-infected Kenyan woman at 914 days post-infection. Using this strategy, 12 HIV-envelope-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were isolated and three mediated potent ADCC activity when compared to well-characterized ADCC mAbs. The ADCC-mediating Abs also mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), which provides a net measure of Fc receptor-triggered effects against replicating virus. Two of the three ADCC-mediating Abs targeted a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope also bound by the mAb C11; the third antibody targeted the N-terminus of V3. Both CD4i Abs identified here demonstrated strong cross-clade breadth with activity against 10 of 11 envelopes tested, including those from clades A, B, C, A/D and C/D, whereas the V3-specific antibody showed more limited breadth. Variants of these CD4i, C11-like mAbs engineered to interrupt binding to FcγRs inhibited a measurable percentage of the donor's ADCC activity starting as early as 189 days post-infection. C11-like antibodies also accounted for between 18–78% of ADCC activity in 9 chronically infected individuals from the same cohort study. Further, the two CD4i Abs originated from unique B cells, suggesting that antibodies targeting this epitope can be commonly produced. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that CD4i, C11-like antibodies develop within the first 6 months of infection and they can arise from unique B-cell lineages in the

  2. Antibody-mediated immune suppression is improved when blends of anti-RBC monoclonal antibodies are used in mice.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Amash, Alaa; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-08-25

    Although the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is highly effective using polyclonal anti-D, a recombinant alternative is long overdue. Unfortunately, anti-D monoclonal antibodies have been, at best, disappointing. To determine the primary attribute defining an optimal antibody, we assessed suppression of murine red blood cell (RBC) immunization by single-monoclonal antibodies vs defined blends of subtype-matched antibodies. Allogeneic RBCs expressing the HOD antigen (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]-ovalbumin-human transmembrane Duffy(b)) were transfused into naïve mice alone or together with selected combinations of HEL-specific antibodies, and the resulting suppressive effect was assessed by evaluating the antibody response. Polyclonal HEL antibodies dramatically inhibited the antibody response to the HOD antigen, whereas single-monoclonal HEL antibodies were less effective despite the use of saturating doses. A blend of monoclonal HEL-specific antibodies reactive with different HEL epitopes significantly increased the suppressive effect, whereas a blend of monoclonal antibodies that block each other's binding to the HEL protein did not increase suppression. In conclusion, these data show that polyclonal antibodies are superior to monoclonal antibodies at suppressing the immune response to the HOD cells, a feature that can be completely recapitulated using monoclonal antibodies to different epitopes.

  3. Persistent expression of biologically active anti-HER2 antibody by AAVrh.10-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Qiu, J; Wang, R; Krause, A; Boyer, J L; Hackett, N R; Crystal, R G

    2010-08-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against an extracellular region of the human epidermal growth-factor receptor type 2 (HER2) protein. We hypothesized that a single adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated genetic delivery of an anti-HER2 antibody should be effective in mediating long-term production of anti-HER2 and in suppressing the growth of human tumors in a xenograft model in nude mice. The adeno-associated virus gene transfer vector AAVrh.10alphaHER2 was constructed based on a non-human primate AAV serotype rh.10 to express the complementary DNAs for the heavy and light chains of mAb 4D5, the murine precursor to trastuzumab. The data show that genetically transferred anti-HER2 selectively bound human HER2 protein and suppressed the proliferation of HER2(+) tumor cell lines. A single administration of AAVrh.10alphaHER2 provided long-term therapeutic levels of anti-HER2 antibody expression without inducing an anti-idiotype response, suppressed the growth of HER2(+) tumors and increased the survival of tumor bearing mice. In the context that trastuzumab therapy requires frequent and repeated administration, this strategy might be developed as an alternate platform for delivery of anti-HER2 therapy.

  4. Current and future challenges in therapy for antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nandini; Ball, Timothy; Uber, Patricia A; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2011-06-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to present a challenge for the survival of the cardiac allograft. AMR appears to be on the rise, likely secondary to changing trends in clinical practice, including selection of patients for transplantation on mechanical circulatory support and development of more effective combinations of immunosuppressive drugs against acute cellular rejection. Most current strategies are aimed at treating acute AMR, but the treatment of chronic AMR is still not well defined. Clinically, AMR can often be more severe than cellular rejection and more difficult to treat, often not responding to typical protocols of increased immunosuppression. Complex steps involved in the antibody response allows for several potential targets for therapeutic intervention, including suppression of T and B cells, elimination of circulating antibodies, and inhibition of residual antibodies. Existing evidence suggests a multiregimen approach is the best option. Sustenance of accommodation and induction of tolerance could be viewed as viable options if adequate immune surveillance can be achieved in this setting. This review discusses the challenges in treating AMR and provides a critical analysis of current and possible future therapies.

  5. Molecular Mechanism of Antibody-Mediated Activation of β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; McMullan, Greg; Henderson, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Summary Binding of a single-chain Fv antibody to Escherichia coli β-galactosidase (β-gal) is known to stabilize the enzyme and activate several inactive point mutants, historically called antibody-mediated enzyme formation mutants. To understand the nature of this activation, we have determined by electron cryo-microscopy the structure of the complex between β-gal and the antibody scFv13R4. Our structure localizes the scFv13R4 binding site to the crevice between domains 1 and 3 in each β-gal subunit. The mutations that scFv13R4 counteracts are located between the antibody binding site and the active site of β-gal, at one end of the TIM-barrel that forms domain 3 where the substrate lactose is hydrolyzed. The mode of binding suggests how scFv stabilizes both the active site of β-gal and the tetrameric state. PMID:24613486

  6. Immunization with heat-killed Francisella tularensis LVS elicits protective antibody-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Christy L; Clinton, Shawn R; Angelova-Fischer, Irena; Marion, Tony N; Bina, Xiaowen R; Bina, James E; Whitt, Michael A; Miller, Mark A

    2007-11-01

    Francisella tularensis (FT) has been classified by the CDC as a category A pathogen because of its high virulence and the high mortality rate associated with infection via the aerosol route. Because there is no licensed vaccine available for FT, development of prophylactic and therapeutic regimens for the prevention/treatment of infection is a high priority. In this report, heat-killed FT live vaccine strain (HKLVS) was employed as a vaccine immunogen, either alone or in combination with an adjuvant, and was found to elicit protective immunity against high-dose FT live vaccine strain (FTLVS) challenge. FT-specific antibodies produced in response to immunization with HKLVS alone were subsequently found to completely protect naive mice against high-dose FT challenge in both infection-interference and passive immunization experiments. Additional passive immunization trials employing serum collected from mice immunized with a heat-killed preparation of an O-antigen-deficient transposon mutant of FTLVS (HKLVS-OAg(neg)) yielded similar results. These findings demonstrated that FT-specific antibodies alone can confer immunity against high-dose FTLVS challenge, and they reveal that antibody-mediated protection is not dependent upon production of LPS-specific antibodies.

  7. Atypical HUS associated with severe, unexpected antibody-mediated rejection post kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Sarah; Mallett, Andrew; Oliver, Kimberley; Hyland, Valentine; Hawley, Carmel; Malmanche, Theo; Isbel, Nicole

    2014-04-01

    We present a case of an unsensitized patient with end-stage kidney disease secondary to atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) with mutations in CD46/MCP and CFH who developed severe, intractable antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) unresponsive to therapy post kidney transplantation. There were no haematological features of thrombotic microangiopathy. The patient received standard induction therapy and after an initial fall in serum creatinine, severe ABMR developed in the setting of urosepsis. Despite maximal therapy with thymoglobulin, plasma exchange and methylprednisolone, rapid graft loss resulted and transplant nephrectomy was performed. Luminex at 4 weeks showed a new DSA and when repeated after nephrectomy showed antibodies to each of the 5 mismatched antigens with high MFI. The rate of recurrence of disease in patients with aHUS referred for transplantation is 50% and is associated with a high rate of graft loss. It is dependent in part on the nature of the mutation with circulating factors CFH and CFI more likely to cause recurrent disease than MCP which is highly expressed in the kidney. There is increasing interest in the role of complement in the development and propagation of ABMR via terminal complement activation. This case suggesting that dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway within the transplant kidney may have contributed to the severe AMR. Very little is known about the impact of complement dysregulation and the development of anti HLA antibodies however the strength of HLA antibody formation was prominent in this case.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of fucose reducing effects in a humanized antibody on Fcγ receptor binding and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activities

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Shan; Quarmby, Valerie; Gao, Xiaoying; Ying, Yong; Lin, Linda; Reed, Chae; Fong, Chris; Lau, Wendy; Qiu, Zhihua J.; Shen, Amy; Vanderlaan, Martin; Song, An

    2012-01-01

    The presence or absence of core fucose in the Fc region N-linked glycans of antibodies affects their binding affinity toward FcγRIIIa as well as their antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. However, the quantitative nature of this structure-function relationship remains unclear. In this study, the in vitro biological activity of an afucosylated anti-CD20 antibody was fully characterized. Further, the effect of fucose reduction on Fc effector functions was quantitatively evaluated using the afucosylated antibody, its “regular” fucosylated counterpart and a series of mixtures containing varying proportions of “regular” and afucosylated materials. Compared with the “regular” fucosylated antibody, the afucosylated antibody demonstrated similar binding interactions with the target antigen (CD20), C1q and FcγRIa, moderate increases in binding to FcγRIIa and IIb, and substantially increased binding to FcγRIIIa. The afucosylated antibodies also showed comparable complement-dependent cytotoxicity activity but markedly increased ADCC activity. Based on EC50 values derived from dose-response curves, our results indicate that the amount of afucosylated glycan in antibody samples correlate with both FcγRIIIa binding activity and ADCC activity in a linear fashion. Furthermore, the extent of ADCC enhancement due to fucose depletion was not affected by the FcγRIIIa genotype of the effector cells. PMID:22531441

  9. Quantitative evaluation of fucose reducing effects in a humanized antibody on Fcγ receptor binding and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activities.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shan; Quarmby, Valerie; Gao, Xiaoying; Ying, Yong; Lin, Linda; Reed, Chae; Fong, Chris; Lau, Wendy; Qiu, Zhihua J; Shen, Amy; Vanderlaan, Martin; Song, An

    2012-01-01

    The presence or absence of core fucose in the Fc region N-linked glycans of antibodies affects their binding affinity toward FcγRIIIa as well as their antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. However, the quantitative nature of this structure-function relationship remains unclear. In this study, the in vitro biological activity of an afucosylated anti-CD20 antibody was fully characterized. Further, the effect of fucose reduction on Fc effector functions was quantitatively evaluated using the afucosylated antibody, its "regular" fucosylated counterpart and a series of mixtures containing varying proportions of "regular" and afucosylated materials. Compared with the "regular" fucosylated antibody, the afucosylated antibody demonstrated similar binding interactions with the target antigen (CD20), C1q and FcγRIa, moderate increases in binding to FcγRIIa and IIb, and substantially increased binding to FcγRIIIa. The afucosylated antibodies also showed comparable complement-dependent cytotoxicity activity but markedly increased ADCC activity. Based on EC 50 values derived from dose-response curves, our results indicate that the amount of afucosylated glycan in antibody samples correlate with both FcγRIIIa binding activity and ADCC activity in a linear fashion. Furthermore, the extent of ADCC enhancement due to fucose depletion was not affected by the FcγRIIIa genotype of the effector cells.

  10. Generation of an affinity column for antibody purification by intein-mediated protein ligation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2003-11-01

    Coupling an antigenic peptide to a solid support is a crucial step in the affinity purification of a peptide-specific antibody. Conventional methods for generating reactive agarose, cellulose or other matrices for peptide conjugation are laborious and can result in a significant amount of chemical waste. In this report, we present a novel method for the facile production of a peptide affinity column by employing intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) in conjunction with chitin affinity chromatography. A reactive thioester was generated at the C-terminal of the chitin binding domain (CBD) from the chitinase A1 of Bacillus circulans WL-2 by thiol-induced cleavage of the peptide bond between the CBD and a modified intein. Peptide epitopes possessing an N-terminal cysteine were ligated to the chitin bound CBD tag. We demonstrate that the resulting peptide columns permit the highly specific and efficient affinity purification of antibodies from animal sera.

  11. A severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia inducing an acute antibody-mediated pulmonary graft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Démir, Sarah; Saison, Julien; Sénéchal, Agathe; Mornex, Jean-Francois

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old cystic fibrosis woman with a history of double-lung transplantation 2 years previously was admitted for a progressive respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed fever (39°C) and diffuse bilateral lung crackles. Laboratory findings included severe hypoxemia and inflammatory syndrome. Bronchoalveolar lavage and serological test were positive for mycoplasma pneumonia. As the patient did not improve after 3 days of antibiotics and donor-specific HLA antibodies had been detected, an acute antibody-mediated graft rejection was treated with high-dose corticosteroids, plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab. The patient rapidly improved. Unfortunately, 6 months after this episode, she developed a bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome with a dependence to noninvasive ventilator leading to the indication of retransplantation. This case illustrates the possible relationship between infection and humoral rejection. These two diagnoses should be promptly investigated and systematically treated in lung transplant recipients. PMID:28144069

  12. Serum Therapy for Tuberculosis Revisited: Reappraisal of the Role of Antibody-Mediated Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Casadevall, Arturo

    1998-01-01

    Fifty years after the introduction of the first effective antimicrobial agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, this pathogen continues to be a tremendous public health problem. The rise in the number of resistant strains and the difficulties involved in the therapy of tuberculosis in immunocompromised AIDS patients have renewed the interest in the development of effective vaccines. To evaluate whether a potential vaccine against tuberculosis could prevent infection by eliciting a protective antibody response, we reviewed the history of antibody-mediated immunity against tuberculosis. Review of the literature of the past 100 years demonstrates that there is sufficient evidence to conclude that antibody-mediated immunity can modify the course of infection in certain situations. Based on our findings and on what is known in other systems, we propose that the role of antibody-mediated immunity to M. tuberculosis be reexamined, using advanced technology. PMID:9665981

  13. A reappraisal of humoral immunity based on mechanisms of antibody-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2006-01-01

    Sometime in the mid to late twentieth century the study of antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) entered the doldrums, as many immunologists believed that the function of AMI was well understood, and was no longer deserving of intensive investigation. However, beginning in the 1990s studies using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) revealed new functions for antibodies, including direct antimicrobial effects and their ability to modify host inflammatory and cellular responses. Furthermore, the demonstration that mAbs to several intracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens were protective issued a serious challenge to the paradigm that host defense against such microbes was strictly governed by cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Hence, a new view of AMI is emerging. This view is based on the concept that a major function of antibody (Ab) is to amplify or subdue the inflammatory response to a microbe. In this regard, the "damage-response framework" of microbial pathogenesis provides a new conceptual viewpoint for understanding mechanisms of AMI. According to this view, the ability of an Ab to affect the outcome of a host-microbe interaction is a function of its capacity to modify the damage ensuing from such an interaction. In fact, it is increasingly apparent that the efficacy of an Ab cannot be defined either by immunoglobulin or epitope characteristics alone, but rather by a complex function of Ab variables, such as specificity, isotype, and amount, host variables, such as genetic background and immune status, and microbial variables, such as inoculum, mechanisms of avoiding host immune surveillance and pathogenic strategy. Consequently, far from being understood, recent findings in AMI imply a system with unfathomable complexity and the field is poised for a long overdue renaissance.

  14. Antibody-mediated enzyme replacement therapy targeting both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haiqing; Sun, Tao; Armstrong, Dustin; Borneman, Scott; Yang, Chunyu; Austin, Stephanie; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2017-02-02

    Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen primarily in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Mannose-6-phosphate receptor-mediated enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) targets the enzyme to lysosomes and thus is unable to digest cytoplasmic glycogen. Studies have shown that anti-DNA antibody 3E10 penetrates living cells and delivers "cargo" proteins to the cytosol or nucleus via equilibrative nucleoside transporter ENT2. We speculate that 3E10-mediated ERT with GAA will target both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease. A fusion protein (FabGAA) containing a humanized Fab fragment derived from the murine 3E10 antibody and the 110 kDa human GAA precursor was constructed and produced in CHO cells. Immunostaining with an anti-Fab antibody revealed that the Fab signals did not co-localize with the lysosomal marker LAMP2 in cultured L6 myoblasts or Pompe patient fibroblasts after incubation with FabGAA. Western blot with an anti-GAA antibody showed presence of the 150 kDa full-length FabGAA in the cell lysates, in addition to the 95- and 76 kDa processed forms of GAA that were also seen in the rhGAA-treated cells. Blocking of mannose-6-phosphate receptor with mannose-6-phosphate markedly reduced the 95- and the 76 kDa forms but not the 150 kDa form. In GAA-KO mice, FabGAA achieved similar treatment efficacy as rhGAA at an equal molar dose in reducing tissue glycogen contents. Our data suggest that FabGAA retains the ability of rhGAA to treat lysosomal glycogen accumulation and has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to reduce cytoplasmic glycogen storage in Pompe disease.

  15. A refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Toshinari; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Izumi; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Yamada, Hiroki; Miki, Jun; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We herein report a refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient. A 45-year-old man was admitted for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 1.8 mg/dL 3 years following primary kidney transplantation. Histological examination revealed moderate to severe inflammatory cell infiltration in the peritubular capillaries. Thorough laboratory examination showed that the patient had donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to DR9 and DQ9. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, we diagnosed acute antibody-mediated rejection. The patient underwent 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange. We also administered rituximab (200 mg/body). Six months after the treatment, a second allograft biopsy revealed the progression of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and persistence of mild peritubular capillaritis. Further analysis showed that the anti-DR9 antibodies had disappeared, but that the mean fluorescence intensity value of the anti-DQ9 antibodies had increased. Therefore, we repeated the plasma exchange and IVIG. Allograft function was stable throughout the course of treatment, and the S-Cr level remained at 1.8 mg/dL. This case report demonstrates the difficulty of treating AMR due to the presence of anti-DQ DSAbs and the necessity for subsequent therapies in refractory cases.

  16. ABO-compatible Liver Allograft Antibody-mediated Rejection: an update

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, Anthony J.; Zeevi, Adriana; O’Leary, Jacqueline G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Liver allograft antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) studies have lagged behind parallel efforts in kidney and heart because of a comparative inherent hepatic resistance to AMR. Three developments, however, have increased interest: 1) solid phase antibody testing enabled more precise antibody characterization; 2) increased expectations for long-term, morbidity-free survival; and 3) immunosuppression minimization trials. Recent Findings Two overlapping liver allograft AMR phenotypic expressions are beginning to emerge: acute and chronic AMR. Acute AMR usually occurs within the several weeks after transplantation and characterized clinically by DSA persistence, allograft dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and hypocomplementemia. Acute AMR appears histopathologically similar to acute AMR in other organs: diffuse microvascular endothelial cell hypertrophy, C4d deposits, neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and macrophage-mediated microvasculitis/capillaritis, along with liver-specific ductular reaction, centrilobular hepatocyte swelling and hepatocanalicular cholestasis often combined with T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR). Chronic AMR is less well-defined, but strongly linked to serum class II DSA and associated with late-onset acute TCMR, fibrosis, chronic rejection and decreased survival. Unlike acute AMR, chronic AMR is a slowly evolving insult with a number of potential manifestations, but most commonly appears as low-grade lymphoplasmacytic portal and perivenular inflammation accompanied by unusual fibrosis patterns and variable microvascular C4d deposition; capillaritis is more difficult to identify than in acute AMR. Summary More precise DSA characterization, increasing expectations for long-term survival, and immunosuppression weaning precipitated a re-emergence of liver allograft AMR interest. Pathophysiological similarities exist between heart, kidney, and liver allografts, but liver-specific considerations may prove critical to our ultimate understanding of all

  17. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) -Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sanne Skov; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Rasmussen, Line Dahlerup; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated the ability of effector cells and antibodies to mediate ADCC separately and in combination using the ADCC-PanToxiLux assay. The ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mediate ADCC was significantly higher in individuals who had been treated with ART before seroconversion, compared to the individuals initiating ART at a low CD4+ T cell count (<350 cells/μl blood) and the ART-naïve individuals. The frequency of CD16 expressing natural killer (NK) cells correlated with both the duration of ART and Granzyme B (GzB) activity. In contrast, the plasma titer of antibodies mediating ADCC declined during ART. These findings suggest improved cytotoxic function of the NK cells if initiating ART early during infection, while the levels of ADCC mediating antibodies declined during ART.

  18. Social Support Mediates Loneliness and Human Herpesvirus Type 6 (HHV-6) Antibody Titers.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Denise; Cruess, Stacy; Kilbourn, Kristin; Klimas, Nancy; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Ironson, Gail; Baum, Andrew; Schneiderman, Neil; Antoni, Michael H

    2006-07-31

    The current study investigated the impact of a severe environmental stressor and the role that declining social integration played in mediating its effect on loneliness and immune status. Increased loneliness and decreased social support in the months following the stressor (storm) were significantly associated with increased HHV-6 antibody titers, reflecting poorer control over the virus. Poorer social integration mediated the relationship between loneliness and HHV-6, even after controlling for nonspecific polyclonal B-cell activation, disease status (CD3+CD4+ cell counts), living arrangements, acute social losses (bereavement), and potential disruptions in social-support resources. These findings suggest that specific elements of social support may explain the oft-noted negative effects of loneliness on the immune system, and generalized to a medically vulnerable population.

  19. p53 protein, EGF receptor, and anti-p53 antibodies in serum from patients with occupationally derived lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, J; Presek, P; Braun, A; Bauer, P; Konietzko, N; Wiesner, B; Woitowitz, H-J

    1999-01-01

    The oncogene product epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R), the tumour suppressor gene product p53 and anti-p53 antibodies are detectable in the serum of certain cancer patients. Increased levels of some of these products were reported in lung cancer patients after occupational asbestos exposure and after exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or vinylchloride. In the first step, this study investigated the possible diagnostic value of serum EGF-R, p53-protein and anti-p53 antibodies, measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in lung tumour patients. In addition to being investigated on a molecular epidemiological basis, these parameters were examined as biomarkers of carcinogenesis, especially with regard to asbestos incorporation effects or of radon-induced lung cancers. Also, a possible effect of cigarette smoking and age dependence were studied. A total of 116 male patients with lung or pleural tumours were examined. The histological classification was four small-cell cancers, six large-cell cancers, 32 adenocarcinomas, 47 squamous carcinomas, 12 mixed lung carcinomas, five diffuse malignant mesotheliomas and ten lung metastasis of extrapulmonary tumours. Twenty-two lung cancers and all mesotheliomas were related to asbestos, 22 lung cancers were related to ionizing radiation and 61 patients had cigarette smoke-related lung cancer. Besides these patients 50 male patients with non-malignant lung or pleural diseases were included; of the latter eight subjects suffered from asbestosis. Controls were 129 male subjects without any lung disease. No significantly elevated or decreased serum values for p53 protein, EGF-R, or anti-p53 antibodies as a function of histological tumour type, age, or degree and type of exposure (asbestos, smoking, ionizing radiation) could be found. The utility of p53-protein, EGF-R and anti-p53 antibodies as routine biomarkers for screening occupationally derived lung cancers is limited. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign

  20. Antibody-Mediated Rejection Due to Preexisting versus De Novo Donor-Specific Antibodies in Kidney Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Olivier; Loupy, Alexandre; Hidalgo, Luis; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Higgins, Sarah; Viglietti, Denis; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Halloran, Philip F

    2017-03-02

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) can occur in patients with preexisting anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies (DSA) or in patients who develop de novo DSA. However, how these processes compare in terms of allograft injury and outcome has not been addressed. From a cohort of 771 kidney biopsy specimens from two North American and five European centers, we performed a systematic assessment of clinical and biologic parameters, histopathology, circulating DSA, and allograft gene expression for all patients with ABMR (n=205). Overall, 103 (50%) patients had preexisting DSA and 102 (50%) had de novo DSA. Compared with patients with preexisting DSA ABMR, patients with de novo DSA ABMR displayed increased proteinuria, more transplant glomerulopathy lesions, and lower glomerulitis, but similar levels of peritubular capillaritis and C4d deposition. De novo DSA ABMR was characterized by increased expression of IFNγ-inducible, natural killer cell, and T cell transcripts, but less expression of AKI transcripts compared with preexisting DSA ABMR. The preexisting DSA ABMR had superior graft survival compared with the de novo DSA ABMR (63% versus 34% at 8 years after rejection, respectively; P<0.001). After adjusting for clinical, histologic, and immunologic characteristics and treatment, we identified de novo DSA ABMR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.82 compared with preexisting DSA ABMR; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.07 to 3.08; P=0.03); low eGFR (<30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) at diagnosis (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.48 to 7.23; P<0.001); ≥0.30 g/g urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (HR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.47 to 4.09; P<0.001); and presence of cg lesions (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.34 to 3.79; P=0.002) as the main independent determinants of allograft loss. Our findings support the transplant of kidneys into highly sensitized patients and should encourage efforts to monitor patients for de novo DSA.

  1. An Fcγ receptor-dependent mechanism drives antibody-mediated target-receptor signaling in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicholas S; Yang, Becky; Yang, Annie; Loeser, Stefanie; Marsters, Scot; Lawrence, David; Li, Yun; Pitti, Robert; Totpal, Klara; Yee, Sharon; Ross, Sarajane; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Lu, Yanmei; Adams, Cam; Offringa, Rienk; Kelley, Bob; Hymowitz, Sarah; Daniel, Dylan; Meng, Gloria; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2011-01-18

    Antibodies to cell-surface antigens trigger activatory Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated retrograde signals in leukocytes to control immune effector functions. Here, we uncover an FcγR mechanism that drives antibody-dependent forward signaling in target cells. Agonistic antibodies to death receptor 5 (DR5) induce cancer-cell apoptosis and are in clinical trials; however, their mechanism of action in vivo is not fully defined. Interaction of the DR5-agonistic antibody drozitumab with leukocyte FcγRs promoted DR5-mediated tumor-cell apoptosis. Whereas the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab required activatory FcγRs for tumoricidal function, drozitumab was effective in the context of either activatory or inhibitory FcγRs. A CD40-agonistic antibody required similar FcγR interactions to stimulate nuclear factor-κB activity in B cells. Thus, FcγRs can drive antibody-mediated receptor signaling in target cells.

  2. Protein disulfide isomerases are antibody targets during immune-mediated tumor destruction

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Catia; Soiffer, Robert; Ho, Vincent; Vanneman, Matthew; Jinushi, Masahisa; Ritz, Jerome; Neuberg, Donna; Stone, Richard; DeAngelo, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The identification of cancer antigens that contribute to transformation and are linked with immune-mediated tumor destruction is an important goal for immunotherapy. Toward this end, we screened a murine renal cell carcinoma cDNA expression library with sera from mice vaccinated with irradiated tumor cells engineered to secrete granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Multiple nonmutated, overexpressed proteins that function in tumor cell migration, protein/nucleic acid homeostasis, metabolism, and stress responses were detected. Among these, the most frequently recognized clone was protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). High titer antibodies to human PDI were similarly induced in an acute myeloid leukemia patient who achieved a complete response after vac-cination with irradiated, autologous GM-CSF–secreting tumor cells in the setting of nonmyeloablative allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Moreover, ERp5, a closely related disulfide isomerase involved in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related protein A (MICA) shedding, also evoked potent humoral reactions in diverse solid and hematologic malignancy patients who responded to GM-CSF–secreting tumor cell vaccines or antibody blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4). Together, these findings reveal the unexpected immunogenicity of PDIs and raise the possibility that these gene products might serve as targets for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:19008459

  3. Role of Fc in antibody-mediated protection from ricin toxin.

    PubMed

    Pincus, Seth H; Das, Anushka; Song, Kejing; Maresh, Grace A; Corti, Miriam; Berry, Jody

    2014-05-07

    We have studied the role of the antibody (Ab) Fc region in mediating protection from ricin toxicity. We compared the in vitro and in vivo effects of intact Ig and of Fab fragments derived from two different neutralizing Ab preparations, one monoclonal, the other polyclonal. Consistent results were obtained from each, showing little difference between Ig and Fab in terms of antigen binding and in vitro neutralization, but with relatively large differences in protection of animals. We also studied whether importing Ab into the cell by Fc receptors enhanced the intracellular neutralization of ricin toxin. We found that the imported Ab was found in the ER and Golgi, a compartment traversed by ricin, as it traffics through the cell, but intracellular Ab did not contribute to the neutralization of ricin. These results indicate that the Fc region of antibody is important for in vivo protection, although the mechanism of enhanced protection by intact Ig does not appear to operate at the single cell level. When using xenogeneic antibodies, the diminished immunogenicity of Fab/F(ab')2 preparations should be balanced against possible loss of protective efficacy.

  4. Complement inhibition as potential new therapy for antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Eskandary, Farsad; Wahrmann, Markus; Mühlbacher, Jakob; Böhmig, Georg A

    2016-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a leading cause of kidney allograft failure. While the exact mechanisms contributing to donor-specific antibody (DSA)-triggered tissue injury are still incompletely understood, complement activation via the classical pathway is believed to be one of the key players. There is now growing interest in complement blockade as an antirejection treatment. One attractive strategy may be inhibition of terminal complex formation using anti-C5 antibody eculizumab. Anecdotal reports, case series, and a unique cohort of flow crossmatch-positive live donor kidney transplant recipients subjected to eculizumab-based desensitization have demonstrated successful prevention and reversal of acute clinical ABMR. Nevertheless, maybe due to complement activation steps proximal of C5 or even complement-independent mechanisms, subclinical rejection processes that might culminate in chronic injury were found to escape inhibition. Larger studies designed to clarify the actual clinical value of terminal complement inhibition as an antirejection treatment are currently underway. In addition, alternative concepts, such as therapies that target key component C1, are currently under development, and we will see in the near future whether new strategies in the pipeline will have the potential to beneficially impact clinical practice.

  5. A Probabilistic Approach to Histologic Diagnosis of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Famulski, K S; Chang, J

    2017-01-01

    Histologic diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in kidney transplant biopsies uses lesion score cutoffs such as 0 versus >0 rather than actual scores and requires donor-specific antibody (DSA); however, cutoffs lose information, and DSA is not always reliable. Using microarray-derived molecular ABMR scores as a histology-independent estimate of ABMR in 703 biopsies, we reassessed criteria for ABMR to determine relative importance of various lesions, the utility of equations using actual scores rather than cutoffs, and the potential for diagnosing ABMR when DSA is unknown or negative. We confirmed that the important features for ABMR diagnosis were peritubular capillaritis (ptc), glomerulitis (g), glomerular double contours, DSA and C4d staining, but we questioned some features: arterial fibrosis, vasculitis, acute tubular injury, and sum of ptc+g scores. Regression equations using lesion scores predicted molecular ABMR more accurately than score cutoffs (area under the curve 0.85-0.86 vs. 0.75). DSA positivity improved accuracy, but regression equations predicted ABMR with moderate accuracy when DSA was unknown. Some biopsies without detectable DSA had high probability of ABMR by regression, although most had HLA antibody. We concluded that regression equations using lesion scores plus DSA maximized diagnostic accuracy and can estimate probable ABMR when DSA is unknown or undetectable.

  6. CD8+ T cells mediate antibody-independent platelet clearance in mice.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Connie M; Patel, Seema R; Sullivan, H Cliff; Winkler, Annie M; Tormey, Chris A; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Stowell, Sean R

    2016-04-07

    Platelet transfusion provides an important therapeutic intervention in the treatment and prevention of bleeding. However, some patients rapidly clear transfused platelets, preventing the desired therapeutic outcome. Although platelet clearance can occur through a variety of mechanisms, immune-mediated platelet removal often plays a significant role. Numerous studies demonstrate that anti-platelet alloantibodies can induce significant platelet clearance following transfusion. In fact, for nearly 50 years, anti-platelet alloantibodies were considered to be the sole mediator of immune-mediated platelet clearance in platelet-refractory individuals. Although nonimmune mechanisms of platelet clearance can often explain platelet removal in the absence of anti-platelet alloantibodies, many patients experience platelet clearance following transfusion in the absence of a clear mechanism. These results suggest that other processes of antibody-independent platelet clearance may occur. Our studies demonstrate that CD8(+)T cells possess the unique ability to induce platelet clearance in the complete absence of anti-platelet alloantibodies. These results suggest a previously unrecognized form of immune-mediated platelet clearance with significant implications in the appropriate management of platelet-refractory individuals.

  7. Microparticle Adhesive Dynamics and Rolling Mediated by Selectin-Specific Antibodies Under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Anthony Sang Won; Goetz, Douglas J.; Klibanov, Alexander L.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies were performed to characterize the relative performance of candidate receptors to target microparticles to inflammatory markers on vascular endothelium. To model the interactions of drug-bearing micro-particles or imaging contrast agents with the vasculature, 6 micron polystyrene particles bearing antibodies, peptides, or carbohydrates were perfused over immobilized E- or P-selectin in a flow chamber. Microparticles conjugated with HuEP5C7.g2 (HuEP), a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific to E- and P-selectin, supported leukocyte-like rolling and transient adhesion at venular shear rates. In contrast, microparticles conjugated with a higher affinity mAb specific for P-selectin (G1) were unable to form bonds at venular flow rates. When both HuEP and G1 were conjugated to the microparticle, HuEP supported binding to P-selectin in flow which allowed G1 to form bonds leading to stable adhesion. While the microparticle attachment and rolling performance was not as stable as that mediated by the natural ligands P-selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 or sialyl Lewisx, HuEP performed significantly better than any previously characterized mAb in terms of mediating micro-particle binding under flow conditions. HuEP may be a viable alternative to natural ligands to selectins for targeting particles to inflamed endothelium. PMID:16917925

  8. Microarray diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant biopsies: an international prospective study (INTERCOM).

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Pereira, A B; Chang, J; Matas, A; Picton, M; De Freitas, D; Bromberg, J; Serón, D; Sellarés, J; Einecke, G; Reeve, J

    2013-11-01

    In a reference set of 403 kidney transplant biopsies, we recently developed a microarray-based test that diagnoses antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) by assigning an ABMR score. To validate the ABMR score and assess its potential impact on practice, we performed the present prospective INTERCOM study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01299168) in 300 new biopsies (264 patients) from six centers: Baltimore, Barcelona, Edmonton, Hannover, Manchester and Minneapolis. We assigned ABMR scores using the classifier created in the reference set and compared it to conventional assessment as documented in the pathology reports. INTERCOM documented uncertainty in conventional assessment: In 41% of biopsies where ABMR features were noted, the recorded diagnoses did not mention ABMR. The ABMR score correlated with ABMR histologic lesions and donor-specific antibodies, but not with T cell-mediated rejection lesions. The agreement between ABMR scores and conventional assessment was identical to that in the reference set (accuracy 85%). The ABMR score was more strongly associated with failure than conventional assessment, and when the ABMR score and conventional assessment disagreed, only the ABMR score was associated with early progression to failure. INTERCOM confirms the need to reduce uncertainty in the diagnosis of ABMR, and demonstrates the potential of the ABMR score to impact practice.

  9. Bortezomib-based treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Li, X L; Xu, X G; Shi, B Y; Zhang, Z M; Li, Z L; Han, Y; Zhou, W Q; Chen, C Q; Cai, M; Zhang, X

    2015-12-22

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is an important factor affecting survival after renal transplantation. A highly selective proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, clears activated plasma cells from the body and has important therapeutic effect on AMR. We investigated the effects of bortezomib on AMR in a patient after a second renal transplant. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of mixed cellular rejection and AMR. Bortezomib was administered on day 1 (1.3 mg/m(2)), day 4 (1.0 mg/m(2)), and day 8 (1.0 mg/m(2)). On the same days, 250 mg methylprednisolone was administered once, and cyclosporine dose (5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) was reduced by 50%. Oral mycophenolate mofetil and steroid were withdrawn on day 1 of bortezomib treatment. Intermittent double-filtration plasmapheresis was also performed. We monitored parameters, including T lymphocyte subsets, CD139 and CD19 expression, panel reactive antibody (PRA), and serum creatinine concentration. At follow-up 6 months after bortezomib treatment, we observed: 1) serum creatinine stabilized at 130 μM from a peak level of 337 μM; 2) PRA decreased from a maximum of 66.7 to 0%; 3) blood plasma cell percentage rebounded after significantly decreasing following the first dose of bortezomib; 4) in renal allograft biopsy, immunohistochemical staining for C4d shifted from strongly positive to negative, and cellular rejection shifted from type IIA to borderline; and 5) adverse effects such as platelet suppression, hypotension, and grade 3 peripheral neuropathy emerged. Bortezomib effectively treated antibody-mediated renal transplantation rejection in this case study, but clinical trials with large sample sizes are still needed to explore clinical safety and tolerability.

  10. Complement Inhibition for Prevention and Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Jordan, S C; Choi, J; Kahwaji, J; Vo, A

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic interventions aimed at the human complement system are recognized as potentially important strategies for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases because there is often evidence of complement-mediated injury according to pathologic assessments. In addition, there are a large number of potential targets, both soluble and cell bound, that might offer potential for new drug development, but progress in this area has met with significant challenges. Currently, 2 drugs are approved aimed at inhibition of complement activation. The first option is eculizumab (anti-C5), which is approved for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab has also been studied in human transplantation for the treatment and prevention of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Initial data from uncontrolled studies suggested a significant benefit of eculizumab for the prevention of ABMR in highly HLA-sensitized patients, but a subsequent randomized, placebo-controlled trial failed to meet its primary endpoint. Anecdotal data, primarily from case studies, showed benefits in treating complement-mediated ABMR. A second approved complement-inhibiting therapy is C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), which is approved for use in patients with hereditary angioedema, a condition caused by mutations in the gene that codes for C1-INH. A recent placebo-controlled trial of C1-INH for prevention of ABMR in HLA-sensitized patients found that the drug was safe, with evidence for inhibition of systemic complement activation and complement-activating donor-specific antibodies. Other drugs are now under development.

  11. Ibrutinib interferes with the cell-mediated anti-tumor activities of therapeutic CD20 antibodies: implications for combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Roit, Fabio Da; Engelberts, Patrick J.; Taylor, Ronald P.; Breij, Esther C.W.; Gritti, Giuseppe; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Introna, Martino; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Beurskens, Frank J.; Golay, Josée

    2015-01-01

    The novel Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib and phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-δ inhibitor idelalisib are promising drugs for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, either alone or in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. We investigated the possible positive or negative impact of these drugs on all known mechanisms of action of both type I and type II anti-CD20 antibodies. Pretreatment with ibrutinib for 1 hour did not increase direct cell death of cell lines or chronic lymphocytic leukemia samples mediated by anti-CD20 antibodies. Pre-treatment with ibrutinib did not inhibit complement activation or complement-mediated lysis. In contrast, ibrutinib strongly inhibited all cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies rituximab, ofatumumab or obinutuzumab, either in purified systems or whole blood assays. Activation of natural killer cells, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by these cells, as well as phagocytosis by macrophages or neutrophils were inhibited by ibrutinib with a half maximal effective concentration of 0.3–3 μM. Analysis of anti-CD20 mediated activation of natural killer cells isolated from patients on continued oral ibrutinib treatment suggested that repeated drug dosing inhibits these cells in vivo. Finally we show that the phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-δ inhibitor idelalisib similarly inhibited the immune cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies, although the effects of this drug at 10 μM were weaker than those observed with ibrutinib at the same concentration. We conclude that the design of combined treatment schedules of anti-CD20 antibodies with these kinase inhibitors should consider the multiple negative interactions between these two classes of drugs. PMID:25344523

  12. Growth inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor and by ganglioside GM3: involvement of receptor-directed protein tyrosine phosphatase(s).

    PubMed

    Suarez Pestana, E; Greiser, U; Sánchez, B; Fernández, L E; Lage, A; Perez, R; Böhmer, F D

    1997-01-01

    Growth of the EGF receptor-expressing non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line H125 seems to be at least partially driven by autocrine activation of the resident EGF receptors. Thus, the possibility of an EGF receptor-directed antiproliferative treatment was investigated in vitro using a monoclonal antibody (alpha EGFR ior egf/r3) against the human EGF receptor and gangliosides which are known to possess antiproliferative and anti-tyrosine kinase activity. The moderate growth-inhibitory effect of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 was strongly potentiated by the addition of monosialoganglioside GM3. Likewise, the combination of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 inhibited EGF receptor autophosphorylation activity in H125 cells more strongly than either agent alone. A synergistic inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 was also observed in the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. In both cell lines, the inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by GM3 was prevented by pretreatment of the cells with pervanadate, a potent inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases). Also, GM3 accelerated EGF receptor dephosphorylation in isolated A431 cell membranes. These findings indicate that GM3 has the capacity to activate EGF receptor-directed PTPase activity and suggest a novel possible mechanism for the regulation of cellular PTPases.

  13. Growth inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor and by ganglioside GM3: involvement of receptor-directed protein tyrosine phosphatase(s).

    PubMed Central

    Suarez Pestana, E.; Greiser, U.; Sánchez, B.; Fernández, L. E.; Lage, A.; Perez, R.; Böhmer, F. D.

    1997-01-01

    Growth of the EGF receptor-expressing non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line H125 seems to be at least partially driven by autocrine activation of the resident EGF receptors. Thus, the possibility of an EGF receptor-directed antiproliferative treatment was investigated in vitro using a monoclonal antibody (alpha EGFR ior egf/r3) against the human EGF receptor and gangliosides which are known to possess antiproliferative and anti-tyrosine kinase activity. The moderate growth-inhibitory effect of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 was strongly potentiated by the addition of monosialoganglioside GM3. Likewise, the combination of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 inhibited EGF receptor autophosphorylation activity in H125 cells more strongly than either agent alone. A synergistic inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 was also observed in the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. In both cell lines, the inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by GM3 was prevented by pretreatment of the cells with pervanadate, a potent inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases). Also, GM3 accelerated EGF receptor dephosphorylation in isolated A431 cell membranes. These findings indicate that GM3 has the capacity to activate EGF receptor-directed PTPase activity and suggest a novel possible mechanism for the regulation of cellular PTPases. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9010029

  14. Role of Fc fragments in antibody-mediated recovery from ocular and subcutaneous herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, J E; Lausch, R N

    1981-01-01

    The contributions of the Fc fragment of virus-specific antibody in the resistance of mice to peripheral herpes simplex virus infection were investigated. Rabbit anti-herpes simplex virus-specific F(ab')2 fragments prepared by pepsin digestion of immune immunoglobulin G (IgG) were found to be inactive in complement-mediated cytolysis while retaining their capacity to neutralize virus infectivity in vitro. When F(ab')2 fragments were passively transferred either before or simultaneously with virus inoculation, they were as efficient as intact IgG was in protecting animals from virus challenge. However, if passive transfer was delayed until 8 h after herpes simplex virus infection, only IgG antibody was protective. The loss of protective activity could not be attributed to a rapid disappearance of F(ab')2 fragments, because comparable levels of F(ab')2 fragments and IgG antibody were maintained in the blood of recipients during the time that antibody mediated its protective effects. The inability of F(ab')2 subunits to activate complement was also not a factor, because complement-deficient A/J mice and complement-sufficient SJL/J mice recovered from herpes simplex virus infection after the passive transfer of IgG. We concluded that the Fc component of the antibody molecule is needed to resolve intracellular infection and that the mechanism by which antibody mediates recovery remains undefined but does not appear to involve virus neutralization or complement activation. PMID:6266961

  15. Severe antibody-mediated rejection following IVIG infusion in a kidney transplant recipient with BK-virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mainra, R; Xu, Q; Chibbar, R; Hassan, A; Shoker, A

    2013-06-01

    Intravenous immune-globulin (IVIG) use in renal transplantation has increased, with common uses including desensitization, treatment of antibody mediated rejection and adjunctive therapy for BK virus nephropathy. Although considered generally safe, potential side effects can occur in up to 23% of patients including acute kidney injury. We present a case of an unexpected cause of acute kidney injury in a renal transplant recipient following IVIG infusion. A 48-year-old nonsensitized female with end stage renal disease secondary to polycystic kidney disease received a deceased donor kidney transplant. The initial post-transplant period was unremarkable however at three years post-transplant the patient develops BK virus nephropathy. Despite a reduction in immunosuppression, graft function worsened and IVIG infusion was commenced. Immediately following the IVIG infusion, the patient develops anuric acute kidney injury necessitating hemodialysis. Renal transplant biopsy performed before and after the IVIG infusion revealed the de novo development of acute antibody mediated rejection and donor specific antibodies in the serum. Anti-HLA and donor-specific antibodies were also confirmed in a diluted sample of the IVIG preparation. We argue that the anti-HLA antibodies present in the IVIG caused an acute antibody mediated rejection in this previously nonsensitized female.

  16. Antibody-mediated immunity in CFW mice infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium. Humoral immune response in murine leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Casoluengo-Méndez, M; Díaz, G V

    1976-01-01

    A depression in antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) measured both in terms of circulating antibody and plaque-forming cells in the spleen was observed in CFW mice infected with M. lepraemurium when sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and human gammaglobulin (HGG) were used as antigens. The impairment in AMI was evident only after 75 days of infection thereafter the antibody response to SRBC antigen progressively decreased until the last day of experimentation (135 days). Within the first 60 days of infection no alteration in AMI was observed with the HGG antigen while the response to the SRBC antigen was significantly higher in the infected animals than in uninfected controls. PMID:795574

  17. Understanding the causes of kidney transplant failure: the dominant role of antibody-mediated rejection and nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; de Freitas, D G; Mengel, M; Reeve, J; Einecke, G; Sis, B; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K; Matas, A; Halloran, P F

    2012-02-01

    We prospectively studied kidney transplants that progressed to failure after a biopsy for clinical indications, aiming to assign a cause to every failure. We followed 315 allograft recipients who underwent indication biopsies at 6 days to 32 years posttransplant. Sixty kidneys progressed to failure in the follow-up period (median 31.4 months). Failure was rare after T-cell-mediated rejection and acute kidney injury and common after antibody-mediated rejection or glomerulonephritis. We developed rules for using biopsy diagnoses, HLA antibody and clinical data to explain each failure. Excluding four with missing information, 56 failures were attributed to four causes: rejection 36 (64%), glomerulonephritis 10 (18%), polyoma virus nephropathy 4 (7%) and intercurrent events 6 (11%). Every rejection loss had evidence of antibody-mediated rejection by the time of failure. Among rejection losses, 17 of 36 (47%) had been independently identified as nonadherent by attending clinicians. Nonadherence was more frequent in patients who progressed to failure (32%) versus those who survived (3%). Pure T-cell-mediated rejection, acute kidney injury, drug toxicity and unexplained progressive fibrosis were not causes of loss. This prospective cohort indicates that many actual failures after indication biopsies manifest phenotypic features of antibody-mediated or mixed rejection and also underscores the major role of nonadherence.

  18. Mediation of Cytotoxic Effects of Streptococcal M Protein by Nontype-Specific Antibody in Human Sera

    PubMed Central

    Beachey, Edwin H.; Stollerman, Gene H.

    1973-01-01

    The cytotoxic moiety(ies) in highly purified streptococcal M protein has been shown to be distinct from the type-specific M determinant. This nontype-specific M-associated determinant(s) (NTSM) causes humoral and cellular immunotoxic responses in man. NTSM is common to M protein prepared from all streptococcal serotypes studied so far. In this study, immunoabsorbents prepared by entrapping purified M proteins in polyacrylamide gel were employed to identify, separate, and purify antibodies directed against NTSM as well as against the type-specific M (TSM) determinants. We found that anti-NTSM present in human blood mediated cytotoxic platelet and leukocyte reactions in the presence of “M proteins” prepared from groups A, C, and G streptococci. Human sera that produced cytotoxic reactions and fixed complement in the presence of highly purified M protein but that contained no antibody to the homologous TSM determinant were used as a source of anti-NTSM. Anti-NTSM was absorbed with and eluted from M protein-polyacrylamide particles and identified as IgG. Antibodies to NTSM were present in most normal human sera and some primate sera (rhesus monkey and baboons) but not in the sera of other common laboratory animals. Further absorption studies showed NTSM to be a component not only of extractable M protein but also of protoplast membranes and of cell walls of avirulent streptococci that lacked extractable TSM antigen. Preparation of antisera that can distinguish between the type-specific protective moiety and the closely associated immunotoxic components in purified M protein vaccines may help answer whether or not M-associated moieties play a role in pathogenesis of poststreptococcal diseases. Images PMID:4125717

  19. Molecular microscope strategy to improve risk stratification in early antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Vernerey, Dewi; Chang, Jessica; Hidalgo, Luis G; Beuscart, Thibaut; Verine, Jerome; Aubert, Olivier; Dubleumortier, Sébastien; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe; Halloran, Philip F

    2014-10-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the leading cause of kidney allograft loss. We investigated whether the addition of gene expression measurements to conventional methods could serve as a molecular microscope to identify kidneys with ABMR that are at high risk for failure. We studied 939 consecutive kidney recipients at Necker Hospital (2004-2010; principal cohort) and 321 kidney recipients at Saint Louis Hospital (2006-2010; validation cohort) and assessed patients with ABMR in the first 1 year post-transplant. In addition to conventional features, we assessed microarray-based gene expression in transplant biopsy specimens using relevant molecular measurements: the ABMR Molecular Score and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcript set. The main outcomes were kidney transplant loss and progression to chronic transplant injury. We identified 74 patients with ABMR in the principal cohort and 54 patients with ABMR in the validation cohort. Conventional features independently associated with failure were donor age and humoral histologic score (g+ptc+v+cg+C4d). Adjusting for conventional features, ABMR Molecular Score (hazard ratio [HR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 3.58; P=0.001) and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcripts (HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 9.16; P<0.05) independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. The results were replicated in the independent validation group. Adding a gene expression assessment to a traditional risk model improved the stratification of patients at risk for graft failure (continuous net reclassification improvement, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.46; P<0.001; integrated discrimination improvement, 0.16; P<0.001). Compared with conventional assessment, the addition of gene expression measurement in kidney transplants with ABMR improves stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss.

  20. Presentation and Outcomes of C4d-Negative Antibody-Mediated Rejection After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Orandi, B J; Alachkar, N; Kraus, E S; Naqvi, F; Lonze, B E; Lees, L; Van Arendonk, K J; Wickliffe, C; Bagnasco, S M; Zachary, A A; Segev, D L; Montgomery, R A

    2016-01-01

    The updated Banff classification allows for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the absence of peritubular capillary C4d staining. Our objective was to quantify allograft loss risk in patients with consistently C4d-negative AMR (n = 51) compared with C4d-positive AMR patients (n = 156) and matched control subjects without AMR. All first-year posttransplant biopsy results from January 2004 through June 2014 were reviewed and correlated with the presence of donor-specific antibody (DSA). C4d-negative AMR patients were not different from C4d-positive AMR patients on any baseline characteristics, including immunologic risk factors (panel reactive antibody, prior transplant, HLA mismatch, donor type, DSA class, and anti-HLA/ABO-incompatibility). C4d-positive AMR patients were significantly more likely to have a clinical presentation (85.3% vs. 54.9%, p < 0.001), and those patients presented substantially earlier posttransplantation (median 14 [interquartile range 8-32] days vs. 46 [interquartile range 20-191], p < 0.001) and were three times more common (7.8% vs 2.5%). One- and 2-year post-AMR-defining biopsy graft survival in C4d-negative AMR patients was 93.4% and 90.2% versus 86.8% and 82.6% in C4d-positive AMR patients, respectively (p = 0.4). C4d-negative AMR was associated with a 2.56-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.08-6.05, p = 0.033) increased risk of graft loss compared with AMR-free matched controls. No clinical characteristics were identified that reliably distinguished C4d-negative from C4d-positive AMR. However, both phenotypes are associated with increased graft loss and thus warrant consideration for intervention.

  1. Disappearance of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Despite Continued Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Late Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Philip F; Chang, Jessica; Famulski, Konrad; Hidalgo, Luis G; Salazar, Israel D R; Merino Lopez, Maribel; Matas, Arthur; Picton, Michael; de Freitas, Declan; Bromberg, Jonathan; Serón, Daniel; Sellarés, Joana; Einecke, Gunilla; Reeve, Jeff

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent renal transplant population presents an opportunity to observe the adaptive changes in the alloimmune response over time, but such studies have been limited by uncertainties in the conventional biopsy diagnosis of T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) and antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). To circumvent these limitations, we used microarrays and conventional methods to investigate rejection in 703 unselected biopsies taken 3 days to 35 years post-transplant from North American and European centers. Using conventional methods, we diagnosed rejection in 205 biopsy specimens (28%): 67 pure TCMR, 110 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (89 designated borderline). Using microarrays, we diagnosed rejection in 228 biopsy specimens (32%): 76 pure TCMR, 124 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (no borderline). Molecular assessment confirmed most conventional diagnoses (agreement was 90% for TCMR and 83% for ABMR) but revealed some errors, particularly in mixed rejection, and improved prediction of failure. ABMR was strongly associated with increased graft loss, but TCMR was not. ABMR became common in biopsy specimens obtained >1 year post-transplant and continued to appear in all subsequent intervals. TCMR was common early but progressively disappeared over time. In 108 biopsy specimens obtained 10.2-35 years post-transplant, TCMR defined by molecular and conventional features was never observed. We conclude that the main cause of kidney transplant failure is ABMR, which can present even decades after transplantation. In contrast, TCMR disappears by 10 years post-transplant, implying that a state of partial adaptive tolerance emerges over time in the kidney transplant population.

  2. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA): epidemiology, immunogenicity and risks.

