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Sample records for egg-based subunit influenza

  1. Efficient chromatographic reduction of ovalbumin for egg-based influenza virus purification.

    PubMed

    Blom, Hans; Åkerblom, Anna; Kon, Theone; Shaker, Sabah; van der Pol, Leo; Lundgren, Mats

    2014-06-24

    Vaccination is the most effective prevention strategy to avoid influenza infection and for protection of large populations. The vast majority of influenza vaccines are still produced with allantoic fluid from fertilized chicken eggs. The presence of ovalbumin, which can constitute over 60% of the total protein content in allantoic fluid, can result in severe allergies. Consequently, efficient reduction of ovalbumin is critical during egg based vaccine manufacturing. Here we present Capto Core 700, a novel core bead chromatographic flow through mode resin for removal of ovalbumin and compare it to sucrose zonal gradient ultracentrifugation, which is the industry standard for egg-based vaccine production. The results demonstrate that core bead chromatography is fully comparable to zonal centrifugation in removing ovalbumin to meet regulatory requirements. Furthermore, the scalability and the shorter process times of this method have the potential to significantly improve the productivity and economy for industrial production compared to zonal centrifugation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Advancements in the development of subunit influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Naru; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Yusen; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing threat of influenza epidemics and pandemics has emphasized the importance of developing safe and effective vaccines against infections from divergent influenza viruses. In this review, we first introduce the structure and life cycle of influenza A viruses, describing major influenza A virus-caused pandemics. We then compare different types of influenza vaccines and discuss current advancements in the development of subunit influenza vaccines, particularly those based on nucleoprotein (NP), extracellular domain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins. We also illustrate potential strategies for improving the efficacy of subunit influenza vaccines. PMID:25529753

  3. Alkaline-extracted influenza subunit vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, E A

    1976-01-01

    Treatment of influenza virus concentrates with alkaline solvents releases a major fraction of the viral structural protein content. As determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the surface glycoprotein substructures, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, are the primary solubilized products. Two forms of hemagglutinin antigen are recovered, a 39S active hemagglutinin and a 23S blocking antigen. Dose-response assays in mice demonstrate that hemagglutination-inhibiting and neuraminidase antibodies are induced. Antibody responses are comparable to those resulting from immunization with inactivated whole virus. On the basis of demonstrated purity, high yields of protective antigens, immunogenic potency, and absence of deleterious reagents, alkaline-extracted influenza protein preparations merit consideration as subunit vaccines for human use. PMID:826484

  4. Plant-based rapid production of recombinant subunit hemagglutinin vaccines targeting H1N1 and H5N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Yoko; Chichester, Jessica A; Jones, Mark; Manceva, Slobodanka D; Damon, Emily; Mett, Vadim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Bi, Hong; Farrance, Christine; Shamloul, Moneim; Kushnir, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, a novel H1N1 swine influenza virus was isolated from infected humans in Mexico and the United States, and rapidly spread around the world. Another virus, a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype, identified by the World Health Organization as a potential pandemic threat in 1997, continues to be a significant risk. While vaccination is the preferred strategy for the prevention and control of influenza infections, the traditional egg-based approach to producing influenza vaccines does not provide sufficient capacity and adequate speed to satisfy global needs to combat newly emerging strains, seasonal or potentially pandemic. Significant efforts are underway to develop and implement new cell substrates with improved efficiency for influenza vaccine development and manufacturing. In recent years, plants have been used to produce recombinant proteins including subunit vaccines and antibodies. The main advantages of using plant systems for the production of vaccine antigens against influenza are their independence from pathogenic viruses, and cost and time efficiency. Here, we describe the large-scale production of recombinant hemagglutinin proteins from A/California/04/09 (H1N1) and A/Indonesia/05/05 (H5N1) strains of influenza virus in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and their immunogenicity (serum hemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralizing antibodies), and safety in animal models. These results support the testing of these candidate vaccines in human volunteers and also the utility of our plant expression system for large-scale recombinant influenza vaccine production.

  5. Lack of effect of highly purified subunit influenza vaccination on theophylline metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, P A; Tjia, J; Back, D J; Hobson, D; Breckenridge, A M

    1985-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of theophylline, and urinary recovery of theophylline and its metabolites [1, 3-dimethyluric acid, 3-methyl xanthine and 1-methyluric acid] were measured before and after highly purified subunit influenza vaccination in seven healthy subjects, and five subjects with chronic obstructive bronchitis. No cases of theophylline toxicity were seen, and there was no increase in mean plasma theophylline concentration or significant decrease in urinary metabolite concentration after vaccination. An antibody response to vaccination was demonstrated in all subjects. Highly purified subunit influenza vaccination may be given with safety to patients on theophylline. PMID:4027135

  6. Development of a Freeze-Dried, Heat-Stable Influenza Subunit Vaccine Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Alexander; Chen, Dexiang

    2016-01-01

    An influenza pandemic remains a major public health concern. A key strategy to prevent a pandemic is to stockpile and pre-position stable influenza vaccine to allow rapid deployment in response to an outbreak. However, most influenza vaccines today are formulated as liquids that are stable only within a temperature range of 2°C to 8°C and require use of a cold chain, making vaccine transportation, distribution, and storage complicated and expensive, particularly for developing countries. To support the National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza preparedness in the United States and internationally, we developed two lead dry formulations of stable H1N1 influenza subunit vaccines using freeze-drying technology. The stable formulations contain an excipient combination of a disaccharide, such as sucrose or trehalose, and glycine, in addition to a surfactant and phosphate buffer. The freeze-dried vaccines were shown to be safe and remained immunogenic in an in vivo study in mice. Moreover, the lead formulations demonstrated no significant loss of activity after 40 months at storage temperatures of 25°C and 37°C. This stability can be particularly attractive as it could eliminate the need to use a cold chain for vaccine deployment and facilitate integration of vaccine distribution with general drug distribution where appropriate. These freeze-dried thermostable influenza subunit vaccines could also reduce the frequency of vaccine stockpile turnover, offering a cost-effective option for pandemic preparedness. PMID:27851765

  7. Effectiveness of subunit influenza vaccination in the 2014-2015 season and residual effect of split vaccination in previous seasons.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Jesús; Navascués, Ana; Fernández-Alonso, Mirian; Reina, Gabriel; Pozo, Francisco; Casado, Itziar; Guevara, Marcela; Martínez-Baz, Iván; Barricarte, Aurelio; Ezpeleta, Carmen

    2016-03-08

    In Navarra, Spain, subunit vaccine was first used in the 2014-2015 season, whereas trivalent split-virion influenza vaccines had been used in previous seasons. We estimate the effectiveness of the subunit vaccine in the current season and split vaccine in the two previous seasons against laboratory-confirmed influenza in the 2014-2015 season. Patients with influenza-like illness hospitalized or attended by sentinel general practitioners were swabbed for influenza testing. The previous and current vaccine status of laboratory-confirmed cases was compared to test-negative controls. Among 1213 patients tested, 619 (51%) were confirmed for influenza virus: 52% influenza A(H3N2), 46% influenza B, and 2% A(H1N1)pdm09. The overall effectiveness for subunit vaccination in the current season was 19% (95% confidence interval [CI]: -13 to 42), 2% (95%CI: -47 to 35) against influenza A(H3N2) and 32% (95%CI: -4 to 56) against influenza B. The effectiveness against any influenza was 67% (95%CI: 17-87) for 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 vaccination only, 42% (95%CI: -31 to 74) for 2014-2015 vaccination only, and 38% (95%CI: 8-58) for vaccination in the 2012-2013, 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 seasons. The same estimates against influenza A(H3N2) were 47% (95%CI: -60 to 82), -54% (95%CI: -274 to 37) and 28% (95%CI: -17 to 56), and against influenza B were 82% (95%CI: 19-96), 93% (95%CI: 45-99) and 43% (95%CI: 5-66), respectively. These results suggest a considerable residual protection of split vaccination in previous seasons, low overall effectiveness of current season subunit vaccination, and possible interference between current subunit and previous split vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The cap-snatching endonuclease of influenza virus polymerase resides in the PA subunit.

    PubMed

    Dias, Alexandre; Bouvier, Denis; Crépin, Thibaut; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Baudin, Florence; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W H

    2009-04-16

    The influenza virus polymerase, a heterotrimer composed of three subunits, PA, PB1 and PB2, is responsible for replication and transcription of the eight separate segments of the viral RNA genome in the nuclei of infected cells. The polymerase synthesizes viral messenger RNAs using short capped primers derived from cellular transcripts by a unique 'cap-snatching' mechanism. The PB2 subunit binds the 5' cap of host pre-mRNAs, which are subsequently cleaved after 10-13 nucleotides by the viral endonuclease, hitherto thought to reside in the PB2 (ref. 5) or PB1 (ref. 2) subunits. Here we describe biochemical and structural studies showing that the amino-terminal 209 residues of the PA subunit contain the endonuclease active site. We show that this domain has intrinsic RNA and DNA endonuclease activity that is strongly activated by manganese ions, matching observations reported for the endonuclease activity of the intact trimeric polymerase. Furthermore, this activity is inhibited by 2,4-dioxo-4-phenylbutanoic acid, a known inhibitor of the influenza endonuclease. The crystal structure of the domain reveals a structural core closely resembling resolvases and type II restriction endonucleases. The active site comprises a histidine and a cluster of three acidic residues, conserved in all influenza viruses, which bind two manganese ions in a configuration similar to other two-metal-dependent endonucleases. Two active site residues have previously been shown to specifically eliminate the polymerase endonuclease activity when mutated. These results will facilitate the optimisation of endonuclease inhibitors as potential new anti-influenza drugs.

  9. Reassortment and mutation of the avian influenza virus polymerase PA subunit overcome species barriers.

    PubMed

    Mehle, Andrew; Dugan, Vivien G; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2012-02-01

    The emergence of new pandemic influenza A viruses requires overcoming barriers to cross-species transmission as viruses move from animal reservoirs into humans. This complicated process is driven by both individual gene mutations and genome reassortments. The viral polymerase complex, composed of the proteins PB1, PB2, and PA, is a major factor controlling host adaptation, and reassortment events involving polymerase gene segments occurred with past pandemic viruses. Here we investigate the ability of polymerase reassortment to restore the activity of an avian influenza virus polymerase that is normally impaired in human cells. Our data show that the substitution of human-origin PA subunits into an avian influenza virus polymerase alleviates restriction in human cells and increases polymerase activity in vitro. Reassortants with 2009 pandemic H1N1 PA proteins were the most active. Mutational analyses demonstrated that the majority of the enhancing activity in human PA results from a threonine-to-serine change at residue 552. Reassortant viruses with avian polymerases and human PA subunits, or simply the T552S mutation, displayed faster replication kinetics in culture and increased pathogenicity in mice compared to those containing a wholly avian polymerase complex. Thus, the acquisition of a human PA subunit, or the signature T552S mutation, is a potential mechanism to overcome the species-specific restriction of avian polymerases and increase virus replication. Our data suggest that the human, avian, swine, and 2009 H1N1-like viruses that are currently cocirculating in pig populations set the stage for PA reassortments with the potential to generate novel viruses that could possess expanded tropism and enhanced pathogenicity.

  10. A randomized controlled trial comparing split and subunit influenza vaccines in adults in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Morales, Alvaro; Arias Salazar, Javier; Salazar, Yolanda; García, Albert; Arnoux, Sabine; Arancibia, Andrea; Deroche, Christèle; Rey, Elena

    2003-01-01

    In a two-center, comparative trial, 344 adults were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of inactivated split-virion (Imovax Gripe) or sub-unit (Agrippal S1) influenza vaccine (1999-2000 formulations). For analysis, study groups were subdivided into adult (18-60 years old) and elderly (over 60 years) subjects. Blood was drawn immediately before and one month after vaccination, safety was evaluated using a blind-observer design based on reporting of solicited and unsolicited adverse events. Both vaccines were very well tolerated, had similar reactogenicity profiles, and elicited fewer reports of reactions in elderly individuals. Post-vaccination Imovax Gripe induced seroprotective antibody titers against the three vaccine strains in 94-99% of adults and 88-97% of elderly subjects, compared with 88-100% and 88-98%, respectively, of those given Agrippal S1. In conclusion, the split-virion and sub-unit influenza vaccines had similar safety and reactogenicity profiles, and elicited satisfactory immunity in adult and elderly subjects. However, higher post-vaccination geometric mean titer (GMT) values in response to the B strain were seen with the split vaccine Imovax Gripe, giving it a better overall immunogenicity.

  11. Molecular Basis of mRNA Cap Recognition by Influenza B Polymerase PB2 Subunit.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lili; Wartchow, Charles; Shia, Steven; Uehara, Kyoko; Steffek, Micah; Warne, Robert; Sutton, James; Muiru, Gladys T; Leonard, Vincent H J; Bussiere, Dirksen E; Ma, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus polymerase catalyzes the transcription of viral mRNAs by a process known as "cap-snatching," where the 5'-cap of cellular pre-mRNA is recognized by the PB2 subunit and cleaved 10-13 nucleotides downstream of the cap by the endonuclease PA subunit. Although this mechanism is common to both influenza A (FluA) and influenza B (FluB) viruses, FluB PB2 recognizes a wider range of cap structures including m(7)GpppGm-, m(7)GpppG-, and GpppG-RNA, whereas FluA PB2 utilizes methylated G-capped RNA specifically. Biophysical studies with isolated PB2 cap-binding domain (PB2(cap)) confirm that FluB PB2 has expanded mRNA cap recognition capability, although the affinities toward m(7)GTP are significantly reduced when compared with FluA PB2. The x-ray co-structures of the FluB PB2(cap) with bound cap analogs m(7)GTP and GTP reveal an inverted GTP binding mode that is distinct from the cognate m(7)GTP binding mode shared between FluA and FluB PB2. These results delineate the commonalities and differences in the cap-binding site between FluA and FluB PB2 and will aid structure-guided drug design efforts to identify dual inhibitors of both FluA and FluB PB2. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Targeting the HA2 subunit of influenza A virus hemagglutinin via CD40L provides universal protection against diverse subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, X; Hashem, A M; Chen, Z; Li, C; Doyle, T; Zhang, Y; Yi, Y; Farnsworth, A; Xu, K; Li, Z; He, R; Li, X; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    The influenza viral hemagglutinin (HA) is comprised of two subunits. Current influenza vaccine predominantly induces neutralizing antibodies (Abs) against the HA1 subunit, which is constantly evolving in unpredictable fashion. The other subunit, HA2, however, is highly conserved but largely shielded by the HA head domain. Thus, enhancing immune response against HA2 could potentially elicit broadly inhibitory Abs. We generated a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) encoding secreted fusion protein, consisting of codon-optimized HA2 subunit of influenza A/California/7/2009(H1N1) virus fused to a trimerized form of murine CD40L, and determined its ability of inducing protective immunity upon intranasal administration. We found that mice immunized with this recombinant viral vaccine were completely protected against lethal challenge with divergent influenza A virus subtypes including H1N1, H3N2, and H9N2. Codon-optimization of HA2 as well as the use of CD40L as a targeting ligand/molecular adjuvant were indispensable to enhance HA2-specific mucosal IgA and serum IgG levels. Moreover, induction of HA2-specific T-cell responses was dependent on CD40L, as rAd secreting HA2 subunit without CD40L failed to induce any significant levels of T-cell cytokines. Finally, sera obtained from immunized mice were capable of inhibiting 13 subtypes of influenza A viruses in vitro. These results provide proof of concept for a prototype HA2-based universal influenza vaccine. PMID:25052763

  13. Single-dose monomeric HA subunit vaccine generates full protection from influenza challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mallajosyula, Jyothi K; Hiatt, Ernie; Hume, Steve; Johnson, Ashley; Jeevan, Trushar; Chikwamba, Rachel; Pogue, Gregory P; Bratcher, Barry; Haydon, Hugh; Webby, Richard J; McCormick, Alison A

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are an efficient strategy to meet the demands of a possible influenza pandemic, because of rapid and scalable production. However, vaccines made from recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) subunit protein are often of low potency, requiring high dose or boosting to generate a sustained immune response. We have improved the immunogenicity of a plant-made HA vaccine by chemical conjugation to the surface of the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) which is non infectious in mammals. We have previously shown that TMV is taken up by mammalian dendritic cells and is a highly effective antigen carrier. In this work, we tested several TMV-HA conjugation chemistries, and compared immunogenicity in mice as measured by anti-HA IgG titers and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI). Importantly, pre-existing immunity to TMV did not reduce initial or boosted titers. Further optimization included dosing with and without alum or oil-in water adjuvants. Surprisingly, we were able to stimulate potent immunogenicity and HAI titers with a single 15µg dose of HA as a TMV conjugate. We then evaluated the efficacy of the TMV-HA vaccine in a lethal virus challenge in mice. Our results show that a single dose of the TMV-HA conjugate vaccine is sufficient to generate 50% survival, or 100% survival with adjuvant, compared with 10% survival after vaccination with a commercially available H1N1 vaccine. TMV-HA is an effective dose-sparing influenza vaccine, using a single-step process to rapidly generate large quantities of highly effective flu vaccine from an otherwise low potency HA subunit protein. PMID:24378714

  14. Single-dose monomeric HA subunit vaccine generates full protection from influenza challenge.

    PubMed

    Mallajosyula, Jyothi K; Hiatt, Ernie; Hume, Steve; Johnson, Ashley; Jeevan, Trushar; Chikwamba, Rachel; Pogue, Gregory P; Bratcher, Barry; Haydon, Hugh; Webby, Richard J; McCormick, Alison A

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are an efficient strategy to meet the demands of a possible influenza pandemic, because of rapid and scalable production. However, vaccines made from recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) subunit protein are often of low potency, requiring high dose or boosting to generate a sustained immune response. We have improved the immunogenicity of a plant-made HA vaccine by chemical conjugation to the surface of the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) which is non infectious in mammals. We have previously shown that TMV is taken up by mammalian dendritic cells and is a highly effective antigen carrier. In this work, we tested several TMV-HA conjugation chemistries, and compared immunogenicity in mice as measured by anti-HA IgG titers and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI). Importantly, pre-existing immunity to TMV did not reduce initial or boosted titers. Further optimization included dosing with and without alum or oil-in water adjuvants. Surprisingly, we were able to stimulate potent immunogenicity and HAI titers with a single 15 µg dose of HA as a TMV conjugate. We then evaluated the efficacy of the TMV-HA vaccine in a lethal virus challenge in mice. Our results show that a single dose of the TMV-HA conjugate vaccine is sufficient to generate 50% survival, or 100% survival with adjuvant, compared with 10% survival after vaccination with a commercially available H1N1 vaccine. TMV-HA is an effective dose-sparing influenza vaccine, using a single-step process to rapidly generate large quantities of highly effective flu vaccine from an otherwise low potency HA subunit protein.

  15. [Vaccination of infants and schoolchildren with an influenza subunit vaccine (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Jürgenssen, O; Moritz, A; Liehl, E; Bachmayer, H

    1978-01-01

    A new influenza subunit vaccine which contains only hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antigens was investigated for reactogenicity and immunogenicity in children aged between three and 15 years. Children under six years of age received either 500 IU or 1000 IU of the commercial vaccine, those aged from six to 15 years either 1000 IU or 2000 IU. The vaccines contained the virus strains recommended by the World Health Organisation for the vaccination season 1976/77. In a double blind study the vaccinees were allocated at random to the different dosage groups. The children were examined for reactions by the vaccinating physician 24 hours after vaccination. Serum hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers were determined before vaccination and four weeks after vaccination. In the younger age-group additional antibody determination was made two weeks after a booster injection. A very low rate of side-reactions was observed in all dosage groups. The increase of the antigen content was not associated with a higher rate of side reactions. After the first vaccination a significant rise of antibody titers could be observed in all children. After the booster injection a further increase of these antibody titers was observed. The response of the younger age group to the dosages 500 and 100 IU did not different significantly. In contrast, in the older age group the increase of the dosage from 1000 to 2000 IU was connected with a better immune response. This was especially marked in the antibody titers against the influenza B-strain virus.

  16. Cross-protection of Lactococcus lactis-displayed HA2 subunit against homologous and heterologous influenza A viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Lei, Han; Peng, Xiaojue; Zhao, Daxian; Jiao, Huifeng; Ouyang, Jiexiu

    2015-12-01

    Current influenza vaccines provide strain-specific protection against homologous subtypes and need to be updated annually. Therefore, it is essential to develop a universal vaccine that would induce broadly cross-protective immunity against homologous and heterologous influenza A viruses. The highly conserved HA2 subunit is a promising candidate for developing a universal influenza vaccine. Here, we hypothesized that the HA2 subunit could be displayed on the surface of Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis), using Spax as an anchor protein (L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2) and that L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 would have immunogenicity by oral administration without the use of adjuvant in the mouse model. To address this hypothesis, we show that oral vaccination of mice with L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 elicited significant humoral and mucosal immune responses. Importantly, L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 provided 100% protection against homologous H5N1 or heterologous H1N1 virus challenge. These results suggest that an HA2 subunit presented on the surface of L. lactis is an effective universal vaccine candidate against influenza A viruses in the poultry industry and in humans.

  17. Gyrase activity and number of copies of the gyrase B subunit gene in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Juárez, E; Setlow, J K

    1985-01-01

    Gyrase activities in extracts of various strains of Haemophilus influenzae can differ by more than an order of magnitude (J. K. Setlow, E. Cabrera-Juárez, W. L. Albritton, D. Spikes, and A. Mutschler, J. Bacteriol. 164:525-534, 1985). Measurements of in vitro activity and copy number indicated that most of these differences arose from variations in the number of copies of the gene for the gyrase B subunit, with some strains containing multicopy plasmids coding for that subunit. The quantitative relationship between gyrase and copy number depended on the mutations in the plasmids and in the host. The gyrase and copy number were considerably lower in plasmid-bearing strains carrying the prophage HP1c1. Two mutations affecting gyrase that are apparently regulatory caused an increase in gyrase without a concomitant increase in copy number. The possibility that the in vivo gyrase activity did not reflect the in vitro data was explored by measurement of alkaline phosphatase and ATPase activity in the extracts. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased with increasing gyrase activity measured in vitro, but ATPase activity did not. We conclude that extra supercoiling enhanced transcription of the alkaline phosphatase gene but not the ATPase gene and that it is unlikely that there is much discrepancy between gyrase activity assayed in vitro and the activity in the cell. PMID:2997116

  18. Intermonomer Interactions in Hemagglutinin Subunits HA1 and HA2 Affecting Hemagglutinin Stability and Influenza Virus Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; DeFeo, Christopher J; Alvarado-Facundo, Esmeralda; Vassell, Russell; Weiss, Carol D

    2015-10-01

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) mediates virus entry by binding to cell surface receptors and fusing the viral and endosomal membranes following uptake by endocytosis. The acidic environment of endosomes triggers a large-scale conformational change in the transmembrane subunit of HA (HA2) involving a loop (B loop)-to-helix transition, which releases the fusion peptide at the HA2 N terminus from an interior pocket within the HA trimer. Subsequent insertion of the fusion peptide into the endosomal membrane initiates fusion. The acid stability of HA is influenced by residues in the fusion peptide, fusion peptide pocket, coiled-coil regions of HA2, and interactions between the surface (HA1) and HA2 subunits, but details are not fully understood and vary among strains. Current evidence suggests that the HA from the circulating pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus [A(H1N1)pdm09] is less stable than the HAs from other seasonal influenza virus strains. Here we show that residue 205 in HA1 and residue 399 in the B loop of HA2 (residue 72, HA2 numbering) in different monomers of the trimeric A(H1N1)pdm09 HA are involved in functionally important intermolecular interactions and that a conserved histidine in this pair helps regulate HA stability. An arginine-lysine pair at this location destabilizes HA at acidic pH and mediates fusion at a higher pH, while a glutamate-lysine pair enhances HA stability and requires a lower pH to induce fusion. Our findings identify key residues in HA1 and HA2 that interact to help regulate H1N1 HA stability and virus infectivity. Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the principal antigen in inactivated influenza vaccines and the target of protective antibodies. However, the influenza A virus HA is highly variable, necessitating frequent vaccine changes to match circulating strains. Sequence changes in HA affect not only antigenicity but also HA stability, which has important implications for vaccine production, as well as viral adaptation

  19. Intermonomer Interactions in Hemagglutinin Subunits HA1 and HA2 Affecting Hemagglutinin Stability and Influenza Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    DeFeo, Christopher J.; Alvarado-Facundo, Esmeralda; Vassell, Russell

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) mediates virus entry by binding to cell surface receptors and fusing the viral and endosomal membranes following uptake by endocytosis. The acidic environment of endosomes triggers a large-scale conformational change in the transmembrane subunit of HA (HA2) involving a loop (B loop)-to-helix transition, which releases the fusion peptide at the HA2 N terminus from an interior pocket within the HA trimer. Subsequent insertion of the fusion peptide into the endosomal membrane initiates fusion. The acid stability of HA is influenced by residues in the fusion peptide, fusion peptide pocket, coiled-coil regions of HA2, and interactions between the surface (HA1) and HA2 subunits, but details are not fully understood and vary among strains. Current evidence suggests that the HA from the circulating pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus [A(H1N1)pdm09] is less stable than the HAs from other seasonal influenza virus strains. Here we show that residue 205 in HA1 and residue 399 in the B loop of HA2 (residue 72, HA2 numbering) in different monomers of the trimeric A(H1N1)pdm09 HA are involved in functionally important intermolecular interactions and that a conserved histidine in this pair helps regulate HA stability. An arginine-lysine pair at this location destabilizes HA at acidic pH and mediates fusion at a higher pH, while a glutamate-lysine pair enhances HA stability and requires a lower pH to induce fusion. Our findings identify key residues in HA1 and HA2 that interact to help regulate H1N1 HA stability and virus infectivity. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the principal antigen in inactivated influenza vaccines and the target of protective antibodies. However, the influenza A virus HA is highly variable, necessitating frequent vaccine changes to match circulating strains. Sequence changes in HA affect not only antigenicity but also HA stability, which has important implications for vaccine production, as well

  20. Identification of a novel compound with antiviral activity against influenza A virus depending on PA subunit of viral RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazunori; Koyama, Hiroko; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ueda, Atsushi; Sasaki, Yutaka; Kanesashi, Shin-Nosuke; Ueno, Ryuki; Nakamura, Hironori K; Kuwata, Kazuo; Shimizu, Kazufumi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Aida, Yoko

    2012-08-01

    Influenza viruses have developed resistance to current drugs, creating a need for new antiviral targets and new drugs to treat influenza virus infections. In this study, computational and experimental screening of an extensive compound library identified THC19, which was able to suppress influenza virus replication. This compound had no cytotoxic effects and did not disrupt cell cycle progression or induce apoptosis in MDCK cells as confirmed by WST-1 assays, flow cytometry analysis, and caspase-3 assays. Time-of-addition experiments showed that THC19 acts at a relatively early stage of the viral lifecycle. Subsequent mini-genome assays revealed that THC19 inhibited viral genome replication and/or transcription, suggesting that it interferes with one or more of the viral components that form the ribonucleoprotein complexes, namely polymerase basic 2 (PB2), polymerase basic 1 (PB1), polymerase acidic (PA), nucleoprotein (NP) and viral RNA. Finally, mini-genome assays where PB2, PB1, PA or NP from A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus were replaced with those from A/Udorn/307/1972 (H3N2) virus effectively demonstrated that THC19 inhibited viral multiplication in a manner dependent upon the PA subunit. Taken together, these results suggest that influenza virus PA protein is a potential target for, and may aid the development of, novel compounds that inhibit influenza A virus replication. Copyright © 2012 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. The PB2 Subunit of the Influenza A Virus RNA Polymerase Is Imported into the Mitochondrial Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Long, Joshua C. D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The polymerase basic 2 (PB2) subunit of the RNA polymerase complex of seasonal human influenza A viruses has been shown to localize to the mitochondria. Various roles, including the regulation of apoptosis and innate immune responses to viral infection, have been proposed for mitochondrial PB2. In particular, PB2 has been shown to inhibit interferon expression by associating with the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein, which acts downstream of RIG-I and MDA-5 in the interferon induction pathway. However, in spite of a growing body of literature on the potential roles of mitochondrial PB2, the exact location of PB2 in mitochondria has not been determined. Here, we used enhanced ascorbate peroxidase (APEX)-tagged PB2 proteins and electron microscopy to study the localization of PB2 in mitochondria. We found that PB2 is imported into mitochondria, where it localizes to the mitochondrial matrix. We also demonstrated that MAVS is not required for the import of PB2 into mitochondria by showing that PB2 associates with mitochondria in MAVS knockout mouse embryo fibroblasts. Instead, we found that amino acid residue 9 in the N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence is a determinant of the mitochondrial import of PB2, differentiating the localization of PB2 of human from that of avian influenza A virus strains. We also showed that a virus encoding nonmitochondrial PB2 is attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) compared with an isogenic virus encoding mitochondrial PB2, in a MAVS-independent manner, suggesting a role for PB2 within the mitochondrial matrix. This work extends our understanding of the interplay between influenza virus and mitochondria. IMPORTANCE The PB2 subunit of the influenza virus RNA polymerase is a major determinant of viral pathogenicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of how PB2 determines pathogenicity remain poorly understood. PB2 associates with mitochondria and inhibits the function of the mitochondrial

  2. Multi-target Parallel Processing Approach for Gene-to-structure Determination of the Influenza Polymerase PB2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Spencer O.; Smith, Eric; Raymond, Amy C.; Fairman, James W.; Stewart, Lance J.; Staker, Bart L.; Begley, Darren W.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Lorimer, Donald D.

    2013-01-01

    Pandemic outbreaks of highly virulent influenza strains can cause widespread morbidity and mortality in human populations worldwide. In the United States alone, an average of 41,400 deaths and 1.86 million hospitalizations are caused by influenza virus infection each year 1. Point mutations in the polymerase basic protein 2 subunit (PB2) have been linked to the adaptation of the viral infection in humans 2. Findings from such studies have revealed the biological significance of PB2 as a virulence factor, thus highlighting its potential as an antiviral drug target. The structural genomics program put forth by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) provides funding to Emerald Bio and three other Pacific Northwest institutions that together make up the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). The SSGCID is dedicated to providing the scientific community with three-dimensional protein structures of NIAID category A-C pathogens. Making such structural information available to the scientific community serves to accelerate structure-based drug design. Structure-based drug design plays an important role in drug development. Pursuing multiple targets in parallel greatly increases the chance of success for new lead discovery by targeting a pathway or an entire protein family. Emerald Bio has developed a high-throughput, multi-target parallel processing pipeline (MTPP) for gene-to-structure determination to support the consortium. Here we describe the protocols used to determine the structure of the PB2 subunit from four different influenza A strains. PMID:23851357

  3. Gastro-intestinal delivery of influenza subunit vaccine formulation adjuvanted with Gram-positive enhancer matrix (GEM) particles.

    PubMed

    Saluja, V; Visser, M R; van Roosmalen, M L; Leenhouts, K; Huckriede, A; Hinrichs, W L J; Frijlink, H W

    2010-11-01

    In this study, a liquid formulation of influenza subunit vaccine admixed with Gram-positive enhancer matrix (GEM) particles as adjuvant was delivered to upper and lower parts of intestinal tract. The aim was to determine the most effective immunization site in the intestines. Mice were vaccinated with a liquid formulation of GEM and influenza subunit vaccine orally and rectally. The oral administration of the vaccine with GEM particles induced a better systemic and mucosal immune response than oral (vaccine only) and rectal (with and without adjuvant) immunizations. Rectal administration elicited high IgG1 responses but little IgG2a, indicating a Th2 dominated immune response. In contrast, the oral immunization with GEM particles elicited a balanced IgG1 and IgG2a response. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that GEM-adjuvanted influenza vaccine should be targeted to the upper part of the intestinal tract. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-target parallel processing approach for gene-to-structure determination of the influenza polymerase PB2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Armour, Brianna L; Barnes, Steve R; Moen, Spencer O; Smith, Eric; Raymond, Amy C; Fairman, James W; Stewart, Lance J; Staker, Bart L; Begley, Darren W; Edwards, Thomas E; Lorimer, Donald D

    2013-06-28

    Pandemic outbreaks of highly virulent influenza strains can cause widespread morbidity and mortality in human populations worldwide. In the United States alone, an average of 41,400 deaths and 1.86 million hospitalizations are caused by influenza virus infection each year (1). Point mutations in the polymerase basic protein 2 subunit (PB2) have been linked to the adaptation of the viral infection in humans (2). Findings from such studies have revealed the biological significance of PB2 as a virulence factor, thus highlighting its potential as an antiviral drug target. The structural genomics program put forth by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) provides funding to Emerald Bio and three other Pacific Northwest institutions that together make up the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). The SSGCID is dedicated to providing the scientific community with three-dimensional protein structures of NIAID category A-C pathogens. Making such structural information available to the scientific community serves to accelerate structure-based drug design. Structure-based drug design plays an important role in drug development. Pursuing multiple targets in parallel greatly increases the chance of success for new lead discovery by targeting a pathway or an entire protein family. Emerald Bio has developed a high-throughput, multi-target parallel processing pipeline (MTPP) for gene-to-structure determination to support the consortium. Here we describe the protocols used to determine the structure of the PB2 subunit from four different influenza A strains.

  5. Expression of the hemagglutinin HA1 subunit of the equine influenza virus using a baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed

    Sguazza, Guillermo H; Fuentealba, Nadia A; Tizzano, Marco A; Galosi, Cecilia M; Pecoraro, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    Equine influenza virus is a leading cause of respiratory disease in horses worldwide. Disease prevention is by vaccination with inactivated whole virus vaccines. Most current influenza vaccines are generated in embryonated hens' eggs. Virions are harvested from allantoic fluid and chemically inactivated. Although this system has served well over the years, the use of eggs as the substrate for vaccine production has several well-recognized disadvantages (cost, egg supply, waste disposal and yield in eggs). The aim of this study was to evaluate a baculovirus system as a potential method for producing recombinant equine influenza hemagglutinin to be used as a vaccine. The hemagglutinin ectodomain (HA1 subunit) was cloned and expressed using a baculovirus expression vector. The expression was determined by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. A high yield, 20μg/ml of viral protein, was obtained from recombinant baculovirus-infected cells. The immune response in BALB/c mice was examined following rHA1 inoculation. Preliminary results show that recombinant hemagglutinin expressed from baculovirus elicits a strong antibody response in mice; therefore it could be used as an antigen for subunit vaccines and diagnostic tests. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of the Subunit Structure of the Ribonucleic Acid Genome of Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, L. J.; Content, J.; Leppla, S. H.

    1971-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid extracted from influenza virus was labeled at the 3′ termini with 3H and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Influenza virus was found to contain a minimum of seven and possibly as many as 10 polynucleotide chains, most of which appear to terminate at the 3′ end in uridine. PMID:4332140

  7. Structure-Based Drug Design Targeting a Subunit Interaction of Influenza Virus RNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Kanako; Obayashi, Eiji; Yoshida, Hisashi; Park, Sam-Yong

    Influenza A virus is a major human and animal pathogen with the potential to cause catastrophic loss of life. Influenza virus reproduces rapidly, mutates frequently, and occasionally crosses species barriers. The recent emergence of swine-origin influenza H1N1 and avian influenza related to highly pathogenic forms of the human virus has highlighted the urgent need for new effective treatments. Here, we describe two crystal structures of complexes made by fragments of PA and PB1, and PB1 and PB2. These novel interfaces are surprisingly small, yet they play a crucial role in regulating the 250 kDa polymerase complex, and are completely conserved among swine, avian and human influenza viruses. Given their importance to viral replication and strict conservation, the PA/PB1 and PB1/PB2 interfaces appear to be promising targets for novel anti-influenza drugs of use against all strains of influenza A virus. It is hoped that the structures presented here will assist the search for such compounds.

  8. Identification of a small-molecule inhibitor of influenza virus via disrupting the subunits interaction of the viral polymerase.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Chu, Hin; Zhao, Hanjun; Zhang, Ke; Singh, Kailash; Chow, Billy K C; Kao, Richard Y T; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of the heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase complex from the individual subunits PB1, PA, and PB2 is a prerequisite for viral replication, in which the interaction between the C terminal of PA (PAC) and the N-terminal of PB1 (PB1N) may be a desired target for antiviral development. In this study, we compared the feasibility of high throughput screening by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fluorescence polarization assay. Among the two, ELISA was demonstrated to own broader dynamic range so that it was used for screening inhibitors that blocked PAC and PB1N interaction. Several binding inhibitors of PAC-PB1N were identified and subsequently tested for the antiviral efficacy. Apparently, 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-6-ethyl-7-methyl[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrimidin-5-ol, designated ANA-1, was found to be a strong inhibitor of viral polymerase activity and act as a potent antiviral agent against the infections of multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9 and H9N2 subtypes, in cell cultures. Intranasal administration of ANA-1 protected mice from lethal challenge and reduced lung viral loads in H1N1 virus infected BALB/c mice. Docking analyses predicted that ANA-1 bound to an allosteric site of PAC, which might cause conformational changes thereby disrupting the PAC-PB1N interaction. Overall, our study has identified a novel compound with potential to be developed as an anti-influenza drug. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Immunogenicity of inactivated subunit adsorbed monovalent vaccine against influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) strain].

    PubMed

    Zverev, V V; Kostinov, M P; Mikhailova, N A; Zhirova, S N; Mironov, A N; Terkacheva, O A; Romanova, A A; Cherdantsev, A P

    2011-01-01

    The immunogenicity of Pandeflu subunit vaccine against influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) was evaluated in 70 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 60 years. The vaccine was intramuscularly injected twice at an interval of 28 days. Each dose (0.5 ml) contains A(HIN1) influenza virus hemagglutinin (15 +/- 2.2 microg), aluminum hydroxide (Denmark) (0.475 +/- 0.075 microg), and the preservative thiomerosal (merthiolate) (50 +/- 7.5 microg). The level of antibodies was determined in the microneutralization assay. After administration of two doses of the vaccine at a 28-day interval, the geometric mean antibody titer (GMAT) reached 1:21.1 with a further increase to 1:30 (the baseline GMAT) was 1:6.1). The frequencies of seroconversion and seroprotection were 71.4 and 59.2%, respectively; the antibody increase factor was 4.92, which meets the CPMP criteria. The administration of the vaccine did not result in adverse reactions in the postvaccination period.

  10. Evaluation of a Subunit H5 Vaccine and an Inactivated H5N2 Avian Influenza Marker Vaccine in Ducks Challenged with Vietnamese H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Tze-Hoong; Leung, Connie Y. H.; Fang, H. E.; Chow, Chun-Kin; Ma, Siu-Kit; Sia, Sin-Fun; Ng, Iris H. Y.; Fenwick, Stanley G.; James, Cassandra M.; Chua, Sin Bin; Chew, Siang Thai; Kwang, Jimmy; Peiris, J. S. M.; Ellis, Trevor M.

    2010-01-01

    The protective efficacy of a subunit avian influenza virus H5 vaccine based on recombinant baculovirus expressed H5 haemagglutinin antigen and an inactivated H5N2 avian influenza vaccine combined with a marker antigen (tetanus toxoid) was compared with commercially available inactivated H5N2 avian influenza vaccine in young ducks. Antibody responses, morbidity, mortality, and virus shedding were evaluated after challenge with a Vietnamese clade 1 H5N1 HPAI virus [A/VN/1203/04 (H5N1)] that was known to cause a high mortality rate in ducks. All three vaccines, administered with water-in-oil adjuvant, provided significant protection and dramatically reduced the duration and titer of virus shedding in the vaccinated challenged ducks compared with unvaccinated controls. The H5 subunit vaccine was shown to provide equivalent protection to the other two vaccines despite the H5 antibody responses in subunit vaccinated ducks being significantly lower prior to challenge. Ducks vaccinated with the H5N2 marker vaccine consistently produced antitetanus toxoid antibody. The two novel vaccines have attributes that would enhance H5N1 avian influenza surveillance and control by vaccination in small scale and village poultry systems. PMID:23074648

  11. Cleavage site and Ectodomain of HA2 sub-unit sequence of three equine influenza virus isolated in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Boukharta, Mohamed; Zakham, Fathiah; Touil, Nadia; Elharrak, Mehdi; Ennaji, Moulay Mustapha

    2014-07-12

    The equine influenza (EI) is an infectious and contagious disease of the upper respiratory tract of horses. Two outbreaks were notified in Morocco during 1997 and 2004 respectively in Nador and Essaouira. The aims of the present study concern the amino acids sequences comparison with reference strain A/equine/Miami/1963(H3N8) of the HA2 subunit including the cleavage site of three equine influenza viruses (H3N8) isolated in Morocco: A/equine/Nador/1/1997(H3N8), A/equine/Essaouira/2/2004 (H3N8) and A/equine/Essaouira/3/2004 (H3N8). The obtained results demonstrated that the substitutions were located at Ectodomain (ED) and transmembrane domain (TD), and they have only one arginine in cleavage site (HA1-PEKQI-R329-GI-HA2). In the Ectodomain, the mutation N/1542/T deleted the NGT glycosylation site at position 154 for both strains A/equine/Essaouira/2/2004(H3N8) and A/equine/Essaouira/3/2004(H3N8). Except for mutation D/1602/Y of the A/equine/Nador/1/1997(H3N8) strain, the other mutations were involved in non conserved sites. While the transmembrane domain (TM) of the strain A/equine/Essaouira/3/2004(H3N8) exhibits a substitution at residue C/1992/F. For the A/equine/Nador/1/1997(H3N8) strain the HA2 shows a mutation at residue M/2072/L. Three Moroccan strains reveals a common substitution at the residue E/2112/Q located between transmembrane domain TM and the cytoplasmic domain (CD). The given nature virulence of three Moroccan strains, the identified and reported mutations certainly played a permissive role of infection viral process.

  12. Preclinical activity of VX-787, a first-in-class, orally bioavailable inhibitor of the influenza virus polymerase PB2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Byrn, Randal A; Jones, Steven M; Bennett, Hamilton B; Bral, Chris; Clark, Michael P; Jacobs, Marc D; Kwong, Ann D; Ledeboer, Mark W; Leeman, Joshua R; McNeil, Colleen F; Murcko, Mark A; Nezami, Azin; Perola, Emanuele; Rijnbrand, Rene; Saxena, Kumkum; Tsai, Alice W; Zhou, Yi; Charifson, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    VX-787 is a novel inhibitor of influenza virus replication that blocks the PB2 cap-snatching activity of the influenza viral polymerase complex. Viral genetics and X-ray crystallography studies provide support for the idea that VX-787 occupies the 7-methyl GTP (m(7)GTP) cap-binding site of PB2. VX-787 binds the cap-binding domain of the PB2 subunit with a KD (dissociation constant) of 24 nM as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The cell-based EC50 (the concentration of compound that ensures 50% cell viability of an uninfected control) for VX-787 is 1.6 nM in a cytopathic effect (CPE) assay, with a similar EC50 in a viral RNA replication assay. VX-787 is active against a diverse panel of influenza A virus strains, including H1N1pdm09 and H5N1 strains, as well as strains with reduced susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). VX-787 was highly efficacious in both prophylaxis and treatment models of mouse influenza and was superior to the neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir, including in delayed-start-to-treat experiments, with 100% survival at up to 96 h postinfection and partial survival in groups where the initiation of therapy was delayed up to 120 h postinfection. At different doses, VX-787 showed a 1-log to >5-log reduction in viral load (relative to vehicle controls) in mouse lungs. Overall, these favorable findings validate the PB2 subunit of the viral polymerase as a drug target for influenza therapy and support the continued development of VX-787 as a novel antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza infection.

  13. Preclinical Activity of VX-787, a First-in-Class, Orally Bioavailable Inhibitor of the Influenza Virus Polymerase PB2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Byrn, Randal A.; Jones, Steven M.; Bennett, Hamilton B.; Bral, Chris; Clark, Michael P.; Jacobs, Marc D.; Kwong, Ann D.; Ledeboer, Mark W.; Leeman, Joshua R.; McNeil, Colleen F.; Murcko, Mark A.; Nezami, Azin; Perola, Emanuele; Rijnbrand, Rene; Saxena, Kumkum; Tsai, Alice W.; Zhou, Yi

    2014-01-01

    VX-787 is a novel inhibitor of influenza virus replication that blocks the PB2 cap-snatching activity of the influenza viral polymerase complex. Viral genetics and X-ray crystallography studies provide support for the idea that VX-787 occupies the 7-methyl GTP (m7GTP) cap-binding site of PB2. VX-787 binds the cap-binding domain of the PB2 subunit with a KD (dissociation constant) of 24 nM as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The cell-based EC50 (the concentration of compound that ensures 50% cell viability of an uninfected control) for VX-787 is 1.6 nM in a cytopathic effect (CPE) assay, with a similar EC50 in a viral RNA replication assay. VX-787 is active against a diverse panel of influenza A virus strains, including H1N1pdm09 and H5N1 strains, as well as strains with reduced susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). VX-787 was highly efficacious in both prophylaxis and treatment models of mouse influenza and was superior to the neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir, including in delayed-start-to-treat experiments, with 100% survival at up to 96 h postinfection and partial survival in groups where the initiation of therapy was delayed up to 120 h postinfection. At different doses, VX-787 showed a 1-log to >5-log reduction in viral load (relative to vehicle controls) in mouse lungs. Overall, these favorable findings validate the PB2 subunit of the viral polymerase as a drug target for influenza therapy and support the continued development of VX-787 as a novel antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza infection. PMID:25547360

  14. Safety and antigenicity of whole virus and subunit influenza A/Hong Kong/1073/99 (H9N2) vaccine in healthy adults: phase I randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Iain; Nicholson, Karl G; Glück, Reinhardt; Mischler, Robert; Newman, Robert W; Palache, Abraham M; Verlander, Neville Q; Warburton, Fiona; Wood, John M; Zambon, Maria C

    2003-12-13

    In 1999, avian influenza A/Hong Kong/1073/99 (H9N2) virus emerged as a pandemic threat to human beings. We aimed to assess safety, tolerability, and antigenicity of whole virus and subunit H9N2 vaccines in healthy volunteers. In a phase I randomised trial we randomly assigned 60 participants to whole virus or subunit H9N2 vaccine. Two doses of 7.5 microg, 15 microg, or 30 microg haemagglutinin influenza A H9N2 vaccine, were given 3 weeks apart. We measured antibody responses by haemagglutination-inhibition and microneutralisation. The primary outcome was geometric mean antibody titre 21 days after vaccination. Analysis was per protocol. Both vaccines were safe and well tolerated. The antibody titres after vaccination did not differ significantly between subunit and whole virus vaccine. 24 of 60 prevaccination serum samples had unexpected reactivity to H9N2, but only in participants older than 32 years, in whom one dose of either vaccine evoked antibody responses associated with protection. In participants aged 32 years or younger, antibody responses to one dose of whole virus or subunit vaccine were poor, fulfilling none of the criteria used for yearly relicensing of interpandemic vaccines. Whole virus vaccine produced a significantly higher probability of seroconversion compared with subunit virus for this age-group. In immunologically naive patients whole-virus vaccine produced better responses than subunit vaccine. Two doses of subunit or whole virus vaccine would leave a large proportion of the naive population (< or =32 years) unprotected against A/Hong Kong/1073/99 (H9N2). Primed patients should be protected with a single dose of either vaccine.

  15. The N-Terminal Fragment of a PB2 Subunit from the Influenza A Virus (A/Hong Kong/156/1997 H5N1) Effectively Inhibits RNP Activity and Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Takahito; Hara, Koyu; Nakazono, Yoko; Uemura, Yusaku; Imamura, Yoshihiro; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus has a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) that is composed of three subunits (PB1, PB2 and PA subunit), which assemble with nucleoproteins (NP) and a viral RNA (vRNA) to form a RNP complex in the host nucleus. Recently, we demonstrated that the combination of influenza ribonucleoprotein (RNP) components is important for both its assembly and activity. Therefore, we questioned whether the inhibition of the RNP combination via an incompatible component in the RNP complex could become a methodology for an anti-influenza drug. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that a H5N1 PB2 subunit efficiently inhibits H1N1 RNP assembly and activity. Moreover, we determined the domains and important amino acids on the N-terminus of the PB2 subunit that are required for a strong inhibitory effect. The NP binding site of the PB2 subunit is important for the inhibition of RNP activity by another strain. A plaque assay also confirmed that a fragment of the PB2 subunit could inhibit viral replication. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the N-terminal fragment of a PB2 subunit becomes an inhibitor that targets influenza RNP activity that is different from that targeted by current drugs such as M2 and NA inhibitors. PMID:25460916

  16. The final conformation of the complete ectodomain of the HA2 subunit of influenza hemagglutinin can by itself drive low pH-dependent fusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Sup; Epand, Raquel F; Leikina, Eugenia; Epand, Richard M; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2011-04-15

    One of the best characterized fusion proteins, the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), mediates fusion between the viral envelope and the endosomal membrane during viral entry into the cell. In the initial conformation of HA, its fusogenic subunit, the transmembrane protein HA2, is locked in a metastable conformation by the receptor-binding HA1 subunit of HA. Acidification in the endosome triggers HA2 refolding toward the final lowest energy conformation. Is the fusion process driven by this final conformation or, as often suggested, by the energy released by protein restructuring? Here we explored structural properties as well as the fusogenic activity of the full sized trimeric HA2(1-185) (here called HA2*) that presents the final conformation of the HA2 ectodomain. We found HA2* to mediate fusion between lipid bilayers and between biological membranes in a low pH-dependent manner. Two mutations known to inhibit HA-mediated fusion strongly inhibited the fusogenic activity of HA2*. At surface densities similar to those of HA in the influenza virus particle, HA2* formed small fusion pores but did not expand them. Our results confirm that the HA1 subunit responsible for receptor binding as well as the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of HA2 is not required for fusion pore opening and substantiate the hypothesis that the final form of HA2 is more important for fusion than the conformational change that generates this form.