    PubMed

    Macdougall, Iain C

    2005-05-01

    Although epoetin-induced antibody (Ab)-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) was very rare prior to 1998, a large increase in the number of global cases was observed from 1999 to 2002 in patients treated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) for the anaemia associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The number of global cases of this immunological form of PRCA has declined precipitously since 2003 following increased awareness of this disorder and changes in the handling and administration of the formulation of epoetin-alpha (EPO) that was associated with the majority of cases. Current recommendations state that patients should stop treatment immediately following a diagnosis of Ab-mediated PRCA and not resume treatment with the same or another ESA. The feasibility of re-treatment following remission from PRCA or during ongoing immunosuppressive therapy is currently under investigation. The immunological mechanism for developing Ab-mediated PRCA is unknown, but a variety of factors may increase the immunogenicity of epoetin or other ESAs. Product-related factors that have the potential to impact on immunogenicity include sequence variations in proteins, the degree and nature of protein glycosylation, the manufacturing process, handling and storage, and components and properties of the product formulation. Patient-related factors associated with developing Ab-mediated PRCA include skin reactions, immune status and treatment history. Increased awareness among physicians of the factors contributing to the development of PRCA and its distinguishing clinical features has coincided with studies aimed at identifying effective therapies for this disorder. A number of immunosuppressive therapies have been shown recently to reconstitute effectively the erythropoietic response in patients with PRCA. However, therapeutic approaches for this serious immunological reaction to recombinant ESAs remain investigative.

  3. Activation of NLRC4 downregulates TLR5-mediated antibody immune responses against flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yang, Jingyi; Zhang, Ejuan; Zhong, Maohua; Xiao, Yang; Yu, Jie; Zhou, Dihan; Cao, Yuan; Yang, Yi; Li, Yaoming; Yan, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial flagellin is a unique pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP), which can be recognized by surface localized Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) and the cytosolic NOD-like receptor (NLR) protein 4 (NLRC4) receptors. Activation of the TLR5 and/or NLRC4 signaling pathways by flagellin and the resulting immune responses play important roles in anti-bacterial immunity. However, it remains unclear how the dual activities of flagellin that activate the TLR5 and/or NLRC4 signaling pathways orchestrate the immune responses. In this study, we assessed the effects of flagellin and its mutants lacking the ability to activate TLR5 and NLRC4 alone or in combination on the adaptive immune responses against flagellin. Flagellin that was unable to activate NLRC4 induced a significantly higher antibody response than did wild-type flagellin. The increased antibody response could be eliminated when macrophages were depleted in vivo. The activation of NLRC4 by flagellin downregulated the flagellin-induced and TLR5-mediated immune responses against flagellin. PMID:25914934

  4. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T.; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O.; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G.; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  5. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-05-19

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors.

  6. Phagocytic cells contribute to the antibody-mediated elimination of pulmonary-infected SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Fumihiko; Kohara, Michinori; Kitabatake, Masahiro; Nishiwaki, Tetsu; Fujii, Hideki; Tateno, Chise; Yoneda, Misako; Morita, Kouichi; Matsushima, Kouji; Koyasu, Shigeo; Kai, Chieko

    2014-04-01

    While the 2002-2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) resulted in 774 deaths, patients who were affected with mild pulmonary symptoms successfully recovered. The objective of the present work was to identify, using SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) mouse infection models, immune factors responsible for clearing of the virus. The elimination of pulmonary SARS-CoV infection required the activation of B cells by CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, passive immunization (post-infection) with homologous (murine) anti-SARS-CoV antiserum showed greater elimination efficacy against SARS-CoV than that with heterologous (rabbit) antiserum, despite the use of equivalent titers of neutralizing antibodies. This distinction was mediated by mouse phagocytic cells (monocyte-derived infiltrating macrophages and partially alveolar macrophages, but not neutrophils), as demonstrated both by adoptive transfer from donors and by immunological depletion of selected cell types. These results indicate that the cooperation of anti-SARS-CoV antibodies and phagocytic cells plays an important role in the elimination of SARS-CoV.

  7. Soluble BAFF Cytokine Levels and Antibody-Mediated Rejection of the Kidney Allograft.

    PubMed

    Slavcev, Antonij; Brozova, Jitka; Slatinska, Janka; Sekerkova, Zuzana; Honsova, Eva; Skibova, Jelena; Striz, Ilja; Viklicky, Ondrej

    2016-12-01

    The B-cell activating factor (BAFF) cytokine has important functions for the survival and maturation of B lymphocytes, which implies that this cytokine might play a role in the development of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) after kidney transplantation. In our study, we compared the concentrations of the soluble BAFF cytokine in kidney graft recipients with AMR and patients without rejection with the goal of testing the hypothesis whether BAFF level measurement might be useful as a diagnostic marker of AMR. The study included a cohort of 19 high-risk patients with diagnosed AMR and 17 control patients free of rejection. BAFF was measured in all patients before transplantation, during the rejection episodes, and three months after transplantation in patients free of rejection using the Luminex technique. Before transplantation, the serum concentrations of BAFF in patients with AMR and kidney recipients without rejection did not significantly differ. After transplantation, however, BAFF levels were significantly lower in patients with AMR and also in patients with concurrent humoral and cellular rejection compared with patients without rejection (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). No correlation was found between BAFF and the production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) before and after transplantation. Patients experiencing AMR and simultaneous cellular and AMR had significantly lower concentrations of BAFF in comparison with patients free of rejection.

  8. Eculizumab to treat antibody-mediated rejection in a 7-year-old kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Hassib; Rotman, Samuel; Matter, Maurice; Girardin, Eric; Aubert, Vincent; Pascual, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    We report on successful early eculizumab administration to treat acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in a highly sensitized kidney transplant recipient. The recipient is a 7-year-old boy who received, 6 months after a desensitization protocol with monthly intravenous immunoglobulin infusion, a second kidney transplant in the presence of low donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). Both pretransplant lymphocytotoxic and flow cytometric crossmatch were negative. Allograft function recovered promptly, with excellent initial function. On postoperative day (POD) 4, the child developed significant proteinuria with an acute rise in serum creatinine. Allograft biopsy showed severe acute ABMR. Intravenous eculizumab (600 mg), preceded by a single session of plasmapheresis, was administered on POD 5 and 12 along with a 4-day thymoglobulin course. After the first dose of eculizumab, a strikingly rapid normalization of allograft function with a decrease in proteinuria occurred. However, because circulating DSA levels remained elevated, the child received 3 doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (POD 15, 16, and 17), with a significant subsequent decrease in DSA levels. At 9 months after transplant, the child continues to maintain excellent allograft function with undetectable circulating DSA levels. This unique case highlights the potential efficacy of using early eculizumab to rapidly reverse severe ABMR in pediatric transplantation, and therefore it suggests a novel therapeutic approach to treat acute ABMR.

  9. Better understanding of transplant glomerulopathy secondary to chronic antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Remport, Adam; Ivanyi, Bela; Mathe, Zoltan; Tinckam, Kathryn; Mucsi, Istvan; Molnar, Miklos Z

    2015-11-01

    Transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is generally accepted to result from repeated episodes of endothelial activation, injury and repair, leading to pathological abnormalities of double contouring or multi-layering of the glomerular basement membrane. TG is a major sequel of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (cABMR), from pre-existing or de novo anti-HLA antibodies. Hepatitis C infection, thrombotic microangiopathy or other factors may also contribute to TG development. TG prevalence is 5-20% in most series, reaching 55%, in some high-risk cohorts, and is associated with worse allograft outcomes. Despite its prevalence and clinical significance, few well-studied treatment options have been proposed. Similar to desensitization protocols, plasmapheresis with or without immunoabsorption, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, bortezomib and eculizumab have been proposed in the treatment of TG due to cABMR individually or in various combinations. Robust clinical trials are urgently needed to address this major cause of allograft loss. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the epidemiology, etiology, pathology, and the preventive and treatment options for TG secondary to cABMR.

  10. Antibody-mediated p53 protein therapy prevents liver metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James E; Fischer, Laurice K; Chan, Grace; Chang, Sophia S; Baldwin, Scott W; Aragon, Robert J; Carter, Jacqueline J; Lilly, Michael; Nishimura, Robert N; Weisbart, Richard H; Reeves, Mark E

    2007-02-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3E10 Fv antibody-mediated p53 protein therapy, an Fv-p53 fusion protein produced in Pichia pastoris was tested on CT26.CL25 colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model of colon cancer metastasis to the liver. In vitro experiments showed killing of CT26.CL25 cells by Fv-p53 but not Fv or p53 alone, and immunohistochemical staining confirmed that Fv was required for transport of p53 into cells. Prevention of liver metastasis in vivo was tested by splenic injection of 100 nmol/L Fv-p53 10 min and 1 week after injection of CT26.CL25 cancer cells into the portal vein of BALB/c mice. Mice were sacrificed 1 week after the second injection of Fv-p53 and assigned a quantitative metastasis score. Control mice had an average metastasis score of 3.3 +/- 1.3, whereas mice treated with Fv-p53 had an average metastasis score of 0.8 +/- 0.4 (P = 0.004). These results indicate that Fv-p53 treatment had a profound effect on liver metastasis and represent the first demonstration of effective full-length p53 protein therapy in vivo. mAb 3E10 Fv has significant clinical potential as a mediator of intracellular and intranuclear delivery of p53 for prevention and treatment of cancer metastasis.

  11. The toxicity of antiprion antibodies is mediated by the flexible tail of the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Sonati, Tiziana; Reimann, Regina R; Falsig, Jeppe; Baral, Pravas Kumar; O'Connor, Tracy; Hornemann, Simone; Yaganoglu, Sine; Li, Bei; Herrmann, Uli S; Wieland, Barbara; Swayampakula, Mridula; Rahman, Muhammad Hafizur; Das, Dipankar; Kav, Nat; Riek, Roland; Liberski, Pawel P; James, Michael N G; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2013-09-05

    Prion infections cause lethal neurodegeneration. This process requires the cellular prion protein (PrP(C); ref. 1), which contains a globular domain hinged to a long amino-proximal flexible tail. Here we describe rapid neurotoxicity in mice and cerebellar organotypic cultured slices exposed to ligands targeting the α1 and α3 helices of the PrP(C) globular domain. Ligands included seven distinct monoclonal antibodies, monovalent Fab1 fragments and recombinant single-chain variable fragment miniantibodies. Similar to prion infections, the toxicity of globular domain ligands required neuronal PrP(C), was exacerbated by PrP(C) overexpression, was associated with calpain activation and was antagonized by calpain inhibitors. Neurodegeneration was accompanied by a burst of reactive oxygen species, and was suppressed by antioxidants. Furthermore, genetic ablation of the superoxide-producing enzyme NOX2 (also known as CYBB) protected mice from globular domain ligand toxicity. We also found that neurotoxicity was prevented by deletions of the octapeptide repeats within the flexible tail. These deletions did not appreciably compromise globular domain antibody binding, suggesting that the flexible tail is required to transmit toxic signals that originate from the globular domain and trigger oxidative stress and calpain activation. Supporting this view, various octapeptide ligands were not only innocuous to both cerebellar organotypic cultured slices and mice, but also prevented the toxicity of globular domain ligands while not interfering with their binding. We conclude that PrP(C) consists of two functionally distinct modules, with the globular domain and the flexible tail exerting regulatory and executive functions, respectively. Octapeptide ligands also prolonged the life of mice expressing the toxic PrP(C) mutant, PrP(Δ94-134), indicating that the flexible tail mediates toxicity in two distinct PrP(C)-related conditions. Flexible tail-mediated toxicity may conceivably

  12. Antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients: potential efficacy of B-cell depletion and antibody removal.

    PubMed

    Bierl, Charlene; Miller, Barry; Prak, Eline Luning; Gasiewski, Allison; Kearns, Jane; Tsai, Donald; Jessup, Mariell; Kamoun, Malek

    2006-01-01

    We present four patients with late AMR following cardiac transplantation, which was associated with de novo post-transplant anti-HLA class II antibody production. All patients had negative anti-HLA class I and class II antibodies prior to transplantation (as assessed by sensitive Flow PRA bead assays) and had a negative retrospective T- and B-cell flow cytometric cross-match. Upon presentation with late graft rejection due to AMR, all patients were treated with rituximab and serial plasmapheresis with IVIg plus triple-drug immunosuppression therapy. Despite initial responses to therapy, relapses occurred in all of the patients and necessitated prolonged or multiple hospital admissions and second transplants in two cases. Post-transplant serum antibody monitoring did not prove to be predictive of treatment success or failure. Serum anti-HLA antibodies should be monitored after heart transplantation. We recommend an assessment of anti-HLA antibodies following a decline in immunosuppressant drug levels or in the presence of heart failure symptoms. Anti-HLA antibody detection should be performed using very sensitive techniques such as microparticle-based assays.

  13. Incidence of erythropoietin antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia: the Prospective Immunogenicity Surveillance Registry (PRIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Macdougall, Iain C.; Casadevall, Nicole; Locatelli, Francesco; Combe, Christian; London, Gerard M.; Di Paolo, Salvatore; Kribben, Andreas; Fliser, Danilo; Messner, Hans; McNeil, John; Stevens, Paul; Santoro, Antonio; De Francisco, Angel L.M.; Percheson, Paul; Potamianou, Anna; Foucher, Arnaud; Fife, Daniel; Mérit, Véronique; Vercammen, Els

    2015-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous administration of Eprex® (epoetin alfa) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) was contraindicated in the European Union between 2002 and 2006 after increased reports of anti-erythropoietin antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). The Prospective Immunogenicity Surveillance Registry (PRIMS) was conducted to estimate the incidence of antibody-mediated PRCA with subcutaneous administration of a new coated-stopper syringe presentation of Eprex® and to compare this with the PRCA incidence with subcutaneous NeoRecormon® (epoetin beta) and Aranesp® (darbepoetin alfa). Methods PRIMS was a multicentre, multinational, non-interventional, parallel-group, immunogenicity surveillance registry. Adults with CKD receiving or about to initiate subcutaneous Eprex®, NeoRecormon® or Aranesp® for anaemia were enrolled and followed for up to 3 years. Unexplained loss or lack of effect (LOE), including suspected PRCA, was reported, with antibody testing for confirmation of PRCA. Results Of the 15 333 patients enrolled, 5948 received Eprex® (8377 patient-years) and 9356 received NeoRecormon®/Aranesp® (14 286 patient-years). No treatment data were available for 29 patients. Among 23 patients with LOE, five cases of PRCA were confirmed (Eprex®, n = 3; NeoRecormon®, n = 1; Aranesp®, n = 1). Based on exposed time, PRCA incidence was 35.8/100 000 patient-years (95% CI 7.4–104.7) for Eprex® versus 14.0/100 000 patient-years (95% CI 1.7–50.6) for NeoRecormon®/Aranesp®. The incidence of PRCA with Eprex® was not significantly different versus comparator ESAs (rate ratio: 2.56; 95% CI 0.43–15.31). An analysis based on observed time produced similar findings. Conclusion This large, prospective registry demonstrates that PRCA is rare with subcutaneous administration of either the new coated-stopper syringe presentation of Eprex®, or NeoRecormon® or Aranesp®. PMID:25239637

  14. Heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors. II. Relationship to antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gormus, B. J.; Woodson, Mildred; Kaplan, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were incubated (stripped) with pronase or papain and compared with unstripped lymphocytes for their ability to mediate antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Despite marked removal or inactivation of receptors for heat-aggregated IgG (aggG) by proteolytic digestion, and pronounced changes in the percentages of cells rosetting with IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA) (decreased by papain, increased by pronase), stripped PBL functioned normally in ADCC. Stripped and unstripped lymphocytes were pre-treated with aggG to determine the role of aggG receptors in ADCC. AggG almost totally abolished ADCC by unstripped PBL, but inhibited ADCC by enzyme-stripped lymphocytes relatively poorly. Neither untreated nor stripped PBL were able to induce cytotoxicity of chicken erythrocyte (CRBC) target cells sensitized with the Fab'2 fragment of anti-CRBC IgG antibody (CRBC-A). Exposure of PBL to EA monolayers composed of CRBC-A or of sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) sensitized with rabbit anti-SRBC IgG antibody (SRBC-A) depleted PBL of cells that rosetted with CRBC-A and with human Rh-positive, type O erythrocytes sensitized with the human anti-Rh serum Ripley (HRBC-A Ripley). Non-adherent cells were incapable of binding aggG and had markedly diminished cytotoxicity in ADCC. Similarly, exposure of PBL to HRBC-A Ripley monolayers resulted in non-adherent cells that were incapable of rosette formation with HRBC-A or CRBC-A, failed to bind aggG, and exhibited significantly diminished ADCC activity. These studies indicated that: (1) cytotoxic effector PBL active in ADCC (K cells) have receptors for aggG and for EA; (2) PBL deficient in functional aggG receptors (enzymatically inactivated or removed) are capable of inducing normal levels of ADCC; (3) aggG and EA receptors appear to be closely associated on native K-cell membranes; (4) there is no clear-cut relationship in a given lymphocyte population between the presence of either aggG or

  15. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Arterialised Venous Allografts Is Inhibited by Immunosuppression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Martin; Oliverius, Martin; Kuhn, Stephanie; Feldbrügge, Linda; Krenzien, Felix; Hau, Hans-Michael; Wiltberger, Georg; Schmelzle, Moritz; Jonas, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Objectives and Design We determined in a rat model (1) the presence and dynamics of alloantibodies recognizing MHC complexes on quiescent Brown-Norway (BN) splenic cells in the sera of Lewis (LEW) recipients of Brown-Norway iliolumbar vein grafts under tacrolimus immunosuppression; and (2) the presence of immunoglobulins in the wall of acute rejected vein allografts. Materials and Methods Flow cytometry was used for the analysis of day 0, 14 and 30 sera obtained from Lewis recipients of isogeneic iliolumbar vein grafts (group A) or Brown-Norway grafts (group B, C) for the presence of donor specific anti-MHC class I and II antibodies. Tacrolimus 0.2 mg/kg daily was administered from day 1 to day 30 (group C). Histology was performed on day 30. Results Sera obtained preoperatively and on day 30 were compared in all groups. The statistically significant decrease of anti MHC class I and II antibody binding was observed only in allogenic non-immunosuppressed group B (splenocytes: MHC class I - day 0 (93%±7% ) vs day 30 (66%±7%), p = 0.02, MHC class II - day 0 (105%±3% ) vs day 30 (83%±5%), p = 0.003; B-cells: MHC class I - day 0 (83%±5%) vs day 30 (55%±6%), p = 0.003, MHC class II - day 0 (101%±1%) vs day 30 (79%±6%), p = 0.006; T-cells: MHC class I - day 0 (71%±7%) vs day 30 (49%±5%), p = 0.04). No free clusters of immunoglobulin G deposition were detected in any experimental group. Conclusion Arterialized venous allografts induce strong donor-specific anti-MHC class I and anti-MHC class II antibody production with subsequent immune-mediated destruction of these allografts with no evidence of immunoglobulin G deposition. Low-dose tacrolimus suppress the donor-specific antibody production. PMID:24618652

  16. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) treatment and re-treatment: multiple options.

    PubMed

    Rossert, Jérôme; Macdougall, Iain; Casadevall, Nicole

    2005-05-01

    In the vast majority of patients with antibody (Ab)-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), simple withdrawal of the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) does not effectively reverse PRCA. In contrast, immunosuppressive treatments can induce the disappearance of anti-erythropoietin Abs and a reversal of PRCA. Consensus opinion on the optimal therapy has not been established, but individual case reports or case series suggest that kidney transplantation or treatment with corticosteroids plus cyclophosphamide are the most effective therapies. However, treatment with cyclosporine is an interesting alternative, since it appears to be effective in at least two-thirds of patients and with minimal side effects. Due to the key role of ESAs in the management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), some patients have been re-treated with an ESA following resolution of Ab-mediated PRCA. In all reported cases, this treatment increased haemoglobin levels, alleviated the need for transfusions and did not have side effects. However, one should be extremely cautious when deciding to re-treat a patient with ESA, due to the small number of reported cases and the possibility of publication bias.

  17. Key role for CD4 T cells during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, A.; Wang, J.; Pelletier, R.P.; Nadasdy, T.; Brodsky, S.; Roy, S.; Lodder, M.; Bobek, D.; Mofatt-Bruce, S.; Fairchild, R.L.; Henry, M.L.; Hadley, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    We utilized mouse models to elucidate the immunologic mechanisms of functional graft loss during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts (mixed AMR), in which humoral and cellular responses to the graft occur concomitantly. Although the majority of T cells in the graft at the time of rejection were CD8 T cells with only a minor population of CD4 T cells, depletion of CD4 but not CD8 cells prevented acute graft loss during mixed AMR. CD4 depletion eliminated anti-donor alloantibodies and conferred protection from destruction of renal allografts. ELISPOT revealed that CD4 T effectors responded to donor alloantigens by both the direct and indirect pathways of allorecognition. In transfer studies, CD4 T effectors primed to donor alloantigens were highly effective at promoting acute graft dysfunction, and exhibited the attributes of effector T cells. Laser capture microdissection and confirmatory immunostaining studies revealed that CD4 T cells infiltrating the graft produced effector molecules with graft destructive potential. Bioluminescent imaging confirmed that CD4 T effectors traffic to the graft site in immune replete hosts. These data document that host CD4 T cells can promote acute dysfunction of renal allografts by directly mediating graft injury in addition to facilitating anti-donor alloantibody responses. PMID:24410909

  18. Decitabine enhances anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody BI 836858-mediated natural killer ADCC against AML blasts.

    PubMed

    Vasu, Sumithira; He, Shun; Cheney, Carolyn; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lozanski, Gerard; Mo, Xiaokui; Groh, Veronica; Whitman, Susan P; Konopitzky, Renate; Kössl, Christian; Bucci, Donna; Lucas, David M; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A; Blum, William; Adam, Paul J; Borges, Eric; Rueter, Bjoern; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Marcucci, Guido; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2016-06-09

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia, affecting older individuals at a median age of 67 years. Resistance to intensive induction chemotherapy is the major cause of death in elderly AML; hence, novel treatment strategies are warranted. CD33-directed antibody-drug conjugates (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) have been shown to improve overall survival, validating CD33 as a target for antibody-based therapy of AML. Here, we report the in vitro efficacy of BI 836858, a fully human, Fc-engineered, anti-CD33 antibody using AML cell lines and primary AML blasts as targets. BI 836858-opsonized AML cells significantly induced both autologous and allogeneic natural killer (NK)-cell degranulation and NK-cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro treatment of AML blasts with decitabine (DAC) or 5-azacytidine, 2 hypomethylating agents that show efficacy in older patients, did not compromise BI 836858-induced NK-cell-mediated ADCC. Evaluation of BI 836858-mediated ADCC in serial marrow AML aspirates in patients who received a 10-day course of DAC (pre-DAC, days 4, 11, and 28 post-DAC) revealed significantly higher ADCC in samples at day 28 post-DAC when compared with pre-DAC treatment. Analysis of ligands to activating receptors (NKG2D) showed significantly increased NKG2D ligand [NKG2DL] expression in day 28 post-DAC samples compared with pre-DAC samples; when NKG2DL receptor was blocked using antibodies, BI 836858-mediated ADCC was significantly decreased, suggesting that DAC enhances AML blast susceptibility to BI 836858 by upregulating NKG2DL. These data provide a rationale for combination therapy of Fc-engineered antibodies such as BI 836858 with azanucleosides in elderly patients with AML.

  19. Decitabine enhances anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody BI 836858–mediated natural killer ADCC against AML blasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Sumithira; He, Shun; Cheney, Carolyn; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lozanski, Gerard; Mo, Xiaokui; Groh, Veronica; Whitman, Susan P.; Konopitzky, Renate; Kössl, Christian; Bucci, Donna; Lucas, David M.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Blum, William; Adam, Paul J.; Borges, Eric; Rueter, Bjoern; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia, affecting older individuals at a median age of 67 years. Resistance to intensive induction chemotherapy is the major cause of death in elderly AML; hence, novel treatment strategies are warranted. CD33-directed antibody-drug conjugates (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) have been shown to improve overall survival, validating CD33 as a target for antibody-based therapy of AML. Here, we report the in vitro efficacy of BI 836858, a fully human, Fc-engineered, anti-CD33 antibody using AML cell lines and primary AML blasts as targets. BI 836858–opsonized AML cells significantly induced both autologous and allogeneic natural killer (NK)-cell degranulation and NK-cell–mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro treatment of AML blasts with decitabine (DAC) or 5-azacytidine, 2 hypomethylating agents that show efficacy in older patients, did not compromise BI 836858–induced NK-cell–mediated ADCC. Evaluation of BI 836858–mediated ADCC in serial marrow AML aspirates in patients who received a 10-day course of DAC (pre-DAC, days 4, 11, and 28 post-DAC) revealed significantly higher ADCC in samples at day 28 post-DAC when compared with pre-DAC treatment. Analysis of ligands to activating receptors (NKG2D) showed significantly increased NKG2D ligand [NKG2DL] expression in day 28 post-DAC samples compared with pre-DAC samples; when NKG2DL receptor was blocked using antibodies, BI 836858–mediated ADCC was significantly decreased, suggesting that DAC enhances AML blast susceptibility to BI 836858 by upregulating NKG2DL. These data provide a rationale for combination therapy of Fc-engineered antibodies such as BI 836858 with azanucleosides in elderly patients with AML. PMID:27013443

  20. Effect of cinnarizine on IgE antibody-mediated experimental allergic reactions in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Nagai, H; Yamada, H; Yakuo, I; Inagaki, N; Choi, S H; Koda, A; Daikoku, M

    1987-02-01

    The anti-allergic activity and mechanism of cinnarizine was investigated in guinea pigs. Nifedipine, a calcium antagonist, and tranilast, a potent, orally active anti-allergic agent, were used as comparative drugs. Cinnarizine protected against fatal systemic anaphylactic shock in guinea pigs passively sensitized with IgE antibody. Cinnarizine reduced many of the features of severe respiratory disorders. Nifedipine and tranilast showed similar effects. Cinnarizine and nifedipine inhibited the contractile response to antigen of sensitized tracheal smooth muscle when the challenge was carried out at low antigen concentrations. Tranilast showed a tendency to inhibit the antigen-induced contraction of tracheal smooth muscle. Cinnarizine and nifedipine inhibited Ca-induced contraction in potassium-depolarized tracheal smooth muscle, tranilast had no effect. Cinnarizine showed antagonistic action to the contraction by histamine or leukotriene D4 (LTD4) of tracheal muscle. Nifedipine showed similar antagonistic action, although its potency is lower than cinnarizine. Tranilast showed slight antagonistic action to LTD4. Antigen-induced release of histamine and slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) from sensitized lung tissues was inhibited by nifedipine and tranilast but not by cinnarizine. The release of histamine and SRS-A from lung tissues by calcium ionophore A23187 was inhibited by nifedipine and tranilast but not by cinnarizine. These results suggest that the anti-allergic action of cinnarizine is mainly due to the antagonistic action to allergic mediators and not by interfering with the release of mediators. Cinnarizine's mechanism seems to be related to its antagonistic action to Ca in smooth muscle, but not to the transport of Ca in releasing the anaphylactic chemical mediators in mast cells and other target cells.

  1. Treatment of simultaneous acute antibody-mediated rejection and acute cellular rejection with alemtuzumab in kidney transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jirasiritham, S; Khunprakant, R; Techawathanawanna, N; Jirasiritham, Si; Mavichak, V

    2010-04-01

    This is a case report of a living related donor kidney transplantation using basiliximab induction and maintenance immunosuppression with cyclosporine, mycophenolate sodium, and steroid. On the second posttransplant day, the patient developed acute antibody-mediated rejection, which was treated with plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Five days later, the graft had still not responded to the treatment. Another biopsy revealed additional acute cellular rejection (Banff IIA). As alemtuzumab can rapidly deplete T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, and natural killer cells, the patient was treated with alemtuzumab (30 mg subcutaneously) together with methylprednisolone (500 mg) and two more plasmaphereses. The kidney graft responded within 48 hours, producing more than 4 L of urine per day. The total lymphocyte decreased from 530/microL to 50/microL remaining in the 50 to 220/microL range. The patient received valgancyclovir and cotrimoxazole as infection prophylaxis. The kidney graft responded well to the rescue treatment and the patient was discharged with a serum creatinine of 1.1 mg/mL and has been uneventfully followed in the outpatient clinic for 8 months. Today, with the potent, effective, and selective immunosuppressive regimens, the rate and severity of acute cellular rejection in kidney transplantation has decreased in most centers. However, the rate of acute antibody-mediated rejection has increased to levels greater than those of acute cellular rejection in many centers. Acute antibody-mediated rejection is more difficult and expensive to treat successfully. The treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection included plasmapheresis and IVIG. Herein we have reported a case of kidney transplantation simultaneously developing acute antibody-mediated and acute cellular rejection; the patient was successfully treated with alemtuzumab.

  2. Annexin A2 is involved in antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pathogenic effects in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Romay-Penabad, Zurina; Montiel-Manzano, Maria Guadalupe; Shilagard, Tuya; Papalardo, Elizabeth; Vargas, Gracie; Deora, Arun B; Wang, Michael; Jacovina, Andrew T; Garcia-Latorre, Ethel; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba; Hajjar, Katherine A; Pierangeli, Silvia S

    2009-10-01

    Antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies recognize receptor-bound beta(2) glycoprotein I (beta(2)GPI) on target cells, and induce an intracellular signaling and a procoagulant/proinflammatory phenotype that leads to thrombosis. Evidence indicates that annexin A2 (A2), a receptor for tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen, binds beta(2)GPI on target cells. However, whether A2 mediates pathogenic effects of aPL antibodies in vivo is unknown. In this work, we studied the effects of human aPL antibodies in A2-deficient (A2(-/-)) mice. A2(-/-) and A2(+/+) mice were injected with immunoglobulin G (IgG) isolated from either a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome (IgG-APS), a healthy control subject (IgG-normal human serum), a monoclonal anti-beta(2)GPI antibody (4C5), an anti-A2 monoclonal antibody, or monoclonal antibody of irrelevant specificity as control. We found that, after IgG-APS or 4C5 injections and vascular injury, mean thrombus size was significantly smaller and tissue factor activity was significantly less in A2(-/-) mice compared with A2(+/+) mice. The expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 induced by IgG-APS or 4C5 in explanted A2(-/-) aorta was also significantly reduced compared with A2(+/+) mice. Interestingly, anti-A2 monoclonal antibody significantly decreased aPL-induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, and tissue factor activity on cultured endothelial cells. Together, these data indicate for the first time that A2 mediates the pathogenic effects of aPL antibodies in vivo and in vitro APS.

  3. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-12-01

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a `handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the `handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing

  4. Substitution of the precursor peptide prevents anti-prM antibody-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Si, Lu-Lu; Guo, Xiao-Lan; Cui, Guo-Hui; Fang, Dan-Yun; Zhou, Jun-Mei; Yan, Hui-Jun; Jiang, Li-Fang

    2017-02-02

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is currently considered as the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of severe dengue disease. Many studies have shown that precursor (pr) peptide-specific antibodies do not efficiently neutralize infection but potently promote ADE of dengue virus (DENV) infection. To explore the effect of pr peptide substitution on neutralization and ADE of DENV infection, the rabbit anti-prM polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) and anti-JEVpr/DENV-M pAbs were prepared, and the neutralization and ADE of these two pAbs were further compared. Here, we report that both anti-JEVpr/DENV-M and anti-prM pAbs exhibited broad cross-reactivity and only partial neutralization with four DENV serotypes and immature DENV. Rabbit anti-prM pAbs showed a significant enhancement in a broad range of serum dilutions. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the enhancing activity of rabbit anti-JEVpr/DENV-M pAbs at various levels of dilution. These results demonstrate that anti-prM antibody-mediated ADE can be prevented by JEV pr peptide replacement. The present study contribute further to research on the pathogenesis of DENV infection.

  5. Antibodies directed against Integration Host Factor Mediate Biofilm Clearance from Nasopore®

    PubMed Central

    Brandstetter, Kathleyn A.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Goodman, Steven D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Das, Subinoy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Intranasal resorbable packing, such as Nasopore®, is commonly used during sinus surgery despite a paucity of evidence that demonstrates clinical benefit. We theorized that Nasopore supports bacterial growth and biofilm formation. The DNABII family of bacterial nucleic acid binding proteins stabilizes the extracellular polymeric substance of the biofilm, thus protecting bacteria from host defenses and traditional antibiotics. We tested the hypothesis that use of anti-IHF antibodies in conjunction with antibiotics would enhance biofilm eradication from Nasopore. Study Design In vitro experiments. Methods Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) biofilms were grown on Nasopore. Following 24-hour incubation, biofilms were incubated for an additional 16 hours with either: medium alone, naïve rabbit serum, rabbit anti-IHF serum, amoxicillin/clavulanate or anti-IHF serum + amoxicillin/clavulanate. COMSTAT analysis was performed on images of biofilms obtained via confocal microscopy. Results NTHI readily formed a biofilm on Nasopore. Treatment with amoxicillin/clavulanate alone mediated an increase in biomass by 92% to 6.63 μ2/μ3 compared to incubation in sterile medium alone (3.46 μ2/μ3). Treatment with anti-IHF alone reduced the biomass by 77% to 1.29 μ2/μ3 compared to incubation with naïve rabbit serum (5.53 μ2/μ3). Anti-IHF + amoxicillin/clavulanate reduced biomass by 88% to 0.66 μ2/μ3 (p<0.02) compared to incubation with naïve rabbit serum. Conclusion Antibiotics alone were ineffective in eradicating NTHI biofilms that had formed on Nasopore in vitro. Anti-IHF antibodies plus amoxicillin/clavulanate therapy synergistically reduced biofilm biomass by 88%. These data support clinical studies for the use of anti-IHF combined with antibiotics to reduce biofilm formation on intranasal packing. PMID:23670606

  6. Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection: Improving Step by Step

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, Michael; Schönemann, Constanze; Pruß, Axel; Budde, Klemens; Waiser, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the past years we stepwise modified our immunosuppressive treatment regimen for patients with antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Here, we describe three consecutive groups treated with different regimens. From 2005 until 2008, we treated all patients with biopsy-proven ABMR with rituximab (500 mg), low-dose (30 g) intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), and plasmapheresis (PPH, 6x) (group RLP, n = 12). Between 2009 and June 2010, patients received bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2, 4x) together with low-dose IVIG and PPH (group BLP, n = 11). In July 2010, we increased the IVIG dose and treated all subsequent patients with bortezomib, high-dose IVIG (1.5 g/kg), and PPH (group BHP, n = 11). Graft survival at three years after treatment was 73% in group BHP as compared to 45% in group BLP and 25% in group RLP. At six months after treatment median serum creatinine was 2.1 mg/dL, 2.9 mg/dL, and 4.2 mg/dL in groups BHP, BLP, and RLP, respectively (p = 0.02). Following treatment, a significant decrease of donor-specific HLA antibody (DSA) mean fluorescence intensity from 8467 ± 6876 to 5221 ± 4711 (p = 0.01) was observed in group BHP, but not in the other groups. Our results indicate that graft survival, graft function, and DSA levels could be improved along with stepwise modifications to our treatment regimen, that is, the introduction of bortezomib and high-dose IVIG treatment. PMID:28255562

  7. Treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection using bortezomib: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yong-Hun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Joon Seok; Lee, Jin Ho; Kim, Seong Min; Kim, Joong Kyung

    2015-07-01

    Here we report the successful treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) with bortezomib. Bortezomib rescue treatment was administered after a 42-year-old woman failed to respond to steroid pulse and plasmapheresis with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The patient underwent a second renal transplantation with a deceased donor kidney. She was treated pre-operatively with rituximab (200 mg/body) and underwent plasmapheresis twice (day-1 and operation day) because ELISA screening revealed that her pre-operative peak panel reactive antibody (PRA) composition was 100% class I and 100% class II and 15 times of cross-match positive history during the waiting period for transplantation. The patients received induction therapy with Simulect (an IL-2-blocking agent). A 1-hour protocol biopsy revealed C4d-positivity and mild peritubular capillary inflammation. This was suggestive of early AMR-associated changes. After transplantation, the patient underwent plasmaphereses (nine times) with low-dose IVIG (2 mg/kg). Despite this treatment regimen, serum creatinine levels increased to 3.4 mg/dL on post-transplant day 15. A second graft biopsy was performed, which showed overt AMR with glomerulitis, peritubular capillary inflammation and no C4d deposition. On post-operative day (POD) 22, treatment with four doses of bortezomib (1.3 mg/m(2) ) was initiated with the patient's consent. On POD 55, renal function had recovered and serum creatinine was 1.5 mg/dL. In summary, bortezomib was administered as a rescue treatment for a patient who developed AMR that was refractory to a combination of plasmaphereses with low-dose IVIG and preemptive administration of rituximab.

  8. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2014-01-21

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a 'handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the 'handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.

  9. Naturally occurring anti-band-3 antibodies and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, H.U.; Bussolino, F.; Flepp, R.; Fasler, S.; Stammler, P.; Kazatchkine, M.D.; Arese, P.

    1987-11-01

    Treatment of erythrocytes with the thiol-specific oxidant azodicarboxylic acid bis(dimethylamide) (diamide) enhances their phagocytosis by adherent monocytes. Phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes required that the cells were opsonized with whole serum, since complement inactivation abolished phagocytosis. Opsonization with whole serum containing 20-100 times the physiological concentration of naturally occurring anti-band-3- antibodies enhanced phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes. High inputs of anti-band-3 also restored phagocytosis of erythrocytes that had been incubated with complement-inactivated serum. Elevated concentrations of anti-spectrin antibodies were ineffective in whole and complement-inactivated serum. Specific recognition of diamide-treated erythrocytes by anti-band-3 antibodies may be due to generation of anti-band-3 reactive protein oligomers on intact diamide-treated erythrocytes. Generation of such oligomers was dose-dependent with respect to diamide. Bound anti-band-3 alone was not sufficient to mediate phagocytosis. It resulted in deposition of complement component C3b on the cells through activation of the alternative complement pathway in amounts exceeding that of bound antibodies by two orders of magnitude. Thus, anti-band-3 and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed erythrocytes, which simulate senescent erythrocytes with respect to bound antibody and complement.

  10. Myelin-reactive antibodies mediate the pathology of MBP-PLP fusion protein MP4-induced EAE.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Pauly, Robert; Rottlaender, Andrea; Rodi, Michael; Gruppe, Traugott L; Addicks, Klaus; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V

    2011-07-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is frequently used for studies of multiple sclerosis (MS). Because in most EAE models T cells mediate the pathology in the absence of B cells/autoantibodies, the notion has evolved that also MS may be a primarily T cell-mediated disease. We have previously introduced MBP-PLP fusion protein (MP4)-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice. Here we show that the disease in this model is antibody-dependent. Immunization of B cell-deficient mice did not induce EAE. When such B cell-deficient mice were, however, injected with MBP/PLP-specific antibodies in addition to the immunization with MP4, they developed disease of a severity and course that was similar to the wild-type mice. The deposition of antibodies in demyelinated lesions provided further evidence for the contribution of MBP/PLP-specific antibodies to CNS lesion formation. Based upon these data we suggest a two-stage model for the involvement of MBP/PLP-specific antibodies in autoimmune CNS pathology.

  11. Glycoengineered CD20 antibody obinutuzumab activates neutrophils and mediates phagocytosis through CD16B more efficiently than rituximab.

    PubMed

    Golay, Josée; Da Roit, Fabio; Bologna, Luca; Ferrara, Claudia; Leusen, Jeanette H; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Klein, Christian; Introna, Martino

    2013-11-14

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a glycoengineered type 2 CD20 antibody with enhanced CD16A-binding and natural killer-mediated cytotoxicity. CD16B is highly homologous to CD16A and a major FcγR on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We show here that glycoengineered obinutuzumab or rituximab bound CD16B with approximately sevenfold higher affinity, compared with nonglycoengineered wild-type parental antibodies. Furthermore, glycoengineered obinutuzumab activated PMNs, either purified or in chronic lymphoblastic leukemia whole blood, more efficiently than wild-type rituximab. Activation resulted in a 50% increase in CD11b expression and 70% down-modulation of CD62L on neutrophils and in release of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-6, and IL-8. Activation was not accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity, but led to up to 47% phagocytosis of glycoengineered anti-CD20 opsonized chronic lymphoblastic leukemia targets by purified PMNs. Significant phagocytosis was observed in whole blood, but only in the presence of glycoengineered antibodies, and was followed by up to 50% PMN death. Finally we show, using anti-CD16B and anti-CD32A Fab and F(ab')2 fragments, that both of these receptors are involved in PMN activation, phagocytosis, and cell death induced by glycoengineered antibodies. We conclude that phagocytosis by PMNs is an additional mechanism of action of obinutuzumab mediated through its higher binding affinity for CD16B.

  12. Anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by hyperimmune bovine colostrum IgG.

    PubMed

    Kramski, Marit; Lichtfuss, Gregor F; Navis, Marjon; Isitman, Gamze; Wren, Leia; Rawlin, Grant; Center, Rob J; Jaworowski, Anthony; Kent, Stephen J; Purcell, Damian F J

    2012-10-01

    Antibodies with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity play an important role in protection against HIV-1 infection, but generating sufficient amounts of antibodies to study their protective efficacy is difficult. HIV-specific IgG can be easily and inexpensively produced in large quantities using bovine colostrum. We previously vaccinated cows with HIV-1 envelope gp140 and elicited high titers of anti-gp140-binding IgG in colostrum. In the present study, we determined whether bovine antibodies would also demonstrate specific cytotoxic activity. We found that bovine IgG bind to Fcγ-receptors (FcγRs) on human neutrophils, monocytes, and NK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Antibody-dependent killing was observed in the presence of anti-HIV-1 colostrum IgG but not nonimmune colostrum IgG. Killing was dependent on Fc and FcγR interaction since ADDC activity was not seen with F(ab')(2) fragments. ADCC activity was primarily mediated by CD14(+) monocytes with FcγRIIa (CD32a) as the major receptor responsible for monocyte-mediated ADCC in response to bovine IgG. In conclusion, we demonstrate that bovine anti-HIV colostrum IgG have robust HIV-1-specific ADCC activity and therefore offer a useful source of antibodies able to provide a rapid and potent response against HIV-1 infection. This could assist the development of novel Ab-mediated approaches for prevention of HIV-1 transmission.

  13. Natural killer cells play a critical role in mediating inflammation and graft failure during antibody-mediated rejection of kidney allografts.

    PubMed

    Kohei, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya; Dvorina, Nina; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M; Fairchild, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    While the incidence of antibody-mediated kidney graft rejection has increased, the key cellular and molecular participants underlying this graft injury remain unclear. Rejection of kidney allografts in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR5 is dependent on production of donor-specific antibody. Here we determine if cells expressing cytotoxic function contributed to antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection in these recipients. Wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) mice were transplanted with complete MHC-mismatched A/J kidney grafts, and intragraft inflammatory components were followed to rejection. B6.CCR5(-/-) and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients rejected kidney allografts by day 35, whereas 65% of allografts in wild-type recipients survived past day 80 post-transplant. Rejected allografts in wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients expressed high levels of VCAM-1 and MMP7 mRNA that was associated with high serum titers of donor-specific antibody. High levels of perforin and granzyme B mRNA expression peaked on day 6 post-transplant in allografts in all recipients, but were absent in isografts. Depletion of natural killer cells in B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients reduced this expression to background levels and promoted the long-term survival of 40% of the kidney allografts. Thus, natural killer cells have a role in increased inflammation during antibody-mediated kidney allograft injury and in rejection of the grafts.

  14. Anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody promotes bone fracture healing through regulating IL-20-mediated osteoblastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Chiu, Yi-Shu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Jou, I-Ming; Wu, Po-Tin; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Ming-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and skeletal fragility in bone fracture are caused by an imbalance in bone remodeling. The current challenge in bone fracture healing is to promote osteoblastogenesis and bone formation. We aimed to explore the role of IL-20 in osteoblastogenesis, osteoblast differentiation and bone fracture. Serum IL-20 was significantly correlated with serum sclerostin in patients with bone fracture. In a mouse model, anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 7E increased bone formation during fracture healing. In vitro, IL-20 inhibited osteoblastogenesis by upregulating sclerostin, and downregulating osterix (OSX), RUNX2, and osteoprotegerin (OPG). IL-20R1 deficiency attenuated IL-20-mediated inhibition of osteoblast differentiation and maturation and reduced the healing time after a bone fracture. We conclude that IL-20 affects bone formation and downregulates osteoblastogenesis by modulating sclerostin, OSX, RUNX2, and OPG on osteoblasts. Our results demonstrated that IL-20 is involved in osteoregulation and anti-IL-20 mAb is a potential therapeutic for treating bone fracture or metabolic bone diseases. PMID:27075747

  15. Detection of Pathogen-Specific Antibodies by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Burbulis, Ian E.; Yamaguchi, Kumiko; Nikolskaia, Olga V.; Prigge, Sean T.; Magez, Stefan; Bisser, Sylvie; Reller, Megan E.

    2015-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a method for enzymatically replicating DNA that has great utility for clinical diagnosis at the point of care (POC), given its high sensitivity, specificity, speed, and technical requirements (isothermal conditions). Here, we adapted LAMP for measuring protein analytes by creating a protein-DNA fusion (referred to here as a “LAMPole”) that attaches oligonucleotides (LAMP templates) to IgG antibodies. This fusion consists of a DNA element covalently bonded to an IgG-binding polypeptide (protein L/G domain). In our platform, LAMP is expected to provide the most suitable means for amplifying LAMPoles for clinical diagnosis at the POC, while quantitative PCR is more suitable for laboratory-based quantification of antigen-specific IgG abundance. As proof of concept, we measured serological responses to a protozoan parasite by quantifying changes in solution turbidity in real time. We observed a >6-log fold difference in signal between sera from vaccinated versus control mice and in a clinical patient sample versus a control. We assert that LAMPoles will be useful for increasing the sensitivity of measuring proteins, whether it be in a clinical laboratory or in a field setting, thereby improving acute diagnosis of a variety of infections. PMID:25651920

  16. Endothelial Cells in Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Kidney Transplantation: Pathogenesis Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Wang, Jina; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been identified as a main obstacle for stable immune tolerance and long survival of kidney allografts. In spite of new insights into the underlying mechanisms of AMR, accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment are still challenges in clinical practice. Endothelium is the first barrier between recipients' immune systems and grafts in vascularized organ transplants. Considering that endothelial cells express a number of antigens that can be attacked by various allo- and autoantibodies, endothelial cells act as main targets for the recipients' humoral immune responses. Importantly, emerging evidence has shown that endothelial cells in transplants could also initiate protective mechanisms in response to immune injuries. A better understanding of the role of endothelial cells during the pathogenesis of AMR might provide novel therapeutic targets. In the present review, we summarize the antigens expressed by endothelial cells and also discuss the activation and accommodation of endothelial cells as well as their clinical implications. Collectively, the progress discussed in this review indicates endothelial cells as promising targets to improve current diagnosis and therapeutic regimens for AMR. PMID:28255564

  17. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif A; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR.

  18. Endothelial Cells in Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Kidney Transplantation: Pathogenesis Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Jina; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Ming; Rong, Ruiming; Zhu, Tongyu; Zhu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been identified as a main obstacle for stable immune tolerance and long survival of kidney allografts. In spite of new insights into the underlying mechanisms of AMR, accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment are still challenges in clinical practice. Endothelium is the first barrier between recipients' immune systems and grafts in vascularized organ transplants. Considering that endothelial cells express a number of antigens that can be attacked by various allo- and autoantibodies, endothelial cells act as main targets for the recipients' humoral immune responses. Importantly, emerging evidence has shown that endothelial cells in transplants could also initiate protective mechanisms in response to immune injuries. A better understanding of the role of endothelial cells during the pathogenesis of AMR might provide novel therapeutic targets. In the present review, we summarize the antigens expressed by endothelial cells and also discuss the activation and accommodation of endothelial cells as well as their clinical implications. Collectively, the progress discussed in this review indicates endothelial cells as promising targets to improve current diagnosis and therapeutic regimens for AMR.

  19. Modulation of Antibody-Mediated Immune Response by Probiotics in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Haghighi, Hamid R.; Gong, Jianhua; Gyles, Carlton L.; Hayes, M. Anthony; Sanei, Babak; Parvizi, Payvand; Gisavi, Haris; Chambers, James R.; Sharif, Shayan

    2005-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum, have been shown to enhance antibody responses in mammals. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a probiotic product containing the above bacteria in addition to Streptococcus faecalis on the induction of the chicken antibody response to various antigens, both systemically and in the gut. The birds received probiotics via oral gavage and subsequently were immunized with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) to evaluate antibody responses in serum or with tetanus toxoid (TT) to measure the mucosal antibody response in gut contents. Control groups received phosphate-buffered saline. Overall, BSA and SRBC induced a detectable antibody response as early as week 1 postimmunization (p.i.), which lasted until week 3 p.i. Probiotic-treated birds had significantly (P ≤ 0.001) more serum antibody (predominantly immunoglobulin M [IgM]) to SRBC than the birds that were not treated with probiotics. However, treatment with probiotics did not enhance the serum IgM and IgG antibody responses to BSA. Immunization with TT resulted in the presence of specific IgA and IgG antibody responses in the gut. Again, treatment with probiotics did not change the level or duration of the antibody response in the gut. In conclusion, probiotics enhance the systemic antibody response to some antigens in chickens, but it remains to be seen whether probiotics have an effect on the generation of the mucosal antibody response. PMID:16339061

  20. The CD25-binding antibody Daclizumab High-Yield Process has a distinct glycosylation pattern and reduced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in comparison to Zenapax®.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Bishu; Balasa, Balaji; Efros, Lyubov; Hinton, Paul R; Hartman, Stephen; Thakur, Archana; Xiong, Joanna M; Schmidt, Brian; Robinson, Randy R; Sornasse, Thierry; Vexler, Vladimir; Sheridan, James P

    2016-10-01

    The CD25-binding antibody daclizumab high-yield process (DAC HYP) is an interleukin (IL)-2 signal modulating antibody that shares primary amino acid sequence and CD25 binding affinity with Zenapax®, a distinct form of daclizumab, which was approved for the prevention of acute organ rejection in patients receiving renal transplants as part of an immunosuppressive regimen that includes cyclosporine and corticosteroids. Comparison of the physicochemical properties of the two antibody forms revealed the glycosylation profile of DAC HYP differs from Zenapax in both glycan distribution and the types of oligosaccharides, most notably high-mannose, galactosylated and galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) oligosaccharides, resulting in a DAC HYP antibody material that is structurally distinct from Zenapax. Although neither antibody elicited complement-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro, DAC HYP antibody had significantly reduced levels of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The ADCC activity required natural killer (NK) cells, but not monocytes, suggesting the effects were mediated through binding to Fc-gamma RIII (CD16). Incubation of each antibody with peripheral blood mononuclear cells also caused the down-modulation of CD16 expression on NK cells and the CD16 down-modulation was greater for Zenapax in comparison to that observed for DAC HYP. The substantive glycosylation differences between the two antibody forms and corresponding greater Fc-mediated effector activities by Zenapax, including cell killing activity, manifest as a difference in the biological function and pharmacology between DAC HYP and Zenapax.

  1. The development of antibody-based immunotherapy for methamphetamine abuse: immunization, and virus-mediated gene transfer approaches.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a highly addictive psychostimulant that has been seriously abused worldwide, and currently there are no approved medications for the treatment of its abuse. Conventional treatments for drug addiction mainly seek to use small molecule agonists or antagonists to target the drug receptors in the brain, but unfortunately it is difficult to find a similar small molecule for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. Alternatively, anti-methamphetamine antibodies can sequester the drug in the bloodstream and reduce the amount of drug available to the central nervous system, acting as peripheral pharmacokinetic antagonists. This review describes the development of antibody-based immunotherapies, classified into active and passive immunizations, for the treatment of methamphetamine addiction. Furthermore, an alternative therapeutic approach, using a recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer technique to achieve in vivo expression of characterized anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibodies, is proposed in this article.

  2. Excess reactive oxygen species production mediates monoclonal antibody-induced human embryonic stem cell death via oncosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji Yun; Tan, Heng Liang; Matsudaira, Paul Thomas; Choo, Andre

    2017-03-01

    Antibody-mediated cell killing has significantly facilitated the elimination of undesired cells in therapeutic applications. Besides the well-known Fc-dependent mechanisms, pathways of antibody-induced apoptosis were also extensively studied. However, with fewer studies reporting the ability of antibodies to evoke an alternative form of programmed cell death, oncosis, the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated oncosis remains underinvestigated. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), TAG-A1 (A1), was generated to selectively kill residual undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESC) so as to prevent teratoma formation upon transplantation of hESC-derived products. We revealed that A1 induces hESC death via oncosis. Aided with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we uncovered nanoscale morphological changes in A1-induced hESC oncosis, as well as A1 distribution on hESC surface. A1 induces hESC oncosis via binding-initiated signaling cascade, most likely by ligating receptors on surface microvilli. The ability to evoke excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via the Nox2 isoform of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase is critical in the cell death pathway. Excess ROS production occurs downstream of microvilli degradation and homotypic adhesion, but upstream of actin reorganization, plasma membrane damage and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. To our knowledge, this is the first mechanistic model of mAb-induced oncosis on hESC revealing a previously unrecognized role for NAPDH oxidase-derived ROS in mediating oncotic hESC death. These findings in the cell death pathway may potentially be exploited to improve the efficiency of A1 in eliminating undifferentiated hESC and to provide insights into the study of other mAb-induced cell death.

  3. B cells display an abnormal distribution and an impaired suppressive function in patients with chronic antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Nouël, Alexandre; Ségalen, Isabelle; Jamin, Christophe; Doucet, Laurent; Caillard, Sophie; Renaudineau, Yves; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Le Meur, Yannick; Hillion, Sophie

    2014-03-01

    In kidney transplantation, the composition of the B-cell compartment is increasingly identified as an important determinant for graft outcome. Whereas naive and transitional B cells have been associated with long-term allograft survival and operational tolerance, memory B cells have been linked to graft rejection and graft loss. Chronic antibody-mediated rejection now represents a major complication in transplantation and is a challenge in current therapeutics. Here, we show that patients with chronic antibody-mediated rejection display a unique B-cell phenotype with a reduced ratio of activated to memory B cells associated with an impaired immunosuppressive activity. The regulatory functions of the B cells depended on their maturation status. Thus, phenotypic and functional analyses of the B-cell compartment may be indicated for appropriate follow-up after transplantation and drive therapy in the establishment of transplant tolerance processes.