  17. N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles loaded with influenza subunit antigen for intranasal vaccination: biological properties and immunogenicity in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Amidi, Maryam; Romeijn, Stefan G; Verhoef, J Coos; Junginger, Hans E; Bungener, Laura; Huckriede, Anke; Crommelin, Daan J A; Jiskoot, Wim

    2007-01-02

    In this study, the potential of N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles as a carrier system for the nasal delivery of a monovalent influenza subunit vaccine was investigated. The antigen-loaded nanoparticles were prepared by mixing a solution containing TMC and monovalent influenza A subunit H3N2 with a tripolyphosphate (TPP) solution, at ambient temperature and pH 7.4 while stirring. The nanoparticles had an average size of about 800 nm with a narrow size distribution and a positive surface charge. The nanoparticles showed a loading efficiency of 78% and a loading capacity of 13% (w/w). It was shown that more than 75% of the protein remained associated with the TMC nanoparticles upon incubation of the particles in PBS for 3h. The molecular weight and antigenicity of the entrapped hemagglutinin was maintained as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, respectively. Single i.n. or i.m. immunization with antigen-loaded TMC nanoparticles resulted in strong hemagglutination inhibition and total IgG responses. These responses were significantly higher than those achieved after i.m. administration of the subunit antigen, whereas the IgG1/IgG2a profile did not change substantially. The i.n. administered antigen-TMC nanoparticles induced higher immune responses compared to the other i.n. antigen formulations, and these responses were enhanced by i.n. booster vaccinations. Moreover, among the tested formulations only i.n. administered antigen-containing TMC nanoparticles induced significant IgA levels in nasal washes of all mice. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that TMC nanoparticles are a potent new delivery system for i.n. administered influenza antigens.

  18. Influenza neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Air, Gillian M.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Air. (2012) Influenza neuraminidase. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(4), 245–256. Influenza neuraminidase is the target of two licensed antivirals that have been very successful, with several more in development. However, neuraminidase has been largely ignored as a vaccine target despite evidence that inclusion of neuraminidase in the subunit vaccine gives increased protection. This article describes current knowledge on the structure, enzyme activity, and antigenic significance of neuraminidase. PMID:22085243

  19. Clinical efficacy of cell culture–derived and egg‐derived inactivated subunit influenza vaccines in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Frey, Sharon; Vesikari, Timo; Szymczakiewicz-Multanowska, Agnieszka; Lattanzi, Maria; Izu, Allen; Groth, Nicola; Holmes, Sandra

    2010-11-01

    More efficient methods are needed to manufacture influenza vaccines. This trial compared the efficacy of cell culture-derived influenza vaccine (CCIV) and egg-derived trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) with placebo against laboratory-confirmed influenza illness in healthy adults in the United States, Finland, and Poland during the 2007-2008 influenza season. A total of 11,404 study participants aged 18-49 years were randomized equally to receive CCIV (Optaflu; n = 3828), TIV (Agrippal; n = 3676), or placebo (n = 3900). Each participant was observed during a 6-month study surveillance period. Nasal and throat swabs for virus isolation and characterization were collected from all patients with influenza-like illness. Vaccine immunogenicity was evaluated in a subset of 1045 participants. Efficacy of CCIV and TIV against vaccine-like (83.8% [1-sided 97.5% confidence interval [CI] lower limit, 61.0%] and 78.4% [1-sided 97.5% CI lower limit, 52.1%], respectively) and all circulating influenza virus strains (69.5% [1-sided 97.5% CI lower limit, 55.0%] and 63.0% [1-sided 97.5% lower limit, 46.7%], respectively) exceeded the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research efficacy criteria. Immunogenicity of both vaccines exceeded the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research licensing criteria. Both vaccines were well tolerated, with similar safety profiles. Most solicited reactions were mild to moderate in severity and transient. No vaccination-related serious adverse events were reported; no withdrawals resulted from vaccine-related adverse events. Both CCIV and TIV were effective in preventing influenza caused by vaccine-like and by all circulating influenza virus strains, were well tolerated, and had good safety profiles. Both vaccines can be considered for annual influenza vaccination campaigns. NCT00630331.

  20. Immunopotentiation of Different Adjuvants on Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Induced by HA1-2 Subunit Vaccines of H7N9 Influenza in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Xiong, Dan; Hu, Maozhi; Kang, Xilong; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2013, human infections with a novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus were reported in China. The number of cases has increased with over 200 mortalities reported to date. However, there is currently no vaccine available for the H7 subtype of influenza A virus. Virus-specific cellular immune responses play a critical role in virus clearance during influenza infection. In this study, we undertook a side-by-side evaluation of two different adjuvants, Salmonella typhimurium flagellin (fliC) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), through intraperitoneal administration to assess their effects on the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine of H7N9 influenza. The fusion protein HA1-2-fliC and HA1-2 combined with PEI could induce significantly higher HA1-2-specific IgG and hemagglutination inhibition titers than HA1-2 alone at 12 days post-boost, with superior HA1-2 specific IgG titers in the HA1-2-fliC group compared with the PEI adjuvanted group. The PEI adjuvanted vaccine induced higher IgG1/IgG2a ratio and significantly increased numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells than HA1-2 alone, suggesting a mixed Th1/Th2-type cellular immune response with a Th2 bias. Meanwhile, the HA1-2-fliC induced higher IgG2a and IgG1 levels, which is indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2-type profile. Consistent with this, significant levels, and equal numbers, of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells were detected after HA1-2-fliC vaccination. Moreover, the marked increase in CD69 expression and the proliferative index with the HA1-2-fliC and PEI adjuvanted vaccines indicated that both adjuvanted vaccine candidates effectively induced antigen-specific cellular immune responses. Taken together, our findings indicate that the two adjuvanted vaccine candidates elicit effective and HA1-2-specific humoral and cellular immune responses, offering significant promise for the development of a successful recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine for H7N9 influenza. PMID:26930068

  1. Non-inferiority of mammalian cell-derived quadrivalent subunit influenza virus vaccines compared to trivalent subunit influenza virus vaccines in healthy children: a phase III randomized, multicenter, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hartvickson, Robyn; Cruz, Marilou; Ervin, John; Brandon, Donald; Forleo-Neto, Eduardo; Dagnew, Alemnew F; Chandra, Richa; Lindert, Kelly; Mateen, Ahmed Abdul

    2015-12-01

    The safety and immunogenicity of mammalian cell-derived quadrivalent influenza vaccine (QIVc) as compared with trivalent influenza vaccines (TIV1c/TIV2c) was evaluated in children aged ≥4 to <18 years. Two thousand three hundred and thirty-three subjects were randomized 2:1:1 to receive either one or two doses of study vaccine depending on previous vaccination status. Hemagglutination inhibition antibody responses for all four influenza strains were performed 3 weeks after the last dose. Reactogenicity and safety were also assessed (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01992107). QIVc met the non-inferiority criteria against all four vaccine strains and demonstrated superiority for both influenza B strains over the unmatched B lineage included in the comparator vaccines, when geometric mean titers and seroconversion rates were compared at 3 weeks after the last vaccination. Similar percentages of subjects experienced solicited and unsolicited adverse events (AEs) across all subgroups. Unsolicited AEs, serious AEs, medically attended AEs, and new onset chronic disease were reported in comparable percentages of subjects in all study groups. No vaccine-related serious AEs or deaths occurred. QIVc demonstrated a similar safety profile and immunogenicity responses against all four vaccine strains without signs of immune interference on addition of an alternate lineage B strain compared with TIV1c/TIV2c and may provide broader protection against both influenza B lineages in children. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural and Functional Characterization of K339T Substitution Identified in the PB2 Subunit Cap-binding Pocket of Influenza A Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Qin, Kun; Meng, Geng; Zhang, Jinfang; Zhou, Jianfang; Zhao, Guangyu; Luo, Ming; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is a heterotrimer composed of PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is required for both transcription and replication of influenza viral RNA taking place in the nucleus of infected cells. A “cap-snatching” mechanism is used to generate a 5′-capped primer for transcription in which the cap-binding domain of PB2 (PB2cap) captures the 5′ cap of the host pre-mRNA. Our statistical analysis of PB2 sequences showed that residue Lys339 located in the cap-binding pocket of H5N1 PB2cap was gradually replaced by Thr339 over the past decade. To understand the role of this amino acid polymorphism, we solved the crystal structures of PB2cap with or without a pre-mRNA cap analog, m7GTP, in the presence of Lys339 or Thr339. The structures showed that Lys339 contributes to binding the γ-phosphate group of m7GTP, and the replacement of Lys339 by Thr eliminates this interaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry analysis showed that Thr339 attenuated the PB2cap cap binding activity in vitro compared with Lys339. Further functional studies confirmed that Thr339-PB2-containing ribonucleoprotein complex has a reduced influenza polymerase activity and RNA synthesis activity, and a reconstituted H5N1 virus containing the Thr339 substitution exhibited a lower virulence to mice but more active replication in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. The K339T substitution in the cap-binding pocket of PB2 modulates the polymerase activity and virulence by regulating the cap binding activity. It is informative to track variations in the cap-binding pocket of PB2 in surveillance of the evolution and spread of influenza virus. PMID:23436652

  3. Immunogenicity and safety of a cell culture-derived inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine (NBP607): A randomized, double-blind, multi-center, phase 3 clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Lee, Jacob; Woo, Heung Jeong; Wie, Seong-Heon; Lee, Jin-Soo; Kim, Shin Woo; Noh, Ji Yun; Choi, Won Suk; Kim, Hun; Kim, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Woo Joo

    2015-10-05

    Cell culture-derived influenza vaccines (CCIVs) have several important advantages over egg-based influenza vaccines, including shorter production time, better preservation of wild-type virus antigenicity and large-scale production capacity. A randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial was undertaken to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of a novel cell culture-derived inactivated, subunit, trivalent influenza vaccine (NBP607, SK Chemicals, Seongnam, Korea) compared to the control vaccine (AgrippalS1, Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics Srl, Siena, Italy) among healthy adults aged 19 years or older (Clinical trial Number-NCT02344134). Immunogenicity was determined at pre-vaccination, 1 month and 6 month post-vaccination by the hemagglutination inhibition assay. Solicited and unsolicited adverse events were assessed after vaccination. A total of 1156 healthy subjects were recruited. NBP607 met all of the criteria of Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) at 21 days post-vaccination. Contrary to NBP607, the control vaccine did not satisfy the seroconversion criteria for influenza B irrespective of age. Although the geometric mean titer for each influenza subtype declined gradually, seroprotection rate still remained ≥80% for all subtypes up to six month after NBP607 administration. NBP607 recipients met the seroprotection criteria for all three influenza subtypes up to 6 month post-vaccination. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of adverse events between the NBP607 and control groups. NBP607, a novel CCIV, showed excellent immunogenicity that lasted ≥6 months after vaccination and had tolerable safety profiles. In particular, NBP607 was more immunogenic against influenza B compared to the control, an egg-based subunit vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of inactivated virosomal subunit influenza vaccination in children aged 3-14 years from the provider and societal perspectives.

    PubMed

    Navas, E; Salleras, L; Domínguez, A; Ibáñez, D; Prat, A; Sentís, J; Garrido, P

    2007-04-20

    The costs and benefits of vaccinating a theoretical cohort of 1000 preschool and school age children (3-14 years) with one dose of inactivated virosomal subunit influenza vaccine in primary health care centers of the Catalan Health Service during the fall annual health examination were compared with the current strategy of no routine vaccination. The economic analysis was carried out from the provider perspective (cost-effectiveness analysis) and from the societal perspective (cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis). The time horizon of the study was established at 6 months. In the base case (cost of vaccination of euro 9.425, cost of paediatric visit plus antibiotic and antipyretic treatment of euro 42.50, cost of 1 day of hospital stay of euro 454.25, cost of the work lost by the mother to take care of her ill child of euro 29.2 and cost of 1 year of quality adjusted life year lost of euro 10,662), the vaccination does not save money from the provider perspective (net present value=euro-1460.51), but the cost-effectiveness ratios are very reasonable (euro 5.80 per episode of acute febrile respiratory process avoided and euro 18.26 per quality adjusted life year saved). From the societal perspective, the vaccination saves money (net present value=euro+7587.03) and the benefit-cost ratio is 1.80, meaning that euro 0.80 is saved per euro invested. Our study shows that vaccination of children 3-14 years old with a single dose of inactivated subunit influenza vaccine in primary health care centers during the fall annual health examination provides socioeconomic benefits to the society in addition to substantial health benefits for the child.

  5. Efficacy of a non-updated, Matrix-C-based equine influenza subunit-tetanus vaccine following Florida sublineage clade 2 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Pouwels, H. G. W.; Van de Zande, S. M. A.; Horspool, L. J. I.; Hoeijmakers, M. J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the ability of current equine influenza vaccines to provide cross-protection against emerging strains is important. Horses not vaccinated previously and seronegative for equine influenza based on haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay were assigned at random to vaccinated (n=7) or non-vaccinated (control, n=5) groups. Vaccination was performed twice four weeks apart with a 1 ml influenza subunit (A/eq/Prague/1/56, A/eq/Newmarket/1/93, A/eq/Newmarket/2/93), tetanus toxoid vaccine with Matrix-C adjuvant (EquilisPrequenza Te). All the horses were challenged individually by aerosol with A/eq/Richmond/1/07 three weeks after the second vaccination. Rectal temperature, clinical signs, serology and virus excretion were monitored for 14 days after challenge. There was no pain at the injection site or increases in rectal temperature following vaccination. Increases in rectal temperature and characteristic clinical signs were recorded in the control horses. Clinical signs were minimal in vaccinated horses. Clinical (P=0.0345) and total clinical scores (P=0.0180) were significantly lower in the vaccinated than in the control horses. Vaccination had a significant effect on indicators of viraemia – the extent (P=0.0006) and duration (P=<0.0001) of virus excretion and the total amount of virus excreted (AUC, P=0.0006). Vaccination also had a significant effect (P=0.0017) on whether a horse was positive or negative for virus excretion during the study. Further research is needed to fully understand the specific properties of this vaccine that may contribute to its cross-protective capacity. PMID:24795071

  6. Molecular basis of the interaction for an essential subunit PA-PB1 in influenza virus RNA polymerase: insights from molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2010-02-01

    The emergence of the extremely aggressive influenza recently has highlighted the urgent need for new effective treatments. The influenza RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) heterotrimer including PA, PB1 and PB2 has crucial roles in viral RNA replication and transcription. The highly conserved PB1 binding site on PA can be considered as a novel potential drug target site. The interaction between PB1 binding site and PA is crucial to many functions of the virus. In this study, to understand the detailed interaction profile and to characterize the binding hot spots in the interactions of the PA-PB1 complex, an 8 ns molecular dynamics simulation of the subunit PA-PB1 combined with MM-PBSA (molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area), MM-GBSA (molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area) computations and virtual alanine scanning were performed. The results from the free energy decomposition indicate that the intermolecular van der Waals interaction and the nonpolar solvation term provide the driving force for binding process. Through the pair interaction analysis and virtual alanine scanning, we identified the binding hot spots of PA and the basic binding motif of PB1. This information can provide some insights for the structure-based RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors design. The identified binding motif can be used as the starting point for the rational design of small molecules or peptide mimics. This study will also lead to new opportunities toward the development of new generation therapeutic agents exhibiting specificity and low resistance to influenza virus.

  7. Efficacy of a non-updated, Matrix-C-based equine influenza subunit-tetanus vaccine following Florida sublineage clade 2 challenge.

    PubMed

    Pouwels, H G W; Van de Zande, S M A; Horspool, L J I; Hoeijmakers, M J H

    2014-06-21

    Assessing the ability of current equine influenza vaccines to provide cross-protection against emerging strains is important. Horses not vaccinated previously and seronegative for equine influenza based on haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay were assigned at random to vaccinated (n=7) or non-vaccinated (control, n=5) groups. Vaccination was performed twice four weeks apart with a 1 ml influenza subunit (A/eq/Prague/1/56, A/eq/Newmarket/1/93, A/eq/Newmarket/2/93), tetanus toxoid vaccine with Matrix-C adjuvant (EquilisPrequenza Te). All the horses were challenged individually by aerosol with A/eq/Richmond/1/07 three weeks after the second vaccination. Rectal temperature, clinical signs, serology and virus excretion were monitored for 14 days after challenge. There was no pain at the injection site or increases in rectal temperature following vaccination. Increases in rectal temperature and characteristic clinical signs were recorded in the control horses. Clinical signs were minimal in vaccinated horses. Clinical (P=0.0345) and total clinical scores (P=0.0180) were significantly lower in the vaccinated than in the control horses. Vaccination had a significant effect on indicators of viraemia - the extent (P=0.0006) and duration (P=<0.0001) of virus excretion and the total amount of virus excreted (AUC, P=0.0006). Vaccination also had a significant effect (P=0.0017) on whether a horse was positive or negative for virus excretion during the study. Further research is needed to fully understand the specific properties of this vaccine that may contribute to its cross-protective capacity.

  8. Modulation of Immunogenicity and Conformation of HA1 Subunit of Influenza A Virus H1/N1 Hemagglutinin in Tubular Immunostimulating Complexes.

    PubMed

    Sanina, Nina; Davydova, Ludmila; Chopenko, Natalia; Kostetsky, Eduard; Shnyrov, Valery

    2017-09-03

    The HA1 subunit of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is a valuable antigen for the development of vaccines against flu due to the availability of most antigenic sites which are conformational. Therefore, a novel adjuvanted antigen delivery system, tubular immunostimulating complexes (TI-complexes) comprising monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) from different marine macrophytes as a lipid matrix for an antigen, was applied to enhance the immunogenicity of recombinant HA1 of influenza A H1N1 and to study the relation between its immunogenicity and conformation. The content of anti-HA1 antibodies and cytokines was estimated by ELISA after the immunization of mice with HA1 alone, and HA1 was incorporated in TI-complexes based on different MGDGs isolated from green algae Ulva lactuca, brown algae Sargassum pallidum, and seagrass Zostera marina. Conformational changes of HA1 were estimated by differential scanning calorimetry and intrinsic fluorescence. It was shown that the adjuvant activity of TI-complexes depends on the microviscosity of MGDGs, which differently influence the conformation of HA1. The highest production of anti-HA1 antibodies (compared with the control) was induced by HA1 incorporated in a TI-complex based on MGDG from S. pallidum, which provided the relaxation of the spatial structure and, likely, the proper presentation of the antigen to immunocompetent cells.

  9. Intranasal immunization with live recombinant Lactococcus lactis combined with heat-labile toxin B subunit protects chickens from highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Lei, Han; Peng, Xiaojue; Shu, Handing; Zhao, Daxian

    2015-01-01

    Development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus infection is a challenging goal. Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) is an ideal delivery vector for vaccine development, and it has been shown previously that oral immunization of encapsulated secretory L. lactis-hemagglutinin (HA) could provide complete protection against homologous H5N1 virus challenge in the mice model. While intranasal immunization is an appealing approach, it is now reported that secretory L. lactis-HA combined with mucosal adjuvant heat-labile toxin B subunit (LTB) could provide protective immunity in the chicken model. As compared to intranasal immunization with L. lactis-HA alone, L. lactis-HA combined with LTB (L. lactis-HA + LTB) could elicit robust neutralizing antibody responses and mucosal IgA responses, as well as strong cellular immune responses in the vaccinated chickens. Importantly, intranasal immunization with L. lactis-HA + LTB could provide 100% protection against H5N1 virus challenge. Taken together, these results suggest that intranasal immunization with L. lactis-HA + LTB can be considered as an effective approach for preventing and controlling infection of H5N1 virus in poultry during an avian influenza A/H5N1 pandemic.

  10. Mapping the domain structure of the influenza A virus polymerase acidic protein (PA) and its interaction with the basic protein 1 (PB1) subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Guu, Tom S.Y.; Dong Liping; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Tao, Yizhi J.

    2008-09-15

    The influenza A virus polymerase consists of three subunits (PA, PB1, and PB2) necessary for viral RNA synthesis. The heterotrimeric polymerase complex forms through PA interacting with PB1 and PB1 interacting with PB2. PA has been shown to play critical roles in the assembly, catalysis, and nuclear localization of the polymerase. To probe the structure of PA, we isolated recombinant PA from insect cells. Limited proteolysis revealed that PA contained two domains connected by a 20-residue linker (residues 257-276). Far-UV circular dichroism established that the two domains folded into a mixed {alpha}/{beta} structure when separately expressed. In vitro pull-down assays showed that neither individually nor cooperatively expressed PA domains, without the linker, could assure PA-PB1 interaction. Protease treatment of PA-PB1 complex indicated that its PA subunit was significantly more stable than free PA, suggesting that the linker is protected and it constitutes an essential component of the PA-PB1 interface.

  11. Development of single-chain variable fragments (scFv) against influenza virus targeting hemagglutinin subunit 2 (HA2).

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-Wei; Cheng, Shu-Fang; Tseng, Yen-Tzu; Yang, Yu-Chih; Liu, Wen-Chun; Wang, Sheng-Cyuan; Chou, Mei-Ju; Lin, Yu-Jen; Wang, Yueh; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Wu, Suh-Chin; Chang, Ding-Kwo

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) are widespread in birds and domestic poultry, occasionally causing severe epidemics in humans and posing health threats. Hence, the need to develop a strategy for prophylaxis or therapy, such as a broadly neutralizing antibody against IAV, is urgent. In this study, single-chain variable fragment (scFv) phage display technology was used to select scFv fragments recognizing influenza envelope proteins. The Tomlinson I and J scFv phage display libraries were screened against the recombinant HA2 protein (rHA2) for three rounds. Only the third-round elution sample of the Tomlinson J library showed high binding affinity to rHA2, from which three clones (3JA18, 3JA62, and 3JA78) were chosen for preparative-scale production as soluble antibody by E. coli. The clone 3JA18 was selected for further tests due to its broad affinity for influenza H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1. Simulations of the scFv 3JA18-HA trimer complex revealed that the complementarity-determining region of the variable heavy chain (VH-CDR2) bound the stem region of HA. Neutralization assays using a peptide derived from VH-CDR2 also supported the simulation model. Both the selected antibody and its derived peptide were shown to suppress infection with H5N1 and H1N1 viruses, but not H3N2 viruses. The results also suggested that the scFvs selected from rHA2 could have neutralizing activity by interfering with the function of the HA stem region during virus entry into target cells.

  12. Role of fimbriae expressed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in pathogenesis of and protection against otitis media and relatedness of the fimbrin subunit to outer membrane protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Sirakova, T; Kolattukudy, P E; Murwin, D; Billy, J; Leake, E; Lim, D; DeMaria, T; Bakaletz, L

    1994-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is a primary pathogen in both acute otitis media (OM) and chronic OM, yet the pathogenesis of this disease is not fully understood. Although fimbriae have been observed on all clinical OM isolates examined to date, their role in pathogenesis remains unclear. Therefore, the gene which codes for the fimbrial subunit protein (fimbrin) in nontypeable H. influenzae 1128 was isolated, cloned, and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of the fimbrin gene was found to contain an open reading frame of 1,077 bp which would encode a mature fimbrin protein consisting of 338 amino acid with a calculated molecular mass of 36.4 kDa. The translated amino acid sequence was found to be homologous with various OmpA proteins of other gram-negative bacteria, and algorithmic analysis predicted that this protein is organized as a coiled coil. To directly test whether fimbriae are involved in pathogenesis, the fimbrin gene was disrupted, and the biological consequences of disruption were absence of both expression of the fimbrial appendage and the specific immunogold labeling thereof with antisera directed against isolated fimbrial protein, reduced adherence to human oropharyngeal cells in vitro, augmented clearance from the tympanum post-transbullar inoculation, and significantly reduced induction of OM post-intranasal inoculation in a chinchilla model compared with the fimbriated parent strain. We additionally find that either passive immunization or active immunization against isolated fimbrial protein confers partial protection against transbullar challenge. A Western blot (immunoblot) indicated a degree of serological relatedness among fimbrin proteins of 15 nontypeable and type b isolates. These data suggest that fimbrin could be useful as a component of a vaccine to protect against OM. Images PMID:7909539

  13. Compatibility among polymerase subunit proteins is a restricting factor in reassortment between equine H7N7 and human H3N2 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjun; Hatta, Masato; Watanabe, Shinji; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2008-12-01

    Reassortment is an important driving force for influenza virus evolution, and a better understanding of the factors that affect this process could improve our ability to respond to future influenza pandemics and epidemics. To identify factors that restrict the generation of reassortant viruses, we cotransfected human embryonic kidney cells with plasmids for the synthesis of viral RNAs of both A/equine/Prague/1/56 (Prague; H7N7) and A/Yokohama/2017/03 (Yokohama; H3N2) viruses together with the supporting protein expression plasmids. Of the possible 256 genotypes, we identified 29 genotypes in 120 randomly plaque-picked reassortants examined. Analyses of these reassortants suggested that the formation of functional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes was a restricting factor, a finding that correlated with the activities of RNP complexes composed of different combinations of the proteins from the two viruses, as measured in a minigenome assay. For at least one nonfunctional RNP complex (i.e., Prague PB2, Prague PB1, Yokohama PA, and Prague NP), the lack of activity was due to the inability of the three polymerase subunit proteins to form a heterotrimer. Adaptation of viruses possessing a gene encoding a chimera of the PA proteins of the two viruses and the remaining genes from Prague virus resulted in compensatory mutations in the PB2 and/or PA protein. These results indicate substantial incompatibility among the gene products of the two test viruses, a critical role for the RNP complex in the generation of reassortant viruses, and a functional interaction of PB2 and PA.

  14. A novel functional site in the PB2 subunit of influenza A virus essential for acetyl-CoA interaction, RNA polymerase activity, and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Dai; Shoji, Masaki; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Hirota, Takenori; Nagae, Monami; Yanagisawa, Shin; Nakano, Masahiro; Ohmi, Naho; Noda, Takeshi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2014-09-05

    The PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits, components of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus, are essential for viral transcription and replication. The PB2 subunit binds to the host RNA cap (7-methylguanosine triphosphate (m(7)GTP)) and supports the endonuclease activity of PA to "snatch" the cap from host pre-mRNAs. However, the structure of PB2 is not fully understood, and the functional sites remain unknown. In this study, we describe a novel Val/Arg/Gly (VRG) site in the PB2 cap-binding domain, which is involved in interaction with acetyl-CoA found in eukaryotic histone acetyltransferases (HATs). In vitro experiments revealed that the recombinant PB2 cap-binding domain that includes the VRG site interacts with acetyl-CoA; moreover, it was found that this interaction could be blocked by CoA and various HAT inhibitors. Interestingly, m(7)GTP also inhibited this interaction, suggesting that the same active pocket is capable of interacting with acetyl-CoA and m(7)GTP. To elucidate the importance of the VRG site on PB2 function and viral replication, we constructed a PB2 recombinant protein and recombinant viruses including several patterns of amino acid mutations in the VRG site. Substitutions of the valine and arginine residues or of all 3 residues of the VRG site to alanine significantly reduced the binding ability of PB2 to acetyl-CoA and its RNA polymerase activity. Recombinant viruses containing the same mutations could not be replicated in cultured cells. These results indicate that the PB2 VRG sequence is a functional site that is essential for acetyl-CoA interaction, RNA polymerase activity, and viral replication. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Basic amino acids in the N-terminal half of the PB2 subunit of influenza virus RNA polymerase are involved in both transcription and replication.

    PubMed

    Hara, Koyu; Kashiwagi, Takahito; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    The PB2 subunit of influenza virus RNA polymerase is known to be involved in the initiation of transcription of the virus genome via cap binding. However, other specific roles of PB2 for viral RNA synthesis are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that basic residues, 124R, 142R, 143R, 268R and 331K/332R, in the N-terminal half of PB2 are important for the polymerase activity. Notably, R124A mutation remarkably reduced the synthesis of mRNA, cRNA and vRNA in vivo, which was in good agreement with the data obtained in vitro. Cross-linking studies suggested that a reduction of the polymerase activity in the R124A mutant was due to a significant decrease in binding to the viral RNA promoter. In the three-dimensional structure of the polymerase, 124R is visible through the NTP tunnel and is located close to the polymerase active site. We propose that 124R plays a key role in promoter binding during RNA synthesis.

  16. Hydrophobic photolabeling identifies BHA2 as the subunit mediating the interaction of bromelain-solubilized influenza virus hemagglutinin with liposomes at low pH

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, C.; Baechi, T.S.; Semenza, G.; Brunner, J.

    1988-03-22

    To investigate the molecular basis of the low-pH-mediated interaction of the bromelain-solubilized ectodomain of influenza virus hemagglutinin (BHA) with membranes, we have photolabeled BHA in the presence of liposomes with the two carbene-generating, membrane-directed reagents 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl)diazirine ((/sup 125/I)TID) and a new analogue of a phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-(11-(4-(3-(trifluoromethyl)diazirinyl)phenyl)(2-/sup 3/H) undecanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine ((/sup 3/H)-PTPC/11). With the latter reagent, BHA was labeled in a strictly pH-dependent manner, i.e., at pH 5 only, whereas with (/sup 125/I)TID, labeling was seen also at pH 7. In all experiments, the label was selectively incorporated into the BHA2 polypeptide, demonstrating that the interaction of BHA with membranes is mediated through this subunit, possibly via its hydrophobic N-terminal segment. Similar experiments with a number of other water-soluble proteins (ovalbumin, carbonic anhydrase, alpha-lactalbumin, trypsin, and soybean trypsin inhibitor) indicate that the ability to interact with liposomes at low pH is not a property specific for BHA but is observed with other, perhaps most, proteins.

  17. WHO influenza vaccine technology transfer initiative: role and activities of the Technical Advisory Group.

    PubMed

    Francis, Donald P; Grohmann, Gary

    2011-07-01

    In May 2006, the WHO published a Global Pandemic Influenza Action Plan. A significant part of that plan involves the transfer of technology necessary to build production capacity in developing countries. The WHO influenza technology transfer initiative has been successful. Clearly the relatively small WHO investments made in these companies to develop their own influenza vaccine production facilities have had quite dramatic results. A few companies are already producing large amounts of influenza vaccine. Others will soon follow. Whether they are developing egg-based or planning non-egg based influenza vaccine production, all companies are optimistic that their efforts will come to fruition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Mycoplasma Inactivation during Production of Biologics: Egg-Based Viral Vaccines as a Model▿

    PubMed Central

    David, Selwyn A. Wilson; Volokhov, Dmitriy V.; Ye, Zhiping; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    viral purification processes used for the manufacture of an inactivated egg-based vaccine. PMID:20228111

  19. The three subunits of the polymerase and the nucleoprotein of influenza B virus are the minimum set of viral proteins required for expression of a model RNA template.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, E; Bárcena, J; Uez, O; Portela, A

    1997-09-01

    The genes encoding the nucleoprotein, PB1, PB2, and PA proteins of the influenza virus strain B/Panamá/45/90 have been cloned under control of the T7 RNA polymerase promoter of plasmid pGEM-3. Transfection of the recombinant plasmids obtained into mammalian cells, which had been infected with a vaccinia virus encoding the T7 RNA polymerase, resulted in expression of the expected influenza B virus polypeptides. Moreover, it is shown that coexpression of the four recombinant core proteins in COS-1 cells reconstituted a functional polymerase capable of expressing a synthetic influenza B virus-like CAT RNA. By using the influenza B virus recombinant plasmids and a set of pGEM-derived plasmids encoding the homologous core proteins of the influenza A virus A/Victoria/3/75 (I. Mena et al. (1994). J. Gen. Virol. 75, 2109-2114), the capabilities of homo- and heterotypic mixtures of the four core proteins to express synthetic type A and B CAT RNAs were analyzed. Both the influenza A and B virus polymerases were active in expressing, albeit with reduced efficiencies, the heterotypic model CAT RNAs. However, none of all possible heterotypic mixtures of the core proteins reconstituted a functional polymerase. In order to fully characterize the recombinant plasmids obtained, the nucleotide sequences of the cloned genes were determined and compared to sequences of other type B virus isolates. The results obtained from these latter analyses are discussed in terms of the conservation and evolution of the influenza B virus core genes.

  20. A subunit vaccine candidate derived from a classic H5N1 avian influenza virus in China protects fowls and BALB/c mice from lethal challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangliang; Zhang, Fangfang; Shi, Jianzhong; Tian, Guobing; Chen, Hualan; Yu, Kangzheng; Meng, Qingwen

    2013-11-04

    In recent years, numerous human infections with avian influenza viruses in Asia have raised the concern that the next influenza pandemic is imminent. The most effective way to combat human avian influenza is through vaccination of the public. In this study, we developed an influenza A recombinant protein (rH5HA) directed against the hemagglutinin (HA) of a classic H5N1 high pathogenic avian influenza virus isolated in South China in 1996. Following purification of the recombinant protein expressed from a baculovirus expression system, we evaluated the efficiency of rH5HA on specific pathogen free (SPF) chicken, commercial chicken, and in BALB/c mice in an infection-protection model. The results demonstrated that rH5HA induced antibody responses and provided full protection in both SPF chickens and commercial chickens. Protective immunity was generated within 2 weeks in chickens as young as 7-day post-hatch using a minimum amount of rH5HA protein (2μg/bird/vaccination). The serum antibody generated from rH5HA immunization was protective and lasted more than 6 months. Our data also demonstrated that rH5HA immunization protected BALB/c mice from a lethal challenge with pathogenic avian influenza virus. These results suggested that vaccination with rH5HA could be a vaccine candidate for the control of H5N1 avian influenza in poultry, in mice, and potentially in other mammals including human. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The N terminus of PA polymerase of swine-origin influenza virus H1N1 determines its compatibility with PB2 and PB1 subunits through a strain-specific amino acid serine 186.

    PubMed

    Wanitchang, Asawin; Jengarn, Juggragarn; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2011-01-01

    Despite several lines of evidence suggesting possible mechanisms by which the influenza virus polymerase complex, comprising PB2, PB1 and PA, work in concert during virus replication, exactly how they function is not entirely understood. The N terminal region of the PA subunit has been shown to play a key role in various functions through a number of conserved amino acid residues. However, little is known about the role of amino acids reported to be unique for a virus strain. Here, we investigated the functional implication of an amino acid (S186) present uniquely in the N terminus of the PA subunit of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus and determined the effect of its mutation in terms of polymerase activity as well as virus growth. Using chimeric constructs of PA derived from A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) (PR8) and the swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV) H1N1, we found that, when complexed with PB2 and PB1 of PR8, the chimeric PA protein containing the N terminus of S-OIV (1-213) with the remaining region from PR8 showed significantly reduced polymerase activity. Recombinant viruses harboring the chimeric PA also grew poorly in MDCK cells and embryonated eggs. Likewise, the chimeric PA in which the N terminus of PA of PR8 (1-213) was assembled with the remaining region of PA of S-OIV showed a similar phenotype when complexed with PB2 and PB1 of S-OIV. Interestingly, when S186 in the N terminus was altered to the residue common in most strains of influenza virus (G186), the chimeric as well as wild-type PA of S-OIV showed severely impaired polymerase activity when assayed with PB2 and PB1 of S-OIV. Collectively, this finding suggests that S186 at the N terminal region of PA of S-OIV is necessary for the protein to function optimally.

  2. Trivalent MDCK cell culture-derived influenza vaccine Optaflu (Novartis Vaccines).

    PubMed

    Doroshenko, Alexander; Halperin, Scott A

    2009-06-01

    Annual influenza epidemics continue to have a considerable impact in both developed and developing countries. Vaccination remains the principal measure to prevent seasonal influenza and reduce associated morbidity and mortality. The WHO recommends using established mammalian cell culture lines as an alternative to egg-based substrates in the manufacture of influenza vaccine. In June 2007, the EMEA approved Optaflu, a Madin Darby canine kidney cell culture-derived influenza vaccine manufactured by Novartis Vaccines. This review examines the advantages and disadvantages of cell culture-based technology for influenza vaccine production, compares immunogenicity and safety data for Optaflu with that of currently marketed conventional egg-based influenza vaccines, and considers the prospects for wider use of cell culture-based influenza vaccines.

  3. Vaccine efficacy of live-attenuated virus, whole inactivated virus and alphavirus vectored subunit vaccines against antigenically distinct H3N2 swine influenza A viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is an important pathogen in swine, and the main intervention strategy is vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (HA). Three major antigenic clusters, cyan, red, and green, were identified among H3N2 viruses circulating in pigs in ...

  4. Shelf-stable egg-based products processed by high pressure thermal sterilization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Producing a thermally sterilized egg-based product with increased shelf life without losing the sensory and nutritional properties of the freshly prepared product is challenging. Until recently, all commercial shelf-stable egg-based products were sterilized using conventional thermal processing; how...

  5. Egg-adaptive mutations in H3N2v vaccine virus enhance egg-based production without loss of antigenicity or immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Barman, Subrata; Franks, John; Turner, Jasmine C; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J

    2015-06-22

    The recently detected zoonotic H3N2 variant influenza A (H3N2v) viruses have caused 343 documented cases of human infection linked to contact with swine. An effective vaccine is needed for these viruses, which may acquire transmissibility among humans. However, viruses isolated from human cases do not replicate well in embryonated chicken eggs, posing an obstacle to egg-based vaccine production. To address this issue, we sought to identify egg-adaptive mutations in surface proteins that increase the yield of candidate vaccine viruses (CVVs) in eggs while preserving their immunizing effectiveness. After serial passage of a representative H3N2v isolate (A/Indiana/08/2011), we identified several egg-adaptive combinations of HA mutations and assessed the egg-based replication, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1, PR8)-based 6+2 reverse genetics CVVs carrying these mutations. Here we demonstrate that the respective combined HA substitutions G1861V+N2461K, N1651K+G1861V, T1281N+N1651K+R762G, and T1281N+N1651K+I102M, all identified after egg passage, enhanced the replication of the CVVs in eggs without substantially affecting their antigenicity or immunogenicity. The mutations were stable, and the mutant viruses acquired no additional substitutions during six subsequent egg passages. We found two crucial mutations, G186V, which was previously defined, and N246K, which in combination improved virus yield in eggs without significantly impacting antigenicity or immunogenicity. This combination of egg-adaptive mutations appears to most effectively generate high egg-based yields of influenza A/Indiana/08/2011-like CVVs.

  6. The future of cell culture-based influenza vaccine production.

    PubMed

    Perdue, Michael L; Arnold, Frank; Li, Sheng; Donabedian, Armen; Cioce, Vittoria; Warf, Thomas; Huebner, Robert

    2011-08-01

    Influenza vaccines have been prepared in embryonated chicken eggs and used for more than 60 years. Although this older technology is adequate to produce hundreds of millions of doses per year, most viral vaccines are now being produced in cell culture platforms. The question of whether egg-based influenza vaccines will continue to serve the needs of the growing influenza vaccine market is considered here. In 2006, the US government committed to support the development of cell-based influenza vaccines by funding advanced development and expansion of domestic manufacturing infrastructure. Funding has also been provided for other recombinant DNA approaches that do not depend on growth of influenza viruses. As the influenza vaccine industry expands over the next 5-10 years, it will be interesting to follow which of these various technologies are able to best meet the needs of a growing influenza vaccine market.

  7. Additional Evidence That the Polymerase Subunits Contribute to the Viral Replication and the Virulence of H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Isolates in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xiao; Ding, Longfei; Qin, Zhenqiao; Wu, Jianguo; Pan, Zishu

    2015-01-01

    Genetically similar H5N1 viruses circulating in the avian reservoir exhibit different levels of pathogenicity in mice. In this study, we characterized two highly pathogenic H5N1 avian isolates—A/Hunan/316/2005 (HN05), which is highly pathogenic in mice, and A/Hubei/489/2004 (HB04), which is nonpathogenic. In mammalian cells, HN05 replicates more efficiently than HB04, although both viruses have similar growth kinetics in avian cells. We used reverse genetics to generate recombinant H5N1 strains containing genes from HN05 and HB04 and examined their virulence. HN05 genes encoding the polymerase complex determine pathogenicity and viral replication ability both in vitro and in vivo. The PB2 subunit plays an important role in enhancing viral replication, and the PB1 and PA subunits contribute mainly to pathogenicity in mice. These results can be used to elucidate host-range expansion and the molecular basis of the high virulence of H5N1 viruses in mammalian species. PMID:25938456

  8. N- and C-terminal residues combine in the fusion-pH influenza hemagglutinin HA2 subunit to form an N cap that terminates the triple-stranded coiled coil

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jue; Skehel, John J.; Wiley, Don C.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of a stable recombinant ectodomain of influenza hemagglutinin HA2 subunit, EHA2 (23–185), defined by proteolysis studies of the intact bacterial-expressed ectodomain, was determined to 1.9-Å resolution by using x-ray crystallography. The structure reveals a domain composed of N- and C-terminal residues that form an N cap terminating both the N-terminal α-helix and the central coiled coil. The N cap is formed by a conserved sequence, and part of it is found in the neutral pH conformation of HA. The C-terminal 23 residues of the ectodomain form a 72-Å long nonhelical structure ordered to within 7 residues of the transmembrane anchor. The structure implies that continuous α helices are not required for membrane fusion at either the N or C termini. The difference in stability between recombinant molecules with and without the N cap sequences suggests that additional free energy for membrane fusion may become available after the formation of the central triple-stranded coiled coil and insertion of the fusion peptide into the target membrane. PMID:10430879

  9. Antibodies against the majority subunit of type IV Pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ward, Michael O; Jordan, Zachary B; Goodman, Steven D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-04-01

    Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual 'top-down' dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT and delivered via a noninvasive transcutaneous immunization route induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI.

  10. Antibodies against the majority subunit of Type IV pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Laura A.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Ward, Michael O.; Jordan, Zachary B.; Goodman, Steven D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual ‘top-down’ dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT, and delivered via a non-invasive transcutaneous immunization route, induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization, and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI. PMID:25597921

  11. Antiviral activity of Jinchai capsule against influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Juying; Cui, Xiaolan; Shi, Yujing; Gao, Yingjie; Cao, Hongxin

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the effect on influenza virus of Jinchai, a capsule made of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Madin-darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were infected with the FM1 strain of influenza virus A (subtype H1N1) in vitro. They were used to explore how Jinchai affected cell adsorption, cell membrane fusion, transcription and replication of the influenza virus. Hemagglutinin (HA) protein, intracellular pH, and influenza virus protein acid (PA) polymerase subunit were detected with confocal microscopy and real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Jinchai significantly reduced the expression of HA and PA polymerase subunit mRNA in infected MDCK cells. Jinchai also significantly decreased intracellular pH in infected cells. Jinchai had strong anti-influenza activity against the influenza virus. It weakened the ability of the influenza virus to adsorb to cell wall and fuse with cell membranes in the early infection stage, and inhibited the transcription and replication of the virus.

  12. Meningitis - H. influenzae

    MedlinePlus

    ... influenzae meningitis; H. flu meningitis; Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis ... influenzae meningitis is caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteria. This illness is not the same as ...

  13. SWINE INFLUENZA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1931-01-01

    1. It has been possible to demonstrate, in Berkefeld filtrates of infectious material from experimental cases of swine influenza, a virus which when administered intranasally to susceptible swine induced a mild, usually afebrile illness of short duration. The changes in the respiratory tract resembled those in swine influenza but were usually much less extensive. When the filtrable virus was mixed with pure cultures of H. influenzae suis and administered to swine a disease identical clinically and pathologically with swine influenza was induced. The data presented indicate that the filtrable virus of swine influenza and H. influenzae suis act in concert to produce swine influenza and that neither alone is capable of inducing the disease. 2. One attack of swine influenza usually renders an animal immune to reinfection. Blood serum from an animal made immune in this way neutralizes infectious material from swine influenza in vitro, as shown by the failure of the mixture to produce disease in a susceptible animal. 3. The virus can be stored in a dried state or in glycerol for several weeks at least. In one instance dried material apparently retained both the virus and H. influenzas suis in viable form for a period of 54 days. 4. Fatal cases of experimental swine influenza have been observed in which H. influenzae suis was the only organism that could be cultivated from the respiratory tract. 5. Attention has been called to some features of marked similarity between epizootic swine influenzae and epidemic influenzae in man. PMID:19869924

  14. Cross-protection against drifted influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Andrea; Ansaldi, Filippo; de Florentiis, Daniela; Ceravolo, Antonella; Parodi, Valentina; Canepa, Paola; Coppelli, Martina; Icardi, Giancarlo; Durando, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Antigenic drift, the evolutionary mechanism of influenza viruses, results in an increased susceptibility of vaccinated subjects against circulating viruses. New vaccines able to grant a broader and cross-reactive immune response against drifted influenza variants are needed. Several strategies were explored to enhance the immunogenicity of plain vaccines: adjuvants, carriers and intradermal administration of influenza vaccine emerge as a promising options. To evaluate the ability of a MF59™-adjuvanted and intradermal influenza vaccine to elicit an effective antibody response against circulating viruses presenting antigenic patterns different from those of the vaccine strains, we compared antibody responses elicited by “implemented” vaccines and conventional intramuscular trivalent inactivated vaccine against heterologous circulating influenza A viruses. Different studies, simulating different epidemiological pictures produced by the natural antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses, highlighted the superior cross-reactivity of the antibodies elicited by MF59™ and intradermal vaccines, compared with subunit or split vaccine against heterologous viruses. PMID:23295230

  15. Experimental vaccines against potentially pandemic and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Alaina J; Tompkins, S Mark

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A viruses continue to emerge and re-emerge, causing outbreaks, epidemics and occasionally pandemics. While the influenza vaccines licensed for public use are generally effective against seasonal influenza, issues arise with production, immunogenicity, and efficacy in the case of vaccines against pandemic and emerging influenza viruses, and highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in particular. Thus, there is need of improved influenza vaccines and vaccination strategies. This review discusses advances in alternative influenza vaccines, touching briefly on licensed vaccines and vaccine antigens; then reviewing recombinant subunit vaccines, virus-like particle vaccines and DNA vaccines, with the main focus on virus-vectored vaccine approaches. PMID:23440999

  16. Avian influenza

    MedlinePlus

    Bird flu; H5N1; H5N2; H5N8; H7N9; Avian influenza A (HPAI) H5 ... The first avian influenza in humans was reported in Hong Kong in 1997. It was called avian influenza (H5N1). The outbreak was linked ...

  17. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Variant Other Information on Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Virus Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ... disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that regularly cause outbreaks of influenza in pigs. ...

  18. Anti-influenza activity of phenethylphenylphthalimide analogs derived from thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Yuma; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Hatakeyama, Dai; Motoshima, Kazunori; Ishikawa, Minoru; Sugita, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Harada, Yuichi; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Sei, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2010-07-15

    Swine-origin influenza A virus has caused pandemics throughout the world and influenza A is regarded as a serious global health issue. Hence, novel drugs that will target these viruses are very desirable. Influenza A expresses an RNA polymerase essential for its transcription and replication which comprises PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits. We identified potential novel anti-influenza agents from a screen of 34 synthesized phenethylphenylphthalimide analogs derived from thalidomide (PPT analogs). For this screen we used a PA endonuclease inhibition assay, a PB2 pathogenicity-determinant domain-binding assay, and an anti-influenza A virus assay. Three PPT analogs, PPT-65, PPT-66, and PPT-67, were found to both inhibit PA endonuclease activity and retard the growth of influenza A, suggesting a correlation between their activities. PPT-28 was also found to inhibit the growth of influenza A. These four analogs have a 3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl group in common. We also discuss the possibility that 3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl group flexibility may play an important functional role in PA endonuclease inhibition. Another analog harboring a dimethoxyphenethyl group, PPT-62, showed PB2 pathogenicity-determinant domain-binding activity, but did not inhibit the growth of the virus. Our present results indicate the utility of the PA endonuclease assay in the screening of anti-influenza drugs and are therefore useful for future strategies to develop novel anti-influenza A drugs and for mapping the function of the influenza A RNA polymerase subunits.

  19. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Lara-Puente, Horacio; Espitia, Clara; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura C.; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans. PMID:26919288

  20. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Pérez-Toledo, Marisol; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Lara-Puente, Horacio; Espitia, Clara; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura C; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans.

  1. Development of Stable Influenza Vaccine Powder Formulations: Challenges and Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Amorij, J-P.; Huckriede, A.; Wilschut, J.; Frijlink, H. W.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza vaccination represents the cornerstone of influenza prevention. However, today all influenza vaccines are formulated as liquids that are unstable at ambient temperatures and have to be stored and distributed under refrigeration. In order to stabilize influenza vaccines, they can be brought into the dry state using suitable excipients, stabilizers and drying processes. The resulting stable influenza vaccine powder is independent of cold-chain facilities. This can be attractive for the integration of the vaccine logistics with general drug distribution in Western as well as developing countries. In addition, a stockpile of stable vaccine formulations of potential vaccines against pandemic viruses can provide an immediate availability and simple distribution of vaccine in a pandemic outbreak. Finally, in the development of new needle-free dosage forms, dry and stable influenza vaccine powder formulations can facilitate new or improved targeting strategies for the vaccine compound. This review represents the current status of dry stable inactivated influenza vaccine development. Attention is given to the different influenza vaccine types (i.e. whole inactivated virus, split, subunit or virosomal vaccine), the rationale and need for stabilized influenza vaccines, drying methods by which influenza vaccines can be stabilized (i.e. lyophilization, spray drying, spray-freeze drying, vacuum drying or supercritical fluid drying), the current status of dry influenza vaccine development and the challenges for ultimate market introduction of a stable and effective dry-powder influenza vaccine. PMID:18338241

  2. Development of influenza vaccine production capacity by the Government Pharmaceutical Organization of Thailand: addressing the threat of an influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Surichan, Somchaiya; Wirachwong, Ponthip; Supachaturas, Wutichai; Utid, Kanchala; Theerasurakarn, Sompone; Langsanam, Pimsuk; Lakornrach, Pattharachai; Nitisaporn, Ladda; Chansikkakorn, Chanpen; Vangkanonta, Wilak; Kaweepornpoj, Ruangchai; Poopipatpol, Kittisak; Thirapakpoomanunt, Sit; Srichainak, Somchai; Artavatkun, Witit; Chokevivat, Vichai; Wibulpolprasert, Suwit

    2011-07-01

    In 2005, a year after highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreaks in Thailand, the Thai Government issued a National Strategy Plan for Pandemic Influenza Preparedness, a major objective of which was the domestic production of seasonal influenza vaccine. It was considered that sustained influenza vaccine production was the best guarantee of a pandemic vaccine in the event of a future pandemic. The Government decided to provide funds to establish an industrial-scale influenza vaccine production plant, and gave responsibility for this challenging project to the Government Pharmaceutical Organization (GPO). In 2007, with support from the World Health Organization (WHO), the GPO started to develop egg-based, trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in a renovated pilot plant. In early 2009, during the second year of the project, the GPO turned its attention to develop a pandemic live attenuated influenza vaccine (PLAIV) against the influenza A (H1N1) virus. By December 2010, the H1N1 PLAIV had successfully completed Phase II clinical trials and was awaiting registration approval from the Thai Food and Drug Administration (TFDA). The GPO has also started to develop an H5N2 PLAIV, which is expected to enter clinical trials in January 2011. The next step in 2011 will be the development and clinical evaluation of seasonal LAIV. To meet the needs of the national seasonal influenza vaccination programme, the GPO aims to produce 2 million doses of trivalent IIV in 2012 and progressively increase production to the maximum annual capacity of 10 million doses. This article relates how influenza vaccine production capacity was developed and how major challenges are being met in an expeditious manner, with strong local and global commitment.

  3. Utility of Respiratory Vaccination With Recombinant Subunit Vaccines for Protection Against Pneumonic Plague

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Immunity at mucosal sites can prevent pathogen infection of the host. A) oral poliovirus vaccine B) inhaled influenza vaccine C) kennel cough & Newcastle...Utility of respiratory vaccination with recombinant subunit vaccines for protection against pneumonic plague. Douglas S. Reed & Jennifer Smoll...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Utility of respiratory vaccination with recombinant subunit vaccines for

  4. Influenza surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, M.; Assaad, F. A.; Delon, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    The main objectives of influenza surveillance are: to measure the impact of the disease by collection and analysis of epidemiological information on morbidity and mortality, and to anticipate future epidemics and pandemics by the collection and analysis of influenza viruses. The World Health Organization's influenza programme is based on the collaboration of 98 national influenza centres in 70 countries and the 2 WHO Collaborating Centres in Atlanta and London. Epidemiological information may be based on morbidity figures derived from a variety of sources such as returns from physicians or hospitals; mortality statistics or new claims for sickness benefit; school or industrial absenteeism, etc. The laboratory aspects of influenza epidemiology are certainly more uniformly covered than the statistical aspects. Since the advent of the A/Hong Kong/1/68 (H3N2) influenza virus A subtype there have been a number of variants with antigenic ”drift” but only three succeeded in causing widespread epidemics: A/England/42/72, A/Port Chalmers/1/73, and A/Victoria/3/75. In 1972, the influenza B virus also showed some antigenic ”drift”, the new variants being characterized by B/Hong Kong/5/72. Whenever a new variant appears, the degree of protection afforded to the population by the available vaccine is assessed. In the light of these data, WHO publishes annually in the Weekly epidemiological record recommendations formulated by the WHO Collaborating Centres on vaccine composition. PMID:78771

  5. Avian influenza pandemic preparedness: developing prepandemic and pandemic vaccines against a moving target

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neetu; Pandey, Aseem; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented global spread of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses within the past ten years and their extreme lethality to poultry and humans has underscored their potential to cause an influenza pandemic. Combating the threat of an impending H5N1 influenza pandemic will require a combination of pharmaceutical and nonpharmaceutical intervention strategies. The emergence of the H1N1 pandemic in 2009 emphasised the unpredictable nature of a pandemic influenza. Undoubtedly, vaccines offer the most viable means to combat a pandemic threat. Current egg-based influenza vaccine manufacturing strategies are unlikely to be able to cater to the huge, rapid global demand because of the anticipated scarcity of embryonated eggs in an avian influenza pandemic and other factors associated with the vaccine production process. Therefore, alternative, egg-independent vaccine manufacturing strategies should be evaluated to supplement the traditional egg-derived influenza vaccine manufacturing. Furthermore, evaluation of dose-sparing strategies that offer protection with a reduced antigen dose will be critical for pandemic influenza preparedness. Development of new antiviral therapeutics and other, nonpharmaceutical intervention strategies will further supplement pandemic preparedness. This review highlights the current status of egg-dependent and egg-independent strategies against an avian influenza pandemic. PMID:20426889

  6. Virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines for pandemic influenza: performance of a VLP vaccine during the 2009 influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    López-Macías, Constantino

    2012-03-01

    The influenza pandemic of 2009 demonstrated the inability of the established global capacity for egg-based vaccine production technology to provide sufficient vaccine for the population in a timely fashion. Several alternative technologies for developing influenza vaccines have been proposed, among which non-replicating virus-like particles (VLPs) represent an attractive option because of their safety and immunogenic characteristics. VLP vaccines against pandemic influenza have been developed in tobacco plant cells and in Sf9 insect cells infected with baculovirus that expresses protein genes from pandemic influenza strains. These technologies allow rapid and large-scale production of vaccines (3-12 weeks). The 2009 influenza outbreak provided an opportunity for clinical testing of a pandemic influenza VLP vaccine in the midst of the outbreak at its epicenter in Mexico. An influenza A(H1N1)2009 VLP pandemic vaccine (produced in insect cells) was tested in a phase II clinical trial involving 4,563 healthy adults. Results showed that the vaccine is safe and immunogenic despite high preexisting anti-A(H1N1)2009 antibody titers present in the population. The safety and immunogenicity profile presented by this pandemic VLP vaccine during the outbreak in Mexico suggests that VLP technology is a suitable alternative to current influenza vaccine technologies for producing pandemic and seasonal vaccines.

  7. Rapid production of a H₉ N₂ influenza vaccine from MDCK cells for protecting chicken against influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhenghua; Lu, Zhongzheng; Wang, Lei; Huo, Zeren; Cui, Jianhua; Zheng, Tingting; Dai, Qing; Chen, Cuiling; Qin, Mengying; Chen, Meihua; Yang, Rirong

    2015-04-01

    H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses are widespread in domestic poultry, and vaccination remains the most effective way to protect the chicken population from avian influenza pandemics. Currently, egg-based H9N2 influenza vaccine production has several disadvantages and mammalian MDCK cells are being investigated as candidates for influenza vaccine production. However, little research has been conducted on low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) such as H9N2 replicating in mammalian cells using microcarrier beads in a bioreactor. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of a safe H9N2 influenza vaccine derived from MDCK cells for protecting chickens against influenza virus infection. In 2008, we isolated two novel H9N2 influenza viruses from chickens raised in southern China, and these H9N2 viruses were adapted to MDCK cells. The H9N2 virus was produced in MDCK cells in a scalable bioreactor, purified, inactivated, and investigated for use as a vaccine. The MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine was able to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies in chickens of different ages. Histopathological examination, direct immunofluorescence, HI assay, CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio test, and cytokine evaluation indicated that the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine evoked a rapid and effective immune response to protect chickens from influenza infection. High titers of H9N2-specific antibodies were maintained in chickens for 5 months, and the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine had no effects on chicken growth. The use of MDCK cells in bioreactors for LPAIV vaccine production is an attractive option to prevent outbreaks of LPAIV in poultry.

  8. Anti-Influenza Activity of C60 Fullerene Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Masaki; Takahashi, Etsuhisa; Hatakeyama, Dai; Iwai, Yuma; Morita, Yuka; Shirayama, Riku; Echigo, Noriko; Kido, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shigeo; Mashino, Tadahiko; Okutani, Takeshi; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The H1N1 influenza A virus, which originated in swine, caused a global pandemic in 2009, and the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus has also caused epidemics in Southeast Asia in recent years. Thus, the threat from influenza A remains a serious global health issue, and novel drugs that target these viruses are highly desirable. Influenza A RNA polymerase consists of the PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits, and the N-terminal domain of the PA subunit demonstrates endonuclease activity. Fullerene (C60) is a unique carbon molecule that forms a sphere. To identify potential new anti-influenza compounds, we screened 12 fullerene derivatives using an in vitro PA endonuclease inhibition assay. We identified 8 fullerene derivatives that inhibited the endonuclease activity of the PA N-terminal domain or full-length PA protein in vitro. We also performed in silico docking simulation analysis of the C60 fullerene and PA endonuclease, which suggested that fullerenes can bind to the active pocket of PA endonuclease. In a cell culture system, we found that several fullerene derivatives inhibit influenza A viral infection and the expression of influenza A nucleoprotein and nonstructural protein 1. These results indicate that fullerene derivatives are possible candidates for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs. PMID:23785493

  9. Anti-influenza activity of c60 fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Masaki; Takahashi, Etsuhisa; Hatakeyama, Dai; Iwai, Yuma; Morita, Yuka; Shirayama, Riku; Echigo, Noriko; Kido, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shigeo; Mashino, Tadahiko; Okutani, Takeshi; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The H1N1 influenza A virus, which originated in swine, caused a global pandemic in 2009, and the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus has also caused epidemics in Southeast Asia in recent years. Thus, the threat from influenza A remains a serious global health issue, and novel drugs that target these viruses are highly desirable. Influenza A RNA polymerase consists of the PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits, and the N-terminal domain of the PA subunit demonstrates endonuclease activity. Fullerene (C60) is a unique carbon molecule that forms a sphere. To identify potential new anti-influenza compounds, we screened 12 fullerene derivatives using an in vitro PA endonuclease inhibition assay. We identified 8 fullerene derivatives that inhibited the endonuclease activity of the PA N-terminal domain or full-length PA protein in vitro. We also performed in silico docking simulation analysis of the C60 fullerene and PA endonuclease, which suggested that fullerenes can bind to the active pocket of PA endonuclease. In a cell culture system, we found that several fullerene derivatives inhibit influenza A viral infection and the expression of influenza A nucleoprotein and nonstructural protein 1. These results indicate that fullerene derivatives are possible candidates for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs.

  10. Preflucel®: a Vero-cell culture-derived trivalent influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chan, Candice Yuen-Yue; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah

    2012-07-01

    Vaccination is the principal means to reduce the impact of influenza infection. Effective vaccination programs require a reliable and safe production system. Traditionally, influenza vaccines are produced in embryonated chicken eggs. Over the last two decades, new cell culture-derived vaccines have been licensed and manufactured, and other vaccines are still in various phases of development. Vero cells have been used for the development of a wide variety of vaccines including influenza vaccines. Pandemic and avian influenza vaccines derived from Vero cells have been shown to be well tolerated and immunogenic in animal and Phase I-II clinical studies. A Phase III randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a trivalent influenza vaccine produced in Vero-cell culture was conducted in 7250 adults aged 18-49 years. Overall protective efficacy for antigenically matched influenza vaccine was 78.5%. The vaccine was well tolerated with no treatment-related serious adverse events and compared favorably with egg-derived vaccines from previous trials. Vero-cell-derived influenza vaccines have the potential to be an important parts of the influenza vaccine strategy, especially if an avian-derived strain becomes predominant or the demand outstrips the capacity of egg-based production systems.

  11. Evaluation of MDCK Cell-Derived Influenza H7N9 Vaccine Candidates in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Fen; Weng, Tsai-Chuan; Lai, Chia-Chun; Lin, Jun-Yang; Chen, Po-Ling; Wang, Ya-Fang; Chao, Sin-Ru; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Hwang, Yi-Shiuh; Yeh, Chia-Tsui; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chen, Yee-Chun; Su, Ih-Jen; Lee, Min-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) viruses emerged as human pathogens in China in early 2013 and have killed >100 persons. Influenza vaccines are mainly manufactured using egg-based technology which could not meet the surging demand during influenza pandemics. In this study, we evaluated cell-based influenza H7N9 vaccines in ferrets. An egg-derived influenza H7N9 reassortant vaccine virus was adapted in MDCK cells. Influenza H7N9 whole virus vaccine antigen was manufactured using a microcarrier-based culture system. Immunogenicity and protection of the vaccine candidates with three different formulations (300μg aluminum hydroxide, 1.5μg HA, and 1.5μg HA plus 300μg aluminum hydroxide) were evaluated in ferrets. In ferrets receiving two doses of vaccination, geometric mean titers of hemagglutination (HA) inhibition and neutralizing antibodies were <10 and <40 for the control group (adjuvant only), 17 and 80 for the unadjuvanted (HA only) group, and 190 and 640 for the adjuvanted group (HA plus adjuvant), respectively. After challenge with wild-type influenza H7N9 viruses, virus titers in respiratory tracts of the adjuvanted group were significantly lower than that in the control, and unadjuvanted groups. MDCK cell-derived influenza H7N9 whole virus vaccine candidate is immunogenic and protective in ferrets and clinical development is highly warranted. PMID:25799397

  12. Virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines for pandemic influenza

    PubMed Central

    López-Macías, Constantino

    2012-01-01

    The influenza pandemic of 2009 demonstrated the inability of the established global capacity for egg-based vaccine production technology to provide sufficient vaccine for the population in a timely fashion. Several alternative technologies for developing influenza vaccines have been proposed, among which non-replicating virus-like particles (VLPs) represent an attractive option because of their safety and immunogenic characteristics. VLP vaccines against pandemic influenza have been developed in tobacco plant cells and in Sf9 insect cells infected with baculovirus that expresses protein genes from pandemic influenza strains. These technologies allow rapid and large-scale production of vaccines (3–12 weeks). The 2009 influenza outbreak provided an opportunity for clinical testing of a pandemic influenza VLP vaccine in the midst of the outbreak at its epicenter in Mexico. An influenza A(H1N1)2009 VLP pandemic vaccine (produced in insect cells) was tested in a phase II clinical trial involving 4,563 healthy adults. Results showed that the vaccine is safe and immunogenic despite high preexisting anti-A(H1N1)2009 antibody titers present in the population. The safety and immunogenicity profile presented by this pandemic VLP vaccine during the outbreak in Mexico suggests that VLP technology is a suitable alternative to current influenza vaccine technologies for producing pandemic and seasonal vaccines. PMID:22330956

  13. Avian Influenza/Pandemic Influenza Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS) research related to avian influenza and pandemic influenza preparedness and...surveillance and efforts in support of research related to avian influenza /pandemic influenza. The results of these efforts will be coordinated with the

  14. Current and emerging cell culture manufacturing technologies for influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Milián, Ernest; Kamen, Amine A

    2015-01-01

    Annually, influenza virus infects millions of people worldwide. Vaccination programs against seasonal influenza infections require the production of hundreds of million doses within a very short period of time. The influenza vaccine is currently produced using a technology developed in the 1940s that relies on replicating the virus in embryonated hens' eggs. The monovalent viral preparation is inactivated and purified before being formulated in trivalent or tetravalent influenza vaccines. The production process has depended on a continuous supply of eggs. In the case of pandemic outbreaks, this mode of production might be problematic because of a possible drastic reduction in the egg supply and the low flexibility of the manufacturing process resulting in a lack of supply of the required vaccine doses in a timely fashion. Novel production systems using mammalian or insect cell cultures have emerged to overcome the limitations of the egg-based production system. These industrially well-established production systems have been primarily selected for a faster and more flexible response to pandemic threats. Here, we review the most important cell culture manufacturing processes that have been developed in recent years for mass production of influenza vaccines.

  15. Current and Emerging Cell Culture Manufacturing Technologies for Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Milián, Ernest; Kamen, Amine A.

    2015-01-01

    Annually, influenza virus infects millions of people worldwide. Vaccination programs against seasonal influenza infections require the production of hundreds of million doses within a very short period of time. The influenza vaccine is currently produced using a technology developed in the 1940s that relies on replicating the virus in embryonated hens' eggs. The monovalent viral preparation is inactivated and purified before being formulated in trivalent or tetravalent influenza vaccines. The production process has depended on a continuous supply of eggs. In the case of pandemic outbreaks, this mode of production might be problematic because of a possible drastic reduction in the egg supply and the low flexibility of the manufacturing process resulting in a lack of supply of the required vaccine doses in a timely fashion. Novel production systems using mammalian or insect cell cultures have emerged to overcome the limitations of the egg-based production system. These industrially well-established production systems have been primarily selected for a faster and more flexible response to pandemic threats. Here, we review the most important cell culture manufacturing processes that have been developed in recent years for mass production of influenza vaccines. PMID:25815321

  16. Avian Influenza.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Gary Adam; Maslow, Melanie Jane

    2005-05-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate more than 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantining, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent an increase in human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short-interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems, offer promise should a pandemic occur.

  17. Avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Gary A; Maslow, Melanie J

    2006-03-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004 alone, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate over 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantines, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent increased human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short, interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems offer promise, should a pandemic occur.

  18. The Next Wave of Influenza Drugs.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Megan L

    2017-09-11

    Options for influenza therapy are currently limited to one class of drug, the neuraminidase inhibitors. Amidst concerns about drug resistance, much effort has been placed on the discovery of new drugs with distinct targets and mechanisms of action, with great success. There are now several candidates in late stage development which include small molecules targeting the three subunits of the viral polymerase complex and monoclonal antibodies targeting the hemagglutinin, as well as host-directed therapies. The availability of drugs with diverse mechanisms now opens the door to exploring combination therapies for influenza, and the range of administration routes presents more opportunities for treating hospitalized patients.

  19. Sodium channel auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tsai-Tien; McMahon, Allison M; Johnson, Victoria T; Mangubat, Erwin Z; Zahm, Robert J; Pacold, Mary E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are well known for their functional roles in excitable tissues. Excitable tissues rely on voltage-gated ion channels and their auxiliary subunits to achieve concerted electrical activity in living cells. Auxiliary subunits are also known to provide functional diversity towards the transport and biogenesis properties of the principal subunits. Recent interests in pharmacological properties of these auxiliary subunits have prompted significant amounts of efforts in understanding their physiological roles. Some auxiliary subunits can potentially serve as drug targets for novel analgesics. Three families of sodium channel auxiliary subunits are described here: beta1 and beta3, beta2 and beta4, and temperature-induced paralytic E (TipE). While sodium channel beta-subunits are encoded in many animal genomes, TipE has only been found exclusively in insects. In this review, we present phylogenetic analyses, discuss potential evolutionary origins and functional data available for each of these subunits. For each family, we also correlate the functional specificity with the history of evolution for the individual auxiliary subunits.

  20. Immunogenicity of Virus Like Particle Forming Baculoviral DNA Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Yong-Dae; Kim, Sehyun; Cho, Yeondong; Heo, Yoonki; Cho, Hansam; Park, Kihoon; Lee, Hee-Jung; Choi, Jiwon; Poo, Haryoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza H1N1 in 2009, representing the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century, was transmitted to over a million individuals and claimed 18,449 lives. The current status in many countries is to prepare influenza vaccine using cell-based or egg-based killed vaccine. However, traditional influenza vaccine platforms have several limitations. To overcome these limitations, many researchers have tried various approaches to develop alternative production platforms. One of the alternative approach, we reported the efficacy of influenza HA vaccination using a baculoviral DNA vaccine (AcHERV-HA). However, the immune response elicited by the AcHERV-HA vaccine, which only targets the HA antigen, was lower than that of the commercial killed vaccine. To overcome the limitations of this previous vaccine, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, baculovirus-based, virus-like-particle (VLP)–forming DNA vaccine (termed AcHERV-VLP) against pandemic influenza A/California/04/2009 (pH1N1). BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-VLP (1×107 FFU AcHERV-VLP, i.m.) and compared with mice immunized with the killed vaccine or mice immunized with AcHERV-HA. As a result, AcHERV-VLP immunization produced a greater humoral immune response and exhibited neutralizing activity with an intrasubgroup H1 strain (PR8), elicited neutralizing antibody production, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in splenocytes, and diminished virus shedding in the lung after challenge with a lethal dose of influenza virus. In conclusion, VLP-forming baculovirus DNA vaccine could be a potential vaccine candidate capable of efficiently delivering DNA to the vaccinee and VLP forming DNA eliciting stronger immunogenicity than egg-based killed vaccines. PMID:27149064

  1. Influenza (Flu) Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Influenza (Flu) Viruses Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ... circulate and cause illness. More Information about Flu Viruses Types of Influenza Viruses Influenza A and B ...

  2. Influenza Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C., Image Smith 18 "Convalescing, 1918 influenza epidemic" www.vaccineinformation.org/ ... Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C., Image Smith 3 About • Contact • A-Z Index • Site Map • ...

  3. Cold adaptation improves the growth of seasonal influenza B vaccine viruses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsuh; Schoofs, Peter; Anderson, David A; Tannock, Gregory A; Rockman, Steven P

    2014-05-01

    Gene reassortment has proved useful in improving yields of influenza A antigens of egg-based inactivated vaccines, but similar approaches have been difficult with influenza B antigens. Current regulations for influenza vaccine seed viruses limit the number of egg passages and as a result resultant yields from influenza B vaccine seed viruses are frequently inconsistent. Therefore, reliable approaches to enhance yields of influenza B vaccine seed viruses are required for efficient vaccine manufacture. In the present study three stable cold-adapted (ca) mutants, caF, caM and caB derived from seasonal epidemic strains, B/Florida/4/2006, B/Malaysia/2506/2004 and B/Brisbane/60/2008 were prepared, which produced high hemagglutinin antigen yields and also increased viral yields of reassortants possessing the desired 6:2 gene constellation. The results demonstrate that consistent improvements in yields of influenza B viruses can be obtained by cold adaptation following extended passage. Taken together, the three ca viruses were shown to have potential as donor viruses for the preparation of high-yielding influenza B vaccine viruses by reassortment.

  4. Avian Influenza in Birds

    MedlinePlus

    ... during outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza the economic impact and trade restrictions from a highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreak the possibility that avian influenza A viruses could be transmitted to humans When H5 or H7 avian influenza outbreaks occur ...

  5. Influenza viruses: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Neumann, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    We provide a brief introduction into the genome organization, life cycle, pathogenicity, and host range of influenza A viruses. We also briefly summarize influenza pandemics and currently available measures to control influenza virus outbreaks, including vaccines and antiviral compounds to influenza viruses.

  6. Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Recommendations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-04

    Clade I avian influenza vaccine and the option of offering the vaccine to service members prior to the vaccine’s scheduled expiration date in...the questions posed by the DASD (FHP&R). In addition to conducting a review of the current literature of avian influenza vaccines, members of the...antivirals against pandemic influenz.a, as well as a long-term plan for the acquisition of broadly protective pandemic influenza/ avian influenza vaccines

  7. Construction and Characterization of an Infectious Vaccinia Virus Recombinant That Expresses the Influenza Hemagglutinin Gene and Induces Resistance to Influenza Virus Infection in Hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Murphy, Brian R.; Moss, Bernard

    1983-12-01

    A DNA copy of the influenza virus hemagglutinin gene, derived from influenza virus A/Jap/305/57 (H2N2) was inserted into the genome of vaccinia virus under the control of an early vaccinia virus promoter. Tissue culture cells infected with the purified recombinant virus synthesized influenza hemagglutinin, which was glycosylated and transported to the cell surface where it could be cleaved with trypsin into HA1 and HA2 subunits. Rabbits and hamsters inoculated intradermally with recombinant virus produced circulating antibodies that inhibited hemagglutination by influenza virus. Furthermore, vaccinated hamsters achieved levels of antibody similar to those obtained upon primary infection with influenza virus and were protected against respiratory infection with the A/Jap/305/57 influenza virus.

  8. Saikosaponin A inhibits influenza A virus replication and lung immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaqin; Ling, Fangfang; Xiao, Kun; Li, Qian; Li, Bin; Lu, Chunni; Qi, Wenbao; Zeng, Zhenling; Liao, Ming; Liu, Yahong; Chen, Weisan

    2015-01-01

    Fatal influenza outcomes result from a combination of rapid virus replication and collateral lung tissue damage caused by exaggerated pro-inflammatory host immune cell responses. There are few therapeutic agents that target both biological processes for the attenuation of influenza-induced lung pathology. We show that Saikosaponin A, a bioactive triterpene saponin with previouslyestablished anti-inflammatory effects, demonstrates both in vitro and in vivo anti-viral activity against influenza A virus infections. Saikosaponin A attenuated the replication of three different influenza A virus strains, including a highly pathogenic H5N1 strain, in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells. This anti-viral activity occurred through both downregulation of NF-κB signaling and caspase 3-dependent virus ribonucleoprotein nuclear export as demonstrated by NF-κB subunit p65 and influenza virus nucleoprotein nuclear translocation studies in influenza virus infected A549 cells. Critically, Saikosaponin A also attenuated viral replication, aberrant pro-inflammatory cytokine production and lung histopathology in the widely established H1N1 PR8 model of influenza A virus lethality in C57BL/6 mice. Flow cytometry studies of mouse bronchoalveolar lavage cells revealed that SSa exerted immunomodulatory effects through a selective attenuation of lung neutrophil and monocyte recruitment during the early peak of the innate immune response to PR8 infection. Altogether, our results indicate that Saikosaponin A possesses novel therapeutic potential for the treatment of pathological influenza virus infections. PMID:26637810

  9. Microbial quality of industrial liquid egg white: assumptions on spoiling issues in egg-based chilled desserts.

    PubMed

    Techer, Clarisse; Daoud, Amina; Madec, Marie-Noëlle; Gautier, Michel; Jan, Sophie; Baron, Florence

    2015-02-01

    As a 1st step, this study aimed at investigating the microbial quality of liquid egg white in a French egg processing company. Thirty raw and 33 pasteurized liquid egg white samples were analyzed. Pasteurization was globally found efficient on mesophilic contaminants (1.7 ± 1.6 and 0.8 ± 0.9 log CFU/mL in raw and pasteurized samples, respectively), including for the control of Salmonella. However, Gram-positive enterococci were still detected in the pasteurized samples. As a 2nd step, a representative bacterial collection was built for exploring the spoilage issue in egg-based chilled desserts. Custard cream was chosen as growth medium since this food is widely used for the production of French chilled desserts. All of the 166 isolates of the bacterial collection were shown to be able to grow and to induce spoilage of the custard cream at refrigeration temperature (10 °C). Several spoilage types were highlighted in the custard cream, on the basis of changes regarding pH, consistency, production of holes or gas. As a 3rd step, bacterial enzymatic activities were explored on custard cream-based agar media. The bacterial collection was reduced to 43 isolates, based on further selection regarding the genera and the spoilage types previously highlighted. Albeit to different degrees, all these isolates were able to produce proteases. A large part of these isolates also expressed lipolytic and amylolytic activities. This study emphasizes the need to control egg white contamination and especially with Gram-positive heat-resistant Enterococi, in order to guarantee the shelf life of egg-based chilled desserts.

  10. Equine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Landolt, Gabriele A

    2014-12-01

    For decades the horse has been viewed as an isolated or "dead-end" host for influenza A viruses, with equine influenza virus being considered as relatively stable genetically. Although equine influenza viruses are genetically more stable than those of human lineage, they are by no means in evolutionary stasis. Moreover, recent transmission of equine-lineage influenza viruses to dogs also challenges the horse's status as a dead-end host. This article reviews recent developments in the epidemiology and evolution of equine influenza virus. In addition, the clinical presentation of equine influenza infection, diagnostic techniques, and vaccine recommendations are briefly summarized.

  11. Bat-derived influenza-like viruses H17N10 and H18N11.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Wu, Yan; Tefsen, Boris; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2014-04-01

    Shorebirds and waterfowls are believed to be the reservoir hosts for influenza viruses, whereas swine putatively act as mixing vessels. The recent identification of two influenza-like virus genomes (designated H17N10 and H18N11) from bats has challenged this notion. A crucial question concerns the role bats might play in influenza virus ecology. Structural and functional studies of the two major surface envelope proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), demonstrate that neither has canonical HA or NA functions found in influenza viruses. However, putative functional modules and domains in other encoded proteins are conserved, and the N-terminal domain of the H17N10 polymerase subunit PA has a classical structure and function. Therefore, potential genomic reassortments of such influenza-like viruses with canonical influenza viruses cannot be excluded at this point and should be assessed.

  12. A recombinant influenza virus vaccine expressing the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Wendy; Ozawa, Makoto; Hatta, Masato; Orozco, Esther; Martínez, Máximo B; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Infections with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) rank high among the most common human respiratory diseases worldwide. Previously, we developed a replication-incompetent influenza virus by replacing the coding sequence of the PB2 gene, which encodes one of the viral RNA polymerase subunits, with that of a reporter gene. Here, we generated a PB2-knockout recombinant influenza virus expressing the F protein of RSV (PB2-RSVF virus) and tested its potential as a bivalent vaccine. In mice intranasally immunized with the PB2-RSVF virus, we detected high levels of antibodies against influenza virus, but not RSV. PB2-RSVF virus-immunized mice were protected from a lethal challenge with influenza virus but experienced severe body weight loss when challenged with RSV, indicating that PB2-RSVF vaccination enhanced RSV-associated disease. These results highlight one of the difficulties of developing an effective bivalent vaccine against influenza virus and RSV infections. PMID:24292020

  13. Comparison of egg and high yielding MDCK cell-derived live attenuated influenza virus for commercial production of trivalent influenza vaccine: in vitro cell susceptibility and influenza virus replication kinetics in permissive and semi-permissive cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Althaf I; Cordeiro, Melissa; Sevilla, Elizabeth; Liu, Jonathan

    2010-05-14

    Currently MedImmune manufactures cold-adapted (ca) live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) from specific-pathogen free (SPF) chicken eggs. Difficulties in production scale-up and potential exposure of chicken flocks to avian influenza viruses especially in the event of a pandemic influenza outbreak have prompted evaluation and development of alternative non-egg based influenza vaccine manufacturing technologies. As part of MedImmune's effort to develop the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) using cell culture production technologies we have investigated the use of high yielding, cloned MDCK cells as a substrate for vaccine production by assessing host range and virus replication of influenza virus produced from both SPF egg and MDCK cell production technologies. In addition to cloned MDCK cells the indicator cell lines used to evaluate the impact of producing LAIV in cells on host range and replication included two human cell lines: human lung carcinoma (A549) cells and human muco-epidermoid bronchiolar carcinoma (NCI H292) cells. The influenza viruses used to infect the indicators cell lines represented both the egg and cell culture manufacturing processes and included virus strains that composed the 2006-2007 influenza seasonal trivalent vaccine (A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1), A/Wisconsin/67/05 (H3N2) and B/Malaysia/2506/04). Results from this study demonstrate remarkable similarity between influenza viruses representing the current commercial egg produced and developmental MDCK cell produced vaccine production platforms. MedImmune's high yielding cloned MDCK cells used for the cell culture based vaccine production were highly permissive to both egg and cell produced ca attenuated influenza viruses. Both the A549 and NCI H292 cells regardless of production system were less permissive to influenza A and B viruses than the MDCK cells. Irrespective of the indicator cell line used the replication properties were similar between egg and the cell produced

  14. Haemophilus Influenzae Type b

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Haemophilus Influenzae type b Page Content Article Body If you’re like ... may have been unfamiliar with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infections until your pediatrician recommended a vaccine ...

  15. About Haemophilus influenzae Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis About Haemophilus influenzae Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir H. ... severe, such as a bloodstream infection. Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections Infections caused by these bacteria... Causes, How ...

  16. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Information on Avian Influenza Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ...

  17. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT ... to your doctor or pharmacist about the best flu vaccine option for you or your family.

  18. [Influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Antoniukas, Linas

    2007-01-01

    Every year, especially during the cold season, many people catch an acute respiratory disease, namely flu. It is easy to catch this disease; therefore, it spreads very rapidly and often becomes an epidemic or a global pandemic. Airway inflammation and other body ailments, which form in a very short period, torment the patient several weeks. After that, the symptoms of the disease usually disappear as quickly as they emerged. The great epidemics of flu have rather unique characteristics; therefore, it is possible to identify descriptions of such epidemics in historic sources. Already in the 4th century bc, Hippocrates himself wrote about one of them. It is known now that flu epidemics emerge rather frequently, but there are no regular intervals between those events. The epidemics can differ in their consequences, but usually they cause an increased mortality of elderly people. The great flu epidemics of the last century took millions of human lives. In 1918-19, during "The Spanish" pandemic of flu, there were around 40-50 millions of deaths all over the world; "Pandemic of Asia" in 1957 took up to one million lives, etc. Influenza virus can cause various disorders of the respiratory system: from mild inflammations of upper airways to acute pneumonia that finally results in the patient's death. Scientist Richard E. Shope, who investigated swine flu in 1920, had a suspicion that the cause of this disease might be a virus. Already in 1933, scientists from the National Institute for Medical Research in London - Wilson Smith, Sir Christopher Andrewes, and Sir Patrick Laidlaw - for the first time isolated the virus, which caused human flu. Then scientific community started the exhaustive research of influenza virus, and the great interest in this virus and its unique features is still active even today.

  19. Avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza, which is adapted to an avian host. Although avian influenza has been isolated from numerous avian species, the primary natural hosts for the virus are dabbling ducks, shorebirds, and gulls. The virus can be found world-wide in these species and in o...

  20. Influenza, Winter Olympiad, 2002

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Michael A.; Samore, Matthew H.; Lopansri, Bert; Lahey, Timothy; McGuire, Heather L.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Dunn, James J.; Willick, Stuart E.; Vosters, Randal L.; Waeckerle, Joseph F.; Carroll, Karen C.; Gwaltney, Jack M.; Hayden, Frederick G.; Elstad, Mark R.; Sande, Merle A.

    2006-01-01

    Prospective surveillance for influenza was performed during the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics. Oseltamivir was administered to patients with influenzalike illness and confirmed influenza, while their close contacts were given oseltamivir prophylactically. Influenza A/B was diagnosed in 36 of 188 patients, including 13 athletes. Prompt management limited the spread of this outbreak. PMID:16494733

  1. A/H5N1 prepandemic influenza vaccine (whole virion, vero cell-derived, inactivated) [Vepacel®].

    PubMed

    Plosker, Greg L

    2012-07-30

    The influenza A subtype H5N1 virus is a likely causative agent for the next human influenza pandemic. Pandemic influenza vaccine production can begin only after a novel pandemic virus emerges. Cell-based vaccine production has advantages over conventional egg-based methods, allowing more rapid large-scale vaccine production. A reliable Vero cell culture system is available for pandemic and prepandemic influenza vaccine production. Prepandemic influenza vaccines are an important component of influenza pandemic preparedness plans, as their targeted use in the pandemic alert period or early in a pandemic is likely to mitigate the consequences of an influenza outbreak. Vepacel® is a prepandemic influenza vaccine (whole virion, Vero cell-derived, inactivated) containing antigen of H5N1 strain A/Vietnam/1203/2004 and is approved for use in the EU. Clinical immunogenicity studies with the vaccine have demonstrated good rates of functional neutralizing antibody responses against the vaccine strain (A/Vietnam/1203/2004), meeting established immunogenicity criteria for seasonal influenza vaccines, and cross-reactivity against H5N1 strains from other clades. In phase I/II and III studies, a heterologous (A/Indonesia/05/2005) booster vaccine administered to healthy adult and elderly volunteers 6-24 months after the two-dose priming vaccine (A/Vietnam/1203/2004) regimen induced good immunogenic responses against both H5N1 strains, demonstrating strong immunological memory. Broadly similar, albeit less robust, responses were observed in two special risk cohorts of immunocompromised and chronically ill patients. In general, adverse events observed in clinical immunogenicity studies with H5N1 vaccine (A/Vietnam/1203/2004) were similar to those reported with non-adjuvanted, inactivated, seasonal influenza vaccines.

  2. An evaluation of the emerging vaccines against influenza in children.

    PubMed

    Nair, Harish; Lau, Eva; Brooks, W; Seong, Ang; Theodoratou, Evropi; Zgaga, Lina; Huda, Tanvir; Jadhav, Suresh S; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is an under-appreciated cause of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in children. It is estimated to cause approximately 20 million new episodes of ALRI in children annually, 97% of these occurring in developing countries. It is also estimated to result in 28000 to 112000 deaths annually in young children. Apart from hospitalisations and deaths, influenza has significant economic consequences. The current egg-based inactivated influenza vaccines have several limitations: annual vaccination, high production costs, and cannot respond adequately to meet the demand during pandemics. We used a modified CHNRI methodology for setting priorities in health research investments. This was done in two stages. In Stage I, we systematically reviewed the literature related to emerging cross-protective vaccines against influenza relevant to several criteria of interest: answerability; cost of development, production and implementation; efficacy and effectiveness; deliverability, affordability and sustainability; maximum potential impact on disease burden reduction; acceptability to the end users and health workers; and effect on equity. In Stage II, we conducted an expert opinion exercise by inviting 20 experts (leading basic scientists, international public health researchers, international policy makers and representatives of pharmaceutical companies). They answered questions from the CHNRI framework and their "collective optimism" towards each criterion was documented on a scale from 0 to 100%. The experts expressed very high level of optimism for deliverability, impact on equity, and acceptability to health workers and end users. However, they expressed concerns over the criteria of answerability, low development cost, low product cost, low implementation cost, affordability and, to a lesser extent sustainability. In addition they felt that the vaccine would have higher efficacy and impact on disease burden reduction on overall influenza-associated disease

  3. Formulation of microneedles coated with influenza virus-like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Quan, Fu-Shi; Compans, Richard W; Kang, Sang-Moo; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-09-01

    Mortality due to seasonal and pandemic influenza could be reduced by increasing the speed of influenza vaccine production and distribution. We propose that vaccination can be expedited by (1) immunizing with influenza virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines, which are simpler and faster to manufacture than conventional egg-based inactivated virus vaccines, and (2) administering vaccines using microneedle patches, which should simplify vaccine distribution due to their small package size and possible self-administration. In this study, we coated microneedle patches with influenza VLP vaccine, which was released into skin by dissolution within minutes. Optimizing the coating formulation required balancing factors affecting the coating dose and vaccine antigen stability. Vaccine stability, as measured by an in vitro hemagglutination assay, was increased by formulation with increased concentration of trehalose or other stabilizing carbohydrate compounds and decreased concentration of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) or other viscosity-enhancing compounds. Coating dose was increased by formulation with increased VLP concentration, increased CMC concentration, and decreased trehalose concentration, as well as increased number of dip coating cycles. Finally, vaccination of mice using microneedles stabilized by trehalose generated strong antibody responses and provided full protection against high-dose lethal challenge infection. In summary, this study provides detailed analysis to guide formulation of microneedle patches coated with influenza VLP vaccine and demonstrates effective vaccination in vivo using this system.

  4. Continuing challenges in influenza

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Robert G.; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is an acute respiratory disease in mammals and domestic poultry that emerges from zoonotic reservoirs in aquatic birds and bats. Although influenza viruses are among the most intensively studied pathogens, existing control options require further improvement. Influenza vaccines must be regularly updated because of continuous antigenic drift and sporadic antigenic shifts in the viral surface glycoproteins. Currently, influenza therapeutics are limited to neuraminidase inhibitors; novel drugs and vaccine approaches are therefore urgently needed. Advances in vaccinology and structural analysis have revealed common antigenic epitopes on hemagglutinins across all influenza viruses and suggest that a universal influenza vaccine is possible. In addition, various immunomodulatory agents and signaling pathway inhibitors are undergoing preclinical development. Continuing challenges in influenza include the emergence of pandemic H1N1 influenza in 2009, human infections with avian H7N9 influenza in 2013, and sporadic human cases of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza. Here, we review the challenges facing influenza scientists and veterinary and human public health officials; we also discuss the exciting possibility of achieving the ultimate goal of controlling influenza’s ability to change its antigenicity. PMID:24891213

  5. Statistical analysis of influenza vaccine lot consistency studies.

    PubMed

    Nauta, J

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated statistical approach to the analysis of influenza vaccine lot consistency studies in which three lots are compared. The approach ensures that the overall Type I error rate (i.e., the probability of wrongly concluding that the lots are similar) is controlled. It is argued that the optimum efficacy measure is the geometric mean titer. The approach is demonstrated using data from a randomized, double-blind lot consistency study in which three consecutive production lots of Solvay Pharmaceuticals' new, virosomal subunit influenza vaccine Invivac were compared.

  6. Anti-influenza activity of marchantins, macrocyclic bisbibenzyls contained in liverworts.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Yuma; Murakami, Kouki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Hatakeyama, Dai; Echigo, Noriko; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The H1N1 influenza A virus of swine-origin caused pandemics throughout the world in 2009 and the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus has also caused epidemics in Southeast Asia in recent years. The threat of influenza A thus remains a serious global health issue and novel drugs that target these viruses are highly desirable. Influenza A possesses an endonuclease within its RNA polymerase which comprises PA, PB1 and PB2 subunits. To identify potential new anti-influenza compounds in our current study, we screened 33 different types of phytochemicals using a PA endonuclease inhibition assay in vitro and an anti-influenza A virus assay. The marchantins are macrocyclic bisbibenzyls found in liverworts, and plagiochin A and perrottetin F are marchantin-related phytochemicals. We found from our screen that marchantin A, B, E, plagiochin A and perrottetin F inhibit influenza PA endonuclease activity in vitro. These compounds have a 3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl group in common, indicating the importance of this moiety for the inhibition of PA endonuclease. Docking simulations of marchantin E with PA endonuclease suggest a putative "fitting and chelating model" as the mechanism underlying PA endonuclease inhibition. The docking amino acids are well conserved between influenza A and B. In a cultured cell system, marchantin E was further found to inhibit the growth of both H3N2 and H1N1 influenza A viruses, and marchantin A, E and perrotein F showed inhibitory properties towards the growth of influenza B. These marchantins also decreased the viral infectivity titer, with marchantin E showing the strongest activity in this assay. We additionally identified a chemical group that is conserved among different anti-influenza chemicals including marchantins, green tea catechins and dihydroxy phenethylphenylphthalimides. Our present results indicate that marchantins are candidate anti-influenza drugs and demonstrate the utility of the PA endonuclease assay in the screening of

  7. Influenza immunization in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Adlard, P; Bryett, K

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen children with cystic fibrosis and aged between 5 and 13 years were randomized to receive two doses at monthly intervals of either a split-virion influenza vaccine (MFV-Ject, Institut Merieux) or a sub-unit vaccine (Fluvirin, Evans). In those completing the study, there was a satisfactory serological response. There was no statistically significant difference between the immunogenicity of the two vaccines as evaluated by haemagglutination inhibition or single radial haemolysis tests. The incidence of local side-effects was similar in the two groups.

  8. Avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Won; Saif, Yehia M

    2009-07-01

    Avian influenza viruses do not typically replicate efficiently in humans, indicating direct transmission of avian influenza virus to humans is unlikely. However, since 1997, several cases of human infections with different subtypes (H5N1, H7N7, and H9N2) of avian influenza viruses have been identified and raised the pandemic potential of avian influenza virus in humans. Although circumstantial evidence of human to human transmission exists, the novel avian-origin influenza viruses isolated from humans lack the ability to transmit efficiently from person-to-person. However, the on-going human infection with avian-origin H5N1 viruses increases the likelihood of the generation of human-adapted avian influenza virus with pandemic potential. Thus, a better understanding of the biological and genetic basis of host restriction of influenza viruses is a critical factor in determining whether the introduction of a novel influenza virus into the human population will result in a pandemic. In this article, we review current knowledge of type A influenza virus in which all avian influenza viruses are categorized.

  9. Influenza in Children.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra

    2017-02-01

    In children, influenza is one among the commonest causes of acute respiratory illness and loss of school days. Influenza A, B, and C are 3 types of viruses responsible for illness. Type A virus has many subtypes based on antigens but Type B and Type C viruses have no known subtypes. Currently, influenza A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and influenza type B viruses are circulating in humans. Transmission of influenza occurs through droplets from infected person or through direct contact with person or fomites. Clinically, influenza is characterized by acute onset fever, chills, running nose, cough, sore throat, headache and myalgia. Mostly, febrile illness lasts for 3-4 d with resolution of disease in 7-10 d. Confirmation of influenza can be done either by virus culture, RT-PCR or specific neutralizing antibodies in blood. Basic principles of management include prompt institution of infection control measures, early identification of children at higher risk, supportive care and antiviral drugs. Vaccine and chemoprophylaxis are two commonly used methods for prevention of influenza. Currently, inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) are available for use with good efficacy. Cough etiquette, use of face masks and hand hygiene are the most important measures to reduce the risk of infection transmission from person to person.

  10. Application of recombinant hemagglutinin proteins as alternative antigen standards for pandemic influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yejin; Kwon, Seong Yi; Oh, Ho Jung; Shim, Sunbo; Chang, Seokkee; Chung, Hye Joo; Kim, Do Keun; Park, Younsang; Lee, Younghee

    2017-09-01

    The single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) assay, used to quantify hemagglutinin (HA) in influenza vaccines, requires reference reagents; however, because centralized production of reference reagents may slow the emergency deployment of vaccines, alternatives are needed. We investigated the production of HA proteins using recombinant DNA technology, rather than a traditional egg-based production process. The HA proteins were then used in an SRID assay as a reference antigen. We found that HA can be quantified in both egg-based and cell-based influenza vaccines when recombinant HAs (rHAs) are used as the reference antigen. Furthermore, we confirmed that rHAs obtained from strains with pandemic potential, such as H5N1, H7N3, H7N9, and H9N2 strains, can be utilized in the SRID assay. The rHA production process takes just one month, in contrast to the traditional process that takes three to four months. The use of rHAs may reduce the time required to produce reference reagents and facilitate timely introduction of vaccines during emergencies.

  11. Hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion (HEF) protein of influenza C virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyang; Veit, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Influenza C virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family, causes flu-like disease but typically only with mild symptoms. Humans are the main reservoir of the virus, but it also infects pigs and dogs. Very recently, influenza C-like viruses were isolated from pigs and cattle that differ from classical influenza C virus and might constitute a new influenza virus genus. Influenza C virus is unique since it contains only one spike protein, the hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein HEF that possesses receptor binding, receptor destroying and membrane fusion activities, thus combining the functions of Hemagglutinin (HA) and Neuraminidase (NA) of influenza A and B viruses. Here we briefly review the epidemiology and pathology of the virus and the morphology of virus particles and their genome. The main focus is on the structure of the HEF protein as well as on its co- and post-translational modification, such as N-glycosylation, disulfide bond formation, S-acylation and proteolytic cleavage into HEF1 and HEF2 subunits. Finally, we describe the functions of HEF: receptor binding, esterase activity and membrane fusion.

  12. A plant-based system for rapid production of influenza vaccine antigens.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Yoko; Farrance, Christine E; Bautista, James; Bi, Hong; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Horsey, April; Park, Heewoo; Jaje, Jennifer; Green, Brian J; Shamloul, Moneim; Sharma, Satish; Chichester, Jessica A; Mett, Vadim; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2012-05-01

    Influenza virus is a globally important respiratory pathogen that causes a high degree of annual morbidity and mortality. Significant antigenic drift results in emergence of new, potentially pandemic, virus variants. The best prophylactic option for controlling emerging virus strains is to manufacture and administer pandemic vaccines in sufficient quantities and to do so in a timely manner without impacting the regular seasonal influenza vaccine capacity. Current, egg-based, influenza vaccine production is well established and provides an effective product, but has limited capacity and speed. To satisfy the additional global demand for emerging influenza vaccines, high-performance cost-effective technologies need to be developed. Plants have a potential as an economic and efficient large-scale production platform for vaccine antigens. In this study, a plant virus-based transient expression system was used to produce hemagglutinin (HA) proteins from the three vaccine strains used during the 2008-2009 influenza season, A/Brisbane/59/07 (H1N1), A/Brisbane/10/07 (H3N2), and B/Florida/4/06, as well as from the recently emerged novel H1N1 influenza A virus, A/California/04/09. The recombinant plant-based HA proteins were engineered and produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants within 2 months of obtaining the genetic sequences specific to each virus strain. These antigens expressed at the rate of 400-1300 mg/kg of fresh leaf tissue, with >70% solubility. Immunization of mice with these HA antigens induced serum anti-HA IgG and hemagglutination inhibition antibody responses at the levels considered protective against these virus infections. These results demonstrate the feasibility of our transient plant expression system for the rapid production of influenza vaccine antigens. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Advances and challenges in the development and production of effective plant-based influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Kushnir, Natasha; Streatfield, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Influenza infections continue to present a major threat to public health. Traditional modes of influenza vaccine manufacturing are failing to satisfy the global demand because of limited scalability and long production timelines. In contrast, subunit vaccines (SUVs) can be produced in heterologous expression systems in shorter times and at higher quantities. Plants are emerging as a promising platform for SUV production due to time efficiency, scalability, lack of harbored mammalian pathogens and possession of the machinery for eukaryotic post-translational protein modifications. So far, several organizations have utilized plant-based transient expression systems to produce SUVs against influenza, including vaccines based on virus-like particles. Plant-produced influenza SUV candidates have been extensively evaluated in animal models and some have shown safety and immunogenicity in clinical trials. Here, the authors review ongoing efforts and challenges to producing influenza SUV candidates in plants and discuss the likelihood of bringing these products to the market.

  14. Overview of avian influenza DIVA test strategies.

    PubMed

    Suarez, David L

    2005-12-01

    The use of vaccination in poultry to control avian influenza has been increasing in recent years. Vaccination has been primarily with killed whole virus-adjuvanted vaccines. Proper vaccination can reduce or prevent clinical signs, reduce virus shedding in infected birds, and increase the resistance to infection. Historically, one limitation of the killed vaccines is that vaccinated birds cannot be differentiated serologically from naturally infected birds using the commonly available diagnostic tests. Therefore, surveillance for avian influenza becomes much more difficult and often results in trade restrictions because of the inability to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Several different DIVA strategies have been proposed for avian influenza to overcome this limitation. The most common is the use of unvaccinated sentinels. A second approach is the use of subunit vaccines targeted to the hemagglutinin protein that allows serologic surveillance to the internal proteins. A third strategy is to vaccinate with a homologous hemagglutinin to the circulating field strain, but a heterologous neuraminidase subtype. Serologic surveillance can then be performed for the homologous NA subtype as evidence of natural infection. The fourth strategy is to measure the serologic response to the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1). The NS1 protein is produced in large quantities in infected cells, but it is not packaged in the virion. Since killed vaccines for influenza are primarily made with whole virions, a differential antibody response can be seen between naturally infected and vaccinated animals. However, poultry vaccines are not highly purified, and they contain small amounts of the NS1 protein. Although vaccinated chickens will produce low levels of antibody to the NS1 protein, virus infected chickens will produce higher levels of NS1 antibody, and the two groups can be differentiated. All four DIVA strategies have advantages and disadvantages, and further

  15. Filamentous Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Badham, Matthew D.; Rossman, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a pathogen of global medical importance causing significant health and socio-economic costs every year. Influenza virus is an unusual pathogen in that it is pleomorphic, capable of forming virions ranging in shape from spherical to filamentous. Despite decades of research on the influenza virus, much remains unknown about the formation of filamentous influenza viruses and their role in the viral replication cycle. Here, we discuss what is known about influenza virus assembly and budding, focusing on the viral and host factors that are involved in the determination of viral morphology. Whilst the biological function of the filamentous morphology remains unknown, recent results suggest a role in facilitating viral spread in vivo. We discuss these results and speculate on the consequences of viral morphology during influenza virus infection of the human respiratory tract. PMID:28042529

  16. Influenza retinitis: association with influenza encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Shin; Wakakura, Masato; Inouye, Jiro

    2005-01-01

    To report an unusual case of retinitis caused by influenza virus. A 30-year-old male claimed partial color blindness after recovery from influenza encephalitis. Visual acuity was 0.3 in the right eye and 0.03 in the left. An ophthalmoscopic fundus examination looked normal, but fluorescein angiography revealed granular hyperfluorescence with multiple dark circular lesions at the posterior pole of both eyes. Serological testing revealed an influenza A virus infection. With corticosteroid pulse therapy (3 days) followed by oral methyl prednisolone for 1 month, visual acuity gradually recovered. Over the following 2-year period, visual acuity has recovered to 1.2 in both eyes, but color sensation still remains impaired. Influenza encephalitis can cause visual loss due to retinitis at the posterior pole. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Influenza-Sediment Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusiak, A.; Block, K. A.; Katz, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Alimova, A.; Galarza, J.; Wei, H.; Steiner, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A typical water fowl can secrete 1012 influenza virions per day. Therefore it is not unexpected that influenza virions interact with sediments in the water column. The influence of sediments on avian influenza virions is not known. With the threat of avian influenza emerging into the human population, it is crucial to understand virus survivability and residence time in a body of water. Influenza and clay sediments are colloidal particles and thus aggregate as explained by DLVO (Derjaguin & Landau, Verwey & Overbeek) theory. Of great importance is an understanding of the types of particulate or macromolecular components that bind the virus particles, and whether the virus remains biologically active. We present results of hetero-aggregation and transmission electron microscopy experiments performed with influenza A/PR8/38. Influenza particles are suspended with sediment and minimal nutrients for several days, after which the components are evaluated to determine influenza concentration and survivability. Transmission electron microscopy results are reported on the influenza-sediment aggregates to elucidate structure and morphology of the components.