  4. 2016 Comprehensive Update of the Banff Working Group on Liver Allograft Pathology: Introduction of Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Demetris, A J; Bellamy, C; Hübscher, S G; O'Leary, J; Randhawa, P S; Feng, S; Neil, D; Colvin, R B; McCaughan, G; Fung, J J; Del Bello, A; Reinholt, F P; Haga, H; Adeyi, O; Czaja, A J; Schiano, T; Fiel, M I; Smith, M L; Sebagh, M; Tanigawa, R Y; Yilmaz, F; Alexander, G; Baiocchi, L; Balasubramanian, M; Batal, I; Bhan, A K; Bucuvalas, J; Cerski, C T S; Charlotte, F; de Vera, M E; ElMonayeri, M; Fontes, P; Furth, E E; Gouw, A S H; Hafezi-Bakhtiari, S; Hart, J; Honsova, E; Ismail, W; Itoh, T; Jhala, N C; Khettry, U; Klintmalm, G B; Knechtle, S; Koshiba, T; Kozlowski, T; Lassman, C R; Lerut, J; Levitsky, J; Licini, L; Liotta, R; Mazariegos, G; Minervini, M I; Misdraji, J; Mohanakumar, T; Mölne, J; Nasser, I; Neuberger, J; O'Neil, M; Pappo, O; Petrovic, L; Ruiz, P; Sağol, Ö; Sanchez Fueyo, A; Sasatomi, E; Shaked, A; Shiller, M; Shimizu, T; Sis, B; Sonzogni, A; Stevenson, H L; Thung, S N; Tisone, G; Tsamandas, A C; Wernerson, A; Wu, T; Zeevi, A; Zen, Y

    2016-06-07

    The Banff Working Group on Liver Allograft Pathology reviewed and discussed literature evidence regarding antibody-mediated liver allograft rejection at the 11th (Paris, France, June 5-10, 2011), 12th (Comandatuba, Brazil, August 19-23, 2013), and 13th (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, October 5-10, 2015) meetings of the Banff Conference on Allograft Pathology. Discussion continued online. The primary goal was to introduce guidelines and consensus criteria for the diagnosis of liver allograft antibody-mediated rejection and provide a comprehensive update of all Banff Schema recommendations. Included are new recommendations for complement component 4d tissue staining and interpretation, staging liver allograft fibrosis, and findings related to immunosuppression minimization. In an effort to create a single reference document, previous unchanged criteria are also included.

  5. Influence of IgG Subclass on Human Antimannan Antibody-Mediated Resistance to Hematogenously Disseminated Candidiasis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nishiya, Casey T; Boxx, Gayle M; Robison, Kerry; Itatani, Carol; Kozel, Thomas R; Zhang, Mason X

    2015-11-16

    Candida albicans is a yeast-like pathogen and can cause life-threatening systemic candidiasis. Its cell surface is enriched with mannan that is resistant to complement activation. Previously, we developed the recombinant human IgG1 antimannan antibody M1g1. M1g1 was found to promote complement activation and phagocytosis and protect mice from systemic candidiasis. Here, we evaluate the influence of IgG subclass on antimannan antibody-mediated protection. Three IgG subclass variants of M1g1 were constructed: M1g2, M1g3, and M1g4. The IgG subclass identity for each variant was confirmed with DNA sequence and subclass-specific antibodies. These variants contain identical M1 Fabs and exhibited similar binding affinities for C. albicans yeast and purified mannan. Yeast cells and hyphae recovered from the kidney of antibody-treated mice with systemic candidiasis showed uniform binding of each variant, indicating constitutive expression of the M1 epitope and antibody opsonization in the kidney. All variants promoted deposition of both murine and human C3 onto the yeast cell surface, with M1g4 showing delayed activation, as determined by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. M1g4-mediated complement activation was found to be associated with its M1 Fab that activates the alternative pathway in an Fc-independent manner. Treatment with each subclass variant extended the survival of mice with systemic candidiasis (P < 0.001). However, treatment with M1g1, M1g3, or M1g4, but not with M1g2, also reduced the kidney fungal burden (P < 0.001). Thus, the role of human antimannan antibody in host resistance to systemic candidiasis is influenced by its IgG subclass.

  6. LGR5 expressing cells of hair follicle as potential targets for antibody mediated anti-cancer laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris V.

    2013-02-01

    Near infrared laser immunotherapy becomes now a new promising research field to cure the patients with cancers. One of the critical limitation in medical application of this treatment is availability of the specific markers for delivery of laser-sensitive nanoparticles. When coupled to antibodies to the cancer stem cells markers these nanoparticles may be delivered to the cancer tissue and mediate the laser induced thermolysis of the cancer stem cells that initiate and drive growth of cancer. This paper addresses the Lgr5 cell surface marker mediating the Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction as a potential target for anti-cancer laser immunotherapy of skin cancers.

  7. C6 knock-out Mice Are Protected from Thrombophilia Mediated by Antiphospholipid Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Carrera-Marín Ana; Zurina, Romay-Penabad; Elizabeth, Papalardo; Elba, Reyes-Maldonado; Ethel, Garcia-Latorre; Gracie, Vargas; Tuya, Shilagard; Silvia, Pierangeli

    2013-01-01

    Background Complement activation plays a role in pathogenesis of the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS), but the involvement of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex (MAC) is unknown. Here we studied the effects of human polyclonal antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies on thrombosis and tissue factor (TF) up-regulation in C6 deficient (C6-/-) mice. Methods C6-/- or the wild-type (C3H/HeJ) C6+/+ mice were injected twice with IgG-APS (n=2) or IgM-APS (n=1) isolated from APS patients or with the corresponding control Igs (IgG-NHS or IgM-NHS). Then, the size of induced thrombi in the femoral vein were determined 72 hours after the first injection. Tissue factor was determined in homogenates of carotid arteries and in peritoneal macrophages. Results Thrombus sizes were significantly larger in C6+/+ treated with IgG-APS1 or with IgG-APS2 or with IgM-APS when compared with C6+/+ mice treated with IgG-NHS or with IgM-NHS, respectively. The sizes of thrombi were significantly smaller in the C6-/- mice injected with IgG-APS1, IgG-APS2 or IgM-APS (p<0.001), compared to their C6+/+ counterparts showing an important abrogation of thrombus formation in mice lacking C6. The TF expression and activity in the C6-/- mice treated with IgG-APS were diminished when compared to C6+/+ treated with the same immunoglobulins. All mice injected with IgG-APS and IgM-APS had medium-high titers of aCL and aβ2GPI antibodies. Conclusions These data indicate that the C6 component of the complement system mediates aPL-thrombogenic effects, underscoring an important pathogenic mechanism and indicating the possibility of inhibiting complement to ameliorate APS-related manifestations. PMID:22933620

  8. Women with Cervicovaginal Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity Have Lower Genital HIV-1 RNA Loads

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Pratip; Kim, Jenney; Sapiega, Vytautas; Landay, Alan L.; Bremer, James W.; Mestecky, Jiri; Reichelderfer, Patricia; Kovacs, Andrea; Cohn, Jonathan; Weiser, Barbara; Baum, Linda L.

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies that mediate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) are present in the cervical fluid of many HIV-positive women; however, the role that these antibodies play in host defense against HIV is not known. To understand the contribution of ADCC in cervical secretions as a protective mechanism against HIV, we evaluated ADCC titers in paired serum and cervical-lavage (CVL) samples from >300 HIV-1–positive women who participated in the multicenter Division of AIDS Treatment Research Initiative Study 009. The present study demonstrates that women with CVL ADCC activity had lower genital viral loads than did women with serum ADCC activity only. Women with CVL ADCC activity were likely to have HIV-1 gp120–specific immunoglobulin (Ig) G, but not IgA, in their cervical fluid. This finding suggests that specific IgG in cervical fluid can mediate ADCC activity that inversely correlates with genital viral load. PMID:15529262

  9. Markers of Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition: Evidence for Antibody-Endothelium Interaction during Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Recipients.

    PubMed

    Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; Peltier, Julie; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Suberbielle-Boissel, Caroline; Djamali, Arjang; Reese, Shannon; Mooney, Nuala; Keuylian, Zela; Lion, Julien; Ouali, Nacéra; Levy, Pierre P; Jouanneau, Chantal; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a leading cause of allograft loss. Treatment efficacy depends on accurate diagnosis at an early stage. However, sensitive and reliable markers of antibody-endothelium interaction during ABMR are not available for routine use. Using immunohistochemistry, we retrospectively studied the diagnostic value of three markers of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47, for ABMR in 53 renal transplant biopsy specimens, including 20 ABMR specimens, 24 cell-mediated rejection specimens, and nine normal grafts. We validated our results in an independent set of 74 unselected biopsy specimens. Endothelial cells of the peritubular capillaries in grafts with ABMR expressed fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47 strongly, whereas those from normal renal grafts did not. The level of EndMT marker expression was significantly associated with current ABMR criteria, including capillaritis, glomerulitis, peritubular capillary C4d deposition, and donor-specific antibodies. These markers allowed us to identify C4d-negative ABMR and to predict late occurrence of disease. EndMT markers were more specific than capillaritis for the diagnosis and prognosis of ABMR and predicted late (up to 4 years after biopsy) renal graft dysfunction and proteinuria. In the independent set of 74 renal graft biopsy specimens, the EndMT markers for the diagnosis of ABMR had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85%. Fascin1 expression in peritubular capillaries was also induced in a rat model of ABMR. In conclusion, EndMT markers are a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for detecting endothelial activation during ABMR and predicting late loss of allograft function.

  10. Role of oxygen in antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mediated by monocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Borregaard, N; Kragballe, K

    1980-01-01

    The antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytoxicity (ADCC) by human monocytes and neutrophils was investigated by measuring the release of 51chromate from prelabeled erythrocytes coated with immunoglobulin G. ADCC was found to be positively correlated to phagocytosis of 51Cr-labeled erythrocytes and to the postphagocytic events of the effector cells, activation of the hexose monophosphate shunt, and degranulation. Exclusion of oxygen from the incubation media halved the ADCC by both cell types without affectijg phagocytosis or degranulation. Likewise, ADCC by cells from patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) was only half the intensity of ADCC by cells from normals. Inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration were without depressing effect of ADCC. Azide, which in addition to its blocking action on oxydative phosphorylation also inhibits catalase and myeloperoxidase, resulted in a approximately equal to 40% stimulation of ADCC by cells from normals but was without effect of ADCC by cells from CGD patients. The hydroxyl radical scavenger, mannitol, significantly depressed ADCC by cells from normals (P < 0.01) but was without effect on cells from CGD patients. Azide and mannitol also were without effect on ADCC by normal cells when oxygen was excluded. In a xanthine-xanthine oxidase system, erythrocytes were effectively lysed. This lysis was inhibited by catalase, superoxide dismutase, and mannitol. When comparable concentrations of glucose oxidase were used no lysis was observed. H2O2 either alone or in combination with azide did not lyse erythrocytes. It is suggested that ADCC by both monocytes and neutrophils is partly dependent on the generation of hydroxyl radicals by the effector cells. PMID:6252248

  11. Asymptomatic Antibody-mediated Rejection After Heart Transplantation Predicts Poor Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Grace W.; Kobashigawa, Jon A.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kittleson, Michelle M.; Reed, Elaine F.; Kiyosaki, Krista K.; Ardehali, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been associated with poor outcome after heart transplantation. The diagnosis of AMR usually includes endomyocardial biopsy findings of endothelial cell swelling, intravascular macrophages, C4d+ staining, and associated left ventricular dysfunction. The significance of AMR findings in biopsy specimens of asymptomatic heart transplant patients (normal cardiac function and no symptoms of heart failure) is unclear. Methods Between July 1997 and September 2001, AMR was found in the biopsy specimens of 43 patients. Patients were divided into 2 groups: asymptomatic AMR (AsAMR, n = 21) and treated AMR (TxAMR with associated left ventricular dysfunction, n = 22). For comparison, a control group of 86 contemporaneous patients, without AMR, was matched for age, gender, and time from transplant. Outcomes included 5-year actuarial survival and development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Patients were considered to have AMR if they had ≥ 1 endomyocardial biopsy specimen positive for AMR. Results The 5-year actuarial survival for the AsAMR (86%), TxAMR (68%), and control groups (79%) was not significantly different (p = 0.41). Five-year freedom from CAV (≥ 30% stenosis in any vessel) was AsAMR, 52%; TxAMR, 68%; and control, 79%. Individually, freedom from CAV was significantly lower in the AsAMR group compared with the control group (p = 0.02). There was no significant difference between AsAMR vs TxAMR and TxAMR vs control for CAV. Conclusions Despite comparable 5-year survival with controls after heart transplantation, AsAMR rejection is associated with a greater risk of CAV. Trials to treat AsAMR to alter outcome are warranted. PMID:19416767

  12. A type I interferon signature characterizes chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rascio, Federica; Pontrelli, Paola; Accetturo, Matteo; Oranger, Annarita; Gigante, Margherita; Castellano, Giuseppe; Gigante, Maddalena; Zito, Anna; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Ranieri, Elena; Stallone, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) represents the main cause of kidney graft loss. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, we characterized the molecular signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and, separately, of CD4(+) T lymphocytes isolated from CAMR patients, compared to kidney transplant recipients with normal graft function and histology. We enrolled 29 patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, 29 stable transplant recipients (controls), and 8 transplant recipients with clinical and histological evidence of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. Messenger RNA and microRNA profiling of PBMCs and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was performed using Agilent microarrays in eight randomly selected patients per group from CAMR and control subjects. Results were evaluated statistically and by functional pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) and validated in the remaining subjects. In PBMCs, 45 genes were differentially expressed between the two groups, most of which were up-regulated in CAMR and were involved in type I interferon signalling. In the same patients, 16 microRNAs were down-regulated in CAMR subjects compared to controls: four were predicted modulators of six mRNAs identified in the transcriptional analysis. In silico functional analysis supported the involvement of type I interferon signalling. To further confirm this result, we investigated the transcriptomic profiles of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in an independent group of patients, observing that the activation of type I interferon signalling was a specific hallmark of CAMR. In addition, in CAMR patients, we detected a reduction of circulating BDCA2(+) dendritic cells, the natural type I interferon-producing cells, and their recruitment into the graft along with increased expression of MXA, a type I interferon-induced protein, at the tubulointerstitial and vascular level. Finally, interferon alpha mRNA expression was significantly increased in CAMR compared to control

  13. Antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplantation: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yolanda W; Singh, Manpreet; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplant is the preferred treatment of pediatric end-stage renal disease. One of the most challenging aspects of pediatric kidney transplant is the prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR), which is one of the main causes of graft dysfunction and early graft loss. Most challenges are similar to those faced in adult kidney transplants; however, factors unique to the pediatric realm include naivety of the immune system and the small number of studies and randomized controlled trials available when considering pharmacological treatment options. Here, we present a case of ABMR in a pediatric patient and a review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of ABMR. ABMR in pediatric kidney transplant continues to be a frustrating condition to treat because (1) there still remain many unidentified potential antigens leading to ABMR, (2) children and adults are at different stages of their immune system development, and, thus, (3) the full pathophysiology of alloimmunity is still not completely understood, and (4) the efficacy and safety of treatment in adults may not be directly translated to children. As we continue to gain a better understanding towards the precise alloimmune mechanism that drives a particular ABMR, we can also improve pharmacotherapeutic choices. With continued research, they will become more precise in treating a particular mechanism versus using a broad scope of immunosuppression such as steroids. However, there is much more to be uncovered, such as identifying more non-human leukocyte antigens and their role in alloimmunity, determining the exact mechanism of adults achieving complete operational tolerance, and understanding the difference between pediatric and adult transplant recipients. Making strides towards a better understanding of these mechanisms will lead to continued efficacy and safety in treatment of pediatric ABMR.

  14. DNA-mediated strand displacement facilitates sensitive electronic detection of antibodies in human serums.

    PubMed

    Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Shi, Kai; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-09-15

    We describe here the development of a sensitive and convenient electronic sensor for the detection of antibodies in human serums. The sensor is constructed by self-assembly formation of a mixed monolayer containing the small molecule epitope conjugated double stranded DNA probes on gold electrode. The target antibody binds the epitope on the dsDNA probe and lowers the melting temperature of the duplex, which facilitates the displacement of the antibody-linked strand of the duplex probe by an invading methylene blue-tagged single stranded DNA (MB-ssDNA) through the strand displacement reaction and leads to the capture of many MB-ssDNA on the sensor surface. Subsequent electrochemical oxidation of the methylene blue labels results in amplified current response for sensitive monitoring of the antibodies. The antibody assay conditions are optimized and the sensor exhibits a linear range between 1.0 and 25.0nM with a detection limit of 0.67nM for the target antibody. The sensor is also selective and can be employed to detect the target antibodies in human serum samples. With the advantages of using small molecule epitope as the antibody recognition element over traditional antigen, the versatile manipulability of the DNA probes and the unique properties of the electrochemical transduction technique, the developed sensor thus hold great potential for simple and sensitive detection of different antibodies and other proteins in real samples.

  15. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein mediates tumor cell resistance to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M K; Sauer, S J; Nath, S; Robinson, T J; Morse, M A; Devi, G R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the deadliest, distinct subtype of breast cancer. High expression of epidermal growth factor receptors [EGFR or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] in IBC tumors has prompted trials of anti-EGFR/HER2 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit oncogenic signaling; however, de novo and acquired therapeutic resistance is common. Another critical function of these antibodies is to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which enables immune effector cells to engage tumors and deliver granzymes, activating executioner caspases. We hypothesized that high expression of anti-apoptotic molecules in tumors would render them resistant to ADCC. Herein, we demonstrate that the most potent caspase inhibitor, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), overexpressed in IBC, drives resistance to ADCC mediated by cetuximab (anti-EGFR) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2). Overexpression of XIAP in parental IBC cell lines enhances resistance to ADCC; conversely, targeted downregulation of XIAP in ADCC-resistant IBC cells renders them sensitive. As hypothesized, this ADCC resistance is in part a result of the ability of XIAP to inhibit caspase activity; however, we also unexpectedly found that resistance was dependent on XIAP-mediated, caspase-independent suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which otherwise occurs during ADCC. Transcriptome analysis supported these observations by revealing modulation of genes involved in immunosuppression and oxidative stress response in XIAP-overexpressing, ADCC-resistant cells. We conclude that XIAP is a critical modulator of ADCC responsiveness, operating through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These results suggest that strategies targeting the effects of XIAP on caspase activation and ROS suppression have the potential to enhance the activity of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26821068

  16. Activation of the transcription factor c-Jun in acute cellular and antibody-mediated rejection after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Takahashi, Takamune; Horita, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Izumi; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Teraoka, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kazunari; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    2010-12-01

    c-Jun is a transcription factor that belongs to the activator protein-1 family of proteins. In human kidney disease, c-Jun is activated in glomerular and tubular cells and plays a major role in renal pathophysiology. However, the contribution of this pathway to renal allograft rejection has not been determined. We investigated whether c-Jun is activated in acute allograft rejection. c-Jun activation was assessed with immunohistochemistry using phospho-specific c-Jun antibodies in control human renal tissue and renal tissue from patients with acute cellular rejection, acute antibody-mediated rejection, and no rejection in the month after transplantation. In patients with acute cellular rejection, c-Jun activation was observed primarily in infiltrated T cells associated with tubulitis, interstitial cell infiltration, and endarteritis. The number of infiltrated phosphorylated c-Jun-positive cells in the tubules and interstitium was correlated with the Banff classification "t" and "i" scores. In patients with acute antibody-mediated rejection, c-Jun activation was observed in injured endothelial cells as well as in infiltrated cells, including macrophages, in the glomerular and peritubular capillaries. Furthermore, the serum creatinine levels and changes in serum creatinine from the previous year were significantly correlated with the total tubulointerstitial phosphorylated c-Jun-positive score (representing the number of positive nuclei in the tubules, interstitium, and peritubular capillaries). In conclusion, c-Jun was activated in acute antibody-mediated rejection and acute cellular rejection and was associated with reduced graft function. These findings suggest that c-Jun plays a key role in pathological events and may represent a novel therapeutic target in acute renal allograft rejection.

  17. ANTIBODY-MEDIATED ACTIVATION OF A DEFECTIVE β-D-GALACTOSIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Celada, Franco; Ellis, John; Bodlund, Kerstin; Rotman, Boris

    1971-01-01

    Two closely related protein antigens were used to study immunogenic competition. Namely, normal β-D-galactosidase of Escherichia coli (Z) and a genetically defective β-D-galactosidase (AMEF) which seems to differ from the normal in one amino acid substitution. A unique characteristic of this pair of antigens is that, although they are indistinguishable in precipitation and absorption tests with antibodies, the enzymatic activity of AMEF is specifically increased several-hundredfold in the presence of antibodies directed against Z. The following results show that Z and AMEF also differ in their immunogenic ability: (a) antibodies directed against Z activated AMEF; antibodies directed against AMEF did not activate, but competed specifically with activating antibodies. (b) Animals immunized with AMEF failed to produce activating antibodies when they were subsequently challenged with Z, although the presence of some cells primed to produce activating antibodies could be demonstrated by adoptive transfer. (c) Animals preimmunized with Z were stimulated in their production of activating antibodies by AMEF challenge, although not as efficiently as with Z. A model explaining these observations by competition for the immunogenic site among antigen-sensitive cells carrying cross-reacting receptors is presented. PMID:15776573

  18. Decreased chronic cellular and antibody-mediated injury in the kidney following simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Taner, Timucin; Heimbach, Julie K; Rosen, Charles B; Nyberg, Scott L; Park, Walter D; Stegall, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    In simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation (SLK), the liver can protect the kidney from hyperacute rejection and may also decrease acute cellular rejection rates. Whether the liver protects against chronic injury is unknown. To answer this we studied renal allograft surveillance biopsies in 68 consecutive SLK recipients (14 with donor-specific alloantibodies at transplantation [DSA+], 54 with low or no DSA, [DSA-]). These were compared with biopsies of a matched cohort of kidney transplant alone (KTA) recipients (28 DSA+, 108 DSA-). Overall 5-year patient and graft survival was not different: 93.8% and 91.2% in SLK, and 91.9% and 77.1% in KTA. In DSA+ recipients, KTA had a significantly higher incidence of acute antibody-mediated rejection (46.4% vs. 7.1%) and chronic transplant glomerulopathy (53.6% vs. 0%). In DSA- recipients at 5 years, KTA had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of T cell-mediated rejection (clinical plus subclinical, 30.6% vs. 7.4%). By 5 years, DSA+ KTA had a 44% decline in mean GFR while DSA+SLK had stable GFR. In DSA- KTA, the incidence of a combined endpoint of renal allograft loss or over a 50% decline in GFR was significantly higher (20.4% vs. 7.4%). Simultaneously transplanted liver allograft was the most predictive factor for a significantly lower incidence of cellular (odds ratio 0.13, 95% confidence interval 0.06-0.27) and antibody-mediated injury (odds ratio 0.11, confidence interval 0.03-0.32), as well as graft functional decline (odds ratio 0.22, confidence interval 0.06-0.59). Thus, SLK is associated with reduced chronic cellular and antibody-mediated alloimmune injury in the kidney allograft.

  19. The molecular landscape of antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection: evidence for NK involvement through CD16a Fc receptors.

    PubMed

    Venner, J M; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K S; Chang, J; Halloran, P F

    2015-05-01

    The recent recognition that antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the major cause of kidney transplant loss creates strong interest in its pathogenesis. We used microarray analysis of kidney transplant biopsies to identify the changes in pure ABMR. We found that the ABMR transcript changes in the initial Discovery Set were strongly conserved in a subsequent Validation Set. In the Combined Set of 703 biopsies, 2603 transcripts were significantly changed (FDR < 0.05) in ABMR versus all other biopsies. In cultured cells, the transcripts strongly associated with ABMR were expressed in endothelial cells, e.g. cadherins CDH5 and CDH13; IFNG-treated endothelial cells, e.g. phospholipase PLA1A and chemokine CXCL11; or NK cells, e.g. cytotoxicity molecules granulysin (GNLY) and FGFBP2. Other ABMR transcripts were expressed in normal kidney but not cell lines, either increased e.g. Duffy chemokine receptor (DARC) or decreased e.g. sclerostin (SOST). Pathway analysis of ABMR transcripts identified angiogenesis, with roles for angiopoietin and vascular endothelial growth factors; leukocyte-endothelial interactions; and NK signaling, including evidence for CD16a Fc receptor signaling elements shared with T cells. These data support a model of ABMR involving injury-repair in the microcirculation induced by cognate recognition involving antibody and CD16a, triggering IFNG release and antibody-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  20. Increasing FcγRIIa affinity of an FcγRIII-optimized anti-EGFR antibody restores neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Derer, Stefanie; Glorius, Pia; Schlaeth, Martin; Lohse, Stefan; Klausz, Katja; Muchhal, Umesh; Desjarlais, John R; Humpe, Andreas; Valerius, Thomas; Peipp, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been suggested as an essential mechanism for the in vivo activity of cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting therapeutic antibody. Thus, enhancing the affinity of human IgG1 antibodies to natural killer (NK) cell-expressed FcγRIIIa by glyco- or protein-engineering of their Fc portion has been demonstrated to improve NK cell-mediated ADCC and to represent a promising strategy to improve antibody therapy. However, human polymorphonuclear (PMN) effector cells express the highly homologous FcγRIIIb isoform, which is described to be ineffective in triggering ADCC. Here, non-fucosylated or protein-engineered anti-EGFR antibodies with optimized FcγRIIIa affinities demonstrated the expected benefit in NK cell-mediated ADCC, but did not mediate ADCC by PMN, which could be restored by FcγRIIIb blockade. Furthermore, eosinophils and PMN from paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria patients that expressed no or low levels of FcγRIIIb mediated effective ADCC with FcγRIII-optimized anti-EGFR antibody. Additional experiments with double FcγRIIa/FcγRIII-optimized constructs demonstrated enhanced PMN-mediated ADCC compared with single FcγRIII-optimized antibody. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that FcγRIIIb engagement impairs PMN-mediated ADCC activity of FcγRIII-optimized anti-EGFR antibodies, while further optimization of FcγRIIa binding significantly restores PMN recruitment. PMID:24492248

  1. C-C chemokine receptor-7 mediated endocytosis of antibody cargoes into intact cells.

    PubMed

    Charest-Morin, Xavier; Pépin, Rémy; Gagné-Henley, Angélique; Morissette, Guillaume; Lodge, Robert; Marceau, François

    2013-01-01

    The C-C chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7) is a G protein coupled receptor that has a role in leukocyte homing, but that is also expressed in aggressive tumor cells. Preclinical research supports that CCR7 is a valid target in oncology. In view of the increasing availability of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that carry cytotoxic cargoes, we studied the feasibility of forcing intact cells to internalize known monoclonal antibodies by exploiting the cycle of endocytosis and recycling triggered by the CCR7 agonist CCL19. Firstly, an anti-CCR7 antibody (CD197; clone 150503) labeled surface recombinant CCR7 expressed in intact HEK 293a cells and the fluorescent antibody was internalized following CCL19 treatment. Secondly, a recombinant myc-tagged CCL19 construction was exploited along the anti-myc monoclonal antibody 4A6. The myc-tagged ligand was produced as a conditioned medium of transfected HEK 293a cells that contained the equivalent of 430 ng/ml of immunoreactive CCL19 (average value, ELISA determination). CCL19-myc, but not authentic CCL19, carried the fluorophore-labeled antibody 4A6 into other recipient cells that expressed recombinant CCR7 (microscopy, cytofluorometry). The immune complexes were apparent in endosomal structures, co-localized well with the small GTPase Rab5 and progressed toward Rab7-positive endosomes. A dominant negative form of Rab5 (GDP-locked) inhibited this endocytosis. Further, endosomes in CCL19-myc- or CCL19-stimulated cells were positive for β-arrestin2, but rarely for β-arrestin1. Following treatment with CCL19-myc and the 4A6 antibody, the melanoma cell line A375 that expresses endogenous CCR7 was specifically stained using a secondary peroxidase-conjugated antibody. Agonist-stimulated CCR7 can transport antibody-based cargoes, with possible therapeutic applications in oncology.

  2. Tcr-like antibody drug conjugates mediate killing of tumor cells with low peptide/hla targets.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Devin B; Bivens, Camille K; Mobley, Alexis S; Herrera, Christian E; McCormick, Amanda L; Wichner, Timea; Sabnani, Manoj K; Wood, Laurence M; Weidanz, Jon A

    2017-03-08

    The currently marketed antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) destabilize microtubule assembly in cancer cells and initiate apoptosis in patients. However, few tumor antigens (TA) are expressed at high densities on cancer lesions, potentially minimizing the therapeutic index of current ADC regimens. The peptide/human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex can be specifically targeted by therapeutic antibodies (designated T cell receptor [TCR]-like antibodies) and adequately distinguish malignant cells, but has not been the focus of ADC development. We analyzed the killing potential of TCR-like ADCs when cross-linked to the DNA alkylating compound duocarmycin. Our data comprise proof-of-principle results that TCR-like ADCs mediate potent tumor cytotoxicity, particularly under common scenarios of low TA/HLA density, and support their continued development alongside agents that disrupt DNA replication. Additionally, TCR-like antibody ligand binding appears to play an important role in ADC functionality and should be addressed during therapy development to avoid binding patterns that negate ADC killing efficacy.

  3. Impact of ABO Incompatibility on the Development of Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients Presensitized to HLA.

    PubMed

    Chung, Byung Ha; Joo, Yu Young; Lee, Jaesin; Kim, Hyung Duk; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In Sung; Choi, Bum Soon; Oh, Eun-Jee; Park, Cheol Whee; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo

    2015-01-01

    Whether the coexistence of anti-A/B antibody and donor specific anti-HLA antibody (HLA-DSA) has a synergistic impact on the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR) in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) is unclear. This study includes 92 KTRs who received a kidney from an ABO-incompatible (ABOi) donor or were presensitized to donor HLA (HLAs) and 292 controls (CONT). HLAs was defined as a crossmatch positivity or the presence of HLA-DSA. We compared the incidence of AAMR among ABOi (n = 58), ABOi+HLAs (n = 12), HLAs (n = 22), and CONT (n = 292) groups and evaluated the risk factors and antibody type (anti-A/B vs. HLA-DSA) responsible for AAMR. AAMR developed less frequently in ABOi and CONT than in the ABOi+HLAs or HLAs (P < 0.05 for all); however, there was no difference between the ABOi+HLAs and HLAs groups. AAMR developed more frequently with strong HLA-DSA at baseline; however, high baseline anti-A/B titer did not affect AAMR development. Strong baseline HLA-DSA was an independent predictor for AAMR, however the baseline anti-A/B titer was not. All four AAMR episodes in ABOi+HLAs were positive to HLA-DSA but not to anti-A/B. In conclusion, ABO incompatibility does not increase the risk for AAMR in HLAs KTRs.

  4. Determining donor-specific antibody C1q-binding ability improves the prediction of antibody-mediated rejection in human leucocyte antigen-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Jorge; Tafulo, Sandra; Dias, Leonídio; Martins, La Salete; Fonseca, Isabel; Beirão, Idalina; Castro-Henriques, António; Cabrita, António

    2017-04-01

    Detrimental impact of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) against human leucocyte antigens on outcomes after kidney transplantation are well documented, however, the value of their capacity to bind complement for predicting antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and graft survival still needs to be confirmed. We aimed to study DSA characteristics (strength and C1q binding) that might distinguish harmful DSA from clinically irrelevant ones. We retrospectively studied 60 kidney-transplanted patients with preformed DSA detected by single antigen bead (SAB) assays (IgG and C1q kits), from a cohort of 517 kidney graft recipients (124 with detectable anti-HLA antibodies). Patients were divided into DSA strength (MFI < vs. ≥ 15 000) and C1q-binding ability. AMR frequency was high (30%) and it increased with DSA strength (P = 0.002) and C1q+ DSA (P < 0.001). The performance of DSA C1q-binding ability as a predictor of AMR was better than DSA strength (diagnostic odds ratio 16.3 vs. 6.4, respectively). Furthermore, a multivariable logistic regression showed that C1q+ DSA was a risk factor for AMR (OR = 16.80, P = 0.001), while high MFI DSAs were not. Graft survival was lower in high MFI C1q+ DSA in comparison with patients with C1q- high or low MFI DSA (at 6 years, 38%, 83% and 80%, respectively; P = 0.001). Both DSA strength and C1q-binding ability assessment seem valuable for improving pretransplant risk assessment. Since DSA C1q-binding ability was a better predictor of AMR and correlated with graft survival, C1q-SAB may be a particularly useful tool.

  5. Evidence of T-cell mediated neuronal injury in stiff-person syndrome with anti-amphiphysin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Poh, Mervyn Q W; Simon, Neil G; Buckland, Michael E; Salisbury, Elizabeth; Watson, Shaun

    2014-02-15

    Paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome (SPS) has been associated with antibodies against amphiphysin. Current evidence supports a pathogenic role for anti-amphiphysin antibodies. A 74-year-old female was diagnosed with amphiphysin-associated paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome and associated encephalomyelitis. She had initial response to IVIG, however her symptoms worsened after two months and were resistant to further treatment. Subsequently the patient died and a post-mortem was performed. Neuropathology revealed perivascular and parenchymal lymphocytic infiltrates, with neuronophagia mediated by CD8+ T cells and microglia in brainstem, spinal cord, and mesial temporal lobe structures. These findings suggest a pathogenic role of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells, with potential implication for therapy of future patients.

  6. Molecular Basis for Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of New World Hemorrhagic Fever Mammarenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Mahmutovic, Selma; Clark, Lars; Levis, Silvana C; Briggiler, Ana M; Enria, Delia A; Harrison, Stephen C; Abraham, Jonathan

    2015-12-09

    In the Western hemisphere, at least five mammarenaviruses cause human viral hemorrhagic fevers with high case fatality rates. Junín virus (JUNV) is the only hemorrhagic fever virus for which transfusion of survivor immune plasma that contains neutralizing antibodies ("passive immunity") is an established treatment. Here, we report the structure of the JUNV surface glycoprotein receptor-binding subunit (GP1) bound to a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The antibody engages the GP1 site that binds transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1)-the host cell surface receptor for all New World hemorrhagic fever mammarenaviruses-and mimics an important receptor contact. We show that survivor immune plasma contains antibodies that bind the same epitope. We propose that viral receptor-binding site accessibility explains the success of passive immunity against JUNV and that this functionally conserved epitope is a potential target for therapeutics and vaccines to limit infection by all New World hemorrhagic fever mammarenaviruses.

  7. Molecular basis for antibody-mediated neutralization of New World hemorrhagic fever mammarenaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mahmutovic, Selma; Clark, Lars; Levis, Silvana C.; Briggiler, Ana M.; Enria, Delia A.; Harrison, Stephen C.; Abraham, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In the Western hemisphere, at least five mammarenaviruses cause human viral hemorrhagic fevers with high case fatality rates. Junín virus (JUNV) is the only hemorrhagic fever virus for which transfusion of survivor immune plasma that contains neutralizing antibodies (‘passive immunity’) is an established treatment. Here, we report the structure of the JUNV surface glycoprotein receptor-binding subunit (GP1) bound to a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The antibody engages the GP1 site that binds transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) – the host cell surface receptor for all New World hemorrhagic fever mammarenaviruses - and mimics an important receptor contact. We show that survivor immune plasma contains antibodies that bind the same epitope. We propose that viral receptor-binding site accessibility explains the success of passive immunity against JUNV and that this functionally conserved epitope is a potential target for therapeutics and vaccines to limit infection by all New World hemorrhagic fever mammarenaviruses. PMID:26651946

  8. Bispecific antibodies that mediate killing of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus of any strain.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, J; Lötscher, E; Steimer, K S; Capon, D J; Baenziger, J; Jäck, H M; Wabl, M

    1991-01-01

    Although AIDS patients lose human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T cells, their remaining CD8-positive T lymphocytes maintain cytotoxic function. To exploit this fact we have constructed bispecific antibodies that direct cytotoxic T lymphocytes of any specificity to cells that express gp120 of HIV. These bispecific antibodies comprise one heavy/light chain pair from an antibody to CD3, linked to a heavy chain whose variable region has been replaced with sequences from CD4 plus a second light chain. CD3 is part of the antigen receptor on T cells and is responsible for signal transduction. In the presence of these bispecific antibodies, T cells of irrelevant specificity effectively lyse HIV-infected cells in vitro. Images PMID:1905015

  9. Differential timing of antibody-mediated phagocytosis and cell-free killing of invasive African Salmonella allows immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Siggins, Matthew K; O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Pravin, John; Cunningham, Adam F; Henderson, Ian R; Drayson, Mark T; MacLennan, Calman A

    2014-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae commonly cause fatal bacteraemia in African children lacking anti-Salmonella antibodies. These are facultative intracellular bacteria capable of cell-free and intracellular survival within macrophages. To better understand the relationship between extracellular and intracellular infection in blood and general mechanisms of Ab-related protection against Salmonella, we used human blood and sera to measure kinetics of Ab and complement deposition, serum-mediated bactericidal killing and phagocytosis of invasive African Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium D23580. Binding of antibodies peaked by 30 s, but C3 deposition lagged behind, peaking after 2-4 min. C5b-9 deposition was undetectable until between 2 and 6 min and peaked after 10 min, after which time an increase in serum-mediated killing occurred. In contrast, intracellular, opsonized Salmonellae were readily detectable within 5 min. By 10 min, around half of monocytes and most neutrophils contained bacteria. The same kinetics of serum-mediated killing and phagocytosis were observed with S. enterica Typhimurium laboratory strain SL1344, and the S. enterica Enteritidis African invasive isolate D24954 and laboratory strain PT4. The differential kinetics between cell-free killing and phagocytosis of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella allows these bacteria to escape the blood and establish intracellular infection before they are killed by the membrane attack complex.

  10. The absence of IgE antibody-mediated augmentation of immune responses in CD23-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, H; Kikutani, H; Suematsu, S; Naka, T; Yoshida, K; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, T; Suemura, M; Matsumoto, N; Kojima, S

    1994-01-01

    The CD23 antigen, a low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc epsilon RII), is a type II membrane-bound glycoprotein expressed on various cells, particularly mature B cells. A number of functions have been ascribed to CD23, including specific regulation of IgE production, IgE-mediated cytotoxicity and release of mediators, IgE-dependent antigen focusing, promotion of B-cell growth, prevention of germinal center B cells from apoptosis, proliferation of myeloid precursors, and maturation of early thymocytes. It is not clear whether these activities represent in vivo functions. To explore in vivo functions of CD23, we have produced CD23-deficient mice. These mice displayed normal lymphocyte differentiation and could mount normal antibody responses, including IgE responses upon immunization with T-dependent antigens and infection with Nippostrongyrus brasiliensis. Germinal center formation after immunization and in vitro proliferative response of B cells were not affected in mutant mice. However, antigen-specific IgE-mediated enhancement of antibody responses was severely impaired. Images PMID:8041705

  11. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against ricin's enzymatic subunit interfere with protein disulfide isomerase-mediated reduction of ricin holotoxin in vitro.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Joanne M; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2013-09-30

    The penultimate event in the intoxication of mammalian cells by ricin toxin is the reduction, in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), of the intermolecular disulfide bond that links ricin's enzymatic (RTA) and binding (RTB) subunits. In this report we adapted an in vitro protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-mediated reduction assay to test the hypothesis that the RTA-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) IB2 interferes with the liberation of RTA from RTB. IB2 recognizes an epitope located near the interface between RTA and RTB and, like a number of other RTA-specific neutralizing mAbs, is proposed to neutralize ricin intracellularly. In this study, we found that IB2 virtually eliminated the reduction of ricin holotoxin into RTA and RTB in vitro. Surprisingly, three other neutralizing mAbs (GD12, R70 and SyH7) that bind epitopes at considerable distance from ricin's disulfide bond were as effective (or nearly as effective) as IB2 in interfering with PDI-mediated liberation of RTA from RTB. By contrast, two non-neutralizing RTA-specific mAbs, FGA12 and SB1, did not affect PDI-mediated reduction of ricin. These data reveal a possible mechanism by which RTA-specific antibodies may neutralize ricin intracellularly, provided they are capable of trafficking in association with ricin from the cell surface to the ER.

  12. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  13. Immune-Mediated Fever in the Dog. Occurrence of Antinuclear Antibodies, Rheumatoid Factor, Tumor Necrosis Factor and Interleukin-6 in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Bohnhorst, Øvrebø; Hanssen, I; Moen, Torolf

    2002-01-01

    Contents of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), rheumatoid factor (RF), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured in serum from 20 dogs with immune-mediated fever. Seven out of 20 patients were ANA positive, 1 out of 20 was positive to antibodies against extractable nuclear antigens (ENA), 1 out of 20 was positive to antibodies against deoxynucleoproteins (DNP), 2 out of 13 were RF positive and none out of 20 patients had antibodies against native DNA in the serum. TNF-α was not detected in any serum of 15 dogs with immune-mediated fever, while 10 out of 13 presented with elevated IL-6. The results varied between patients, but the IL-6 level was high in most of them. This indicate a role for IL-6 in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated fever in most cases. PMID:12564546

  14. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Prevents Murine Antibody-Mediated Acute Lung Injury at the Level of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production

    PubMed Central

    Semple, John W.; Kim, Michael; Hou, Jing; McVey, Mark; Lee, Young Jin; Tabuchi, Arata; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Chai, Zhong-Wei; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality that can occur with any type of transfusion and is thought to be primarily due to donor antibodies activating pulmonary neutrophils in recipients. Recently, a large prospective case controlled clinical study of cardiac surgery patients demonstrated that despite implementation of male donors, a high incidence of TRALI still occurred and suggested a need for additional interventions in susceptible patient populations. To examine if intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) may be effective, a murine model of antibody-mediated acute lung injury that approximates human TRALI was examined. When BALB/c mice were injected with the anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody 34-1-2s, mild shock (reduced rectal temperature) and respiratory distress (dyspnea) were observed and pre-treatment of the mice with 2 g/kg IVIg completely prevented these symptoms. To determine IVIg's usefulness to affect severe lung damage, SCID mice, previously shown to be hypersensitive to 34-1-2s were used. SCID mice treated with 34-1-2s underwent severe shock, lung damage (increased wet/dry ratios) and 40% mortality within 2 hours. Treatment with 2 g/kg IVIg 18 hours before 34-1-2s administration completely protected the mice from all adverse events. Treatment with IVIg after symptoms began also reduced lung damage and mortality. While the prophylactic IVIg administration did not affect 34-1-2s-induced pulmonary neutrophil accumulation, bone marrow-derived neutrophils from the IVIg-treated mice displayed no spontaneous ROS production nor could they be stimulated in vitro with fMLP or 34-1-2s. These results suggest that IVIg prevents murine antibody-mediated acute lung injury at the level of neutrophil ROS production and thus, alleviating tissue damage. PMID:22363629

  15. Variation in use of erythrocyte invasion pathways by Plasmodium falciparum mediates evasion of human inhibitory antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Kristina E.M.; McCallum, Fiona J.; Reiling, Linda; Lister, Nicole A.; Stubbs, Janine; Cowman, Alan F.; Marsh, Kevin; Beeson, James G.

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that inhibit Plasmodium falciparum invasion of erythrocytes are believed to be an important component of immunity against malaria. During blood-stage infection, P. falciparum can use different pathways for erythrocyte invasion by varying the expression and/or utilization of members of 2 invasion ligand families: the erythrocyte-binding antigens (EBAs) and reticulocyte-binding homologs (PfRhs). Invasion pathways can be broadly classified into 2 groups based on the use of sialic acid (SA) on the erythrocyte surface by parasite ligands. We found that inhibitory antibodies are acquired by malaria-exposed Kenyan children and adults against ligands of SA-dependent and SA-independent invasion pathways, and the ability of antibodies to inhibit erythrocyte invasion depended on the pathway used by P. falciparum isolates. Differential inhibition of P. falciparum lines that varied in their use of specific EBA and PfRh proteins pointed to these ligand families as major targets of inhibitory antibodies. Antibodies against recombinant EBA and PfRh proteins were acquired in an age-associated manner, and inhibitory antibodies against EBA175 appeared prominent among some individuals. These findings suggest that variation in invasion phenotype might have evolved as a mechanism that facilitates immune evasion by P. falciparum and that a broad inhibitory response against multiple ligands may be required for effective immunity. PMID:18064303

  16. Monoclonal antibody production by receptor-mediated electrically induced cell fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Mathew M. S.; Tsong, Tian Yow; Conrad, Mary K.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.; Hester, Lynda D.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1984-08-01

    Fusion of myeloma cells and B lymphocytes to form hybridomas which produce monoclonal antibodies has been a major advance1-3, but the poor efficiency and randomness of viral or polyethylene glycol fusion techniques generally gives poor yields of specific, high affinity antibodies. High voltage electrical fields with dielectrophoresis to ensure cell alignment can fuse a limited number of cells under direct microscopic examination4-9, but it is not possible to identify B-cells destined to secrete relevant antibodies. However, B-cells express, on their surface, antigen receptor immunoglobulins of the same antigenic specificity as the secreted antibodies. Binding of antigen to surface immunoglobulins stimulates proliferation and differentiation of B-cells into plasma cells. Here we report the use of the selective, high affinity interaction of antigen with surface immunoglobulins on B-cells to facilitate a close adherence to myeloma cells. The antigen, covalently conjugated to avidin, binds to the surface immunoglobulins on B-cells. This B-cell-antigen-avidin complex binds to biotin covalently attached to the surface of myeloma cells. An intense electric field across a bulk cell suspension then produces selective fusion of cells in contact, that is, of myeloma cells with B-cells which make the appropriate antibody. We have used this technique with several antigens, and all resultant hybridomas secrete appropriate antibodies with very high affinity.

  17. Fc-mediated activity of EGFR x c-Met bispecific antibody JNJ-61186372 enhanced killing of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Grugan, Katharine D; Dorn, Keri; Jarantow, Stephen W; Bushey, Barbara S; Pardinas, Jose R; Laquerre, Sylvie; Moores, Sheri L; Chiu, Mark L

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant non-small cell lung cancers acquire resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors through multiple mechanisms including c-Met receptor pathway activation. We generated a bispecific antibody targeting EGFR and c-Met (JNJ-61186372) demonstrating anti-tumor activity in wild-type and mutant EGFR settings with c-Met pathway activation. JNJ-61186372 was engineered with low fucosylation (<10 %), resulting in enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and FcγRIIIa binding. In vitro and in vivo studies with the single-arm EGFR or c-Met versions of JNJ-61186372 identified that the Fc-activity of JNJ-61186372 is mediated by binding of the anti-EGFR arm and required for inhibition of EGFR-driven tumor cells. In a tumor model driven by both EGFR and c-Met, treatment with Fc-silent JNJ-61186372 or with c-Met single-arm antibody reduced tumor growth inhibition compared to treatment with JNJ-61186372, suggesting that the Fc function of JNJ-61186372 is essential for maximal tumor inhibition. Moreover in this same model, downregulation of both EGFR and c-Met receptors was observed upon treatment with Fc-competent JNJ-61186372, suggesting that the Fc interactions are necessary for down-modulation of the receptors in vivo and for efficacy. These Fc-mediated activities, in combination with inhibition of both the EGFR and c-Met signaling pathways, highlight the multiple mechanisms by which JNJ-61186372 combats therapeutic resistance in EGFR mutant patients.

  18. Fc-mediated activity of EGFR x c-Met bispecific antibody JNJ-61186372 enhanced killing of lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Grugan, Katharine D.; Dorn, Keri; Bushey, Barbara S.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Laquerre, Sylvie; Moores, Sheri L.; Chiu, Mark L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant non-small cell lung cancers acquire resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors through multiple mechanisms including c-Met receptor pathway activation. We generated a bispecific antibody targeting EGFR and c-Met (JNJ-61186372) demonstrating anti-tumor activity in wild-type and mutant EGFR settings with c-Met pathway activation. JNJ-61186372 was engineered with low fucosylation (<10 %), resulting in enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and FcγRIIIa binding. In vitro and in vivo studies with the single-arm EGFR or c-Met versions of JNJ-61186372 identified that the Fc-activity of JNJ-61186372 is mediated by binding of the anti-EGFR arm and required for inhibition of EGFR-driven tumor cells. In a tumor model driven by both EGFR and c-Met, treatment with Fc-silent JNJ-61186372 or with c-Met single-arm antibody reduced tumor growth inhibition compared to treatment with JNJ-61186372, suggesting that the Fc function of JNJ-61186372 is essential for maximal tumor inhibition. Moreover in this same model, downregulation of both EGFR and c-Met receptors was observed upon treatment with Fc-competent JNJ-61186372, suggesting that the Fc interactions are necessary for down-modulation of the receptors in vivo and for efficacy. These Fc-mediated activities, in combination with inhibition of both the EGFR and c-Met signaling pathways, highlight the multiple mechanisms by which JNJ-61186372 combats therapeutic resistance in EGFR mutant patients. PMID:27786612

  19. Expression of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjiao; Fu, Lu; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Guan, Shanshan; Kuai, Ziyu; Kong, Wei; Shi, Yuhua; Shan, Yaming

    2016-12-01

    Despite unremitting efforts since the discovery of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), an effective vaccine has not been generated. Viral vector-mediated transfer for expression of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) is an attractive strategy. In this study, a recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 (rAAV8) vector was used to encode full-length antibodies against HIV-1 in 293T cells and Balb/c mice after gene transfer. The 10E8 or NIH45-46 BnAb was expressed from a single open reading frame by linking the heavy and light chains with a furin cleavage and a 2A self-processing peptide (F2A). The results showed that the BnAbs could be expressed in the 293T cell culture medium. A single intramuscular injection of rAAV8 led to long-term expression of BnAbs in Balb/c mice. The expressed antibodies in the supernatant of 293T cells and in Balb/c mice showed neutralization effects against HIV-1 pseudoviruses. Combined immunization of rAAV8 expressing 10E8 and rAAV8 expressing NIH45-46 in Balb/c mice could increase these neutralization effects on strains of HIV-1 sensitive to 10E8 or NIH45-46 antibody compared with a single injection of rAAV8 expressing either antibody alone. Therefore, the combined immunization may be a potential vaccine approach against HIV-1.

  20. High-multiplicity HIV-1 infection and neutralizing antibody evasion mediated by the macrophage-T cell virological synapse.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christopher J A; Williams, James P; Schiffner, Torben; Gärtner, Kathleen; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John; Russell, Rebecca A; Frater, John; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2014-02-01

    Macrophage infection is considered to play an important role in HIV-1 pathogenesis and persistence. Using a primary cell-based coculture model, we show that monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) efficiently transmit a high-multiplicity HIV-1 infection to autologous CD4(+) T cells through a viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) receptor- and actin-dependent virological synapse (VS), facilitated by interactions between ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Virological synapse (VS)-mediated transmission by MDM results in high levels of T cell HIV-1 integration and is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude more efficient than cell-free infection. This mode of cell-to-cell transmission is broadly susceptible to the activity of CD4 binding site (CD4bs) and glycan or glycopeptide epitope-specific broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNMAbs) but shows resistance to bNMAbs targeting the Env gp41 subunit membrane-proximal external region (MPER). These data define for the first time the structure and function of the macrophage-to-T cell VS and have important implications for bNMAb activity in HIV-1 prophylaxis and therapy. IMPORTANCE The ability of HIV-1 to move directly between contacting immune cells allows efficient viral dissemination with the potential to evade antibody attack. Here, we show that HIV-1 spreads from infected macrophages to T cells via a structure called a virological synapse that maintains extended contact between the two cell types, allowing transfer of multiple infectious events to the T cell. This process allows the virus to avoid neutralization by a class of antibody targeting the gp41 subunit of the envelope glycoproteins. These results have implications for viral spread in vivo and the specificities of neutralizing antibody elicited by antibody-based vaccines.

  1. Sustained remission of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis and nephrotic syndrome in mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Harris, Alexis A; Barry, Marc; Murata, Glen H; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2013-08-01

    A woman diagnosed with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) developed an anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and nephrotic syndrome with normal serum creatinine. Percutaneous kidney biopsy showed pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with superimposed immune complex deposition. After treatment with cyclophophamide and prednisone, proteinuria decreased progressively to a level of 0.4 g/g creatinine, ANCA became undetectable, while serum creatinine remained normal seven years after the beginning of treatment. Sustained remission of nephrotic proteinuria with preserved renal function may follow treatment of ANCA-mediated disease developing in patients with MCTD.

  2. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) on switching from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta: what are the implications?

    PubMed Central

    Assunção, José; Vinhas, José

    2008-01-01

    We report the development of antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) in a 63-year-old man with end-stage renal disease following a switch from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta. Haemoglobin levels began to decrease 6 months after the switch. Increasing the epoetin beta dose produced no response and regular blood transfusions were required; PRCA was confirmed and epoetin beta was discontinued. The patient responded positively to immunosuppression; after 2 months on prednisone and cyclophosphamide, haemoglobin levels stabilized and no further transfusions were required. This case highlights the difficulty in establishing a cause-effect relationship where more than one erythropoiesis-stimulating agent is involved. PMID:25983889

  3. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) on switching from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta: what are the implications?

    PubMed

    Assunção, José; Vinhas, José

    2008-08-01

    We report the development of antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) in a 63-year-old man with end-stage renal disease following a switch from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta. Haemoglobin levels began to decrease 6 months after the switch. Increasing the epoetin beta dose produced no response and regular blood transfusions were required; PRCA was confirmed and epoetin beta was discontinued. The patient responded positively to immunosuppression; after 2 months on prednisone and cyclophosphamide, haemoglobin levels stabilized and no further transfusions were required. This case highlights the difficulty in establishing a cause-effect relationship where more than one erythropoiesis-stimulating agent is involved.