  18. Hsp90 inhibitors reduce influenza virus replication in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, Geoffrey; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Leung, B.W.; Mayer, Daniel; Schwemmle, Martin Brownlee, George

    2008-08-01

    The viral RNA polymerase complex of influenza A virus consists of three subunits PB1, PB2 and PA. Recently, the cellular chaperone Hsp90 was shown to play a role in nuclear import and assembly of the trimeric polymerase complex by binding to PB1 and PB2. Here we show that Hsp90 inhibitors, geldanamycin or its derivative 17-AAG, delay the growth of influenza virus in cell culture resulting in a 1-2 log reduction in viral titre early in infection. We suggest that this is caused by the reduced half-life of PB1 and PB2 and inhibition of nuclear import of PB1 and PA which lead to reduction in viral RNP assembly. Hsp90 inhibitors may represent a new class of antiviral compounds against influenza viruses.

  19. Interactions among rice ORC subunits.

    PubMed

    Tan, Deyong; Lv, Qundan; Chen, Xinai; Shi, Jianghua; Ren, Meiyan; Wu, Ping; Mao, Chuanzao

    2013-08-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) is composed of six subunits and plays an important role in DNA replication in all eukaryotes. The ORC subunits OsORC6 as well as the other five ORC subunits in rice were experimentally isolated and sequenced. It indicated that there also exist six ORC subunits in rice. Results of RT-PCR indicated that expression of all the rice ORC genes are no significant difference under 26°C and 34°C. Yeast two hybridization indicated that OsORC2, -3, -5 interact with each other. OsORC5 can then bind OsORC4 to form the OsORC2, -3,-4,-5 core complex. It suggested that the basic interactions have been conserved through evolution. No binding of OsORC1 and OsORC6 with the other subunits were observed. A model of ORC complex in rice is proposed.

  20. Avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  1. Seasonal Influenza: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Christina; Freedman, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. It also has major social and economic consequences in the form of high rates of absenteeism from school and work as well as significant treatment and hospitalization costs. In fact, annual influenza epidemics and the resulting deaths and lost days of productivity…

  2. Avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza (AI) is caused by type A influenza virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family. AI viruses are serologically categorized into 16 hemagglutinin (H1-H16) and 9 neuraminidase (N1-N9) subtypes. All subtypes have been identified in birds. Infections by AI viruses have been reported in ...

  3. Seasonal Influenza: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Christina; Freedman, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. It also has major social and economic consequences in the form of high rates of absenteeism from school and work as well as significant treatment and hospitalization costs. In fact, annual influenza epidemics and the resulting deaths and lost days of productivity…

  4. [Anti-influenza virus agent].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shigeki; Kohno, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    The necessity of newly anti-influenza agents is increasing rapidly after the prevalence of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009. In addition to the existing anti-influenza drugs, novel neuraminidase inhibitors such as peramivir (a first intravenous anti-influenza agent) and laninamivir (long acting inhaled anti-influenza agent) can be available. Moreover favipiravir, which shows a novel anti-influenza mechanism acting as RNA polymerase inhibitor, has been developing. These drugs are expected to improve the prognosis of severe cases caused by not only seasonal influenza but pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus and H5N1 avian influenza, and also treat oseltamivir-resistant influenza effectively.

  5. Highly conserved small subunit residues influence rubisco large subunit catalysis.

    PubMed

    Genkov, Todor; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2009-10-30

    The chloroplast enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. With a deeper understanding of its structure-function relationships and competitive inhibition by O(2), it may be possible to engineer an increase in agricultural productivity and renewable energy. The chloroplast-encoded large subunits form the active site, but the nuclear-encoded small subunits can also influence catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, the 10 most conserved residues in all small subunits were substituted with alanine by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the small subunit gene family. All the mutant strains were able to grow photosynthetically, indicating that none of the residues is essential for function. Three of the substitutions have little or no effect (S16A, P19A, and E92A), one primarily affects holoenzyme stability (L18A), and the remainder affect catalysis with or without some level of associated structural instability (Y32A, E43A, W73A, L78A, P79A, and F81A). Y32A and E43A cause decreases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure of Chlamydomonas Rubisco, all but one (Glu-92) of the conserved residues are in contact with large subunits and cluster near the amino- or carboxyl-terminal ends of large subunit alpha-helix 8, which is a structural element of the alpha/beta-barrel active site. Small subunit residues Glu-43 and Trp-73 identify a possible structural connection between active site alpha-helix 8 and the highly variable small subunit loop between beta-strands A and B, which can also influence Rubisco CO(2)/O(2) specificity.

  6. DNA vaccination elicits protective immune responses against pandemic and classic swine influenza viruses in pigs.

    PubMed

    Gorres, J Patrick; Lager, Kelly M; Kong, Wing-Pui; Royals, Michael; Todd, John-Paul; Vincent, Amy L; Wei, Chih-Jen; Loving, Crystal L; Zanella, Eraldo L; Janke, Bruce; Kehrli, Marcus E; Nabel, Gary J; Rao, Srinivas S

    2011-11-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious viral infection in pigs that significantly impacts the pork industry due to weight loss and secondary infections. There is also the potential of a significant threat to public health, as was seen in 2009 when the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strain emerged from reassortment events among avian, swine, and human influenza viruses within pigs. As classic and pandemic H1N1 strains now circulate in swine, an effective vaccine may be the best strategy to protect the pork industry and public health. Current inactivated-virus vaccines available for swine influenza protect only against viral strains closely related to the vaccine strain, and egg-based production of these vaccines is insufficient to respond to large outbreaks. DNA vaccines are a promising alternative since they can potentially induce broad-based protection with more efficient production methods. In this study we evaluated the potentials of monovalent and trivalent DNA vaccine constructs to (i) elicit both humoral and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses and (ii) protect pigs against viral shedding and lung disease after challenge with pandemic H1N1 or classic swine H1N1 influenza virus. We also compared the efficiency of a needle-free vaccine delivery method to that of a conventional needle/syringe injection. We report that DNA vaccination elicits robust serum antibody and cellular responses after three immunizations and confers significant protection against influenza virus challenge. Needle-free delivery elicited improved antibody responses with the same efficiency as conventional injection and should be considered for development as a practical alternative for vaccine administration.

  7. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Language: English (US) Español ... with Avian Influenza A Viruses Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Although avian influenza A viruses ...

  8. Screening for Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitors Targeting the Assembly of Influenza Virus Polymerase Complex by a Bimolecular Luminescence Complementation-Based Reporter System.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunfeng; Wang, Zining; Cao, Yang; Wang, Lulan; Ji, Jingyun; Chen, Zhigao; Deng, Tao; Jiang, Taijiao; Cheng, Genhong; Qin, F Xiao-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Influenza virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase consists of three viral protein subunits: PA, PB1, and PB2. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of these subunits play pivotal roles in assembling the functional polymerase complex, which is essential for the replication and transcription of influenza virus RNA. Here we developed a highly specific and robust bimolecular luminescence complementation (BiLC) reporter system to facilitate the investigation of influenza virus polymerase complex formation. Furthermore, by combining computational modeling and the BiLC reporter assay, we identified several novel small-molecule compounds that selectively inhibited PB1-PB2 interaction. Function of one such lead compound was confirmed by its activity in suppressing influenza virus replication. In addition, our studies also revealed that PA plays a critical role in enhancing interactions between PB1 and PB2, which could be important in targeting sites for anti-influenza intervention. Collectively, these findings not only aid the development of novel inhibitors targeting the formation of influenza virus polymerase complex but also present a new tool to investigate the exquisite mechanism of PPIs. IMPORTANCE Formation of the functional influenza virus polymerase involves complex protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits. In this work, we developed a novel BiLC assay system which is sensitive and specific to quantify both strong and weak PPIs between influenza virus polymerase subunits. More importantly, by combining in silico modeling and our BiLC assay, we identified a small molecule that can suppress influenza virus replication by disrupting the polymerase assembly. Thus, we developed an innovative method to investigate PPIs of multisubunit complexes effectively and to identify new molecules inhibiting influenza virus polymerase assembly. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Antiviral activity of crude extracts of Eugenia jambolana Lam. against highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) virus.

    PubMed

    Sood, Richa; Swarup, D; Bhatia, S; Kulkarni, D D; Dey, S; Saini, M; Dubey, S C

    2012-03-01

    Crude extracts of leaves and bark of E. jambolana were tested for antiviral activity against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) by CPE reduction assay in three different layouts to elucidate virucidal, post-exposure and preexposure antiviral activity of the extracts. The cold and hot aqueous extracts of bark and hot aqueous extract of leaves of E. jambolana showed significant virucidal activity (100% inhibition) which was further confirmed in virus yield reduction assay (-98 to 99% reduction) and by egg based in ovo assay. The selective index (CC50/EC50) of hot aqueous extract (248) and cold aqueous extract (43.5) of bark of E. jambolana showed their antiviral potential against H5N1 virus. The significant virucidal activity of leaves and bark of E. jambolana merits further investigation as it may provide alternative antiviral agent for managing avian influenza infections in poultry farms and potential avian-human transmission.

  10. In vivo validation of predicted and conserved T cell epitopes in a swine influenza model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection in pigs that is responsible for significant financial losses to pig farmers annually. Current measures to protect herds from infection using inactivated whole-virus, subunit and alpha replicon-based vaccines do not provide broad prot...

  11. Adaptive strategies of the influenza virus polymerase for replication in humans.

    PubMed

    Mehle, Andrew; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2009-12-15

    Transmission of influenza viruses into the human population requires surmounting barriers to cross-species infection. Changes in the influenza polymerase overcome one such barrier. Viruses isolated from birds generally contain polymerases with the avian-signature glutamic acid at amino acid 627 in the PB2 subunit. These polymerases display restricted activity in human cells. An adaptive change in this residue from glutamic acid to the human-signature lysine confers high levels of polymerase activity in human cells. This mutation permits escape from a species-specific restriction factor that targets polymerases from avian viruses. A 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus recently established a pandemic infection in humans, even though the virus encodes a PB2 with the restrictive glutamic acid at amino acid 627. We show here that the 2009 H1N1 virus has acquired second-site suppressor mutations in its PB2 polymerase subunit that convey enhanced polymerase activity in human cells. Introduction of this polymorphism into the PB2 subunit of a primary avian isolate also increased polymerase activity and viral replication in human and porcine cells. An alternate adaptive strategy has also been identified, whereby introduction of a human PA subunit into an avian polymerase overcomes restriction in human cells. These data reveal a strategy used by the 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus and identify other pathways by which avian and swine-origin viruses may evolve to enhance replication, and potentially pathogenesis, in humans.

  12. Conformationally selective biophysical assay for influenza vaccine potency determination.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yingxia; Han, Liqun; Palladino, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Annette; Xie, Yuhong; Carfi, Andrea; Dormitzer, Philip R; Settembre, Ethan C

    2015-10-05

    Influenza vaccines are the primary intervention for reducing the substantial health burden from pandemic and seasonal influenza. Hemagglutinin (HA) is the most important influenza vaccine antigen. Subunit and split influenza vaccines are formulated, released for clinical use, and tested for stability based on an in vitro potency assay, single-radial immunodiffusion (SRID), which selectively detects HA that is immunologically active (capable of eliciting neutralizing or hemagglutination inhibiting antibodies in an immunized subject). The time consuming generation of strain-specific sheep antisera and calibrated antigen standards for SRID can delay vaccine release. The limitation in generating SRID reagents was evident during the early days of the 2009 pandemic, prompting efforts to develop more practical, alternative, quantitative assays for immunologically active HA. Here we demonstrate that, under native conditions, trypsin selectively digests HA produced from egg or mammalian cell in monovalent vaccines that is altered by stress conditions such as reduced pH, elevated temperature, or deamidation, leaving native, pre-fusion HA, intact. Subsequent reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) can separate trypsin-resistant HA from the digested HA. Integration of the resulting RP-HPLC peak yields HA quantities that match well the values obtained by SRID. Therefore, trypsin digestion, to pre-select immunologically active HA, followed by quantification by RP-HPLC is a promising alternative in vitro potency assay for influenza vaccines.

  13. Estimated influenza illnesses and hospitalizations averted by influenza vaccination - United States, 2012-13 influenza season.

    PubMed

    2013-12-13

    Influenza is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality each year in the United States. From 1976 to 2007, annual deaths from influenza ranged from approximately 3,300 to 49,000. Vaccination against influenza has been recommended to prevent illness and related complications, and since 2010, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has recommended that all persons aged ≥6 months be vaccinated against influenza each year. In 2013, CDC published a model to quantify the annual number of influenza-associated illnesses and hospitalizations averted by influenza vaccination during the 2006-11 influenza seasons. Using that model with 2012-13 influenza season vaccination coverage rates, influenza vaccine effectiveness, and influenza hospitalization rates, CDC estimated that vaccination resulted in 79,000 (17%) fewer hospitalizations during the 2012-13 influenza season than otherwise might have occurred. Based on estimates of the percentage of influenza illnesses that involve hospitalization or medical attention, vaccination also prevented approximately 6.6 million influenza illnesses and 3.2 million medically attended illnesses. Influenza vaccination during the 2012-13 season produced a substantial reduction in influenza-associated illness. However, fewer than half of persons aged ≥6 months were vaccinated. Higher vaccination rates would have resulted in prevention of a substantial number of additional cases and hospitalizations.

  14. Seasonal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Anthony E; Bridges, Carolyn B; Cox, Nancy J

    2009-01-01

    Influenza vaccines are the mainstay of efforts to reduce the substantial health burden from seasonal influenza. Inactivated influenza vaccines have been available since the 1940s and are administered via intramuscular injection. Inactivated vaccines can be given to anyone six months of age or older. Live attenuated, cold-adapted influenza vaccines (LAIV) were developed in the 1960s but were not licensed in the United States until 2003, and are administered via nasal spray. Both vaccines are trivalent preparations grown in eggs and do not contain adjuvants. LAIV is licensed for use in the United States for healthy nonpregnant persons 2-49 years of age.Influenza vaccination induces antibodies primarily against the major surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA); antibodies directed against the HA are most important for protection against illness. The immune response peaks at 2-4 weeks after one dose in primed individuals. In previously unvaccinated children <9 years of age, two doses of influenza vaccine are recommended, as some children in this age group have limited or no prior infections from circulating types and subtypes of seasonal influenza. These children require both an initial priming dose and a subsequent booster dose of vaccine to mount a protective antibody response.The most common adverse events associated with inactivated vaccines are sore arm and redness at the injection site; systemic symptoms such as fever or malaise are less commonly reported. Guillian-Barré Syndrome (GBS) was identified among approximately 1 per 100,000 recipients of the 1976 swine influenza vaccine. The risk of influenza vaccine-associated GBS from seasonal influenza vaccine is thought to be at most approximately 1-2 cases per 1 million vaccinees, based on a few studies that have found an association; other studies have found no association.The most common adverse events associated with LAIV are nasal congestion, headache, myalgias or fever. Studies of the

  15. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Pandemic influenza: certain uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Morens, David M.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY For at least five centuries, major epidemics and pandemics of influenza have occurred unexpectedly and at irregular intervals. Despite the modern notion that pandemic influenza is a distinct phenomenon obeying such constant (if incompletely understood) rules such as dramatic genetic change, cyclicity, “wave” patterning, virus replacement, and predictable epidemic behavior, much evidence suggests the opposite. Although there is much that we know about pandemic influenza, there appears to be much more that we do not know. Pandemics arise as a result of various genetic mechanisms, have no predictable patterns of mortality among different age groups, and vary greatly in how and when they arise and recur. Some are followed by new pandemics, whereas others fade gradually or abruptly into long-term endemicity. Human influenza pandemics have been caused by viruses that evolved singly or in co-circulation with other pandemic virus descendants and often have involved significant transmission between, or establishment of, viral reservoirs within other animal hosts. In recent decades, pandemic influenza has continued to produce numerous unanticipated events that expose fundamental gaps in scientific knowledge. Influenza pandemics appear to be not a single phenomenon but a heterogeneous collection of viral evolutionary events whose similarities are overshadowed by important differences, the determinants of which remain poorly understood. These uncertainties make it difficult to predict influenza pandemics and, therefore, to adequately plan to prevent them. PMID:21706672

  17. Neonatal Haemophilus influenzae infections.

    PubMed Central

    Takala, A K; Pekkanen, E; Eskola, J

    1991-01-01

    Nine cases of neonatal Haemophilus influenzae septicaemia were recorded in Finland during 1985-9; incidence was 2.8/100,000 live births, and 1.6% of all cases of neonatal septicaemia. The onset of the disease was early in all cases, ranging from 0-6 hours after delivery. Seven of the infants were preterm and three died (overall mortality 33%). H influenzae was isolated from blood in seven of the cases, and in two neonates with clinical signs of septicaemia it was found on several surface sites and the placenta. One of the eight strains of H influenzae was capsular type b and biotype I, the rest being non-typable--a distribution similar to those previously reported. Four of the uncapsulated strains were of biotype III, and three were of biotype II. None of the strains of H influenzae was of biotype IV, which has been reported to be characteristic of neonatal and genital isolates of H influenzae. All nine mothers had some sign of infection at the time of or shortly after delivery. H influenzae was isolated from five mothers: from the blood (n = 1) or from the placenta or cervix (n = 4). The use of intrauterine devices may be a possible risk factor for neonatal H influenzae infections; two of the mothers had such devices in place during their pregnancies. PMID:2025040

  18. Characterization of Influenza Vaccine Hemagglutinin Complexes by Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Image Analyses Reveals Structural Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    McCraw, Dustin M.; Gallagher, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus afflicts millions of people worldwide on an annual basis. There is an ever-present risk that animal viruses will cross the species barrier to cause epidemics and pandemics resulting in great morbidity and mortality. Zoonosis outbreaks, such as the H7N9 outbreak, underscore the need to better understand the molecular organization of viral immunogens, such as recombinant influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) proteins, used in influenza virus subunit vaccines in order to optimize vaccine efficacy. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis, we show that recombinant H7 HA in vaccines formed macromolecular complexes consisting of variable numbers of HA subunits (range, 6 to 8). In addition, HA complexes were distributed across at least four distinct structural classes (polymorphisms). Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and molecular modeling indicated that HA was in the prefusion state and suggested that the oligomerization and the structural polymorphisms observed were due to hydrophobic interactions involving the transmembrane regions. These experiments suggest that characterization of the molecular structures of influenza virus HA complexes used in subunit vaccines will lead to better understanding of the differences in vaccine efficacy and to the optimization of subunit vaccines to prevent influenza virus infection. PMID:27074939

  19. The ferret model for influenza.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lamirande, Elaine W; Subbarao, Kanta

    2009-05-01

    A major challenge in influenza research is the selection of an appropriate animal model that accurately reflects the disease and protective immune response to influenza infection in humans. Ferrets are exquisitely susceptible to infection with human influenza viruses and are widely believed to be the ideal small animal model for influenza research. Mice have also been used for influenza vaccine research for decades. Ferrets are used as an animal model for the study of influenza because they are susceptible to human influenza viruses and develop some of the symptoms of influenza that are seen in humans. Although they are not discussed in detail in this unit, hamsters, guinea pigs, and both cotton rats (Sigmodon) and rats (Rattus) have also been used for influenza research.

  20. New treatments for influenza

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Influenza has a long history of causing morbidity and mortality in the human population through routine seasonal spread and global pandemics. The high mutation rate of the RNA genome of the influenza virus, combined with assortment of its multiple genomic segments, promote antigenic diversity and new subtypes, allowing the virus to evade vaccines and become resistant to antiviral drugs. There is thus a continuing need for new anti-influenza therapy using novel targets and creative strategies. In this review, we summarize prospective future therapeutic regimens based on recent molecular and genomic discoveries. PMID:22973873

  1. Influenza in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Beeler, Emily

    2009-03-01

    Influenza has been long absent from the list of infectious diseases considered as possibilities in dogs and cats. With the discovery that avian influenza H5N1 can infect cats and dogs, and the appearance of canine influenza H3N8, small animal veterinarians have an important role to play in detection of influenza virus strains that may become zoonotic. Small animal veterinarians must educate staff and clients about influenza to improve understanding as to when and where influenza infection is possible, and to avert unreasonable fears.

  2. Improvement influenza HA2 DNA vaccine cellular and humoral immune responses with Mx bio adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Sina; Shahsavandi, Shahla; Maddadgar, Omid

    2017-03-01

    Immunization with DNA vaccines as a novel alternative to conventional vaccination strategy requires adjuvant for improving vaccine efficacy. The conserved immunogenic HA2 subunit, which harbors neutralizing epitopes is a promising vaccine candidate against influenza viruses. In this study, for the first time we explore the idea of using host interferon inducible Mx protein to increase the immunogenicity of HA2 H9N2 influenza DNA vaccine. The potency and safety of the Mx adjuvanted-HA2 vaccine was evaluated in BALB/c mice by different prime-boost strategies. To assess the effect of the vaccination on the virus clearance rate, mice were challenged with homologous influenza virus. Administration of the adjuvanted vaccine and boosting with the same regimen could effectively enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses in treated mice. These data demonstrated that Mx as host defense peptide can be potentiated for improving influenza vaccine efficacy.

  3. Treating Influenza (Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    Treating Influenza (Flu) Information for People at High Risk for Flu Complications Do you have Asthma, Diabetes, or Chronic Heart Disease? ... risk of serious illness if you get the flu. In past flu seasons, as many as 80 ...

  4. Optimizing influenza vaccine distribution.

    PubMed

    Medlock, Jan; Galvani, Alison P

    2009-09-25

    The criteria to assess public health policies are fundamental to policy optimization. Using a model parametrized with survey-based contact data and mortality data from influenza pandemics, we determined optimal vaccine allocation for five outcome measures: deaths, infections, years of life lost, contingent valuation, and economic costs. We find that optimal vaccination is achieved by prioritization of schoolchildren and adults aged 30 to 39 years. Schoolchildren are most responsible for transmission, and their parents serve as bridges to the rest of the population. Our results indicate that consideration of age-specific transmission dynamics is paramount to the optimal allocation of influenza vaccines. We also found that previous and new recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention both for the novel swine-origin influenza and, particularly, for seasonal influenza, are suboptimal for all outcome measures.

  5. First Aid: Influenza (Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Flu Vaccine Does My Child Need? Your Child's Immunizations: Influenza Vaccine Immunization Schedule Tips for Treating the Flu Too Late for the Flu Vaccine? Vomiting Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Flu Center Who Needs a Flu Shot? ...

  6. Influence of resistance training combined with daily consumption of an egg-based or bagel-based breakfast on risk factors for chronic diseases in healthy untrained individuals.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Zachary S; Scholar, Kylee R; Shelechi, Mahshid; Hernandez, Lisa M; Barber, Anjee M; Petrisko, Yumi J; Hooshmand, Shirin; Kern, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Egg consumption is often discouraged due to cholesterol content; however, recent studies have not demonstrated a clear adverse influence of eggs on blood lipids. Furthermore, exercise training promotes improved lipids and blood pressure. The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of eating an isoenergetic (400 kcal) egg-based (including two eggs per day) versus bagel-based breakfasts, daily, combined with resistance training three times per week, prior to breakfast, on plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, insulin sensitivity and blood pressure in untrained individuals. Twenty-five healthy adult men and women (18-35 years of age) participated in the twelve week study following random assignment to study groups. Lipids and blood pressure were examined at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks. Plasma triglycerides (TG) decreased significantly in the egg- based breakfast (EBB) group from baseline to six weeks (p = 0.011) and from six to twelve weeks (p = 0.045). A significant (p = 0.033) decrease in insulin sensitivity was observed in the bagel-based breakfast (BBB) group from zero to six weeks. No significant effects on systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein- cholesterol or low density lipoprotein cholesterol were detected. Overall, daily breakfasts including two eggs for twelve weeks did not adversely affect lipids during a resistance training program and promoted improvements in plasma TG.

  7. Animals in the influenza world.

    PubMed

    Easterday, B C

    1980-02-25

    In the history of influenza there are many references, notes and comments about influenza epizootics occurring among various non-human animals, sometimes coinciding with epidemics of influenza in human beings. That the first influenza viruses were recovered from non-human animals is not so surprising, given the current knowledge of the distribution of influenza among animals. Influenza viruses are found in a wide variety of mammalian and avian species. In some species the disease that occurs as a result of the infection mimics the influenza disease of human beings, in other species there are no signs of disease, and in others there is disease specific to a species. It is clear that influenza viruses have a significant impact on the health of several animal species. In recent times it has also become clear that many species of animals are inextricably entwined in the puzzle of influenza viruses and human influenza. Our knowledge in animals has provided both questions and answers about the influenza viruses and their diseases. Certainly our understanding of human influenza has been advanced because of the animals in the influenza world.

  8. The Dilemma of Influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Fred; Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    With the many major advances in medical and biological sciences that have taken place in recent years it would seem remarkable that we are still unable to come to grips with the problem of influenza. In spite of our ability to produce detail sequences of bacterial and viral genomes, the emergence of new epidemic or pandemic strains of the influenza virus is still shrouded in mystery. To resolve this mystery we may need to turn to space.

  9. United States of America Department of Health and Human Services support for advancing influenza vaccine manufacturing in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Perdue, Michael L; Bright, Rick A

    2011-07-01

    five years of age. In addition to achievements described in this issue of Vaccine, the programme has been successful from the US perspective because the working relationships established between the US Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) and its partners have assisted in advancing influenza vaccine development at many different levels. A few examples of BARDA's support include: establishment of egg-based influenza vaccine production from "scratch", enhancement of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) production techniques and infrastructure, completion of fill/finish operations for imported bulk vaccine, and training in advanced bio-manufacturing techniques. These HHS-supported programmes have been well-received internationally, and we and our partners hope the successes will stimulate even more interest within the international community in maximizing global production levels for influenza vaccines.

  10. Vaccination strategies against influenza.

    PubMed

    Hanon, E

    2009-01-01

    Every year, Influenza virus infection is at the origin of substantial excess in morbidity and mortality in developed as well as developing countries. Influenza viruses undergo antigenic drift which cause annual replacement of strain included in classical trivalent vaccines. Less frequently, this virus can also undergo antigenic shift, which corresponds to a major antigenic change and can lead to an extra medical burden. Several vaccines have been made available to immunize individuals against seasonal as well as pandemic influenza viruses. For seasonal Influenza vaccines, live attenuated and classical inactivated trivalent vaccines have been licensed and are widely used. Additionally, several strategies are under investigations to improve further the efficacy of existing seasonal vaccines in children and elderly. These include the use of adjuvant, increase in antigen content, or alternative route of delivery. Similarly, several approaches have been licensed to address additional challenge posed by pandemic viruses. The different vaccination strategies used to maximise protection against seasonal as well as pandemic influenza will be reviewed and discussed in the perspective the current threat posed by the H1N1v pandemic Influenza.

  11. Animal and human influenzas.

    PubMed

    Peiris, M; Yen, H-L

    2014-08-01

    Influenza type A viruses affect humans and other animals and cause significant morbidity, mortality and economic impact. Influenza A viruses are well adapted to cross species barriers and evade host immunity. Viruses that cause no clinical signs in wild aquatic birds may adapt in domestic poultry to become highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses which decimate poultry flocks. Viruses that cause asymptomatic infection in poultry (e.g. the recently emerged A/H7N9 virus) may cause severe zoonotic disease and pose a major pandemic threat. Pandemic influenza arises at unpredictable intervals from animal viruses and, in its global spread, outpaces current technologies for making vaccines against such novel viruses. Confronting the threat of influenza in humans and other animals is an excellent example of a task that requires a One Health approach. Changes in travel, trade in livestock and pets, changes in animal husbandry practices, wet markets and complex marketing chains all contribute to an increased risk of the emergence of novel influenza viruses with the ability to cross species barriers, leading to epizootics or pandemics. Coordinated surveillance at the animal- human interface for pandemic preparedness, risk assessment, risk reduction and prevention at source requires coordinated action among practitioners in human and animal health and the environmental sciences. Implementation of One Health in the field can be challenging because of divergent short-term objectives. Successful implementation requires effort, mutual trust, respect and understanding to ensure that long-term goals are achieved without adverse impacts on agricultural production and food security.

  12. Influenza virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Scott; Walker, David; Webster, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    The isolation of influenza viruses is important for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases in lower animals and humans, for the detection of the infecting agent in surveillance programs, and is an essential element in the development and production of vaccine. Since influenza is caused by a zoonotic virus it is necessary to do surveillance in the reservoir species (aquatic waterfowls), intermediate hosts (quails, pigs), and in affected mammals including humans. Two of the hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes of influenza A viruses (H5 and H7) can evolve into highly pathogenic (HP) strains for gallinaceous poultry; some HP H5 and H7 strains cause lethal infection of humans. In waterfowls, low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) isolates are obtained primarily from the cloaca (or feces); in domestic poultry, the virus is more often recovered from the respiratory tract than from cloacal samples; in mammals, the virus is most often isolated from the respiratory tract, and in cases of high pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) from the blood and internal organs of infected birds. Virus isolation procedures are performed by inoculation of clinical specimens into embryonated eggs (primarily chicken eggs) or onto a variety of primary or continuous tissue culture systems. Successful isolation of influenza virus depends on the quality of the sample and matching the appropriate culture method to the sample type.

  13. THE EFFECT OF HEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE SUIS VACCINES ON SWINE INFLUENZA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1937-01-01

    Either living or heat-killed H. influenzae suis vaccines, given intramuscularly to swine, elicit an immune response capable of modifying the course of a later swine influenza infection. The protection afforded is only partial and is in no way comparable to the complete immunity afforded by swine influenza virus vaccines. PMID:19870654

  14. The mouse model for influenza.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lamirande, Elaine W; Subbarao, Kanta

    2009-05-01

    A major challenge in influenza research is the selection of an appropriate animal model that accurately reflects the disease and protective immune response to influenza infection in humans. Ferrets are exquisitely susceptible to infection with human influenza viruses and are widely believed to be the ideal small animal model for influenza research. Mice have also been used for influenza vaccine research for decades. Although human influenza viruses generally cause disease in mice only if they are first adapted to the species, the ready availability of mice, their relatively low cost, and the variety of genetic backgrounds and targeted defects, and the immunologic reagents available make the mouse an attractive and heavily utilized animal model for studies of influenza. Although they are not discussed in detail in this unit, hamsters, guinea pigs, cotton rats (Sigmodon), and rats (Rattus) have also been used for influenza research.

  15. Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Españ ...

  16. Pregnant Women and Influenza (Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Pregnant Women & Influenza (Flu) Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ...

  17. Influenza Prevention: Information for Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Influenza Prevention: Information for Travelers Language: English (US) Españ ...

  18. Strengthening the influenza vaccine virus selection and development process: Report of the 3rd WHO Informal Consultation for Improving Influenza Vaccine Virus Selection held at WHO headquarters, Geneva, Switzerland, 1-3 April 2014.

    PubMed

    Ampofo, William K; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Bashir, Uzma; Cox, Nancy J; Fasce, Rodrigo; Giovanni, Maria; Grohmann, Gary; Huang, Sue; Katz, Jackie; Mironenko, Alla; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Sasono, Pretty Multihartina; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Siqueira, Marilda; Waddell, Anthony L; Waiboci, Lillian; Wood, John; Zhang, Wenqing; Ziegler, Thedi

    2015-08-26

    investigations but could drive a new surveillance paradigm. However, despite the advances made, significant challenges will need to be addressed before next-generation technologies become routine, particularly in low-resource settings. Emerging approaches and techniques such as synthetic genomics, systems genetics, systems biology and mathematical modelling are capable of generating potentially huge volumes of highly complex and diverse datasets. Harnessing the currently theoretical benefits of such bioinformatics ("big data") concepts for the influenza vaccine virus selection and development process will depend upon further advances in data generation, integration, analysis and dissemination. Over the last decade, growing awareness of influenza as an important global public health issue has been coupled to ever-increasing demands from the global community for more-equitable access to effective and affordable influenza vaccines. The current influenza vaccine landscape continues to be dominated by egg-based inactivated and live attenuated vaccines, with a small number of cell-based and recombinant vaccines. Successfully completing each step in the annual influenza vaccine manufacturing cycle will continue to rely upon timely and regular communication between the WHO GISRS, manufacturers and regulatory authorities. While the pipeline of influenza vaccines appears to be moving towards a variety of niche products in the near term, it is apparent that the ultimate aim remains the development of effective "universal" influenza vaccines that offer longer-lasting immunity against a broad range of influenza A subtypes.

  19. Current developments in avian influenza vaccines, including safety of vaccinated birds as food.

    PubMed

    Swayne, D E; Suarez, D L

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, most vaccines against avian influenza were based on oil-emulsified inactivated low- or high-pathogenicity viruses. Now, recombinant fowl pox and avian paramyxovirus type 1 vaccines with avian influenza H5 gene inserts (+ or - N1 gene insert) are available and licensed. New technologies might overcome existing limitations to make available vaccines that can be grown in tissue culture systems for more rapid production; provide optimized protection, as a result of closer genetic relations to field viruses; allow mass administration by aerosol, in drinking-water or in ovo; and allow easier strategies for identifying infected birds within vaccinated populations (DIVA). The technologies include avian influenza viruses with partial gene deletions, avian influenza-Newcastle disease virus chimeras, vectored vaccines such as adenoviruses and Marek's disease virus, and subunit vaccines. These new methods should be licensed only after their purity, safety, efficacy and potency against avian influenza viruses have been demonstrated, and, for live vectored vaccines, restriction of viral transmission to unvaccinated birds. Use of vaccines in countries affected by highly pathogenic avian influenza will not only protect poultry but will provide additional safety for consumers. Experimental studies have shown that birds vaccinated against avian influenza have no virus in meat and minimal amounts in eggs after HPAI virus challenge, and that replication and shedding from their respiratory and alimentary tracts is greatly reduced.

  20. Synthesis of influenza neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Magid, A F; Maryanoff, C A; Mehrman, S J

    2001-11-01

    Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors provide a means to combat flu, a potentially very serious disease. For the first time, there is a way to treat influenza by blocking the influenza enzyme neuraminidase to stop or slow the progression of infection. The diverse structures and synthesis of several influenza neuraminidase inhibitors are discussed. Contributions from chemical process development groups are highlighted for those compounds that have reached the market, such as zanamivir and oseltamivir phosphate.

  1. Influenza Vaccines: Challenges and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Katherine; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is the best method for the prevention and control of influenza. Vaccination can reduce illness and lessen severity of infection. This review focuses on how currently licensed influenza vaccines are generated in the U.S., why the biology of influenza poses vaccine challenges, and vaccine approaches on the horizon that address these challenges. PMID:25766291

  2. Improving pandemic influenza risk assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Assessing the pandemic risk posed by specific non-human influenza A viruses remains a complex challenge. As influenza virus genome sequencing becomes cheaper, faster and more readily available, the ability to predict pandemic potential from sequence data could transform pandemic influenza risk asses...

  3. Domestic influenza vaccine production in Mexico: a state-owned and a multinational company working together for public health.

    PubMed

    Ponce-de-Leon, Samuel; Velazquez-Fernandez, Ruth; Bugarin-González, Jose; García-Bañuelos, Pedro; Lopez-Sotelo, Angelica; Jimenez-Corona, María-Eugenia; Padilla-Catalan, Francisco; Cervantes-Rosales, Rocio

    2011-07-01

    The Mexican Government developed a plan in 2004 for pandemic influenza preparedness that included local production of influenza vaccine. To achieve this, an agreement was concluded between Birmex - a state-owned vaccine manufacturer - and sanofi pasteur, a leading developer of vaccine technology. Under this agreement, sanofi pasteur will establish a facility in Mexico to produce antigen for up to 30 million doses of egg-based seasonal vaccine per year, and Birmex will build a facility to formulate, fill and package the inactivated split-virion influenza vaccine. As at November 2010, the sanofi pasteur facility has been completed and the Birmex plant is under construction. Most of the critical equipment has been purchased and is in the process of validation. In addition to intensive support from sanofi pasteur for the transfer of the technology, the project is supported by the Mexican Ministry of Health, complemented by Birmex's own budget and grants from the WHO developing country influenza technology transfer project. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. The cap-binding site of influenza virus protein PB2 as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Severin, Chelsea; Rocha de Moura, Tales; Liu, Yong; Li, Keqin; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Luo, Ming

    2016-02-01

    The RNA polymerase of influenza virus consists of three subunits: PA, PB1 and PB2. It uses a unique `cap-snatching' mechanism for the transcription of viral mRNAs. The cap-binding domain of the PB2 subunit (PB2cap) in the viral polymerase binds the cap of a host pre-mRNA molecule, while the endonuclease of the PA subunit cleaves the RNA 10-13 nucleotides downstream from the cap. The capped RNA fragment is then used as the primer for viral mRNA transcription. The structure of PB2cap from influenza virus H1N1 A/California/07/2009 and of its complex with the cap analog m(7)GTP were solved at high resolution. Structural changes are observed in the cap-binding site of this new pandemic influenza virus strain, especially the hydrophobic interactions between the ligand and the target protein. m(7)GTP binds deeper in the pocket than some other virus strains, much deeper than the host cap-binding proteins. Analysis of the new H1N1 structures and comparisons with other structures provide new insights into the design of small-molecule inhibitors that will be effective against multiple strains of both type A and type B influenza viruses.

  5. Expression of hBD-2 induced by 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhenwei; Lei, Han

    2012-10-01

    Human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is an antimicrobial peptide with high activity and broad spectrum activity. hBD-2 expression may be highly elevated by microorganisms and inflammation. We reported that the majority of common vaccines used, including 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine, could induce the expression of hBD-2 in epithelial cells. Among them, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine was effective at a lower concentration (0.5 µg/ml), while Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine were effective at the concentration of 1 µg/ml. However, bacteriostatic experiments revealed that the split influenza virus vaccine was capable of inducing the highest antimicrobial activity. The medium of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine treatment group had a higher antimicrobial activity than the medium of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine treatment group. The transcriptional regulator of hBD-2, that is, the NF-κB subunit, had a high level of activity, while the normal epithelial cells showed barely detectable activity, indicating that these vaccines have potential for clinical application.

  6. Interaction of influenza virus proteins with nucleosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Robles, Inmaculada; Akarsu, Hatice; Mueller, Christoph W.; Ruigrok, Rob W.H.; Baudin, Florence . E-mail: baudin@embl-grenoble.fr

    2005-02-05

    During influenza virus infection, transcription and replication of the viral RNA take place in the cell nucleus. Directly after entry in the nucleus the viral ribonucleoproteins (RNPs, the viral subunits containing vRNA, nucleoprotein and the viral polymerase) are tightly associated with the nuclear matrix. Here, we have analysed the binding of RNPs, M1 and NS2/NEP proteins to purified nucleosomes, reconstituted histone octamers and purified single histones. RNPs and M1 both bind to the chromatin components but at two different sites, RNP to the histone tails and M1 to the globular domain of the histone octamer. NS2/NEP did not bind to nucleosomes at all. The possible consequences of these findings for nuclear release of newly made RNPs and for other processes during the infection cycle are discussed.

  7. [Resistance in influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Hungnes, Olav; Dudman, Susanne Gjeruldsen

    2008-11-20

    Influenza virus infection can be prevented and treated with antiviral drugs. The usage of such drugs in Norway has been infrequent, however, they are an important component in our pandemic preparedness planning, as it will probably be difficult to get access to the appropriate vaccine in time before the pandemic reaches the country. The first generation of influenza drugs acquired resistance to a large degree, in contrast to the modern neuraminidase inhibitors that until recently have had minor problems with resistance. This review is based on research found in relevant published literature, together with experience from a virology reference laboratory and participation in a national and international surveillance including susceptibility testing. While resistance has been a longstanding problem with the use of the "old" influenza drugs amantadine and rimantadine, only during the winter 2007/2008 did it become clear, that a certain type of virus acquired widespread resistance against the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Resistance surveillance is crucial for the correct choice of empiric treatment for influenza infection, and will be one of the most important tasks at the National Influenza Centre in certain phases of a pandemic. The current situation with an increasing resistance problem strengthens the need to conduct continuous monitoring of antiviral susceptibility, as well as development of new antiviral drugs and treatment regimes.

  8. Pandemic influenza: a zoonosis?

    PubMed

    Shortridge, K F

    1992-03-01

    In the last two decades, influenza A viruses have been found to occur throughout the animal kingdom, mainly in birds, notably aquatic ones, in which infection is largely intestinal, waterborne, and asymptomatic. The domestic duck of southern China, raised in countless numbers all year round mainly as an adjunct to rice farming, is the principal host of influenza A viruses. Studies based on Hong Kong H3N2 viruses from southern China suggest that pandemic strains originate from the domestic duck there and are transmitted to humans via the domestic pig, which acts as a "mixing vessel" for two-way transmission of viruses. This provides further support for the hypothesis that the region is a hypothetical influenza epicenter. Rural dwellers in the epicenter show serological evidence of contact with non-human influenza A viruses. Two hypotheses are advanced for the range of hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes of viruses that can cause pandemics (1) circle or cycle limited to H1, H2, and H3 subtypes, thereby implying that a virus of the H2 subtype will cause the next pandemic; and (2) spiral, by which any one of the 14 HA subtypes recorded to date may be involved. Consideration is given to the temporal and geographical factors and range of hosts, namely the duck, pig, and human, that need to be submitted to virus surveillance in China and beyond to attempt to anticipate a future pandemic. Evidence is presented that points strongly to pandemic influenza being a zoonosis.

  9. Improving pandemic influenza risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russell, Colin A; Kasson, Peter M; Donis, Ruben O; Riley, Steven; Dunbar, John; Rambaut, Andrew; Asher, Jason; Burke, Stephen; Davis, C Todd; Garten, Rebecca J; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Hay, Simon I; Herfst, Sander; Lewis, Nicola S; Lloyd-Smith, James O; Macken, Catherine A; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Neuhaus, Elizabeth; Parrish, Colin R; Pepin, Kim M; Shepard, Samuel S; Smith, David L; Suarez, David L; Trock, Susan C; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; George, Dylan B; Lipsitch, Marc; Bloom, Jesse D

    2014-10-16

    Assessing the pandemic risk posed by specific non-human influenza A viruses is an important goal in public health research. As influenza virus genome sequencing becomes cheaper, faster, and more readily available, the ability to predict pandemic potential from sequence data could transform pandemic influenza risk assessment capabilities. However, the complexities of the relationships between virus genotype and phenotype make such predictions extremely difficult. The integration of experimental work, computational tool development, and analysis of evolutionary pathways, together with refinements to influenza surveillance, has the potential to transform our ability to assess the risks posed to humans by non-human influenza viruses and lead to improved pandemic preparedness and response.

  10. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  11. High Yield Production of Influenza Virus in Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) Cells with Stable Knockdown of IRF7

    PubMed Central

    Hamamoto, Itsuki; Takaku, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Masato; Yamamoto, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is a serious public health problem that causes a contagious respiratory disease. Vaccination is the most effective strategy to reduce transmission and prevent influenza. In recent years, cell-based vaccines have been developed with continuous cell lines such as Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and Vero. However, wild-type influenza and egg-based vaccine seed viruses will not grow efficiently in these cell lines. Therefore, improvement of virus growth is strongly required for development of vaccine seed viruses and cell-based influenza vaccine production. The aim of our research is to develop novel MDCK cells supporting highly efficient propagation of influenza virus in order to expand the capacity of vaccine production. In this study, we screened a human siRNA library that involves 78 target molecules relating to three major type I interferon (IFN) pathways to identify genes that when knocked down by siRNA lead to enhanced production of influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 in A549 cells. The siRNAs targeting 23 candidate genes were selected to undergo a second screening pass in MDCK cells. We examined the effects of knockdown of target genes on the viral production using newly designed siRNAs based on sequence analyses. Knockdown of the expression of a canine gene corresponding to human IRF7 by siRNA increased the efficiency of viral production in MDCK cells through an unknown process that includes the mechanisms other than inhibition of IFN-α/β induction. Furthermore, the viral yield greatly increased in MDCK cells stably transduced with the lentiviral vector for expression of short hairpin RNA against IRF7 compared with that in control MDCK cells. Therefore, we propose that modified MDCK cells with lower expression level of IRF7 could be useful not only for increasing the capacity of vaccine production but also facilitating the process of seed virus isolation from clinical specimens for manufacturing of vaccines. PMID:23555825

  12. DNA Vaccination Elicits Protective Immune Responses against Pandemic and Classic Swine Influenza Viruses in Pigs ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gorres, J. Patrick; Lager, Kelly M.; Kong, Wing-Pui; Royals, Michael; Todd, John-Paul; Vincent, Amy L.; Wei, Chih-Jen; Loving, Crystal L.; Zanella, Eraldo L.; Janke, Bruce; Kehrli, Marcus E.; Nabel, Gary J.; Rao, Srinivas S.

    2011-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious viral infection in pigs that significantly impacts the pork industry due to weight loss and secondary infections. There is also the potential of a significant threat to public health, as was seen in 2009 when the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strain emerged from reassortment events among avian, swine, and human influenza viruses within pigs. As classic and pandemic H1N1 strains now circulate in swine, an effective vaccine may be the best strategy to protect the pork industry and public health. Current inactivated-virus vaccines available for swine influenza protect only against viral strains closely related to the vaccine strain, and egg-based production of these vaccines is insufficient to respond to large outbreaks. DNA vaccines are a promising alternative since they can potentially induce broad-based protection with more efficient production methods. In this study we evaluated the potentials of monovalent and trivalent DNA vaccine constructs to (i) elicit both humoral and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses and (ii) protect pigs against viral shedding and lung disease after challenge with pandemic H1N1 or classic swine H1N1 influenza virus. We also compared the efficiency of a needle-free vaccine delivery method to that of a conventional needle/syringe injection. We report that DNA vaccination elicits robust serum antibody and cellular responses after three immunizations and confers significant protection against influenza virus challenge. Needle-free delivery elicited improved antibody responses with the same efficiency as conventional injection and should be considered for development as a practical alternative for vaccine administration. PMID:21918118

  13. Industry and Government Perspective in Influenza Control

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Eve E.

    2004-01-01

    We have had recent reminders of the threats posed by naturally occurring and bioengineered pandemic respiratory infections. It is estimated that if a pandemic infection were to arise anywhere in the world, such an infection would become widespread within 3 months and would have its maximum effect within 6 months. At present, the fastest that a vaccine effective against a new combination of antigens can be developed, purified, and produced is 9–12 months, not counting time for mass production. The current rate at which the production of influenza vaccines can be accelerated is limited by the fact that production is carried out in eggs. Therefore, there is urgent need for cell-based vaccine technologies. These are under way in several centers, yet attainment of a safe product remains several years away. Furthermore, there is need for public and private investment in manufacturing surge capacity and/or dedicated National Institutes of Health facilities to enable accelerated production. We must support efforts to shorten development time by developing and approving subunit antigens and immunogens that anticipate the most virulent viral mutations. Surveillance sites and their electronic interconnections must be expanded. Another component still lacking is funding for laboratories with high throughput screening and strong informatics capabilities to enable the fingerprinting and cataloguing of all known specimens of influenza and other pathogenic organisms for rapid identification of emerging or bioengineered pathogens. In all these efforts, we look to the federal government and to the biomedical research community in both public and private sectors. PMID:15061626

  14. Industry and government perspective in influenza control.

    PubMed

    Slater, Eve E

    2004-01-01

    We have had recent reminders of the threats posed by naturally occurring and bioengineered pandemic respiratory infections. It is estimated that if a pandemic infection were to arise anywhere in the world, such an infection would become widespread within 3 months and would have its maximum effect within 6 months. At present, the fastest that a vaccine effective against a new combination of antigens can be developed, purified, and produced is 9-12 months, not counting time for mass production. The current rate at which the production of influenza vaccines can be accelerated is limited by the fact that production is carried out in eggs. Therefore, there is urgent need for cell-based vaccine technologies. These are under way in several centers, yet attainment of a safe product remains several years away. Furthermore, there is need for public and private investment in manufacturing surge capacity and/or dedicated National Institutes of Health facilities to enable accelerated production. We must support efforts to shorten development time by developing and approving subunit antigens and immunogens that anticipate the most virulent viral mutations. Surveillance sites and their electronic interconnections must be expanded. Another component still lacking is funding for laboratories with high throughput screening and strong informatics capabilities to enable the fingerprinting and cataloguing of all known specimens of influenza and other pathogenic organisms for rapid identification of emerging or bioengineered pathogens. In all these efforts, we look to the federal government and to the biomedical research community in both public and private sectors.

  15. [Influenza: Whats new?

    PubMed

    Salzberger, Bernd; Schmidt, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    The burden of disease of influenza in Germany has been dominated by high rates of complications in elderly patients in years with high circulation of H3N2 viruses after the introduction of the new H1N1 strain in 2009. Human infections with avian influenza viruses occur mostly in China. Due to the potential of reassortment with human strains these cases are monitored closely. The efficacy of neuraminidase inhibitors (NI) has been newly rated. In randomized studies effects on reduction of complications could not be found, although large cohort studies have demonstrated a reduction of mortality in patients treated with vs. without neuraminidase inhibitors.The administration and acceptance of influenza vaccine is low in Germany in general and in risk populations. New vaccines have been introduced with quadrivalent vaccines covering both circulating B-types simultaneously and high dose vaccines for elder patients.

  16. Animal influenza epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Ducatez, M.F.; Webster, R.G.; Webby, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses exist within their natural host, aquatic birds, in a number of antigenic subtypes. Only a few of these subtypes have successfully crossed into other avian and mammalian hosts. This brief review will focus on just three examples of viruses that have successfully passed between species; avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses and H3N2 viruses which have transmitted from aquatic birds to humans and then to swine. Although there are a number of other subtypes that have also transmitted successfully between species, these three selected examples have spread and evolved in different ways, exemplifying the complexity of influenza A virus epidemiology. PMID:19230163

  17. [Comparative clinical trial of vaccines against avian influenza].

    PubMed

    Zverev, V V; Katlinskiĭ, A V; Kostinov, M P; Zhirova, S N; Erofeeva, M K; Stukova, M A; Korovkin, S A; Mel'nikov, S Ia; Semchenko, A V; Mironov, A N

    2007-01-01

    Scientic-production association "Microgen" has finished 1st phase of clinical trials of candidate vaccines against avian influenza in order to assess their reactogenicity, safety, and immunogenicity. Two vaccines constructed from NIBRG-14 vaccine strain [A/Vietnam/1 194/2004 (H5N1)], obtained from World Health Organization, were studied: "OrniFlu" (inactivated subunit influenza vaccine adsorbed on aluminium hydroxide) and inactivated polymer-subunit influenza vaccine with polyoxydonium (IPSIV). Clinical trial of the vaccines with different quantity of antigen (15, 30, and 45 mcg of H5N1 virus hemagglutinin) was carried out in Influenza Research Institute (St. Petersburg) and in Mechnikov Research Institute of Vaccines and Sera (Moscow). Analysis of results allowed to conclude that both vaccines were safe, well tolerated and characterized by low reactogenicity. Two-doses vaccination schedule was needed to meet required seroconversion and seroprotection rates (> or =1:40 in > or =70% of vaccinated volunteers). "Orni-Flu" vaccine containing 15 mcg of hemagglutinin and optimal quantity of aluminium hydroxide (0.5 mg) in one dose as well as IPSIV containing 45 mcg of hemagglutinin and 0.75 mg of polyoxydonium in one dose were most immunogenic after 2 doses - seroprotection rates in microneutralization assay were 72.2% and 77.0% respectively. Marked influence of aluminium hydroxide content on immunogenicity of the "OrniFlu" vaccine was confirmed in the study. Optimal quantity of adjuvant was 0.5 mg per dose. According to basic concept of vaccine development, preference is given to vaccine that under minimal quantity of antigen induces sufficient specific immune response and is safe in volunteers. "OrniFlu" vaccine containing 15 mcg of H5N1 virus hemagglutinin and optimal quantity of aluminium hydroxide (0.5 mg) corresponded to these requirements that allowed researchers to recommend it for clinical trials of 2nd phase.

  18. Rotating proton pumping ATPases: subunit/subunit interactions and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Sekiya, Mizuki; Futai, Masamitsu

    2013-03-01

    In this article, we discuss single molecule observation of rotational catalysis by E. coli ATP synthase (F-ATPase) using small gold beads. Studies involving a low viscous drag probe showed the stochastic properties of the enzyme in alternating catalytically active and inhibited states. The importance of subunit interaction between the rotor and the stator, and thermodynamics of the catalysis are also discussed. "Single Molecule Enzymology" is a new trend for understanding enzyme mechanisms in biochemistry and physiology.

  19. Universal influenza vaccine: the holy grail?

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alan R

    2012-08-01

    Influenza vaccines have been available since the 1950s and have seen increasingly wide use as public health authorities expanded recommendations. Recent events including shortages and avian influenza outbreaks have renewed interest in influenza vaccines, particularly improved vaccines.

  20. Preliminary Proteomic Analysis of A549 Cells Infected with Avian Influenza Virus H7N9 and Influenza A Virus H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoman; Lu, Jiahai; Yu, Ruoxi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Ting; Dong, Fangyuan; Peng, Bo; Wu, Weihua; Liu, Hui; Geng, Yijie; Zhang, Renli; Ma, Hanwu; Cheng, Jinquan; Yu, Muhua; Fang, Shisong

    2016-01-01

    A newly emerged H7N9 influenza virus poses high risk to human beings. However, the pathogenic mechanism of the virus remains unclear. The temporal response of primary human alveolar adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549) infected with H7N9 influenza virus and H1N1 influenza A virus (H1N1, pdm09) were evaluated using the proteomics approaches (2D-DIGE combined with MALDI-TOF-MS/MS) at 24, 48 and 72 hours post of the infection (hpi). There were 11, 12 and 33 proteins with significant different expressions (P<0.05) at 24, 48 and 72hpi, especially F-actin-capping protein subunit alpha-1 (CAPZA1), Ornithine aminotransferase (OAT), Poly(rC)-binding protein 1 (PCBP1), Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A-1 (EIF5A) and Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolaseⅠb subunit beta (PAFAH1B2) were validated by western-blot analysis. The functional analysis revealed that the differential proteins in A549 cells involved in regulating cytopathic effect. Among them, the down-regulation of CAPZA1, OAT, PCBP1, EIF5A are related to the death of cells infected by H7N9 influenza virus. This is the first time show that the down-regulation of PAFAH1B2 is related to the later clinical symptoms of patients infected by H7N9 influenza virus. These findings may improve our understanding of pathogenic mechanism of H7N9 influenza virus in proteomics. PMID:27223893

  1. Avian influenza control strategies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Control strategies for avian influenza in poultry vary depending on whether the goal is prevention, management, or eradication. Components used in control programs include: 1) education which includes communication, public awareness, and behavioral change, 2) changes to production and marketing sys...

  2. INFLUENZA AND PNEUMONIA

    PubMed Central

    1916-01-01

    This symposium summarizes the opinions of several widely known health workers on the modes of infection, spread, prevalence and nature, epidemiology, and legislative and executive management of influenza and pneumonia—the two diseases which so greatly increased our morbidity rates during the winter season. PMID:18009431

  3. Avian influenza (fowl plague)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses infect domestic poultry and wild birds. In domestic poultry, AI viruses are typically of low pathogenicity (LP) causing subclinical infections, respiratory disease or drops in egg production. However, a few AI viruses cause severe systemic disease with high mortality; ...

  4. Influenza and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... WHO) announced that a pandemic of novel H1N1 flu was underway. H1N1 (referred to as “swine flu” early on) is ... strains of influenza virus as well as the H1N1 flu virus, so only a single vaccination is necessary ...

  5. Genetic analysis of novel avian A(H7N9) influenza viruses isolated from patients in China, February to April 2013.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, T; Fujisaki, S; Takashita, E; Xu, H; Yamada, S; Uchida, Y; Neumann, G; Saito, T; Kawaoka, Y; Tashiro, M

    2013-04-11

    Novel influenza viruses of the H7N9 subtype have infected 33 and killed nine people in China as of 10 April 2013. Their haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase genes probably originated from Eurasian avian influenza viruses; the remaining genes are closely related to avian H9N2 influenza viruses. Several characteristic amino acid changes in HA and the PB2 RNA polymerase subunit probably facilitate binding to human-type receptors and efficient replication in mammals, respectively, highlighting the pandemic potential of the novel viruses.

  6. Influenza infection in wild raccoons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, J.S.; Bentler, K.T.; Landolt, G.; Elmore, S.A.; Minnis, R.B.; Campbell, T.A.; Barras, S.C.; Root, J.J.; Pilon, J.; Pabilonia, K.; Driscoll, C.; Slate, D.; Sullivan, H.; McLean, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Raccoons (Procyon lotor) are common, widely distributed animals that frequently come into contact with wild waterfowl, agricultural operations, and humans. Serosurveys showed that raccoons are exposed to avian influenza virus. We found antibodies to a variety of influenza virus subtypes (H10N7, H4N6, H4N2, H3, and H1) with wide geographic variation in seroprevalence. Experimental infection studies showed that raccoons become infected with avian and human influenza A viruses, shed and transmit virus to virus-free animals, and seroconvert. Analyses of cellular receptors showed that raccoons have avian and human type receptors with a similar distribution as found in human respiratory tracts. The potential exists for co-infection of multiple subtypes of influenza virus with genetic reassortment and creation of novel strains of influenza virus. Experimental and field data indicate that raccoons may play an important role in influenza disease ecology and pose risks to agriculture and human health.

  7. Influenza infection in wild raccoons.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jeffrey S; Bentler, Kevin T; Landolt, Gabrielle; Elmore, Stacey A; Minnis, Richard B; Campbell, Tyler A; Barras, Scott C; Root, J Jeffrey; Pilon, John; Pabilonia, Kristy; Driscoll, Cindy; Slate, Dennis; Sullivan, Heather; McLean, Robert G

    2008-12-01

    Raccoons (Procyon lotor) are common, widely distributed animals that frequently come into contact with wild waterfowl, agricultural operations, and humans. Serosurveys showed that raccoons are exposed to avian influenza virus. We found antibodies to a variety of influenza virus subtypes (H10N7, H4N6, H4N2, H3, and H1) with wide geographic variation in seroprevalence. Experimental infection studies showed that raccoons become infected with avian and human influenza A viruses, shed and transmit virus to virus-free animals, and seroconvert. Analyses of cellular receptors showed that raccoons have avian and human type receptors with a similar distribution as found in human respiratory tracts. The potential exists for co-infection of multiple subtypes of influenza virus with genetic reassortment and creation of novel strains of influenza virus. Experimental and field data indicate that raccoons may play an important role in influenza disease ecology and pose risks to agriculture and human health.

  8. Influenza Infection in Wild Raccoons

    PubMed Central

    Bentler, Kevin T.; Landolt, Gabrielle; Elmore, Stacey A.; Minnis, Richard B.; Campbell, Tyler A.; Barras, Scott C.; Root, J. Jeffrey; Pilon, John; Pabilonia, Kristy; Driscoll, Cindy; Slate, Dennis; Sullivan, Heather; McLean, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Raccoons (Procyon lotor) are common, widely distributed animals that frequently come into contact with wild waterfowl, agricultural operations, and humans. Serosurveys showed that raccoons are exposed to avian influenza virus. We found antibodies to a variety of influenza virus subtypes (H10N7, H4N6, H4N2, H3, and H1) with wide geographic variation in seroprevalence. Experimental infection studies showed that raccoons become infected with avian and human influenza A viruses, shed and transmit virus to virus-free animals, and seroconvert. Analyses of cellular receptors showed that raccoons have avian and human type receptors with a similar distribution as found in human respiratory tracts. The potential exists for co-infection of multiple subtypes of influenza virus with genetic reassortment and creation of novel strains of influenza virus. Experimental and field data indicate that raccoons may play an important role in influenza disease ecology and pose risks to agriculture and human health. PMID:19046505

  9. Role of the PB2 627 Domain in Influenza A Virus Polymerase Function

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Benjamin E.; te Velthuis, Aartjan J. W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The RNA genome of influenza A viruses is transcribed and replicated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, composed of the subunits PA, PB1, and PB2. High-resolution structural data revealed that the polymerase assembles into a central polymerase core and several auxiliary highly flexible, protruding domains. The auxiliary PB2 cap-binding and the PA endonuclease domains are both involved in cap snatching, but the role of the auxiliary PB2 627 domain, implicated in host range restriction of influenza A viruses, is still poorly understood. In this study, we used structure-guided truncations of the PB2 subunit to show that a PB2 subunit lacking the 627 domain accumulates in the cell nucleus and assembles into a heterotrimeric polymerase with PB1 and PA. Furthermore, we showed that a recombinant viral polymerase lacking the PB2 627 domain is able to carry out cap snatching, cap-dependent transcription initiation, and cap-independent ApG dinucleotide extension in vitro, indicating that the PB2 627 domain of the influenza virus RNA polymerase is not involved in core catalytic functions of the polymerase. However, in a cellular context, the 627 domain is essential for both transcription and replication. In particular, we showed that the PB2 627 domain is essential for the accumulation of the cRNA replicative intermediate in infected cells. Together, these results further our understanding of the role of the PB2 627 domain in transcription and replication of the influenza virus RNA genome. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses are a major global health threat, not only causing disease in both humans and birds but also placing significant strains on economies worldwide. Avian influenza A virus polymerases typically do not function efficiently in mammalian hosts and require adaptive mutations to restore polymerase activity. These adaptations include mutations in the 627 domain of the PB2 subunit of the viral polymerase, but it still remains to be established how these

  10. Influenza viruses: transmission between species.

    PubMed

    Webster, R G; Hinshaw, V S; Bean, W J; Sriram, G

    1980-02-25

    The only direct evidence for transmission of influenza viruses between species comes from studies on swine influenza viruses. Antigenically and genetically identical Hsw1N1 influenza viruses were isolated from pigs and man on the same farm in Wisconsin, U.S.A. The isolation of H3N2 influenza viruses from a wide range of lower animals and birds suggests that influenza viruses of man can spread to the lower orders. Under some conditions the H3N2 viruses can persist for a number of years in some species. The isolation, from aquatic birds, of a large number of influenza A viruses that possess surface proteins antigenically similar to the viruses isolated from man, pigs and horses provides indirect evidence for inter-species transmission. There is now a considerable body of evidence which suggests that influenza viruses of lower animals and birds may play a role in the origin of some of the pandemic strains of influenza A viruses. There is no direct evidence that the influenza viruses in aquatic birds are transmitted to man, but they may serve as a genetic pool from which some genes may be introduced into humans by recombination. Preliminary evidence suggests that the molecular basis of host range and virulence may be related to the RNA segments coding for one of the polymerase proteins (P3) and for the nucleoprotein (NP).

  11. Inhibition of influenza A virus infection in vitro by peptides designed in silico.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Rogelio; Ramírez-Salinas, G Lizbeth; Correa-Basurto, José; Barrón, Blanca L

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are enveloped, segmented negative single-stranded RNA viruses, capable of causing severe human respiratory infections. Currently, only two types of drugs are used to treat influenza A infections, the M2 H(+) ion channel blockers (amantadine and rimantadine) and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAI) (oseltamivir and zanamivir). Moreover, the emergence of drug-resistant influenza A virus strains has emphasized the need to develop new antiviral agents to complement or replace the existing drugs. Influenza A virus has on the surface a glycoprotein named hemagglutinin (HA) which due to its important role in the initial stage of infection: receptor binding and fusion activities of viral and endosomal membranes, is a potential target for new antiviral drugs. In this work we designed nine peptides using several bioinformatics tools. These peptides were derived from the HA1 and HA2 subunits of influenza A HA with the aim to inhibit influenza A virus infection. The peptides were synthetized and their antiviral activity was tested in vitro against several influenza A viral strains: Puerto Rico/916/34 (H1N1), (H1N1)pdm09, swine (H1N1) and avian (H5N2). We found these peptides were able to inhibit the influenza A viral strains tested, without showing any cytotoxic effect. By docking studies we found evidence that all the peptides were capable to bind to the viral HA, principally to important regions on the viral HA stalk, thus could prevent the HA conformational changes required to carry out its membranes fusion activity.

  12. A new avian influenza virus from feral birds in the USSR: Recombination in nature?

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Robert G.; Isachenko, Valentina A.; Carter, Martha

    1974-01-01

    Six avian influenza A viruses isolated in the USSR were characterized antigenically by using specific antisera to the isolated surface subunits of the known reference strains. Three of the viruses, all isolated from the same region, were characterized as A/duck/Ukraine/63 (Hav7 Neq2), and a virus isolated from a crow was of the Hong Kong/68 (H3 N2) type. The remaining two viruses were novel in that they possessed Hav7 Nav2 antigens, a combination that has not previously been reported. It is suggested that these new influenza viruses might have arisen by recombination in nature between the A/duck/Ukraine/63 (Hav7 Neq2) and A/tern/So. Africa/61 (Hav5 Nav2) strains of avian influenza viruses. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4549487

  13. Vaccines against influenza A viruses in poultry and swine: Status and future developments.

    PubMed

    Rahn, J; Hoffmann, D; Harder, T C; Beer, M

    2015-05-15

    Influenza A viruses are important pathogens with a very broad host spectrum including domestic poultry and swine. For preventing clinical disease and controlling the spread, vaccination is one of the most efficient tools. Classical influenza vaccines for domestic poultry and swine are conventional inactivated preparations. However, a very broad range of novel vaccine types ranging from (i) nucleic acid-based vaccines, (ii) replicon particles, (iii) subunits and virus-like particles, (iv) vectored vaccines, or (v) live-attenuated vaccines has been described, and some of them are now also used in the field. The different novel approaches for vaccines against avian and swine influenza virus infections are reviewed, and additional features like universal vaccines, novel application approaches and the "differentiating infected from vaccinated animals" (DIVA)-strategy are summarized.

  14. Intranasal flu vaccine protective against seasonal and H5N1 avian influenza infections.

    PubMed

    Alsharifi, Mohammed; Furuya, Yoichi; Bowden, Timothy R; Lobigs, Mario; Koskinen, Aulikki; Regner, Matthias; Trinidad, Lee; Boyle, David B; Müllbacher, Arno

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A (flu) virus causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, and current vaccines require annual updating to protect against the rapidly arising antigenic variations due to antigenic shift and drift. In fact, current subunit or split flu vaccines rely exclusively on antibody responses for protection and do not induce cytotoxic T (Tc) cell responses, which are broadly cross-reactive between virus strains. We have previously reported that gamma-ray inactivated flu virus can induce cross-reactive Tc cell responses. Here, we report that intranasal administration of purified gamma-ray inactivated human influenza A virus preparations (gamma-Flu) effectively induces heterotypic and cross-protective immunity. A single intranasal administration of gamma-A/PR8[H1N1] protects mice against lethal H5N1 and other heterotypic infections. Intranasal gamma-Flu represents a unique approach for a cross-protective vaccine against both seasonal as well as possible future pandemic influenza A virus infections.

  15. Stimulation of cytotoxic T cells by liposomes containing influenza virus or its components.

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, C J; Taylor, P M; Askonas, B A

    1983-01-01

    Since inactivated virus preparations are poor inducers of influenza-specific cytotoxic T cells (Tc), studies were undertaken utilizing artificial vesicles (liposomes) as a means of delivering viral and H-2 antigens in a multivalent form and oriented with respect to a lipid bilayer. Liposomes prepared from extracted mouse cell lipids efficiently incorporated influenza-viral proteins and were not toxic in culture. Using polybrene to promote greater contact of liposomes with cells, liposomes prepared from whole virus could effectively stimulate memory Tc from spleens of intranasally infected mice in vitro. H-2 was not required in the liposomes to obtain stimulation, and its presence did not improve responses, which were always lower than in parallel stimulations using virally infected syngeneic cells. Liposomes prepared from purified influenza virion subunits (haemagglutinin, neuraminidase, matrix protein) were only slightly stimulatory in vitro, and were unable to prime mice for significant Tc memory. PMID:6602089

  16. [Determination of antimycobacterial activities of fluoroquinolones against clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: comparative determination with egg-based Ogawa and agar-based Middlebrook 7H10 media].

    PubMed

    Yamane, N; Chilima, B Z; Tosaka, M; Okazawa, Y; Tanno, K

    1996-08-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to the fluoroquinolones, ofloxacin (OFLX), ciprofloxacin (CPFX), sparfloxacin (SPFX), norfloxacin (NFLX), balofloxacin (BLFX) and CS-940, were determined in 100 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The MICs were determined with 1% egg-based Ogawa or agar-based Middlebrook 7H10 and each of them supplemented with oxidation-reduction color dye, 2,3-diphenyl-5-thienyl-(2)-tetrazolium chloride (STC) by using the microculture technique. The MICs determined with Ogawa medium were approximately two- to four-fold higher when compared to those determined with Middlebrook agar medium. The supplement with STC slightly increased the MICs, probably as a result of easily recognizing small initial colonies. Among the six fluoroquinolones, CS-940 and SPFX showed the greatest antimycobacterial activities with inhibition of 50% of all the isolates at the concentrations between 0.25 to 0.5 microgram/ml. OFLX, CPFX and BLFX followed in potency at 0.5 to 2.0 micrograms /ml. NFLX was less potent requiring 8 to 16 micrograms/ml to inhibit 50% of the isolates.

  17. A comprehensive review of influenza and influenza vaccination during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Carol Y S; Tarrant, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is a highly infectious respiratory disease that can impose significant health risks leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Receiving influenza vaccination is the most important and effective means of preventing the infection and its related complications. During pregnancy, physiological changes increase susceptibility to influenza infection, and women contracting infectious diseases during pregnancy are more likely to have adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Influenza vaccination during pregnancy is safe for both pregnant women and their fetus, and pregnant women are now the highest priority group for vaccination. Despite the accumulated evidence of the benefits and safety of influenza vaccination during pregnancy, uptake among pregnant women remains suboptimal. Concerns about the vaccine's safety persist, and the fear of birth defects remains the predominant barrier to vaccination. Targeted interventions have been shown effective in enhancing influenza vaccination uptake among pregnant women. Reluctance to be vaccinated should be addressed by offering accurate information to counteract the misperceptions about the risk of influenza infection during pregnancy as well as to educate mothers about the safety and benefits of influenza vaccination. High-quality randomized controlled trials are recommended to evaluate the effectiveness of individual or multifaceted approaches to increase vaccine uptake.

  18. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Experimental Approach Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9′ serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Key Results Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose–response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9′S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Conclusions and Implications Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. PMID:24206220

  19. Vitamin D and Influenza

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    greater than ~87nmol/L. Vitamin D from sunlight affects TB The 1903 Nobel prize was awarded for the discovery that vitamin D from sunlight could cure cutaneous TB…. ...0.1% did so in May. Shadrin AS, Marinich IG, Taros LY. Journal of Hygiene, Epidemiology, Microbiology , and Immunology 1977; 21:155–161. In a...influenza vaccine in different seasons of the year. Journal of Hygiene, Epidemiology, Microbiology , and Immunology 1987; 31: 453–459. Season

  20. Post-influenza aspergillosis, do not underestimate influenza B

    PubMed Central

    Nulens, Eric FL; Bourgeois, Marc JC; Reynders, Marijke BML

    2017-01-01

    Our objective is to highlight and focus on post-influenza aspergillosis, triggered by influenza B virus. This relatively new clinical entity is often associated with a fulminant course of respiratory decline and high mortality. A 51-year immunocompetent woman, without any medical history or risk factors for developing a complicated influenza infection, was admitted to the intensive care unit. During admission, she presented with an afebrile flu-like syndrome, myocarditis, rhabdomyolysis, multiple organ failure, and evolved to severe respiratory distress. The broncho-alveolar lavage contained influenza B RNA, and the culture revealed Aspergillus fumigatus. Despite maximal organ support, immunoglobulin, antiviral and antifungal therapy, the patient died. This case demonstrates that influenza B virus may be life threatening even to immunocompetent adults and may trigger an invasive Aspergillus superinfection. PMID:28260935

  1. Influenza Virus Infection in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Engel, Gregory A.; Feeroz, M.M.; San, Sorn; Rompis, Aida; Lee, Benjamin P. Y.-H.; Shaw, Eric; Oh, Gunwha; Schillaci, Michael A.; Grant, Richard; Heidrich, John; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether nonhuman primates are infected with influenza viruses in nature, we conducted serologic and swab studies among macaques from several parts of the world. Our detection of influenza virus and antibodies to influenza virus raises questions about the role of nonhuman primates in the ecology of influenza. PMID:23017256

  2. The rationale for quadrivalent influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Christopher S.; Levin, Myron J.

    2012-01-01

    Two antigenically distinct lineages of influenza B viruses have circulated globally since 1985. However, licensed trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines contain antigens from only a single influenza B virus and thus provide limited immunity against circulating influenza B strains of the lineage not present in the vaccine. In recent years, predictions about which B lineage will predominate in an upcoming influenza season have been no better than chance alone, correct in only 5 of the 10 seasons from 2001 to 2011. Consequently, seasonal influenza vaccines could be improved by inclusion of influenza B strains of both lineages. The resulting quadrivalent influenza vaccines would allow influenza vaccination campaigns to respond more effectively to current global influenza epidemiology. Manufacturing capacity for seasonal influenza vaccines has increased sufficiently to supply quadrivalent influenza vaccines, and methods to identify the influenza B strains to include in such vaccines are in place. Multiple manufacturers have initiated clinical studies of quadrivalent influenza vaccines. Data from those studies, taken together with epidemiologic data regarding the burden of disease caused by influenza B infections, will determine the safety, effectiveness, and benefit of utilizing quadrivalent vaccines for the prevention of seasonal influenza disease. PMID:22252006

  3. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  4. Avian influenza in Poland.

    PubMed

    Smietanka, Krzysztof; Minta, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    Poland has experienced four episodes of avian influenza (AI) outbreaks over the past two decades. The first epidemic was caused by a low pathogenicity (LPAIV) H7N7 subtype and occurred in fattening and breeder turkeys in 1995. Two waves of H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) took place in 2006 and 2007. In spring 2006, 64 cases of the H5N1 virus were detected, mostly in mute swans. In December 2007, ten outbreaks of H5N1 HPAI were detected in commercial poultry (n = 9) and wild birds kept in captivity (n = 1). The outbreaks in 2006 and 2007 were caused by genetically similar but clearly distinguishable viruses of the 2.2 clade. In 2013, an H9N2 avian influenza virus was detected in 4 fattening turkey holdings. The virus was low pathogenic and a phylogenetic study has shown a close relatedness to the Eurasian lineage of AIV of the wild bird origin. Neither preventive nor prophylactic vaccinations have ever been used in poultry or other birds. Emergency vaccinations using autogenous vaccine were introduced only to control the H7N7 LPAI outbreaks in 1995. The baseline surveillance for AI in live migratory birds and poultry provides a valuable insight into the ecology of AIV at the wild and domestic bird interface. Passive surveillance is in place of early detection of HPAIV infection in dead or moribund birds.

  5. Development of an Alternative Modified Live Influenza B Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Courtney; Sutton, Troy; Obadan, Adebimpe; Aguirre, Isabel; Wan, Zhimin; Lopez, Diego; Geiger, Ginger; Gonzalez-Reiche, Ana Silvia; Ferreri, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza B virus (IBV) is considered a major human pathogen, responsible for seasonal epidemics of acute respiratory illness. Two antigenically distinct IBV hemagglutinin (HA) lineages cocirculate worldwide with little cross-reactivity. Live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines have been shown to provide better cross-protective immune responses than inactivated vaccines by eliciting local mucosal immunity and systemic B cell- and T cell-mediated memory responses. We have shown previously that incorporation of temperature-sensitive (ts) mutations into the PB1 and PB2 subunits along with a modified HA epitope tag in the C terminus of PB1 resulted in influenza A viruses (IAV) that are safe and effective as modified live attenuated (att) virus vaccines (IAV att). We explored whether analogous mutations in the IBV polymerase subunits would result in a stable virus with an att phenotype. The PB1 subunit of the influenza B/Brisbane/60/2008 strain was used to incorporate ts mutations and a C-terminal HA tag. Such modifications resulted in a B/Bris att strain with ts characteristics in vitro and an att phenotype in vivo. Vaccination studies in mice showed that a single dose of the B/Bris att candidate stimulated sterilizing immunity against lethal homologous challenge and complete protection against heterologous challenge. These studies show the potential of an alternative LAIV platform for the development of IBV vaccines. IMPORTANCE A number of issues with regard to the effectiveness of the LAIV vaccine licensed in the United States (FluMist) have arisen over the past three seasons (2013–2014, 2014–2015, and 2015–2016). While the reasons for the limited robustness of the vaccine-elicited immune response remain controversial, this problem highlights the critical importance of continued investment in LAIV development and creates an opportunity to improve current strategies so as to develop more efficacious vaccines. Our laboratory has developed an

  6. Protection of human influenza vaccines against a reassortant swine influenza virus of pandemic H1N1 origin using a pig model.

    PubMed

    Arunorat, Jirapat; Charoenvisal, Nataya; Woonwong, Yonlayong; Kedkovid, Roongtham; Jittimanee, Supattra; Sitthicharoenchai, Panchan; Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Poolperm, Pariwat; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2017-02-28

    Since the pandemic H1N1 emergence in 2009 (pdmH1N1), many reassortant pdmH1N1 viruses emerged and found circulating in the pig population worldwide. Currently, commercial human subunit vaccines are used commonly to prevent the influenza symptom based on the WHO recommendation. In case of current reassortant swine influenza viruses transmitting from pigs to humans, the efficacy of current human influenza vaccines is of interest. In this study, influenza A negative pigs were vaccinated with selected commercial human subunit vaccines and challenged with rH3N2. All sera were tested with both HI and SN assays using four representative viruses from the surveillance data in 2012 (enH1N1, pdmH1N1, rH1N2 and rH3N2). The results showed no significant differences in clinical signs and macroscopic and microscopic findings among groups. However, all pig sera from vaccinated groups had protective HI titers to the enH1N1, pdmH1N1 and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward and had protective SN titers only to pdmH1N1and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward. SN test results appeared more specific than those of HI tests. All tested sera had no cross-reactivity against the rH3N2. Both studied human subunit vaccines failed to protect and to stop viral shedding with no evidence of serological reaction against rH3N2. SIV surveillance is essential for monitoring a novel SIV emergence potentially for zoonosis.

  7. Avian And Other Zoonotic Influenza

    MedlinePlus

    ... as avian influenza virus subtypes A(H5N1), A(H7N9), and A(H9N2) and swine influenza virus subtypes ... of human cases of A(H5N1) and A(H7N9) infection have been associated with direct or indirect ...

  8. H1N1 Influenza

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a fever and cough. What causes H1N1 influenza? A virus causes H1N1. It spreads from person to person. ... least 24 hours after your fever breaks. H1N1 influenza treatment Your ... H1N1. This helps kill the virus so you can recover and aren’t contagious. ...

  9. Influenza SIRS with Minimal Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Erramilli, Shruti; Mannam, Praveen; Manthous, Constantine A

    2016-01-01

    Although systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a known complication of severe influenza pneumonia, it has been reported very rarely in patients with minimal parenchymal lung disease. We here report a case of severe SIRS, anasarca, and marked vascular phenomena with minimal or no pneumonitis. This case highlights that viruses, including influenza, may cause vascular dysregulation causing SIRS, even without substantial visceral organ involvement.

  10. Avian influenza surveillance and diagnosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rapid detection and accurate identification of low (LPAI) and high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) is critical to controlling infections and disease in poultry. Test selection and algorithms for the detection and diagnosis of avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry may vary somewhat among differ...

  11. The Subunit Structure of Benzylsuccinate Synthase†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Patterson, Dustin P.; Fox, Christel C.; Lin, Brian; Coschigano, Peter W.; Marsh, E. Neil G.

    2010-01-01

    Benzylsuccinate synthase is a member of the glycyl radical family of enzymes. It catalyzes the addition of toluene to fumarate to form benzylsuccinate as the first step in the anaerobic pathway of toluene fermentation. The enzyme comprises three subunits α, β and γ that in Thauera Aromatica T1 strain are encoded by the tutD, tutG and tutF genes respectively. The large α-subunit contains the essential glycine and cysteine residues that are conserved in all glycyl radical enzymes. However, the function of the small β- and γ-subunits has remained unclear. We have over-expressed all three subunits of benzylsuccinate synthase in E. coli, both individually and in combination. Co-expression of the γ-subunit (but not the β-subunit) is essential for efficient expression of the α-subunit. The benzylsuccinate synthase complex lacking the glycyl radical could be purified as an α2β2γ2 hexamer by nickel-affinity chromatography through a ‘His6’ affinity tag engineered onto the C-terminus of the α-subunit. Unexpectedly, BSS was found to contain two iron-sulfur clusters, one associated with the β-subunit and the other with the γ-subunit that appear to be necessary for the structural integrity of the complex. The spectroscopic properties of these clusters suggest that they are most likely [4Fe-4S] clusters. Removal of iron with chelating agents results in dissociation of the complex; similarly a mutant γ-subunit lacking the [4Fe-4S] cluster is unable to stabilize the α-subunit when the proteins are co-expressed. PMID:19159265

  12. Improving pandemic influenza risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Colin A; Kasson, Peter M; Donis, Ruben O; Riley, Steven; Dunbar, John; Rambaut, Andrew; Asher, Jason; Burke, Stephen; Davis, C Todd; Garten, Rebecca J; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Hay, Simon I; Herfst, Sander; Lewis, Nicola S; Lloyd-Smith, James O; Macken, Catherine A; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Neuhaus, Elizabeth; Parrish, Colin R; Pepin, Kim M; Shepard, Samuel S; Smith, David L; Suarez, David L; Trock, Susan C; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; George, Dylan B; Lipsitch, Marc; Bloom, Jesse D

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the pandemic risk posed by specific non-human influenza A viruses is an important goal in public health research. As influenza virus genome sequencing becomes cheaper, faster, and more readily available, the ability to predict pandemic potential from sequence data could transform pandemic influenza risk assessment capabilities. However, the complexities of the relationships between virus genotype and phenotype make such predictions extremely difficult. The integration of experimental work, computational tool development, and analysis of evolutionary pathways, together with refinements to influenza surveillance, has the potential to transform our ability to assess the risks posed to humans by non-human influenza viruses and lead to improved pandemic preparedness and response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03883.001 PMID:25321142

  13. Haemophilus influenzae and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Alistair; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Munson, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a commensal of the human upper respiratory tract. H. influenzae can, however, move out of its commensal niche and cause multiple respiratory tract diseases. Such diseases include otitis media in young children, as well as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sinusitis, conjunctivitis, and bronchitis. During the course of colonization and infection, H. influenzae must withstand oxidative stress generated by multiple reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by other co-pathogens and by host cells. H. influenzae has, therefore, evolved multiple mechanisms that protect the cell against oxygen-generated stresses. In this review, we will describe these systems relative to the well-described systems in Escherichia coli. Moreover, we will compare how H. influenzae combats the effect of oxidative stress as a necessary phenotype for its roles as both a successful commensal and pathogen. PMID:22919631

  14. Pandemic Influenza's 500th Anniversary

    PubMed Central

    Morens, David M.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Folkers, Gregory K.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2010-01-01

    It is impossible to know with certainty the first time that an influenza virus infected humans or when the first influenza pandemic occurred. However, many historians agree that the year 1510 a.d.—500 years ago—marks the first recognition of pandemic influenza. On this significant anniversary it is timely to ask: what were the circumstances surrounding the emergence of the 1510 pandemic, and what have we learned about this important disease over the subsequent five centuries?We conclude that in recent decades significant progress has been made in diagnosis, prevention, control, and treatment of influenza. It seems likely that, in the foreseeable future, we may be able to greatly reduce the burden of influenza pandemics with improved vaccines and other scientific and public health approaches. PMID:21067353

  15. Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2013-2014 Influenza Season

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-21

    Naval Health Research Center Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2013–2014 Influenza Season Angelia A. Cost...2000–2013 P A G E 1 5 Brief report: mid-season influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates for the 2013–2014 influenza season Angelia A. Cost, PhD...Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2013–2014 Influenza Season Angelia A

  16. Quercetin as an Antiviral Agent Inhibits Influenza A Virus (IAV) Entry

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenjiao; Li, Richan; Li, Xianglian; He, Jian; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen; Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause seasonal pandemics and epidemics with high morbidity and mortality, which calls for effective anti-IAV agents. The glycoprotein hemagglutinin of influenza virus plays a crucial role in the initial stage of virus infection, making it a potential target for anti-influenza therapeutics development. Here we found that quercetin inhibited influenza infection with a wide spectrum of strains, including A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1), A/FM-1/47/1 (H1N1), and A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2) with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 7.756 ± 1.097, 6.225 ± 0.467, and 2.738 ± 1.931 μg/mL, respectively. Mechanism studies identified that quercetin showed interaction with the HA2 subunit. Moreover, quercetin could inhibit the entry of the H5N1 virus using the pseudovirus-based drug screening system. This study indicates that quercetin showing inhibitory activity in the early stage of influenza infection provides a future therapeutic option to develop effective, safe and affordable natural products for the treatment and prophylaxis of IAV infections. PMID:26712783

  17. Bovine and human-derived passive immunization could help slow a future avian influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Alisky, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    An epidemic of human transmitted avian influenza could have casualties on a scale seen in the great Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918. This paper proposes that should such occur before effective vaccines and antiviral drugs are available, the outbreak could be significantly slowed by consumption of raw milk produced by herds of pathogen-free lactating cows intranasally inoculated with heat-sterilized sputa pooled from avian influenza patients, supplemented by parenteral serum immune globulin from the same cows. Efficiency of bovine antibody production could be enhanced using cholera toxin subunit b, and milk production could be rapidly accelerated using recombinant bovine somatotropin hormone. In this way, it would be possible to quickly create and distribute large quantities of milk-based and serum-based passive immune globulin active against the strains of avian influenza present in a particular geographic area and gain time for production of human convalescent plasma and other public health measures. This novel approach might also have utility for other serious respiratory infectious diseases, including non-avian influenza, SARS, hantavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and pneumonia-causing Staphylococcus aureus.

  18. Quercetin as an Antiviral Agent Inhibits Influenza A Virus (IAV) Entry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenjiao; Li, Richan; Li, Xianglian; He, Jian; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen; Yang, Jie

    2015-12-25

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause seasonal pandemics and epidemics with high morbidity and mortality, which calls for effective anti-IAV agents. The glycoprotein hemagglutinin of influenza virus plays a crucial role in the initial stage of virus infection, making it a potential target for anti-influenza therapeutics development. Here we found that quercetin inhibited influenza infection with a wide spectrum of strains, including A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1), A/FM-1/47/1 (H1N1), and A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2) with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 7.756 ± 1.097, 6.225 ± 0.467, and 2.738 ± 1.931 μg/mL, respectively. Mechanism studies identified that quercetin showed interaction with the HA2 subunit. Moreover, quercetin could inhibit the entry of the H5N1 virus using the pseudovirus-based drug screening system. This study indicates that quercetin showing inhibitory activity in the early stage of influenza infection provides a future therapeutic option to develop effective, safe and affordable natural products for the treatment and prophylaxis of IAV infections.

  19. Role of the Rubisco Small Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, Robert Joseph

    2016-11-05

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of CO2 fixation in photosynthesis. However, it is a slow enzyme, and O2 competes with CO2 at the active site. Oxygenation initiates the photorespiratory pathway, which also results in the loss of CO2. If carboxylation could be increased or oxygenation decreased, an increase in net CO2 fixation would be realized. Because Rubisco provides the primary means by which carbon enters all life on earth, there is much interest in engineering Rubisco to increase the production of food and renewable energy. Rubisco is located in the chloroplasts of plants, and it is comprised of two subunits. Much is known about the chloroplast-gene-encoded large subunit (rbcL gene), which contains the active site, but much less is known about the role of the nuclear-gene-encoded small subunit in Rubisco function (rbcS gene). Both subunits are coded by multiple genes in plants, which makes genetic engineering difficult. In the eukaryotic, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it has been possible to eliminate all the Rubisco genes. These Rubisco-less mutants can be maintained by providing acetate as an alternative carbon source. In this project, focus has been placed on determining whether the small subunit might be a better genetic-engineering target for improving Rubisco. Analysis of a variable-loop structure (βA-βB loop) of the small subunit by genetic selection, directed mutagenesis, and construction of chimeras has shown that the small subunit can influence CO2/O2 specificity. X-ray crystal structures of engineered chimeric-loop enzymes have indicated that additional residues and regions of the small subunit may also contribute to Rubisco function. Structural dynamics of the small-subunit carboxyl terminus was also investigated. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the most-conserved small-subunit residues has identified a

  20. Use of fractional factorial design to study the compatibility of viral ribonucleoprotein gene segments of human H7N9 virus and circulating human influenza subtypes.

    PubMed

    Chin, Alex W H; Mok, Chris K P; Zhu, Huachen; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Joseph S M; Poon, Leo L M

    2014-09-01

    Avian H7N9 influenza viruses may pose a further threat to humans by reassortment with human viruses, which could lead to generation of novel reassortants with enhanced polymerase activity. We previously established a novel statistical approach to study the polymerase activity of reassorted vRNPs (Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2013;7:969-78). Here, we report the use of this method to study recombinant vRNPs with subunits derived from human H1N1, H3N2, and H7N9 viruses. Our results demonstrate that some reassortant vRNPs with subunits derived from the H7N9 and other human viruses can have much higher polymerase activities than the wild-type levels. © 2014 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Multiple Natural Substitutions in Avian Influenza A Virus PB2 Facilitate Efficient Replication in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mänz, Benjamin; de Graaf, Miranda; Mögling, Ramona; Richard, Mathilde; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A strong restriction of the avian influenza A virus polymerase in mammalian cells generally limits viral host-range switching. Although substitutions like E627K in the PB2 polymerase subunit can facilitate polymerase activity to allow replication in mammals, many human H5N1 and H7N9 viruses lack this adaptive substitution. Here, several previously unknown, naturally occurring, adaptive substitutions in PB2 were identified by bioinformatics, and their enhancing activity was verified using in vitro assays. Adaptive substitutions enhanced polymerase activity and virus replication in mammalian cells for avian H5N1 and H7N9 viruses but not for a partially human-adapted H5N1 virus. Adaptive substitutions toward basic amino acids were frequent and were mostly clustered in a putative RNA exit channel in a polymerase crystal structure. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated divergent dependency of influenza viruses on adaptive substitutions. The novel adaptive substitutions found in this study increase basic understanding of influenza virus host adaptation and will help in surveillance efforts. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses from birds jump the species barrier into humans relatively frequently. Such influenza virus zoonoses may pose public health risks if the virus adapts to humans and becomes a pandemic threat. Relatively few amino acid substitutions—most notably in the receptor binding site of hemagglutinin and at positions 591 and 627 in the polymerase protein PB2—have been identified in pandemic influenza virus strains as determinants of host adaptation, to facilitate efficient virus replication and transmission in humans. Here, we show that substantial numbers of amino acid substitutions are functionally compensating for the lack of the above-mentioned mutations in PB2 and could facilitate influenza virus emergence in humans. PMID:27076644

  2. Adaptation of avian influenza virus to a swine host

    PubMed Central

    Lyall, Jon; Frost, Simon D. W.; Teillaud, Angélique; Smith, Catherine A.; Leclaire, Sarah; Fu, JinQi; Gandon, Sylvain; Guérin, Jean-Luc; Tiley, Laurence S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The emergence of pathogenic RNA viruses into new hosts can have dramatic consequences for both livestock and public health. Here we characterize the viral genetic changes that were observed in a previous study which experimentally adapted a field isolate of duck influenza virus to swine respiratory cells. Both pre-existing and de novo mutations were selected during this adaptation. We compare the in vitro growth dynamics of the adapted virus with those of the original strain as well as all possible reassortants using reverse genetics. This full factorial design showed that viral gene segments are involved in complex epistatic interactions on virus fitness, including negative and sign epistasis. We also identify two point mutations at positions 67 and 113 of the HA2 subunit of the hemagglutinin protein conferring a fast growth phenotype on the naïve avian virus in swine cells. These HA2 mutations enhance the pH dependent, HA-mediated membrane fusion. A global H1 maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis, combined with comprehensive ancestry reconstruction and tests for directional selection, confirmed the field relevance of the mutation at position 113 of HA2. Most notably, this mutation was associated with the establishment of the H1 ‘avian-like’ swine influenza lineage, regarded as the most likely to cause the next influenza pandemic in humans. This multidisciplinary approach to study the genetics of viral adaptation provides unique insights on the underlying processes leading to influenza emergence in a new host species, and identifies specific targets for future surveillance and functional studies. PMID:28458917

  3. Estimating Influenza Hospitalizations among Children

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Carlos G.; Craig, Allen S.; Dupont, William D.; Bridges, Carolyn B.; Schrag, Stephanie J.; Iwane, Marika K.; Schaffner, William; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2006-01-01

    Although influenza causes more hospitalizations and deaths among American children than any other vaccine-preventable disease, deriving accurate population-based estimates of disease impact is challenging. Using 2 independent surveillance systems, we performed a capture-recapture analysis to estimate influenza-associated hospitalizations in children in Davidson County, Tennessee, during the 2003–2004 influenza season. The New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) enrolled children hospitalized with respiratory symptoms or fever and tested them for influenza. The Tennessee Emerging Infections Program (EIP) identified inpatients with positive influenza diagnostic test results through review of laboratory and infection control logs. The hospitalization rate estimated from the capture-recapture analysis in children <5 years of age was 2.4 per 1,000 (95% confidence interval 1.8–3.8). When NVSN estimates were compared with capture-recapture estimates, NVSN found 84% of community-acquired cases, EIP found 64% of cases in which an influenza rapid test was performed, and the overall sensitivity of NVSN and EIP for influenza hospitalizations was 73% and 38%, respectively. PMID:16494725

  4. [The Spanish influenza pandemic].

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, S; Fiorino, S

    2007-12-01

    The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919, so-called Spanish influenza, spread to almost all nations worldwide. This outbreak is thought to have killed 25 million people, although some have claimed that the epidemic resulted in as many as 40 million deaths. This pandemic was a particularly dramatic event, because it occurred at the end of World War I, when both armies and the civilian population, in nations involved in the war, were exhausted. In Italy 600,000 people are estimated to have died of Spanish influenza. Together with the death of 650,000 soldiers during the war, this had a major demographic impact. We describe the course of the epidemic in Italy as a whole and in Bologna in particular. In Bologna and in its province we analysed the lists drawn up at the end of the World War I by the Central Records Office in Bologna, which coordinated research into causes of death of soldiers engaged in the conflict. We also examined the trend of burials at Certosa in Bologna in the first decades of the last century in order to establish, during the two-year period 1918-1919, the impact of the epidemic upon annual mortality. In Bologna the impact of the epidemic, albeit important in comparison to other situations, was not particularly dramatic. No special preventive measures were adopted, with the exception of isolating seriously ill patients in a former school converted by the military authorities into a hospital. Family doctors worked together actively with the city's medical authorities when the epidemiological survey was carried out.

  5. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  6. Avian influenza in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, C

    2009-04-01

    The outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N2 in Mexico in 1994 led to a clear increase in biosecurity measures and improvement of intensive poultry production systems. The control and eradication measures implemented were based on active surveillance, disease detection, depopulation of infected farms and prevention of possible contacts (identified by epidemiological investigations), improvement of biosecurity measures, and restriction of the movement of live birds, poultry products, by-products and infected material. In addition, Mexico introduced a massive vaccination programme, which resulted in the eradication of HPAI in a relatively short time in two affected areas that had a high density of commercial poultry.

  7. A possible outbreak of swine influenza, 1892.

    PubMed

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-02-01

    Influenza A viruses are globally enzootic in swine populations. Swine influenza has been recognised only since 1918, but an anecdotal report suggests that a swine-influenza epizootic might have occurred in England in 1892, at the same time as an explosive epidemic (or pandemic recurrence) of human influenza. This outbreak suggests that the ecobiological association between human and swine influenza could extend to before 1918. By contrast with the recent documentation of swine influenza, influenza in horses has been well documented for hundreds of years, and was often linked temporally and geographically to epidemics of human influenza. Both decreased contact between people and horses, and the concomitant increase in swine production over the past century, might have altered the character and dynamics of influenza host-switch events between people and domestic mammals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A possible outbreak of swine influenza, 1892

    PubMed Central

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are globally enzootic in swine populations. Swine influenza has been recognised only since 1918, but an anecdotal report suggests that a swine-influenza epizootic might have occurred in England in 1892, at the same time as an explosive epidemic (or pandemic recurrence) of human influenza. This outbreak suggests that the ecobiological association between human and swine influenza could extend to before 1918. By contrast with the recent documentation of swine influenza, influenza in horses has been well documented for hundreds of years, and was often linked temporally and geographically to epidemics of human influenza. Both decreased contact between people and horses, and the concomitant increase in swine production over the past century, might have altered the character and dynamics of influenza host-switch events between people and domestic mammals. PMID:24290840

  9. [Problem of influenza prophylaxis by vaccines].

    PubMed

    Gendon, Iu Z; Vasiliev, Iu M

    2011-01-01

    Scientific data is presented and problems of influenza prophylaxis in various age groups are discussed. Influenza prophylaxis in neonates is possible by inducing maternal antibodies, this dictates the necessity of influenza vaccination in pregnancy. Problems of influenza prophylaxis are most pressing in the group of children from 6 months to 2 years of age. More effective vaccines that do not cause adverse reactions are necessary for the children of this age group. Influenza prophylaxis in healthy working adults is most important for reducing economical impact during influenza epidemics. Influenza prophylaxis in the elderly is reasonable by using novel and more effective vaccines with adjuvants. The optimal method for influenza prophylaxis in the population in general is mass vaccination of children (80%), when, besides the induction of protection in children, influenza morbidity may decrease up to 80% in the other age groups of unvaccinated population.

  10. Spectroscopic properties of Callinectes sapidus hemocyanin subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeva, Stanka; Dolashka, Pavlina; Bankov, Banko; Voelter, Wolfgang; Salvato, Benedeto; Genov, Nicolay

    1995-10-01

    The two major subunits of the Callinectes sapidus hemocyanin were isolated and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. They consist of 641 and 652 residues, respectively. Circular dichroism spectra showed that the structural integrity of the isolated polypeptide chains is preserved. Tryptophan fluorescence parameters were determined for the hemocyanin aggregates and for the subunits Cs1 and Cs2. The emitting tryptophyl fluorophores in the native hemocyanin are deeply buried in hydrophobic regions and are shielded from the solvent by the quaternary structure of the protein aggregates. In two subunits, obtained after dissociation of the aggregates, these residues become "exposed". It is concluded that the tryptophyl side chains in Cs1 and Cs2 are located in subunit interfaces (contact regions) in a negatively charged environment when the polypeptide chains are aggregated. Most probably they participate in hydrophobic protein-protein interactions. The environment of these fluorophores is more negatively charged after the dissociation of the aggregates to subunits.

  11. Household Transmission of Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Tim K; Lau, Lincoln L H; Cauchemez, Simon; Cowling, Benjamin J

    2016-02-01

    Human influenza viruses cause regular epidemics and occasional pandemics with a substantial public health burden. Household transmission studies have provided valuable information on the dynamics of influenza transmission. We reviewed published studies and found that once one household member is infected with influenza, the risk of infection in a household contact can be up to 38%, and the delay between onset in index and secondary cases is around 3 days. Younger age was associated with higher susceptibility. In the future, household transmission studies will provide information on transmission dynamics, including the correlation of virus shedding and symptoms with transmission, and the correlation of new measures of immunity with protection against infection.

  12. [Allergic alveolitis after influenza vaccination].