  4. Pituitary expression of CTLA-4 mediates hypophysitis secondary to administration of CTLA-4 blocking antibody.

    PubMed

    Iwama, Shintaro; De Remigis, Alessandra; Callahan, Margaret K; Slovin, Susan F; Wolchok, Jedd D; Caturegli, Patrizio

    2014-04-02

    Hypophysitis is a chronic inflammation of the pituitary gland of unknown (primary forms) or recognizable (secondary forms) etiology, such as the use of ipilimumab in cancer immunotherapy. Ipilimumab, which blocks the T cell inhibitory molecule CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4), induces hypophysitis in about 4% of patients through unknown mechanisms. We first established a model of secondary hypophysitis by repeated injections of a CTLA-4 blocking antibody into SJL/J or C57BL/6J mice, and showed that they developed lymphocytic infiltration of the pituitary gland and circulating pituitary antibodies. We next assessed the prevalence of pituitary antibodies in a cohort of 20 patients with advanced melanoma or prostate cancer, 7 with a clinical diagnosis of hypophysitis, before and after ipilimumab administration. Pituitary antibodies, negative at baseline, developed in the 7 patients with hypophysitis but not in the 13 without it; these antibodies predominantly recognized thyrotropin-, follicle-stimulating hormone-, and corticotropin-secreting cells. We then hypothesized that the injected CTLA-4 antibody could cause pituitary toxicity if bound to CTLA-4 antigen expressed "ectopically" on pituitary endocrine cells. Pituitary glands indeed expressed CTLA-4 at both RNA and protein levels, particularly in a subset of prolactin- and thyrotropin-secreting cells. Notably, these cells became the site of complement activation, featuring deposition of C3d and C4d components and an inflammatory cascade akin to that seen in type II hypersensitivity. In summary, the study offers a mechanism to explain the pituitary toxicity observed in patients receiving ipilimumab, and highlights the utility of measuring pituitary antibodies in this form of secondary hypophysitis.

  5. Acute T cell-mediated rejection accompanied by C4d-negative acute antibody-mediated rejection and cell debris in tubulus: A case report.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Izumi; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Katsumata, Haruki; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Furuya, Maiko; Mafune, Aki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Herein, we report a complicated case of acute T-cell-mediated rejection (ACR) accompanied by C4d-negative acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and cell debris in tubulus. A 32 year-old male was admitted for an episode biopsy with a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 1.83 mg/dL and pyuria (20-29 white blood cells per high power field) 49 days following kidney transplantation. Histological features included three distinct entities, mainly, in one of the three specimens: 1) focal aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell infiltration with moderate tubulitis, 2) inflammatory cell infiltration in peritubular capillaries (including neutrophils) and glomerular capillaries, and 3) cell debris consisting mainly of neutrophils in tubulus. Laboratory examination revealed evidence of non-human leukocyte antigen donor-specific antibodies. However, urinary culture and gram staining were negative. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, the patient was diagnosed with ACR accompanied by C4d-negative AMR and suspicion of a urinary tract infection (UTI). The patient was treated for three consecutive days with steroid pulse therapy. The patient's S-Cr level decreased to ~1.5 mg/dL following treatment and did not increase thereafter. A second biopsy 133 days following kidney transplantation showed an excellent response to treatment and revealed no evidence of rejection. This case report demonstrates the difficulty in the diagnosis of, and therapy for, the complicated pathological findings of ACR, AMR and suspicion of a UTI.

  6. The CD25-binding antibody Daclizumab High-Yield Process has a distinct glycosylation pattern and reduced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in comparison to Zenapax®

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Bishu; Balasa, Balaji; Efros, Lyubov; Hinton, Paul R.; Hartman, Stephen; Thakur, Archana; Xiong, Joanna M.; Schmidt, Brian; Robinson, Randy R.; Sornasse, Thierry; Vexler, Vladimir; Sheridan, James P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CD25-binding antibody daclizumab high-yield process (DAC HYP) is an interleukin (IL)-2 signal modulating antibody that shares primary amino acid sequence and CD25 binding affinity with Zenapax®, a distinct form of daclizumab, which was approved for the prevention of acute organ rejection in patients receiving renal transplants as part of an immunosuppressive regimen that includes cyclosporine and corticosteroids. Comparison of the physicochemical properties of the two antibody forms revealed the glycosylation profile of DAC HYP differs from Zenapax in both glycan distribution and the types of oligosaccharides, most notably high-mannose, galactosylated and galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) oligosaccharides, resulting in a DAC HYP antibody material that is structurally distinct from Zenapax. Although neither antibody elicited complement-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro, DAC HYP antibody had significantly reduced levels of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The ADCC activity required natural killer (NK) cells, but not monocytes, suggesting the effects were mediated through binding to Fc-gamma RIII (CD16). Incubation of each antibody with peripheral blood mononuclear cells also caused the down-modulation of CD16 expression on NK cells and the CD16 down-modulation was greater for Zenapax in comparison to that observed for DAC HYP. The substantive glycosylation differences between the two antibody forms and corresponding greater Fc-mediated effector activities by Zenapax, including cell killing activity, manifest as a difference in the biological function and pharmacology between DAC HYP and Zenapax. PMID:27367933

  7. Enzyme-Mediated Modification of Single-Domain Antibodies for Imaging Modalities with Different Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Edens, Jerre G.; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Hossain, Intekhab; Wang, Qifan; Victora, Gabriel D.; Vasdev, Neil; Ploegh, Hidde; Liang, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are currently the fastest-growing class of therapeutics. Although naked antibodies have proven valuable as pharmaceutical agents, they have some limitations, such as low tissue penetration and a long circulatory half-life. They have been conjugated to toxic payloads, PEGs, or radio-isotopes to increase and optimize their therapeutic efficacy. Although nonspecific conjugation is suitable for most in vitro applications, it has become evident that site specifically modified antibodies may have advantages for in vivo applications. Herein we describe a novel approach in which the antibody fragment is tagged with two handles: one for the introduction of a fluorophore or 18F isotope, and the second for further modification of the fragment with a PEG moiety or a second antibody fragment to tune its circulatory half-life or its avidity. Such constructs, which recognize Class II MHC products and CD11b, showed high avidity and specificity. They were used to image cancers and could detect small tumors. PMID:26630549

  8. Subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-human-leukocyte-antigen-DR53 antibody accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection in a patient with cadaveric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, Ai; Yamamoto, Izumi; Komatsuzaki, Yo; Niikura, Takahito; Kawabe, Mayuko; Okabayashi, Yusuke; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Katsumata, Haruki; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    A 56-year-old man who had undergone cadaveric kidney transplantation 21 months earlier was admitted to our hospital for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine level of 1.2 mg/dL and no proteinuria. Histological features showed two distinct entities: (i) inflammatory cell infiltration, in the glomerular and peritubular capillaries and (ii) focal, aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell infiltration, predominantly plasma cells, with mild tubulitis (Banff 13 classification: i2, t1, g2, ptc2, v0, ci1, ct1, cg0, cv0). Immunohistological studies showed mildly positive C4d immunoreactivity in the peritubular capillaries. The patient had donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53. We diagnosed him with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection. Both antibody-mediated rejection due to anti- human-leucocyte-antigen -DR53 antibodies and plasma cell-rich acute rejection are known to be refractory and have a poor prognosis. Thus, we started plasma exchange with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab for the former and 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy for the latter. Three months after treatment, a follow-up allograft biopsy showed excellent responses to treatment for both histological features. This case report considers the importance of an early diagnosis and appropriate intervention for subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53 and plasma cell-rich acute rejection.

  9. Cellular Uptake of α-Synuclein Oligomer-Selective Antibodies is Enhanced by the Extracellular Presence of α-Synuclein and Mediated via Fcγ Receptors.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Gabriel; Eriksson, Fredrik; Möller, Christer; da Fonseca, Tomás Lopes; Outeiro, Tiago F; Lannfelt, Lars; Bergström, Joakim; Ingelsson, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy targeting aggregated α-synuclein has emerged as a potential treatment strategy against Parkinson's disease and other α-synucleinopathies. We have developed α-synuclein oligomer/protofibril selective antibodies that reduce toxic α-synuclein in a human cell line and, upon intraperitoneal administration, in spinal cord of transgenic mice. Here, we investigated under which conditions and by which mechanisms such antibodies can be internalized by cells. For this purpose, human neuroglioma H4 cells were treated with either monoclonal oligomer/protofibril selective α-synuclein antibodies, linear epitope monoclonal α-synuclein antibodies, or with a control antibody. The oligomer/protofibril selective antibody mAb47 displayed the highest cellular uptake and was therefore chosen for additional analyses. Next, α-synuclein overexpressing cells were incubated with mAb47, which resulted in increased antibody internalization as compared to non-transfected cells. Similarly, regular cells exposed to mAb47 together with media containing α-synuclein displayed a higher uptake as compared to cells incubated with regular media. Finally, different Fcγ receptors were targeted and we then found that blockage of FcγRI and FcγRIIB/C resulted in reduced antibody internalization. Our data thus indicate that the robust uptake of the oligomer/protofibril selective antibody mAb47 by human CNS-derived cells is enhanced by extracellular α-synuclein and mediated via Fcγ receptors. Altogether, our finding lend further support to the belief that α-synuclein pathology can be modified by monoclonal antibodies and that these can target toxic α-synuclein species in the extracellular milieu. In the context of immunotherapy, antibody binding of α-synuclein would then not only block further aggregation but also mediate internalization and subsequent degradation of antigen-antibody complexes.

  10. HER2-specific immunoligands engaging NKp30 or NKp80 trigger NK-cell-mediated lysis of tumor cells and enhance antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Peipp, Matthias; Derer, Stefanie; Lohse, Stefan; Staudinger, Matthias; Klausz, Katja; Valerius, Thomas; Gramatzki, Martin; Kellner, Christian

    2015-10-13

    NK cells detect tumors through activating surface receptors, which bind self-antigens that are frequently expressed upon malignant transformation. To increase the recognition of tumor cells, the extracellular domains of ligands of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30, NKp80 and DNAM-1 (i.e. B7-H6, AICL and PVR, respectively) were fused to a single-chain fragment variable (scFv) targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which is displayed by various solid tumors. The resulting immunoligands, designated B7-H6:HER2-scFv, AICL:HER2-scFv, and PVR:HER2-scFv, respectively, bound HER2 and the addressed NK cell receptor. However, whereas B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv triggered NK cells to kill HER2-positive breast cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, PVR:HER2-scFv was not efficacious. Moreover, NK cell cytotoxicity was enhanced synergistically when B7-H6:HER2-scFv or AICL:HER2-scFv were applied in combination with another HER2-specific immunoligand engaging the stimulatory receptor NKG2D. In contrast, no improvements were achieved by combining B7-H6:HER2-scFv with AICL:HER2-scFv. Additionally, B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) by the therapeutic antibodies trastuzumab and cetuximab synergistically, with B7-H6:HER2-scFv exhibiting a higher efficacy. In summary, antibody-derived proteins engaging NKp30 or NKp80 may represent attractive biologics to further enhance anti-tumor NK cell responses and may provide an innovative approach to sensitize tumor cells for antibody-based immunotherapy.

  11. Prospective Evaluation of Cetuximab-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Predicts Treatment Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Anna Maria; Ottaiano, Alessandro; Romano, Carmela; Nasti, Guglielmo; Nappi, Anna; De Divitiis, Chiara; Napolitano, Maria; Zanotta, Serena; Casaretti, Rossana; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Avallone, Antonio; Califano, Daniela; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody to the EGFR that induces antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) through Fcγ receptors on immune cells. Although SNPs in genes encoding Fcγ receptors are functionally relevant to cetuximab-mediated ADCC in colorectal cancer, a direct correlation between in vitro ADCC and clinical response to cetuximab is not defined. We therefore enrolled 96 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients at diagnosis in a study that assessed FcγR status and cetuximab-mediated ADCC. Patients carrying the FcγRIIa H alleles 131H/Hand 131H/R had significantly higher ADCC compared with patients with the 131R/R alleles (P= 0.013). Patients carrying FcγRIIIa genotypes with the V alleles 158V/V and 158V/F displayed higher ADCC compared with patients carrying the 158F/F genotype (P= 0.001). Progression-free survival of patients with an FcγRIIIa 158V allele was significantly longer compared with patients carrying 158F/F (P= 0.05), whereas no significant difference was observed for overall survival. Twenty-eight of 50 mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS received cetuximab. The average ADCC-mediated killing was 30% of assay targets for patients who experienced cetuximab complete or partial response, 21% in patients with stable disease and 9% in patients with progressive disease. To characterize basal natural killer (NK) activity, cytotoxicity was evaluated in 39 of 96 mCRC patients. Patients who responded to first-line treatment had higher NK-cell cytotoxicity. Thus, although limited to this cohort of patients, in vitro cetuximab-mediated ADCC correlated with FcγR polymorphisms and predicted cetuximab responsiveness.

  12. Adlayer-mediated antibody immobilization to stainless steel for potential application to endothelial progenitor cell capture.

    PubMed

    Benvenuto, Pasquale; Neves, Miguel A D; Blaszykowski, Christophe; Romaschin, Alexander; Chung, Timothy; Kim, Sa Rang; Thompson, Michael

    2015-05-19

    This work describes the straightforward surface modification of 316L stainless steel with BTS, S-(11-trichlorosilylundecanyl)-benzenethiosulfonate, a thiol-reactive trichlorosilane cross-linker molecule designed to form intermediary coatings with subsequent biofunctionalization capability. The strategy is more specifically exemplified with the immobilization of intact antibodies and their Fab' fragments. Both surface derivatization steps are thoroughly characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The antigen binding capability of both types of biofunctionalized surfaces is subsequently assessed by fluorescence microscopy. It was determined that BTS adlayers achieve robust immobilization of both intact and fragmented antibodies, while preserving antigen binding activity. Another key finding was the observation that the Fab' fragment immobilization strategy would constitute a preferential option over that involving intact antibodies in the context of in vivo capture of endothelial progenitor cells in stent applications.

  13. Dashboard systems: Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic mediated dose optimization for monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Dubinsky, Marla C

    2015-03-01

    Many marketed drugs exhibit high variability in exposure and response. While these drugs are efficacious in their approved indications, finding appropriate dose regimens for individual patients is not straightforward. Similar dose adjustment problems are also seen with drugs that have a complex relationship between exposure and response and/or a narrow therapeutic window. This is particularly true for monoclonal antibodies, where prolonged dosing at a sub-therapeutic dose can also elicit anti-drug antibodies which will further compromise safety and efficacy. Thus, finding appropriate doses quickly would represent a substantial improvement in healthcare. Dashboard systems, which are decision-support tools, offer an improved, convenient means of tailoring treatment for individual patients. This article reviews the clinical need for this approach, particularly with monoclonal antibodies, the design, development, and testing of such systems, and the likely benefits of dashboard systems in clinical practice. We focus on infliximab for reference.

  14. Removal of a C-terminal serine residue proximal to the inter-chain disulfide bond of a human IgG1 lambda light chain mediates enhanced antibody stability and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Zeng, Lin; Zhu, Aiping; Blanc, Tim; Patel, Dipa; Pennello, Anthony; Bari, Amtul; Ng, Stanley; Persaud, Kris; Kang, Yun (Kenneth); Balderes, Paul; Surguladze, David; Hindi, Sagit; Zhou, Qinwei; Ludwig, Dale L.; Snavely, Marshall

    2013-01-01

    Optimization of biophysical properties is a critical success factor for the developability of monoclonal antibodies with potential therapeutic applications. The inter-domain disulfide bond between light chain (Lc) and heavy chain (Hc) in human IgG1 lends structural support for antibody scaffold stability, optimal antigen binding, and normal Fc function. Recently, human IgG1λ has been suggested to exhibit significantly greater susceptibility to reduction of the inter Lc-Hc disulfide bond relative to the same disulfide bond in human IgG1κ. To understand the molecular basis for this observed difference in stability, the sequence and structure of human IgG1λ and human IgG1κ were compared. Based on this Lc comparison, three single mutations were made in the λ Lc proximal to the cysteine residue, which forms a disulfide bond with the Hc. We determined that deletion of S214 (dS) improved resistance of the association between Lc and Hc to thermal stress. In addition, deletion of this terminal serine from the Lc of IgG1λ provided further benefit, including an increase in stability at elevated pH, increased yield from transient transfection, and improved in vitro antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). These observations support the conclusion that the presence of the terminal serine of the λ Lc creates a weaker inter-chain disulfide bond between the Lc and Hc, leading to slightly reduced stability and a potential compromise in IgG1λ function. Our data from a human IgG1λ provide a basis for further investigation of the effects of deleting terminal serine from λLc on the stability and function of other human IgG1λ antibodies. PMID:23567210

  15. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    PubMed

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-07

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses.

  16. HA Antibody-Mediated FcγRIIIa Activity Is Both Dependent on FcR Engagement and Interactions between HA and Sialic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Freek; Kwaks, Ted; Brandenburg, Boerries; Koldijk, Martin H.; Klaren, Vincent; Smal, Bastiaan; Korse, Hans J. W. M.; Geelen, Eric; Tettero, Lisanne; Zuijdgeest, David; Stoop, Esther J. M.; Saeland, Eirikur; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H. E.; Koudstaal, Wouter; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with receptors for the Fc region of IgG (FcγRs) have been shown to contribute to the in vivo protection against influenza A viruses provided by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that bind to the viral hemagglutinin (HA) stem. In particular, Fc-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been shown to contribute to protection by stem-binding bnAbs. Fc-mediated effector functions appear not to contribute to protection provided by strain-specific HA head-binding antibodies. We used a panel of anti-stem and anti-head influenza A and B monoclonal antibodies with identical human IgG1 Fc domains and investigated their ability to mediate ADCC-associated FcγRIIIa activation. Antibodies which do not interfere with sialic acid binding of HA can mediate FcγRIIIa activation. However, the FcγRIIIa activation was inhibited when a mutant HA, unable to bind sialic acids, was used. Antibodies which block sialic acid receptor interactions of HA interfered with FcγRIIIa activation. The inhibition of FcγRIIIa activation by HA head-binding and sialic acid receptor-blocking antibodies was confirmed in plasma samples of H5N1 vaccinated human subjects. Together, these results suggest that in addition to Fc–FcγR binding, interactions between HA and sialic acids on immune cells are required for optimal Fc-mediated effector functions by anti-HA antibodies. PMID:27746785

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulins and rituximab therapy for severe transplant glomerulopathy in chronic antibody-mediated rejection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bachelet, Thomas; Nodimar, Celine; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Lepreux, Sebastien; Moreau, Karine; Morel, Delphine; Guidicelli, Gwendaline; Couzi, Lionel; Merville, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    Outcome of patients with transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is poor. Using B-cell targeting molecules represent a rational strategy to treat TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection. In this pilot study, 21 patients with this diagnosis received four doses of intravenous immunoglobulins and two doses of rituximab (IVIG/RTX group). They were retrospectively compared with a untreated control group of 10 patients. At 24 months post-biopsy, graft survival was similar and poor between the treated and the untreated group, 47% vs. 40%, respectively, p = 0.69. This absence of response of IVIG/RTX treatment was observed, regardless the phenotype of TG. Baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and decline in eGFR during the first six months after the treatment were risk factors associated with 24-month graft survival. The IVIG/RTX therapy had a modest effect on the kinetics of donor-specific alloantibodies at M24, compared to the untreated group, not associated with an improvement in graft survival. The mean number of adverse events per patient was higher in the IVIG/RTX group than in the control group (p = 0.03). Taken together, IVIG/RTX treatment for severe TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection does not seem to change the natural history of TG and is associated with a high incidence of adverse events.

  18. Characterization of transfusion-elicited acute antibody-mediated rejection in a rat model of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, G; Wilson, N A; Reese, S R; Jacobson, L M; Zhong, W; Djamali, A

    2014-05-01

    Animal models of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) may provide important evidence supporting proof of concept. We elicited donor-specific antibodies (DSA) by transfusion of donor blood (Brown Norway RT1(n) ) into a complete mismatch recipient (Lewis RT1(l) ) 3 weeks prior to kidney transplantation. Sensitized recipients had increased anti-donor splenocyte IgG1, IgG2b and IgG2c DSA 1 week after transplantation. Histopathology was consistent with ABMR characterized by diffuse peritubular capillary C4d and moderate microvascular inflammation with peritubular capillaritis + glomerulitis > 2. Immunofluorescence studies of kidney allograft tissue demonstrated a greater CD68/CD3 ratio in sensitized animals, primarily of the M1 (pro-inflammatory) phenotype, consistent with cytokine gene analyses that demonstrated a predominant T helper (TH )1 (interferon-γ, IL-2) profile. Immunoblot analyses confirmed the activation of the M1 macrophage phenotype as interferon regulatory factor 5, inducible nitric oxide synthase and phagocytic NADPH oxidase 2 were significantly up-regulated. Clinical biopsy samples in sensitized patients with acute ABMR confirmed the dominance of M1 macrophage phenotype in humans. Despite the absence of tubulitis, we were unable to exclude the effects of T cell-mediated rejection. These studies suggest that M1 macrophages and TH 1 cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute mixed rejection in sensitized allograft recipients.

  19. Antibody-mediated inhibition of Nogo-A signaling promotes neurite growth in PC-12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Iman K; Taghipour, Nima; Hmaidan, Sarah; Palomba, Roberto; Scaria, Shilpa; Munoz, Alvaro; Boone, Timothy B; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    The use of a monoclonal antibody to block the neurite outgrowth inhibitor Nogo-A has been of great interest for promoting axonal recovery as a treatment for spinal cord injury. While several cellular and non-cellular assays have been developed to quantify the bioactive effects of Nogo-A signaling, demand still exists for the development of a reliable approach to characterize the effectiveness of the anti-Nogo-A antibody. In this study, we developed and validated a novel cell-based approach to facilitate the biological quantification of a Nogo-A antibody using PC-12 cells as an in vitro neuronal cell model. Changes in the mRNA levels of the neuronal differentiation markers, growth-associated protein 43 and neurofilament light-polypeptide, suggest that activation of the Nogo-A pathway suppresses axonal growth and dendrite formation in the tested cell line. We found that application of anti-Nogo-A monoclonal antibody can significantly enhance the neuronal maturity of PC-12 cells by blocking the Nogo-A inhibitory effects, providing enhanced effects on neural maturity at the molecular level. No adverse effects were observed on cell viability. PMID:27027860

  20. Molecular Assessment of Microcirculation Injury in Formalin-Fixed Human Cardiac Allograft Biopsies With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Afzali, B; Chapman, E; Racapé, M; Adam, B; Bruneval, P; Gil, F; Kim, D; Hidalgo, L; Campbell, P; Sis, B; Duong Van Huyen, J P; Mengel, M

    2017-02-01

    Precise diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in cardiac allograft endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) remains challenging. This study assessed molecular diagnostics in human EMBs with AMR. A set of 34 endothelial, natural killer cell and inflammatory genes was quantified in 106 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded EMBs classified according to 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) criteria. The gene set expression was compared between ISHLT diagnoses and correlated with donor-specific antibody (DSA), endothelial injury by electron microscopy (EM) and prognosis. Findings were validated in an independent set of 57 EMBs. In the training set (n = 106), AMR cases (n = 70) showed higher gene set expression than acute cellular rejection (ACR; n = 21, p < 0.001) and controls (n = 15, p < 0.0001). Anti-HLA DSA positivity was associated with higher gene set expression (p = 0.01). Endothelial injury by electron microscopy strongly correlated with gene set expression, specifically in AMR cases (r = 0.62, p = 0.002). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for diagnosing AMR showed greater accuracy with gene set expression (area under the curve [AUC] = 79.88) than with DSA (AUC = 70.47) and C4d (AUC = 70.71). In AMR patients (n = 17) with sequential biopsies, increasing gene set expression was associated with inferior prognosis (p = 0.034). These findings were confirmed in the validation set. In conclusion, biopsy-based molecular assessment of antibody-mediated microcirculation injury has the potential to improve diagnosis of AMR in human cardiac transplants.

  1. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  2. Host Anti-antibody Responses Following Adeno-associated Virus-mediated Delivery of Antibodies Against HIV and SIV in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Navio, José M; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Pedreño-López, Sònia; Rakasz, Eva G; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2016-02-01

    Long-term delivery of antibodies against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is a promising approach for the prevention or treatment of HIV infection. However, host antibody responses to the delivered antibody are a serious concern that could significantly limit the applicability of this approach. Here, we describe the dynamics and characteristics of the anti-antibody responses in monkeys that received either rhesus anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) antibodies (4L6 or 5L7) in prevention trials or a combination of rhesusized human anti-HIV antibodies (1NC9/8ANC195/3BNC117 or 10-1074/10E8/3BNC117) in therapy trials, all employing AAV1 delivery of IgG1. Eight out of eight monkeys that received the anti-HIV antibodies made persisting antibody responses to all three antibodies in the mix. Six out of six uninfected monkeys that received the anti-SIV antibody 4L6 and three out of six of those receiving anti-SIV antibody 5L7 also generated anti-antibodies. Both heavy and light chains were targeted, predominantly or exclusively to variable regions, and reactivity to complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 peptide could be demonstrated. There was a highly significant correlation of the magnitude of anti-antibody responses with the degree of sequence divergence of the delivered antibody from germline. Our results suggest the need for effective strategies to counteract the problem of antibody responses to AAV-delivered antibodies.

  3. Antiglomerular basement membrane antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis after intranasal cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Navascués, R A; Baltar, J; Seco, M; Alvarez, J

    1999-01-01

    We report a case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis due to antiglomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies that progressed to end-stage renal disease in a 35-year-old man who used intranasal cocaine on an occasional basis. In contrast to many prior reports of acute renal failure occurring with cocaine-associated rhabdomyolysis, this patient did not have any evidence of acute muscle damage and myoglobin release. Circulating anti-GBM antibodies and renal biopsy with linear IgG and C3 deposits confirmed the diagnosis of anti-GBM disease. The possibility of anti-GBM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute renal failure in cocaine addicts. This unusual combination raises complex questions regarding the pathogenesis of this type of renal injury.

  4. Antibody-Mediated Inhibition of TNFR1 Attenuates Disease in a Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sarah K.; Maier, Olaf; Fischer, Roman; Fairless, Richard; Hochmeister, Sonja; Stojic, Aleksandar; Pick, Lara; Haar, Doreen; Musiol, Sylvia; Storch, Maria K.; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Diem, Ricarda

    2014-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is known to regulate inflammation in a number of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Although targeting of TNF in models of MS has been successful, the pathological role of TNF in MS remains unclear due to clinical trials where the non-selective inhibition of TNF resulted in exacerbated disease. Subsequent experiments have indicated that this may have resulted from the divergent effects of the two TNF receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2. Here we show that the selective targeting of TNFR1 with an antagonistic antibody ameliorates symptoms of the most common animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), when given following both a prophylactic and therapeutic treatment regime. Our results demonstrate that antagonistic TNFR1-specific antibodies may represent a therapeutic approach for the treatment of MS in the future. PMID:24587232

  5. Banff 2013 meeting report: inclusion of c4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection and antibody-associated arterial lesions.

    PubMed

    Haas, M; Sis, B; Racusen, L C; Solez, K; Glotz, D; Colvin, R B; Castro, M C R; David, D S R; David-Neto, E; Bagnasco, S M; Cendales, L C; Cornell, L D; Demetris, A J; Drachenberg, C B; Farver, C F; Farris, A B; Gibson, I W; Kraus, E; Liapis, H; Loupy, A; Nickeleit, V; Randhawa, P; Rodriguez, E R; Rush, D; Smith, R N; Tan, C D; Wallace, W D; Mengel, M

    2014-02-01

    The 12th Banff Conference on Allograft Pathology was held in Comandatuba, Brazil, from August 19-23, 2013, and was preceded by a 2-day Latin American Symposium on Transplant Immunobiology and Immunopathology. The meeting was highlighted by the presentation of the findings of several working groups formed at the 2009 and 2011 Banff meetings to: (1) establish consensus criteria for diagnosing antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in the presence and absence of detectable C4d deposition; (2) develop consensus definitions and thresholds for glomerulitis (g score) and chronic glomerulopathy (cg score), associated with improved inter-observer agreement and correlation with clinical, molecular and serological data; (3) determine whether isolated lesions of intimal arteritis ("isolated v") represent acute rejection similar to intimal arteritis in the presence of tubulointerstitial inflammation; (4) compare different methodologies for evaluating interstitial fibrosis and for performing/evaluating implantation biopsies of renal allografts with regard to reproducibility and prediction of subsequent graft function; and (5) define clinically and prognostically significant morphologic criteria for subclassifying polyoma virus nephropathy. The key outcome of the 2013 conference is defining criteria for diagnosis of C4d-negative ABMR and respective modification of the Banff classification. In addition, three new Banff Working Groups were initiated.

  6. Antibody-mediated neutralization of Ebola virus can occur by two distinct mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Bailey, Michael A.; Popernack, Paul M.; Cunningham, James M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sullivan, Nancy J.

    2010-06-05

    Human Ebola virus causes severe hemorrhagic fever disease with high mortality and there is no vaccine or treatment. Antibodies in survivors occur early, are sustained, and can delay infection when transferred into nonhuman primates. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from survivors exhibit potent neutralizing activity in vitro and are protective in rodents. To better understand targets and mechanisms of neutralization, we investigated a panel of mAbs shown previously to react with the envelope glycoprotein (GP). While one non-neutralizing mAb recognized a GP epitope in the nonessential mucin-like domain, the rest were specific for GP1, were neutralizing, and could be further distinguished by reactivity with secreted GP. We show that survivor antibodies, human KZ52 and monkey JP3K11, were specific for conformation-dependent epitopes comprising residues in GP1 and GP2 and that neutralization occurred by two distinct mechanisms; KZ52 inhibited cathepsin cleavage of GP whereas JP3K11 recognized the cleaved, fusion-active form of GP.

  7. Antibody-Mediated Elimination of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Ehrlichia chaffeensis during Active Infection

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Gary M.; Yager, Eric; Shilo, Konstantin; Volk, Erin; Reilly, Andrew; Chu, Frederick K.

    2000-01-01

    It is generally accepted that cellular, but not humoral immunity, plays an important role in host defense against intracellular bacteria. However, studies of some of these pathogens have provided evidence that antibodies can provide immunity if present during the initiation of infection. Here, we examined immunity against infection by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Studies with mice have demonstrated that immunocompetent strains are resistant to persistent infection but that SCID mice become persistently and fatally infected. Transfer of immune serum or antibodies obtained from immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice to C57BL/6 scid mice provided significant although transient protection from infection. Bacterial clearance was observed when administration occurred at the time of inoculation or well after infection was established. The effect was dose dependent, occurred within 2 days, and persisted for as long as 2 weeks. Weekly serum administration prolonged the survival of susceptible mice. Although cellular immunity is required for complete bacterial clearance, the data show that antibodies can play a significant role in the elimination of this obligate intracellular bacterium during active infection and thus challenge the paradigm that humoral responses are unimportant for immunity to such organisms. PMID:10722619

  8. Susceptibility of Vibrio cholerae O139 to antibody-dependent, complement-mediated bacteriolysis.

    PubMed

    Attridge, S R; Qadri, F; Albert, M J; Manning, P A

    2000-05-01

    Volunteer studies with Vibrio cholerae O1 have shown that the best correlate of a vaccine's protective efficacy is its propensity to elicit serum bactericidal responses in its recipients. Attempts to detect such responses following infection with V. cholerae O139, however, have met with varying success. Using a tube-based assay which involves viable counting, we now report that strains of serogroup O139 can appear to be sensitive or resistant to a fixed concentration of complement in the presence of antibody, depending on assay conditions. Susceptibility to lysis is critically dependent on the availability of complement, but with O139 indicator strains this is not simply determined by the concentration of serum added to the reaction mix. The nature of the assay diluent and the concentration of indicator bacteria can also dramatically affect bactericidal end points, whereas such variables have minimal significance with O1 indicator bacteria. Although some laboratories use unencapsulated mutant strains to seek evidence of seroconversion following exposure to V. cholerae O139, this is not necessary, and our findings question the significance of capsule expression as a determinant of complement sensitivity when antibody is present. The medium used for growth of the indicator strain and the particular strain used appeared to be unimportant. Each of seven O139 isolates tested was found to be lysed by antibody and complement in our standard assay system, which allowed the detection of significant serum bactericidal responses in 9 of 11 cases of O139 disease.

  9. Antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses to a synthetic oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine after booster immunization.

    PubMed

    Safari, Dodi; Dekker, Huberta A Th; de Jong, Ben; Rijkers, Ger T; Kamerling, Johannis P; Snippe, Harm

    2011-09-02

    Memory formation to CRM-neoglycoconjugate, a synthetic branched tetrasaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 polysaccharide (Pn14PS) that is conjugated to a CRM197 protein, was investigated using mice models. Mice were first immunized with the CRM-neoglycoconjugate and then boosted with either the same neoglycoconjugate or a native Pn14PS in order to investigate the effect of booster immunization. Boosting with the CRM-neoglycoconjugate resulted in increased levels of interleukin 5 (IL-5) in the serum on Day 1, followed by the appearance of high levels of specific anti-Pn14PS IgG antibodies on Day 7. Boosting with native Pn14PS resulted in neither IL-5 induction nor the generation of anti-Pn14PS IgG antibodies. In vitro (re)stimulation of spleen cells after booster injection with the neoglycoconjugate revealed the presence of IL-4 and IL-5. This was not seen in spleen cells obtained from mice boosted with the polysaccharide. When stimulated with heat-inactivated bacteria, however, the polysaccharide-boosted mice did have higher levels of IFN-γ and lower levels of IL-17 than both the CRM-neoglycoconjugate-boosted mice and the mock-immunized mice. In conclusion, neoglycoconjugate boosting is responsible for the activation of memory cells and the establishment of sustained immunity. Not only is a booster with native polysaccharide ineffective in inducing opsonic antibodies, but it also interferes with several immunoregulatory mechanisms.

  10. Utilization of cholera toxin B as a mucosal adjuvant elicits antibody-mediated protection against S. pneumoniae infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiedinger, Kari; Pinho, Daniel; Bitsaktsis, Constantine

    2017-01-01

    Backgound: The introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines have been valuable tools for combating invasive pneumococcal infection in children and healthy adults. Despite the available vaccination strategies, pneumococcal pneumonia and associated diseases continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly in individuals with chronic disease and ageing populations. Next-generation pneumococcal vaccines will need to be highly immunogenic across patient populations providing both mucosal and systemic protective immunity. Mucosal immunization is an effective strategy for stimulating the immune response at the site of pathogen entry while increasing systemic immunity. In this study we utilized intranasal immunization with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), in combination with the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B (CTB), to characterize the immune components providing protection against S. pneumoniae challenge. Methods: Mice were immunized intranasally with CTB and PspA individually, and in combination, followed by lethal bacterial challenge with S. pneumoniae, strain A66.1. Animals were monitored for survival and tested for lung bacterial burden, cytokine production as well as S. pneumoniae-specific antibody titer in mouse sera. The primary immunological contributor to the observed protection was confirmed by cytokine neutralization and serum passive transfer. Results: The combination of CTB and PspA provided complete protection against bacterial challenge, which coincided with a significant decrease in lung bacterial burden. Increases in the T-helper (Th) 1 cytokines, interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 were observed in the lung 24 h post-challenge while decreases in proinflammatory mediators IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were also recorded at the same time point. The adjuvanted PspA immunization induced significant titers of S. pneumoniae-specific antibody in the serum of mice prior to infection. Serum

  11. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1)-targeted TRAIL augments the tumoricidal activity of granulocytes and potentiates therapeutic antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, Valerie R; de Bruyn, Marco; Shi, Ce; Gooden, Marloes J M; Wouters, Maartje C A; Samplonius, Douwe F; Hendriks, Djoke; Nijman, Hans W; Wei, Yunwei; Zhou, Jin; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies stems from their capacity to opsonize targeted cancer cells with subsequent phagocytic removal, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or induction of complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). The major immune effector cells involved in these processes are natural killer (NK) cells and granulocytes. The latter and most prevalent blood cell population contributes to phagocytosis, but is not effective in inducing ADCC. Here, we report that targeted delivery of the tumoricidal protein tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to granulocyte marker C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1), using fusion protein CLL1:TRAIL, equips granulocytes with high levels of TRAIL. Upon CLL1-selective binding of this fusion protein, granulocytes acquire additional TRAIL-mediated cytotoxic activity that, importantly, potentiates antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of clinically used therapeutic antibodies (e.g., rituximab, cetuximab). Thus, CLL1:TRAIL could be used as an adjuvant to optimize the clinical potential of anticancer antibody therapy by augmenting tumoricidal activity of granulocytes.

  12. Targeting of indium 111-labeled bivalent hapten to human melanoma mediated by bispecific monoclonal antibody conjugates: Imaging of tumors hosted in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Le Doussal, J.M.; Gruaz-Guyon, A.; Martin, M.; Gautherot, E.; Delaage, M.; Barbet, J. )

    1990-06-01

    Antibody conjugates were prepared by coupling F(ab')2 or Fab' fragments of an antibody specific for the human high molecular weight-melanoma associated antigen to Fab' fragments of an antibody specific for indium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate complexes. Monovalent and bivalent haptens were synthesized by reacting the dipeptide tyrosyl-lysine with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic cyclic anhydride. In vitro, the antibody conjugate mediated binding of the 111In-labeled haptens to melanoma cells. In vivo, it allowed specific localization of the haptens in A375 tumors. The bivalent hapten exhibited much higher efficiency at targeting 111In onto cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Antibody conjugate and hapten doses (2 micrograms and 1 pmol, respectively) and the delay between antibody conjugate and tracer injections (24 h) were adjusted to maximize tumor uptake (4% injected dose/g) and tumor to normal tissue contrast (greater than 3) obtained 3 h after injection of the 111In-labeled bivalent hapten. This two-step technique, when compared to direct targeting of 111In-labeled F(ab')2 fragments, provided lower localization of injected activity into the tumor (x 0.25), but higher tumor/tissue ratios, especially with respect to liver (x 7), spleen (x 8), and kidneys (x 10). In addition, high contrast images were obtained within 3 hours, instead of days. Thus, antibody conjugate-mediated targeting of small bivalent haptens, labeled with short half-life isotopes, is proposed as a general method for improving tumor radioimmunolocalization.

  13. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA): ensuring future progress by collecting data from a registry.

    PubMed

    Aljama, Pedro; Carracedo, Julia; Madueño, Juan Antonio; Ramirez, Rafael; Martin-Malo, Alejandro; Martin de Francisco, Angel L

    2005-05-01

    The recent emergence of antibody (Ab)-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) resulting from administration of certain erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) has heightened awareness of the potential for this disorder in patients receiving ESAs for anaemia associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The Spanish Society of Nephrology sponsored an independent registry for analysis of patients who developed epoetin-induced, Ab-mediated PRCA in Spain. Twelve patients from 11 regional hospitals were included in the Spanish PRCA registry from November 2000 to December 2002 that met the criteria for Ab-mediated PRCA. Patients were reported using a standardized form specifically developed for PRCA, and serum samples were analysed in a central laboratory at Reina Sofia University Hospital in Cordoba, Spain. The characteristics of these patients, their serological and haematological results, and the outcomes of immunosuppressive therapies are presented. The Spanish PRCA registry serves as a model for establishing an independent global PRCA registry sponsored by the various nephrology societies in European Union countries, and elsewhere and coordinated by key investigators from the respective countries.

  14. Assays for detecting and diagnosing antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA): an assessment of available procedures.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Robin; Swanson, Steven J

    2005-05-01

    Antibody (Ab)-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) develops when patients mount a neutralizing Ab response to recombinant erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) such as epoetin-alpha (EPO). These neutralizing Abs can also cross-neutralize endogenous EPO, leading to a state of absolute EPO resistance and transfusion dependence. The diagnosis of Ab-mediated PRCA in part relies on the sensitive and specific detection of serum anti-EPO Abs and a confirmatory examination of patients' bone marrow for lack of erythroid precursors. To date, a variety of assays have been used to detect anti-EPO Abs, including radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and bioassays that measure neutralizing Abs. Each of these assays can yield informative results and possess characteristic benefits and limitations, so it is unclear whether or not a "superior" assay is required or possible. To date, a universal standardized assay has not yet been established that would facilitate the comparison of Ab data derived from different laboratories and retrospective analysis of stored sera. This review evaluates the results of studies measuring anti-EPO Abs with different assays and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of specificity, sensitivity, ease of use and ability to measure Ab-binding affinities and subclasses. These comparisons provide a basis for determining the optimal assay(s) for screening and/or analysis of patients' serum for anti-EPO Abs during treatment or after onset of Ab-mediated PRCA.

  15. Protooncogene bcl-2 gene transfer abrogates Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis of human malignant glioma cells and confers resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and therapeutic irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Weller, M; Malipiero, U; Aguzzi, A; Reed, J C; Fontana, A

    1995-01-01

    The majority of human malignant glioma cells express Fas/APO-1 and are susceptible to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis in vitro. The sensitivity of Fas/APO-1-positive glioma cell lines to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated killing correlates inversely with the constitutive expression of the antiapoptotic protooncogene bcl-2. Here we report that BCL-2 protein expression of human glial tumors in vivo correlates with malignant transformation in that BCL-2 immunoreactive glioma cells were more abundant in WHO grade III/IV gliomas than in grade I/II gliomas. Fas/APO-1 antibody-sensitive human glioma cell lines stably transfected with a murine bcl-2 cDNA acquired resistance to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis. Forced expression of bcl-2 also attenuated TNF alpha-mediated cytotoxicity of glioma cell lines in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide and conferred partial protection from irradiation and the cancer chemotherapy drugs, cisplatin and BCNU. Preexposure of the glioma cell lines to the cytokines, IFN gamma and TNF alpha, which sensitize for Fas/APO-1-dependent killing, partially overcame bcl-2-mediated rescue from apoptosis, suggesting that multimodality immunotherapy involving cytokines and Fas/APO-1 targeting might eventually provide a promising approach to the treatment of human malignant gliomas. Images PMID:7539458

  16. Polyclonal antibodies mediated immobilization of a peroxidase from ammonium sulphate fractionated bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) proteins.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Aiman; Husain, Qayyum

    2007-06-01

    Polyclonal antibody bound Sepharose 4B support has been exploited for the immobilization of bitter gourd peroxidase directly from ammonium sulphate precipitated proteins. Immunoaffinity immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase exhibited high yield of immobilization. IgG-Sepharose 4B bound bitter gourd peroxidase showed a higher stability against heat, chaotropic agents (urea and guanidinium chloride), detergents (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and Surf Excel), proteolytic enzyme (trypsin) and water-miscible organic solvents (propanol, THF and dioxane). The activity of immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase was significantly enhanced in the presence of cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and after treatment with trypsin as compared to soluble enzyme.

  17. Complement and Antibody-Mediated Enhancement of Erythrocyte Invasion by Plasmodium Falciparum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    take place via antibody-dependent or independent mechanisms. Complement is activated during malaria infection (4), especially in the presence of...that complement activation during malaria infection enhances the invasion of RBCs by P. falciparum. In this research we tested our hypothesis by... infection have an enhancing effect on invasion and, if so, what is the mechanism. A - C3/C4 + C3/C4 % I n h ib it io n -10 -5 0 5 10 15 - C3/C4 + C3/C4

  18. Seroprevalence of Antibody-Mediated, Complement-Dependent Opsonophagocytic Activity against Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B in England.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Holly E; Brookes, Charlotte; Allen, Lauren; Kuisma, Eeva; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    The correlate of protection for the licensure of meningococcal vaccines is serum bactericidal activity. However, evidence indicates that a complex situation and other mechanisms, such as antibody-mediated, complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis (OP), may play a role in protection and should be investigated in order to understand immunity to this disease. In this study, a high-throughput flow cytometric opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) was optimized. The assay measures the presence of killed fluorescently labeled Neisseria meningitidis within human granulocytes (differentiated HL60 cells) by flow cytometry, using IgG-depleted pooled human plasma as an exogenous source of complement. This method was found to be reliable and correlated with the results of an opsonophagocytic killing assay. The OPA was used to measure OP activity in 1,878 serum samples from individuals ranging from 0 to 99 years of age against N. meningitidis strain NZ98/254 (B:4:P1.7-2,4). The levels of OP activity in individual serum samples varied greatly. OP activity showed an initial peak in the 6- to 12-month age group corresponding to a peak in disease incidence. The OP activity dropped in childhood until the late teenage years, although there was still a higher percentage of individuals with OP activity than with protective bactericidal antibody titers. OP activity reached a peak in the 30- to 39-year age group and then declined. This later peak in OP activity did not coincide with the young adults in whom peak serum bactericidal activity and disease incidence occurred. The demonstration of OP activity when disease incidence is low and when protective bactericidal antibody titers are not detected may indicate a role for OP in protection from meningococcal disease in these age groups.

  19. Seroprevalence of Antibody-Mediated, Complement-Dependent Opsonophagocytic Activity against Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B in England

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Charlotte; Allen, Lauren; Kuisma, Eeva; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The correlate of protection for the licensure of meningococcal vaccines is serum bactericidal activity. However, evidence indicates that a complex situation and other mechanisms, such as antibody-mediated, complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis (OP), may play a role in protection and should be investigated in order to understand immunity to this disease. In this study, a high-throughput flow cytometric opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) was optimized. The assay measures the presence of killed fluorescently labeled Neisseria meningitidis within human granulocytes (differentiated HL60 cells) by flow cytometry, using IgG-depleted pooled human plasma as an exogenous source of complement. This method was found to be reliable and correlated with the results of an opsonophagocytic killing assay. The OPA was used to measure OP activity in 1,878 serum samples from individuals ranging from 0 to 99 years of age against N. meningitidis strain NZ98/254 (B:4:P1.7-2,4). The levels of OP activity in individual serum samples varied greatly. OP activity showed an initial peak in the 6- to 12-month age group corresponding to a peak in disease incidence. The OP activity dropped in childhood until the late teenage years, although there was still a higher percentage of individuals with OP activity than with protective bactericidal antibody titers. OP activity reached a peak in the 30- to 39-year age group and then declined. This later peak in OP activity did not coincide with the young adults in whom peak serum bactericidal activity and disease incidence occurred. The demonstration of OP activity when disease incidence is low and when protective bactericidal antibody titers are not detected may indicate a role for OP in protection from meningococcal disease in these age groups. PMID:25739917

  20. Antibody-mediated rejection, T cell-mediated rejection, and the injury-repair response: new insights from the Genome Canada studies of kidney transplant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Philip F; Reeve, Jeff P; Pereira, Andre B; Hidalgo, Luis G; Famulski, Konrad S

    2014-02-01

    Prospective studies of unselected indication biopsies from kidney transplants, combining conventional assessment with molecular analysis, have created a new understanding of transplant disease states and their outcomes. A large-scale Genome Canada grant permitted us to use conventional and molecular phenotypes to create a new disease classification. T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), characterized histologically or molecularly, has little effect on outcomes. Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) manifests as microcirculation lesions and transcript changes reflecting endothelial injury, interferon-γ effects, and natural killer cells. ABMR is frequently C4d negative and has been greatly underestimated by conventional criteria. Indeed, ABMR, triggered in some cases by non-adherence, is the major disease causing failure. Progressive dysfunction is usually attributable to specific diseases, and pure calcineurin inhibitor toxicity rarely explains failure. The importance of ABMR argues against immunosuppressive drug minimization and stands as a barrier to tolerance induction. Microarrays also defined the transcripts induced by acute kidney injury (AKI), which correlate with reduced function, whereas histologic changes of acute tubular injury do not. AKI transcripts are induced in kidneys with late dysfunction, and are better predictors of failure than fibrosis and inflammation. Thus progression reflects ongoing parenchymal injury, usually from identifiable diseases such as ABMR, not destructive fibrosis.

  1. Bortezomib in the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplant recipients: A multicenter Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Kizilbash, Sarah; Claes, Donna; Ashoor, Isa; Chen, Ashton; Jandeska, Sara; Matar, Raed Bou; Misurac, Jason; Sherbotie, Joseph; Twombley, Katherine; Verghese, Priya

    2017-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection leads to allograft loss after kidney transplantation. Bortezomib has been used in adults for the reversal of antibody-mediated rejection; however, pediatric data are limited. This retrospective study was conducted in collaboration with the Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium. Pediatric kidney transplant recipients who received bortezomib for biopsy-proven antibody-mediated rejection between 2008 and 2015 were included. The objective was to characterize the use of bortezomib in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Thirty-three patients received bortezomib for antibody-mediated rejection at nine pediatric kidney transplant centers. Ninety percent of patients received intravenous immunoglobulin, 78% received plasmapheresis, and 78% received rituximab. After a median follow-up of 15 months, 65% of patients had a functioning graft. The estimated glomerular filtration rate improved or stabilized in 61% and 36% of patients at 3 and 12 months post-bortezomib, respectively. The estimated glomerular filtration rate at diagnosis significantly predicted estimated glomerular filtration rate at 12 months after adjusting for chronic histologic changes (P .001). Fifty-six percent of patients showed an at least 25% reduction in the mean fluorescence intensity of the immune-dominant donor-specific antibody, 1-3 months after the first dose of bortezomib. Non-life-threatening side effects were documented in 21 of 33 patients. Pediatric kidney transplant recipients tolerated bortezomib without life-threatening side effects. Bortezomib may stabilize estimated glomerular filtration rate for 3-6 months in pediatric kidney transplant recipients with antibody-mediated rejection.

  2. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by endowing IgG with FcαRI (CD89) binding.

    PubMed

    Borrok, M Jack; Luheshi, Nadia M; Beyaz, Nurten; Davies, Gareth C; Legg, James W; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Tsui, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Fc effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) are crucial to the efficacy of many antibody therapeutics. In addition to IgG, antibodies of the IgA isotype can also promote cell killing through engagement of myeloid lineage cells via interactions between the IgA-Fc and FcαRI (CD89). Herein, we describe a unique, tandem IgG1/IgA2 antibody format in the context of a trastuzumab variable domain that exhibits enhanced ADCC and ADCP capabilities. The IgG1/IgA2 tandem Fc format retains IgG1 FcγR binding as well as FcRn-mediated serum persistence, yet is augmented with myeloid cell-mediated effector functions via FcαRI/IgA Fc interactions. In this work, we demonstrate anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibodies with the unique tandem IgG1/IgA2 Fc can better recruit and engage cytotoxic polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells than either the parental IgG1 or IgA2. Pharmacokinetics of IgG1/IgA2 in BALB/c mice are similar to the parental IgG, and far surpass the poor serum persistence of IgA2. The IgG1/IgA2 format is expressed at similar levels and with similar thermal stability to IgG1, and can be purified via standard protein A chromatography. The tandem IgG1/IgA2 format could potentially augment IgG-based immunotherapeutics with enhanced PMN-mediated cytotoxicity while avoiding many of the problems associated with developing IgAs.

  3. Malachite green mediates homodimerization of antibody VL domains to form a fluorescent ternary complex with singular symmetric interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Szent-Gyorgyi, Chris; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Andreko, Susan; Dempsey, Alison; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Capek, Sara; Waggoner, Alan; Wilson, Ian A.; Bruchez, Marcel P.

    2013-01-01

    We report that a symmetric small molecule ligand mediates the assembly of antibody light chain variable domains (VLs) into a correspondent symmetric ternary complex with novel interfaces. The L5* Fluorogen Activating Protein (FAP) is a VL domain that binds malachite green dye (MG) to activate intense fluorescence. Crystallography of liganded L5* reveals a 2:1 protein:ligand complex with inclusive C2 symmetry, where MG is almost entirely encapsulated between an antiparallel arrangement of the two VL domains. Unliganded L5* VL domains crystallize as a similar antiparallel VL/VL homodimer. The complementarity determining regions (CDRs) are spatially oriented to form novel VL/VL and VL/ligand interfaces that tightly constrain a propeller conformer of MG. Binding equilibrium analysis suggests highly cooperative assembly to form a very stable VL/MG/VL complex, such that MG behaves as a strong chemical inducer of dimerization. Fusion of two VL domains into a single protein tightens MG binding over 1,000-fold to low picomolar affinity without altering the large binding enthalpy, suggesting that bonding interactions with ligand and restriction of domain movements make independent contributions to binding. Fluorescence activation of a symmetrical fluorogen provides a selection mechanism for the isolation and directed evolution of ternary complexes where unnatural symmetric binding interfaces are favored over canonical antibody interfaces. As exemplified by L5*, these self-reporting complexes may be useful as modulators of protein association or as high affinity protein tags and capture reagents. PMID:23978698

  4. Antibody-mediated FOXP3 protein therapy induces apoptosis in cancer cells in vitro and inhibits metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heinze, Emil; Baldwin, Scott; Chan, Grace; Hansen, James; Song, Jason; Clements, Douglas; Aragon, Robert; Nishimura, Robert; Reeves, Mark; Weisbart, Richard

    2009-07-01

    In addition to its immune suppressive function in T-regulatory cells, the nuclear transcription factor, FOXP3, has been identified as a tumor suppressor. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3E10 Fv antibody-mediated FOXP3 protein therapy of cancer, the Fv-FOXP3 fusion protein produced in Pichia pastoris was tested on breast, ovarian, and colon cancer cells in vitro, and with colon cancer cells in vivo in a mouse model of colon cancer metastasis to liver. Treatment with Fv-FOXP3 resulted in dose-dependent cell death of cancer cells in vitro. Apoptosis was established as a mechanism of cell death by demonstrating increased production of the p17 activated fragment of caspase-3 by cancer cells in response to Fv-FOXP3 and inhibition of cell killing by the caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. Fv-FOXP3 treatment resulted in clinically significant reduction in tumor burden in a syngeneic model of colon cancer metastasis to liver in Balb/c mice. These results represent the first demonstration of effective full-length FOXP3 protein therapy and emphasize the clinical potential of mAb 3E10 as an intracellular and intranuclear delivery vehicle of FOXP3 for prevention and treatment of cancer metastasis.