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, D; Sennekamp, J; Kirsten, A; Kirsten, D

    2009-09-01

    Allergic alveolitis as a side effect of vaccination is very rare. We report a life-threatening complication in a female patient after influenza vaccination. The causative antigen was the influenza virus itself. Our Patient has suffered from exogen-allergic alveolitis for 12 years. Because of the guidelines of regular administration of influenza vaccination in patients with chronic pulmonary disease further research in patients with known exogen-allergic alveolitis is vitally important for the pharmaceutical drug safety. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  13. Development of live attenuated influenza vaccines against pandemic influenza strains.

    PubMed

    Coelingh, Kathleen L; Luke, Catherine J; Jin, Hong; Talaat, Kawsar R

    2014-07-01

    Avian and animal influenza viruses can sporadically transmit to humans, causing outbreaks of varying severity. In some cases, further human-to-human virus transmission does not occur, and the outbreak in humans is limited. In other cases, sustained human-to-human transmission occurs, resulting in worldwide influenza pandemics. Preparation for future pandemics is an important global public health goal. A key objective of preparedness is to gain an understanding of how to design, test, and manufacture effective vaccines that could be stockpiled for use in a pandemic. This review summarizes results of an ongoing collaboration to produce, characterize, and clinically test a library of live attenuated influenza vaccine strains (based on Ann Arbor attenuated Type A strain) containing protective antigens from influenza viruses considered to be of high pandemic potential.

  14. [History of influenza epidemics and discovery of influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K

    1997-10-01

    Influenza epidemics occur almost annually, sometimes taking on a global scale and turning into pandemics. According to Noble, the first clearly recorded epidemic was one that struck Europe in 1173 to 1174. In Japan the first comprehensive review of epidemic records was made by Fujikawa in the early 20th century, who listed 46 epidemics between 862 and 1868. Of the ten pandemics since the 1700s that have been certified by Beveridge nine have struck Japan as well. The human influenza A virus was discovered in 1933 soon after Shope succeeded in isolating swine influenza A virus in 1931. Since the discovery studies in the influenza have made immense progress and have contributed greatly to not only virology but also immunology and molecular biology.

  15. Influenza A virus polymerase is a site for adaptive changes during experimental evolution in bat cells.

    PubMed

    Poole, Daniel S; Yú, Shuǐqìng; Caì, Yíngyún; Dinis, Jorge M; Müller, Marcel A; Jordan, Ingo; Friedrich, Thomas C; Kuhn, Jens H; Mehle, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    The recent identification of highly divergent influenza A viruses in bats revealed a new, geographically dispersed viral reservoir. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of host-restricted viral tropism and the potential for transmission of viruses between humans and bats, we exposed a panel of cell lines from bats of diverse species to a prototypical human-origin influenza A virus. All of the tested bat cell lines were susceptible to influenza A virus infection. Experimental evolution of human and avian-like viruses in bat cells resulted in efficient replication and created highly cytopathic variants. Deep sequencing of adapted human influenza A virus revealed a mutation in the PA polymerase subunit not previously described, M285K. Recombinant virus with the PA M285K mutation completely phenocopied the adapted virus. Adaptation of an avian virus-like virus resulted in the canonical PB2 E627K mutation that is required for efficient replication in other mammals. None of the adaptive mutations occurred in the gene for viral hemagglutinin, a gene that frequently acquires changes to recognize host-specific variations in sialic acid receptors. We showed that human influenza A virus uses canonical sialic acid receptors to infect bat cells, even though bat influenza A viruses do not appear to use these receptors for virus entry. Our results demonstrate that bats are unique hosts that select for both a novel mutation and a well-known adaptive mutation in the viral polymerase to support replication. Bats constitute well-known reservoirs for viruses that may be transferred into human populations, sometimes with fatal consequences. Influenza A viruses have recently been identified in bats, dramatically expanding the known host range of this virus. Here we investigated the replication of human influenza A virus in bat cell lines and the barriers that the virus faces in this new host. Human influenza A and B viruses infected cells from geographically and evolutionarily

  16. Influenza A Virus Polymerase Is a Site for Adaptive Changes during Experimental Evolution in Bat Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Daniel S.; Yú, Shuǐqìng; Caì, Yíngyún; Dinis, Jorge M.; Müller, Marcel A.; Jordan, Ingo; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Kuhn, Jens H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The recent identification of highly divergent influenza A viruses in bats revealed a new, geographically dispersed viral reservoir. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of host-restricted viral tropism and the potential for transmission of viruses between humans and bats, we exposed a panel of cell lines from bats of diverse species to a prototypical human-origin influenza A virus. All of the tested bat cell lines were susceptible to influenza A virus infection. Experimental evolution of human and avian-like viruses in bat cells resulted in efficient replication and created highly cytopathic variants. Deep sequencing of adapted human influenza A virus revealed a mutation in the PA polymerase subunit not previously described, M285K. Recombinant virus with the PA M285K mutation completely phenocopied the adapted virus. Adaptation of an avian virus-like virus resulted in the canonical PB2 E627K mutation that is required for efficient replication in other mammals. None of the adaptive mutations occurred in the gene for viral hemagglutinin, a gene that frequently acquires changes to recognize host-specific variations in sialic acid receptors. We showed that human influenza A virus uses canonical sialic acid receptors to infect bat cells, even though bat influenza A viruses do not appear to use these receptors for virus entry. Our results demonstrate that bats are unique hosts that select for both a novel mutation and a well-known adaptive mutation in the viral polymerase to support replication. IMPORTANCE Bats constitute well-known reservoirs for viruses that may be transferred into human populations, sometimes with fatal consequences. Influenza A viruses have recently been identified in bats, dramatically expanding the known host range of this virus. Here we investigated the replication of human influenza A virus in bat cell lines and the barriers that the virus faces in this new host. Human influenza A and B viruses infected cells from geographically and

  17. A rationally designed form of the TLR5 agonist, flagellin, supports superior immunogenicity of Influenza B globular head vaccines.

    PubMed

    Song, Langzhou; Liu, Ge; Umlauf, Scott; Liu, Xiangyu; Li, Hong; Tian, Haijun; Reiserova, Lucia; Hou, Fuxiang; Bell, Rodney; Tussey, Lynda

    2014-07-23

    Previously, we demonstrated that for H1N1 and H5N1 influenza strains, the globular head of the hemagglutinin (HA) antigen fused to flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium fljB (STF2) is highly immunogenic in preclinical models and man (Song et al. (2008) [13]; Song et al. (2009) [14]; Taylor et al. (2012) [12]). Further we showed that the vaccine format, or point of attachment of the vaccine antigen to flagellin, can dramatically affect the immunogenicity and safety profile of the vaccine. However, Influenza B vaccines based on these formats are poor triggers of TLR5 and consequently are poorly immunogenic. Through rational design, here we show that we have identified a fusion position within domain 3 of flagellin that improves TLR5 signaling and consequently, immunogenicity of multiple influenza B vaccines. Our results demonstrate that, similar to influenza A strains, the protective subunit of the influenza B HA can be fused to flagellin and produced in a standard prokaryotic expression system thereby allowing for cost and time efficient production of multivalent seasonal influenza vaccines.

  18. Discovery of a novel, first-in-class, orally bioavailable azaindole inhibitor (VX-787) of influenza PB2.

    PubMed

    Clark, Michael P; Ledeboer, Mark W; Davies, Ioana; Byrn, Randal A; Jones, Steven M; Perola, Emanuele; Tsai, Alice; Jacobs, Marc; Nti-Addae, Kwame; Bandarage, Upul K; Boyd, Michael J; Bethiel, Randy S; Court, John J; Deng, Hongbo; Duffy, John P; Dorsch, Warren A; Farmer, Luc J; Gao, Huai; Gu, Wenxin; Jackson, Katrina; Jacobs, Dylan H; Kennedy, Joseph M; Ledford, Brian; Liang, Jianglin; Maltais, François; Murcko, Mark; Wang, Tiansheng; Wannamaker, M Woods; Bennett, Hamilton B; Leeman, Joshua R; McNeil, Colleen; Taylor, William P; Memmott, Christine; Jiang, Min; Rijnbrand, Rene; Bral, Christopher; Germann, Ursula; Nezami, Azin; Zhang, Yuegang; Salituro, Francesco G; Bennani, Youssef L; Charifson, Paul S

    2014-08-14

    In our effort to develop agents for the treatment of influenza, a phenotypic screening approach utilizing a cell protection assay identified a series of azaindole based inhibitors of the cap-snatching function of the PB2 subunit of the influenza A viral polymerase complex. Using a bDNA viral replication assay (Wagaman, P. C., Leong, M. A., and Simmen, K. A. Development of a novel influenza A antiviral assay. J. Virol. Methods 2002, 105, 105-114) in cells as a direct measure of antiviral activity, we discovered a set of cyclohexyl carboxylic acid analogues, highlighted by VX-787 (2). Compound 2 shows strong potency versus multiple influenza A strains, including pandemic 2009 H1N1 and avian H5N1 flu strains, and shows an efficacy profile in a mouse influenza model even when treatment was administered 48 h after infection. Compound 2 represents a first-in-class, orally bioavailable, novel compound that offers potential for the treatment of both pandemic and seasonal influenza and has a distinct advantage over the current standard of care treatments including potency, efficacy, and extended treatment window.

  19. Protection against multiple subtypes of influenza viruses by virus-like particle vaccines based on a hemagglutinin conserved epitope.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoheng; Zheng, Dan; Li, Changgui; Zhang, Wenjie; Xu, Wenting; Liu, Xueying; Fang, Fang; Chen, Ze

    2015-01-01

    We selected the conserved sequence in the stalk region of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) trimmer, the long alpha helix (LAH), as the vaccine candidate sequence, and inserted it into the major immunodominant region (MIR) of hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc), and, by using the E. coli expression system, we prepared a recombinant protein vaccine LAH-HBc in the form of virus-like particles (VLP). Intranasal immunization of mice with this LAH-HBc VLP plus cholera toxin B subunit with 0.2% of cholera toxin (CTB(*)) adjuvant could effectively elicit humoral and cellular immune responses and protect mice against a lethal challenge of homologous influenza viruses (A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8) (H1N1)). In addition, passage of the immune sera containing specific antibodies to naïve mice rendered them resistant against a lethal homologous challenge. Immunization with LAH-HBc VLP vaccine plus CTB(*) adjuvant could also fully protect mice against a lethal challenge of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus or the avian H9N2 virus and could partially protect mice against a lethal challenge of the avian H5N1 influenza virus. This study demonstrated that the LAH-HBc VLP vaccine based on a conserved sequence of the HA trimmer stalk region is a promising candidate vaccine for developing a universal influenza vaccine against multiple influenza viruses infections.

  20. Prevention and management of influenza in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Beigi, Richard H

    2014-12-01

    Influenza infections are an important global source of morbidity and mortality. Pregnant and postpartum women are at increased risk for serious disease, related complications, and death from influenza infection. This increased risk is thought to be mostly caused by the altered physiologic and immunologic specifics of pregnancy. The morbidity of influenza infection during pregnancy is compounded by the potential for adverse obstetric, fetal, and neonatal outcomes. Importantly, influenza vaccination to prevent or minimize the severity of influenza infection during pregnancy (and the neonatal period) is recommended for all women who are or will be pregnant during influenza season. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Surveillance and prevention of influenza in Belgium].

    PubMed

    Yane, F

    2001-09-01

    Influenza is a major public health problem. The national influenza surveillance system is based on the collaboration of sentinel general practitioners who collect nose and throat swabs from their patients and report the percentage of consultations which concern influenza-like illness or acute respiratory infections. During the influenza season, a report is published each week on the website http://www.lph.fgov.be/epidemio. Belgium participates in the European Influenza Surveillance Scheme and the global Influenza surveillance system of the W.H.O.

  2. The herpes zoster subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Anthony L

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) causes severe pain and rash in older people and may be complicated by prolonged pain (postherpetic neuralgia; PHN). HZ results from reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection, often associated with age related or other causes of decreased T cell immunity. A concentrated live attenuated vaccine boosts this immunity and provides partial protection against HZ, but this decreases with age and declines over 5-8 years. The new HZ subunit (HZ/su or Shingrix) vaccine combines a key surface VZV glycoprotein (E) with T cell boosting adjuvant (AS01B). It is highly efficacious in protection (97%) against HZ in immunocompetent subjects, with no decline in advancing age and protection maintained for >3 years. Phase I-II trials showed safety and similar immunogenicity in severely immunocompromised patients. Local injection site pain and swelling can be severe in a minority (9.5%) but is transient (2 days). The HZ/su vaccine appears very promising in immunocompetent patients in the ZoE-50 controlled trial. The unblinding of the current ZoE-50 trial and publication of results from the accompanying ZoE-70 trial will reveal more about its mechanism of action and its efficacy against PHN, particularly in subjects >70 years. Phase III trial results in immunocompromised patients are eagerly awaited.

  3. Attenuated Strains of Influenza A Viruses Do Not Induce Degradation of RNA Polymerase II▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Ariel; Pérez-González, Alicia; Hossain, M. Jaber; Chen, Li-Mei; Rolling, Thierry; Pérez-Breña, Pilar; Donis, Ruben; Kochs, Georg; Nieto, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that infection with laboratory-passaged strains of influenza virus causes both specific degradation of the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II complex (RNAP II) and inhibition of host cell transcription. When infection with natural human and avian isolates belonging to different antigenic subtypes was examined, we observed that all of these viruses efficiently induce the proteolytic process. To evaluate whether this process is a general feature of nonattenuated viruses, we studied the behavior of the influenza virus strains A/PR8/8/34 (PR8) and the cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA), which are currently used as the donor strains for vaccine seeds due to their attenuated phenotype. We have observed that upon infection with these strains, degradation of the RNAP II does not occur. Moreover, by runoff experiments we observe that PR8 has a reduced ability to inhibit cellular mRNA transcription. In addition, a hypervirulent PR8 (hvPR8) variant that multiplies much faster than standard PR8 (lvPR8) in infected cells and is more virulent in mice than the parental PR8 virus, efficiently induces RNAP II degradation. Studies with reassortant viruses containing defined genome segments of both hvPR8 and lvPR8 indicate that PA and PB2 subunits individually contribute to the ability of influenza virus to degrade the RNAP II. In addition, recently it has been reported that the inclusion of PA or PB2 from hvPR8 in lvPR8 recombinant viruses, highly increases their pathogenicity. Together, the data indicate that the capacity of the influenza virus to degrade RNAP II and inhibit the host cell transcription machinery is a feature of influenza A viruses that might contribute to their virulence. PMID:19692472

  4. [Co-expression of beta-subunit with other subunits of Qbeta replicase].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong

    2004-12-01

    In researches involving in vitro protein synthesis and self-replication system, Qbeta replicase is one of the key enzymes, which are demanded for the high availability. Qbeta replicase is a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of Qbeta coliphage. It consists of four subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunit), where the beta-subunit is encoded by the viral genome, while the other three subunits are host proteins normally involved in protein synthesis, namely, ribosomal protein S1 (alpha), elongation factors EF-Tu (gamma) and EF-Ts (delta). To increase the production of the Qbeta replicase holoenzyme, several types of expression vectors, including pKK, pET and others, were employed to produce Qbeta replicase. However, the beta-subunit was almost in the precipitate fraction. Considering that the four subunits of Qbeta replicase holoenzyme are in equivalent molar ratio and the amount of the subunits, ribosomal S1 and EF-Ts, being produced by the host cells is relatively low, co-expression of beta-subunit with the other three subunits was performed to know whether the availability of the host subunits is the contributing factor for the solubility of the Qbeta replicase. pBAD33-rep was constructed by cloning the beta-subunit gene into pBAD 33, a pACYC derivative, and pET21a(+) was employed as expression vector for the three other subunits. Among the different combinations of co-expression experiments, solubility was found to slightly increase by SDS-PAGE analysis when the beta-subunit was co-expressed with EF-Tu-Ts. And the replicase activity assay showed this soluble enzyme is in active form. The expression of beta-subunit was enhanced by decreasing the level of inducer IPTG in co-expression, and more soluble enzyme were obtained.

  5. Cellular Human CLE/C14orf166 Protein Interacts with Influenza Virus Polymerase and Is Required for Viral Replication ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Ariel; Pérez-González, Alicia; Nieto, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    The influenza A virus polymerase associates with a number of cellular transcription-related factors, including RNA polymerase II. We previously described the interaction of influenza virus polymerase subunit PA with human CLE/C14orf166 protein (hCLE), a positive modulator of this cellular RNA polymerase. Here, we show that hCLE also interacts with the influenza virus polymerase complex and colocalizes with viral ribonucleoproteins. Silencing of hCLE causes reduction of viral polymerase activity, viral RNA transcription and replication, virus titer, and viral particle production. Altogether, these findings indicate that the cellular transcription factor hCLE is an important protein for influenza virus replication. PMID:21900157

  6. Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multimedia Related Links Global Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections Recommend ... infection, but can also cause severe illnesses like meningitis (an infection of the covering of the brain ...

  7. New aspects of influenza viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, M W; Arden, N H; Maassab, H F

    1992-01-01

    Influenza virus infections continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality with a worldwide social and economic impact. The past five years have seen dramatic advances in our understanding of viral replication, evolution, and antigenic variation. Genetic analyses have clarified relationships between human and animal influenza virus strains, demonstrating the potential for the appearance of new pandemic reassortants as hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes are exchanged in an intermediate host. Clinical trials of candidate live attenuated influenza virus vaccines have shown the cold-adapted reassortants to be a promising alternative to the currently available inactivated virus preparations. Modern molecular techniques have allowed serious consideration of new approaches to the development of antiviral agents and vaccines as the functions of the viral genes and proteins are further elucidated. The development of techniques whereby the genes of influenza viruses can be specifically altered to investigate those functions will undoubtedly accelerate the pace at which our knowledge expands. PMID:1310439

  8. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  9. Pediatric Influenza Prevention and Control

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna

    2004-01-01

    Global evaluation of influenza vaccination in children indicates that current recommendations are not followed. Most children at high risk for influenza-related complications do not receive the vaccine, and increased efforts are needed to protect them. Furthermore, immunizing healthy infants 6–23 months of age and their close contacts should be strongly encouraged. Vaccinations are recommended for children with recurrent acute otitis media or recurrent respiratory tract infections and possibly for healthy daycare and school-age children because of the potential socioeconomic implications of influenza. Issues that need to be addressed include educating physicians and parents concerning influenza-related illness and complications, cost-effectiveness and safety of licensed vaccines, adequate vaccine supply, and availability of intranasal products. PMID:15200844

  10. Influenza Casts a Lung Shadow.

    PubMed

    De Luna, Xavier; Hartshorn, Kevan L

    2017-04-01

    This commentary highlights the article by Pociask et al that provides new insights into the lingering effects of influenza infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA, identification of cleavage activation site and amino acid sequence of N-terminus of F1 subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Norrby, E; Camargo, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein (Fo) was deduced from the sequence of a partial cDNA clone of mRNA and from the 5' mRNA sequence obtained by primer extension and dideoxysequencing. The encoded protein of 574 amino acids is extremely hydrophobic and has a molecular weight of 63371 daltons. The site of proteolytic cleavage within this protein was accurately mapped by determining a partial amino acid sequence of the N-terminus of the larger subunit (F1) purified by radioimmunoprecipitation using monoclonal antibodies. Alignment of the N-terminus of the F1 subunit within the deduced amino acid sequence of Fo permitted us to identify a sequence of lys-lys-arg-lys-arg-arg at the C-terminus of the smaller N-terminal F2 subunit that appears to represent the cleavage/activation domain. Five potential sites of glycosylation, four within the F2 subunit, were also identified. Three extremely hydrophobic domains are present in the protein; a) the N-terminal signal sequence, b) the N-terminus of the F1 subunit that is analogous to the N-terminus of the paramyxovirus F1 subunit and the HA2 subunit of influenza virus hemagglutinin, and c) the putative membrane anchorage domain near the C-terminus of F1. Images PMID:2987829

  12. National surveillance for influenza and influenza-like illness in Vietnam, 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Yen T; Graitcer, Samuel B; Nguyen, Tuan H; Tran, Duong N; Pham, Tho D; Le, Mai T Q; Tran, Huu N; Bui, Chien T; Dang, Dat T; Nguyen, Long T; Uyeki, Timothy M; Dennis, David; Kile, James C; Kapella, Bryan K; Iuliano, A D; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Nguyen, Hien T

    2013-09-13

    Influenza virus infections result in considerable morbidity and mortality both in the temperate and tropical world. Influenza surveillance over multiple years is important to determine the impact and epidemiology of influenza and to develop a national vaccine policy, especially in countries developing influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity, such as Vietnam. We conducted surveillance of influenza and influenza-like illness in Vietnam through the National Influenza Surveillance System during 2006-2010. At 15 sentinel sites, the first two patients presenting each weekday with influenza-like illness (ILI), defined as fever and cough and/or sore throat with illness onset within 3 days, were enrolled and throat specimens were collected and tested for influenza virus type and influenza A subtype by RT-PCR. De-identified demographic and provider reported subsequent hospitalization information was collected on each patient. Each site also collected information on the total number of patients with influenza-like illness evaluated per week. Of 29,804 enrolled patients presenting with influenza-like illness, 6516 (22%) were influenza positive. Of enrolled patients, 2737 (9.3%) were reported as subsequently hospitalized; of the 2737, 527 (19%) were influenza positive. Across all age groups with ILI, school-aged children had the highest percent of influenza infection (29%) and the highest percent of subsequent hospitalizations associated with influenza infection (28%). Influenza viruses co-circulated throughout most years in Vietnam during 2006-2010 and often reached peak levels multiple times during a year, when >20% of tests were influenza positive. Influenza is an important cause of all influenza-like illness and provider reported subsequent hospitalization among outpatients in Vietnam, especially among school-aged children. These findings may have important implications for influenza vaccine policy in Vietnam.

  13. Subunit mass analysis for monitoring antibody oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowska, Izabela; Mo, Jingjie; Dong, Jia; Lewis, Michael J.; Hu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methionine oxidation is a common posttranslational modification (PTM) of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Oxidation can reduce the in-vivo half-life, efficacy and stability of the product. Peptide mapping is commonly used to monitor the levels of oxidation, but this is a relatively time-consuming method. A high-throughput, automated subunit mass analysis method was developed to monitor antibody methionine oxidation. In this method, samples were treated with IdeS, EndoS and dithiothreitol to generate three individual IgG subunits (light chain, Fd’ and single chain Fc). These subunits were analyzed by reversed phase-ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with an online quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the levels of oxidation on each subunit were quantitated based on the deconvoluted mass spectra using the UNIFI software. The oxidation results obtained by subunit mass analysis correlated well with the results obtained by peptide mapping. Method qualification demonstrated that this subunit method had excellent repeatability and intermediate precision. In addition, UNIFI software used in this application allows automated data acquisition and processing, which makes this method suitable for high-throughput process monitoring and product characterization. Finally, subunit mass analysis revealed the different patterns of Fc methionine oxidation induced by chemical and photo stress, which makes it attractive for investigating the root cause of oxidation. PMID:28106519

  14. Subunit mass analysis for monitoring antibody oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sokolowska, Izabela; Mo, Jingjie; Dong, Jia; Lewis, Michael J; Hu, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Methionine oxidation is a common posttranslational modification (PTM) of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Oxidation can reduce the in-vivo half-life, efficacy and stability of the product. Peptide mapping is commonly used to monitor the levels of oxidation, but this is a relatively time-consuming method. A high-throughput, automated subunit mass analysis method was developed to monitor antibody methionine oxidation. In this method, samples were treated with IdeS, EndoS and dithiothreitol to generate three individual IgG subunits (light chain, Fd' and single chain Fc). These subunits were analyzed by reversed phase-ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with an online quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the levels of oxidation on each subunit were quantitated based on the deconvoluted mass spectra using the UNIFI software. The oxidation results obtained by subunit mass analysis correlated well with the results obtained by peptide mapping. Method qualification demonstrated that this subunit method had excellent repeatability and intermediate precision. In addition, UNIFI software used in this application allows automated data acquisition and processing, which makes this method suitable for high-throughput process monitoring and product characterization. Finally, subunit mass analysis revealed the different patterns of Fc methionine oxidation induced by chemical and photo stress, which makes it attractive for investigating the root cause of oxidation.

  15. A randomized, controlled, crossover trial to assess the acute appetitive and metabolic effects of sausage and egg-based convenience breakfast meals in overweight premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Rains, Tia M; Leidy, Heather J; Sanoshy, Kristen D; Lawless, Andrea L; Maki, Kevin C

    2015-02-10

    Dietary protein at breakfast has been shown to enhance satiety and reduce subsequent energy intake more so than carbohydrate or fat. However, relatively few studies have assessed substitution of protein for carbohydrate on indicators of appetite and glucose homeostasis simultaneously. The acute appetitive and metabolic effects of commercially-prepared sausage and egg-based breakfast meals at two different protein levels (30 g and 39 g/serving), vs. a low-protein pancake breakfast (3 g protein) and no breakfast (water), were examined in premenopausal women (N = 35; age 32.5 ± 1.6 yr; BMI 24.8 ± 0.5 kg/m(2)). Test products provided ~280 kcal/serving and similar fat (12-14 g) and fiber contents (0-1 g). Visual Analog Scale ratings for appetite (hunger, fullness, prospective consumption, desire to eat) and repeated blood sampling for plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were assessed throughout each test day. Energy intake was recorded at an ad libitum lunch meal at 240 min. Results showed increased satiety ratings for both the 30 and 39 g protein meals vs. the low-protein and no breakfast conditions (p < 0.001 for all). Postprandial glucose and insulin excursions were lower following the 30 g and 39 g protein conditions vs. the low-protein condition, with smaller responses following the 39 g vs. 30 g protein condition (p < 0.05 for all). Energy intake at lunch was significantly less (p < 0.001) following the 39 g protein meal (692 kcal) vs. the low-protein and no breakfast conditions (789 and 810 kcal, respectively). Total energy intake from the test condition + lunch was higher (p < 0.01) for the 30 and 39 g meals (982 and 983 kcal, respectively) vs. no breakfast (810 kcal), and less than the low protein breakfast (1064 kcal; p < 0.01 vs. 39 g condition only). Results suggest that convenience meals providing 30 or 39 g protein/serving produce greater appetite control, lower postprandial glycemia and insulinemia, and reduced

  16. Avian influenza virus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shelan; Sha, Jianping; Yu, Zhao; Hu, Yan; Chan, Ta-Chien; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Pan, Hao; Cheng, Wei; Mao, Shenghua; Zhang, Run Ju; Chen, Enfu

    2016-07-01

    The unprecedented epizootic of avian influenza viruses, such as H5N1, H5N6, H7N1 and H10N8, has continued to cause disease in humans in recent years. In 2013, another novel influenza A (H7N9) virus emerged in China, and 30% of those patients died. Pregnant women are particularly susceptible to avian influenza and are more likely to develop severe complications and to die, especially when infection occurs in the middle and late trimesters. Viremia is believed to occur infrequently, and thus vertical transmission induced by avian influenza appears to be rare. However, avian influenza increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including spontaneous abortion, preterm birth and fatal distress. This review summarises 39 cases of pregnant women and their fetuses from different countries dating back to 1997, including 11, 15 and 13 infections with H7N9, H5N1 and the 2009 pandemic influenza (H1N1), respectively. We analysed the epidemic features, following the geographical, population and pregnancy trimester distributions; underlying diseases; exposure history; medical timelines; human-to-human transmission; pathogenicity and vertical transmission; antivirus treatments; maternal severity and mortality and pregnancy outcome. The common experiences reported in different countries and areas suggest that early identification and treatment are imperative. In the future, vigilant virologic and epidemiologic surveillance systems should be developed to monitor avian influenza viruses during pregnancy. Furthermore, extensive study on the immune mechanisms should be conducted, as this will guide safe, rational immunomodulatory treatment among this high-risk population. Most importantly, we should develop a universal avian influenza virus vaccine to prevent outbreaks of the different subtypes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Antigenic properties of a transport-competent influenza HA/HIV Env chimeric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Sun Yuliang; Lin Jianguo; Bu Zhigao; Wu Qingyang; Jiang, Shibo; Steinhauer, David A.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-15

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV Env glycoprotein contains conserved neutralizing epitopes which are not well-exposed in wild-type HIV Env proteins. To enhance the exposure of these epitopes, a chimeric protein, HA/gp41, in which the gp41 of HIV-1 89.6 envelope protein was fused to the C-terminus of the HA1 subunit of the influenza HA protein, was constructed. Characterization of protein expression showed that the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins were expressed on cell surfaces and formed trimeric oligomers, as found in the HIV Env as well as influenza HA proteins. In addition, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein expressed on the cell surface can also be cleaved into 2 subunits by trypsin treatment, similar to the influenza HA. Moreover, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein was found to maintain a pre-fusion conformation. Interestingly, the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins on cell surfaces exhibited increased reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the HIV Env gp41 subunit compared with the HIV-1 envelope protein, including the two broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine expressing the HA/gp41 chimeric protein induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 protein and these antibodies exhibit neutralizing activity against infection by an HIV SF162 pseudovirus. These results demonstrate that the construction of such chimeric proteins can provide enhanced exposure of conserved epitopes in the HIV Env gp41 and may represent a novel vaccine design strategy for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV.

  18. Forecasting seasonal outbreaks of influenza.

    PubMed

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Karspeck, Alicia

    2012-12-11

    Influenza recurs seasonally in temperate regions of the world; however, our ability to predict the timing, duration, and magnitude of local seasonal outbreaks of influenza remains limited. Here we develop a framework for initializing real-time forecasts of seasonal influenza outbreaks, using a data assimilation technique commonly applied in numerical weather prediction. The availability of real-time, web-based estimates of local influenza infection rates makes this type of quantitative forecasting possible. Retrospective ensemble forecasts are generated on a weekly basis following assimilation of these web-based estimates for the 2003-2008 influenza seasons in New York City. The findings indicate that real-time skillful predictions of peak timing can be made more than 7 wk in advance of the actual peak. In addition, confidence in those predictions can be inferred from the spread of the forecast ensemble. This work represents an initial step in the development of a statistically rigorous system for real-time forecast of seasonal influenza.

  19. Forecasting seasonal outbreaks of influenza

    PubMed Central

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Karspeck, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Influenza recurs seasonally in temperate regions of the world; however, our ability to predict the timing, duration, and magnitude of local seasonal outbreaks of influenza remains limited. Here we develop a framework for initializing real-time forecasts of seasonal influenza outbreaks, using a data assimilation technique commonly applied in numerical weather prediction. The availability of real-time, web-based estimates of local influenza infection rates makes this type of quantitative forecasting possible. Retrospective ensemble forecasts are generated on a weekly basis following assimilation of these web-based estimates for the 2003–2008 influenza seasons in New York City. The findings indicate that real-time skillful predictions of peak timing can be made more than 7 wk in advance of the actual peak. In addition, confidence in those predictions can be inferred from the spread of the forecast ensemble. This work represents an initial step in the development of a statistically rigorous system for real-time forecast of seasonal influenza. PMID:23184969

  20. Influenza vaccine and healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Díaz, Fatima Del Carmen; Jiménez-Corona, Maria Eugenia; Ponce-de-León-Rosales, Samuel

    2011-11-01

    We undertook this study to review attitudes, beliefs and practices of healthcare workers (HCW) toward pandemic influenza A vaccine (H1N1) 2009 reported in the literature. Relevant papers published from 2009-2011 reporting attitudes, beliefs and practices of HCW towards pandemic influenza vaccine were identified. Variables such as age, gender, profession, work place area, and previous vaccination uptake were analyzed. In this study, 30 articles regarding attitudes and beliefs toward pandemic influenza vaccination, vaccine uptake and intention to accept vaccine were analyzed. Most studies were cross-sectional in design. Vaccination intention and uptake varies among different countries, 13.5-89.0% and 7.5-63.0%, respectively. Most common reasons for rejection were fear of adverse events, doubt regarding efficacy, not feeling as belonging to a high-risk group and believing that influenza is not a serious illness. Physicians show more favorable attitudes compared to nurses. The main predictor of vaccine uptake was having received previous influenza vaccination. Pandemic influenza uptake was low in most countries. The main reason among HCW for rejection was concern regarding side effects. It is necessary to establish educational programs to provided reliable information and raise awareness of HCW about vaccine use so that they can act as vaccine promoters among the general population.

  1. Amino acid changes in the influenza A virus PA protein that attenuate avian H5N1 viruses in mammals.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shufang; Hatta, Masato; Kim, Jin Hyun; Le, Mai Quynh; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-12-01

    The influenza viral polymerase complex affects host tropism and pathogenicity. In particular, several amino acids in the PB2 polymerase subunit are essential for the efficient replication of avian influenza viruses in mammals. The PA polymerase subunit also contributes to host range and pathogenicity. Here, we report that the PA proteins of several highly pathogenic avian H5N1 viruses have attenuating properties in mammalian cells and that the attenuating phenotype is conferred by strain-specific amino acid changes. Specifically, lysine at position 185 of A/duck/Vietnam/TY165/2010 (TY165; H5N1) PA induced strongly attenuating effects in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, the introduction of the arginine residue commonly found at this position in PA significantly increased the viral polymerase activity of TY165 in mammalian cells and its virulence and pathogenicity in mice. These findings demonstrate that the PA protein plays an important role in influenza virulence and pathogenicity. Highly pathogenic influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype cause severe respiratory infections in humans, which have resulted in death in nearly two-thirds of the patients with laboratory-confirmed cases. We found that the viral PA polymerase subunit of several H5N1 viruses possesses amino acid changes that attenuate virus replication in mammalian cells (yet the H5N1 viruses possessing these mutations are highly pathogenic in mice). Specifically, we found that an arginine-to-lysine substitution at position 185 of an H5N1 virus PA protein significantly affected that virus's virulence and pathogenicity in mice. The PA protein thus plays a role in the pathogenicity of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Other Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  3. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... and Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Haemophilus influenzae , including Hib, disease causes different symptoms depending on ...

  4. Fluzone High-Dose Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Fluzone High-Dose Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español ...

  5. Selecting Viruses for the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Resources References Medical Office Telephone Evaluation Infection Control Prevention Strategies for Seasonal Influenza in Healthcare Settings Interim Guidance for Influenza Outbreak Management in Long-Term Care Facilities Settings Where High- ...

  6. Crosstalk between animal and human influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Makoto; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Although outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in wild and domestic birds have been posing the threat of a new influenza pandemic for the last decade, the first pandemic of the 21st century came from swine viruses. This fact emphasizes the complexity of influenza viral ecology and the difficulty of predicting influenza viral dynamics. Complete control of influenza viruses seems impossible. However, we must minimize the impact of animal and human influenza outbreaks by learning lessons from past experiences and recognizing the current status. Here, we review the most recent influenza virology data in the veterinary field, including aspects of zoonotic agents and recent studies that assessed the pandemic potential of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. PMID:25387011

  7. Influenza Virus Infection of Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, Sasan; Munoz, Olga; Von Dobschuetz, Sophie; De Nardi, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Interspecies transmission may play a key role in the evolution and ecology of influenza A viruses. The importance of marine mammals as hosts or carriers of potential zoonotic pathogens such as highly pathogenic H5 and H7 influenza viruses is not well understood. The fact that influenza viruses are some of the few zoonotic pathogens known to have caused infection in marine mammals, evidence for direct transmission of influenza A virus H7N7 subtype from seals to man, transmission of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses to seals and also limited evidence for long-term persistence of influenza B viruses in seal populations without significant genetic change, makes monitoring of influenza viruses in marine mammal populations worth being performed. In addition, such monitoring studies could be a great tool to better understand the ecology of influenza viruses in nature.

  8. Influenza Burden and Transmission in the Tropics.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sophia; Gordon, Aubree

    Each year, influenza causes substantial mortality and morbidity worldwide. It is important to understand influenza in the tropics because of the significant burden in the region and its relevance to global influenza circulation. In this review, influenza burden, transmission dynamics, and their determinants in the tropics are discussed. Environmental, cultural, and social conditions in the tropics are very diverse and often differ from those of temperate regions. Theories that account for and predict influenza dynamics in temperate regions do not fully explain influenza epidemic patterns observed in the tropics. Routine surveillance and household studies have been useful in understanding influenza dynamics in the tropics, but these studies have been limited to only some regions; there is still a lack of information regarding influenza burden and transmission dynamics in many tropical countries. Further studies in the tropics will provide useful insight on many questions that remain.

  9. Avian-human influenza epidemic model.

    PubMed

    Iwami, Shingo; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Liu, Xianning

    2007-05-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to interpret the spread of avian influenza from the bird world to the human world. Our mathematical model warns that two types of the outbreak of avian influenza may occur if the humans do not prevent the spread of avian influenza. Moreover, it suggests that we cannot feel relieved although the total infected humans are kept at low level. In order to prevent spread of avian influenza in the human world, we must take the measures not only for the birds infected with avian influenza to exterminate but also for the humans infected with mutant avian influenza to quarantine when mutant avian influenza has already occurred. In particular, the latter measure is shown to be important to stop the second pandemic of avian influenza.

  10. Fluorescence biosensor based on CdTe quantum dots for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa Nguyen, Thi; Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Hien Vu, Thi; Tran, Thi Kim Chi; Quyen Dong, Van; Khang Dinh, Duy; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2012-09-01

    This report highlights the fabrication of fluorescence biosensors based on CdTe quantum dots (QDs) for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus. The core biosensor was composed of (i) the highly luminescent CdTe/CdS QDs, (ii) chromatophores extracted from bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum, and (iii) the antibody of β-subunit. This core part was linked to the peripheral part of the biosensor via a biotin-streptavidin-biotin bridge and finally connected to the H5N1 antibody to make it ready for detecting H5N1 avian influenza virus. Detailed studies of each constituent were performed showing the image of QDs-labeled chromatophores under optical microscope, proper photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CdTe/CdS QDs, chromatophores and the H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

  11. An inhibitory activity in human cells restricts the function of an avian-like influenza virus polymerase.

    PubMed

    Mehle, Andrew; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2008-08-14

    Transmission of avian influenza virus into human populations has the potential to cause pandemic outbreaks. A major determinant of species tropism is the identity of amino acid 627 in the PB2 subunit of the heterotrimeric influenza polymerase; glutamic acid predominates in avian PB2, whereas lysine occupies this position in human isolates. We show that a dominant inhibitory activity in human cells potently and selectively restricts the function of polymerases containing an avian-like PB2 with glutamic acid at residue 627. Restricted polymerases fail to assemble into ribonucleoprotein complexes, resulting in decreased genome transcription, replication, and virus production without any significant effect on relative viral infectivity. Understanding the molecular basis of this species-specific restriction should provide strategies to prevent and treat avian influenza outbreaks in humans.

  12. Gene targeting of CK2 catalytic subunits

    PubMed Central

    Lou, David Y.; Toselli, Paul; Landesman-Bollag, Esther; Dominguez, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a highly conserved and ubiquitous serine–threonine kinase. It is a tetrameric enzyme that is made up of two regulatory CK2β subunits and two catalytic subunits, either CK2α/CK2α, CK2α/ CK2α′, or CK2α′/CK2α′. Although the two catalytic subunits diverge in their C termini, their enzymatic activities are similar. To identify the specific function of the two catalytic subunits in development, we have deleted them individually from the mouse genome by homologous recombination. We have previously reported that CK2α′is essential for male germ cell development, and we now demonstrate that CK2α has an essential role in embryogenesis, as mice lacking CK2α die in mid-embryogenesis, with cardiac and neural tube defects. PMID:18594950

  13. Influenza in Canada geese.

    PubMed

    Winkler, W G; Trainer, D O; Easterday, B C

    1972-01-01

    The role of wild avian species in the natural history of influenza is unknown. A serological study was carried out to ascertain the prevalence, distribution, and types of influenza antibody in several wild Canada goose populations. Geese were trapped and blood samples were obtained in each of 4 consecutive years, 1966-69. Antibody to influenzavirus was found in 66 (4.7%) of the 1 401 Canada geese tested by the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. Antiribonucleoprotein antibody was found in 8 of 1 359 sera tested by the agar gel precipitation (AGP) test. An increase in the percentage of reactors was seen each year. This increase was greater in two refuges with nonmigratory flocks. HI antibody was found against the turkey/Wisconsin/66, turkey/Wisconsin/68, turkey/Canada/63, and turkey/Alberta/6962/66, or closely related viruses. No antibody was found against duck/Ukraine/1/63 or human A/Hong Kong/68 virus at a time when the latter was prevalent in human populations, suggesting that Canada geese played no direct role in spreading the virus.Canada geese were experimentally exposed to turkey/Wisconsin/66 and turkey/Wisconsin/68 viruses; mallard ducks were exposed to turkey/Wisconsin/66 virus. HI antibody developed in 75% of the geese and 40% of the ducks but was generally short-lived. Anti-RNP antibody was detected in 15% of the exposed geese but in none of the ducks. Virus was recovered from 3 of 10 adult ducks but not from geese. None of the birds showed signs of disease.

  14. Universal influenza vaccines: a realistic option?

    PubMed

    de Vries, R D; Altenburg, A F; Rimmelzwaan, G F

    2016-12-01

    The extensive antigenic drift displayed by seasonal influenza viruses and the risk of pandemics caused by newly emerging antigenically distinct influenza A viruses of novel subtypes has raised considerable interest in the development of so-called universal influenza vaccines. We review options for the development of universal flu vaccines and discuss progress that has been made recently.

  15. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  16. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  17. 77 FR 34783 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule... importation of bird and poultry products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza... avian influenza (HPAI). On January 24, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 4046-4056...

  18. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 93, 94, and 95 RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal... products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The... vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza, or that have moved through regions where any subtype of...

  19. Swine Influenza Viruses: a North American Perspective

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Influenza is a zoonotic viral disease that represents a health and economic threat to both humans and animals worldwide. Swine influenza was first recognized clinically in pigs in the Midwestern U.S. in 1918, coinciding with the human influenza pandemic known as the Spanish flu. Since that time swin...

  20. Septic Arthritis Caused by Noncapsulated Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Le Quellec, Sandra; Gaillot, Olivier; Chotel, Franck; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Laurent, Frédéric; Vandenesch, François

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of type b Haemophilus influenzae vaccination, noncapsulated H. influenzae has become responsible for most cases of invasive H. influenzae diseases. In our two cases of septic arthritis, we isolated strains with β-lactamase-positive amoxicillin-clavulanate resistance (BLPACR). Thus, the increasing prevalence of BLPACR should be taken into account when empirical therapy is chosen for septic arthritis. PMID:23515545

  1. Current situation on highly pathogenic avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza is one of the most important diseases affecting the poultry industry worldwide. Avian influenza viruses can cause a range of clinical disease in poultry. Viruses that cause severe disease and mortality are referred to as highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. The Asian ...

  2. Bacterium-Like Particles for Efficient Immune Stimulation of Existing Vaccines and New Subunit Vaccines in Mucosal Applications

    PubMed Central

    Van Braeckel-Budimir, Natalija; Haijema, Bert Jan; Leenhouts, Kees

    2013-01-01

    The successful development of a mucosal vaccine depends critically on the use of a safe and effective immunostimulant and/or carrier system. This review describes the effectiveness and mode of action of an immunostimulating particle, derived from bacteria, used in mucosal subunit vaccines. The non-living particles, designated bacterium-like particles are based on the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis. The focus of the overview is on the development of intranasal BLP-based vaccines to prevent diseases caused by influenza and respiratory syncytial virus, and includes a selection of Phase I clinical data for the intranasal FluGEM vaccine. PMID:24062748

  3. 18S rRNA is a reliable normalisation gene for real time PCR based on influenza virus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Kuchipudi, Suresh V; Tellabati, Meenu; Nelli, Rahul K; White, Gavin A; Perez, Belinda Baquero; Sebastian, Sujith; Slomka, Marek J; Brookes, Sharon M; Brown, Ian H; Dunham, Stephen P; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2012-10-08

    One requisite of quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is to normalise the data with an internal reference gene that is invariant regardless of treatment, such as virus infection. Several studies have found variability in the expression of commonly used housekeeping genes, such as beta-actin (ACTB) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), under different experimental settings. However, ACTB and GAPDH remain widely used in the studies of host gene response to virus infections, including influenza viruses. To date no detailed study has been described that compares the suitability of commonly used housekeeping genes in influenza virus infections. The present study evaluated several commonly used housekeeping genes [ACTB, GAPDH, 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA), ATP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial F1 complex, beta polypeptide (ATP5B) and ATP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial Fo complex, subunit C1 (subunit 9) (ATP5G1)] to identify the most stably expressed gene in human, pig, chicken and duck cells infected with a range of influenza A virus subtypes. The relative expression stability of commonly used housekeeping genes were determined in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs), pig tracheal epithelial cells (PTECs), and chicken and duck primary lung-derived cells infected with five influenza A virus subtypes. Analysis of qRT-PCR data from virus and mock infected cells using NormFinder and BestKeeper software programmes found that 18S rRNA was the most stable gene in HBECs, PTECs and avian lung cells. Based on the presented data from cell culture models (HBECs, PTECs, chicken and duck lung cells) infected with a range of influenza viruses, we found that 18S rRNA is the most stable reference gene for normalising qRT-PCR data. Expression levels of the other housekeeping genes evaluated in this study (including ACTB and GPADH) were highly affected by influenza virus infection and hence are not reliable as reference genes for RNA

  4. Characterization of Influenza Vaccine Immunogenicity Using Influenza Antigen Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kattah, Nicole H.; Newell, Evan; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Davis, Mark M.; Utz, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Existing methods to measure influenza vaccine immunogenicity prohibit detailed analysis of epitope determinants recognized by immunoglobulins. The development of highly multiplex proteomics platforms capable of capturing a high level of antibody binding information will enable researchers and clinicians to generate rapid and meaningful readouts of influenza-specific antibody reactivity. Methods We developed influenza hemagglutinin (HA) whole-protein and peptide microarrays and validated that the arrays allow detection of specific antibody reactivity across a broad dynamic range using commercially available antibodies targeted to linear and conformational HA epitopes. We derived serum from blood draws taken from 76 young and elderly subjects immediately before and 28±7 days post-vaccination with the 2008/2009 trivalent influenza vaccine and determined the antibody reactivity of these sera to influenza array antigens. Results Using linear regression and correcting for multiple hypothesis testing by the Benjamini and Hochberg method of permutations over 1000 resamplings, we identified antibody reactivity to influenza whole-protein and peptide array features that correlated significantly with age, H1N1, and B-strain post-vaccine titer as assessed through a standard microneutralization assay (p<0.05, q <0.2). Notably, we identified several peptide epitopes that were inversely correlated with regard to age and seasonal H1N1 and B-strain neutralization titer (p<0.05, q <0.2), implicating reactivity to these epitopes in age-related defects in response to H1N1 influenza. We also employed multivariate linear regression with cross-validation to build models based on age and pre-vaccine peptide reactivity that predicted vaccine-induced neutralization of seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 influenza strains with a high level of accuracy (84.7% and 74.0%, respectively). Conclusion Our methods provide powerful tools for rapid and accurate measurement of broad antibody-based immune

  5. Anthranilate synthase subunit organization in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Carminatti, C A; Oliveira, I L; Recouvreux, D O S; Antônio, R V; Porto, L M

    2008-09-16

    Tryptophan is an aromatic amino acid used for protein synthesis and cellular growth. Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 uses two tryptophan molecules to synthesize violacein, a secondary metabolite of pharmacological interest. The genome analysis of this bacterium revealed that the genes trpA-F and pabA-B encode the enzymes of the tryptophan pathway in which the first reaction is the conversion of chorismate to anthranilate by anthranilate synthase (AS), an enzyme complex. In the present study, the organization and structure of AS protein subunits from C. violaceum were analyzed using bioinformatics tools available on the Web. We showed by calculating molecular masses that AS in C. violaceum is composed of alpha (TrpE) and beta (PabA) subunits. This is in agreement with values determined experimentally. Catalytic and regulatory sites of the AS subunits were identified. The TrpE and PabA subunits contribute to the catalytic site while the TrpE subunit is involved in the allosteric site. Protein models for the TrpE and PabA subunits were built by restraint-based homology modeling using AS enzyme, chains A and B, from Salmonella typhimurium (PDB ID 1I1Q).

  6. The history of avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Lupiani, Blanca; Reddy, Sanjay M

    2009-07-01

    The first description of avian influenza (AI) dates back to 1878 in northern Italy, when Perroncito [Perroncito E. Epizoozia tifoide nei gallinacei. Annali Accad Agri Torino 1878;21:87-126] described a contagious disease of poultry associated with high mortality. The disease, termed "fowl plague", was initially confused with the acute septicemic form of fowl cholera. However, in 1880, soon after its first description, Rivolta and Delprato [as reported by Stubs EL. Fowl pest, In: Biester HE, Devries L, editors. Diseases of poultry. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Iowa State College Press; 1943. p. 493-502] showed it to be different from fowl cholera, based on clinical and pathological properties, and called it Typhus exudatious gallinarum. In 1901, Centanni and Savunzzi [Centanni E, Savonuzzi E, La peste aviaria I & II, Communicazione fatta all'accademia delle scienze mediche e naturali de Ferrara, 1901] determined that fowl plague was caused by a filterable virus; however, it was not until 1955 that the classical fowl plague virus was shown to be a type A influenza virus based on the presence of type A influenza virus type-specific ribonucleoprotein [Schäfer W. Vergleichender sero-immunologische Untersuchungen über die Viren der Influenza und klassischen Geflügelpest. Z Naturf 1955;10b:81-91]. The term fowl plague was substituted by the more appropriate term highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) at the First International Symposium on Avian Influenza [Proceedings of the First International Symposium on Avian Influenza. Beltsville, MD. 1981, Avian Dis 47 (Special Issue) 2003.] and will be used throughout this review when referring to any previously described fowl plague virus.

  7. Universal influenza vaccines, science fiction or soon reality?

    PubMed

    de Vries, Rory D; Altenburg, Arwen F; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2015-01-01

    Currently used influenza vaccines are only effective when the vaccine strains match the epidemic strains antigenically. To this end, seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated almost annually. Furthermore, seasonal influenza vaccines fail to afford protection against antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. Because of an ever-present threat of the next influenza pandemic and the continuous emergence of drift variants of seasonal influenza A viruses, there is a need for an universal influenza vaccine that induces protective immunity against all influenza A viruses. Here, we summarize some of the efforts that are ongoing to develop universal influenza vaccines.

  8. Development of a universal influenza A vaccine based on the M2e peptide fused to the papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) vaccine platform.