  5. Malachite green mediates homodimerization of antibody VL domains to form a fluorescent ternary complex with singular symmetric interfaces.

    PubMed

    Szent-Gyorgyi, Chris; Stanfield, Robyn L; Andreko, Susan; Dempsey, Alison; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Capek, Sarah; Waggoner, Alan S; Wilson, Ian A; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2013-11-15

    We report that a symmetric small-molecule ligand mediates the assembly of antibody light chain variable domains (VLs) into a correspondent symmetric ternary complex with novel interfaces. The L5* fluorogen activating protein is a VL domain that binds malachite green (MG) dye to activate intense fluorescence. Crystallography of liganded L5* reveals a 2:1 protein:ligand complex with inclusive C2 symmetry, where MG is almost entirely encapsulated between an antiparallel arrangement of the two VL domains. Unliganded L5* VL domains crystallize as a similar antiparallel VL/VL homodimer. The complementarity-determining regions are spatially oriented to form novel VL/VL and VL/ligand interfaces that tightly constrain a propeller conformer of MG. Binding equilibrium analysis suggests highly cooperative assembly to form a very stable VL/MG/VL complex, such that MG behaves as a strong chemical inducer of dimerization. Fusion of two VL domains into a single protein tightens MG binding over 1000-fold to low picomolar affinity without altering the large binding enthalpy, suggesting that bonding interactions with ligand and restriction of domain movements make independent contributions to binding. Fluorescence activation of a symmetrical fluorogen provides a selection mechanism for the isolation and directed evolution of ternary complexes where unnatural symmetric binding interfaces are favored over canonical antibody interfaces. As exemplified by L5*, these self-reporting complexes may be useful as modulators of protein association or as high-affinity protein tags and capture reagents.

  6. MP-4 Contributes to Snake Venom Neutralization by Mucuna pruriens Seeds through an Indirect Antibody-mediated Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Chitra; Nair, Deepak T; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2016-05-20

    Mortality due to snakebite is a serious public health problem, and available therapeutics are known to induce debilitating side effects. Traditional medicine suggests that seeds of Mucuna pruriens can provide protection against the effects of snakebite. Our aim is to identify the protein(s) that may be important for snake venom neutralization and elucidate its mechanism of action. To this end, we have identified and purified a protein from M. pruriens, which we have named MP-4. The full-length polypeptide sequence of MP-4 was obtained through N-terminal sequencing of peptide fragments. Sequence analysis suggested that the protein may belong to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor family and therefore may potentially neutralize the proteases present in snake venom. Using various structural and biochemical tools coupled with in vivo assays, we are able to show that MP-4 does not afford direct protection against snake venom because it is actually a poor inhibitor of serine proteases. Further experiments showed that antibodies generated against MP-4 cross-react with the whole venom and provide protection to mice against Echis carinatus snake venom. This study shows that the MP-4 contributes significantly to the snake venom neutralization activity of M. pruriens seeds through an indirect antibody-mediated mechanism.

  7. CD40 agonist antibody mediated improvement of chronic Cryptosporidium infection in patients with X- linked hyper IgM syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiying; Upadhyaya, Bhaskar; Wu, Liming; Koh, Christopher; Santín-Durán, Mónica; Pittaluga, Stefania; Uzel, Gulbu; Kleiner, David; Williams, Ester; Ma, Chi A.; Bodansky, Aaron; Oliveira, Joao B.; Edmonds, Pamela; Hornung, Ronald; Wong, Duane W.; Fayer, Ronald; Fleisher, Tom; Heller, Theo; Prussin, Calman; Jain, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHM) is a combined immune deficiency disorder caused by mutations in CD40 ligand. We tested CP-870,893, a human CD40 agonist monoclonal antibody, in the treatment of two XHM patients with biliary Cryptosporidiosis. CP-870,893 activated B cells and APCs in vitro, restoring class switch recombination in XHM B cells and inducing cytokine secretion by monocytes. CP-870,893 infusions were well tolerated and showed significant activity in vivo, decreasing leukocyte concentration in peripheral blood. Although specific antibody responses were lacking, frequent dosing in one subject primed T cells to secrete IFN-g and suppressed oocyst shedding in the stool. Nevertheless, relapse occurred after discontinuation of therapy. The CD40 receptor was rapidly internalized following binding with CP-870,893, potentially explaining the limited capacity of CP-870,893 to mediate immune reconstitution. This study demonstrates that CP-870,893 suppressed oocysts shedding in XHM patients with biliary cryptosporidiosis. The continued study of CD40 agonists in XHM is warranted. PMID:22459705

  8. Eculizumab for Treatment of Refractory Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Patients: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Yelken, B; Arpalı, E; Görcin, S; Kocak, B; Karatas, C; Demiralp, E; Turkmen, A

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is responsible for up to 20%-30% of acute rejection episodes after kidney transplantation. In several cases, conventional therapies including plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and anti-CD20 therapy can resolve AMR successfully. But in some cases the load of immunoglobulins that can activate complement cascade may submerge the routine desensitization therapy and result in the formation of membrane attack complexes. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5, was reported to be an option in cases with severe AMR that are resistant to conventional therapy. Here, we present 8 cases that were resistant to conventional therapy and in which eculizumab was given as a salvage treatment. Given the bad prognosis for renal transplants displaying acute injury progressing rapidly to cortical necrosis on the biopsy, the prompt use of eculizumab could have the advantage of immediate effects by stopping cellular injury. This can provide a therapeutic window to allow conventional treatment modalities to be effective and prevent early graft loss.

  9. Difference in outcomes after antibody-mediated rejection between abo-incompatible and positive cross-match transplantations.

    PubMed

    Couzi, Lionel; Manook, Miriam; Perera, Ranmith; Shaw, Olivia; Ahmed, Zubir; Kessaris, Nicos; Dorling, Anthony; Mamode, Nizam

    2015-10-01

    Graft survival seems to be worse in positive cross-match (HLAi) than in ABO-incompatible (ABOi) transplantation. However, it is not entirely clear why these differences exist. Sixty-nine ABOi, 27 HLAi and 10 combined ABOi+HLAi patients were included in this retrospective study, to determine whether the frequency, severity and the outcome of active antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) were different. Five-year death-censored graft survival was better in ABOi than in HLAi and ABOi+HLAi patients (99%, 69% and 64%, respectively, P = 0.0002). Features of AMR were found in 38%, 95% and 100% of ABOi, HLAi and ABOi+HLAi patients that had a biopsy, respectively (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.001). After active AMR, a declining eGFR and graft loss were observed more frequently in HLAi and HLAi+ABOi than in ABOi patients. The poorer prognosis after AMR in HLAi and ABOi+HLAi transplantations was not explained by a higher severity of histological lesions or by a less aggressive treatment. In conclusion, ABOi transplantation offers better results than HLAi transplantation, partly because AMR occurs less frequently but also because outcome after AMR is distinctly better. HLAi and combined ABOi+HLAi transplantations appear to have the same outcome, suggesting there is no synergistic effect between anti-A/B and anti-HLA antibodies.

  10. Inhibition of cell surface mediated plasminogen activation by a monoclonal antibody against alpha-Enolase.

    PubMed

    López-Alemany, Roser; Longstaff, Colin; Hawley, Stephen; Mirshahi, Massoud; Fábregas, Pere; Jardí, Merce; Merton, Elizabeth; Miles, Lindsey A; Félez, Jordi

    2003-04-01

    Localization of plasmin activity on leukocyte surfaces plays a critical role in fibrinolysis as well as in pathological and physiological processes in which cells must degrade the extracellular matrix in order to migrate. The binding of plasminogen to leukocytic cell lines induces a 30- to 80-fold increase in the rate of plasminogen activation by tissue-type (tPA) and urokinase-type (uPA) plasminogen activators. In the present study we have examined the role of alpha-enolase in plasminogen activation on the cell surface. We produced and characterized a monoclonal antibody (MAb) 11G1 against purified alpha-enolase, which abrogated about 90% of cell-dependent plasminogen activation by either uPA or tPA on leukocytoid cell lines of different lineages: B-lymphocytic, T-lymphocytic, granulocytic, and monocytic cells. In addition, MAb 11G1 also blocked enhancement of plasmin formation by peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. In contrast, MAb 11G1 did not affect plasmin generation in the presence of fibrin, indicating that this antibody did not interact with fibrinolytic components in the absence of cells. These data suggest that, although leukocytic cells display several molecules that bind plasminogen, alpha-enolase is responsible for the majority of the promotion of plasminogen activation on the surfaces of leukocytic cells.

  11. Effector-mediated eradication of precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a novel Fc engineered monoclonal antibody targeting the BAFF-R

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Lim, Min; Fei, Fei; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Arutyunyan, Anna; Schiffer, Isabelle; McLaughlin, Margaret E.; Gram, Hermann; Huet, Heather; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor receptor (BAFF-R) is expressed on precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia ALL (pre-B ALL) cells but not on their pre-B normal counterparts. Thus, selective killing of ALL cells is possible by targeting this receptor. Here we have further examined therapeutic targeting of pre-B ALL based on the presence of the BAFF-R. Mouse pre-B ALL cells lacking BAFF-R function had comparable viability and proliferation to wild type cells but were more sensitive to drug treatment. Viability of human pre-B ALL cells was further reduced when antibodies to the BAFF-R were combined with other drugs, even in the presence of stromal protection. This indicates that inhibition of BAFF-R function reduces fitness of stressed pre-B ALL cells. We tested a novel humanized anti-BAFF-R monoclonal antibody optimalized for FcRγIII mediated, antibody-dependent cell killing by effector cells. Antibody binding to human ALL cells was inhibitable, in a dose-dependent manner, by recombinant human BAFF. There was no evidence for internalization of the antibodies. The antibodies significantly stimulated NK cell-mediated killing of different human patient-derived ALL cells. Moreover, incubation of such ALL cells with these antibodies stimulated phagocytosis by macrophages. When this was tested in an immunodeficient transplant model, mice that were treated with the antibody had a significantly decreased leukemia burden in bone marrow and spleen. In view of the restricted expression of the BAFF-R on normal cells and the multiple anti-pre-B ALL activities stimulated by this antibody, a further examination of its use for treatment of pre-B ALL is warranted. PMID:24825858

  12. Naturally Acquired HMW1- and HMW2-Specific Serum Antibodies in Adults and Children Mediate Opsonophagocytic Killing of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Linda E.

    2015-01-01

    The HMW1 and HMW2 proteins are highly immunogenic adhesins expressed by approximately 75% of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) strains, and HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies can mediate opsonophagocytic killing of NTHi. In this study, we assessed the ability of HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies in sera from healthy adults and convalescent-phase sera from children with NTHi otitis media to mediate killing of homologous and heterologous NTHi. The serum samples were examined pre- and postadsorption on HMW1 and HMW2 affinity columns, and affinity-purified antibodies were assessed for ability to mediate killing of homologous and heterologous strains. Adult serum samples mediated the killing of six prototype NTHi strains at titers of <1:10 to 1:1,280. HMW1- and HMW2-adsorbed sera demonstrated unchanged to 8-fold decreased opsonophagocytic titers against the homologous strains. Each affinity-purified antibody preparation mediated the killing of the respective homologous strain at titers of <1:10 to 1:320 and of the five heterologous strains at titers of <1:10 to 1:320, with most preparations killing most heterologous strains to some degree. None of the acute-phase serum samples from children mediated killing, but each convalescent-phase serum sample mediated killing of the infecting strain at titers of 1:40 to 1:640. HMW1- and HMW2-adsorbed convalescent-phase serum samples demonstrated ≥4-fold decreases in titer. Three of four affinity-purified antibody preparations mediated killing of the infecting strain at titers of 1:20 to 1:320, but no killing of representative heterologous strains was observed. HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies capable of mediating opsonophagocytic killing are present in the serum from normal adults and develop in convalescent-phase sera of children with NTHi otitis media. Continued investigation of the HMW1 and HMW2 proteins as potential vaccine candidates for the prevention of NTHi disease is warranted. PMID:26512048

  13. Immune-mediated Adverse Effects of Anti-CTLA-4 Antibody Therapy in Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, Shannon K.; Shure, Anna K.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Ipilimumab, an antibody that blocks cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4; CD152), was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011 for the treatment of unresectable stage III or IV malignant melanoma. Although the addition of this particular immunotherapy has broadened treatment options, immune-related adverse events (irAEs) are associated with ipilimumab therapy, including dermatologic effects, colitis and diarrhea, endocrine effects, hepatotoxicity, ocular effects, renal effects, neurologic effects, and others. In this article, a critical evaluation of the underlying mechanisms of irAEs associated with anti-CTLA-4 therapy is presented. Additionally, potentially beneficial effects of combinational therapies to alleviate ipilimumab-induced irAEs in malignant melanoma are discussed. Future research is warranted to elucidate the efficacy of such combination therapies as well as specific biomarkers that would help to predict a clinical response to ipilimumab in patients with malignant melanoma. PMID:26118951

  14. Antibody-mediated sialidase activity in blood serum of patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bilyy, Rostyslav; Tomin, Andriy; Mahorivska, Iryna; Shalay, Olga; Lohinskyy, Volodymyr; Stoika, Rostyslav; Kit, Yuriy

    2011-01-01

    Cell surface sialylation is known to be tightly connected with tumorigenicity, invasiveness, metastatic potential, clearance of aged cells, while the sialylation of IgG molecules determines their anti-inflammatory properties. Four sialidases - hydrolytic enzymes responsible for cleavage of sialic residues - were described in different cellular compartments. However, sialidases activity in body fluids, and specifically in blood serum, remains poorly studied. Here, we characterize first known IgG antibodies possessing sialidase-like activity in blood serum of multiple myeloma (MM) patients. Ig fractions were precipitated with ammonium sulfate (50% of saturation) from blood serum of 12 healthy donors and 14 MM patients, and screened for the presence of sialidase activity by using 4-MUNA (2'-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid) as substrate. High level of sialidase activity was detected in the MM patients, but not in healthy donors. Subsequent antibody purification by protein-G affinity chromatography and HPLC size exclusion chromatography at acidic conditions demonstrated that sialidase activity was attributable to IgG molecules. Sialidase activity was also specific for (Fab)(2) fragment of IgG and blocked by sialidase inhibitor DANA. Sialidase activity of IgG molecule was also confirmed by in gel assay for cleavage of sialidase substrate. Kinetic parameters of the catalysis reaction were described by Michaelis-Menten equation with K(m)  = 44.4-108 µM and k(cat) = 2.7-23.1 min(-1). The action of IgG possessing sialidase-like activity towards human red blood cells resulted in a subsequent increase in their agglutination by the peanut agglutinin, that confirms their desialylation by the studied IgG. This is the first demonstration of the intrinsic sialidase activity of IgG isolated from blood serum of MM patients.

  15. Neutralization of Clostridium difficile Toxin B Mediated by Engineered Lactobacilli That Produce Single-Domain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kasper Krogh; Strokappe, Nika M.; Hultberg, Anna; Truusalu, Kai; Smidt, Imbi; Mikelsaar, Raik-Hiio; Mikelsaar, Marika; Verrips, Theo; Hammarström, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the primary cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the Western world. The major virulence factors of C. difficile are two exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which cause extensive colonic inflammation and epithelial damage manifested by episodes of diarrhea. In this study, we explored the basis for an oral antitoxin strategy based on engineered Lactobacillus strains expressing TcdB-neutralizing antibody fragments in the gastrointestinal tract. Variable domain of heavy chain-only (VHH) antibodies were raised in llamas by immunization with the complete TcdB toxin. Four unique VHH fragments neutralizing TcdB in vitro were isolated. When these VHH fragments were expressed in either secreted or cell wall-anchored form in Lactobacillus paracasei BL23, they were able to neutralize the cytotoxic effect of the toxin in an in vitro cell-based assay. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of two strains of engineered L. paracasei BL23 expressing two neutralizing anti-TcdB VHH fragments (VHH-B2 and VHH-G3) delayed killing in a hamster protection model where the animals were challenged with spores of a TcdA− TcdB+ strain of C. difficile (P < 0.05). Half of the hamsters in the treated group survived until the termination of the experiment at day 5 and showed either no damage or limited inflammation of the colonic mucosa despite having been colonized with C. difficile for up to 4 days. The protective effect in the hamster model suggests that the strategy could be explored as a supplement to existing therapies for patients. PMID:26573738

  16. Myelin-reactive antibodies initiate T cell-mediated CNS autoimmune disease by opsonization of endogenous antigen.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, Silke; Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Torke, Sebastian; Häusler, Darius; Winkler, Anne; Stadelmann, Christine; Payne, Natalie; Feldmann, Linda; Saiz, Albert; Reindl, Markus; Lalive, Patrice H; Bernard, Claude C; Brück, Wolfgang; Weber, Martin S

    2016-07-01

    In the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorders, antigen-specific B cells are implicated to act as potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), eliciting waves of inflammatory CNS infiltration. Here, we provide the first evidence that CNS-reactive antibodies (Ab) are similarly capable of initiating an encephalitogenic immune response by targeting endogenous CNS antigen to otherwise inert myeloid APC. In a transgenic mouse model, constitutive production of Ab against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was sufficient to promote spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the absence of B cells, when mice endogenously contained MOG-recognizing T cells. Adoptive transfer studies corroborated that anti-MOG Ab triggered activation and expansion of peripheral MOG-specific T cells in an Fc-dependent manner, subsequently causing EAE. To evaluate the underlying mechanism, anti-MOG Ab were added to a co-culture of myeloid APC and MOG-specific T cells. At otherwise undetected concentrations, anti-MOG Ab enabled Fc-mediated APC recognition of intact MOG; internalized, processed and presented MOG activated naïve T cells to differentiate in an encephalitogenic manner. In a series of translational experiments, anti-MOG Ab from two patients with an acute flare of CNS inflammation likewise facilitated detection of human MOG. Jointly, these observations highlight Ab-mediated opsonization of endogenous CNS auto-antigen as a novel disease- and/or relapse-triggering mechanism in CNS demyelinating disorders.

  17. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC’s regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9−/−) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9−/−. We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9−/−, which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9−/−. Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  18. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Cole, Leah E; Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Anosova, Natalie G; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2(-/-)mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates.

  19. Rebmab200, a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody Targeting the Sodium Phosphate Transporter NaPi2b Displays Strong Immune Mediated Cytotoxicity against Cancer: A Novel Reagent for Targeted Antibody Therapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Mariana Lopes; Yeda, Fernanda Perez; Tsuruta, Lilian Rumi; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Pimenta, Alécio A.; Degaki, Theri Leica; Soares, Ibere C.; Tuma, Maria Carolina; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Alves, Venancio A. F.; Ritter, Gerd; Moro, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    NaPi2b, a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, is highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and is recognized by the murine monoclonal antibody MX35. The antibody had shown excellent targeting to ovarian cancer in several early phase clinical trials but being murine the antibody's full therapeutic potential could not be explored. To overcome this impediment we developed a humanized antibody version named Rebmab200, expressed in human PER.C6® cells and cloned by limiting dilution. In order to select a clone with high therapeutic potential clones were characterized using a series of physicochemical assays, flow cytometry, real-time surface plasmon resonance, glycosylation analyses, immunohistochemistry, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement-dependent-cytotoxicity assays and quantitative PCR. Comparative analyses of Rebmab200 and MX35 monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that the two antibodies had similar specificity for NaPi2b by flow cytometry with a panel of 30 cell lines and maintained similar kinetic parameters. Robust and high producer cell clones potentially suitable for use in manufacturing were obtained. Rebmab200 antibodies were assessed by immunohistochemistry using a large panel of tissues including human carcinomas of ovarian, lung, kidney and breast origin. An assessment of its binding towards 33 normal human organs was performed as well. Rebmab200 showed selected strong reactivity with the tested tumor types but little or no reactivity with the normal tissues tested confirming its potential for targeted therapeutics strategies. The remarkable cytotoxicity shown by Rebmab200 in OVCAR-3 cells is a significant addition to the traits of stability and productivity displayed by the top clones of Rebmab200. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated toxicity functionality was confirmed in repeated assays using cancer cell lines derived from ovary, kidney and lung as targets. To explore use of this antibody in clinical trials, GMP production of Rebmab

  20. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab administered at approved doses may delay development of trastuzumab resistance by additively enhancing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gábor; Szöőr, Árpád; Simon, László; Yarden, Yosef; Szöllősi, János; Vereb, György

    2016-10-01

    Although the recently concluded CLEOPATRA trial showed clinical benefits of combining trastuzumab and pertuzumab for treating HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, trastuzumab monotherapy is still the mainstay in adjuvant settings. Since trastuzumab resistance occurs in over half of these cancers, we examined the mechanisms by which treatment of intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant and -sensitive tumors can benefit from the combination of these antibodies. F(ab')2 of both trastuzumab and pertuzumab were generated and validated in order to separately analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC)-based and direct biological effects of the antibodies. Compared to monotherapy, combination of the two antibodies at clinically permitted doses enhanced the recruitment of natural killer cells responsible for ADCC, and significantly delayed the outgrowth of xenografts from intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant JIMT-1 cells. Antibody dose-response curves of in vitro ADCC showed that antibody-mediated killing can be saturated, and the two antibodies exert an additive effect at sub-saturation doses. Thus, the additive effect in vivo indicates that therapeutic tissue levels likely do not saturate ADCC. Additionally, isobole studies with the in vitro trastuzumab-sensitive BT-474 cells showed that the direct biological effect of combined treatment is additive, and surpasses the maximum effect of either monotherapy. Our results suggest the combined therapy is expected to give results that are superior to monotherapy, whatever the type of HER2-positive tumor may be. The combination of both antibodies at maximum clinically approved doses should thus be administered to patients to recruit maximum ADCC and cause maximum direct biological growth inhibition.

  1. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab administered at approved doses may delay development of trastuzumab resistance by additively enhancing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Gábor; Szöőr, Árpád; Simon, László; Yarden, Yosef; Szöllősi, János; Vereb, György

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the recently concluded CLEOPATRA trial showed clinical benefits of combining trastuzumab and pertuzumab for treating HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, trastuzumab monotherapy is still the mainstay in adjuvant settings. Since trastuzumab resistance occurs in over half of these cancers, we examined the mechanisms by which treatment of intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant and -sensitive tumors can benefit from the combination of these antibodies. F(ab′)2 of both trastuzumab and pertuzumab were generated and validated in order to separately analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC)-based and direct biological effects of the antibodies. Compared to monotherapy, combination of the two antibodies at clinically permitted doses enhanced the recruitment of natural killer cells responsible for ADCC, and significantly delayed the outgrowth of xenografts from intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant JIMT-1 cells. Antibody dose-response curves of in vitro ADCC showed that antibody-mediated killing can be saturated, and the two antibodies exert an additive effect at sub-saturation doses. Thus, the additive effect in vivo indicates that therapeutic tissue levels likely do not saturate ADCC. Additionally, isobole studies with the in vitro trastuzumab-sensitive BT-474 cells showed that the direct biological effect of combined treatment is additive, and surpasses the maximum effect of either monotherapy. Our results suggest the combined therapy is expected to give results that are superior to monotherapy, whatever the type of HER2-positive tumor may be. The combination of both antibodies at maximum clinically approved doses should thus be administered to patients to recruit maximum ADCC and cause maximum direct biological growth inhibition. PMID:27380003

  2. Intein-mediated one-step purification of Escherichia coli secreted human antibody fragments.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wan-Yi; Miller, Keith D.; Coolbaugh, Michael; Wood, David W.

    2011-02-25

    In this work, we apply self-cleaving affinity tag technology to several target proteins secreted into the Escherichia coli periplasm, including two with disulfide bonds. The target proteins were genetically fused to a self-cleaving chitin-binding domain intein tag for purification via a chitin agarose affinity resin. By attaching the intein-tagged fusion genes to the PelB secretion leader sequence, the tagged target proteins were secreted to the periplasmic space and could be recovered in active form by simple osmotic shock. After chitin-affinity purification, the target proteins were released from the chitin-binding domain tag via intein self-cleaving. This was induced by a small change in pH from 8.5 to 6.5 at room temperature, allowing direct elution of the cleaved target protein from the chitin affinity resin. The target proteins include the E. coli maltose-binding protein and b-lactamase enzyme, as well as two human antibody fragments that contain disulfide bonds. In all cases, the target proteins were purified with good activity and yield, without the need for refolding. Overall, this work demonstrates the compatibility of the DI-CM intein with the PelB secretion system in E. coli, greatly expanding its potential to more complex proteins.

  3. One step antibody-mediated isolation and patterning of multiple cell types in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Bavli, Danny; Ezra, Elishai; Kitsberg, Daniel; Murthy, Shashi K.; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell interactions play a key role in regeneration, differentiation, and basic tissue function taking place under physiological shear forces. However, current solutions to mimic such interactions by micro-patterning cells within microfluidic devices have low resolution, high fabrication complexity, and are limited to one or two cell types. Here, we present a microfluidic platform capable of laminar patterning of any biotin-labeled peptide using streptavidin-based surface chemistry. The design permits the generation of arbitrary cell patterns from heterogeneous mixtures in microfluidic devices. We demonstrate the robust co-patterning of α-CD24, α-ASGPR-1, and α-Tie2 antibodies for rapid isolation and co-patterning of mixtures of hepatocytes and endothelial cells. In addition to one-step isolation and patterning, our design permits step-wise patterning of multiple cell types and empty spaces to create complex cellular geometries in vitro. In conclusion, we developed a microfluidic device that permits the generation of perfusable tissue-like patterns in microfluidic devices by directly injecting complex cell mixtures such as differentiated stem cells or tissue digests with minimal sample preparation. PMID:27051469

  4. In vivo gene targeting of IL-3 into immature hematopoietic cells through CD117 receptor mediated antibody gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Deas, Olivier; Bensidhoum, Morad; François, Sabine; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Poncet, Pascal; Dürrbach, Antoine; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert C; Hirsch, François; Thierry, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Background Targeted gene transfection remains a crucial issue to permit the real development of genetic therapy. As such, in vivo targeted transfection of specific subsets of hematopoietic stem cells might help to sustain hematopoietic recovery from bone marrow aplasia by providing local production of growth factors. Methods Balb/C mice were injected intravenously, with an anti-mouse c-kit (CD117) monoclonal antibody chemically coupled to a human IL-3 gene-containing plasmid DNA. Mice were sacrificed for tissue analyses at various days after injection of the conjugates. Results By ELISA, the production of human IL-3 was evidenced in the sera of animals 5 days after treatment. Cytofluorometric analysis after in vivo transfection of a reporter gene eGFP demonstrated transfection of CD117+/Sca1+ hematopoietic immature cells. By PCR analysis of genomic DNA and RNA using primer specific pIL3 sequences, presence and expression of the human IL-3-transgene were detected in the bone marrow up to 10 days in transfected mice but not in control animals. Conclusions These data clearly indicate that antibody-mediated endocytosis gene transfer allows the expression of the IL-3 transgene into hematopoietic immature cells, in vivo. While availability of marketed recombinant growth factors is restricted, this targeting strategy should permit delivery of therapeutic genes to tissues of interest through systemic delivery. In particular, the ability to specifically target growth factor expression into repopulating hematopoietic stem cells may create new opportunities for the treatment of primary or radiation-induced marrow failures. PMID:15509303

  5. Rituximab in Combination With Bortezomib, Plasmapheresis, and High-Dose IVIG to Treat Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Waiser, Johannes; Duerr, Michael; Schönemann, Constanze; Rudolph, Birgit; Wu, Kaiyin; Halleck, Fabian; Budde, Klemens; Lachmann, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Background Current treatment strategies for antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection (AMR) are not sufficiently effective. In most centers, “standard of care” treatment includes plasmapheresis (PPH) and IVIG preparations. Since several years, modern therapeutics targeting B cells and plasma cells have become available. We investigated, whether combined administration of rituximab and bortezomib in addition to PPH and high-dose IVIG is useful. Methods Between November 2011 and January 2013, we treated 10 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven AMR with rituximab (500 mg), bortezomib (4× 1.3 mg/m2), PPH (6×), and high-dose IVIG (1.5 g/kg) (group A). This group was compared with a group of 11 consecutive patients treated with an identical regimen without rituximab between July 2010 and November 2011 (group B). Results Median follow-up was 41(33-46) months in group A and 55(47-63) months in group B. At 40 months after treatment, graft survival was 60% in group A and 64% in group B, respectively (P = 0.87). Before and after treatment, serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and proteinuria were not different between groups. A significant reduction in donor-specific HLA antibody mean fluorescence intensity was observed in group A (25.2%, P = 0.046) and B (38.3%, P = 0.01) at 3 months posttreatment. In group A, more patients suffered from side effects compared with group B (infections: 70% vs 18%, P = 0.02). Conclusions The addition of rituximab to bortezomib, PPH, and high-dose IVIG did not further improve graft survival. Instead, we observed an increase of side effects. Therefore, combined administration of bortezomib and rituximab in addition to PPH and IVIG should be regarded with caution. PMID:27819032

  6. Mechanisms mediating enhanced neutralization efficacy of Staphylococcal enterotoxin B by combinations of monoclonal antibodies

    DOE PAGES

    Dutta, Kaushik; Varshney, Avanish K.; Franklin, Matthew C.; ...

    2015-01-08

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a superantigen that cross-links the major histocompatibility complex class II and specific V-β chains of the T-cell receptor, thus forming a ternary complex. Developing neutralizing mAb to disrupt the ternary complex and abrogate the resulting toxicity is a major therapeutic challenge because SEB is effective at very low concentrations. We show that combining two SEB-specific mAbs enhances their efficacy, even though one of the two mAbs by itself has no effect on neutralization. Crystallography was employed for fine-mapping conformational epitopes in binary and ternary complexes between SEB and Fab fragments. NMR spectroscopy was used tomore » validate and identify subtle allosteric changes induced by mAbs binding to SEB. The mapping of epitopes established that a combination of different mAbs can enhance efficacy of mAb-mediated protection from SEB induced lethal shock by two different mechanisms: one mAb mixture promoted clearance of the toxin both in vitro and in vivo by FcR-mediated cross-linking and clearance, whereas the other mAb mixture induced subtle allosteric conformational changes in SEB that perturbed formation of the SEB·T-cell receptor·major histocompatibility complex class II trimer. Lastly structural information accurately predicted mAb binding to other superantigens that share conformational epitopes with SEB. Fine mapping of conformational epitopes is a powerful tool to establish the mechanism and optimize the action of synergistic mAb combinations.« less

  7. Mechanisms mediating enhanced neutralization efficacy of Staphylococcal enterotoxin B by combinations of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Kaushik; Varshney, Avanish K.; Franklin, Matthew C.; Goger, Michael; Wang, Xiaobo; Fries, Bettina C.

    2015-01-08

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a superantigen that cross-links the major histocompatibility complex class II and specific V-β chains of the T-cell receptor, thus forming a ternary complex. Developing neutralizing mAb to disrupt the ternary complex and abrogate the resulting toxicity is a major therapeutic challenge because SEB is effective at very low concentrations. We show that combining two SEB-specific mAbs enhances their efficacy, even though one of the two mAbs by itself has no effect on neutralization. Crystallography was employed for fine-mapping conformational epitopes in binary and ternary complexes between SEB and Fab fragments. NMR spectroscopy was used to validate and identify subtle allosteric changes induced by mAbs binding to SEB. The mapping of epitopes established that a combination of different mAbs can enhance efficacy of mAb-mediated protection from SEB induced lethal shock by two different mechanisms: one mAb mixture promoted clearance of the toxin both in vitro and in vivo by FcR-mediated cross-linking and clearance, whereas the other mAb mixture induced subtle allosteric conformational changes in SEB that perturbed formation of the SEB·T-cell receptor·major histocompatibility complex class II trimer. Lastly structural information accurately predicted mAb binding to other superantigens that share conformational epitopes with SEB. Fine mapping of conformational epitopes is a powerful tool to establish the mechanism and optimize the action of synergistic mAb combinations.

  8. Mechanisms mediating enhanced neutralization efficacy of staphylococcal enterotoxin B by combinations of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Kaushik; Varshney, Avanish K; Franklin, Matthew C; Goger, Michael; Wang, Xiaobo; Fries, Bettina C

    2015-03-13

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a superantigen that cross-links the major histocompatibility complex class II and specific V-β chains of the T-cell receptor, thus forming a ternary complex. Developing neutralizing mAb to disrupt the ternary complex and abrogate the resulting toxicity is a major therapeutic challenge because SEB is effective at very low concentrations. We show that combining two SEB-specific mAbs enhances their efficacy, even though one of the two mAbs by itself has no effect on neutralization. Crystallography was employed for fine-mapping conformational epitopes in binary and ternary complexes between SEB and Fab fragments. NMR spectroscopy was used to validate and identify subtle allosteric changes induced by mAbs binding to SEB. The mapping of epitopes established that a combination of different mAbs can enhance efficacy of mAb-mediated protection from SEB induced lethal shock by two different mechanisms: one mAb mixture promoted clearance of the toxin both in vitro and in vivo by FcR-mediated cross-linking and clearance, whereas the other mAb mixture induced subtle allosteric conformational changes in SEB that perturbed formation of the SEB·T-cell receptor·major histocompatibility complex class II trimer. Finally structural information accurately predicted mAb binding to other superantigens that share conformational epitopes with SEB. Fine mapping of conformational epitopes is a powerful tool to establish the mechanism and optimize the action of synergistic mAb combinations.

  9. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  10. Erythropoietin enhances nerve repair in anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated models of immune neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Lehmann, Helmar C; Bogdanova, Nataliia; Gao, Tong; Zhang, Jiangyang; Sheikh, Kazim A

    2011-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a monophasic immune neuropathic disorder in which a significant proportion of patients have incomplete recovery. The patients with incomplete recovery almost always have some degree of failure of axon regeneration and target reinnervation. Anti-ganglioside antibodies (Abs) are the most commonly recognized autoimmune markers in all forms of GBS and specific Abs are associated with the slow/poor recovery. We recently demonstrated that specific anti-ganglioside Abs inhibit axonal regeneration and nerve repair in preclinical models by activation of small GTPase RhoA and its downstream effectors. The objective of this study was to determine whether erythropoietin (EPO), a pleiotropic cytokine with neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, enhances nerve regeneration in preclinical cell culture and animal models of autoimmune neuropathy/nerve repair generated with monoclonal and patient derived Abs. Primary neuronal cultures and a standardized sciatic crush nerve model were used to assess the efficacy of EPO in reversing inhibitory effects of anti-ganglioside Abs on nerve repair. We found that EPO completely reversed the inhibitory effects of anti-ganglioside Abs on axon regeneration in cell culture models and significantly improved nerve regeneration/repair in an animal model. Moreover, EPO-induced proregenerative effects in nerve cells are through EPO receptors and Janus kinase 2/Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 pathway and not via early direct modulation of small GTPase RhoA. These preclinical studies indicate that EPO is a viable candidate drug to develop further for neuroprotection and enhancing nerve repair in patients with GBS.

  11. Combination of Antibody Targeting and PTD-Mediated Intracellular Toxin Delivery for Colorectal Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ah Min, Kyoung; Lee, Kyuri; Moon, Cheol; Balthasar, Joseph P.; Yang, Victor C.

    2014-01-01

    The bottlenecks of current chemotherapy in the treatment of colorectal cancer lie in the ineffectiveness of the existing anti-cancer small molecule drugs as well as the dose-limiting toxicity caused by the nonselective action on normal tissues by such drugs. To address these problems, we introduce a novel therapeutic strategy based on tumor targeting using a non-internalizing anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and intracellular delivery of the extremely potent yet cell-impermeable protein toxin gelonin via the aid of a cell-penetrating peptide (also termed as protein transduction domain; PTD). A chimeric TAT-gelonin fusion protein was genetically engineered, and it displayed remarkably enhanced anti-cancer activity against human colorectal cancer cells, with IC50 values being several orders of magnitude lower than the unmodified gelonin. On the other hand, a chemically synthesized conjugate of heparin and a murine anti-CEA mAb, T84.66 (termed T84.66-Hep) was found able to bind highly specifically to CEA over-expressing LS174T colorectal cancer cells. When mixing together, TAT-gelonin and T84.66-Hep could associate tightly and automatically through an electrostatic interaction between the cationic TAT and anionic heparin. In preliminary in vivo studies using LS174T s.c. xenograft tumor bearing mouse, selective and significantly augmented (58-fold) delivery of TAT-gelonin to the tumor target was observed, when compared with administration of TAT-gelonin alone. More importantly, efficacy studies also revealed that only the TAT-gelonin/T84.66-Hep complex yielded a significant inhibition of tumor growth (46%) without causing gelonin-induced systemic toxicity. Overall, this study suggested a generic strategy to effectively yet safely deliver potent PTD-modified protein toxins to the tumor. PMID:25204286

  12. Macrophage and NK-mediated killing of precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells targeted with a-fucosylated anti-CD19 humanized antibodies.

    PubMed

    Matlawska-Wasowska, K; Ward, E; Stevens, S; Wang, Y; Herbst, R; Winter, S S; Wilson, B S

    2013-06-01

    This work reports the tumoricidal effects of a novel investigational humanized anti-CD19 monoclonal antibody (Medi-551). An a-fucosylated antibody with increased affinity for human FcγRIIIA, Medi-551 is shown to mediate both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). Medi-551/CD19 complexes internalize slowly (>5 h) and thus remain accessible to effector cells for prolonged periods. We evaluated in vitro ADCC and ADCP activities of primary human natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages against precursor-B (pre-B) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient blasts. Fluorescent imaging studies document immunological synapses formed between anti-CD19-bound target leukemia cells and effector cells and capture the kinetics of both NK-mediated killing and macrophage phagocytosis. Genetic polymorphisms in FcγRIIIA-158F/V modulate in vitro activities of effector cells, with FcγRIIIA-158V homozygotes or heterozygotes showing the strongest activity. Medi-551 treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice engrafted with human pre-B cells led to prolonged animal survival and markedly reduced disease burden in blood, liver and bone marrow. These data show that anti-CD19 antibodies effectively recruit immune cells to pre-B ALL cells and support a move forward to early phase trials in this disease.

  13. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of mononuclear cells against Langerhans islets of Wistar rats in normal man and in patients at diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Köhler, E; Knospe, S; Woltanski, G; Maciejewski, R; Salzsieder, C; Rjasanowski, I; Strese, J; Michaelis, D

    1984-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against pancreatic islets was investigated in 13 newly diagnosed insulin-dependent diabetics, in 38 patients at high risk for the disease and in 20 age-matched healthy controls. For this purpose 51Cr-labeled neonatal rat pancreatic islets incubated with the specific anti-rat islet cell antiserum 339 or with serum of the lymphocyte donors were used as targets. The antibody-mediated cytotoxic activity of mononuclear cells was evaluated from the specific chromium release after 6 h exposure of pretreated islets to the effector cells. The specific cytotoxic effect of mononuclear cells from healthy controls on pancreatic islets pretreated with serum is weak. ADCC mediated by the specific antirat islet cell antiserum is significantly increased in 54% of newly diagnosed diabetics as well as in 32% of patients at high risk for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. 46% of the newly diagnosed diabetics were also ADCC-positive when their own serum was used for the pretreatment of islets, regardless of whether they were islet cell antibody- or islet cell surface antibody positive or not. Subsets of mononuclear cells (non E-rosette-forming cells, high affinity E-rosette-forming cells, low affinity E-rosette-forming cells) were prepared and their cytotoxic potential was analysed in patients with positive ADCC test results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Urinary C-X-C Motif Chemokine 10 Independently Improves the Noninvasive Diagnosis of Antibody-Mediated Kidney Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rabant, Marion; Amrouche, Lucile; Lebreton, Xavier; Aulagnon, Florence; Benon, Aurélien; Sauvaget, Virginia; Bonifay, Raja; Morin, Lise; Scemla, Anne; Delville, Marianne; Martinez, Frank; Timsit, Marc Olivier; Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Legendre, Christophe; Terzi, Fabiola; Anglicheau, Dany

    2015-11-01

    Urinary levels of C-X-C motif chemokine 9 (CXCL9) and CXCL10 can noninvasively diagnose T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) of renal allografts. However, performance of these molecules as diagnostic/prognostic markers of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is unknown. We investigated urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels in a highly sensitized cohort of 244 renal allograft recipients (67 with preformed donor-specific antibodies [DSAs]) with 281 indication biopsy samples. We assessed the benefit of adding these biomarkers to conventional models for diagnosing/prognosing ABMR. Urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels, normalized to urine creatinine (Cr) levels (CXCL9:Cr and CXCL10:Cr) or not, correlated with the extent of tubulointerstitial (i+t score; all P<0.001) and microvascular (g+ptc score; all P<0.001) inflammation. CXCL10:Cr diagnosed TCMR (area under the curve [AUC]=0.80; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68 to 0.92; P<0.001) and ABMR (AUC=0.76; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.82; P<0.001) with high accuracy, even in the absence of tubulointerstitial inflammation (AUC=0.70; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.79; P<0.001). Although mean fluorescence intensity of the immunodominant DSA diagnosed ABMR (AUC=0.75; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.82; P<0.001), combining urinary CXCL10:Cr with immunodominant DSA levels improved the diagnosis of ABMR (AUC=0.83; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.89; P<0.001). At the time of ABMR, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio was independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. In conclusion, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio associates with tubulointerstitial and microvascular inflammation of the renal allograft. Combining the urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio with DSA monitoring significantly improves the noninvasive diagnosis of ABMR and the stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss.

  15. Maternal Antibody-Mediated Disease Enhancement in Type I Interferon-Deficient Mice Leads to Lethal Disease Associated with Liver Damage.

    PubMed

    Martínez Gómez, Julia María; Ong, Li Ching; Lam, Jian Hang; Binte Aman, Siti Amanlina; Libau, Eshele Anak; Lee, Pei Xuan; St John, Ashley L; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that most of the severe dengue cases occur upon a secondary heterologous infection. Furthermore, babies born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk of developing severe disease upon primary infection with a heterologous or homologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype when maternal antibodies reach sub-neutralizing concentrations. These observations have been explained by the antibody mediated disease enhancement (ADE) phenomenon whereby heterologous antibodies or sub-neutralizing homologous antibodies bind to but fail to neutralize DENV particles, allowing Fc-receptor mediated entry of the virus-antibody complexes into host cells. This eventually results in enhanced viral replication and heightened inflammatory responses. In an attempt to replicate this ADE phenomenon in a mouse model, we previously reported that upon DENV2 infection 5-week old type I and II interferon (IFN) receptors-deficient mice (AG129) born to DENV1-immune mothers displayed enhancement of disease severity characterized by increased virus titers and extensive vascular leakage which eventually led to the animals' death. However, as dengue occurs in immune competent individuals, we sought to reproduce this mouse model in a less immunocompromised background. Here, we report an ADE model that is mediated by maternal antibodies in type I IFN receptor-deficient A129 mice. We show that 5-week old A129 mice born to DENV1-immune mothers succumbed to a DENV2 infection within 4 days that was sub-lethal in mice born to naïve mothers. Clinical manifestations included extensive hepatocyte vacuolation, moderate vascular leakage, lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Anti-TNFα therapy totally protected the mice and correlated with healthy hepatocytes. In contrast, blocking IL-6 did not impact the virus titers or disease outcome. This A129 mouse model of ADE may help dissecting the mechanisms involved in dengue pathogenesis and evaluate the efficacy of vaccine and

  16. Maternal Antibody-Mediated Disease Enhancement in Type I Interferon-Deficient Mice Leads to Lethal Disease Associated with Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jian Hang; Binte Aman, Siti Amanlina; Libau, Eshele Anak; Lee, Pei Xuan; St. John, Ashley L.; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that most of the severe dengue cases occur upon a secondary heterologous infection. Furthermore, babies born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk of developing severe disease upon primary infection with a heterologous or homologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype when maternal antibodies reach sub-neutralizing concentrations. These observations have been explained by the antibody mediated disease enhancement (ADE) phenomenon whereby heterologous antibodies or sub-neutralizing homologous antibodies bind to but fail to neutralize DENV particles, allowing Fc-receptor mediated entry of the virus-antibody complexes into host cells. This eventually results in enhanced viral replication and heightened inflammatory responses. In an attempt to replicate this ADE phenomenon in a mouse model, we previously reported that upon DENV2 infection 5-week old type I and II interferon (IFN) receptors-deficient mice (AG129) born to DENV1-immune mothers displayed enhancement of disease severity characterized by increased virus titers and extensive vascular leakage which eventually led to the animals’ death. However, as dengue occurs in immune competent individuals, we sought to reproduce this mouse model in a less immunocompromised background. Here, we report an ADE model that is mediated by maternal antibodies in type I IFN receptor-deficient A129 mice. We show that 5-week old A129 mice born to DENV1-immune mothers succumbed to a DENV2 infection within 4 days that was sub-lethal in mice born to naïve mothers. Clinical manifestations included extensive hepatocyte vacuolation, moderate vascular leakage, lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Anti-TNFα therapy totally protected the mice and correlated with healthy hepatocytes. In contrast, blocking IL-6 did not impact the virus titers or disease outcome. This A129 mouse model of ADE may help dissecting the mechanisms involved in dengue pathogenesis and evaluate the efficacy of vaccine and

  17. Plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Maiko; Yamamoto, Izumi; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Sugano, Naoki; Tanno, Yudo; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    We report a case of plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. A 33-year-old man was admitted for an episode biopsy; he had a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 5.7 mg/dL 1 year following primary kidney transplantation. Histological features included two distinct entities: (1) a focal, aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell (predominantly plasma cells) infiltration with moderate tubulitis; and (2) inflammatory cell infiltration (including neutrophils) in peritubular capillaries. Substantial laboratory examination showed that the patient had donor-specific antibodies for DQ4 and DQ6. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, we diagnosed him with plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection. We started 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy three times every 2 weeks for the former and plasma exchange with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for the latter histological feature. One month after treatment, a second allograft biopsy showed excellent responses to treatment for plasma cell-rich rejection, but moderate, acute antibody-mediated rejection remained. Therefore, we added plasma exchange with IVIG again. After treatment, allograft function was stable, with an S-Cr level of 2.8 mg/dL. This case report demonstrates the difficulty of the diagnosis of, and treatment for, plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. We also include a review of the related literature.

  18. Early membrane rupture events during neutrophil-mediated antibody-dependent tumor cell cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Kindzelskii, A L; Petty, H R

    1999-03-15

    Although cell-mediated cytolysis is a fundamental immune effector response, its mechanism remains poorly understood at the cellular level. In this report, we image for the first time transient ruptures, as inferred by cytoplasmic marker release, in tumor cell membranes during Ab-dependent cellular cytolysis. The cytosol of IgG-opsonized YAC tumor cells was labeled with tetra-methylrhodamine diacetate followed by the formation of tumor cell-neutrophil conjugates. We hypothesized that tumor cell cytolysis proceeds via a series of discrete membrane rupture/resealing events that contribute to marker release. To test this hypothesis, we occluded the fluorescence image of the labeled tumor cells by passing an opaque disk into a field-conjugated plane between the light source and the sample. Multiple small bursts of fluorescent label release from tumor cells could be detected using a photomultiplier tube. Similarly, multiple fluorescent plumes were observed at various sites around the perimeter of a target. These findings support a multihit model of target cytolysis and suggest that cytolytic release is not focused at specific sites. Cytolytic bursts were generally observed at 20-s intervals, which match the previously described reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate and superoxide release oscillation periods for neutrophils; we speculate that metabolic oscillations of the effector cell drive the membrane damage of the target.

  19. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk) Mediates IL-1β Induction by Primary Human Monocytes during Antibody-enhanced Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Justin B; Smith, Scott A; McKinnon, Karen P; de Silva, Aravinda M; Crowe, James E; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2015-07-10

    Approximately 500,000 people are hospitalized with severe dengue illness annually. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus (DENV) infection is believed to contribute to the pathogenic cytokine storm described in severe dengue patients, but the precise signaling pathways contributing to elevated cytokine production are not elucidated. IL-1β is a potent inflammatory cytokine that is frequently elevated during severe dengue, and the unique dual regulation of IL-1β provides an informative model to study ADE-induced cytokines. This work utilizes patient-derived anti-DENV mAbs and primary human monocytes to study ADE-induced IL-1β and other cytokines. ADE of DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2) elevates mature IL-1β secretion by monocytes independent of DENV replication by 4 h postinoculation (hpi). Prior to this, DENV immune complexes activate spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) within 1 hpi. Syk induces elevated IL1B, TNF, and IL6 mRNA by 2 hpi. Syk mediates elevated IL-1β secretion by activating ERK1/2, and both Syk and ERK1/2 inhibitors ablated ADE-induced IL-1β secretion. Maturation of pro-IL-1β during ADE requires caspase-1 and NLRP3, but caspase-1 is suboptimally increased by ADE and can be significantly enhanced by a typical inflammasome agonist, ATP. Importantly, this inflammatory Syk-ERK signaling axis requires DENV immune complexes, because DENV-2 in the presence of serotype-matched anti-DENV-2 mAb, but not anti-DENV-1 mAb, activates Syk, ERK, and IL-1β secretion. This study provides evidence that DENV-2 immune complexes activate Syk to mediate elevated expression of inflammatory cytokines. Syk and ERK may serve as new therapeutic targets for interfering with ADE-induced cytokine expression during severe dengue.

  20. Fc Receptor-Mediated Activities of Env-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Generated from Volunteers Receiving the DNA Prime-Protein Boost HIV Vaccine DP6-001.

    PubMed

    Costa, Matthew R; Pollara, Justin; Edwards, Regina Whitney; Seaman, Michael S; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Montefiori, David C; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 is able to elicit broadly potent neutralizing antibodies in a very small subset of individuals only after several years of infection, and therefore, vaccines that elicit these types of antibodies have been difficult to design. The RV144 trial showed that moderate protection is possible and that this protection may correlate with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. Our previous studies demonstrated that in an HIV vaccine phase I trial, the DP6-001 trial, a polyvalent Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation could elicit potent and broadly reactive, gp120-specific antibodies with positive neutralization activities. Here we report on the production and analysis of HIV-1 Env-specific human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) isolated from vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial. For this initial report, 13 hMAbs from four vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial showed broad binding to gp120 proteins of diverse subtypes both autologous and heterologous to vaccine immunogens. Equally cross-reactive Fc receptor-mediated functional activities, including ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) activities, were present with both immune sera and isolated MAbs, confirming the induction of nonneutralizing functional hMAbs by the DNA prime-protein boost vaccination. Elicitation of broadly reactive hMAbs by vaccination in healthy human volunteers confirms the value of the polyvalent formulation in this HIV vaccine design.