    PubMed

    Denis, Jérôme; Acosta-Ramirez, Elizabeth; Zhao, Yinghi; Hamelin, Marie-Eve; Koukavica, Irena; Baz, Mariana; Abed, Yacine; Savard, Christian; Pare, Christine; Lopez Macias, Constantino; Boivin, Guy; Leclerc, Denis

    2008-06-25

    With the emergence of highly virulent influenza viruses and the consequent risk of pandemics, new approaches to designing universal influenza vaccines are urgently needed. In this report, we demonstrate the potential of using a papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) platform carrying the universal M2e influenza epitope (PapMV-CP-M2e) as a candidate flu vaccine. We show that PapMV-CP-M2e virus-like particles (VLPs) can induce production in mice of anti-M2e antibodies that can recognize influenza-infected cells. PapMV-CP-M2e discs made of 20 coat protein (CP) subunits were shown to be poorly immunogenic compared to PapMV-CP-M2e VLPs composed of several hundred CP subunits. We also show that addition of either alum or PapMV-CP VLPs as adjuvant dramatically increased the immunogenicity of PapMV-CP-M2e-containing vaccine, and led to 100% protection against a challenge of 4LD(50) with the WSN/33 strain. These results show, for the first time, the potential of a recombinant plant virus protein to serve as both peptide delivery system and adjuvant in the crucial field of influenza vaccine development.

  9. CHD6, a Cellular Repressor of Influenza Virus Replication, Is Degraded in Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells and Mice Lungs during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, Roberto; Rodriguez, Ariel; Rodriguez, Paloma; Lutz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The influenza virus polymerase associates to an important number of transcription-related proteins, including the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II complex (RNAP II). Despite this association, degradation of the RNAP II takes place in the infected cells once viral transcription is completed. We have previously shown that the chromatin remodeler CHD6 protein interacts with the influenza virus polymerase complex, represses viral replication, and relocalizes to inactive chromatin during influenza virus infection. In this paper, we report that CHD6 acts as a negative modulator of the influenza virus polymerase activity and is also subjected to degradation through a process that includes the following characteristics: (i) the cellular proteasome is not implicated, (ii) the sole expression of the three viral polymerase subunits from its cloned cDNAs is sufficient to induce proteolysis, and (iii) degradation is also observed in vivo in lungs of infected mice and correlates with the increase of viral titers in the lungs. Collectively, the data indicate that CHD6 degradation is a general effect exerted by influenza A viruses and suggest that this viral repressor may play an important inhibitory role since degradation and accumulation into inactive chromatin occur during the infection. PMID:23408615

  10. Influenza Virus Assembly and Budding

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Jeremy S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A virus causes seasonal epidemics, sporadic pandemics and is a significant global heath burden. Influenza virus is an enveloped virus that contains a segmented negative strand RNA genome. Assembly and budding of progeny influenza virions is a complex, multistep process that occurs in lipid raft domains on the apical membrane of infected cells. The viral proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) are targeted to lipid rafts, causing the coalescence and enlargement of the raft domains. This clustering of HA and NA may cause a deformation of the membrane and the initiation of the virus budding event. M1 is then thought to bind to the cytoplasmic tails of HA and NA where it can then polymerize and form the interior structure of the emerging virion. M1, bound to the cytoplasmic tails of HA and NA, additionally serves as a docking site for the recruitment of the viral RNPs and may mediate the recruitment of M2 to the site of virus budding. M2 initially stabilizes the site of budding, possibly enabling the polymerization of the matrix protein and the formation of filamentous virions. Subsequently, M2 is able to alter membrane curvature at the neck of the budding virus, causing membrane scission and the release of the progeny virion. This review investigates the latest research on influenza virus budding in an attempt to provide a step-by-step analysis of the assembly and budding processes for influenza viruses. PMID:21237476

  11. Avian flu to human influenza.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David B

    2006-01-01

    Influenza A viral infection causes substantial annual morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly for infants, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. The virus mainly replicates in the respiratory tract and is spread by respiratory secretions. A growing concern is the recent identification of H5N1 strains of avian influenza A in Asia that were previously thought to infect only wild birds and poultry, but have now infected humans, cats, pigs, and other mammals, often with fatal results, in an ongoing outbreak. A human pandemic with H5N1 virus could potentially be catastrophic because most human populations have negligible antibody-mediated immunity to the H5 surface protein and this viral subtype is highly virulent. Whether an H5N1 influenza pandemic will occur is likely to hinge on whether the viral strains involved in the current outbreak acquire additional mutations that facilitate efficient human-to-human transfer of infection. Although there is no historical precedent for an H5N1 avian strain causing widespread human-to-human transmission, some type of influenza A pandemic is very likely in the near future. The possibility of an H5N1 influenza pandemic has highlighted the many current limitations of treatment with antiviral agents and of vaccine production and immunogenicity. Future vaccine strategies that may include more robust induction of T-cell responses, such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes, may provide better protection than is offered by current vaccines, which rely solely or mainly on antibody neutralization of infection.

  12. Effective influenza vaccines for children

    PubMed Central

    Banzhoff, Angelika; Stoddard, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal influenza causes clinical illness and hospitalization in all age groups; however, conventional inactivated vaccines have only limited efficacy in young children. MF59®, an oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant, has been used since the 1990s to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines in the elderly, a population with waning immune function due to immunosenescence.   Clinical trials now provide information to support a favorable immunogenicity and safety profile of MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine in young children. Published data indicate that Fluad®, a trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine with MF59, was immunogenic and well tolerated in young children, with a benefit/risk ratio that supports routine clinical use. A recent clinical trial also shows that Fluad provides high efficacy against PCR-confirmed influenza. Based on the results of clinical studies in children, the use of MF59-adjuvanted vaccine offers the potential to enhance efficacy and make vaccination a viable prevention and control strategy in this population. PMID:22327501

  13. Traditional and new influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sook-San; Webby, Richard J

    2013-07-01

    The challenges in successful vaccination against influenza using conventional approaches lie in their variable efficacy in different age populations, the antigenic variability of the circulating virus, and the production and manufacturing limitations to ensure safe, timely, and adequate supply of vaccine. The conventional influenza vaccine platform is based on stimulating immunity against the major neutralizing antibody target, hemagglutinin (HA), by virus attenuation or inactivation. Improvements to this conventional system have focused primarily on improving production and immunogenicity. Cell culture, reverse genetics, and baculovirus expression technology allow for safe and scalable production, while adjuvants, dose variation, and alternate routes of delivery aim to improve vaccine immunogenicity. Fundamentally different approaches that are currently under development hope to signal new generations of influenza vaccines. Such approaches target nonvariable regions of antigenic proteins, with the idea of stimulating cross-protective antibodies and thus creating a "universal" influenza vaccine. While such approaches have obvious benefits, there are many hurdles yet to clear. Here, we discuss the process and challenges of the current influenza vaccine platform as well as new approaches that are being investigated based on the same antigenic target and newer technologies based on different antigenic targets.

  14. Traditional and New Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sook-San

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The challenges in successful vaccination against influenza using conventional approaches lie in their variable efficacy in different age populations, the antigenic variability of the circulating virus, and the production and manufacturing limitations to ensure safe, timely, and adequate supply of vaccine. The conventional influenza vaccine platform is based on stimulating immunity against the major neutralizing antibody target, hemagglutinin (HA), by virus attenuation or inactivation. Improvements to this conventional system have focused primarily on improving production and immunogenicity. Cell culture, reverse genetics, and baculovirus expression technology allow for safe and scalable production, while adjuvants, dose variation, and alternate routes of delivery aim to improve vaccine immunogenicity. Fundamentally different approaches that are currently under development hope to signal new generations of influenza vaccines. Such approaches target nonvariable regions of antigenic proteins, with the idea of stimulating cross-protective antibodies and thus creating a “universal” influenza vaccine. While such approaches have obvious benefits, there are many hurdles yet to clear. Here, we discuss the process and challenges of the current influenza vaccine platform as well as new approaches that are being investigated based on the same antigenic target and newer technologies based on different antigenic targets. PMID:23824369

  15. Global environmental drivers of influenza

    PubMed Central

    Deyle, Ethan R.; Maher, M. Cyrus; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Basu, Sanjay; Sugihara, George

    2016-01-01

    In temperate countries, influenza outbreaks are well correlated to seasonal changes in temperature and absolute humidity. However, tropical countries have much weaker annual climate cycles, and outbreaks show less seasonality and are more difficult to explain with environmental correlations. Here, we use convergent cross mapping, a robust test for causality that does not require correlation, to test alternative hypotheses about the global environmental drivers of influenza outbreaks from country-level epidemic time series. By moving beyond correlation, we show that despite the apparent differences in outbreak patterns between temperate and tropical countries, absolute humidity and, to a lesser extent, temperature drive influenza outbreaks globally. We also find a hypothesized U-shaped relationship between absolute humidity and influenza that is predicted by theory and experiment, but hitherto has not been documented at the population level. The balance between positive and negative effects of absolute humidity appears to be mediated by temperature, and the analysis reveals a key threshold around 75 °F. The results indicate a unified explanation for environmental drivers of influenza that applies globally. PMID:27799563

  16. Structure of influenza A polymerase bound to the viral RNA promoter.

    PubMed

    Pflug, Alexander; Guilligay, Delphine; Reich, Stefan; Cusack, Stephen

    2014-12-18

    The influenza virus polymerase transcribes or replicates the segmented RNA genome (viral RNA) into viral messenger RNA or full-length copies. To initiate RNA synthesis, the polymerase binds to the conserved 3' and 5' extremities of the viral RNA. Here we present the crystal structure of the heterotrimeric bat influenza A polymerase, comprising subunits PA, PB1 and PB2, bound to its viral RNA promoter. PB1 contains a canonical RNA polymerase fold that is stabilized by large interfaces with PA and PB2. The PA endonuclease and the PB2 cap-binding domain, involved in transcription by cap-snatching, form protrusions facing each other across a solvent channel. The 5' extremity of the promoter folds into a compact hook that is bound in a pocket formed by PB1 and PA close to the polymerase active site. This structure lays the basis for an atomic-level mechanistic understanding of the many functions of influenza polymerase, and opens new opportunities for anti-influenza drug design.

  17. Long-term stability of influenza vaccine in a dissolving microneedle patch.

    PubMed

    Mistilis, Matthew J; Joyce, Jessica C; Esser, E Stein; Skountzou, Ioanna; Compans, Richard W; Bommarius, Andreas S; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2017-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that optimized microneedle patch formulations can stabilize trivalent subunit influenza vaccine during long-term storage outside the cold chain and when exposed to potential stresses found during manufacturing and storage. Formulations containing combinations of trehalose/sucrose, sucrose/arginine, and arginine/heptagluconate were successful at retaining most or all vaccine activity during storage at 25 °C for up to 24 months as determined by ELISA assay. The best formulation of microneedle patches contained arginine/heptagluconate, which showed no significant loss of vaccine activity during the study. To validate these in vitro findings, mice were immunized using trivalent influenza vaccine stored in microneedle patches for more than 1 year at 25 °C, which elicited antibody titers greater than or equal to fresh liquid vaccine delivered by intradermal injection, indicating the retention of immunogenicity during storage. Finally, influenza vaccine in microneedle patches lost no significant activity during exposure to 60 °C for 4 months, multiple freeze-thaw cycles, or electron beam irradiation. We conclude that optimally formulated microneedle patches can retain influenza vaccine activity during extended storage outside the cold chain and during other environmental stresses, which suggests the possibility of microneedle patch storage on pharmacy shelves without refrigeration.

  18. Enhancement of Influenza Surveillance With Aggregate Rapid Influenza Test Results: New Mexico, 2003–2007

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Mark; Smelser, Chad; Albanese, Bernadette; Sewell, C. Mack

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to determine whether monitoring rapid influenza laboratory tests improved the influenza-like illness surveillance already in place in New Mexico. Methods. For the past 3 influenza seasons, the New Mexico Department of Health examined influenza-like illness visits and positive rapid influenza test results. Results. The proportion of positive rapid influenza test results started to rise earlier than did the percentage of clinical visits because of influenza-like illness in each of the past 3 influenza seasons: 5 weeks earlier during the 2004–2005 season; 3 weeks earlier in 2005–2006; and 2 weeks earlier in 2006–2007. In addition, rapid influenza tests showed a spike in influenza B activity late in the 2005–2006 season that influenza-like illness syndrome surveillance did not. Conclusions. Laboratory-based rapid influenza test surveillance required relatively few resources to implement and offered a sensitive mechanism to detect the onset of influenza activity while allowing for the distinction of influenza types. PMID:18923127

  19. Predictors of Influenza Diagnosis Among Patients With Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marc R.; Peters, Timothy R.; Suerken, Cynthia K.; Snively, Beverly M.; Poehling, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study was performed to determine predictors of clinical influenza diagnosis among patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza. Methods. Prospective, laboratory-confirmed surveillance for influenza was conducted among patients of all ages who were hospitalized or presented to the emergency department with fever and respiratory symptoms during 2009–2013. We evaluated all enrolled persons who had influenza confirmed by viral culture and/or polymerase chain reaction and received any discharge diagnosis. The primary outcome, clinical influenza diagnosis, was defined as (1) a discharge diagnosis of influenza, (2) a prescription of neuraminidase inhibitor, or (3) a rapid test positive for influenza virus. Bivariate analyses and multiple logistic regression modeling were performed. Results. Influenza was diagnosed for 29% of 504 enrolled patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza and for 56% of 236 patients with high-risk conditions. Overall, clinical influenza diagnosis was predicted by race/ethnicity, insurance status, year, being hospitalized, having high-risk conditions, and receiving no diagnosis of bacterial infection. Being diagnosed with a bacterial infection reduced the odds of receiving an influenza diagnosis by >3-fold for all patients and for patients with high-risk conditions. Conclusions. Many influenza virus–positive patients, including those with high-risk conditions, do not receive a clinical diagnosis of influenza. The pattern of clinical diagnoses among influenza virus–positive patients suggests preferential consideration of bacterial diseases as a diagnosis. PMID:25941330

  20. 1918 Influenza: A Winnebago County, Wisconsin Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shors, Teri; McFadden, Susan H.

    2009-01-01

    The population of Winnebago County in 1918 was approximately 62,000 residents. It consisted of towns supporting diverse manufacturers surrounded by farming country. For this study, records were revisited, and 1918 to 1920 influenza survivors were interviewed. A pharmacological investigation encompassing the various influenza treatments used in Wisconsin from 1918 to 1920 was documented. In 1918, over 180 individuals perished from influenza, and over 2000 cases were reported in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. Influenza returned in 1920, which some researchers refer to as the “fourth wave,” claiming nearly 50 lives in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. This study also documents the 1920 influenza wave. PMID:19889943

  1. Protein synthesis by ribosomes with tethered subunits.

    PubMed

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Erik D; Szal, Teresa; Florin, Tanja; Jewett, Michael C; Mankin, Alexander S

    2015-08-06

    The ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis. In all kingdoms of life it is composed of two subunits, each built on its own ribosomal RNA (rRNA) scaffold. The independent but coordinated functions of the subunits, including their ability to associate at initiation, rotate during elongation, and dissociate after protein release, are an established model of protein synthesis. Furthermore, the bipartite nature of the ribosome is presumed to be essential for biogenesis, since dedicated assembly factors keep immature ribosomal subunits apart and prevent them from translation initiation. Free exchange of the subunits limits the development of specialized orthogonal genetic systems that could be evolved for novel functions without interfering with native translation. Here we show that ribosomes with tethered and thus inseparable subunits (termed Ribo-T) are capable of successfully carrying out protein synthesis. By engineering a hybrid rRNA composed of both small and large subunit rRNA sequences, we produced a functional ribosome in which the subunits are covalently linked into a single entity by short RNA linkers. Notably, Ribo-T was not only functional in vitro, but was also able to support the growth of Escherichia coli cells even in the absence of wild-type ribosomes. We used Ribo-T to create the first fully orthogonal ribosome-messenger RNA system, and demonstrate its evolvability by selecting otherwise dominantly lethal rRNA mutations in the peptidyl transferase centre that facilitate the translation of a problematic protein sequence. Ribo-T can be used for exploring poorly understood functions of the ribosome, enabling orthogonal genetic systems, and engineering ribosomes with new functions.

  2. Epidemiologic study of influenza infection in Okinawa, Japan, from 2001 to 2007: changing patterns of seasonality and prevalence of amantadine-resistant influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasushi; Taira, Katsuya; Saito, Reiko; Nidaira, Minoru; Okano, Shou; Zaraket, Hassan; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    To clarify seasonal influenza patterns and the prevalence of amantadine-resistant influenza A viruses in Okinawa, located at the southern extremity of Japan in a subtropical climate, we conducted a laboratory-based study of influenza virus infections from 2001 to 2007. The annual outbreaks tended to show two peaks in Okinawa, in summer and winter, although the main islands of Japan, located in a temperate climate area, showed only winter influenza activity. Epidemic types and subtypes in Okinawa mostly matched those on the main islands of Japan in winter and those in Taiwan in summer. Rates of amantadine resistance dramatically increased, from 7.3% in the November 2002-to-March 2003 season to 90.0% in summer 2005, and a similarly high rate of resistance continued for the rest of the study period. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin gene of A/H3N2 isolates collected from 2002 to 2007 revealed a monophyletic lineage that was divided into four period groups. Each group included amantadine-sensitive and -resistant viruses within independent clusters. In the November 2005-to-March 2006 season, all of the amantadine-resistant viruses were clustered in clade N, with dual (position 193 and 225) amino acid mutations in their HA1 subunits. In 2005, clade N amantadine-resistant viruses existed in Okinawa several months before the circulation of this clade on the main islands of Japan. In conclusion, surveillance in Okinawa to monitor influenza virus circulation is important for elucidating the dynamics of virus transmission in a border area between temperate and subtropical areas, as Okinawa is one of the best sentinel points in Japan.

  3. Epidemiological and virological characteristics of influenza B: results of the Global Influenza B Study.

    PubMed

    Caini, Saverio; Huang, Q Sue; Ciblak, Meral A; Kusznierz, Gabriela; Owen, Rhonda; Wangchuk, Sonam; Henriques, Cláudio M P; Njouom, Richard; Fasce, Rodrigo A; Yu, Hongjie; Feng, Luzhao; Zambon, Maria; Clara, Alexey W; Kosasih, Herman; Puzelli, Simona; Kadjo, Herve A; Emukule, Gideon; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Ang, Li Wei; Venter, Marietjie; Mironenko, Alla; Brammer, Lynnette; Mai, Le Thi Quynh; Schellevis, François; Plotkin, Stanley; Paget, John

    2015-08-01

    Literature on influenza focuses on influenza A, despite influenza B having a large public health impact. The Global Influenza B Study aims to collect information on global epidemiology and burden of disease of influenza B since 2000. Twenty-six countries in the Southern (n = 5) and Northern (n = 7) hemispheres and intertropical belt (n = 14) provided virological and epidemiological data. We calculated the proportion of influenza cases due to type B and Victoria and Yamagata lineages in each country and season; tested the correlation between proportion of influenza B and maximum weekly influenza-like illness (ILI) rate during the same season; determined the frequency of vaccine mismatches; and described the age distribution of cases by virus type. The database included 935 673 influenza cases (2000-2013). Overall median proportion of influenza B was 22·6%, with no statistically significant differences across seasons. During seasons where influenza B was dominant or co-circulated (>20% of total detections), Victoria and Yamagata lineages predominated during 64% and 36% of seasons, respectively, and a vaccine mismatch was observed in ≈25% of seasons. Proportion of influenza B was inversely correlated with maximum ILI rate in the same season in the Northern and (with borderline significance) Southern hemispheres. Patients infected with influenza B were usually younger (5-17 years) than patients infected with influenza A. Influenza B is a common disease with some epidemiological differences from influenza A. This should be considered when optimizing control/prevention strategies in different regions and reducing the global burden of disease due to influenza. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Profiling of Humoral Response to Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection and Vaccination Measured by a Protein Microarray in Persons with and without History of Seasonal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; Reimerink, Johan; Mulder, Paul G. H.; van Beek, Janko; Meijer, Adam; de Bruin, Erwin; Friesema, Ingrid; de Jong, Menno D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Rossen, John W. A.; Koopmans, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Background The influence of prior seasonal influenza vaccination on the antibody response produced by natural infection or vaccination is not well understood. Methods We compared the profiles of antibody responses of 32 naturally infected subjects and 98 subjects vaccinated with a 2009 influenza A(H1N1) monovalent MF59-adjuvanted vaccine (Focetria®, Novartis), with and without a history of seasonal influenza vaccination. Antibodies were measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and by protein microarray (PA) using the HA1 subunit for seven recent and historic H1, H2 and H3 influenza viruses, and three avian influenza viruses. Serum samples for the infection group were taken at the moment of collection of the diagnostic sample, 10 days and 30 days after onset of influenza symptoms. For the vaccination group, samples were drawn at baseline, 3 weeks after the first vaccination and 5 weeks after the second vaccination. Results We showed that subjects with a history of seasonal vaccination generally exhibited higher baseline titers for the various HA1 antigens than subjects without a seasonal vaccination history. Infection and pandemic influenza vaccination responses in persons with a history of seasonal vaccination were skewed towards historic antigens. Conclusions Seasonal vaccination is of significant influence on the antibody response to subsequent infection and vaccination, and further research is needed to understand the effect of annual vaccination on protective immunity. PMID:23365683

  5. Trends of influenza infection in Suriname.

    PubMed

    Adhin, Malti R; Grunberg, Meritha; Labadie-Bracho, Mergiory

    2013-09-01

    The trends of influenza infection in Suriname were assessed from February 2010 through February 2011. Testing of 393 patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection (ARI) revealed 15.3% Influenza B and 18.6% could be identified as influenza A positive, consisting of 56% influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 44% seasonal A(H3N2). Influenza infection occurred throughout the year, and all three influenza types affected young children as the primary population. The annual incidence of A(H1N1)pdm09 was 6.88 per 100,000 inhabitants [CI] 4.87-9.45. The spread of influenza could neither be linked to tourist flow from the Netherlands nor to contact rates related to school schedules.

  6. Towards multiscale modeling of influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, Lisa N.; Murillo, Michael S.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Aided by recent advances in computational power, algorithms, and higher fidelity data, increasingly detailed theoretical models of infection with influenza A virus are being developed. We review single scale models as they describe influenza infection from intracellular to global scales, and, in particular, we consider those models that capture details specific to influenza and can be used to link different scales. We discuss the few multiscale models of influenza infection that have been developed in this emerging field. In addition to discussing modeling approaches, we also survey biological data on influenza infection and transmission that is relevant for constructing influenza infection models. We envision that, in the future, multiscale models that capitalize on technical advances in experimental biology and high performance computing could be used to describe the large spatial scale epidemiology of influenza infection, evolution of the virus, and transmission between hosts more accurately. PMID:23608630

  7. Nuclear dynamics of influenza A virus ribonucleoproteins revealed by live-cell imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Loucaides, Eva M.; Kirchbach, Johann C. von; Foeglein, Agnes; Sharps, Jane; Fodor, Ervin; Digard, Paul

    2009-11-10

    The negative sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated in the nuclei of infected cells by the viral RNA polymerase. Only four viral polypeptides are required but multiple cellular components are potentially involved. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to characterise the dynamics of GFP-tagged viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) components in living cells. The nucleoprotein (NP) displayed very slow mobility that significantly increased on formation of transcriptionally active RNPs. Conversely, single or dimeric polymerase subunits showed fast nuclear dynamics that decreased upon formation of heterotrimers, suggesting increased interaction of the full polymerase complex with a relatively immobile cellular component(s). Treatment with inhibitors of cellular transcription indicated that in part, this reflected an interaction with cellular RNA polymerase II. Analysis of mutated influenza virus polymerase complexes further suggested that this was through an interaction between PB2 and RNA Pol II separate from PB2 cap-binding activity.

  8. The human side of influenza

    PubMed Central

    Oshansky, Christine M.; Thomas, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    A clear understanding of immunity in individuals infected with influenza virus is critical for the design of effective vaccination and treatment strategies. Whereas myriad studies have teased apart innate and adaptive immune responses to influenza infection in murine models, much less is known about human immunity as a result of the ethical and technical constraints of human research. Still, these murine studies have provided important insights into the critical correlates of protection and pathogenicity in human infection and helped direct the human studies that have been conducted. Here, we examine and review the current literature on immunity in humans infected with influenza virus, noting evidence offered by select murine studies and suggesting directions in which future research is most warranted. PMID:22362872

  9. Influenza vaccination in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Jan; Chlibek, Roman; Shaw, Jana; Splino, Miroslav; Prymula, Roman

    2017-07-14

    Seasonal influenza is a prevalent and serious annual illness resulting in widespread morbidity and economic disruption throughout the population; the elderly and immunocompromised are particularly vulnerable to serious sequelae and mortality. The changing demographics worldwide to an aging society have important implications for public health policy and pharmaceutical innovations. For instance, primary prevention via immunization is effective in reducing the burden of influenza illness among the elderly. However, the elderly may be insufficiently protected by vaccination due to the immunosenescence which accompanies aging. In addition, vaccine hesitancy among the younger populations increases the likelihood of circulating infectious diseases, and thus concomitant exposure. While it is clear that the development of more immunogenic vaccines is an imperative and worthy endeavor, clinical trials continue to demonstrate that the current influenza vaccine formulation remains highly effective in reducing morbidity and mortality when well matched to circulating strains.

  10. Development of universal influenza vaccines based on influenza virus M and NP genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, M; Luo, J; Chen, Z

    2014-04-01

    Vaccination is the safest and most effective measure against influenza virus infections. However, traditional influenza vaccines cannot respond effectively to an unforeseen epidemic or pandemic caused by a virus with antigenic drifts or antigenic shifts. Therefore, developing a universal influenza vaccine (UIV) that induces broad-spectrum and long-term immunity has become a major trend in influenza vaccine research and development. This article reviews the development of UIVs based on these conserved influenza virus proteins. The matrix protein (M1, M2) and nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza viruses have highly conserved sequences, and they become the major target antigens of current UIV studies.

  11. Expression of recombinant HA1 protein for specific detection of influenza A/H1N1/2009 antibodies in human serum.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lizhong; Nishi, Krista; Macleod, Erin; Sabara, Marta I; Coleman, Brenda L; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The hemagglutinin genes (HA1 subunit) from human and animal 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus isolates were expressed with a baculovirus vector. Recombinant HA1 (rHA1) protein-based ELISA was evaluated for detection of specific influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies in serum samples from vaccinated humans. It was found that rHA1 ELISA consistently differentiated between antibodies recognizing the seasonal influenza H1N1 and pdm09 viruses, with a concordance of 94% as compared to the hemagglutination inhibition test. This study suggests the utility of rHA1 ELISA in serosurveillance.

  12. Influenza A virus recycling revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Dowdle, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    Current textbooks link influenza pandemics to influenza A virus subtypes H2 (1889-91), H3 (1990), H1 (1918-20), H2 (1957-58) and H3 (1968), a pattern suggesting subtype recycling in humans. Since H1 reappeared in 1977, whatever its origin, some workers feel that H2 is the next pandemic candidate. This report reviews the publications on which the concept of influenza A virus subtype recycling is based and concludes that the data are inconsistent with the purported sequence of events. The three influenza pandemics prior to 1957-58 were linked with subtypes through retrospective studies of sera from the elderly, or through seroarchaeology. The pandemic seroarchaeological model for subtype H1 has been validated by the recent recovery of swine virus RNA fragments from persons who died from influenza in 1918. Application of the model to pre-existing H3 antibody among the elderly links the H3 subtype to the pandemic of 1889-91, not that of 1900 as popularly quoted. Application of the model to pre-existing H2 antibody among the elderly fails to confirm that this subtype caused a pandemic in the late 1800's, a finding which is consistent with age-related excess mortality patterns during the pandemics of 1957 (H2) and 1968 (H3). H2 variants should be included in pandemic planning for a number of reasons, but not because of evidence of recycling. It is not known when the next pandemic will occur or which of the 15 (or more) haemagglutinin subtypes will be involved. Effective global surveillance remains the key to influenza preparedness. PMID:10593030

  13. A dose-ranging study of a subunit Respiratory Syncytial Virus subtype A vaccine with and without aluminum phosphate adjuvantation in adults > or =65 years of age.

    PubMed

    Langley, Joanne M; Sales, Valerie; McGeer, Allison; Guasparini, Roland; Predy, Gerald; Meekison, William; Li, Minran; Capellan, Jose; Wang, Elaine

    2009-09-25

    We studied the safety and immunogenicity of a Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)-A vaccine containing subunit antigens F, G and M in older persons, and its effect on influenza vaccine immunogenicity. In a dose-ranging, placebo-controlled, blinded trial 561 adults > or =65 years of age at five Canadian sites were randomized to one intramuscular injection of either 100, 50 or 25 microg RSV-A-alum vaccine or 100 microg non-adjuvanted RSV-A vaccine, or alum-placebo. All participants were offered inactivated influenza vaccine on day 32. Immunization was well tolerated and reactogenicity was similar between the RSV and influenza vaccines and the alum-placebo. Only the 100 microg non-adjuvanted RSV vaccine achieved the primary immunogenicity outcome of eliciting a > or =4-fold rise in neutralizing antibody (NA) titres against RSV-A in > or =50% of participants at day 32. Geometric mean titres against RSV-A and -B at all points were comparable in 100 microg adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted groups. At day 32, a > or =4-fold haemagluttinin inhibition (HI) antibody response or HI > or =40 to Influenza (A-H3N2) was seen in >74% of participants; no difference was seen between groups. A subunit non-alum-containing RSV-A vaccine was well tolerated in a large population > or =65 years and did not interfere with influenza vaccine immunogenicity. This RSV-A-based vaccine demonstrated NA rise which could provide seasonal protection against severe RSV illnesses from RSV-A or -B and warrants further testing to determine its efficacy in the prevention of clinical illness in elderly persons.

  14. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of influenza A virus acts by suppressing PA endonuclease activity of the viral polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Chu, Hin; Singh, Kailash; Zhao, Hanjun; Zhang, Ke; Kao, Richard Y. T.; Chow, Billy K. C.; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus comprises conserved and independently-folded subdomains with defined functionalities. The N-terminal domain of the PA subunit (PAN) harbors the endonuclease function so that it can serve as a desired target for drug discovery. To identify a class of anti-influenza inhibitors that impedes PAN endonuclease activity, a screening approach that integrated the fluorescence resonance energy transfer based endonuclease inhibitory assay with the DNA gel-based endonuclease inhibitory assay was conducted, followed by the evaluation of antiviral efficacies and potential cytotoxicity of the primary hits in vitro and in vivo. A small-molecule compound ANA-0 was identified as a potent inhibitor against the replication of multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9 and H9N2, in cell cultures. Combinational treatment of zanamivir and ANA-0 exerted synergistic anti-influenza effect in vitro. Intranasal administration of ANA-0 protected mice from lethal challenge and reduced lung viral loads in H1N1 virus infected BALB/c mice. In summary, ANA-0 shows potential to be developed to novel anti-influenza agents. PMID:26956222

  15. A simple Pichia pastoris fermentation and downstream processing strategy for making recombinant pandemic Swine Origin Influenza a virus Hemagglutinin protein.

    PubMed

    Athmaram, T N; Singh, Anil Kumar; Saraswat, Shweta; Srivastava, Saurabh; Misra, Princi; Kameswara Rao, M; Gopalan, N; Rao, P V L

    2013-02-01

    The present Influenza vaccine manufacturing process has posed a clear impediment to initiation of rapid mass vaccination against spreading pandemic influenza. New vaccine strategies are therefore needed that can accelerate the vaccine production. Pichia offers several advantages for rapid and economical bulk production of recombinant proteins and, hence, can be attractive alternative for producing an effective influenza HA based subunit vaccine. The recombinant Pichia harboring the transgene was subjected to fed-batch fermentation at 10 L scale. A simple fermentation and downstream processing strategy is developed for high-yield secretory expression of the recombinant Hemagglutinin protein of pandemic Swine Origin Influenza A virus using Pichia pastoris via fed-batch fermentation. Expression and purification were optimized and the expressed recombinant Hemagglutinin protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blot and MALDI-TOF analysis. In this paper, we describe a fed-batch fermentation protocol for the secreted production of Swine Influenza A Hemagglutinin protein in the P. pastoris GS115 strain. We have shown that there is a clear relationship between product yield and specific growth rate. The fed-batch fermentation and downstream processing methods optimized in the present study have immense practical application for high-level production of the recombinant H1N1 HA protein in a cost effective way using P. pastoris.

  16. Drosophila laminin: sequence of B2 subunit and expression of all three subunits during embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In a previous study, we described the cloning of the genes encoding the three subunits of Drosophila laminin, a substrate adhesion molecule, and the cDNA sequence of the B1 subunit (Montell and Goodman, 1988). This analysis revealed the similarity of Drosophila laminin with the mouse and human complexes in subunit composition, domain structure, and amino acid sequence. In this paper, we report the deduced amino acid sequence of the B2 subunit. We then describe the expression and tissue distribution of the three subunits of laminin during Drosophila embryogenesis using both in situ hybridization and immunolocalization techniques, with particular emphasis on its expression in and around the developing nervous system. PMID:2808533

  17. Influenza vaccinations and chemosensory function.

    PubMed

    Doty, Richard L; Berman, Austin H; Izhar, Mohammad; Hamilton, Hugh B; Villano, Danylko; Vazquez, Britney E; Warrum, Maja N; Mahbob, Mariam

    2014-01-01

    Although influenza vaccines have saved millions of lives, some have been associated with extremely rare adverse effects such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, Bell's palsy, and optic neuritis. Despite the fact that olfactory loss after an influenza vaccination is noted in one case report, no quantitative olfactory testing was performed. Hence, it is unclear whether, in fact, olfactory dysfunction can be associated with such vaccinations. This study was designed to (1) identify patients from the University of Pennsylvania Smell and Taste Center who attributed their empirically determined chemosensory disturbances to influenza vaccinations and (2) determine whether influenza vaccinations add to the degree of olfactory or gustatory dysfunction due to other causes. A retrospective analysis of self-reported etiologies of 4554 consecutive patients presenting to the University of Pennsylvania Smell and Taste Center with complaints of chemosensory dysfunction was performed. Those who reported dysfunction secondary to influenza vaccinations were identified. Additionally, in a subset of 925 patients for whom detailed inoculation histories were available, it was determined whether the number of lifetime inoculations added to the deficits due to other causes. Nine of the 4554 patients (0.19%) attributed olfactory disturbances to an influenza vaccination. None complained of taste dysfunction. All nine had abnormally low scores on the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (p < 0.001), with three being anosmic and six microsmic. Seven had elevated phenyl ethyl alcohol detection thresholds (p < 0.05). Two cases exhibited mild-to-moderate loss of whole mouth taste function. Of the 925 patients, no association was evident between the number of lifetime vaccinations and the chemosensory test scores. In accord with previous studies, age and sex were significantly related to the test scores. A very small percentage of the 4554 patients evaluated (0.19%) attributed their

  18. Influenza, anthropology, and global uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Atlani-Duault, Laëtitia; Kendall, Carl

    2009-07-01

    The response to the novel H1N1 influenza (swine flu) pandemic has been overwhelmingly biological and epidemiological in scope. While plans are moving forward on a vaccine, few of the social effects of a truly massive global catastrophe-or the issues of communication, responding to predictable inappropriate reactions, preparation of populations for these effects, or using local population resources in the epidemic-have been well considered. Anthropology can play an important and underutilized role in planning and responding to influenza and other global emergencies. This editorial discusses these issues and makes some preliminary recommendations.

  19. Epidemiological and virological characteristics of influenza B: results of the Global Influenza B Study

    PubMed Central

    Caini, Saverio; Huang, Q Sue; Ciblak, Meral A; Kusznierz, Gabriela; Owen, Rhonda; Wangchuk, Sonam; Henriques, Cláudio M P; Njouom, Richard; Fasce, Rodrigo A; Yu, Hongjie; Feng, Luzhao; Zambon, Maria; Clara, Alexey W; Kosasih, Herman; Puzelli, Simona; Kadjo, Herve A; Emukule, Gideon; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Ang, Li Wei; Venter, Marietjie; Mironenko, Alla; Brammer, Lynnette; Mai, Le Thi Quynh; Schellevis, François; Plotkin, Stanley; Paget, John

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Literature on influenza focuses on influenza A, despite influenza B having a large public health impact. The Global Influenza B Study aims to collect information on global epidemiology and burden of disease of influenza B since 2000. Methods Twenty-six countries in the Southern (n = 5) and Northern (n = 7) hemispheres and intertropical belt (n = 14) provided virological and epidemiological data. We calculated the proportion of influenza cases due to type B and Victoria and Yamagata lineages in each country and season; tested the correlation between proportion of influenza B and maximum weekly influenza-like illness (ILI) rate during the same season; determined the frequency of vaccine mismatches; and described the age distribution of cases by virus type. Results The database included 935 673 influenza cases (2000–2013). Overall median proportion of influenza B was 22·6%, with no statistically significant differences across seasons. During seasons where influenza B was dominant or co-circulated (>20% of total detections), Victoria and Yamagata lineages predominated during 64% and 36% of seasons, respectively, and a vaccine mismatch was observed in ≈25% of seasons. Proportion of influenza B was inversely correlated with maximum ILI rate in the same season in the Northern and (with borderline significance) Southern hemispheres. Patients infected with influenza B were usually younger (5–17 years) than patients infected with influenza A. Conclusion Influenza B is a common disease with some epidemiological differences from influenza A. This should be considered when optimizing control/prevention strategies in different regions and reducing the global burden of disease due to influenza. PMID:26256290

  20. Influenza antigen-sparing by immune stimulation with Gram-positive enhancer matrix (GEM) particles.

    PubMed

    Saluja, V; Visser, M R; Ter Veer, W; van Roosmalen, M L; Leenhouts, K; Hinrichs, W L J; Huckriede, A; Frijlink, H W

    2010-11-23

    Gram-positive enhancer matrix (GEM) particles, produced from non-genetically modified Lactococcus lactis bacteria have an inherent immunostimulatory activity. It was investigated whether co-administration of GEM particles can reduce the amount of influenza subunit vaccine (HA) necessary to protect mice from viral infection. Decreasing HA amounts of 5, 1, 0.2 and 0.04μg admixed with GEM particles were tested in intramuscular immunizations. Combinations of GEM and seasonal HA (A/Wisconsin/67/2005 [H3N2]) induced significantly higher systemic and better Th1/Th2-type balanced immune responses than HA alone. Addition of GEM to 0.04μg HA resulted in similar HI titers as 1-5μg non-adjuvanted HA. To test the protective efficacy of the adjuvanted combination, mice were immunized with influenza subunit vaccine A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) and then challenged with live virus (A/PR/8/34). Mice immunized with 1μg HA+GEM showed undetectable virus titers in the lungs 5 days after challenge, whereas mice immunized with 1μg HA alone showed detectable levels of virus in the lungs. Interestingly, mice vaccinated with the 0.04μg HA+GEM vaccine demonstrated reduced lung virus titers and a reduction in weight that was similar as that in mice vaccinated with 1μg non-adjuvanted HA. These results indicate that the use of GEM as immunostimulant allows for a strong reduction in the antigen dose as compared to the benchmark vaccine by using GEM particles. Thus, addition of GEM can strongly potentiate immunogenicity of influenza subunit vaccine both quantitatively and qualitatively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diversity of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew K; Sattelle, David B

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast synaptic transmission in the insect nervous system and are targets of a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. They consist of five subunits arranged around a central ion channeL Since the subunit composition determines the functional and pharmacological properties of the receptor the presence of nAChR families comprising several subunit-encodinggenes provides a molecular basis for broad functional diversity. Analyses of genome sequences have shown that nAChR gene families remain compact in diverse insect species, when compared to their nematode andvertebrate counterparts. Thus, the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), malaria mosquito (Anopheles gambiae), honey bee (Apis mellifera), silk worm (Bombyx mon) and the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) possess 10-12 nAChR genes while human and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have 16 and 29 respectively. Although insect nAChRgene families are amongst the smallest known, receptor diversity can be considerably increased by the posttranscriptional processes alternative splicing and mRNA A-to-I editingwhich can potentially generate protein products which far outnumber the nAChR genes. These two processes can also generate species-specific subunit isoforms. In addition, each insect possesses at least one highly divergent nAChR subunit which may perform species-specific functions. Species-specific subunit diversification may offer promising targets for future rational design of insecticides that target specific pest insects while sparing beneficial species.

  2. Influenza (Flu) vaccine (Live, Intranasal): What you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC Influenza Live, Intranasal Flu Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ... flulive.html . CDC review information for Live, Intranasal Influenza VIS: Vaccine Information Statement Influenza Page last reviewed: ...

  3. Technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) influenza vaccine manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Barry; Boulanger, Robert; Fino, Mireli; Srivastava, Indresh; Holtz, Kathy; Khramtsov, Nikolai; McPherson, Clifton; Meghrous, Jamal; Kubera, Paul; Cox, Manon M J

    2014-09-22

    Multiple different hemagglutinin (HA) protein antigens have been reproducibly manufactured at the 650L scale by Protein Sciences Corporation (PSC) based on an insect cell culture with baculovirus infection. Significantly, these HA protein antigens were produced by the same Universal Manufacturing process as described in the biological license application (BLA) for the first recombinant influenza vaccine approved by the FDA (Flublok). The technology is uniquely designed so that a change in vaccine composition can be readily accommodated from one HA protein antigen to another one. Here we present a vaccine candidate to combat the recently emerged H7N9 virus as an example starting with the genetic sequence for the required HA, creation of the baculovirus and ending with purified protein antigen (or vaccine component) at the 10L scale accomplished within 38 days under GMP conditions. The same process performance is being achieved at the 2L, 10L, 100L, 650L and 2500L scale. An illustration is given of how the technology was transferred from the benchmark 650L scale facility to a retrofitted microbial facility at the 2500L scale within 100 days which includes the time for facility engineering changes. The successful development, technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok process has major implications for being ready to make vaccine rapidly on a worldwide scale as a defense against pandemic influenza. The technology described does not have the same vulnerability to mutations in the egg adapted strain, and resulting loss in vaccine efficacy, faced by egg based manufacture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimized subunit vaccine protects against experimental leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Goto, Yasuyuki; Carter, Lauren; Bhatia, Ajay; Howard, Randall F.; Carter, Darrick; Coler, Rhea N.; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Reed, Steven G.

    2009-01-01

    Development of a protective subunit vaccine against Leishmania spp. depends on antigens and adjuvants that induce appropriate immune responses. We evaluated a second generation polyprotein antigen (Leish-110f) in different adjuvant formulations for immunogenicity and protective efficacy against Leishmania spp. challenges. Vaccine-induced protection was associated with antibody and T cell responses to Leish-110f. CD4 T cells were the source of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-2 double and triple positive populations. This study establishes the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the improved Leish-110f subunit vaccine antigen adjuvanted with natural (MPL-SE) or synthetic (EM005) Toll-like receptor 4 agonists. PMID:19786136

  5. Optimized subunit vaccine protects against experimental leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Goto, Yasuyuki; Carter, Lauren; Bhatia, Ajay; Howard, Randall F; Carter, Darrick; Coler, Rhea N; Vedvick, Thomas S; Reed, Steven G

    2009-11-23

    Development of a protective subunit vaccine against Leishmania spp. depends on antigens and adjuvants that induce appropriate immune responses. We evaluated a second generation polyprotein antigen (Leish-110f) in different adjuvant formulations for immunogenicity and protective efficacy against Leishmania spp. challenges. Vaccine-induced protection was associated with antibody and T cell responses to Leish-110f. CD4 T cells were the source of IFN-gamma, TNF, and IL-2 double- and triple-positive populations. This study establishes the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the improved Leish-110f subunit vaccine antigen adjuvanted with natural (MPL-SE) or synthetic (EM005) Toll-like receptor 4 agonists.

  6. Seasonal Influenza Infections and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Yang, Wan; Ito, Kazuhiko; Matte, Thomas D.; Shaman, Jeffrey; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cardiovascular deaths and influenza epidemics peak during winter in temperate regions. OBJECTIVES To quantify the temporal association between population increases in seasonal influenza infections and mortality due to cardiovascular causes and to test if influenza incidence indicators are predictive of cardiovascular mortality during the influenza season. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Time-series analysis of vital statistics records and emergency department visits in New York City, among cardiovascular deaths that occurred during influenza seasons between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012. The 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic period was excluded from temporal analyses. EXPOSURES Emergency department visits for influenza-like illness, grouped by age (≥0 years and ≥65 years) and scaled by laboratory surveillance data for viral types and subtypes, in the previous 28 days. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Mortality due to cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction. RESULTS Among adults 65 years and older, who accounted for 83.0% (73 363 deaths) of nonpandemic cardiovascular mortality during influenza seasons, seasonal average influenza incidence was correlated year to year with excess cardiovascular mortality (Pearson correlation coefficients ≥0.75, P≤.05 for 4 different influenza indicators). In daily time-series analyses using 4 different influenza metrics, interquartile range increases in influenza incidence during the previous 21 days were associated with an increase between 2.3% (95% CI, 0.7%–3.9%) and 6.3% (95% CI, 3.7%–8.9%) for cardiovascular disease mortality and between 2.4% (95% CI, 1.1%–3.6%) and 6.9% (95% CI, 4.0%–9.9%) for ischemic heart disease mortality among adults 65 years and older. The associations were most acute and strongest for myocardial infarction mortality, with each interquartile range increase in influenza incidence during the previous 14 days associated with mortality

  7. PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF INFLUENZA VIRUS COMPONENTS OBTAINED AFTER ETHER TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Fred M.; Rott, Rudolf; Schäfer, Werner

    1960-01-01

    The Rostock strain of fowl plague, the swine, A, A', and Asian strains of influenza A as well as their hemagglutinin and internal s antigen subunits obtained after ether splitting, were found to be morphologically indistinguishable when examined simultaneously. Hemagglutinin fractions reacted in a highly strain specific manner when tested by hemagglutination inhibition or by complement fixation using sera obtained after infection. With the same sera internal s antigen fractions were shown to be serologically distinguishable by complement fixation. This observation may stimulate interest in the feasibility of employing immunologic techniques for the study of nucleoproteins. The significance of the findings reported is discussed. PMID:13719952

  8. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines. Recombinant virus-vectored vaccines are an appealing alternative to classical inactivated vaccines because virus vectors enable native expression of influenza antigens, even from virulent influenza viruses, while expressed in the context of the vector that can improve immunogenicity. In addition, a vectored vaccine often enables delivery of the vaccine to sites of inductive immunity such as the respiratory tract enabling protection from influenza virus infection. Moreover, the ability to readily manipulate virus vectors to produce novel influenza vaccines may provide the quickest path toward a universal vaccine protecting against all influenza viruses. This review will discuss experimental virus-vectored vaccines for use in humans, comparing them to licensed vaccines and the hurdles faced for licensure of these next-generation influenza virus vaccines. PMID:25105278

  9. Dynamic changes during acid-induced activation of influenza hemagglutinin

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia, Natalie K.; Guttman, Miklos; Ebner, Jamie L.; ...

    2015-03-12

    Influenza hemagglutinin (HA) mediates virus attachment to host cells and fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes during entry. While high-resolution structures are available for the pre-fusion HA ectodomain and the post-fusion HA2 subunit, the sequence of conformational changes during HA activation has eluded structural characterization. In this paper, we apply hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry to examine changes in structural dynamics of the HA ectodomain at various stages of activation, and compare the soluble ectodomain with intact HA on virions. At pH conditions approaching activation (pH 6.0–5.5) HA exhibits increased dynamics at the fusion peptide and neighboring regions, whilemore » the interface between receptor binding subunits (HA1) becomes stabilized. In contrast to many activation models, these data suggest that HA responds to endosomal acidification by releasing the fusion peptide prior to HA1 uncaging and the spring-loaded refolding of HA2. Finally, this staged process may facilitate efficient HA-mediated fusion.« less

  10. Influenza surveillance in animals: what is our capacity to detect emerging influenza viruses with zoonotic potential?

    PubMed

    VON Dobschuetz, S; DE Nardi, M; Harris, K A; Munoz, O; Breed, A C; Wieland, B; Dauphin, G; Lubroth, J; Stärk, K D C

    2015-07-01

    A survey of national animal influenza surveillance programmes was conducted to assess the current capacity to detect influenza viruses with zoonotic potential in animals (i.e. those influenza viruses that can be naturally transmitted between animals and humans) at regional and global levels. Information on 587 animal influenza surveillance system components was collected for 99 countries from Chief Veterinary Officers (CVOs) (n = 94) and published literature. Less than 1% (n = 4) of these components were specifically aimed at detecting influenza viruses with pandemic potential in animals (i.e. those influenza viruses that are capable of causing epidemic spread in human populations over large geographical regions or worldwide), which would have zoonotic potential as a prerequisite. Those countries that sought to detect influenza viruses with pandemic potential searched for such viruses exclusively in domestic pigs. This work shows the global need for increasing surveillance that targets potentially zoonotic influenza viruses in relevant animal species.