  1. FcRn-mediated antibody transport across epithelial cells revealed by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    He, Wanzhong; Ladinsky, Mark S.; Huey-Tubman, Kathryn E.; Jensen, Grant J.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Björkman, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) transports maternal IgG across epithelial barriers1,2, thereby providing the fetus or newborn with humoral immunity before its immune system is fully functional. In newborn rodents, FcRn transfers IgG from milk to blood by apical-to-basolateral transcytosis across intestinal epithelial cells. The pH difference between the apical (pH 6.0-6.5) and basolateral (pH 7.4) sides of intestinal epithelial cells facilitates efficient unidirectional transport of IgG, since FcRn binds IgG at pH 6.0-6.5 but not pH ≥7 1,2. As milk passes through the neonatal intestine, maternal IgG is removed by FcRn-expressing cells in the proximal small intestine (duodenum, jejunum); remaining proteins are absorbed and degraded by FcRn-negative cells in the distal small intestine (ileum)3-6. We used electron tomography to directly visualize jejunal transcytosis in space and time, developing new labeling and detection methods to map individual nanogold-labeled Fc within transport vesicles7 and to simultaneously characterize these vesicles by immunolabeling. Combining electron tomography with a non-perturbing endocytic label allowed us to conclusively identify receptor-bound ligands, resolve interconnecting vesicles, determine if a vesicle was microtubule-associated, and accurately trace FcRn-mediated transport of IgG. Our results present a complex picture in which Fc moved through networks of entangled tubular and irregular vesicles, only some of which were microtubule-associated, as it migrated to the basolateral surface. New features of transcytosis were elucidated, including transport involving multivesicular body inner vesicles/tubules and exocytosis via clathrin-coated pits. Markers for early, late, and recycling endosomes each labeled vesicles in different and overlapping morphological classes, revealing unexpected spatial complexity in endo-lysosomal trafficking. PMID:18818657

  2. Population pharmacokinetics of rituximab with or without plasmapheresis in kidney patients with antibody-mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    Puisset, Florent; White-Koning, Mélanie; Kamar, Nassim; Huart, Antoine; Haberer, Frédérique; Blasco, Hélène; Le Guellec, Chantal; Lafont, Thierry; Grand, Anaïs; Rostaing, Lionel; Chatelut, Etienne; Pourrat, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Aims Both rituximab and plasmapheresis can be associated in the treatment of immune-mediated kidney diseases. The real impact of plasmapheresis on rituximab pharmacokinetics is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare rituximab pharmacokinetics between patients requiring plasmapheresis and others without plasmapheresis. Methods The study included 20 patients receiving one or several infusions of rituximab. In 10 patients, plasmapheresis sessions were also performed (between two and six sessions per patient). Rituximab concentrations were measured in blood samples in all patients and in discarded plasma obtained by plasmapheresis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Data were analysed according to a population pharmacokinetic approach. Results The mean percentage of rituximab removed during the first plasmapheresis session ranged between 47 and 54% when plasmapheresis was performed between 24 and 72 h after rituximab infusion. Rituximab pharmacokinetics was adequately described by a two-compartment model with first-order elimination. Plasmapheresis had a significant impact on rituximab pharmacokinetics, with an increase of rituximab clearance by a factor of 261 (95% confidence interval 146–376), i.e. from 6.64 to 1733 ml h−1. Plasmapheresis performed 24 h after rituximab infusion decreased the rituximab area under the curve by 26%. Conclusions Plasmapheresis removed an important amount of rituximab when performed less than 3 days after infusion. The removal of rituximab led to a significant decrease of the area under the curve. This pharmacokinetic observation should be taken into account for rituximab dosing, e.g. an additional third rituximab infusion may be recommended when three plasmapheresis sessions are performed after the first rituximab infusion. PMID:23432476

  3. Ligation of human Fc receptor like-2 by monoclonal antibodies down-regulates B-cell receptor-mediated signalling

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mahdi; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Ulivieri, Cristina; Amirghofran, Zahra; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Shokri, Fazel

    2014-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signalling and its regulation through negative and positive regulators are critical for balancing B-cell response and function. Human Fc receptor like-2 (FCRL2), a member of the newly identified FCRL family, could influence B-cell signalling due to possession of both immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation and inhibitory motifs (ITAM and ITIM). Since the natural ligand of FCRL2 has not been identified, we generated FCRL2-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and employed them to investigate the influence of FCRL2 stimulation on BCR signalling in an FCRL2-expressing B-cell line. Two anti-FCRL2 mAb-producing hybridoma clones (5A7-E7 and 3D8-G8) were selected. None of the mAbs displayed any cross-reactivity with the other members of the FCRL family including recombinant FCRL1, -3, -4 and -5, as tested by FACS and ELISA techniques. Engagement of the FCRL2 by these mAbs resulted in significant inhibition of BCR signalling mediators such as calcium mobilization and phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases Erk, p38 and Jnk. These findings indicate that the FCRL2 ITIM motifs are functional and the anti-FCRL2 mAbs may mimic the natural ligand of FCRL2 by induction of inhibitory signals in B cells. PMID:24797767

  4. Fcγ-receptor IIa-mediated Src Signaling Pathway Is Essential for the Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Furuyama, Wakako; Marzi, Andrea; Maruyama, Junki; Kuroda, Makoto; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Manzoor, Rashid; Yoshida, Reiko; Igarashi, Manabu; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of Ebola virus (EBOV) infection has been demonstrated in vitro, raising concerns about the detrimental potential of some anti-EBOV antibodies. ADE has been described for many viruses and mostly depends on the cross-linking of virus-antibody complexes to cell surface Fc receptors, leading to enhanced infection. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Here we show that Fcγ-receptor IIa (FcγRIIa)-mediated intracellular signaling through Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) is required for ADE of EBOV infection. We found that deletion of the FcγRIIa cytoplasmic tail abolished EBOV ADE due to decreased virus uptake into cellular endosomes. Furthermore, EBOV ADE, but not non-ADE infection, was significantly reduced by inhibition of the Src family protein PTK pathway, which was also found to be important to promote phagocytosis/macropinocytosis for viral uptake into endosomes. We further confirmed a significant increase of the Src phosphorylation mediated by ADE. These data suggest that antibody-EBOV complexes bound to the cell surface FcγRIIa activate the Src signaling pathway that leads to enhanced viral entry into cells, providing a novel perspective for the general understanding of ADE of virus infection. PMID:28036370

  5. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    PubMed Central

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  6. Development of a selective biopharmaceutical from Herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins E and I for blocking antibody mediated neutralization of oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Bucurescu, Septimiu

    2010-12-01

    Future cancer therapies will be molecular cures. They will correct, block or destroy cancer cells by targeting molecular changes that lead to carcinogenesis. Destroying cancer cells can be done using oncolytic viruses. By blocking antibody mediated neutralization of oncolytic viruses, Herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins E and I could be used in the adjuvant treatment of cancer for improving the chances of oncolytic viruses to kill cancer cells in vivo.

  7. Anti-glycoprotein g antibodies of herpes simplex virus 2 contribute to complete protection after vaccination in mice and induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Görander, Staffan; Ekblad, Maria; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-11-12

    We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2) of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC) activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials.

  8. Long-term persistence of hepatitis B surface antigen and antibody induced by DNA-mediated immunization results in liver and kidney lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Zi, Xiao-Yuan; Yao, Yu-Cheng; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Xiong, Jun; Wu, Xiu-Ju; Zhang, Nan; Ba, Yue; Li, Wen-Lin; Wang, Xin-Ming; Li, Jian-Xiu; Yu, Hong-Yu; Ye, Xu-Ting; Lau, Joseph T Y; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2006-04-01

    DNA-mediated immunization has been recognized as a new approach for prevention and treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, the side effects of this approach have not been well described. Here we report that DNA-mediated immunization by intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA encoding HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) induced long-term persistence of HBsAg and HBsAg-specific antibody (anti-HBs) in the sera of the immunized BALB/c mice and resulted in liver and kidney lesions. The lesions persisted for 6 months after injection. Lesions were also found in normal mice injected with the sera from immunized mice, and in HBV-transgenic mice injected with anti-HBs antibody, or sera from immunized mice. Furthermore, lesions were accompanied by deposition of circulating immune complex (CIC) of HBsAg and anti-HBs antibody in the damaged organs. These results indicate that long-term persistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs in the immunized mice can result in deposited CIC in liver and kidney, and in development of lesions. The use of DNA containing mammalian replication origins, such as the plasmids used in this study, is not appropriate for human vaccines due to safety concerns relating to persistence of DNA; nevertheless, the safety of DNA-mediated immunization protocols still needs to be carefully evaluated before practical application.

  9. Addition of anti-neu antibody to local irradiation can improve tumor-bearing BALB/c mouse survival through immune-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sun Young; Song, Hyunkeun; Park, Jin-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Ki Hyang; Park, SungJae; Park, Dong Hyen; Kang, Mi Seon; Kwak, Minjung; Fu, Yang-Xin; Choi, Inhak; Cho, Heunglae; Park, SaeGwang

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the therapeutic effects of combined local irradiation and anti-HER2/neu antibody in a mixed tumor mouse model comprised of a nonmetastatic neu-positive tumor and a metastatic neu-negative tumor. While local irradiation alone could control the primary tumor in a dose-dependent manner, it did not improve mouse survival. Combined treatment comprised of local irradiation and anti-neu antibody of tumor-bearing BALB/c mice significantly improved mouse survival (P < 0.5), even though the tumor growth was similar to that of the irradiated-alone group. The combined treatment significantly reduced metastatic tumor masses in the lung and increased immune cell infiltration in primary tumor tissues. However, immune deficient nude mice with tumors did not exhibit prolonged survival in response to the combined treatment. Collectively, these results show that combined local irradiation and anti-neu antibody can elicit an immune-mediated abscopal effect to extend survival. Although the mechanism for abscopal effects induced by the combined treatment of radiation and anti-HER2/neu antibody was not elucidated, to our knowledge this is the first published study to describe the abscopal effect induced by the combination of local irradiation and the anti-HER2/neu antibody.

  10. Automated in situ measurement of cell-specific antibody secretion and laser-mediated purification for rapid cloning of highly-secreting producers.

    PubMed

    Hanania, Elie G; Fieck, Annabeth; Stevens, Janine; Bodzin, Leon J; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Koller, Manfred R

    2005-09-30

    Cloning of highly-secreting recombinant cells is critical for biopharmaceutical manufacturing, but faces numerous challenges including the fact that secreted protein does not remain associated with the producing cell. A fundamentally new approach was developed combining in situ capture and measurement of individual cell protein secretion followed by laser-mediated elimination of all non- and poorly-secreting cells, leaving only the highest-secreting cell in a well. Recombinant cells producing humanized antibody were cultured serum-free on a capture matrix, followed by staining with fluorescently-labeled anti-human antibody fragment. A novel, automated, high-throughput instrument (called LEAP) was used to image and locate every cell, quantify the cell-associated and secreted antibody (surrounding each cell), eliminate all undesired cells from a well via targeted laser irradiation, and then track clone outgrowth and stability. Temporarily sparing an island of helper cells around the clone of interest improved cloning efficiency (particularly when using serum-free medium), and helper cells were easily eliminated with the laser after several days. The in situ nature of this process allowed several serial sub-cloning steps to be performed within days of one another, resulting in rapid generation of clonal populations with significantly increased and more stable, homogeneous antibody secretion. Cell lines with specific antibody secretion rates of > 50 pg/cell per day (in static batch culture) were routinely obtained as a result of this cloning approach, often times representing up to 20% of the clones screened.

  11. An antibody against the surfactant protein A (SP-A)-binding domain of the SP-A receptor inhibits T cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Samten, Buka; Townsend, James C; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Barnes, Peter F; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2008-07-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) suppresses lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 secretion, in part, by binding to its receptor, SP-R210. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we studied the effect of antibodies against the SP-A-binding (neck) domain (alpha-SP-R210n) or nonbinding C-terminal domain (alpha-SP-R210ct) of SP-R210 on human peripheral blood T cell immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We demonstrated that both antibodies bind to more than 90% of monocytes and 5-10% of CD3+ T cells in freshly isolated PBMC. Stimulation of PBMC from healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative-positive (PPD+)] with heat-killed M. tuberculosis induced increased antibody binding to CD3+ cells. Increased antibody binding suggested enhanced expression of SP-R210, and this was confirmed by Western blotting. The antibodies (alpha-SP-R210n) cross-linking the SP-R210 through the SP-A-binding domain markedly inhibited cell proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion by PBMC from PPD+ donors in response to heat-killed M. tuberculosis, whereas preimmune IgG and antibodies (alpha-SP-R210ct) cross-linking SP-R210 through the non-SP-A-binding, C-terminal domain had no effect. Anti-SP-R210n also decreased M. tuberculosis-induced production of TNF-alpha but increased production of IL-10. Inhibition of IFN-gamma production by alpha-SP-R210n was abrogated by the combination of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10 and TGF-beta1. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that SP-A, via SP-R210, suppresses cell-mediated immunity against M. tuberculosis via a mechanism that up-regulates secretion of IL-10 and TGF-beta1.

  12. Hyperimmune antisera against synthetic peptides representing the glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 can mediate neutralization and antibody-dependent cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Björling, E; Broliden, K; Bernardi, D; Utter, G; Thorstensson, R; Chiodi, F; Norrby, E

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-five 13- to 35-amino-acid-long peptides representing regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2), strain SBL6669, envelope proteins were evaluated for their immunogenic activity in guinea pigs. The peptides were selected to provide homologous representation of sites in the HIV-1 envelope proteins that were previously documented to have a particular immunogenic importance. A number of the HIV-2 peptides were found to be capable of inducing strain SBL6669 neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) antibodies. Two overlapping peptides covering amino acids 311-337 representing the central and C-terminal part of the variable third (V3) region, terminology according to Modrow et al. [Modrow, S., Hahn, B., Shaw, G. M., Gallo, R. C., Wong-Staal, F. & Wolf, H. (1987) J. Virol. 61, 570-578], showed the most pronounced capacity to induce neutralizing antibodies. One of the peptides (amino acids 318-337) also induced antibodies mediating ADCC. Two additional regions in the large glycoprotein, gp125, containing linear sites reacting with neutralizing antibodies were identified (amino acids, 119-137 and 472-509). The transmembrane protein, gp36, of HIV-2 harbored two regions of importance for induction of neutralizing antibodies (amino acids 595-614 and 714-729). ADCC activity was induced by two additional gp125-specific peptides (amino acids 291-311 and 446-461). Thus, except for the single V3-specific site there was no correlation between linear immunogenic sites stimulating neutralizing antibody and ADCC activity. These findings pave the way for development of synthetic vaccines against HIV-2 and possibly also simian immunodeficiency virus infections. The capacity of such a product to induce protective immunity can be evaluated in macaque monkeys. Images PMID:2068087

  13. Identification of Dominant Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity Epitopes on the Hemagglutinin Antigen of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vikram; Yang, Zheng; Hung, Ivan Fan Ngai; Xu, Jianqing; Zheng, Bojian

    2013-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) bridges innate and adaptive immunity, and it involves both humoral and cellular immune responses. ADCC has been found to be a main route of immune protection against viral infections in vivo. Hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus is highly immunogenic and considered the most important target for immune protection. Several potent cross-reactive HA-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been reported, and their conserved neutralizing epitopes have been revealed, but there has been no report so far about ADCC epitopes on HA. Here we identified two dominant ADCC epitopes, designated E1 (amino acids [aa] 92 to 117) and E2 (aa 124 to 159), on HA of pandemic H1N1 influenza virus by epitope mapping of convalescent-phase plasma IgG antibodies from six H1N1-infected human subjects in China that exhibited different levels of ADCC activity. The E1 and E2 ADCC epitopes overlapped with immunodominant epitopes of HA. Depletion of purified patient plasma IgG antibodies with EBY100 yeast cells expressing E1 or E2 decreased the ADCC activity of the IgG antibodies. E1 and E2 sequences were found to be highly conserved in H1N1 strains but less so in other subtypes of influenza A viruses. Our study may aid in designing immunogens that can elicit antibodies with high ADCC activity. Vaccine immunogens designed to include the structural determinants of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies and ADCC epitopes may confer comprehensive immune protection against influenza virus infection. PMID:23487456

  14. Antitherapeutic antibody-mediated hepatotoxicity of recombinant human Apo2L/TRAIL in the cynomolgus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Zuch de Zafra, Christina L; Ashkenazi, Avi; Darbonne, Walter C; Cheu, Melissa; Totpal, Klara; Ortega, Shirley; Flores, Heather; Walker, Mark D; Kabakoff, Bruce; Lum, Bert L; Mounho-Zamora, Barbara J; Marsters, Scot A; Dybdal, Noël O

    2016-01-01

    Apo2L/TRAIL is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily and an important inducer of apoptosis. Recombinant human (rhu) Apo2L/TRAIL has been attractive as a potential cancer therapeutic because many types of tumor cells are sensitive to its apoptosis-inducing effects. Nonclinical toxicology studies were conducted to evaluate the safety of rhuApo2L/TRAIL for possible use in humans. The cynomolgus monkey was chosen for this safety assessment based on high protein sequence homology between human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL and comparable expression of their receptors. Although hepatotoxicity was observed in repeat-dose monkey studies with rhuApo2L/TRAIL, all animals that displayed hepatotoxicity had developed antitherapeutic antibodies (ATAs). The cynomolgus ATAs augmented the cytotoxicity of rhuApo2L/TRAIL but not of its cynomolgus counterpart. Of note, human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL differ by four amino acids, three of which are surface-exposed. In vivo studies comparing human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL supported the conclusion that these distinct amino acids served as epitopes for cross-species ATAs, capable of crosslinking rhuApo2L/TRAIL and thus triggering hepatocyte apoptosis. We describe a hapten-independent mechanism of immune-mediated, drug-related hepatotoxicity – in this case – associated with the administration of a human recombinant protein in monkeys. The elucidation of this mechanism enabled successful transition of rhuApo2L/TRAIL into human clinical trials. PMID:27512959

  15. Clinical outcome in patients with chronic antibody-mediated rejection treated with and without rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Byung Ha; Kim, Yaeni; Jeong, Hyeong Seok; Hong, Yu Ah; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Choi, Yeong Jin; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo

    2014-09-01

    We previously reported that rituximab (RTX) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) combination therapy (RIT) is effective in treating patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR), and the proteinuria level can determine the response to RIT. However, the results were not compared to those of patients who did not receive RIT. Fifty-nine patients with CAMR were divided into 2 groups: an RIT treated group (n = 25) and a historic control (HC) group who had not received RIT (n = 29). The RIT group was treated with RTX (375 mg/m(2)) and IVIg (0.4 g/kg) for 4 days. We compared the decline in glomerular filtration rate/month (ΔeGFR), RIT-related complications, and allograft survival rate in both groups. We also compared the allograft survival rate between patients with high proteinuria (spot urine protein/creatinine [PC] ratio > 3.5 g/g) and low proteinuria (PC ratio < 3.5 g/g). ΔeGFR was significantly decreased in the RIT group compared with the HC group after 6 months (P < 0.05). No serious complications were associated with RIT, and only one case of herpes zoster infection developed. The overall allograft survival rate in the RIT group was significantly higher than in the HC group. In both groups, patients with low proteinuria survived better than patients with heavy proteinuria (P < 0.05). The allograft survival rate was greater in the high proteinuria RIT group than that in the HC group. RIT treatment is recommended for delaying the progression of CAMR without serious complications, and is not limited by the presence of heavy proteinuria.

  16. Enhancing Virion Tethering by BST2 Sensitizes Productively and Latently HIV-infected T cells to ADCC Mediated by Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Tram N. Q.; Lukhele, Sabelo; Dallaire, Frédéric; Perron, Gabrielle; Cohen, Éric A.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of anti-HIV antibodies (Abs) to envelope (Env) glycoproteins on infected cells can mark them for elimination via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). BST2, a type I interferon (IFN)-stimulated restriction factor that anchors nascent Env-containing virions at the surface of infected cells has been shown to enhance ADCC functions. In a comprehensive analysis of ADCC potency by neutralizing anti-HIV Abs (NAbs), we show in this study that NAbs are capable of mediating ADCC against HIV-infected T cells with 3BNC117, PGT126 and PG9 being most efficient. We demonstrate that HIV-induced BST2 antagonism effectively attenuates Ab binding and ADCC responses mediated by all classes of NAbs that were tested. Interestingly, IFNα treatment can reverse this effect in a BST2-dependent manner. Importantly, while reactivated latent T cell lines display some susceptibility to ADCC mediated by broadly NAbs, inactivating BST2 viral countermeasures and/or exogenous IFNα augment their elimination. Overall, our findings support the notion that NAbs can induce ADCC. They highlight that while BST2 antagonism by HIV promotes ADCC evasion, strategies aimed at restoring BST2 restriction could improve anti-HIV responses and potentially provide a means to eliminate reactivated cells in latent reservoirs. PMID:27853288

  17. Anti-Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis of cultured human glioma cells. Induction and modulation of sensitivity by cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Weller, M; Frei, K; Groscurth, P; Krammer, P H; Yonekawa, Y; Fontana, A

    1994-01-01

    Fas/APO-1 is a transmembrane protein of the nerve growth factor/TNF alpha receptor family which signals apoptotic cell death in susceptible target cells. We have investigated the susceptibility of seven human malignant glioma cell lines to Fas/APO-1-dependent apoptosis. Sensitivity to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated cell killing correlated with cell surface expression of Fas/APO-1. Expression of Fas/APO-1 as well as Fas/APO-1-dependent cytotoxicity were augmented by preexposure of human malignant glioma cells to IFN gamma and TNF alpha. Further, pretreatment with TGF beta 2, IL1 and IL8 enhanced Fas/APO-1 antibody-induced glioma cell apoptosis whereas other cytokines including TNF beta, IL6, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IL10 and IL13 had no such effect. None of the human malignant glioma cell lines was susceptible to TNF alpha-induced cytotoxicity. Fas/APO-1 antibody-sensitive glioma cell lines (n = 5), but not Fas/APO-1 antibody-resistant glioma cell lines (n = 2), became sensitive to TNF alpha when co-treated with inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis. Resistance of human glioma cells to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis was mainly related to low level expression of Fas/APO-1 and appeared not to be linked to overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protooncogene, bcl-2. Given the resistance of human malignant glioma to surgery, irradiation, chemotherapy and immunotherapy, we propose that Fas/APO-1 may be a promising target for a novel locoregionary approach to human malignant glioma. This strategy gains support from the demonstration of Fas/APO-1 expression in ex vivo human malignant glioma specimens and from the absence of Fas/APO-1 in normal human brain parenchyma. Images PMID:7521890

  18. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Takeo; Kaori, Takaki; Enomoto, Ikumi; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2013-01-01

    The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of non-human primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb) B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7,900-, 1,000-, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody.

  19. Immobilized Surfactant-Nanotube Complexes Support Selectin-Mediated Capture of Viable Circulating Tumor Cells in the Absence of Capture Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Castellanos, Carlos A.; King, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells from the primary site to anatomically distant organs leads to a poor patient prognosis. Increasing evidence has linked adhesive interactions between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells to metastatic dissemination. Microscale biomimetic flow devices hold promise as a diagnostic tool to isolate CTCs and develop metastatic therapies, utilizing E-selectin (ES) to trigger the initial rolling adhesion of tumor cells under flow. To trigger firm adhesion and capture under flow, such devices also typically require antibodies against biomarkers thought to be expressed on CTCs. This approach is challenged by the fact that CTCs are now known to exhibit heterogeneous expression of conventional biomarkers. Here, we describe surfactant-nanotube complexes to enhance ES-mediated capture and isolation of tumor cells without the use of capture antibodies. While the majority of tumor cells exhibited weaker rolling adhesion on halloysite nanotubes (HNT) coated with ES, HNT functionalization with the sodium dodecanoate (NaL) surfactant induced a switch to firm cellular adhesion under flow. Conversely, surfactant-nanotube complexes significantly reduced the number of primary human leukocytes captured via ES-mediated adhesion under flow. The switch in tumor cell adhesion was exploited to capture and isolate tumor cells in the absence of EpCAM antibodies, commonly utilized as the gold standard for CTC isolation. Additionally, HNT-NaL complexes were shown to capture tumor cells with low to negligible EpCAM expression, that are not efficiently captured using conventional approaches. PMID:25761664

  20. Establishment of intein-mediated protein ligation under denaturing conditions: C-terminal labeling of a single-chain antibody for biochip screening.

    PubMed

    Sydor, Jens R; Mariano, Maria; Sideris, Steve; Nock, Steffen

    2002-01-01

    Intein-mediated protein ligation is a recently developed method that enables the C-terminal labeling of proteins. This technique requires a correctly folded intein mutant that is fused to the C-terminus of a target protein to create a thioester, which allows the ligation of a peptide with an N-terminal cysteine (1, 2). Here we describe the establishment of this method for the labeling, under denaturing conditions, of target proteins that are expressed insolubly as intein fusion proteins. A GFPuv fusion protein with the Mycobacterium xenopi gyrA intein was expressed in inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli and initially used as a model protein to verify intein cleavage activity under different refolding conditions. The intein showed activity after refolding in nondenaturing and slightly denaturing conditions. A construct of the same intein with an anti-neutravidin single-chain antibody was also expressed in an insoluble form. The intein-mediated ligation was established for this single chain antibody-intein fusion protein under denaturing conditions in 4 M urea to prevent significant precipitation of the fusion protein during the first refolding step. Under optimized conditions, the single-chain antibody was labeled with a fluorescent peptide and used for antigen screening on a biochip after final refolding. This screening procedure allowed the determination of binding characteristics of the scFv for avidin proteins in a miniaturized format.

  1. Characterization of lymphokines mediating B cell growth and differentiation from monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody-stimulated T cells.

    PubMed

    Sherris, D; Stohl, W; Mayer, L

    1989-04-01

    Addition of anti-CD3 mAb 147 (IgG1), 446 (IgG1), or 454 (IgG2a) to cultures of T plus non-T cells can result in both B cell growth and differentiation. To determine whether lymphokines mediating these activities were similar to those described from conventional mitogen-induced T cell activation, normal peripheral blood T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3 mAb for 48 h. The supernatants were assayed for factors inducing B cell growth or differentiation (BCDF). A marked increase in Ig secretion was observed when either EBV-transformed B cell lines or normal B cells, pre-activated with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I strain, were cultured in the presence of mAb 446 (anti-CD3) stimulated T cell supernatant whereas no significant increase in Ig secretion was noted with either mAb 454- or 147-induced T cell supernatant despite equivalent T cell proliferative responses to these antibodies. In contrast, IL-2 secretion was detectable in T cell supernatants from T cells stimulated with either mAb 454 or 147 but not 446. Factors promoting B cell proliferation were detected in all antibody-stimulated T cell supernatants but, contrary to BCDF, appear to act only on non-activated B cells. To determine whether these effector activities were due to distinct lymphokines, supernatants were pooled and concentrated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Superose 12 permeation chromatography revealed BCDF activity with an apparent Mr of approximately 30,000 Da. The growth factor activity eluted over a wider and higher molecular weight range which overlapped the differentiation factor activity. Fractions containing BCDF activity were pooled, dialyzed, applied to a Mono Q anion-exchange column, and eluted with a linear NaCl gradient. The growth factor activity came off in a single-peak while BCDF was found divided into two major areas. The growth factor eluted at an ionic strength between the two BCDF activities. BCDF has an apparent isoelectric point (pI) of 6, in contrast to the reported p

  2. Caspr2-reactive antibody cloned from a mother of an ASD child mediates an ASD-like phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, L; Mader, S; Jeganathan, V; Berlin, R; Coleman, T R; Gregersen, P K; Huerta, P T; Volpe, B T; Diamond, B

    2016-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) occurs in 1 in 68 births, preferentially affecting males. It encompasses a group of neurodevelopmental abnormalities characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, stereotypic behaviors and motor dysfunction. Although recent advances implicate maternal brain-reactive antibodies in a causative role in ASD, a definitive assessment of their pathogenic potential requires cloning of such antibodies. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of monoclonal brain-reactive antibodies from blood of women with brain-reactive serology and a child with ASD. We further demonstrate that male but not female mice exposed in utero to the C6 monoclonal antibody, binding to contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2), display abnormal cortical development, decreased dendritic complexity of excitatory neurons and reduced numbers of inhibitory neurons in the hippocampus, as well as impairments in sociability, flexible learning and repetitive behavior. Anti-Caspr2 antibodies are frequent in women with brain-reactive serology and a child with ASD. Together these studies provide a methodology for obtaining monclonal brain-reactive antibodies from blood B cells, demonstrate that ASD can result from in utero exposure to maternal brain-reactive antibodies of single specificity and point toward the exciting possibility of prognostic and protective strategies.

  3. Heteroantibody-mediated cytotoxicity: antibody to the high affinity Fc receptor for IgG mediates cytotoxicity by human monocytes that is enhanced by interferon-gamma and is not blocked by human IgG.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Guyre, P M; Anderson, C L; Fanger, M W

    1986-12-01

    An IgG1 monoclonal antibody, 32.2, raised against the 72,000 dalton monocyte high affinity Fc receptor, was used to examine the role of this receptor in ADCC. This antibody did not inhibit the binding of human IgG1 to monocytes or to the U937 cell line, nor did it block or stimulate their killing of IgG-coated chicken erythrocytes (CE). Whole 32.2 or its Fab fragments were cross-linked to Fab fragments of rabbit anti-CE by using the agent SPDP. The resulting heteroantibodies (32.2 X Fab anti-CE) mediated monocyte and U937 cytotoxicity against CE, whereas an anti-HLA X anti-CE reagent did not. Both FcR expression and heteroantibody-mediated cytotoxicity were increased by culturing monocytes or U937 with IFN-gamma. Although IgG-mediated ADCC was significantly inhibited by 40 micrograms/ml human IgG1, cytotoxicity mediated by 32.2 X Fab anti-CE was not blocked by 2 mg/ml human IgG1, suggesting that such cytotoxicity might not be blocked by IgG in vivo. These data indicate the potential of 32.2 heteroantibodies in analysis of FcR function and in therapy.

  4. Development of rituximab-resistant B-NHL clones: an in vitro model for studying tumor resistance to monoclonal antibody-mediated immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jazirehi, Ali R; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies for cancer include chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiation. Such therapies result in significant short-term clinical responses; however, relapses and recurrences occur with no treatments. Targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies have improved responses with minimal toxicities. For instance, Rituximab (chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) was the first FDA-approved monoclonal antibody for the treatment of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The clinical response was significantly improved when used in combination with chemotherapy. However, a subset of patients does not respond or becomes resistant to further treatment. Rituximab-resistant (RR) clones were used as a model to address the potential mechanisms of resistance. In this chapter, we discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms by which rituximab signals the cells and modifies several intracellular survival/antiapoptotic pathways, leading to its chemo/immunosensitizing activities. RR clones were developed to mimic in vivo resistance observed in patients. In comparison with the sensitive parental cells, the RR clones are refractory to rituximab-mediated cell signaling and chemosensitization. Noteworthy, interference with the hyperactivated survival/antiapoptotic pathways in the RR clones with various pharmacological inhibitors mimicked rituximab effects in the parental cells. The development of RR clones provides a paradigm for studying resistance by other anticancer monoclonal antibodies in various tumor models.

  5. Antibody-Mediated and Cellular Immune Responses Induced in Naive Volunteers by Vaccination with Long Synthetic Peptides Derived from the Plasmodium vivax Circumsporozoite Protein

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Soto, Liliana; Perlaza, Blanca Liliana; Céspedes, Nora; Vera, Omaira; Lenis, Ana Milena; Bonelo, Anilza; Corradin, Giampietro; Herrera, Sócrates

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite (CS) protein is a leading malaria vaccine candidate. We describe the characterization of specific immune responses induced in 21 malaria-naive volunteers vaccinated with long synthetic peptides derived from the CS protein formulated in Montanide ISA 720. Both antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses were analyzed. Antibodies were predominantly of IgG1 and IgG3 isotypes, recognized parasite proteins on the immunofluorescent antibody test, and partially blocked sporozoite invasion of hepatoma cell lines in vitro. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from most volunteers (94%) showed IFN-γ production in vitro upon stimulation with both long signal peptide and short peptides containing CD8+ T-cell epitopes. The relatively limited sample size did not allow conclusions about HLA associations with the immune responses observed. In summary, the inherent safety and tolerability together with strong antibody responses, invasion blocking activity, and the IFN-γ production induced by these vaccine candidates warrants further testing in a phase II clinical trial. PMID:21292876

  6. Decreased Fc-Receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-01-01

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular-phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection. PMID:21565376

  7. Decreased Fc receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody-mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T; Ackerman, Margaret E; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-07-05

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection.

  8. Effect of Low Molecular Weight Heparins (LMWHs) on antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL) – Mediated Inhibition of Endometrial Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Di Nicuolo, Fiorella; Castellani, Roberta; Veglia, Manuela; Stinson, John; Scambia, Giovanni; Di Simone, Nicoletta

    2012-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity in the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Different pathogenic mechanisms for aPL-mediated pregnancy failure have been proposed. In particular a direct effect of aPL on both maternal and fetal side of the placental tissue has been reported, since their reactivity with β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) makes them adhere to trophoblast and human endometrial endothelial cell (HEEC) membranes. β2GPI can be recognized by aPL that, once bound, interfere with both trophoblast functions and with the HEEC differentiation. APS patients can be successfully treated with Low Molecular Weight Heparin (LMWH). Recent reports suggest that LMWH acts through mechanisms alternative to its well known anticoagulant effect, because of its ability to bind β2GPI. In our previous studies, we showed that LMWH is able to reduce the aPL binding to trophoblasts and restore cell invasiveness and differentiation. So far, however, no study has described its effects on endometrial angiogenesis. The aim of our research was to evaluate whether two LMWHs, tinzaparin and enoxaparin, have an effect on the aPL-inhibited endometrial angiogenesis. This prompted us to investigate: (i) in vitro HEEC angiogenesis through a Matrigel assay; (ii) VEGF secretion by ELISA; (iii) matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity by gelatin zymography; (iv) Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activity by colorimetric assay; (v) STAT-3 activation by a sandwich-ELISA kit. Furthermore, using an in vivo murine model we investigated the LMWHs effects on angiogenesis. We demonstrated that the addition of LMWHs prevents aPL-inhibited HEEC angiogenesis, both in vitro and in vivo, and is able to restore the aPL inhibited NF-κB and/or STAT-3 activity, the VEGF secretion and the MMPs activity. The demonstration of a beneficial role for LMWHs on the aPL-inhibited HEEC angiogenesis might

  9. Biochemical Studies on Methylglyoxal-Mediated Glycated Histones: Implications for Presence of Serum Antibodies against the Glycated Histones in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Nadeem A; Dash, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) mainly reacts with lysine and arginine residues of proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Histone was glycoxidated with glyoxal and methylglyoxal. It was characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and quenching studies involving penicillamine and aminoguanidine as carbonyl scavengers. Further characterization of histone modified with methylglyoxal was done by UV, fluorescence, and IR spectrophotometry. Spectral analysis of the protein clearly demonstrates structural perturbation in the histone by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal-induces cross-linking in the protein leading to aggregation. Role of methylglyoxal mediated glycoxidation of histone in type 1 diabetes was also undertaken. Antibodies were detected against glycoxidated histone in sera of type 1 diabetes patients by solid-phase enzyme immunoassay. The findings indicate that as a result of structural perturbation in histone by methylglyoxal, the modified histone may be involved in production of serum antibodies in the diabetes patients.

  10. Response to abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy in postmenopausal woman with anti-yo antibody mediated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amita; Bhushan, Bharat; Kasundra, Gaurav M; Shubhakaran, Khichar; Pujar, Guruprasad S; Banakar, Basavaraj

    2014-07-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by a widespread loss of Purkinje cells associated with a progressive pancerebellar dysfunction. PCD often precedes the cancer diagnosis by months to years. Here, we report a case of 44-year old postmenopausal woman who presented with PCD symptoms and high levels of anti-Yo antibodies titer since 8 months. We failed to conclude any neoplastic focus after thorough laboratory and imaging study. She minimally responded to methylprednisolone and immunoglobulin therapies. Despite therapy she was severely disabled. Planned abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (AHBSO) was done, histology revealed grade IIA borderline serous papillary carcinoma of ovary. Her neurological deficit responded dramatically to AHBSO. It is first case report who emphasize the response of AHBSO with presentation of anti-Yo antibody-mediated PCD and hidden nidus in post menopausal women.

  11. Post-Transplant Membranous Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Active Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Hepatitis C Infection after Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doke, Tomohito; Sato, Waichi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Sigehisa; Sasaki, Hitomi; Kusaka, Mamoru; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Asami; Yuzawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Midori

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone deceased donor kidney transplantation twice, at 35 and 43 years of age, presented with renal impairment. She was infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The histology of the graft kidney revealed post-transplant membranous nephropathy (MN) with podocytic infolding and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). IgG subclass staining showed fine granular deposits of IgG1 and IgG3, but not IgG4, in the glomerular capillary walls. Panel reactive antibody scores for human leukocyte antigen class I and class II were 92.67% and 66.68%, respectively. Thus, this case of post-transplanted MN was considered to be associated with AMR and HCV infection.

  12. Implications of receptor-mediated endocytosis and intracellular trafficking dynamics in the development of antibody drug conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Michael; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Scott, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The use of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) as a therapeutic platform to treat cancer has recently gained substantial momentum. This therapeutic modality has the potential to increase the efficacy and reduce the systemic toxicity associated with current therapeutic regimens. The efficacy of ADCs, however, relies on the proper exploitation of intracellular sorting dynamics of the antigen as well as the specificity, selectivity and pharmacokinetic properties of the antibody itself. Our understanding of endocytosis and endosomal trafficking of receptors has appreciably increased in recent years, as improvements in the assays used to study these events have resolved many of the molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. As a result, we now have the knowledge necessary to exploit these pathways efficiently to improve the efficacy of antibody-based therapy. This review discusses some recent studies that have explored how endo/lysosomal dynamics can affect the efficacy of engineered therapeutic antibodies, including ADCs. PMID:23221464

  13. Antibody-mediated activation of a defective beta-D-galactosidase: dimeric form of the activatable mutant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Conway de Macario, E; Ellis, J; Guzman, R; Rotman, B

    1978-02-01

    Sedimentation analyses of AMEF, an activatable mutant beta-D-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23), and the products of its reaction with Fab fragments of activating antibody show that this enzyme exists mainly as 10S dimers. Activation of AMEF by purified antibody resulted in formation of 16S tetramers. A unifying hypothesis postulating a dimer--tetramer equilibrium accounts for this observation as the counterpart of inactivation, which was shown to involve the breakdown of tetramers into inactive subunits [Roth, R. A. & Rotman, B. (1975) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 67, 1382--1390]. Conditions are described under which AMEF loses the specific antigenic determinant(s) responsible for binding activating antibody, allowing its subsequent use as an absorption to obtain immunologically purified activating antibody,

  14. Antibody-mediated activation of a defective beta-D-galactosidase: dimeric form of the activatable mutant enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    de Macario, E C; Ellis, J; Guzman, R; Rotman, B

    1978-01-01

    Sedimentation analyses of AMEF, an activatable mutant beta-D-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23), and the products of its reaction with Fab fragments of activating antibody show that this enzyme exists mainly as 10S dimers. Activation of AMEF by purified antibody resulted in formation of 16S tetramers. A unifying hypothesis postulating a dimer--tetramer equilibrium accounts for this observation as the counterpart of inactivation, which was shown to involve the breakdown of tetramers into inactive subunits [Roth, R. A. & Rotman, B. (1975) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 67, 1382--1390]. Conditions are described under which AMEF loses the specific antigenic determinant(s) responsible for binding activating antibody, allowing its subsequent use as an absorption to obtain immunologically purified activating antibody, PMID:416439

  15. Sequential development of pulmonary hemorrhage with MPO-ANCA complicating anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Rodríguez, M; Pobes, A; Seco, M

    2000-05-01

    We report a case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis caused by anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies that progressed to end-stage renal disease in a 67-year-old woman with diabetes. Intensive combined immunosuppressive therapy with methylprednisolone bolus, oral prednisone, and cyclophosphamide led to negativity of anti-GBM antibodies but was not able to restore renal function. After 28 months of hemodialysis, the patient suddenly presented with pulmonary hemorrhage. In this setting, high levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and negative anti-GBM antibodies were found. Therapy with oral prednisone and cyclophosphamide led to resolution of pulmonary hemorrhage and negativity of MPO-ANCA.

  16. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  17. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Capucine L; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-10-04

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs.

  18. Collagen Sponge Functionalized with Chimeric Anti-BMP-2 Monoclonal Antibody Mediates Repair of Critical-Size Mandibular Continuity Defects in a Nonhuman Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yilin; Su, Yingying; Tang, Jianxia; Goh, Bee Tin; Saigo, Leonardo; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jinsong; Khojasteh, Arash; Wang, Songlin

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated osseous regeneration (AMOR) has been introduced by our research group as a tissue engineering approach to capture of endogenous growth factors through the application of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) immobilized on a scaffold. Specifically, anti-Bone Morphogenetic Protein- (BMP-) 2 mAbs have been demonstrated to be efficacious in mediating bone repair in a number of bone defects. The present study sought to investigate the application of AMOR for repair of mandibular continuity defect in nonhuman primates. Critical-sized mandibular continuity defects were created in Macaca fascicularis locally implanted with absorbable collagen sponges (ACS) functionalized with chimeric anti-BMP-2 mAb or isotype control mAb. 2D and 3D analysis of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging demonstrated increased bone density and volume observed within mandibular continuity defects implanted with collagen scaffolds functionalized with anti-BMP-2 mAb, compared with isotype-matched control mAb. Both CBCT imaging and histologic examination demonstrated de novo bone formation that was in direct apposition to the margins of the resected bone. It is hypothesized that bone injury may be necessary for AMOR. This is evidenced by de novo bone formation adjacent to resected bone margins, which may be the source of endogenous BMPs captured by anti-BMP-2 mAb, in turn mediating bone repair.

  19. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies against Ricin’s Enzymatic Subunit Interfere with Protein Disulfide Isomerase-Mediated Reduction of Ricin Holotoxin In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Joanne M.; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    The penultimate event in the intoxication of mammalian cells by ricin toxin is the reduction, in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), of the intermolecular disulfide bond that links ricin’s enzymatic (RTA) and binding (RTB) subunits. In this report we adapted an in vitro protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-mediated reduction assay to test the hypothesis that the RTA-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) IB2 interferes with the liberation of RTA from RTB. IB2 recognizes an epitope located near the interface between RTA and RTB and, like a number of other RTA-specific neutralizing mAbs, is proposed to neutralize ricin intracellularly. In this study, we found that IB2 virtually eliminated the reduction of ricin holotoxin into RTA and RTB in vitro. Surprisingly, three other neutralizing mAbs (GD12, R70 and SyH7) that bind epitopes at considerable distance from ricin’s disulfide bond were as effective (or nearly as effective) as IB2 in interfering with PDI-mediated liberation of RTA from RTB. By contrast, two non-neutralizing RTA-specific mAbs, FGA12 and SB1, did not affect PDI-mediated reduction of ricin. These data reveal a possible mechanism by which RTA-specific antibodies may neutralize ricin intracellularly, provided they are capable of trafficking in association with ricin from the cell surface to the ER. PMID:23774033

  20. Antibodies to the HMW1/HMW2 and Hia Adhesins of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Mediate Broad-Based Opsonophagocytic Killing of Homologous and Heterologous Strains

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Linda E.

    2014-01-01

    The HMW1/HMW2 and Hia proteins are highly immunogenic surface adhesins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Approximately 75% of NTHi strains express HMW1/HMW2 adhesins, and most of the remaining 25% express an Hia adhesin. Our objective in this study was to assess the ability of antisera raised against purified HMW1/HMW2 proteins or recombinant Hia proteins to mediate opsonophagocytic killing of a large panel of unrelated NTHi strains. Native HMW1/HMW2 proteins were purified from three HMW1/HMW2-expressing NTHi strains. Recombinant fusion proteins expressing surface-exposed segments of either of two prototype Hia proteins were purified from Escherichia coli transformants. Immune sera raised in guinea pigs were assessed for their ability to mediate killing of NTHi in an opsonophagocytic assay with the HL-60 phagocytic cell line. The three HMW1/HMW2 antisera mediated killing of 22 of 65, 43 of 65, and 28 of 65 unrelated HMW1/HMW2-expressing NTHi strains, respectively. As a group, the three sera mediated killing of 48 of 65 HMW1/HMW2-expressing strains. The two Hia immune sera mediated killing of 12 of 24 and 13 of 24 unrelated Hia-expressing NTHi strains, respectively. Together, they mediated killing of 15 of 24 Hia-expressing strains. Neither the HMW1/HMW2 nor the Hia antisera mediated killing of NTHi expressing the alternative adhesin type. Antibodies directed against native HMW1/HMW2 proteins and recombinant Hia proteins are capable of mediating broad-based opsonophagocytic killing of homologous and heterologous NTHi strains. A vaccine formulated with a limited number of HMW1/HMW2 and Hia proteins might provide protection against disease caused by most NTHi strains. PMID:24574538

  1. Antibody-mediated complement C3b/iC3b binding to group B Streptococcus in paired mother and baby serum samples in a refugee population on the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Jenny; Thomas, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Turner, Claudia; Turner, Paul; Nosten, Francois; Le Doare, Kirsty; Hudson, Michael; Heath, Paul T; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. In this study, we determined antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b onto the bacterial cell surface of GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V. This was determined for 520 mother and umbilical cord serum sample pairs obtained at the time of birth from a population on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b was detected to at least one serotype in 91% of mothers, despite a known carriage rate in this population of only 12%. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition corresponded to known carriage rates, with the highest levels of complement deposition observed onto the most prevalent serotype (serotype II) followed by serotypes Ia, III, V, and Ib. Finally, neonates born to mothers carrying serotype II GBS at the time of birth showed higher antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against serotype II GBS than neonates born to mothers with no serotype II carriage. Assessment of antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against GBS may provide insights into the seroepidemiology of anti-GBS antibodies in mothers and infants in different populations.

  2. Antibody-Mediated Complement C3b/iC3b Binding to Group B Streptococcus in Paired Mother and Baby Serum Samples in a Refugee Population on the Thailand-Myanmar Border

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Jenny; Thomas, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Turner, Claudia; Turner, Paul; Nosten, Francois; Le Doare, Kirsty; Hudson, Michael; Heath, Paul T.; Gorringe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. In this study, we determined antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b onto the bacterial cell surface of GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V. This was determined for 520 mother and umbilical cord serum sample pairs obtained at the time of birth from a population on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b was detected to at least one serotype in 91% of mothers, despite a known carriage rate in this population of only 12%. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition corresponded to known carriage rates, with the highest levels of complement deposition observed onto the most prevalent serotype (serotype II) followed by serotypes Ia, III, V, and Ib. Finally, neonates born to mothers carrying serotype II GBS at the time of birth showed higher antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against serotype II GBS than neonates born to mothers with no serotype II carriage. Assessment of antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against GBS may provide insights into the seroepidemiology of anti-GBS antibodies in mothers and infants in different populations. PMID:25589553

  3. Sortase Enzyme-Mediated Generation of Site-Specifically Conjugated Antibody Drug Conjugates with High In Vitro and In Vivo Potency

    PubMed Central

    Beerli, Roger R.; Hell, Tamara; Merkel, Anna S.; Grawunder, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) have recently been proven to be highly potent anti-tumor drugs, typically exceeding the efficacy of conventional monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). ADCs are currently produced by chemical conjugation of a small-molecule toxin to the mAb through lysine or cysteine side chains. This leads to heterogeneous mixtures of ADCs in which variable numbers of drugs are conjugated to individual antibodies and in which the site of conjugation cannot be defined. Consequently, there is currently significant interest in further development of drug conjugation technologies, with a particular focus on site-specific payload conjugation. Here, we present an enzymatic conjugation platform based on the S. aureus sortase A-mediated transpeptidation reaction, allowing the efficient generation of ADCs with toxins conjugated to pre-defined sites at pre-defined drug-to-antibody ratios. For this, two modifications were introduced: first, immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) and light (IgL) chains were modified at their C-termini by addition of the sortase A recognition motif LPETG, and second, the small molecule tubulin polymerization inhibitors monomethylauristatin E (MMAE) and maytansine were modified by addition of a pentaglycine peptide, thus making them suitable substrates for sortase A-mediated transpeptidation. We demonstrate efficient generation and characterization of the anti-CD30 ADC Ac10-vcPAB-MMAE, an enzymatically conjugated counterpart of brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris), as well as several anti-HER-2 ADCs including trastuzumab-maytansine, the counterpart of trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla). ADCs generated in this manner were found to display in vitro cell killing activities indistinguishable from the classic conjugates. Further, when tested in vivo in a HER-2-overexpressing ovarian cancer xenograft mouse model, enzymatically generated trastuzumab-maytansine was found to lead to complete regression of established tumors, similar to Kadcyla. PMID:26132162

  4. Anti-cancer Activity of Novel TM4SF5-Targeting Antibodies through TM4SF5 Neutralization and Immune Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hye-Mi; Ryu, Jihye; Song, Jin Myeong; Lee, Yunhee; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ko, Dongjoon; Choi, Inpyo; Kim, Sang Jick; Lee, Jung Weon; Kim, Semi

    2017-01-01

    The transmembrane four L6 family member 5 (TM4SF5) protein is a novel molecular target for the prevention and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. TM4SF5 is highly expressed in liver, colon, esophageal, and pancreatic cancers and is implicated in tumor progression. Here, we screened monoclonal antibodies that specifically bound to the extracellular loop 2 (EC2) of TM4SF5 from a phage-displayed murine antibody (single-chain variable fragment; scFv) library. We constructed and characterized chimeric antibodies, Ab27 and Ab79, of scFv fused with Fc domain of human IgG1. The affinity (KD) of Ab27 and Ab79 for soluble EC2 was approximately 9.2 nM and 16.9 nM, respectively, as determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Ab27 and Ab79 efficiently bound to native TM4SF5 on the cell surface were internalized into the cancer cells, leading to a decrease in cell surface TM4SF5. Ab27 and Ab79 inhibited the proliferation and invasion of TM4SF5-positive liver and colon cancer cells and reduced FAK and c-Src phosphorylation. Ab27 and Ab79 also enhanced anoikis sensitivity and reduced survivin. Ab27 mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. Ab27 and Ab79 efficiently inhibited tumor growth in a liver cancer xenograft model. These results strongly support the further development of Ab27 as a novel anti-cancer agent in the clinic. PMID:28255353

  5. Control of Immune Response to Allogeneic Embryonic Stem Cells by CD3 Antibody-Mediated Operational Tolerance Induction.

    PubMed

    Calderon, D; Prot, M; You, S; Marquet, C; Bellamy, V; Bruneval, P; Valette, F; de Almeida, P; Wu, J C; Pucéat, M; Menasché, P; Chatenoud, L

    2016-02-01

    Implantation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and their differentiated derivatives into allogeneic hosts triggers an immune response that represents a hurdle to clinical application. We established in autoimmunity and in transplantation that CD3 antibody therapy induces a state of immune tolerance. Promising results have been obtained with CD3 antibodies in the clinic. In this study, we tested whether this strategy can prolong the survival of undifferentiated ESCs and their differentiated derivatives in histoincompatible hosts. Recipients of either mouse ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) or cardiac progenitors received a single short tolerogenic regimen of CD3 antibody. In immunocompetent mice, allogeneic EBs and cardiac progenitors were rejected within 20-25 days. Recipients treated with CD3 antibody showed long-term survival of implanted cardiac progenitors or EBs. In due course, EBs became teratomas, the growth of which was self-limited. Regulatory CD4(+)FoxP3(+) T cells and signaling through the PD1/PDL1 pathway played key roles in the CD3 antibody therapeutic effect. Gene profiling emphasized the importance of TGF-β and the inhibitory T cell coreceptor Tim3 to the observed effect. These results demonstrate that CD3 antibody administered alone promotes prolonged survival of allogeneic ESC derivatives and thus could prove useful for enhancing cell engraftment in the absence of chronic immunosuppression.

  6. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR–HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants. PMID:28066408

  7. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  8. Structure and function of broadly reactive antibody PG16 reveal an H3 subdomain that mediates potent neutralization of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pejchal, Robert; Walker, Laura M.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Phogat, Sanjay K.; Koff, Wayne C.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-11-15

    Development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 will likely require elicitation of broad and potent neutralizing antibodies against the trimeric surface envelope glycoprotein (Env). Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) PG9 and PG16 neutralize {approx}80% of HIV-1 isolates across all clades with extraordinary potency and target novel epitopes preferentially expressed on Env trimers. As these neutralization properties are ideal for a vaccine-elicited antibody response to HIV-1, their structural basis was investigated. The crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of PG16 at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution revealed its unusually long, 28-residue, complementarity determining region (CDR) H3 forms a unique, stable subdomain that towers above the antibody surface. A 7-residue 'specificity loop' on the 'hammerhead' subdomain was identified that, when transplanted from PG16 to PG9 and vice versa, accounted for differences in the fine specificity and neutralization of these two mAbs. The PG16 electron density maps also revealed that a CDR H3 tyrosine was sulfated, which was confirmed for both PG9 (doubly) and PG16 (singly) by mass spectral analysis. We further showed that tyrosine sulfation plays a role in binding and neutralization. An N-linked glycan modification is observed in the variable light chain, but not required for antigen recognition. Further, the crystal structure of the PG9 light chain at 3.0 {angstrom} facilitated homology modeling to support the presence of these unusual features in PG9. Thus, PG9 and PG16 use unique structural features to mediate potent neutralization of HIV-1 that may be of utility in antibody engineering and for high-affinity recognition of a variety of therapeutic targets.

  9. Immune-mediated myopathy related to anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase antibodies as an emerging cause of necrotizing myopathy induced by statins.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Clément; Beaufrére, Anne Marie; Boyer, Olivier; Drouot, Laurent; Soubrier, Martin; Tournadre, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) associated with statin use and anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibody is a new and emerging entity that supports a link between statin use and IMNM and raises the questions of distinct clinical phenotypes and treatment strategy. We describe the clinical and histopathological characteristics of a patient and discuss the spectrum of IMNM and statin-induced myopathies. A 65-year-old man was suffering from proximal muscle weakness and elevated CK levels, following exposure to statin therapy. The symptoms worsened despite discontinuation of the drug. At that point, no myositis-specific or -associated antibodies were detected. Malignancy screening did not reveal abnormalities. Muscle biopsy demonstrated a predominantly necrotizing myopathy with minimal lymphocytic infiltrates, MHC class I expression in necrotic muscle fibers, and complement deposition on scattered non-necrotic muscle fibers. Muscle protein analysis by western blot was normal. The patient did not improve with steroid and methotrexate and required monthly intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Muscle strength gradually improved, CK levels normalized and IVIG were stopped 1 year later. Screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies, not available at the time of presentation, was highly positive. Identification of anti-HMGCR antibodies in statin-exposed patients with myopathy appears to be helpful both for differential diagnosis and for treatment strategy. In patients who did not improve after discontinuation of the statin treatment, a muscle biopsy should be performed as well as screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies. Patients with this disorder require aggressive immunosuppressive treatment.

  10. Evidence for a human-specific mechanism for diet and antibody-mediated inflammation in carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, Maria; Padler-Karavani, Vered; Varki, Nissi M.; Varki, Ajit

    2008-01-01

    Patients with cancer have circulating heterophile antibodies that agglutinate animal red cells via recognition of the mammalian cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), which was long considered an oncofetal antigen in humans. However, humans are genetically deficient in Neu5Gc production and instead metabolically accumulate Neu5Gc from dietary sources, particularly red meats and milk products. Moreover, mice with a human-like defect showed no alternate pathway for Neu5Gc synthesis and even normal humans express anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. We show here that human tumors accumulate Neu5Gc that is covalently attached to multiple classes of glycans. The paradox of human tumor Neu5Gc accumulation in the face of circulating anti-Neu5Gc antibodies was hypothesized to be due to facilitation of tumor progression by the resulting low-grade chronic inflammation. Indeed, murine tumors expressing human-like levels of Neu5Gc show accelerated growth in syngeneic mice with a human-like Neu5Gc deficiency, coincident with the induction of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies and increased infiltration of inflammatory cells. Transfer of polyclonal monospecific syngeneic mouse anti-Neu5Gc serum also enhanced growth of transplanted syngeneic tumors bearing human-like levels of Neu5Gc, with tumors showing evidence for antibody deposition, enhanced angiogenesis and chronic inflammation. These effects were suppressed by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, a drug type known to reduce human carcinoma risk. Finally, affinity-purified human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies also accelerate growth of Neu5Gc-containing tumors in Neu5Gc-deficient mice. Taken together, the data suggest that the human propensity to develop diet-related carcinomas is contributed to by local chronic inflammation, resulting from interaction of metabolically-accumulated dietary Neu5Gc with circulating anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. PMID:19017806

  11. Inhibition of HIV-1 Env-Mediated Cell-Cell Fusion by Lectins, Peptide T-20, and Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Michael; Konopka, Krystyna; Balzarini, Jan; Düzgüneş, Nejat

    2011-01-01

    Background: Broadly cross-reactive, neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, including 2F5, 2G12, 4E10 and IgG1 b12, can inhibit HIV-1 infection in vitro at very low concentrations. We examined the ability of these antibodies to inhibit cell-cell fusion between Clone69TRevEnv cells induced to express the viral envelope proteins, gp120/gp41 (Env), and highly CD4-positive SupT1 cells. The cells were loaded with green and red-orange cytoplasmic fluorophores, and fusion was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Results: Cell-cell fusion was inhibited completely by the carbohydrate binding proteins (CBPs), Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) agglutinin (HHA), and Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) agglutinin (GNA), and by the peptide, T-20, at relatively low concentrations. Anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 antibodies, at concentrations much higher than those required for neutralization, were not particularly effective in inhibiting fusion. Monoclonal antibodies b12, m14 IgG and 2G12 had moderate inhibitory activity; the IC50 of 2G12 was about 80 µg/ml. Antibodies 4E10 and 2F5 had no inhibitory activity at the concentrations tested. Conclusions: These observations raise concerns about the ability of neutralizing antibodies to inhibit the spread of viral genetic material from infected cells to uninfected cells via cell-cell fusion. The interaction of gp120/gp41 with cell membrane CD4 may be different in cell-cell and virus-cell membrane fusion reactions, and may explain the differential effects of antibodies in these two systems. The fluorescence assay described here may be useful in high throughput screening of potential HIV fusion inhibitors. PMID:21660189

  12. A Humanized Anti-CD22-Onconase Antibody-Drug Conjugate Mediates Highly Potent Destruction of Targeted Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Tobias; Mavratzas, Athanasios; Kiesgen, Stefan; Haase, Stephanie; Bötticher, Benedikt; Exner, Evelyn; Mier, Walter; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jäger, Dirk; Arndt, Michaela A. E.; Krauss, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have evolved as a new class of potent cancer therapeutics. We here report on the development of ADCs with specificity for the B-cell lineage specific (surface) antigen CD22 being expressed in the majority of hematological malignancies. As targeting moiety a previously generated humanized anti-CD22 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) derivative from the monoclonal antibody RFB4 was reengineered into a humanized IgG1 antibody format (huRFB4). Onconase (ranpirnase), a clinically active pancreatic-type ribonuclease, was employed as cytotoxic payload moiety. Chemical conjugation via thiol-cleavable disulfide linkage retained full enzymatic activity and full binding affinity of the ADC. Development of sophisticated purification procedures using size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography allowed the separation of immunoconjugate species with stoichiometrically defined number of Onconase cargos. A minimum of two Onconase molecules per IgG was required for achieving significant in vitro cytotoxicity towards lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. Antibody-drug conjugates with an Onconase to antibody ratio of 3 : 1 exhibited an IC50 of 0.08 nM, corresponding to more than 18,400-fold increased cytotoxicity of the ADC when compared with unconjugated Onconase. These results justify further development of this ADC as a promising first-in-class compound for the treatment of CD22-positive malignancies. PMID:26605343

  13. Molecular determinants of dengue virus 2 envelope protein important for virus entry in FcγRIIA-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Chotiwan, Nunya; Roehrig, John T.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2014-05-15

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection may cause severe illness in patients suffering a secondary infection by a heterologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype. During ADE of infection, cross-reactive non- or poorly-neutralizing antibodies form infectious virus-Ab complexes with the newly infecting serotype and enhance virus infection by binding to the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) on FcγR-bearing cells. In this study, we determined that molecular determinants of DENV2 envelope protein critical for virus entry during non-ADE infection are also required for ADE infection mediated by FcγRIIA, and binding of virus-Ab complexes with FcγRIIA alone is not sufficient for ADE of infection. The FcγRIIA mainly plays an auxiliary role in concentrating the virus–Ab complex to the cell surface, and other primary cellular receptors are required for virus entry. Understanding the viral entry pathway in ADE of DENV infection will greatly facilitate rational designs of anti-viral therapeutics against severe dengue disease associated with ADE. - Highlights: • KKK305/307/310 in DENV2 E-DIII is critical for virus attachment in ADE and non-ADE infection. • Binding of DENV2–Ab complex with FcγRII alone is not sufficient for virus entry in ADE infection. • Other primary receptors were required for DENV2 internalization during FcγRII–mediated ADE. • G104 and L135 of DENV2 E are critical for virus-mediated membrane fusion. • DENV2 virus-mediated membrane fusion is required for both ADE and non-ADE infection.

  14. The role of specific antibody in alternative complement pathway- mediated opsonophagocytosis of type III, group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The native capsular polysaccharide antigen of type III, group B Streptococcus contains a terminal sialic acid residue on each repeating unit that masks all end-group galactopyranose residues and prevents alternative pathway complement activation by adult human sera in the absence of type-specific antibody. The critical role of the sialic acid residues in allowing the organism to evade activating the alternative complement pathway was shown when neuraminidase treatment of the organism converted the bacteria to activators of the alternative pathway as assessed in agammaglobulinemic serum. The requirement for specific antibody in permitting alternative pathway activation by the fully sialated bacteria was shown when sera that contained low levels of specific antibody failed to activate this pathway, and when prior absorption of serum that contained higher type-specific antibody levels with the capsular antigen failed to activate this pathway. The use of C2-deficient sera showed that the calssical pathway was not required for antibody-dependent alternative pathway activation. The use of isotonic, pH 7.5, veronal-NaCl buffer that contained 1% gelatin and that was supplemented to 4 mM Mg++ and 16 mM EGTA and adjusted to pH 7.5 (MgEGTA) ruled out the participation of the C1-bypass pathway. The presence of sialic acid on the bacterial surface is one means of evading an important mechanism of natural immunity, namely activation of complement by the alternative pathway. Only specific antibody, i.e., acquired immunity, can overcome this virulence factor. PMID:6989947

  15. Donor antibodies to HNA-3a implicated in TRALI reactions prime neutrophils and cause PMN-mediated damage to human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells in a two-event in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Silliman, Christopher C; Curtis, Brian R; Kopko, Patricia M; Khan, Samina Y; Kelher, Marguerite R; Schuller, Randy M; Sannoh, Baindu; Ambruso, Daniel R

    2007-02-15

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Antibodies to HNA-3a are commonly implicated in TRALI. We hypothesized that HNA-3a antibodies prime neutrophils (PMNs) and cause PMN-mediated cytotoxicity through a two-event pathogenesis. Isolated HNA-3a+ or HNA-3a- PMNs were incubated with plasma containing HNA-3a antibodies implicated in TRALI, and their ability to prime the oxidase was measured. Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) were activated with endotoxin or buffer, HNA-3a+ or HNA-3a- PMNs were added, and the coculture was incubated with plasma+/-antibodies to HNA-3a. PMN-mediated damage was measured by counting viable HMVECs/mm2. Plasma containing HNA-3a antibodies primed the fMLP-activated respiratory burst of HNA-3a+, but not HNA-3a-, PMNs and elicited PMN-mediated damage of LPS-activated HMVECs when HNA-3a+, but not HNA-3a-, PMNs were used. Thus, antibodies to HNA-3a primed PMNs and caused PMN-mediated HMVEC cytotoxicity in a two-event model identical to biologic response modifiers implicated in TRALI.

  16. Growth inhibition in a brain metastasis model by antibody delivery using focused ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Kobus, Thiele; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Zhang, Yongzhi; McDannold, Nathan J

    2016-09-28

    HER2-targeting antibodies (i.e. trastuzumab and pertuzumab) prolong survival in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with extracranial metastases. However, the response of brain metastases to these drugs is poor, and it is hypothesized that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits drug delivery to the brain. We investigated whether we could improve the response by temporary disruption of the BBB using focused ultrasound in combination with microbubbles. To study this, we inoculated 30 nude rats with HER2-positive cells derived from a brain metastasis of a breast cancer patient (MDA-MB-361). The animals were divided into three groups: a control-group that received no treatment; an antibody-only group that received six weekly treatments of trastuzumab and pertuzumab; and an ultrasound+antibody group that received trastuzumab and pertuzumab in combination with six weekly sessions of BBB disruption using focused ultrasound. In two animals, the leakiness of the tumors before disruption was evaluated using contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and found that the tumors were not leaky. The same technique was used to evaluate the effectiveness of BBB disruption, which was successful in all sessions. The tumor in the control animals grew exponentially with a growth constant of 0.042±0.011mm(3)/day. None of the antibody-only animals responded to the treatment and the growth constant was 0.033±0.009mm(3)/day during the treatment period. Four of the ten animals in the ultrasound+antibody-group showed a response to the treatment with an average growth constant of 0.010±0.007mm(3)/day, compared to a growth constant 0.043±0.013mm(3)/day for the six non-responders. After the treatment period, the tumors in all groups grew at similar rates. As the tumors were not leaky before BBB disruption and there were no responders in the antibody-only group, these results show that at least in some cases disruption of the BBB is necessary for a response to the antibodies in

  17. Differentiation of salivary agglutinin-mediated adherence and aggregation of mutans streptococci by use of monoclonal antibodies against the major surface adhesin P1.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, L J; Piacentini, D A; Crowley, P J; Oyston, P C; Bleiweis, A S

    1992-01-01

    The ability to adhere to salivary agglutinin-coated hydroxyapatite beads and to aggregate in the presence of fluid-phase salivary agglutinin was tested by using 25 isolates of mutants streptococci representing eight serotypes. Both adherence and aggregation activity correlated with expression of the Mr-185,000 cell surface antigen P1 on Streptococcus mutans serotype c, e, and f strains. In addition, it was shown that the P1 molecule itself served as the adhesin of S. mutans serotype c, since adherence was significantly inhibited by the presence of recombinant-specified Mr-150,000 P1. The ability of S. sobrinus strains to adhere or aggregate did not correlate with expression of the P1 cross-reactive antigen SpaA. There was also evidence for interaction with salivary agglutinin, as manifested by aggregation but not adherence of S. rattus serotype b, which does not express a P1 cross-reactive antigen. To understand the interaction of P1 with salivary agglutinin at the molecular level, a panel of 11 anti-P1 monoclonal antibodies was tested for inhibitory activity in adherence and aggregation inhibition assays. Overlapping, but not identical, subsets of monoclonal antibodies were found to inhibit adherence and aggregation, indicating that the interactions of P1 with salivary agglutinin which mediate these two phenomena are different. The localization of functional domains of P1 which may mediate the aggregation and adherence reactions is discussed. PMID:1541515

  18. Neutralizing Antibodies against IFN-[Beta] in Multiple Sclerosis: Antagonization of IFN-[Beta] Mediated Suppression of MMPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilli, Francesca; Bertolotto, Antonio; Sala, Arianna; Hoffmann, Francine; Capobianco, Marco; Malucchi, Simona; Glass, Tracy; Kappos, Ludwig; Lindberg, Raija L. P.; Leppert, David

    2004-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against interferon-[Beta] (IFN-Beta) develop in about a third of treated multiple sclerosis patients and are believed to reduce therapeutic efficacy of IFN-[Beta] on clinical and MRI measures. The expression of the interferon acute-response protein, myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA) is a sensitive measure of the…

  19. Antibodies against 70-kD heat shock cognate protein inhibit mediated nuclear import of karyophilic proteins

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Previously, we found that anti-DDDED antibodies strongly inhibited in vivo nuclear transport of nuclear proteins and that these antibodies recognized a protein of 69 kD (p69) from rat liver nuclear envelopes that showed specific binding activities to the nuclear location sequences (NLSs) of nucleoplasmin and SV-40 large T-antigen. Here we identified this protein as the 70-kD heat shock cognate protein (hsc70) based on its mass, isoelectric point, cellular localization, and partial amino acid sequences. Competition studies indicated that the recombinant hsc70 expressed in Escherichia coli binds to transport competent SV-40 T-antigen NLS more strongly than to the point mutated transport incompetent mutant NLS. To investigate the possible involvement of hsc70 in nuclear transport, we examined the effect of anti-hsc70 rabbit antibodies on the nuclear accumulation of karyophilic proteins. When injected into the cytoplasm of tissue culture cells, anti-hsc70 strongly inhibited the nuclear import of nucleoplasmin, SV- 40 T-antigen NLS bearing BSA and histone H1. In contrast, anti-hsc70 IgG did not prevent the diffusion of lysozyme or 17.4-kD FITC-dextran into the nuclei. After injection of these antibodies, cells continued RNA synthesis and were viable. These results indicate that hsc70 interacts with NLS-containing proteins in the cytoplasm before their nuclear import. PMID:1332978

  20. A novel monoclonal antibody to human laminin α5 chain strongly inhibits integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration on laminins 511 and 521.

    PubMed

    Wondimu, Zenebech; Omrani, Shahin; Ishikawa, Taichi; Javed, Fawad; Oikawa, Yuko; Virtanen, Ismo; Juronen, Erkki; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Laminins, a large family of αβγ heterotrimeric proteins mainly found in basement membranes, are strong promoters of adhesion and migration of multiple cell types, such as tumor and immune cells, via several integrin receptors. Among laminin α (LMα) chains, α5 displays the widest tissue distribution in adult life and is synthesized by most cell types. Here, we have generated and characterized five novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the human LMα5 chain to further study the biological relevance of α5 laminins, such as laminins 511 (α5β1γ1) and 521 (α5β2γ1). As detected by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, each antibody displayed unique properties when compared to mAb 4C7, the prototype LMα5 antibody. Of greatest interest, mAb 8G9, but not any other antibody, strongly inhibited α3β1/α6β1 integrin-mediated adhesion and migration of glioma, melanoma, and carcinoma cells on laminin-511 and, together with mAb 4C7, on laminin-521. Accordingly, mAb 8G9 abolished the interaction of soluble α3β1 integrin with immobilized laminins 511 and 521. Binding of mAb 8G9 to laminin-511 was unaffected by the other mAbs to the LMα5 chain but largely hindered by mAb 4E10 to a LMβ1 chain epitope near the globular domain of laminin-511. Thus, mAb 8G9 defines a novel epitope localized at or near the integrin-binding globular domain of the LMα5 chain, which is essential for cell adhesion and migration, and identifies a potential therapeutic target in malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  1. B cell receptor-mediated internalization of salmonella: a novel pathway for autonomous B cell activation and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Souwer, Yuri; Griekspoor, Alexander; Jorritsma, Tineke; de Wit, Jelle; Janssen, Hans; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S Marieke

    2009-06-15

    The present paradigm is that primary B cells are nonphagocytosing cells. In this study, we demonstrate that human primary B cells are able to internalize bacteria when the bacteria are recognized by the BCR. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella typhimurium results in B cell differentiation and secretion of anti-Salmonella Ab by the Salmonella-specific B cells. In addition, BCR-mediated internalization leads to efficient Ag delivery to the MHC class II Ag-loading compartments, even though Salmonella remains vital intracellularly in primary B cells. Consequently, BCR-mediated bacterial uptake induces efficient CD4(+) T cell help, which boosts Salmonella-specific Ab production. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella by B cells is superior over extracellular Ag extraction to induce rapid and specific humoral immune responses and efficiently combat infection.

  2. Tissue resident NK cells mediate ischemic kidney injury and are not depleted by anti-Asialo GM1 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Victorino, Francisco; Sojka, Dorothy K.; Brodsky, Kelley S.; McNamee, Eoin N.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Homann, Dirk; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Clambey, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    NK cells are innate lymphoid cells important for immune surveillance, identifying and responding to stress, infection, and/or transformation. While conventional NK (cNK) cells circulate systemically, many NK cells reside in tissues where they appear to be poised to locally regulate tissue function. Here we tested the contribution of tissue-resident NK (trNK) cells to tissue homeostasis by studying ischemic injury in the mouse kidney. Parabiosis experiments demonstrate that the kidney contains a significant fraction of trNK cells under homeostatic conditions. Kidney trNK cells developed independent of NFIL3 and Tbet, and expressed a distinct cell surface phenotype as compared to cNK cells. Among these, trNK cells had reduced asialo-GM1 (AsGM1) expression relative to cNK cells, a phenotype observed in trNK cells across multiple organs and mouse strains. Strikingly, anti-AsGM1 antibody treatment, commonly used as NK cell-depleting regimen, resulted in a robust and selective depletion of cNKs, leaving trNKs largely intact. Using this differential depletion, we tested the relative contribution of cNK and trNK cells in ischemic kidney injury. Whereas anti-NK1.1 antibody effectively depleted both trNK and cNK cells and protected against ischemic-reperfusion injury, anti-AsGM1 antibody preferentially depleted cNK cells and failed to protect against injury. These data demonstrate unanticipated specificity of anti-AsGM1 antibody depletion on NK cell subsets and reveal a new approach to study the contributions of cNK and trNK cells in vivo. In total, these data demonstrate that trNK cells play a key role in modulating local responses to ischemic tissue injury in the kidney and potentially other organs. PMID:26453755

  3. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antibody Mediated Neurologic Relapse Post Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Sarah; Walsh, Aoibhinn; King, Mary D; Lynch, Bryan; Webb, David; Twomey, Eilish; Ronan Leahy, T; Butler, Karina; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Despite the advent of antiviral therapy, herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) remains a devastating condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Neurologic relapse after initial improvement is generally attributed to herpes simplex virus reactivation. In 2013, inflammation caused by anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies was reported in association with cases of neurologic relapse after herpes simplex encephalitis. We present 3 such cases and discuss diagnostic and management dilemmas.

  4. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Expression of Methamphetamine Antibody Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Hyperactivity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuo-Jen; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Wu, Kun-Lieh; Tsai, Ho-Min; Chen, Mao-Liang; Chen, Yi-Wei; Hsieh, Wei; Lin, Chun-Ming; Wang, Yun

    2017-04-07

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is one of the most frequently abused drugs worldwide. Recent studies have indicated that antibodies with high affinity for Meth reduce its pharmacological effects. The purpose of this study was to develop a technique for virus-based passive immunization against Meth effects. We generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype-8 vector (AAV-MethAb) carrying the gene for a Meth-specific monoclonal antibody (MethAb). Infection of 293 cells with AAV-MethAb resulted in the expression and secretion of antibodies which bind to Meth. The viral vector was then examined in adult ICR mice. Systemic administration of AAV-MethAb resulted in long-term expression of MethAb in the serum for up to 29 weeks. Serum collected from the animals receiving AAV-MethAb retained a high specificity for (+)-Meth. Animals were challenged with Meth five weeks after viral injection. Meth levels in the brain and serum were reduced while Meth-induced locomotor activity was significantly attenuated. In conclusion, AAV-MethAb administration effectively depletes Meth from brain and serum while reducing the behavioral response to Meth, and thus is a potential therapeutic approach for Meth abuse.

  5. Anti-Yo antibody-mediated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a female patient with pleural malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Meydan, Nezih; Barutca, Sabri; Ozsan, Nazan; Gurel, Duygu; Veral, Ali

    2013-05-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is a rare non-metastatic complication of malignancies. It presents with acute or subacute onset of ataxia, dysarthria and intention tremor. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is most commonly associated with malignancies of the ovary, breast and lung. The anti-Yo (anti-Purkinje cells) antibodies that specifically damage the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum are found in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Anti-Yo-related paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is most commonly found in women with gynecological and breast cancers, but it is reported in other malignancies. Patients with paraneoplastic syndromes most often present with neurologic symptoms before an underlying cancer is detected. We report a case of anti-Yo-related paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with pleural malignant mesothelioma in a 51-year-old female patient. She presented to our department with a 2-week history after the last chemotherapy of progressive dizziness related to head movement, nausea, vomiting, ataxia and unsteady gait. A western blot assay was negative for anti-Hu, anti-Ri, anti-Ma2, anti-CV2 and anti-amphiphysin paraneoplastic antibody markers but positive for anti-Yo. In conclusion, we report a case of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a patient with pleural malignant mesothelioma because of the rarity of this neurologic presentation after the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma and of the association with anti-Yo antibodies.

  6. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Expression of Methamphetamine Antibody Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Hyperactivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuo-Jen; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Wu, Kun-Lieh; Tsai, Ho-Min; Chen, Mao-Liang; Chen, Yi-Wei; Hsieh, Wei; Lin, Chun-Ming; Wang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is one of the most frequently abused drugs worldwide. Recent studies have indicated that antibodies with high affinity for Meth reduce its pharmacological effects. The purpose of this study was to develop a technique for virus-based passive immunization against Meth effects. We generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype-8 vector (AAV-MethAb) carrying the gene for a Meth-specific monoclonal antibody (MethAb). Infection of 293 cells with AAV-MethAb resulted in the expression and secretion of antibodies which bind to Meth. The viral vector was then examined in adult ICR mice. Systemic administration of AAV-MethAb resulted in long-term expression of MethAb in the serum for up to 29 weeks. Serum collected from the animals receiving AAV-MethAb retained a high specificity for (+)-Meth. Animals were challenged with Meth five weeks after viral injection. Meth levels in the brain and serum were reduced while Meth-induced locomotor activity was significantly attenuated. In conclusion, AAV-MethAb administration effectively depletes Meth from brain and serum while reducing the behavioral response to Meth, and thus is a potential therapeutic approach for Meth abuse. PMID:28387350

  7. Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the murine gastrointestinal tract is effectively mediated by O-antigen-specific circulating antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Pier, G B; Meluleni, G; Goldberg, J B

    1995-01-01

    The colonization of mucosal surfaces by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can lead to local or disseminated disease. Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) has been assumed to be responsible for preventing mucosal colonization by interfering with the binding of bacterial ligands to epithelial surface receptors. However, the efficacy of this mechanism of immunity derives little actual support from in vivo experiments. In an investigation of the role of local and systemic immunization strategies in reducing colonization of the gastrointestinal tract of mice by P. aeruginosa, the bacterial antigens that were potential targets for immune effectors promoting mucosal clearance were identified. Levels of gastrointestinal colonization were reduced when immunity to homologous O antigens, but not that to pili or flagella, was elicited. Oral vaccination with attenuated Salmonella typhimurium expressing P. aeruginosa serogroup O11 antigen elicited mucosal and serum IgA antibodies and serum IgG antibodies specific for the recombinant antigen. Oral challenge of immunized mice with P. aeruginosa serogroup O11 demonstrated protection against gastrointestinal colonization. Intraperitoneal immunization with a serogroup O11 high-molecular-weight O-polysaccharide antigen elicited only serum IgG and IgM antibodies yet was as effective as oral vaccination in protecting mice against gastrointestinal colonization. This finding was confirmed by the demonstration that intraperitoneal immunization with purified lipopolysaccharide was also protective against mucosal surface colonization. These results call into question the need for local immune effectors, particularly secretory IgA, directed at bacterial ligands for epithelial surface components, in protecting a mucosal surface from bacterial challenge. PMID:7542632

  8. Macrophages largely contribute to heterologous anti-Propionibacterium acnes antibody-mediated protection from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiuyue; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Feng; Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Xia, Xiaojing; Feng, Xin; Du, Chongtao; Gu, Jingmin; Han, Wenyu; Lei, Liancheng

    2015-03-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of acute and chronic pleuropneumonia. Propionibacterium acnes is a facultative anaerobic gram-positive corynebacterium. We have previously found that anti-P. acnes antibodies can prevent A. pleuropneumoniae infections in mice. To investigate the role of macrophages in this process, affinity-purified anti-P. acnes IgG and anti-A. pleuropneumoniae IgG were used in opsonophagocytosis assays. Additionally, the efficacy of passive immunization with P. acnes serum against A. pleuropneumoniae was tested in macrophage-depleted mice. It was found that anti-P. acnes IgG had an effect similar to that of anti-A. pleuropneumoniae IgG (P > 0.05), which significantly promotes phagocytosis of A. pleuropneumoniae by macrophages (P < 0.01). It was also demonstrated that, after passive immunization with anti-P. acnes serum, macrophage-replete mice had the highest survival rate (90%), whereas the survival rate of macrophage-depleted mice was only 40% (P < 0.05). However, macrophage-depleted mice that had been passively immunized with naïve serum had the lowest survival rate (20%), this rate being lower than that of macrophage-replete mice that had been passively immunized with naïve serum. Overall, anti-P. acnes antibodies did not prevent A. pleuropneumoniae infection under conditions of macrophage depletion (P > 0.05). Furthermore, in mice that had been passively immunized with anti-P. acnes serum, macrophage depletion resulted in a greater A. pleuropneumoniae burden and more severe pathological features of pneumonia in lung tissues than occurred in macrophage-replete mice. It was concluded that macrophages are essential for the process by which anti-P. acnes antibody prevents A. pleuropneumoniae infection in mice.

  9. [Head drop syndrome in a patient with immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy with anti-signal recognition particle antibody: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kushimura, Yukie; Shiga, Kensuke; Mukai, Mao; Yoshida, Masakatu; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    We report an 87-year-old female patient who presented a dropped head and progressive weakness in proximal muscles over five months. The value of serum creatine kinase was 2,708 IU/l and the antibody against signal recognition particle (SRP) was detected by means of immunoprecipitation. The computed tomography of skeletal muscles revealed atrophy and fatty degeneration preferentially in the neck extensors and paraspinal muscles. The biopsied specimen of the deltoid muscle showed necrotic fibers scattered in fascicles with marked myophagia. The mononuclear cells in necrotic fibers were positive against CD68, leading to the diagnosis of immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. We hypothesize that a group of patients with necrotizing myopathy can present a preferential involvement in neck extensors resulting in dropped head syndrome.

  10. Sex Related Differences in the Risk of Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Subsequent Allograft Vasculopathy Post-Heart Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grupper, Avishay; Nestorovic, Emilija M.; Daly, Richard C.; Milic, Natasa M.; Joyce, Lyle D.; Stulak, John M.; Joyce, David L.; Edwards, Brooks S.; Pereira, Naveen L.; Kushwaha, Sudhir S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregnancies may result in antibodies against HLA, a risk factor for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and subsequent cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) after heart transplantation (HTx). The aim of this study was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of AMR events and subsequent risk of CAV among HTx recipients. Methods The study comprised 160 patients (51 [32%] women) who underwent HTx in 2008 to 2014. The cumulative effect of AMR events was calculated by AMR score (sum of myocardial biopsy grading divided by number of biopsies taken during 3 years post-HTx). Results Females had higher levels of anti-HLA I antibodies pre-HTx compared to males which was associated with a history of pregnancies, total number of children and with a higher AMR score at 6 months post-HTx (P < 0.05). Women demonstrated a significant increase in the total incidence of AMR events (27 vs. 7%, P = 0.001) and in AMR scores at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months post-HTx compared to men (P < 0.05). There were no differences in cellular rejection between the groups. A history of AMR events was associated with a significantly increased risk of severe CAV onset (hazard ratio, 7.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-31.5; P = 0.012). Conclusions Women are at higher risk for AMR post-HTx which subsequently increases their risk for CAV. Females recipients may benefit from closer surveillance to identify AMR at an earlier stage post-HTx, and targeted immunosuppressive therapy to attenuate the development of CAV. PMID:27795988

  11. Anti-HMGCR antibodies as a biomarker for immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies: A history of statins and experience from a large international multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Musset, Lucile; Allenbach, Yves; Benveniste, Olivier; Boyer, Olivier; Bossuyt, Xavier; Bentow, Chelsea; Phillips, Joe; Mammen, Andrew; Van Damme, Philip; Westhovens, René; Ghirardello, Anna; Doria, Andrea; Choi, May Y; Fritzler, Marvin J; Schmeling, Heinrike; Muro, Yoshinao; García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Ortiz-Villalvazo, Miguel A; Bizzaro, Nicola; Infantino, Maria; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Peng, Qinglin; Wang, Guochun; Vencovský, Jiří; Klein, Martin; Krystufkova, Olga; Franceschini, Franco; Fredi, Micaela; Hue, Sophie; Belmondo, Thibaut; Danko, Katalin; Mahler, Michael

    2016-10-01

    In an effort to find naturally occurring substances that reduce cholesterol by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), statins were first discovered by Endo in 1972. With the widespread prescription and use of statins to decrease morbidity from myocardial infarction and stroke, it was noted that approximately 5% of all statin users experienced muscle pain and weakness during treatment. In a smaller proportion of patients, the myopathy progressed to severe morbidity marked by proximal weakness and severe muscle wasting. Remarkably, Mammen and colleagues were the first to discover that the molecular target of statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), is an autoantibody target in patients that develop an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). These observations have been confirmed in a number of studies but, until today, a multi-center, international study of IMNM, related idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), other auto-inflammatory conditions and controls has not been published. Accordingly, an international, multi-center study investigated the utility of anti-HMGCR antibodies in the diagnosis of statin-associated IMNM in comparison to different forms of IIM and controls. This study included samples from patients with different forms of IIM (n=1250) and patients with other diseases (n=656) that were collected from twelve sites and tested for anti-HMGCR antibodies by ELISA. This study confirmed that anti-HMGCR autoantibodies, when found in conjunction with statin use, characterize a subset of IIM who are older and have necrosis on muscle biopsy. Taken together, the data to date indicates that testing for anti-HMGCR antibodies is important in the differential diagnosis of IIM and might be considered for future classification criteria.

  12. Target-mediated drug disposition and prolonged liver accumulation of a novel humanized anti-CD81 monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Vexler, Vladimir; Yu, Li; Pamulapati, Chandrasena; Garrido, Rosario; Grimm, Hans Peter; Sriraman, Priya; Bohini, Sandhya; Schraeml, Michael; Singh, Usha; Brandt, Michael; Ries, Stefan; Ma, Han; Klumpp, Klaus; Ji, Changhua

    2013-01-01

    CD81 is an essential receptor for hepatitis C virus (HCV). K21 is a novel high affinity anti-CD81 antibody with potent broad spectrum anti-HCV activity in vitro. The pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics and liver distribution of K21 were characterized in cynomolgus monkeys after intravenous (i.v.) administration of K21. Characteristic target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) was shown based on the PK profile of K21 and a semi-mechanistic TMDD model was used to analyze the data. From the TMDD model, the estimated size of the total target pool at baseline (Vc • Rbase) is 16 nmol/kg and the estimated apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (KM) is 4.01 nM. A simulation using estimated TMDD parameters indicated that the number of free receptors remains below 1% for at least 3 h after an i.v. bolus of 7 mg/kg. Experimentally, the availability of free CD81 on peripheral lymphocytes was measured by immunostaining with anti-CD81 antibody JS81. After K21 administration, a dose- and time-dependent reduction in free CD81 on peripheral lymphocytes was observed. Fewer than 3% of B cells could bind JS81 3 h after a 7 mg/kg dose. High concentrations of K21 were found in liver homogenates, and the liver/serum ratio of K21 increased time-dependently and reached ~160 at 168 h post-administration. The presence of K21 bound to hepatocytes was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The fast serum clearance of K21 and accumulation in the liver are consistent with TMDD. The TMDD-driven liver accumulation of the anti-CD81 antibody K21 supports the further investigation of K21 as a therapeutic inhibitor of HCV entry. PMID:23924796

  13. Nanoparticle mediated drug delivery of rolipram to tyrosine kinase B positive cells in the inner ear with targeting peptides and agonistic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Glueckert, Rudolf; Pritz, Christian O.; Roy, Soumen; Dudas, Jozsef; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Systemic pharmacotherapies have limitation due to blood-labyrinth barrier, so local delivery via the round window membrane opens a path for effective treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticle (NP)-mediated cell specific drug delivery may enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. Different NPs with ligands to target TrkB receptor were tested. Distribution, uptake mechanisms, trafficking, and bioefficacy of drug release of rolipram loaded NPs were evaluated. Methods: We tested lipid based nanocapsules (LNCs), Quantum Dot, silica NPs with surface modification by peptides mimicking TrkB or TrkB activating antibodies. Bioefficacy of drug release was tested with rolipram loaded LNCs to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. We established different cell culture models with SH-SY-5Y and inner ear derived cell lines and used neonatal and adult mouse explants. Uptake and trafficking was evaluated with FACS and confocal as well as transmission electron microscopy. Results: Plain NPs show some selectivity in uptake related to the in vitro system properties, carrier material, and NP size. Some peptide ligands provide enhanced targeted uptake to neuronal cells but failed to show this in cell cultures. Agonistic antibodies linked to silica NPs showed TrkB activation and enhanced binding to inner ear derived cells. Rolipram loaded LNCs proved as effective carriers to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Discussion: Most NPs with targeting ligands showed limited effects to enhance uptake. NP aggregation and unspecific binding may change uptake mechanisms and impair endocytosis by an overload of NPs. This may affect survival signaling. NPs with antibodies activate survival signaling and show effective binding to TrkB positive cells but needs further optimization for specific internalization. Bioefficiacy of rolipram release confirms LNCs as encouraging vectors for drug delivery of lipophilic agents to the inner ear with ideal release characteristics independent of endocytosis

  14. Passive Immunization with Anti-Glucosaminidase Monoclonal Antibodies Protects Mice from Implant-Associated Osteomyelitis by Mediating Opsonophagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus Megaclusters

    PubMed Central

    Varrone, John J.; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Bello-Irizarry, Sheila N.; Nishitani, Kohei; Mack, Sarah; Hunter, Joshua G.; Kates, Stephen L.; Daiss, John L.; Schwarz, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Towards development of a methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) vaccine we evaluated a neutralizing anti-glucosaminidase (Gmd) monoclonal antibody (1C11) in a murine model of implant-associated osteomyelitis, and compared its effects on LAC USA300 MRSA versus placebo (alpha-T2m) and a Gmd-deficient isogenic strain (delta-Gmd). 1C11 significantly reduced infection severity, as determined by bioluminescent imaging of bacteria, micro-CT assessment of osteolysis and histomorphometry of abscess numbers (p<0.05). Histology also revealed infiltrating macrophages, and the complete lack of staphylococcal abscess communities (SAC), in marrow abscesses of 1C11 treated mice. In vitro, 1C11 had no direct effects on proliferation, but electron microscopy demonstrated that 1C11 treatment phenocopies delta-Gmd defects in binary fission. Moreover, addition of 1C11 to MRSA cultures induced the formation of large bacterial aggregates (megaclusters) that sedimented out of solution, which was not observed in delta-Gmd cultures or 1C11 treated cultures of a protein A-deficient strain (delta-Spa), suggesting that the combined effects of Gmd inhibition and antibody-mediated agglutination are required. Finally, we demonstrated that macrophage opsonophagocytosis of MRSA and megaclusters is significantly increased by 1C11 (p<0.01). Collectively, these results suggest that the primary mechanism of anti-Gmd humoral immunity against MRSA osteomyelitis is macrophage invasion of SAC and opsonophagocytosis of megaclusters. PMID:24992290

  15. Refinement of the criteria for ultrastructural peritubular capillary basement membrane multilayering in the diagnosis of chronic active/acute antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Go, Heounjeong; Shin, Sung; Kim, Young Hoon; Han, Duck Jong; Cho, Yong Mee

    2017-04-01

    Chronic active/acute antibody-mediated rejection (cABMR) is the main cause of late renal allograft loss. Severe peritubular capillary basement membrane multilayering (PTCML) assessed on electron microscopy is one diagnostic feature of cABMR according to the Banff 2013 classification. We aimed to refine the PTCML criteria for an earlier diagnosis of cABMR. We retrospectively investigated ultrastructural features of 159 consecutive renal allografts and 44 nonallografts. The presence of serum donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy of allografts was also examined. Forty-three patients (27.0%) fulfilled the criteria of cABMR, regardless of PTCML, and comprised the cABMR group. Forty-one patients (25.8%) did not exhibit cABMR features and comprised the non-cABMR allograft control group. In addition, 15 zero-day wedge resections and 29 native kidney biopsies comprised the nonallograft control group. When the diagnostic accuracies of various PTCML features were assessed using the cABMR and non-cABMR allograft control groups, ≥4 PTCML, either circumferential or partial, in ≥2 peritubular capillaries of the three most affected capillaries exhibited the highest AUC value (0.885), greater than the Banff 2013 classification (0.640). None of the nonallograft control groups exhibited PTCML features. We suggest that ≥4 PTCML in ≥2 peritubular capillaries of the three most affected cortical capillaries represents the proper cutoff for cABMR.

  16. VEGFR2 targeted antibody fused with MICA stimulates NKG2D mediated immunosurveillance and exhibits potent anti-tumor activity against breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youfu; Ren, Xueyan; Wang, Tong; Chen, Zhiguo; Tang, Mingying; Sun, Fumou; Li, Zhaoting; Wang, Min; Zhang, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Binding of MHC class I-related chain molecules A and B (MICA/B) to the natural killer (NK) cell receptor NK group 2, member D (NKG2D) is thought critical for activating NK-mediated immunosurveillance. Angiogenesis is important for tumor growth and interfering with angiogenesis using the fully human IgG1 anti-VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2) antibody (mAb04) can be effective in treating malignancy. In an effort to make mAb04 more effective we have generated a novel antibody fusion protein (mAb04-MICA) consisting of mAb04 and MICA. We found that mAb04-MICA maintained the anti-angiogenic and antineoplastic activities of mAb04, and also enhanced immunosurveillance activated by the NKG2D pathway. Moreover, in human breast tumor-bearing nude mice, mAb04-MICA demonstrated superior anti-tumor efficacy compared to combination therapy of mAb04 + Docetaxel or Avastin + Docetaxel, highlighting the immunostimulatory effect of MICA. In conclusion, mAb04-MICA provided new inspiration for anti-tumor treatment and had prospects for clinical application. PMID:26909862

  17. CD147 monoclonal antibody mediated by chitosan nanoparticles loaded with α-hederin enhances antineoplastic activity and cellular uptake in liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chun-ge; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Zhi-qiang; Chen, Wei-liang; Yang, Shu-di; Li, Ji-zhao; Zhu, Wen-jing; Zhou, Xiao-feng; You, Ben-gang; Zhang, Xue-nong

    2015-01-01

    An antibody that specifically interacts with an antigen could be applied to an active targeting delivery system. In this study, CD147 antibody was coupled with α-hed chitosan nanoparticles (α-Hed-CS-NPs). α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs were round and spherical in shape, with an average particle size of 148.23 ± 1.75 nm. The half-maximum inhibiting concentration (IC50) of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs in human liver cancer cell lines HepG2 and SMMC-7721 was lower than that of free α-Hed and α-Hed-CS-NPs. α-Hed-induced cell death was mainly triggered by apoptosis. The increase in intracellular accumulation of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs was also related to CD147-mediated internalization through the Caveolae-dependent pathway and lysosomal escape. The higher targeting antitumor efficacy of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs than that α-Hed-CS-NPs was attributed to its stronger fluorescence intensity in the tumor site in nude mice. PMID:26639052

  18. CD147 monoclonal antibody mediated by chitosan nanoparticles loaded with α-hederin enhances antineoplastic activity and cellular uptake in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chun-ge; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Zhi-qiang; Chen, Wei-liang; Yang, Shu-di; Li, Ji-zhao; Zhu, Wen-jing; Zhou, Xiao-feng; You, Ben-gang; Zhang, Xue-nong

    2015-12-07

    An antibody that specifically interacts with an antigen could be applied to an active targeting delivery system. In this study, CD147 antibody was coupled with α-hed chitosan nanoparticles (α-Hed-CS-NPs). α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs were round and spherical in shape, with an average particle size of 148.23 ± 1.75 nm. The half-maximum inhibiting concentration (IC50) of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs in human liver cancer cell lines HepG2 and SMMC-7721 was lower than that of free α-Hed and α-Hed-CS-NPs. α-Hed-induced cell death was mainly triggered by apoptosis. The increase in intracellular accumulation of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs was also related to CD147-mediated internalization through the Caveolae-dependent pathway and lysosomal escape. The higher targeting antitumor efficacy of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs than that α-Hed-CS-NPs was attributed to its stronger fluorescence intensity in the tumor site in nude mice.

  19. The Fc-region of a new class of intact bispecific antibody mediates activation of accessory cells and NK cells and induces direct phagocytosis of tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler, R; Mysliwietz, J; Csánady, M; Walz, A; Ziegler, I; Schmitt, B; Wollenberg, B; Lindhofer, H

    2000-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAb) are considered as promising tools for the elimination of disseminated tumour cells in a minimal residual disease situation. The bsAb-mediated recruitment of an immune effector cell in close vicinity of a tumour cell is thought to induce an antitumoural immune response. However, classical bispecific molecules activate only a single class of immune effector cell that may not yield optimal immune responses. We therefore constructed an intact bispecific antibody, BiUII (anti-CD3 × anti-EpCAM), that not only recognizes tumour cells and T lymphocytes with its two binding arms, but also binds and activates Fcγ-receptor positive accessory cells through its Fc-region. We have demonstrated recently that activated accessory cells contribute to the bsAb-induced antitumoural activity. We now analyse this stimulation in more detail and demonstrate here the BiUll-induced upregulation of activation markers like CD83 and CD95 on accessory cells and the induction of neopterin and biopterin synthesis. Experiments with pure cell subpopulations revealed binding of BiUll to CD64+ accessory cells and CD16+ NK cells, but not to CD32+ B lymphocytes. We provide further evidence for the importance of the Fc-region in that this bispecific molecule stimulates Fcγ-R-positive accessory cells to eliminate tumour cells in vitro by direct phagocytosis. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901380

  20. STAT3-mediated IGF-2 secretion in the tumour microenvironment elicits innate resistance to anti-IGF-1R antibody

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Sun; Kang, Ju-Hee; Boo, Hye-Jin; Hwang, Su-Jung; Hong, Sungyoul; Lee, Su-Chan; Park, Young-Jun; Chung, Tae-Moon; Youn, Hyewon; Mi Lee, Seung; Jae Kim, Byoung; Chung, June-Key; Chung, Yeonseok; William, William N.; Kee Shin, Young; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Oh, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major impediment in medical oncology. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of the tumour microenvironment (TME) to innate resistance, to molecularly targeted therapies. In this study, we investigate the role of TME in resistance to cixutumumab, an anti-IGF-1R monoclonal antibody that has shown limited clinical efficacy. We show that treatment with cixutumumab accelerates tumour infiltration of stromal cells and metastatic tumour growth, and decreases overall survival of mice. Cixutumumab treatment stimulates STAT3-dependent transcriptional upregulation of IGF-2 in cancer cells and recruitment of macrophages and fibroblasts via paracrine IGF-2/IGF-2R activation, resulting in the stroma-derived CXCL8 production, and thus angiogenic and metastatic environment. Silencing IGF-2 or STAT3 expression in cancer cells or IGF-2R or CXCL8 expression in stromal cells significantly inhibits the cancer–stroma communication and vascular endothelial cells' angiogenic activities. These findings suggest that blocking the STAT3/IGF-2/IGF-2R intercellular signalling loop may overcome the adverse consequences of anti-IGF-1R monoclonal antibody-based therapies. PMID:26465273

  1. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket.

    PubMed

    Debler, Erik W; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A

    2009-11-03

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp(H35) and Glu(L34) to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu(L34) to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10(9)-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  2. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, Erik W.; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-12-01

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp{sup H35} and Glu{sup L34} to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu{sup L34} to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10{sup 9}-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  3. Silica vesicles as nanocarriers and adjuvants for generating both antibody and T-cell mediated immune resposes to Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Mody, Karishma T; Mahony, Donna; Zhang, Jun; Cavallaro, Antonino S; Zhang, Bing; Popat, Amirali; Mahony, Timothy J; Yu, Chengzhong; Mitter, Neena

    2014-12-01

    Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) is widely distributed in cattle industries and causes significant economic losses worldwide annually. A limiting factor in the development of subunit vaccines for BVDV is the need to elicit both antibody and T-cell-mediated immunity as well as addressing the toxicity of adjuvants. In this study, we have prepared novel silica vesicles (SV) as the new generation antigen carriers and adjuvants. With small particle size of 50 nm, thin wall (~6 nm), large cavity (~40 nm) and large entrance size (5.9 nm for SV-100 and 16 nm for SV-140), the SV showed high loading capacity (∼ 250 μg/mg) and controlled release of codon-optimised E2 (oE2) protein, a major immunogenic determinant of BVDV. The in vivo functionality of the system was validated in mice immunisation trials comparing oE2 plus Quil A (50 μg of oE2 plus 10 μg of Quil A, a conventional adjuvant) to the oE2/SV-140 (50 μg of oE2 adsorbed to 250 μg of SV-140) or oE2/SV-140 together with 10 μg of Quil A. Compared to the oE2 plus Quil A, which generated BVDV specific antibody responses at a titre of 10(4), the oE2/SV-140 group induced a 10 times higher antibody response. In addition, the cell-mediated response, which is essential to recognise and eliminate the invading pathogens, was also found to be higher [1954-2628 spot forming units (SFU)/million cells] in mice immunised with oE2/SV-140 in comparison to oE2 plus Quil A (512-1369 SFU/million cells). Our study has demonstrated that SV can be used as the next-generation nanocarriers and adjuvants for enhanced veterinary vaccine delivery.

  4. Human neutrophils mediate trogocytosis rather than phagocytosis of CLL B-cells opsonized with anti-CD20 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Cattaneo, Irene; Klein, Christian; Introna, Martino; Figliuzzi, Marina; Golay, Josée

    2017-03-13

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) have previously been reported to mediate phagocytosis of anti-CD20 opsonized B-cells from CLL patients. However recent data have suggested that PMN, like macrophages, can also mediate trogocytosis. We have performed experiments to more precisely investigate this point and discriminate between trogocytosis and phagocytosis. In live cell time-lapse microscopy experiments, we could not detect any significant phagocytosis by purified PMN of anti-CD20-opsonized CLL B-cells, but only the repeated close contact between effectors and targets, suggesting trogocytosis. Similarly, in flow cytometry assays using CLL B-cell targets labeled with the membrane dye PKH67 and opsonized with rituximab or obinutuzumab, we could show that a mean of 50% and 75% of PMN had taken a fraction of the dye from CLL B-cells at 3 and 20 hours, respectively, with no significant decrease in absolute live or total CLL B-cell numbers, confirming that trogocytosis takes place, rather than phagocytosis. Trogocytosis was accompanied by loss of membrane CD20 from CLL B-cells, which was evident with rituximab but not obinutuzumab. We conclude that PMN mediate mostly trogocytosis rather than phagocytosis of anti-CD20-opsonized CLL B-cells and discuss the implications of this finding in CLL patients treated with rituximab or obinutuzumab in vivo.

  5. Immunotherapeutic effect of the lactobacillus vaccine, Solco Trichovac, in trichomoniasis is not mediated by antibodies cross reacting with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Gombosová, A; Demes, P; Valent, M

    1986-01-01

    According to the producers of the lactobacillus vaccine, Solco Trichovac, its therapeutic effect in trichomoniasis is achieved by antibodies that are induced by the vaccination and cross react with Trichomonas vaginalis. Common antigens of Lactobacillus acidophilus from Solco Trichovac vaccine and T vaginalis were therefore sought by three different seroreactions. Immune serum against Lacidophilus obtained by vaccinating two healthy human volunteers and two rabbits with the original Solco Trichovac vaccine, as well as hyperimmune rabbit antiserum to T vaginalis, were tested with each of the two micro-organisms. No evidence of antigenic similarity between L acidophilus and T vaginalis was obtained with either serum in any of the three serological tests. A non-specific immunostimulatory effect therefore seems to be a more probable explanation of the mode of action of Solco Trichovac vaccine. PMID:3522408

  6. Detection of Neutralizing Antibodies against Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) by Inhibition of Gene Transfer Mediated by HPV Pseudovirions

    PubMed Central

    Bousarghin, Latifa; Combita-Rojas, Alba-Lucia; Touzé, Antoine; Mehdaoui, Slimane El; Sizaret, Pierre-Yves; Bravo, Maria-Mercedes; Coursaget, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a human papillomavirus (HPV) neutralization assay using HPV pseudovirions generated in vitro. For this purpose, gene transfer efficiency of HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) was improved by using direct interaction between a reporter plasmid and the VLPs. Electron microscopic observation of the interaction between DNA molecules and VLPs revealed that VLPs always interact with a single DNA molecule and that VLPs bind to the end of linearized DNA molecules. An 100-fold improvement in the gene transfer was obtained by simple interaction between a linearized DNA molecule and VLPs. Moreover, direct interaction methods offer the possibility of transferring plasmids a size higher than that of the papillomavirus genome. The approach that we developed to generate HPV-16 and HPV-31 pseudovirions proved to be suitable for testing neutralizing antibodies in human sera both after immunization and after natural infection. PMID:11880418

  7. IgE Antibodies, FcεRIαand IgE-mediated Local Anaphylaxis Can Limit Snake Venom Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gaudenzio, Nicolas; Reber, Laurent Lionel; Sibilano, Riccardo; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 cytokine-related (i.e., type 2) immune responses associated with development of antigen-specific Immunoglobulin E antibodies (IgE) can contribute to pathology in allergic diseases and to fatal anaphylaxis. However, recent findings in mice indicate that IgE also can enhance defense against honeybee venom. Objective We tested whether IgE antibodies, IgE-dependent effector mechanisms, and a local anaphylactic reaction to an unrelated antigen can enhance defense against Russell's viper venom (RVV) and determined whether such responses can be influenced by immunization protocol or mouse strain. Methods We compared the resistance of RVV-immunized wild-type, IgE-deficient, and Fcer1a-deficient mice following injection of a potentially lethal dose of RVV. Results A single prior exposure to RVV enhanced the ability of wild-type mice, but not mice lacking IgE or functional FcεRI, to survive challenge with a potentially lethal amount of RVV. Moreover, IgE-dependent local passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in response to challenge with an antigen not naturally present in RVV significantly enhanced resistance to the venom. Finally, we observed different effects on resistance to RVV or honeybee venoms in BALB/c versus C57BL/6 mice which had received a second exposure to that venom prior to challenge with a high dose of that venom. Conclusion These observations illustrate the potential benefit of IgE-dependent effector mechanisms in acquired host defense against venoms. The extent to which type 2 immune responses against venoms can decrease pathology associated with envenomation seems to be influenced by the type of venom, the frequency of venom exposure, and the genetic background of the host. PMID:26410782

  8. Assessment of a passive immunity mouse model to quantitatively analyze the impact of neutralizing antibodies on adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lan; Tu, Lingli; Gao, Guangping; Sun, Xun; Duan, Jiachuan; Lu, You

    2013-01-31

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are common infective agents of primates. As such, healthy primates carry a large pool of AAV-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), which inhibit AAV-mediated gene transfer therapeutic strategies. Thus, a clinical method to screen patient candidates for AAV-specific NAbs prior to treatment, especially with the frequently used AAV8 capsid component, will facilitate individualized treatment design and enhance therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and sensitivity of a passive immunity mouse model to quantitatively assess anti-AAV8 NAb titers, as compared to an in vitro immunoassay. The passive transfer model was established in C57BL/6 mice by tail vein injection of pre-defined sera from 23 male rhesus monkeys. The mice were then administered low dose (3e10 GC/mouse) self-complementary (sc) AAV8. The in vitro NAb assay indicated that 69.57% of the rhesus donors had pre-existing anti-AAV8 NAb. The in vivo NAb assay, however, was better able to detect low NAb titer (≤ 1:5), which can mediate neutralization in vivo. Indeed, 17 rhesus donors (74.0%) had pre-existing anti-AAV8 neutralization by in vivo NAb assay. Our findings indicated that the in vivo NAb assay is superior to the in vitro assay for detecting low NAb titers.

  9. Combination of monoclonal antibodies with DST inhibits accelerated rejection mediated by memory T cells to induce long-lived heart allograft acceptance in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Chen, Jibing; Dai, Helong; Peng, Yuanzheng; Wang, Feng; Xia, Junjie; Thorlacius, Henrik; Zhu, Qi; Qi, Zhongquan

    2011-08-30

    Donor-reactive memory T cells mediated accelerated rejection is known as a barrier to the survival of transplanted organs. We investigated the combination of different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and donor-specific transfusion (DST) in memory T cells-based adoptive mice model. In the presence of donor-reactive memory T cells, the mean survival time (MST) of grafts in the anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST group was 49.8d. Adding anti-CD44/CD70 mAbs to anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST treatment. The MST was more than 100 d (MST>100 d). Compared with anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST group, anti-CD40L/LFA-1/CD44/CD70/DST group notably reduced the expansion of memory T cells, enhanced the proportion of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and suppressed donor-specific responses. Our data suggest that anti-CD40L/LFA-1/CD44/CD70mAbs and DST can synergistically inhibit accelerated rejection mediated by memory T cells to induce long-lived heart allograft acceptance in mice.

  10. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody-mediated neurological disease: results of a UK-based surveillance study in children

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Sukhvir; Hacohen, Yael; Jacobson, Leslie; Agrawal, Shakti; Gupta, Rajat; Philip, Sunny; Smith, Martin; Lim, Ming; Wassmer, Evangeline; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Objective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody (NMDAR-Ab) encephalitis is a well-recognised clinico-immunological syndrome that presents with neuropsychiatric symptoms cognitive decline, movement disorder and seizures. This study reports the clinical features, management and neurological outcomes of paediatric NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological disease in the UK. Design A prospective surveillance study. Children with NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological diseases were voluntarily reported to the British Neurological Surveillance Unit (BPNSU) from November 2010 to December 2011. Initial and follow-up questionnaires were sent out to physicians. Results Thirty-one children fulfilled the criteria for the study. Eight presented during the study period giving an incidence of 0.85 per million children per year (95% CI 0.64 to 1.06); 23 cases were historical. Behavioural change and neuropsychiatric features were present in 90% of patients, and seizures and movement disorders both in 67%. Typical NMDAR-Ab encephalitis was reported in 24 children and partial phenotype without encephalopathy in seven, including predominantly psychiatric (four) and movement disorder (three). All patients received steroids, 22 (71%) received intravenous immunoglobulin, 9 (29%) received plasma exchange,and 10 (32%) received second-line immunotherapy. Of the 23 patients who were diagnosed early, 18 (78%) made a full recovery compared with only 1 of 8 (13%) of the late diagnosed patients (p=0.002, Fisher's exact test). Seven patients relapsed, with four needing additional second-line immunotherapy. Conclusions Paediatric NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological disease appears to be similar to adult NMDAR-Ab encephalitis, but some presented with a partial phenotype. Early treatment was associated with a quick and often full recovery. PMID:25637141

  11. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer of helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors to rat neocortical neurons that contain either NMDA receptor 2B or 2A subunits.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haiyan; Zhang, Guo-rong; Geller, Alfred I

    2011-09-30

    Because of the numerous types of neurons in the brain, and particularly the forebrain, neuron type-specific expression will benefit many potential applications of direct gene transfer. The two most promising approaches for achieving neuron type-specific expression are targeted gene transfer to a specific type of neuron and using a neuron type-specific promoter. We previously developed antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors by modifying glycoprotein C (gC) to replace the heparin binding domain, which mediates the initial binding of HSV-1 particles to many cell types, with the Staphylococcus A protein ZZ domain, which binds immunoglobulin (Ig) G. We showed that a chimeric gC-ZZ protein is incorporated into vector particles and binds IgG. As a proof-of-principle for antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer, we isolated complexes of these vector particles and an anti-NMDA NR1 subunit antibody, and demonstrated targeted gene transfer to neocortical cells that contain NR1 subunits. However, because most forebrain neurons contain NR1, we obtained only a modest increase in the specificity of gene transfer, and this targeting specificity is of limited utility for physiological experiments. Here, we report efficient antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer to NMDA NR2B- or NR2A-containing cells in rat postrhinal cortex, and a neuron-specific promoter further restricted recombinant expression to neurons. Of note, because NR2A-containing neurons are relatively rare, these results show that antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer with HSV-1 vectors containing neuron type-specific promoters can restrict recombinant expression to specific types of forebrain neurons of physiological significance.

  12. Targeted antibody-mediated depletion of murine CD19 CAR T cells permanently reverses B cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Paszkiewicz, Paulina J; Fräßle, Simon P; Srivastava, Shivani; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Hudecek, Michael; Drexler, Ingo; Sadelain, Michel; Liu, Lingfeng; Jensen, Michael C; Riddell, Stanley R; Busch, Dirk H

    2016-11-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells that have been genetically modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is effective for treating human B cell malignancies. However, the persistence of functional CD19 CAR T cells causes sustained depletion of endogenous CD19+ B cells and hypogammaglobulinemia. Thus, there is a need for a mechanism to ablate transferred T cells after tumor eradication is complete to allow recovery of normal B cells. Previously, we developed a truncated version of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRt) that is coexpressed with the CAR on the T cell surface. Here, we show that targeting EGFRt with the IgG1 monoclonal antibody cetuximab eliminates CD19 CAR T cells both early and late after adoptive transfer in mice, resulting in complete and permanent recovery of normal functional B cells, without tumor relapse. EGFRt can be incorporated into many clinical applications to regulate the survival of gene-engineered cells. These results support the concept that EGFRt represents a promising approach to improve safety of cell-based therapies.

  13. A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase-10 (ADAM-10) Mediates DN30 Antibody-induced Shedding of the Met Surface Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Schelter, Florian; Kobuch, Julia; Moss, Marcia L.; Becherer, J. David; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Boccaccio, Carla; Krüger, Achim

    2010-01-01

    Met, the tyrosine kinase receptor for the hepatocyte growth factor is a prominent regulator of cancer cell invasiveness and has emerged as a promising therapeutic target. Binding of the anti-Met monoclonal antibody DN30 to its epitope induces the proteolytic cleavage of Met, thereby impairing the invasive growth of tumors. The molecular mechanism controlling this therapeutic shedding process has so far been unknown. Here, we report that A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase (ADAM)-10, but not ADAM-17, is required for DN30-induced Met shedding. Knockdown of ADAM-10 in different tumor cell lines or abrogation of its proteolytic activity by natural or synthetic inhibitors abolished Met down-regulation on the cell surface as well as reduction of Met activation. Moreover, hepatocyte growth factor-induced tumor cell migration and invasion were impaired upon ADAM-10 knockdown. Thus, the therapeutic effect of DN30 involves ADAM-10-dependent Met shedding, linking for the first time a specific metalloprotease to target therapy against a receptor tyrosine kinase. PMID:20554517

  14. Targeted antibody-mediated depletion of murine CD19 CAR T cells permanently reverses B cell aplasia

    PubMed Central

    Paszkiewicz, Paulina J.; Fräßle, Simon P.; Srivastava, Shivani; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Hudecek, Michael; Sadelain, Michel; Liu, Lingfeng; Jensen, Michael C.; Riddell, Stanley R.; Busch, Dirk H.

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells that have been genetically modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is effective for treating human B cell malignancies. However, the persistence of functional CD19 CAR T cells causes sustained depletion of endogenous CD19+ B cells and hypogammaglobulinemia. Thus, there is a need for a mechanism to ablate transferred T cells after tumor eradication is complete to allow recovery of normal B cells. Previously, we developed a truncated version of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRt) that is coexpressed with the CAR on the T cell surface. Here, we show that targeting EGFRt with the IgG1 monoclonal antibody cetuximab eliminates CD19 CAR T cells both early and late after adoptive transfer in mice, resulting in complete and permanent recovery of normal functional B cells, without tumor relapse. EGFRt can be incorporated into many clinical applications to regulate the survival of gene-engineered cells. These results support the concept that EGFRt represents a promising approach to improve safety of cell-based therapies. PMID:27760047

  15. Neutralization Takes Precedence Over IgG or IgA Isotype-related Functions in Mucosal HIV-1 Antibody-mediated Protection.

    PubMed

    Astronomo, Rena D; Santra, Sampa; Ballweber-Fleming, Lamar; Westerberg, Katharine G; Mach, Linh; Hensley-McBain, Tiffany; Sutherland, Laura; Mildenberg, Benjamin; Morton, Georgeanna; Yates, Nicole L; Mize, Gregory J; Pollara, Justin; Hladik, Florian; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Denny, Thomas N; Warrier, Ranjit; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayapan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Ferrari, Guido; Shaw, George M; Xia, Shi-Mao; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Haynes, Barton F; McElrath, Juliana M

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 infection occurs primarily through mucosal transmission. Application of biologically relevant mucosal models can advance understanding of the functional properties of antibodies that mediate HIV protection, thereby guiding antibody-based vaccine development. Here, we employed a human ex vivo vaginal HIV-1 infection model and a rhesus macaque in vivo intrarectal SHIV challenge model to probe the protective capacity of monoclonal broadly-neutralizing (bnAb) and non-neutralizing Abs (nnAbs) that were functionally modified by isotype switching. For human vaginal explants, we developed a replication-competent, secreted NanoLuc reporter virus system and showed that CD4 binding site bnAbs b12 IgG1 and CH31 IgG1 and IgA2 isoforms potently blocked HIV-1JR-CSF and HIV-1Bal26 infection. However, IgG1 and IgA nnAbs, either alone or together, did not inhibit infection despite the presence of FcR-expressing effector cells in the tissue. In macaques, the CH31 IgG1 and IgA2 isoforms infused before high-dose SHIV challenge were completely to partially protective, respectively, while nnAbs (CH54 IgG1 and CH38 mIgA2) were non-protective. Importantly, in both mucosal models IgG1 isotype bnAbs were more protective than the IgA2 isotypes, attributable in part to greater neutralization activity of the IgG1 variants. These findings underscore the importance of potent bnAb induction as a primary goal of HIV-1 vaccine development.

  16. C1q binding is not an independent risk factor for kidney allograft loss after an acute antibody-mediated rejection episode: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Moktefi, Anissa; Parisot, Juliette; Desvaux, Dominique; Canoui-Poitrine, Florence; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Peltier, Julie; Audard, Vincent; Kofman, Tomek; Suberbielle, Caroline; Lang, Philippe; Rondeau, Eric; Grimbert, Philippe; Matignon, Marie

    2017-03-01

    After kidney transplantation, C4d is an incomplete marker of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and C1q-binding donor-specific antibodies (DSA) have been associated with allograft survival. However, the impact on allograft survival of C1q+ DSA after clinical AMR has not been studied yet. We analysed retrospectively in clinical AMR C4d staining and C1q-binding impact on allograft survival. We compared clinical, histological and serological features of C4d- and C4d+ AMR, C1q+ and C1q- DSA AMR and analysed C4d and C1q-binding impact on allograft survival. Among 500 for-cause kidney allograft biopsies, 48 fulfilled AMR criteria. C4d+ AMR [N = 18 (37.5%)] have significantly higher number class I DSA (P = 0.02), higher microvascular score (P = 0.02) and more transplant glomerulopathy (P = 0.04). C1q+ AMR [N = 20 (44%)] presented with significantly more class I and class II DSA (P = 0.005 and 0.04) and C4d+ staining (P = 0.01). Graft losses were significantly higher in the C4d+ group (P = 0.04) but similar in C1q groups. C4d+ but not C1q+ binding was an independent risk factor for graft loss [HR = 2.65; (1.11-6.34); P = 0.028]. In our cohort of clinical AMR, C4d+ staining but not C1q+ binding is an independent risk factor for graft loss. Allograft loss and patient survival were similar in C1q+ and C1q- AMR.

  17. Antibodies in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs from one individual to another can incite the production of antibodies specific for foreign antigens, especially major histocompatibility antigens, in the graft. Antibodies specific for a graft provide an index of immunity and a potential trigger for injury and rejection. However, the index of immunity can sometimes miss antibody-mediated rejection and besides causing injury the antibodies against a graft can also protect a graft from injury by blocking immune recognition, called enhancement, regulating activation of complement, and inducing changes in the graft that resist damage. Reviewed here are potential limitations in the use of antibodies as an index of immunity and the ways antibodies cause and/or prevent injury. PMID:20807473

  18. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-12-16

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64(+) monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients' inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64(+) cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64(+) cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64(+) cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions.

  19. Immune-mediated liver injury of the cancer therapeutic antibody catumaxomab targeting EpCAM, CD3 and Fcγ receptors

    PubMed Central

    Borlak, Jürgen; Länger, Florian; Spanel, Reinhard; Schöndorfer, Georg; Dittrich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The immunotherapeutic catumaxomab targets EpCAM positive cancers and is approved for the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis. To assess the safety of intravenous applications a phase 1 clinical trial was initiated. Treatment of EpCAM positive tumor patients with catumaxomab caused dose dependent hepatitis as evidenced by significant elevations in serum alanine- and aspartate aminotransferases, bilirubin, γGT and induction of the acute phase C-reactive protein (CRP) and the cytokines IL6 and IL8. The first patient receiving 10μg catumaxomab experienced fatal acute liver failure which led to the termination of the study. Immmunopathology revealed catumaxomab to bind via its Fc-fragment to FcγR-positive Kupffer cells to stimulate CRP, chemokine and cytokine release. The observed CD3+T-cell margination at activated hepatic macrophages exacerbated T-cell mediated cytotoxicity. Strikingly, the combined Kupffer/T-cell responses against liver cells did not require hepatocytes to be EpCAM-positive. Catumaxomab's off-target activity involved T-cell mediated lysis of the granzyme B cell death pathway and the molecular interaction of hepatic sinusoidal macrophages with T-cells induced cytolytic hepatitis. Although the bile ducts were surrounded by densely packed lymphocytes these rarely infiltrated the ducts to suggest an intrahepatic cholestasis as the cause of hyperbilirubinaemia. Lastly, evidence for the programming of memory T-cells was observed with one patient that succumbed to his cancer six weeks after the last catumaxomab infusion. In conclusion, our study exemplifies off-target hepatotoxicity with molecularly targeted therapy and highlights the complexities in the clinical development of immunotherapeutic antibodies. PMID:27058902

  20. IgE and IgGa antibody-mediated release of histamine from rat peritoneal cells. II. Interaction of IgGa and IgE at the targe cell.

    PubMed

    Bach, M K; Block, K J; Austen, K F

    1971-04-01

    IgGa, in contrast to IgE, antibodies mediated the antigen-induced release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells without a requirement for a latent period and without the capacity to bind firmly to the target cell. Nonetheless, IgGa anti-DNP antibody interfered with the capacity of rat anti-N. brasiliensis antiserum rich in IgE antibodies to prepare the target cells for histamine release by worm antigen. Further, interaction of IgE antibody-prepared cells with IgGa anti-DNP antibody and DNP-BSA at 0 degrees C so as to achieve sterile activation, or at 30 degrees C to permit histamine release, inactivated such cells as determined by the subsequent failure to release histamine upon challenge with worm antigen. Thus, although IgE and IgGa antibodies are immunochemically distinct homologous immunoglobulins and exhibit different functional characteristics, their interaction at the target cell involves a common receptor and at least one common point in the pathway to the release of pharmacologic agents from the cell.

  1. Early acute antibody-mediated rejection of a negative flow crossmatch 3rd kidney transplant with exclusive disparity at HLA-DP.

    PubMed

    Mierzejewska, Beata; Schroder, Paul M; Baum, Caitlin E; Blair, Annette; Smith, Connie; Duquesnoy, Rene J; Marrari, Marilyn; Gohara, Amira; Malhotra, Deepak; Kaw, Dinkar; Liwski, Robert; Rees, Michael A; Stepkowski, Stanislaw

    2014-08-01

    Donor-specific alloantibodies (DSA) to HLA-DP may cause antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), especially in re-transplants. We describe the immunization history of a patient who received 3 kidney transplants; the 3rd kidney was completely matched except at DPA1 and DPB1. Prior to the 3rd transplant, single antigen bead analysis (SAB) showed DSA reactivity against DPA1 shared by the 1st and 3rd donors, but B and T flow crossmatch (FXM) results were negative. Within 11 days the 3rd transplant underwent acute C4d+ AMR which coincided with the presence of complement (C1q)-binding IgG1 DSA against donor DPA1 and DPB1. Using HLAMatchmaker and SAB, we provide evidence that eplet (epitope) spreading on DPA1 and eplet sharing on differing DPB1 alleles of the 1st and 3rd transplants was associated with AMR. Since weak DSA to DPA1/DPB1 may induce acute AMR with negative FXM, donor DPA1/DPB1 high resolution typing should be considered in sensitized patients with DP-directed DSA.

  2. Plasma-Derived C1 Esterase Inhibitor for Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection Following Kidney Transplantation: Results of a Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, R A; Orandi, B J; Racusen, L; Jackson, A M; Garonzik-Wang, J M; Shah, T; Woodle, E S; Sommerer, C; Fitts, D; Rockich, K; Zhang, P; Uknis, M E

    2016-05-16

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is typically treated with plasmapheresis (PP) and intravenous immunoglobulin (standard of care; SOC); however, there is an unmet need for more effective therapy. We report a phase 2b, multicenter double-blind randomized placebo-controlled pilot study to evaluate the use of human plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor (C1 INH) as add-on therapy to SOC for AMR. Eighteen patients received 20 000 units of C1 INH or placebo (C1 INH n = 9, placebo n = 9) in divided doses every other day for 2 weeks. No discontinuations, graft losses, deaths, or study drug-related serious adverse events occurred. While the study's primary end point, a difference between groups in day 20 pathology or graft survival, was not achieved, the C1 INH group demonstrated a trend toward sustained improvement in renal function. Six-month biopsies performed in 14 subjects (C1 INH = 7, placebo = 7) showed no transplant glomerulopathy (TG) (PTC+cg≥1b) in the C1 INH group, whereas 3 of 7 placebo subjects had TG. Endogenous C1 INH measured before and after PP demonstrated decreased functional C1 INH serum concentration by 43.3% (p < 0.05) for both cohorts (C1 INH and placebo) associated with PP, although exogenous C1 INH-treated patients achieved supraphysiological levels throughout. This new finding suggests that C1 INH replacement may be useful in the treatment of AMR.

  3. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  4. Transpo-mAb display: Transposition-mediated B cell display and functional screening of full-length IgG antibody libraries

    PubMed Central

    Waldmeier, Lorenz; Hellmann, Ina; Gutknecht, Chantal K.; Wolter, Fabian I.; Cook, Skylar C.; Reddy, Sai T.; Grawunder, Ulf; Beerli, Roger R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vitro antibody display and screening technologies geared toward the discovery and engineering of clinically applicable antibodies have evolved from screening artificial antibody formats, powered by microbial display technologies, to screening of natural, full-IgG molecules expressed in mammalian cells to readily yield lead antibodies with favorable properties in production and clinical applications. Here, we report the development and characterization of a novel, next-generation mammalian cell-based antibody display and screening platform called Transpo-mAb Display, offering straightforward and efficient generation of cellular libraries by using non-viral transposition technology to obtain stable antibody expression. Because Transpo-mAb Display uses DNA-transposable vectors with substantial cargo capacity, genomic antibody heavy chain expression constructs can be utilized that undergo the natural switch from membrane bound to secreted antibody expression in B cells by way of alternative splicing of Ig-heavy chain transcripts from the same genomic expression cassette. We demonstrate that stably transposed cells co-express transmembrane and secreted antibodies at levels comparable to those provided by dedicated constructs for secreted and membrane-associated IgGs. This unique feature expedites the screening and antibody characterization process by obviating the need for intermediate sequencing and re-cloning of individual antibody clones into separate expression vectors for functional screening purposes. In a series of proof-of-concept experiments, we demonstrate the seamless integration of antibody discovery with functional screening for various antibody properties, including binding affinity and suitability for preparation of antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:26986818

  5. Transpo-mAb display: Transposition-mediated B cell display and functional screening of full-length IgG antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Waldmeier, Lorenz; Hellmann, Ina; Gutknecht, Chantal K; Wolter, Fabian I; Cook, Skylar C; Reddy, Sai T; Grawunder, Ulf; Beerli, Roger R

    2016-01-01

    In vitro antibody display and screening technologies geared toward the discovery and engineering of clinically applicable antibodies have evolved from screening artificial antibody formats, powered by microbial display technologies, to screening of natural, full-IgG molecules expressed in mammalian cells to readily yield lead antibodies with favorable properties in production and clinical applications. Here, we report the development and characterization of a novel, next-generation mammalian cell-based antibody display and screening platform called Transpo-mAb Display, offering straightforward and efficient generation of cellular libraries by using non-viral transposition technology to obtain stable antibody expression. Because Transpo-mAb Display uses DNA-transposable vectors with substantial cargo capacity, genomic antibody heavy chain expression constructs can be utilized that undergo the natural switch from membrane bound to secreted antibody expression in B cells by way of alternative splicing of Ig-heavy chain transcripts from the same genomic expression cassette. We demonstrate that stably transposed cells co-express transmembrane and secreted antibodies at levels comparable to those provided by dedicated constructs for secreted and membrane-associated IgGs. This unique feature expedites the screening and antibody characterization process by obviating the need for intermediate sequencing and re-cloning of individual antibody clones into separate expression vectors for functional screening purposes. In a series of proof-of-concept experiments, we demonstrate the seamless integration of antibody discovery with functional screening for various antibody properties, including binding affinity and suitability for preparation of antibody-drug conjugates.

  6. Substitution at aspartic acid 1128 in the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein mediates escape from a S2 domain-targeting neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Keng, Choong-Tat; Leung, Cynthia Sau-Wai; Peiris, J S Malik; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs), are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S) protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2): 941-50). In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111-1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A) exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus.

  7. Substitution at Aspartic Acid 1128 in the SARS Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein Mediates Escape from a S2 Domain-Targeting Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Keng, Choong-Tat; Leung, Cynthia Sau-Wai; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs), are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S) protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2): 941–50). In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111–1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A) exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus. PMID:25019613

  8. Studies of nontarget-mediated distribution of human full-length IgG1 antibody and its FAb fragment in cardiovascular and metabolic-related tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Pia; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Svensson, Lena; Ahnmark, Andrea; Flodin, Christine; Wanag, Ewa; Screpanti-Sundqvist, Valentina; Gennemark, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of full-length nontargeted antibody and its antigen-binding fragment (FAb) were evaluated for a range of tissues primarily of interest for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Mice were intravenously injected with a dose of 10 mg/kg of either human IgG1or its FAb fragment; perfused tissues were collected at a range of time points over 3 weeks for the human IgG1 antibody and 1 week for the human FAb antibody. Tissues were homogenized and antibody concentrations were measured by specific immunoassays on the Gyros system. Exposure in terms of maximum concentration (Cmax ) and area under the curve was assessed for all nine tissues. Tissue exposure of full-length antibody relative to plasma exposure was found to be between 1% and 10%, except for brain (0.2%). Relative concentrations of FAb antibody were the same, except for kidney tissue, where the antibody concentration was found to be ten times higher than in plasma. However, the absolute tissue uptake of full-length IgG was significantly higher than the absolute tissue uptake of the FAb antibody. This study provides a reference PK state for full-length whole and FAb antibodies in tissues related to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases that do not include antigen or antibody binding.

  9. Influence of the Envelope gp120 Phe 43 Cavity on HIV-1 Sensitivity to Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity Responses.

    PubMed

    Prévost, Jérémie; Zoubchenok, Daria; Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Pacheco, Beatriz; Coutu, Mathieu; Brassard, Nathalie; Parsons, Matthew S; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Moody, M Anthony; Haynes, Barton F; Bonsignori, Mattia; Sodroski, Joseph; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Shaw, George M; Chenine, Agnès L; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-04-01

    HIV-1-infected cells presenting envelope glycoproteins (Env) in the CD4-bound conformation on their surface are preferentially targeted by antibody-dependent cellular-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). HIV-1 has evolved sophisticated mechanisms to avoid the exposure of Env ADCC epitopes by downregulating CD4 and by limiting the overall amount of Env on the cell surface. In HIV-1, substitution of large residues such as histidine or tryptophan for serine 375 (S375H/W) in the gp120 Phe 43 cavity, where Phe 43 of CD4 contacts gp120, results in the spontaneous sampling of an Env conformation closer to the CD4-bound state. While residue S375 is well conserved in the majority of group M HIV-1 isolates, CRF01_AE strains have a naturally occurring histidine at this position (H375). Interestingly, CRF01_AE is the predominant circulating strain in Thailand, where the RV144 trial took place. In this trial, which resulted in a modest degree of protection, ADCC responses were identified as being part of the correlate of protection. Here we investigate the influence of the Phe 43 cavity on ADCC responses. Filling this cavity with a histidine or tryptophan residue in Env with a natural serine residue at this position (S375H/W) increased the susceptibility of HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC. Conversely, the replacement of His 375 by a serine residue (H375S) within HIV-1 CRF01_AE decreased the efficiency of the ADCC response. Our results raise the intriguing possibility that the presence of His 375 in the circulating strain where the RV144 trial was held contributed to the observed vaccine efficacy.IMPORTANCE HIV-1-infected cells presenting Env in the CD4-bound conformation on their surface are preferentially targeted by ADCC mediated by HIV-positive (HIV(+)) sera. Here we show that the gp120 Phe 43 cavity modulates the propensity of Env to sample this conformation and therefore affects the susceptibility of infected cells to ADCC. CRF01_AE HIV-1 strains have an unusual Phe 43 cavity

  10. Single-chain antibody-mediated intracellular retention of ErbB-2 impairs Neu differentiation factor and epidermal growth factor signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Graus-Porta, D; Beerli, R R; Hynes, N E

    1995-01-01

    ErbB-2 becomes rapidly phosphorylated and activated following treatment of many cell lines with epidermal growth factor (EGF) or Neu differentiation factor (NDF). However, these factors do not directly bind ErbB-2, and its activation is likely to be mediated via transmodulation by other members of the type I/EGF receptor (EGFR)-related family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The precise role of ErbB-2 in the transduction of the signals elicited by EGF and NDF is unclear. We have used a novel approach to study the role of ErbB-2 in signaling through this family of receptors. An ErbB-2-specific single-chain antibody, designed to prevent transit through the endoplasmic reticulum and cell surface localization of ErbB-2, has been expressed in T47D mammary carcinoma cells, which express all four known members of the EGFR family. We show that cell surface expression of ErbB-2 was selectively suppressed in these cells and that the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and p70/p85S6K, induction of c-fos expression, and stimulation of growth by NDF were dramatically impaired. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and p70/p85S6K and induction of c-fos expression by EGF were also significantly reduced. We conclude that in T47D cells, ErbB-2 is a major NDF signal transducer and a potentiator of the EGF signal. Thus, our observations demonstrate that ErbB-2 plays a central role in the type I/EGFR-related family of receptors and that receptor transmodulation represents a crucial step in growth factor signaling. PMID:7532277

  11. Expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 in Renal Tissue of Patients with Chronic Active Antibody-mediated Renal Graft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitor of metallopropteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in the renal allografts of patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), and to explore their role in the pathogenesis of AMR. Methods Immunohistochemistry assay and computer-assisted image analysis were used to detect the expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 in the renal allografts with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) in 46 transplant recipients and 15 normal renal tissue specimens as the controls. The association of the expression level of either MMP-2 or TIMP-1 with the pathological grade of IF/TA in AMR was analyzed. Results The expression of either MMP-2 or TIMP-1 was significantly increased in the renal allografts of the recipients as compared with the normal renal tissue (P < 0.05). MMP-2 expression tended to decrease, while TIMP-1 and serum creatinine increased along with the increase of pathological grade of IF/TA (P < 0.05). In IF/TA groups, the expression of TIMP-1 was positively correlated to serum creatinine level (r = 0.718, P < 0.05). Conclusions It is suggested by the results that abnormal expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 might play roles in the development of renal fibrosis in chronic AMR. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1128474926172838 PMID:23057632

  12. The function of multiple extracellular matrix receptors in mediating cell adhesion to extracellular matrix: preparation of monoclonal antibodies to the fibronectin receptor that specifically inhibit cell adhesion to fibronectin and react with platelet glycoproteins Ic-IIa

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have identified monoclonal antibodies that inhibit human cell adhesion to collagen (P1H5), fibronectin (P1F8 or P1D6), and collagen and fibronectin (P1B5) that react with a family of structurally similar glycoproteins referred to as extracellular matrix receptors (ECMRs) II, VI, and I, respectively. Each member of this family contains a unique alpha subunit, recognized by the antibodies, and a common beta subunit, each of approximately 140 kD. We show here that ECMR VI is identical to the fibronectin receptor (FNR), very late antigen (VLA) 5, and platelet glycoproteins Ic-IIa and shall be referred to as FNR. Monoclonal antibodies to FNR inhibit lymphocyte, fibroblast, and platelet adhesion to fibronectin-coated surfaces. ECMRs I, II, and FNR were differentially expressed in platelets, resting or activated lymphocytes, and myeloid, epithelial, endothelial, and fibroblast cell populations, suggesting a functional role for the receptors in vascular emigration and selective tissue localization. Tissue staining of human fetal skin localized ECMRs I and II to the basal epidermis primarily, while monoclonal antibodies to the FNR stained both the dermis and epidermis. Experiments carried out to investigate the functional roles of these receptors in mediating cell adhesion to complex extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by cells in culture revealed that complete inhibition of cell adhesion to ECM required antibodies to both the FNR and ECMR II, the collagen adhesion receptor. These results show that multiple ECMRs function in combination to mediate cell adhesion to complex EMC templates and predicts that variation in ECM composition and ECMR expression may direct cell localization to specific tissue domains. PMID:2846588

  13. Antibody-mediated activation of a defective beta-D-galactosidase. II. Immunological relationship between the normal and the defective enzyme.

    PubMed

    Celada, F; Ellis, J; Bodlund, K; Rotman, B

    1971-09-01

    Two closely related protein antigens were used to study immunogenic competition. Namely, normal beta-D-galactosidase of Escherichia coli (Z) and a genetically defective beta-D-galactosidase (AMEF) which seems to differ from the normal in one amino acid substitution. A unique characteristic of this pair of antigens is that, although they are indistinguishable in precipitation and absorption tests with antibodies, the enzymatic activity of AMEF is specifically increased several-hundredfold in the presence of antibodies directed against Z. The following results show that Z and AMEF also differ in their immunogenic ability: (a) antibodies directed against Z activated AMEF; antibodies directed against AMEF did not activate, but competed specifically with activating antibodies. (b) Animals immunized with AMEF failed to produce activating antibodies when they were subsequently challenged with Z, although the presence of some cells primed to produce activating antibodies could be demonstrated by adoptive transfer. (c) Animals preimmunized with Z were stimulated in their production of activating antibodies by AMEF challenge, although not as efficiently as with Z. A model explaining these observations by competition for the immunogenic site among antigen-sensitive cells carrying cross-reacting receptors is presented.

  14. CHO-S antibody titers >1 gram/liter using flow electroporation-mediated transient gene expression followed by rapid migration to high-yield stable cell lines.

    PubMed

    Steger, Krista; Brady, James; Wang, Weili; Duskin, Meg; Donato, Karen; Peshwa, Madhusudan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, researchers have turned to transient gene expression (TGE) as an alternative to CHO stable cell line generation for early-stage antibody development. Despite advances in transfection methods and culture optimization, the majority of CHO-based TGE systems produce insufficient antibody titers for extensive use within biotherapeutic development pipelines. Flow electroporation using the MaxCyte STX Scalable Transfection System is a highly efficient, scalable means of CHO-based TGE for gram-level production of antibodies without the need for specialized expression vectors or genetically engineered CHO cell lines. CHO cell flow electroporation is easily scaled from milligram to multigram quantities without protocol reoptimization while maintaining transfection performance and antibody productivity. In this article, data are presented that demonstrate the reproducibility, scalability, and antibody production capabilities of CHO-based TGE using the MaxCyte STX. Data show optimization of posttransfection parameters such as cell density, media composition, and feed strategy that result in secreted antibody titers >1 g/L and production of multiple grams of antibody within 2 weeks of a single CHO-S cell transfection. In addition, data are presented to demonstrate the application of scalable electroporation for the rapid generation of high-yield stable CHO cell lines to bridge the gap between early- and late-stage antibody development activities.

  15. Varicella-zoster virus-specific, cell-mediated immunity with interferon-gamma release assay after vaccination of college students with no or intermediate IgG antibody response.

    PubMed

    Terada, Kihei; Itoh, Yuri; Fujii, Akihide; Kitagawa, Seiko; Ogita, Satoko; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2015-02-01

    This study measured Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and antibodies to clarify immune response after vaccination in 68 college students with negative or intermediate IgG antibody status. The enrolled numbers of negative, intermediate, and positive VZV-IgG antibody were 27, 41, and 28 students, respectively. The positive rates of CMI were 3.7% (1/27), 41.5% (17/41), and 96.4% (27/28) before vaccination, respectively. After vaccination, the IgG antibody titers became significantly higher in the intermediate IgG group compared to those in the negative IgG group (P < 0.01), but CMI did not differ significantly between the two groups. Ninety-three percent (38/41) of the intermediate IgG antibody group and 41% (11/27) of the negative IgG antibody group became positive for the IgG antibody after vaccination (P < 0.0001). When subjects were divided into negative, intermediate, and positive CMI by interferon-gamma values before vaccination, the IgG antibody and interferon-gamma values increased significantly in the positive CMI group compared to the negative CMI group after vaccination (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). All (17/17) of positive CMI group and 61% (27/44) of negative CMI group became positive for the IgG antibody after vaccination (P < 0.01). Ninety-four percent (16/17) of positive CMI group and 59% (28/44) of negative CMI group became positive for CMI after vaccination (P < 0.05). Ninety-six percent (22/23) of the subjects with a history of vaccination became IgG seropositive after a second dose of vaccination, but 22% (5/23) of them remained negative for CMI. CMI is valuable information to identify potential non-responders to vaccination and to predict risk of clinical VZV infection.

  16. Infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT-1: Evidence using antibodies specific to the receptor's large extracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Qingwen; Agrawal, Lokesh; VanHorn-Ali, Zainab; Alkhatib, Ghalib . E-mail: galkhati@iupui.edu

    2006-05-25

    To analyze HTLV-1 cytotropism, we developed a highly sensitive vaccinia virus-based assay measuring activation of a reporter gene upon fusion of two distinct cell populations. We used this system in a functional cDNA screening to isolate and confirm that the glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) is a receptor for HTLV-1. GLUT-1 is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane glycoprotein with 12 transmembrane domains and 6 extracellular loops (ECL). We demonstrate for the first time that peptide antibodies (GLUT-IgY) raised in chicken to the large extracellular loop (ECL1) detect GLUT-1 at the cell surface and inhibit envelope (Env)-mediated fusion and infection. Efficient GLUT-IgY staining was detected with peripheral blood CD4{sup +} lymphocytes purified by positive selection. Further, GLUT-IgY caused efficient inhibition of Env-mediated fusion and infection of CD4{sup +} T and significantly lower inhibition of CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes. The specificity of GLUT-IgY antibodies to GLUT-1 was demonstrated by ECL1 peptide competition studies. Grafting ECL1 of GLUT-1 onto the receptor-negative GLUT-3 conferred significant receptor activity. In contrast, grafting ECL1 of GLUT-3 onto GLUT-1 resulted in a significant loss of the receptor activity. The ECL1-mediated receptor activity was efficiently blocked with four different human monoclonal antibody (HMab) to HTLV-1 Env. The ECL1-derived peptide blocked HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion with several nonhuman mammalian cell lines. The results demonstrate the utilization of cell surface GLUT-1 in HTLV-1 infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes and implicate a critical role for the ECL1 region in viral tropism.

  17. Pre-neutralization of C5a-mediated effects by the monoclonal antibody 137-26 reacting with the C5a moiety of native C5 without preventing C5 cleavage

    PubMed Central

    FUNG, M; LU, M; FURE, H; SUN, W; SUN, C; SHI, N Y; DOU, Y; SU, J; SWANSON, X; MOLLNES, T E

    2003-01-01

    Complement C5a is aetiologically linked to inflammatory tissue damage in conditions like septicaemia, immune complex diseases and ischaemia-reperfusion injury. We here describe a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 137–26, that binds to the C5a moiety of human C5 and neutralizes the effects of C5a without interfering with C5 cleavage and the subsequent formation of lytic C5b-9 complex. Mouse anti-human C5 mAbs were generated and the reactivity with C5 and C5a was detected by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The inhibition of C5a binding to C5a receptor was studied using a radioligand binding assay. The effects of the antibody on C5a functions were examined using isolated neutrophils and a novel human whole blood model of inflammation. Haemolytic assays were used to study the effect on complement-mediated lysis. mAb 137–26 reacted with both solid- and solution-phase C5 and C5a in a dose-dependent manner with high affinity. The antibody competed C5a binding to C5a receptor and inhibited C5a-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils. Furthermore, the antibody effectively abrogated complement-dependent E. coli-induced CD11b up-regulation and oxidative burst in neutrophils of human whole blood. mAb 137–26 was more potent than a C5a receptor antagonist and a previously described anti-C5a antibody. mAb 137–26 did not inhibit complement-mediated lysis, nor did it activate complement itself. Together, mAb 137–26 binds both the C5a moiety of native C5 and free C5a, thereby effectively neutralizing the biological effects of C5a. The antibody may have therapeutic potential in inflammatory diseases where C5a inhibition combined with an operative lytic pathway of C5b-9 is particularly desired. PMID:12869020

  18. Different regulatory and cytotoxic CD4+ T lymphocyte profiles in renal transplants with antibody-mediated chronic rejection or long-term good graft function.

    PubMed

    Giaretta, Fulvia; Bussolino, Stefania; Beltramo, Silvia; Fop, Fabrizio; Rossetti, Maura; Messina, Maria; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Ranghino, Andrea; Basso, Elisa; Camussi, Giovanni; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo; Biancone, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the different subsets of CD4(+) T-lymphocytes may provide hints on the immunologic mechanisms operating in the long-term fate of a kidney transplant. We analyzed peripheral regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Tregs) and CD4(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in antibody-mediated chronic rejection (AMCR), in middle-term kidney transplants (2-4 years, MTKT) with good graft function and rejection-free history, in long-term kidney transplants (>15 years, LTKT) and in normal healthy subjects (NHS). Transplant groups with good prognosis (MTKT and LTKT) displayed a significant lower amount of CD4(+)CD25(high) T lymphocytes than NHS, with a trend of a higher percentage in AMCR than in MTKT and LTKT. However, CD4(+)CD25(high) Foxp3(+) cells were significantly higher in LTKT and MTKT than AMCR. Characterization of CD4(+)CD25(high) T cells showed a marked increase of intracellular CTLA-4 in the AMCR group in respect to the other transplant groups, while the expression of the surface molecule seemed to follow a reverse trend. In addition, CD27, a costimulatory receptor involved in long-term T cell survival and prevention of immune tolerance, is significantly reduced in CD4(+)CD25(high) and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells in the LTKT in respect to the other transplant groups. CD4(+)CD25(high)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)Foxp3(+)CD45RO(+) regulatory T cells with memory function were increased in LTKT compared to NHS and for the latter also in AMCR group. Finally, CD4(+)CTLs that were quantified on the basis of granzyme A expression, were more represented in AMCR patients in comparison to the other groups. Strikingly, CD27 in the CD4(+)CTLs was suppressed in LTKT and MTKT and markedly expressed in AMCR group. No significant differences in the expression of CD28 were observed among different groups. In conclusion, different profiles of Tregs and CD4(+)CTL populations correlate with different long-term conditions of kidney-transplanted patients, suggesting their role in the development

  19. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  20. MiR-142-5p and miR-486-5p as biomarkers for early detection of chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kenta; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Inanaga, Yukiko; Hiramitsu, Takahisa; Miwa, Yuko; Murotani, Kenta; Narumi, Shuji; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Katayama, Akio; Uchida, Kazuharu; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2017-02-01

    De novo donor-specific HLA antibody (DSA) would not necessarily contribute to chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) in kidney transplantation. Here, we investigated whether PBMC miRNAs could be predictable biomarkers for CAMR. Microarray profiling of 435 mature miRNAs in pooled samples was conducted. Individual analysis revealed that miR-142-5p was significantly (p < 0.01) underexpressed in patients with DSA. After DSA production, miR-486-5p and its target PTEN/foxO3 mRNA were significantly overexpressed (p < 0.01) and underexpressed (p < 0.01), respectively, in patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, compared with non-CAMR. Our studies suggest that miRNA expression patterns may serve as noninvasive diagnostic biomarkers to evaluate immune response and kidney allograft status.

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  2. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  3. NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity is enhanced by tamoxifen in HER2/neu non-amplified, but not HER2/neu-amplified, breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Richards, John O; Albers, Alex J; Smith, Thomas S; Tjoe, Judy A

    2016-11-01

    Tumor-targeting antibodies have been successful in the treatment of various types of cancers. Antibodies engage the immune system with their Fc, stimulating immune cell effector function. In the clinic, FcγRIIIa polymorphisms with higher affinity for the Fc of antibodies were shown to improve response rates and overall survival. Efforts have been made to modify the Fc to enhance affinity to Fc receptors and thereby improve effector function. An alternative for improving immune effector function may be to increase the level of tumor antigen expression. In this study, tamoxifen was used to increase HER2/neu protein level to determine whether increased tumor antigen expression could enhance NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC). Tamoxifen was found to increase HER2/neu 1.5-fold to threefold in breast cancer cell lines that were HER2/neu non-amplified. Using flow cytometry to simultaneously evaluate NK cell degranulation and tumor cell death, the increase in HER2/neu enhanced NK cell-mediated ADCC. However, in cells that had HER2/neu gene amplification and estrogen receptor expression, tamoxifen elevated HER2/neu but failed to improve NK cell function. The quantity of HER2/neu on the tumor cell surface was approximately double that of the number of Fc receptors found on NK cells. This appears to reflect a ceiling at which increasing antigen expression fails to improve NK cell effector function. This has clinical implications as trying to increase antigen expression to enhance NK cell function may be useful for patients with antigen-low tumors, but not in those whose tumors have gene amplification or high levels of antigen expression.

  4. Perceived empathy of service providers mediates the association between perceived discrimination and behavioral intention to take up HIV antibody testing again among men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jing; Lau, Joseph T F; Wang, Zixin; Wu, Anise M S; Tan, Xuhui

    2015-01-01

    HIV antibody testing is a key measure of HIV prevention for men who have sex with men (MSM). The World Health Organization recommends sexually active and at-risk MSM to take up HIV antibody testing regularly. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of behavioral intention to take up HIV antibody testing in the next six months among Hong Kong MSM who were ever-testers. An anonymous cross-sectional survey recruited 326 MSM who had taken up HIV antibody testing from gay-friendly venues and internet in Hong Kong. Of the participants, 40.8% had had unprotected anal intercourse with regular or non-regular male sex partners in the last six months; they were at risk of HIV transmission despite experience in HIV antibody testing. Only 37.2% showed a strong intention to take up HIV antibody testing again in the next six months. Adjusted analysis showed that both perceived discrimination toward Hong Kong MSM (AOR = .60, 95% CI: .36-.98) and the CARE Measure assessing perceived empathy of service providers (AOR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02-1.08) were significantly associated with intention for retesting. Perceived discrimination, however, became statistically non-significant (AOR = .68, 95% CI: .41-1.14), when both CARE Measure and perceived discrimination entered into the adjusted model. It is warranted to increase HIV retesting rate by removing perceived discrimination and reducing the negative effect of perceived discrimination through enhancement of empathy of service providers.

  5. Decreased complement mediated binding of antibody//sup 3/-dsDNA immune complexes to the red blood cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P.; Horgan, C.; Buschbacher, R.; Brunner, C.M.; Hess, C.E.; O'Brien, W.M.; Wanebo, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The complement mediated binding of prepared antibody//sup 3/H-dsDNA immune complexes to the red blood cells obtained from a number of patient populations has been investigated. Patients with solid tumors have binding activity similar to that seen in a normal group of individuals. However, a significant fraction of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and hematologic malignancies have lowered binding activity compared with normal subjects. Quantitative studies indicate the lowered activity probably arises due to a decrease in complement receptors on the respective red blood cells. The potential importance and implications of these findings are briefly discussed.

  6. Impaired Antibody-mediated Protection and Defective IgA B-Cell Memory in Experimental Infection of Adults with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Maximillian S.; Jozwik, Agnieszka; Makris, Spyridon; Dunning, Jake; Paras, Allan; DeVincenzo, John P.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Wrammert, Jens; Openshaw, Peter J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Despite relative antigenic stability, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) reinfects throughout life. After more than 40 years of research, no effective human vaccine exists and correlates of protection remain poorly defined. Most current vaccine candidates seek to induce high levels of RSV-specific serum neutralizing antibodies, which are associated with reduced RSV-related hospitalization rates in observational studies but may not actually prevent infection. Objectives: To characterize correlates of protection from infection and the generation of RSV-specific humoral memory to promote effective vaccine development. Methods: We inoculated 61 healthy adults with live RSV and studied protection from infection by serum and mucosal antibody. We analyzed RSV-specific peripheral blood plasmablast and memory B-cell frequencies and antibody longevity. Measurements and Main Results: Despite moderately high levels of preexisting serum antibody, 34 (56%) became infected, of whom 23 (68%) developed symptomatic colds. Prior RSV-specific nasal IgA correlated significantly more strongly with protection from polymerase chain reaction–confirmed infection than serum neutralizing antibody. Increases in virus-specific antibody titers were variable and transient in infected subjects but correlated with plasmablasts that peaked around Day 10. During convalescence, only IgG (and no IgA) RSV-specific memory B cells were detectable in peripheral blood. This contrasted with natural influenza infection, in which virus-specific IgA memory B cells were readily recovered. Conclusions: This observed specific defect in IgA memory may partly explain the ability of RSV to cause recurrent symptomatic infections. If so, vaccines able to induce durable RSV-specific IgA responses may be more protective than those generating systemic antibody alone. PMID:25730467

  7. Successful attenuation of humoral immunity to viral capsid and transgenic protein following AAV-mediated gene transfer with a non-depleting CD4 antibody and cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, J H; Cochrane, M; Cobbold, S; Waldmann, H; Nathwani, S A; Davidoff, A M; Nathwani, A C

    2012-01-01

    The ability of transient immunosuppression with a combination of a non-depleting anti-CD4 (NDCD4) antibody and cyclosporine (CyA) to abrogate immune reactivity to both adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) and its transgene product was evaluated. This combination of immunosuppressants resulted in a 20-fold reduction in the resulting anti-AAV8 antibody titres, to levels in naïve mice, following intravenous administration of 2 × 10(12) AAV8 vector particles per kg to immunocompetent mice. This allowed efficient transduction upon secondary challenge with vector pseudotyped with the same capsid. Persistent tolerance did not result, however, as an anti-AAV8 antibody response was elicited upon rechallenge with AAV8 without immunosuppression. The route of vector administration, vector dose, AAV serotype or the concomitant administration of adenoviral vector appeared to have little impact on the ability of the NDCD4 antibody and CyA combination to moderate the primary humoral response to AAV capsid proteins. The combination of NDCD4 and CyA also abrogated the humoral response to the transgene product, that otherwise invariably would occur, following intramuscular injection of AAV5, leading to stable transgene expression. These observations could significantly improve the prospects of using rAAV vectors for chronic disorders by allowing for repeated vector administration and avoiding the development of antibodies to the transgene product.

  8. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, Daniela; Birzele, Fabian; Voss, Edgar; Nopora, Adam; Bader, Sabine; Friess, Thomas; Goller, Bernhard; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Weigand, Stefan; Runza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages) to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) of the malignant cells by macrophages. PMID:27463372

  9. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Maisel, Daniela; Birzele, Fabian; Voss, Edgar; Nopora, Adam; Bader, Sabine; Friess, Thomas; Goller, Bernhard; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Weigand, Stefan; Runza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages) to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) of the malignant cells by macrophages.

  10. Perceived Empathy of Service Providers Mediates the Association between Perceived Discrimination and Behavioral Intention to Take Up HIV Antibody Testing Again among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jing; Lau, Joseph T. F.; Wang, Zixin; Wu, Anise M. S.; Tan, Xuhui

    2015-01-01

    HIV antibody testing is a key measure of HIV prevention for men who have sex with men (MSM). The World Health Organization recommends sexually active and at-risk MSM to take up HIV antibody testing regularly. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of behavioral intention to take up HIV antibody testing in the next six months among Hong Kong MSM who were ever-testers. An anonymous cross-sectional survey recruited 326 MSM who had taken up HIV antibody testing from gay-friendly venues and internet in Hong Kong. Of the participants, 40.8% had had unprotected anal intercourse with regular or non-regular male sex partners in the last six months; they were at risk of HIV transmission despite experience in HIV antibody testing. Only 37.2% showed a strong intention to take up HIV antibody testing again in the next six months. Adjusted analysis showed that both perceived discrimination toward Hong Kong MSM (AOR = .60, 95% CI: .36–.98) and the CARE Measure assessing perceived empathy of service providers (AOR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02–1.08) were significantly associated with intention for retesting. Perceived discrimination, however, became statistically non-significant (AOR = .68, 95% CI: .41–1.14), when both CARE Measure and perceived discrimination entered into the adjusted model. It is warranted to increase HIV retesting rate by removing perceived discrimination and reducing the negative effect of perceived discrimination through enhancement of empathy of service providers. PMID:25693179

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies in Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Thomas A.

    1991-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been applied clinically to the diagnosis and therapy of an array of human disorders, including cancer and infectious diseases, and have been used for the modulation of immune responses. Effective therapy using unmodified monoclonal antibodies has, however, been elusive. Recently, monoclonal antibody-mediated therapy has been revolutionized by advances such as the definition of cell-surface structures on abnormal cells as targets for effective monoclonal antibody action, genetic engineering to create less immunogenic and more effective monoclonal antibodies, and the arming of such antibodies with toxins or radionuclides to enhance their effector function.

  12. Therapy of B-cell malignancies by anti–HLA-DR humanized monoclonal antibody, IMMU-114, is mediated through hyperactivation of ERK and JNK MAP kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Chen, Xiaochuan; Cardillo, Thomas M.; Furman, Richard R.; Chen, Susan; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M.

    2010-01-01

    A humanized IgG4 anti–HLA-DR monoclonal antibody (IMMU-114), engineered to avoid side effects associated with complement activation, was examined for binding and cytotoxicity on leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma cell lines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient specimens, followed by evaluation of the effects of IMMU-114 on extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways. HLA-DR was expressed on the majority of these cells at markedly higher levels than CD20, CD22, and CD74. IMMU-114 was toxic to mantle cell lymphoma, CLL, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, hairy cell leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (including rituximab-resistant), and multiple myeloma cell lines, and also patient CLL cells. IMMU-114 induced disease-free survival in tumor-bearing SCID mice with early-stage disease and in models that are relatively resistant to anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. Despite positive staining, acute myelogenous leukemic cells were not killed by IMMU-114. The ability of IMMU-114 to induce activation of ERK and JNK signaling correlated with cytotoxicity and differentiates the mechanism of action of IMMU-114 from monoclonal antibodies against CD20 and CD74. Thus, antigen expression is not sufficient for cytotoxicity; antibody-induced hyperactivation of ERK and JNK mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathways are also required. PMID:20101022

  13. Inhibition of HPA-1a alloantibody-mediated platelet destruction by a deglycosylated anti-HPA-1a monoclonal antibody in mice: toward targeted treatment of fetal-alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Bakchoul, Tamam; Greinacher, Andreas; Sachs, Ulrich J; Krautwurst, Annika; Renz, Harald; Harb, Habi; Bein, Gregor; Newman, Peter J; Santoso, Sentot

    2013-07-18

    Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is often caused by maternal alloantibodies against the human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a, which opsonizes fetal platelets (PLTs). Subsequent PLT destruction is mediated via the Fc part of the alloantibodies. The monoclonal antibody (mAb) SZ21 binds to the HPA-1a epitope and inhibits the binding of maternal alloantibodies. However, it also promotes complement activation and phagocytosis. Deglycosylation of antibodies abrogates the Fc-related effector functions. We modified the N-glycan of SZ21 by endoglycosidase F. The in vivo transplacental transport of N-glycan-modified (NGM)-SZ21 was not impaired. When injected into pregnant mice, both native-SZ21 and NGM-SZ21 were transported equally into fetal circulation (8.9% vs 8.7%, respectively, P = .58). Neither the binding properties of NGM-SZ21 to HPA-1a in surface plasmon resonance, nor the inhibition of anti-HPA-1a-induced PLT phagocytosis, were affected by N-glycan modification. NGM-SZ21 prevented PLT destruction induced by maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies in vivo in a mouse model (PLT clearance after 5 hours; 18% vs 62%, in the presence or absence of NGM-SZ21, respectively, P = .013). Deglycosylation of SZ21 abrogates Fc-effector functions without interfering with placental transport or the ability to block anti-HPA-1a binding. Humanized, deglycosylated anti-HPA-1a mAbs may represent a novel treatment strategy to prevent anti-HPA-1a-mediated PLT destruction in FNAIT.

  14. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer to NMDA NR1-containing neurons in rat neocortex by helper virus-free HSV-1 vector particles containing a chimeric HSV-1 glycoprotein C-staphylococcus A protein.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haiyan; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Geller, Alfred I

    2010-09-10

    Because of the heterogeneous cellular composition of the brain, and especially the forebrain, cell type-specific expression will benefit many potential applications of direct gene transfer. The two prevalent approaches for achieving cell type-specific expression are using a cell type-specific promoter or targeting gene transfer to a specific cell type. Targeted gene transfer with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors modifies glycoprotein C (gC) to replace the heparin binding domain, which binds to many cell types, with a binding activity for a specific cell surface protein. We previously reported targeted gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons using chimeric gC-glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor or gC-brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein. Unfortunately, this approach is limited to cells that express the cognate receptor for either neurotrophic factor. Thus, a general strategy for targeting gene transfer to many different types of neurons is desirable. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer has been developed for targeting specific virus vectors to specific peripheral cell types; a specific vector particle protein is modified to contain the Staphylococcus A protein ZZ domain, which binds immunoglobulin (Ig) G. Here, we report antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer of HSV-1 vectors to a specific type of forebrain neuron. We constructed a chimeric gC-ZZ protein, and showed this protein is incorporated into vector particles and binds Ig G. Complexes of these vector particles and an antibody to the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit supported targeted gene transfer to NR1-containing neocortical neurons in the rat brain, with long-term (2 months) expression.

  15. Six Amino Acid Residues in a 1200 Å2 Interface Mediate Binding of Factor VIII to an IgG4κ Inhibitory Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jasper C.; Ettinger, Ruth A.; Schuman, Jason T.; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Wamiq-Adhami, Muhammad; Nguyen, Phuong-Cac T.; Nakaya-Fletcher, Shelley M.; Puranik, Komal; Thompson, Arthur R.; Pratt, Kathleen P.

    2015-01-01

    The development of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies complicates the treatment of many hemophilia A patients. The C-terminal C2 domain is a particularly antigenic FVIII region. A crystal structure of recombinant FVIII-C2 bound to an Fab fragment of the patient-derived monoclonal antibody BO2C11, which recognizes an immunodominant inhibitor epitope on FVIII and blocks its ability to bind von Willebrand factor (VWF) and phospholipids, revealed that 15 amino acids in FVIII contact this antibody. Forty-three recombinant FVIII-C2 proteins, each with a surface-exposed side chain mutated to alanine or another residue, were generated, and surface plasmon resonance studies were carried out to evaluate effects of these substitutions on BO2C11/FVIII-C2 binding affinity. Thermodynamic analysis of experiments carried out at three temperatures indicated that one beta hairpin turn at the antigen-antibody interface (FVIII-F2196, N2198, M2199 and F2200) plus two non-contiguous arginines (FVIII-R2215 and R2220), contributed appreciably to the affinity. B-domain-deleted (BDD) FVIII-F2196A, FVIII-F2196K and FVIII-M2199A were generated and characterized. Their pro-coagulant activities and binding to VWF were similar to those of WT-BDD-FVIII, and FVIII-F2196K avoided neutralization by BO2C11 and murine inhibitory mAb 1B5. This study suggests specific sites for amino acid substitutions to rationally design FVIII variants capable of evading immunodominant neutralizing anti-FVIII antibodies. PMID:25615825

  16. A versatile approach for the site-specific modification of recombinant antibodies using a combination of enzyme-mediated bioconjugation and click chemistry.