  11. Developing Novel Conjugate HIV-1 Subunit Therapeutic Vaccines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    received United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for use in adults and infants (i.e., Haemophilus influenzae type B, group B...533-539. Barrington T, M Skettrup, L Juul, and C Heilmann (1993). Non-epitope specific suppression of the antibody response to Haemophilus influenzae type...Opposite effects of actively and passively acquired immunity to the carrier on responses to human infants to a Haemophilus influenzae type b

  12. Characteristics of seasonal influenza A and B in Latin America: Influenza surveillance data from ten countries

    PubMed Central

    Caini, Saverio; Alonso, Wladimir J.; Balmaseda, Angel; Bruno, Alfredo; Bustos, Patricia; Castillo, Leticia; de Lozano, Celina; de Mora, Doménica; Fasce, Rodrigo A.; Ferreira de Almeida, Walquiria Aparecida; Kusznierz, Gabriela F.; Lara, Jenny; Matute, Maria Luisa; Moreno, Brechla; Pessanha Henriques, Claudio Maierovitch; Rudi, Juan Manuel; El-Guerche Séblain, Clotilde; Schellevis, François; Paget, John

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The increased availability of influenza surveillance data in recent years justifies an actual and more complete overview of influenza epidemiology in Latin America. We compared the influenza surveillance systems and assessed the epidemiology of influenza A and B, including the spatio-temporal patterns of influenza epidemics, in ten countries and sub-national regions in Latin America. Methods We aggregated the data by year and country and characteristics of eighty-two years were analysed. We calculated the median proportion of laboratory-confirmed influenza cases caused by each virus strain, and compared the timing and amplitude of the primary and secondary peaks between countries. Results 37,087 influenza cases were reported during 2004–2012. Influenza A and B accounted for a median of 79% and, respectively, 21% of cases in a year. The percentage of influenza A cases that were subtyped was 82.5%; for influenza B, 15.6% of cases were characterized. Influenza A and B were dominant in seventy-five (91%) and seven (9%) years, respectively. In half (51%) of the influenza A years, influenza A(H3N2) was dominant, followed by influenza A(H1N1)pdm2009 (41%) and pre-pandemic A(H1N1) (8%). The primary peak of influenza activity was in June-September in temperate climate countries, with little or no secondary peak. Tropical climate countries had smaller primary peaks taking place in different months and frequently detectable secondary peaks. Conclusions We found that good influenza surveillance data exists in Latin America, although improvements can still be made (e.g. a better characterization of influenza B specimens); that influenza B plays a considerable role in the seasonal influenza burden; and that there is substantial heterogeneity of spatio-temporal patterns of influenza epidemics. To improve the effectiveness of influenza control measures in Latin America, tropical climate countries may need to develop innovative prevention strategies specifically

  13. Characteristics of seasonal influenza A and B in Latin America: Influenza surveillance data from ten countries.

    PubMed

    Caini, Saverio; Alonso, Wladimir J; Balmaseda, Angel; Bruno, Alfredo; Bustos, Patricia; Castillo, Leticia; de Lozano, Celina; de Mora, Doménica; Fasce, Rodrigo A; Ferreira de Almeida, Walquiria Aparecida; Kusznierz, Gabriela F; Lara, Jenny; Matute, Maria Luisa; Moreno, Brechla; Pessanha Henriques, Claudio Maierovitch; Rudi, Juan Manuel; El-Guerche Séblain, Clotilde; Schellevis, François; Paget, John

    2017-01-01

    The increased availability of influenza surveillance data in recent years justifies an actual and more complete overview of influenza epidemiology in Latin America. We compared the influenza surveillance systems and assessed the epidemiology of influenza A and B, including the spatio-temporal patterns of influenza epidemics, in ten countries and sub-national regions in Latin America. We aggregated the data by year and country and characteristics of eighty-two years were analysed. We calculated the median proportion of laboratory-confirmed influenza cases caused by each virus strain, and compared the timing and amplitude of the primary and secondary peaks between countries. 37,087 influenza cases were reported during 2004-2012. Influenza A and B accounted for a median of 79% and, respectively, 21% of cases in a year. The percentage of influenza A cases that were subtyped was 82.5%; for influenza B, 15.6% of cases were characterized. Influenza A and B were dominant in seventy-five (91%) and seven (9%) years, respectively. In half (51%) of the influenza A years, influenza A(H3N2) was dominant, followed by influenza A(H1N1)pdm2009 (41%) and pre-pandemic A(H1N1) (8%). The primary peak of influenza activity was in June-September in temperate climate countries, with little or no secondary peak. Tropical climate countries had smaller primary peaks taking place in different months and frequently detectable secondary peaks. We found that good influenza surveillance data exists in Latin America, although improvements can still be made (e.g. a better characterization of influenza B specimens); that influenza B plays a considerable role in the seasonal influenza burden; and that there is substantial heterogeneity of spatio-temporal patterns of influenza epidemics. To improve the effectiveness of influenza control measures in Latin America, tropical climate countries may need to develop innovative prevention strategies specifically tailored to the spatio-temporal patterns of

  14. Subunits of phycoerythrin from Fremyella diplosiphon: chemical and immunochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, J; Bogorad, L

    1975-03-25

    The alpha and beta subunits of the phycobiliprotein, phycoerythrin, isolated from the filamentous blue-green alga, Fremyella diplosiphon, have been separated by chromatography on Bio-Rex 70 ion exchange resin. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows no detectable cross-contamination of these subunit preparations. The molar extinction coefficients at 552 nm of the alpha and beta subunits in 8 M urea are 25,549 and 48,456, respectively. The amino acid compositions of the subunits are very similar. Molecular weights of the alpha and beta subunits are 19,500 and 21,700, respectively, based on the amino acid composition analyses. Antisera prepared against the alpha subunit reacts with the beta subunit, and vice versa. Tryptic peptide maps reveal that the subunits share share at least eight common tryptic peptides. These results indicate that the phycoerythrin subunits are chemically very similar.

  15. Serological behaviour of influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Fiset, P.; Depoux, R.

    1954-01-01

    By antibody absorption it was found that strains of influenza virus exhibiting P-Q differences were related according to certain patterns. In the course of this investigation it was also revealed that some viruses possessed masked antigens capable of stimulating antibody production but incapable of combining efficiently with antibody. PMID:14364182

  16. Influenza vaccines for avian species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beginning in Southeast Asia, in 2003, a multi-national epizootic outbreak of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was identified in commercial poultry and wild bird species. This lineage, originally identified in Southern China in 1996 and then Hong Kong in 1997, caused severe morbidity an...

  17. Swine Influenza Virus: Emerging Understandings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: In March-April 2009, a novel pandemic H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America [1]. The gene constellation of the emerging virus was demonstrated to be a combination of genes from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before...

  18. Control strategies against avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since 1959, 40 epizootics of high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) have occurred (Figure 1). Thirty-five of these epizootic HPAI viruses were geographically-limited (mostly to single countries), involved farm-to-farm spread and were eradicated from poultry by stamping-out programs; i.e. the HPAI...

  19. New vaccines against influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Ko, Eun-Ju; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Kwon, Young-Man; Tang, Yinghua; Cho, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective and cost-benefit interventions that prevent the mortality and reduce morbidity from infectious pathogens. However, the licensed influenza vaccine induces strain-specific immunity and must be updated annually based on predicted strains that will circulate in the upcoming season. Influenza virus still causes significant health problems worldwide due to the low vaccine efficacy from unexpected outbreaks of next epidemic strains or the emergence of pandemic viruses. Current influenza vaccines are based on immunity to the hemagglutinin antigen that is highly variable among different influenza viruses circulating in humans and animals. Several scientific advances have been endeavored to develop universal vaccines that will induce broad protection. Universal vaccines have been focused on regions of viral proteins that are highly conserved across different virus subtypes. The strategies of universal vaccines include the matrix 2 protein, the hemagglutinin HA2 stalk domain, and T cell-based multivalent antigens. Supplemented and/or adjuvanted vaccination in combination with universal target antigenic vaccines would have much promise. This review summarizes encouraging scientific advances in the field with a focus on novel vaccine designs. PMID:24427759

  20. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from expe...

  1. OFFLU Network on Avian Influenza

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    OFFLU is the name of the network of avian influenza expertise inaugurated jointly in 2005 by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Organisation for Animal Health. Achievements and constraints to date and plans for the future are described. PMID:16965718

  2. Reasons for low influenza vaccination coverage among adults in Puerto Rico, influenza season 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Arriola, Carmen S; Mercado-Crespo, Melissa C; Rivera, Brenda; Serrano-Rodriguez, Ruby; Macklin, Nora; Rivera, Angel; Graitcer, Samuel; Lacen, Mayra; Bridges, Carolyn B; Kennedy, Erin D

    2015-07-31

    Influenza vaccination is recommended annually for all persons 6 months and older. Reports of increased influenza-related morbidity and mortality during the 2013-2014 influenza season raised concerns about low adult influenza immunization rates in Puerto Rico. In order to inform public health actions to increase vaccination rates, we surveyed adults in Puerto Rico regarding influenza vaccination-related attitudes and barriers. A random-digit-dialing telephone survey (50% landline: 50% cellphone) regarding influenza vaccination, attitudes, practices and barriers was conducted November 19-25, 2013 among adults in Puerto Rico. Survey results were weighted to reflect sampling design and adjustments for non-response. Among 439 surveyed, 229 completed the survey with a 52% response rate. Respondents' median age was 55 years; 18% reported receiving 2013-2014 influenza vaccination. Among 180 unvaccinated respondents, 38% reported barriers associated with limited access to vaccination, 24% reported they did not want or need influenza vaccination, and 20% reported safety concerns. Vaccinated respondents were more likely to know if they were recommended for influenza vaccination, to report greater perceived risk of influenza illness, and to report being less concerned about influenza vaccine safety (p-value<0.05). Of the 175 respondents who saw a healthcare provider (HCP) since July 1, 2013, 38% reported their HCP recommended influenza vaccination and 17% were offered vaccination. Vaccination rates were higher among adults who received a recommendation and/or offer of influenza vaccination (43% vs. 14%; p-value<0.01). Failure of HCP to recommend and/or offer influenza vaccination and patient attitudes (low perceived risk of influenza virus infection) may have contributed to low vaccination rates during the 2013-2014 season. HCP and public health practitioners should strongly recommend influenza vaccination and provide vaccinations during clinical encounters or refer patients

  3. The emergence of influenza A H7N9 in human beings 16 years after influenza A H5N1: a tale of two cities.

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Chen, Honglin; Li, Lanjuan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2013-09-01

    Infection with either influenza A H5N1 virus in 1997 or avian influenza A H7N9 virus in 2013 caused severe pneumonia that did not respond to typical or atypical antimicrobial treatment, and resulted in high mortality. Both viruses are reassortants with internal genes derived from avian influenza A H9N2 viruses that circulate in Asian poultry. Both viruses have genetic markers of mammalian adaptation in their haemagglutinin and polymerase PB2 subunits, which enhanced binding to human-type receptors and improved replication in mammals, respectively. Hong Kong (affected by H5N1 in 1997) and Shanghai (affected by H7N9 in 2013) are two rapidly flourishing cosmopolitan megacities that were increasing in human population and poultry consumption before the outbreaks. Both cities are located along the avian migratory route at the Pearl River delta and Yangtze River delta. Whether the widespread use of the H5N1 vaccine in east Asia-with suboptimum biosecurity measures in live poultry markets and farms-predisposed to the emergence of H7N9 or other virus subtypes needs further investigation. Why H7N9 seems to be more readily transmitted from poultry to people than H5N1 is still unclear. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The gamma subunit of transducin is farnesylated.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, R K; Perez-Sala, D; Cañada, F J; Rando, R R

    1990-01-01

    Protein prenylation with farnesyl or geranylgeranyl moieties is an important posttranslational modification that affects the activity of such diverse proteins as the nuclear lamins, the yeast mating factor mata, and the ras oncogene products. In this article, we show that whole retinal cultures incorporate radioactive mevalonic acid into proteins of 23-26 kDa and one of 8 kDa. The former proteins are probably the "small" guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) and the 8-kDa protein is the gamma subunit of the well-studied retinal heterotrimeric G protein (transducin). After deprenylating purified transducin and its subunits with Raney nickel or methyl iodide/base, the adducted prenyl group can be identified as an all-trans-farnesyl moiety covalently linked to a cysteine residue. Thus far, prenylation reactions have been found to occur at cysteine in a carboxyl-terminal consensus CAAX sequence, where C is the cysteine, A is an aliphatic amino acid, and X is undefined. Both the alpha and gamma subunits of transducin have this consensus sequence, but only the gamma subunit is prenylated. Therefore, the CAAX motif is not necessary and sufficient to direct prenylation. Finally, since transducin is the best understood G protein, both structurally and mechanistically, the discovery that it is farnesylated should allow for a quantitative understanding of this post-translational modification. Images PMID:2217200

  5. Evolution and ecology of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, R G; Bean, W J; Gorman, O T; Chambers, T M; Kawaoka, Y

    1992-01-01

    In this review we examine the hypothesis that aquatic birds are the primordial source of all influenza viruses in other species and study the ecological features that permit the perpetuation of influenza viruses in aquatic avian species. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence of influenza A virus RNA segments coding for the spike proteins (HA, NA, and M2) and the internal proteins (PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M, and NS) from a wide range of hosts, geographical regions, and influenza A virus subtypes support the following conclusions. (i) Two partly overlapping reservoirs of influenza A viruses exist in migrating waterfowl and shorebirds throughout the world. These species harbor influenza viruses of all the known HA and NA subtypes. (ii) Influenza viruses have evolved into a number of host-specific lineages that are exemplified by the NP gene and include equine Prague/56, recent equine strains, classical swine and human strains, H13 gull strains, and all other avian strains. Other genes show similar patterns, but with extensive evidence of genetic reassortment. Geographical as well as host-specific lineages are evident. (iii) All of the influenza A viruses of mammalian sources originated from the avian gene pool, and it is possible that influenza B viruses also arose from the same source. (iv) The different virus lineages are predominantly host specific, but there are periodic exchanges of influenza virus genes or whole viruses between species, giving rise to pandemics of disease in humans, lower animals, and birds. (v) The influenza viruses currently circulating in humans and pigs in North America originated by transmission of all genes from the avian reservoir prior to the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic; some of the genes have subsequently been replaced by others from the influenza gene pool in birds. (vi) The influenza virus gene pool in aquatic birds of the world is probably perpetuated by low-level transmission within that species throughout the year. (vii

  6. Evolution and ecology of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Webster, R G; Bean, W J; Gorman, O T; Chambers, T M; Kawaoka, Y

    1992-03-01

    In this review we examine the hypothesis that aquatic birds are the primordial source of all influenza viruses in other species and study the ecological features that permit the perpetuation of influenza viruses in aquatic avian species. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence of influenza A virus RNA segments coding for the spike proteins (HA, NA, and M2) and the internal proteins (PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M, and NS) from a wide range of hosts, geographical regions, and influenza A virus subtypes support the following conclusions. (i) Two partly overlapping reservoirs of influenza A viruses exist in migrating waterfowl and shorebirds throughout the world. These species harbor influenza viruses of all the known HA and NA subtypes. (ii) Influenza viruses have evolved into a number of host-specific lineages that are exemplified by the NP gene and include equine Prague/56, recent equine strains, classical swine and human strains, H13 gull strains, and all other avian strains. Other genes show similar patterns, but with extensive evidence of genetic reassortment. Geographical as well as host-specific lineages are evident. (iii) All of the influenza A viruses of mammalian sources originated from the avian gene pool, and it is possible that influenza B viruses also arose from the same source. (iv) The different virus lineages are predominantly host specific, but there are periodic exchanges of influenza virus genes or whole viruses between species, giving rise to pandemics of disease in humans, lower animals, and birds. (v) The influenza viruses currently circulating in humans and pigs in North America originated by transmission of all genes from the avian reservoir prior to the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic; some of the genes have subsequently been replaced by others from the influenza gene pool in birds. (vi) The influenza virus gene pool in aquatic birds of the world is probably perpetuated by low-level transmission within that species throughout the year. (vii

  7. Effect of influenza vaccination on the prognosis of hospitalized influenza patients.

    PubMed

    Casado, Itziar; Domínguez, Angela; Toledo, Diana; Chamorro, Judith; Force, Lluis; Soldevila, Núria; Astray, Jenaro; Egurrola, Mikel; Godoy, Pere; Mayoral, José M; Tamames, Sonia; Sanz, Francisco; Castilla, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess whether influenza vaccination reduces the risk of severe and fatal outcomes in influenza inpatients aged ≥65 years. During the 2013-2014 influenza season persons aged ≥65 years hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza were selected in 19 Spanish hospitals. A severe influenza case was defined as admission to the intensive care unit, death in hospital or within 30 days after admission. Logistic regression was used to compare the influenza vaccination status between severe and non-severe influenza inpatients. Of 433 influenza confirmed patients, 81 (19%) were severe cases. Vaccination reduced the risk of severe illness (odds ratio: 0.57; 95%CI: 0.33-0.98). The cumulative number of influenza vaccine doses received since the 2010-2011 season was associated with a lower risk of severe influenza (odds ratio: 0.78; 95% CI 0.66-0.91). Adherence to seasonal influenza vaccination in the elderly may reduce the risk of severe influenza outcomes.

  8. Influenza vaccination coverage and factors affecting adherence to influenza vaccination among patients with diabetes in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mei-Ching; Chou, Yuan-Lin; Lee, Pei-Lun; Yang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate influenza vaccination coverage and the factors influencing acceptance of influenza vaccination among patients with diabetes in Taiwan using the Health Belief Model (HBM). From January 1 to February 28, 2012, 700 patients with diabetes who visited National Cheng Kung University Hospital were invited to participate in the study. A total of 691 (99%) patients with diabetes were enrolled in the study. The mean age of the subjects was 64.7 years (SD = 10.7). The percentages of patients with diabetes who received seasonal influenza vaccination were 31%, 33%, and 35% in 2009–2010, 2010–2011, and 2011–2012, respectively. Multiple regression analyses revealed that patients with diabetes who were female, were older, had comorbidities, had a more positive perception of the benefits of the influenza vaccine and had lower perceived barriers to influenza vaccination were more likely to receive the influenza vaccine in 2011–2012 (adjusted R2 = 0.47; Chi-square = 276.50; P < 0.001). Patients with diabetes perceived the risk of swine influenza to be similar to that of seasonal influenza. Consequently, in the absence of an increase in the perceived risk of influenza, a low level of actual vaccination against seasonal influenza is forecasted. Strategies to improve the uptake of influenza vaccination include interventions that highlight the risk posed by pandemic influenza while simultaneously offering tactics to ameliorate this risk. PMID:24503629

  9. Prevention of influenza in healthy children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y; Shah, Mirat

    2013-01-01

    Healthy children are high transmitters of influenza and can experience poor influenza outcomes. Many questions remain about the efficacy and impect of preventive measures because most existing studies report imprecise proxies of influenza incidence, do not follow subjects throughout the entire influenza season and across multiple influenza seasons, or do not control for important factors such as timing of implementation and social contact patterns. Modeling and simulation are key methodologies to answer questions regarding influenza prevention. While vaccination may be the most efficacious existing intervention, variations in circulating strains and children’s immune systems keep current vaccines from being fully protective, necessitating further clinical and economic studies and technology improvements. Hand hygiene appears to be an important adjunct but improving compliance, standardizing regimens and quantifying its impact remain challenging. Future studies should help better define the specific indications and circumstances for antiviral use and the role of nutritional supplements and nonpharmaceutical interventions. PMID:23199400

  10. Antiviral treatment of influenza in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choe, Young June; Lee, Hyunju; Lee, Hoan Jong; Choi, Eun Hwa

    2015-06-01

    Antiviral therapy has an important role in the treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza. At present, two classes of antiviral agents, adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors, are available for the treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza in Korea. Because of the widespread resistance against adamantanes, neuraminidase inhibitors are mainly used. Because each country has a unique epidemiology of influenza, the proper use of antiviral agents should be determined based on local data. Decisions on the clinical practice in the treatment of influenza in South Korea are guided by the local surveillance data, practice guidelines, health insurance system and the resistance patterns of the circulating influenza viruses. This review highlights the role of antiviral agents in the treatment and outcome of influenza in Korea by providing comprehensive information of their clinical usage in Korea.

  11. Improved Global Capacity for Influenza Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Outin-Blenman, Sajata; Moen, Ann C.

    2016-01-01

    During 2004–2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) partnered with 39 national governments to strengthen global influenza surveillance. Using World Health Organization data and program evaluation indicators collected by CDC in 2013, we retrospectively evaluated progress made 4–9 years after the start of influenza surveillance capacity strengthening in the countries. Our results showed substantial increases in laboratory and sentinel surveillance capacities, which are essential for knowing which influenza strains circulate globally, detecting emergence of novel influenza, identifying viruses for vaccine selection, and determining the epidemiology of respiratory illness. Twenty-eight of 35 countries responding to a 2013 questionnaire indicated that they have leveraged routine influenza surveillance platforms to detect other pathogens. This additional surveillance illustrates increased health-system strengthening. Furthermore, 34 countries reported an increased ability to use data in decision making; data-driven decisions are critical for improving local prevention and control of influenza around the world. PMID:27192395

  12. Influenza pandemics of the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Kilbourne, Edwin D

    2006-01-01

    Three worldwide (pandemic) outbreaks of influenza occurred in the 20th century: in 1918, 1957, and 1968. The latter 2 were in the era of modern virology and most thoroughly characterized. All 3 have been informally identified by their presumed sites of origin as Spanish, Asian, and Hong Kong influenza, respectively. They are now known to represent 3 different antigenic subtypes of influenza A virus: H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2, respectively. Not classified as true pandemics are 3 notable epidemics: a pseudopandemic in 1947 with low death rates, an epidemic in 1977 that was a pandemic in children, and an abortive epidemic of swine influenza in 1976 that was feared to have pandemic potential. Major influenza epidemics show no predictable periodicity or pattern, and all differ from one another. Evidence suggests that true pandemics with changes in hemagglutinin subtypes arise from genetic reassortment with animal influenza A viruses.

  13. Why health care workers decline influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brenda S

    2009-11-01

    Influenza vaccine is essential to preventing influenza among health care workers and their patients. Therefore, the staff of the employee health clinic worked diligently to provide an opportunity for all employees to receive influenza vaccinations. Despite these efforts, a significant percentage of employees declined the vaccine. During the 2007-2008 influenza season, employees were instructed to either receive the influenza vaccine or decline in writing. The vaccination rate for all staff members and direct caregivers, during the 2007-2008 vaccination season, was 52%, with 35% declining and 13% not participating. In response to the 35% declining, data were analyzed to develop an effective educational tool focused on reasons for declination. This article presents an overview of the study, the reasons employees declined influenza vaccine, and strategies for improving vaccination rates. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Methods for molecular surveillance of influenza

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruixue; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2010-01-01

    Molecular-based techniques for detecting influenza viruses have become an integral component of human and animal surveillance programs in the last two decades. The recent pandemic of the swine-origin influenza A virus (H1N1) and the continuing circulation of highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (H5N1) further stress the need for rapid and accurate identification and subtyping of influenza viruses for surveillance, outbreak management, diagnosis and treatment. There has been remarkable progress on the detection and molecular characterization of influenza virus infections in clinical, mammalian, domestic poultry and wild bird samples in recent years. The application of these techniques, including reverse transcriptase-PCR, real-time PCR, microarrays and other nucleic acid sequencing-based amplifications, have greatly enhanced the capability for surveillance and characterization of influenza viruses. PMID:20455681

  15. The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-12

    CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview Sarah A. Lister...REPORT DATE 12 JUN 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview...18 The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview Congressional Research Service Summary On April 29, 2009, in response to the global spread of a new

  16. The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-06

    CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview Sarah A. Lister...REPORT DATE 06 AUG 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview...Z39-18 The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview Congressional Research Service Summary On June 11, 2009, in response to the global spread of a new

  17. Underused options for preventing and treating influenza.

    PubMed

    Mossad, S B

    1999-01-01

    Both amantadine and rimantadine are effective for preventing and treating influenza A, particularly in high-risk patients. However, they should be used judiciously due to the risk of central nervous system side effects and drug interactions. Zanamivir, a new agent for treating influenza, offers promise but needs further study and approval by the Food and Drug Administration before it can be recommended for routine use. Influenza vaccine, the most effective preventive measure, is widely underused.

  18. Influenza Vaccines: From Surveillance Through Production to Protection

    PubMed Central

    Tosh, Pritish K.; Jacobson, Robert M.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza is an important contributor to population and individual morbidity and mortality. The current influenza pandemic with novel H1N1 has highlighted the need for health care professionals to better understand the processes involved in creating influenza vaccines, both for pandemic as well as for seasonal influenza. This review presents an overview of influenza-related topics to help meet this need and includes a discussion of the burden of disease, virology, epidemiology, viral surveillance, and vaccine strain selection. We then present an overview of influenza vaccine—related topics, including vaccine production, vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, influenza vaccine misperceptions, and populations that are recommended to receive vaccination. English-language articles in PubMed published between January 1, 1970, and October 7, 2009, were searched using key words human influenza, influenza vaccines, influenza A, and influenza B. PMID:20118381

  19. Bunyaviridae RNA Polymerases (L-Protein) Have an N-Terminal, Influenza-Like Endonuclease Domain, Essential for Viral Cap-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Reguera, Juan; Weber, Friedemann; Cusack, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are a large family of segmented RNA viruses which, like influenza virus, use a cap-snatching mechanism for transcription whereby short capped primers derived by endonucleolytic cleavage of host mRNAs are used by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L-protein) to transcribe viral mRNAs. It was recently shown that the cap-snatching endonuclease of influenza virus resides in a discrete N-terminal domain of the PA polymerase subunit. Here we structurally and functionally characterize a similar endonuclease in La Crosse orthobunyavirus (LACV) L-protein. We expressed N-terminal fragments of the LACV L-protein and found that residues 1-180 have metal binding and divalent cation dependent nuclease activity analogous to that of influenza virus endonuclease. The 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the domain confirms that LACV and influenza endonucleases have similar overall folds and identical two metal binding active sites. The in vitro activity of the LACV endonuclease could be abolished by point mutations in the active site or by binding 2,4-dioxo-4-phenylbutanoic acid (DPBA), a known influenza virus endonuclease inhibitor. A crystal structure with bound DPBA shows the inhibitor chelating two active site manganese ions. The essential role of this endonuclease in cap-dependent transcription was demonstrated by the loss of transcriptional activity in a RNP reconstitution system in cells upon making the same point mutations in the context of the full-length LACV L-protein. Using structure based sequence alignments we show that a similar endonuclease almost certainly exists at the N-terminus of L-proteins or PA polymerase subunits of essentially all known negative strand and cap-snatching segmented RNA viruses including arenaviruses (2 segments), bunyaviruses (3 segments), tenuiviruses (4–6 segments), and orthomyxoviruses (6–8 segments). This correspondence, together with the well-known mapping of the conserved polymerase motifs to the central

  20. Bunyaviridae RNA polymerases (L-protein) have an N-terminal, influenza-like endonuclease domain, essential for viral cap-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Juan; Weber, Friedemann; Cusack, Stephen

    2010-09-16

    Bunyaviruses are a large family of segmented RNA viruses which, like influenza virus, use a cap-snatching mechanism for transcription whereby short capped primers derived by endonucleolytic cleavage of host mRNAs are used by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L-protein) to transcribe viral mRNAs. It was recently shown that the cap-snatching endonuclease of influenza virus resides in a discrete N-terminal domain of the PA polymerase subunit. Here we structurally and functionally characterize a similar endonuclease in La Crosse orthobunyavirus (LACV) L-protein. We expressed N-terminal fragments of the LACV L-protein and found that residues 1-180 have metal binding and divalent cation dependent nuclease activity analogous to that of influenza virus endonuclease. The 2.2 A resolution X-ray crystal structure of the domain confirms that LACV and influenza endonucleases have similar overall folds and identical two metal binding active sites. The in vitro activity of the LACV endonuclease could be abolished by point mutations in the active site or by binding 2,4-dioxo-4-phenylbutanoic acid (DPBA), a known influenza virus endonuclease inhibitor. A crystal structure with bound DPBA shows the inhibitor chelating two active site manganese ions. The essential role of this endonuclease in cap-dependent transcription was demonstrated by the loss of transcriptional activity in a RNP reconstitution system in cells upon making the same point mutations in the context of the full-length LACV L-protein. Using structure based sequence alignments we show that a similar endonuclease almost certainly exists at the N-terminus of L-proteins or PA polymerase subunits of essentially all known negative strand and cap-snatching segmented RNA viruses including arenaviruses (2 segments), bunyaviruses (3 segments), tenuiviruses (4-6 segments), and orthomyxoviruses (6-8 segments). This correspondence, together with the well-known mapping of the conserved polymerase motifs to the central regions

  1. Avian influenza and human health.

    PubMed

    Capua, Ilaria; Alexander, Dennis J

    2002-07-01

    Natural infections with influenza A viruses have been reported in a variety of animal species including humans, pigs, horses, sea mammals, mustelids and birds. Occasionally devastating pandemics occur in humans. Although viruses of relatively few HA and NA subtype combinations have been isolated from mammalian species, all 15 HA subtypes and all 9 NA subtypes, in most combinations, have been isolated from birds. In the 20th century the sudden emergence of antigenically different strains transmissible in humans, termed antigenic shift, has occurred on four occasions, 1918 (H1N1), 1957 (H2N2), 1968 (H3N2) and 1977 (H1N1), each time resulting in a pandemic. Genetic analysis of the isolates demonstrated that 'new' strains most certainly emerged after reassortment of genes of viruses of avian and human origin in a permissive host. The leading theory is that the pig represents the 'mixing vessel' where this genetic reassortment may occur. In 1996, an H7N7 influenza virus of avian origin was isolated from a woman with a self-limiting conjunctivitis. During 1997 in Hong Kong, an H5N1 avian influenza virus was recognised as the cause of death of 6 of 18 infected patients. Genetic analysis revealed these human isolates of H5N1 subtype to be indistinguishable from a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus that was endemic in the local poultry population. More recently, in March 1999, two independent isolations of influenza virus subtype H9N2 were made from girls aged one to four who recovered from flu-like illnesses in Hong Kong. Subsequently, five isolations of H9N2 virus from humans on mainland China in August 1998 were reported. H9N2 viruses were known to be widespread in poultry in China and other Asian countries. In all these cases there was no evidence of human to human spread except with the H5N1 infections where there was evidence of very limited spread. This is in keeping with the finding that all these viruses possessed all eight genes of avian origin. It may well

  2. Association of Influenza Vaccination Coverage in Younger Adults With Influenza-Related Illness in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Taksler, Glen B; Rothberg, Michael B; Cutler, David M

    2015-11-15

    Older adults have the highest influenza-related morbidity and mortality risk, but the influenza vaccine is less effective in the elderly. It is unknown whether influenza vaccination of nonelderly adults confers additional disease protection on the elderly population. We examined the association between county-wide influenza vaccination coverage among 520 229 younger adults (aged 18-64 years) in the Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System Survey and illnesses related to influenza in 3 317 709 elderly Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 years, between 2002 and 2010 (13 267 786 person-years). Results were stratified by documented receipt of a seasonal influenza vaccine in each Medicare beneficiary. Increases in county-wide vaccine coverage among younger adults were associated with lower adjusted odds of illnesses related to influenza in the elderly. Compared with elderly residents of counties with ≤15% of younger adults vaccinated, the adjusted odds ratio for a principal diagnosis of influenza among elderly residents was 0.91 (95% confidence interval, .88-.94) for counties with 16%-20% of younger adults vaccinated, 0.87 (.84-.90) for counties with 21%-25% vaccinated, 0.80 (.77-.83) for counties with 26%-30% vaccinated, and 0.79 (.76-.83) for counties with ≥31% vaccinated (P for trend <.001). Stronger associations were observed among vaccinated elderly adults, in peak months of influenza season, in more severe influenza seasons, in influenza seasons with greater antigenic match to influenza vaccine, and for more specific definitions of influenza-related illness. In a large, nationwide sample of Medicare beneficiaries, influenza vaccination among adults aged 18-64 years was inversely associated with illnesses related to influenza in the elderly. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Modeling human influenza infection in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Radigan, Kathryn A; Misharin, Alexander V; Chi, Monica; Budinger, Gr Scott

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is the leading cause of death from an infectious cause. Because of its clinical importance, many investigators use animal models to understand the biologic mechanisms of influenza A virus replication, the immune response to the virus, and the efficacy of novel therapies. This review will focus on the biosafety, biosecurity, and ethical concerns that must be considered in pursuing influenza research, in addition to focusing on the two animal models - mice and ferrets - most frequently used by researchers as models of human influenza infection.

  4. Modeling human influenza infection in the laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Radigan, Kathryn A; Misharin, Alexander V; Chi, Monica; Budinger, GR Scott

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is the leading cause of death from an infectious cause. Because of its clinical importance, many investigators use animal models to understand the biologic mechanisms of influenza A virus replication, the immune response to the virus, and the efficacy of novel therapies. This review will focus on the biosafety, biosecurity, and ethical concerns that must be considered in pursuing influenza research, in addition to focusing on the two animal models – mice and ferrets – most frequently used by researchers as models of human influenza infection. PMID:26357484

  5. Bacterial and viral infections associated with influenza.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Carol; Togawa, Yu; Shindo, Nahoko

    2013-09-01

    Influenza-associated bacterial and viral infections are responsible for high levels of morbidity and death during pandemic and seasonal influenza episodes. A review was undertaken to assess and evaluate the incidence, epidemiology, aetiology, clinical importance and impact of bacterial and viral co-infection and secondary infection associated with influenza. A review was carried out of published articles covering bacterial and viral infections associated with pandemic and seasonal influenza between 1918 and 2009 (and published through December 2011) to include both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary infections. While pneumococcal infection remains the predominant cause of bacterial pneumonia, the review highlights the importance of other co- and secondary bacterial and viral infections associated with influenza, and the emergence of newly identified dual infections associated with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain. Severe influenza-associated pneumonia is often bacterial and will necessitate antibiotic treatment. In addition to the well-known bacterial causes, less common bacteria such as Legionella pneumophila may also be associated with influenza when new influenza strains emerge. This review should provide clinicians with an overview of the range of bacterial and viral co- or secondary infections that could present with influenza illness.

  6. Forecasting peaks of seasonal influenza epidemics.

    PubMed

    Nsoesie, Elaine; Mararthe, Madhav; Brownstein, John

    2013-06-21

    We present a framework for near real-time forecast of influenza epidemics using a simulation optimization approach. The method combines an individual-based model and a simple root finding optimization method for parameter estimation and forecasting. In this study, retrospective forecasts were generated for seasonal influenza epidemics using web-based estimates of influenza activity from Google Flu Trends for 2004-2005, 2007-2008 and 2012-2013 flu seasons. In some cases, the peak could be forecasted 5-6 weeks ahead. This study adds to existing resources for influenza forecasting and the proposed method can be used in conjunction with other approaches in an ensemble framework.

  7. Virulence determinants of pandemic influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tscherne, Donna M.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause recurrent, seasonal epidemics and occasional global pandemics with devastating levels of morbidity and mortality. The ability of influenza A viruses to adapt to various hosts and undergo reassortment events ensures constant generation of new strains with unpredictable degrees of pathogenicity, transmissibility, and pandemic potential. Currently, the combination of factors that drives the emergence of pandemic influenza is unclear, making it impossible to foresee the details of a future outbreak. Identification and characterization of influenza A virus virulence determinants may provide insight into genotypic signatures of pathogenicity as well as a more thorough understanding of the factors that give rise to pandemics. PMID:21206092

  8. Influenza vaccination among the elderly in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Pregliasco, F.; Sodano, L.; Mensi, C.; Selvaggi, M. T.; Adamo, B.; D'Argenio, P.; Giussani, F.; Simonetti, A.; Carosella, M. R.; Simeone, R.; Dentizi, C.; Montanaro, C.; Ponzio, G.

    1999-01-01

    This article surveys the attitudes and perceptions of a random sample of the elderly population in three regions of Italy on the use and efficacy of influenza vaccine. The data were collected by direct interviews using a standard questionnaire. The results show that vaccination coverage against influenza is inadequate (26-48.6%). The major reasons for nonvaccination were lack of faith in the vaccine and disbelief that influenza is a dangerous illness. These data emphasize the need for a systematic education programme targeted at the elderly and the provision of influenza vaccination, with the increased cooperation of general practitioners. PMID:10083710

  9. Economic benefits of inactivated influenza vaccines in the prevention of seasonal influenza in children

    PubMed Central

    Salleras, Luis; Navas, Encarna; Torner, Nuria; Prat, Andreu A.; Garrido, Patricio; Soldevila, Núria; Domínguez, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review published studies that evaluated the efficiency of inactivated influenza vaccination in preventing seasonal influenza in children. The vaccine evaluated was the influenza-inactivated vaccine in 10 studies and the virosomal inactivated vaccine in 3 studies. The results show that yearly vaccination of children with the inactivated influenza vaccine saves money from the societal and family perspectives but not from the public or private provider perspective. When vaccination does not save money, the cost-effectiveness ratios were very acceptable. It can be concluded, that inactivated influenza vaccination of children is a very efficient intervention. PMID:23295894

  10. Involvement of proteasomal subunits zeta and iota in RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Petit, F; Jarrousse, A S; Dahlmann, B; Sobek, A; Hendil, K B; Buri, J; Briand, Y; Schmid, H P

    1997-01-01

    We have identified two distinct subunits of 20 S proteasomes that are associated with RNase activity. Proteasome subunits zeta and iota, eluted from two-dimensional Western blots, hydrolysed tobacco mosaic virus RNA, whereas none of the other subunits degraded this substrate under the same conditions. Additionally, proteasomes were dissociated by 6 M urea, and subunit zeta, containing the highest RNase activity, was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Purified subunit zeta migrated as a single spot on two-dimensional PAGE with a molecular mass of approx. 28 kDa. Addition of anti-(subunit zeta) antibodies led to the co-precipitation of this proteasome subunit and nuclease activity. This is the first evidence that proteasomal alpha-type subunits are associated with an enzymic activity, and our results provide further evidence that proteasomes may be involved in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:9337855

  11. Inhibition of influenza virus replication via small molecules that induce the formation of higher-order nucleoprotein oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Gerritz, Samuel W.; Cianci, Christopher; Kim, Sean; Pearce, Bradley C.; Deminie, Carol; Discotto, Linda; McAuliffe, Brian; Minassian, Beatrice F.; Shi, Shuhao; Zhu, Shirong; Zhai, Weixu; Pendri, Annapurna; Poss, Michael A.; Edavettal, Suzanne; McDonnell, Patricia A.; Lewis, Hal A.; Maskos, Klaus; Mörtl, Mario; Kiefersauer, Reiner; Steinbacher, Stefan; Baldwin, Eric T.; Metzler, William; Bryson, James; Healy, Matthew D.; Philip, Thomas; Zoeckler, Mary; Schartman, Richard; Sinz, Michael; Leyva-Grado, Victor H.; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Langley, David R.; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Krystal, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Influenza nucleoprotein (NP) plays multiple roles in the virus life cycle, including an essential function in viral replication as an integral component of the ribonucleoprotein complex, associating with viral RNA and polymerase within the viral core. The multifunctional nature of NP makes it an attractive target for antiviral intervention, and inhibitors targeting this protein have recently been reported. In a parallel effort, we discovered a structurally similar series of influenza replication inhibitors and show that they interfere with NP-dependent processes via formation of higher-order NP oligomers. Support for this unique mechanism is provided by site-directed mutagenesis studies, biophysical characterization of the oligomeric ligand:NP complex, and an X-ray cocrystal structure of an NP dimer of trimers (or hexamer) comprising three NP_A:NP_B dimeric subunits. Each NP_A:NP_B dimeric subunit contains two ligands that bridge two composite, protein-spanning binding sites in an antiparallel orientation to form a stable quaternary complex. Optimization of the initial screening hit produced an analog that protects mice from influenza-induced weight loss and mortality by reducing viral titers to undetectable levels throughout the course of treatment. PMID:21896751

  12. Recent Advances in Subunit Vaccine Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Abhishek; Sucheck, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    The lower immunogenicity of synthetic subunit antigens, compared to live attenuated vaccines, is being addressed with improved vaccine carriers. Recent reports indicate that the physio-chemical properties of these carriers can be altered to achieve optimal antigen presentation, endosomal escape, particle bio-distribution, and cellular trafficking. The carriers can be modified with various antigens and ligands for dendritic cells targeting. They can also be modified with adjuvants, either covalently or entrapped in the matrix, to improve cellular and humoral immune responses against the antigen. As a result, these multi-functional carrier systems are being explored for use in active immunotherapy against cancer and infectious diseases. Advancing technology, improved analytical methods, and use of computational methodology have also contributed to the development of subunit vaccine carriers. This review details recent breakthroughs in the design of nano-particulate vaccine carriers, including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, and inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27104575

  13. PKA regulatory subunit expression in tooth development.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in many biological processes including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cellular metabolism and gene regulation. Mutation in PKA regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A has previously been identified in odontogenic myxomas, but it is unclear whether PKA is involved in tooth development. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of alpha isoforms of PKA regulatory subunit (Prkar1a and Prkar2a) in mouse and human odontogenesis by in situ hybridization. PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A mRNA transcription was further confirmed in a human deciduous germ by qRT-PCR. Mouse Prkar1a and human PRKAR2A exhibited a dynamic spatio-temporal expression in tooth development, whereas neither human PRKAR1A nor mouse Prkar2a showed their expression in odontogenesis. These isoforms thus showed different expression pattern between human and mouse tooth germs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Influenza activity in China: 1998-1999.

    PubMed

    Yuanji, Guo

    2002-05-15

    During 1989-1999, influenza A H3N2 and H1N1 subtypes and B type viruses were still co-circulating in human population in China, while influenza A (H3N2) virus was predominant strain. The two antigenically and genetically distinguishable strains of influenza B virus were also still co-circulating in men in southern China. The antigenic analysis indicated that most of the H3N2 viruses were A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2)-like strain, the most of the H1N1 viruses were antigenically similar to A/Beijing/262/95 (H1N1) virus. However, most of the influenza B viruses were B/Beijing/184/93-like strain, but few of them were antigenically similar to B/Shandong/7/97 virus. In the summer of 1998, the influenza outbreaks caused by H3N2 subtype of influenza A virus occurred widely in southern China. Afterwards, during 1998-1999 influenza season, a severe influenza epidemic caused by H3N2 virus emerged in northern China. The morbidity was reached as high as 10% in Beijing area. It was interesting that during influenza, surveillance from 1998 to 1999, five strains of avian influenza A (H9N2) virus were isolated from outpatients with influenza-like illness in July-August of 1998, and another one was repeatedly isolated from a child suffering from influenza-like disease in November of 1999 in Guangdong province. The genetic analysis revealed that the five strains isolated in 1998 were genetically closely related to H9N2 viruses being isolated from chickens (G9 lineage virus), whereas, A/Guangzhou/333/99 (H9N2) virus was a reassortant derived from reassortment between G9 and G1 lineage of avian influenza A (H9N2) viruses due to its genes encoding the HA, NA, NP and NS proteins, closely related to G9 lineage virus, the rest of the genes encoding the M and three polymerase (PB2, PB1 and PA) were closely related to G1 lineage strain of H9N2 virus. However, no avian influenza A (H5N1) virus has so far been isolated neither from in or outpatients with influenza-like disease in mainland China

  15. Travellers and influenza: risks and prevention

    PubMed Central

    van Genderen, P.; Ward, B. J.; Wilder-Smith, A.; Steffen, R.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Influenza viruses are among the major causes of serious human respiratory tract infection worldwide. In line with the high disease burden attributable to influenza, these viruses play an important, but often neglected, role in travel medicine. Guidelines and recommendations regarding prevention and management of influenza in travellers are scarce. Of special interest for travel medicine are risk populations and also circumstances that facilitate influenza virus transmission and spread, like travel by airplane or cruise ship and mass gatherings. Methods: We conducted a PUBMED/MEDLINE search for a combination of the MeSH terms Influenza virus, travel, mass gathering, large scale events and cruise ship. In addition we gathered guidelines and recommendations from selected countries and regarding influenza prevention and management in travellers. By reviewing these search results in the light of published knowledge in the fields of influenza prevention and management, we present best practice advice for the prevention and management of influenza in travel medicine. Results: Seasonal influenza is among the most prevalent infectious diseases in travellers. Known host-associated risk factors include extremes of age and being immune-compromised, while the most relevant environmental factors are associated with holiday cruises and mass gatherings. Conclusions: Pre-travel advice should address influenza and its prevention for travellers, whenever appropriate on the basis of the epidemiological situation concerned. Preventative measures should be strongly recommended for travellers at high-risk for developing complications. In addition, seasonal influenza vaccination should be considered for any traveller wishing to reduce the risk of incapacitation, particularly cruise ship crew and passengers, as well as those participating in mass gatherings. Besides advice concerning preventive measures and vaccination, advice on the use of antivirals may be considered for some

  16. Transmission of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-05-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to 'novel' viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages.

  17. Avian influenza: an agricultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Andrea

    2006-11-01

    Recent outbreaks of infection with highly pathogenic H5N1 strains of avian influenza virus in poultry in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Middle East have raised concern over the potential emergence of a pandemic strain that can easily infect humans and cause serious morbidity and mortality. To prevent and control a national outbreak, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) conducts measures based on the ecology of avian influenza viruses. To prevent an outbreak in the United States, the USDA conducts surveillance of bird populations, restrictions on bird importation, educational outreach, and regulation of agricultural practices, in collaboration with local, state, and federal organizations. To manage an outbreak, the USDA has in place a well-established emergency management system for optimizing efforts. The USDA also collaborates with international organizations for disease prevention and control in other countries.

  18. Transmission of Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to ‘novel’ viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages. PMID:25812763

  19. Vitamin D and Influenza12

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D has become increasingly recognized in the literature for its extra-skeletal roles, including an effect on inflammation and the immune response to infection. Our goal was to describe the role of vitamin D in the immune response and implications for the risk of influenza infection in humans. In this review, we first consider literature that provides molecular and genetic support to the idea that vitamin D is related to the adaptive and innate immune responses to influenza infection in vitro and in animal models. We then discuss observational studies and randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation in humans. Finally, we consider some of the knowledge gaps surrounding vitamin D and immune response that must be filled. PMID:22797987

  20. Stockpiling Ventilators for Influenza Pandemics

    PubMed Central

    Araz, Ozgur M.; Morton, David P.; Johnson, Gregory P.; Damien, Paul; Clements, Bruce; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2017-01-01

    In preparing for influenza pandemics, public health agencies stockpile critical medical resources. Determining appropriate quantities and locations for such resources can be challenging, given the considerable uncertainty in the timing and severity of future pandemics. We introduce a method for optimizing stockpiles of mechanical ventilators, which are critical for treating hospitalized influenza patients in respiratory failure. As a case study, we consider the US state of Texas during mild, moderate, and severe pandemics. Optimal allocations prioritize local over central storage, even though the latter can be deployed adaptively, on the basis of real-time needs. This prioritization stems from high geographic correlations and the slightly lower treatment success assumed for centrally stockpiled ventilators. We developed our model and analysis in collaboration with academic researchers and a state public health agency and incorporated it into a Web-based decision-support tool for pandemic preparedness and response. PMID:28518041

  1. Climate change and avian influenza

    PubMed Central

    Slingenbergh, J.; Xiao, X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This paper discusses impacts of climate change on the ecology of avian influenza viruses (AI viruses), which presumably co-evolved with migratory water birds, with virus also persisting outside the host in subarctic water bodies. Climate change would almost certainly alter bird migration, influence the AI virus transmission cycle and directly affect virus survival outside the host. The joint, net effects of these changes are rather unpredictable, but it is likely that AI virus circulation in water bird populations will continue with endless adaptation and evolution. In domestic poultry, too little is known about the direct effect of environmental factors on highly pathogenic avian influenza transmission and persistence to allow inference about the possible effect of climate change. However, possible indirect links through changes in the distribution of duck-crop farming are discussed. PMID:18819672

  2. Pandemic influenza and hospital resources.

    PubMed

    Nap, Raoul E; Andriessen, Maarten P H M; Meessen, Nico E L; van der Werf, Tjip S

    2007-11-01

    Using estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, and published models of the expected evolution of pandemic influenza, we modeled the surge capacity of healthcare facility and intensive care unit (ICU) requirements over time in northern Netherlands (approximately 1.7 million population). We compared the demands of various scenarios with estimates of maximum ICU capacity, factoring in healthcare worker absenteeism as well as reported and realistic estimates derived from semistructured telephone interviews with key management in ICUs in the study area. We show that even during the peak of the pandemic, most patients requiring ICU admission may be served, even those who have non-influenza-related conditions, provided that strong indications and decision-making rules are maintained for admission as well as for continuation (or discontinuation) of life support. Such a model should be integral to a preparedness plan for a pandemic with a new human-transmissible agent.

  3. [Evaluation of public knowledge about influenza based on influenza hotline consultations].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satowa; Sunagawa, Tomimasa; Ohyama, Takaaki; Tanaka-Taya, Keiko; Taniguchi, Kiyosu; Okabe, Nobuhiko

    2004-02-01

    In 1999, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare issued guidelines on prevention and control of influenza. These included recommendations for public education about influenza and promotion of vaccination among persons at high risk for complications from influenza. In response, several public education programs were implemented, including an "influenza hotline" that was established within the Infectious Diseases Surveillance Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases. To assess the informational needs of callers about influenza and evaluate the impact of different communication modalities, we analyzed data from telephone consultations made to the "influenza hotline" and from a survey that was conducted among a subset of callers. During the influenza seasons of 2000-2001 to 2002-2003, there was an average of 2,230 callers to the "influenza hotline" each season, range 1,809-2,696. The majority (42.4%) of callers were women aged 30-39 years, which might reflect young mothers. The most frequently asked questions were about influenza vaccination of infants and young children. which accounted for 20.6% (1,501/7,295) of all vaccine-related questions during the four seasons. Questions about the number of recommended influenza vaccine doses was the second most frequently asked topic and comprised 17.8% (1,300/7,295) of all vaccine-related questions. Over the period 2000-2001 to 2002-2003, questions about the recommended number of influenza vaccine doses decreased among elderly callers, but not for callers aged < 60 years. The number of calls about the location of influenza vaccine clinics, availability of influenza vaccine, and vaccination of elderly person declined from 1999-2000 to 2002-2003. Of callers that were surveyed (N = 3,316) about where they received information about influenza, the most frequently reported sources were newspapers (47.7%), and the internet (26.2%). Internet use by callers showed differences among age groups. Only 2.4% of callers aged

  4. Recombinant M2e outer membrane vesicle vaccines protect against lethal influenza A challenge in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Rappazzo, C Garrett; Watkins, Hannah C; Guarino, Cassandra M; Chau, Annie; Lopez, Jody L; DeLisa, Matthew P; Leifer, Cynthia A; Whittaker, Gary R; Putnam, David

    2016-03-04

    Currently approved influenza vaccines predominantly protect through antibodies directed against the highly variable glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), necessitating annual redesign and formulation based on epidemiological prediction of predominant circulating strains. More conserved influenza protein sequences, such as the ectodomain of the influenza M2 protein, or M2e, show promise as a component of a universal influenza A vaccine, but require a Th1-biased immune response for activity. Recently, recombinant, bacterially derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) demonstrated potential as a platform to promote a Th1-biased immune response to subunit antigens. Here, we engineer three M2e-OMV vaccines and show that all elicit strong IgG titers, with high IgG2a:IgG1 ratios, in BALB/c mice. Additionally, the administration of one M2e-OMV construct containing tandem heterologous M2e peptides (M2e4xHet-OMV) resulted in 100% survival against lethal doses of the mouse-adapted H1N1 influenza strain PR8. Passive transfer of antibodies from M2e4xHet-OMV vaccinated mice to unvaccinated mice also resulted in 100% survival to challenge, indicating that protection is driven largely via antibody-mediated immunity. The potential mechanism through which M2e-OMVs initiated the immune response was explored and it was found that the constructs triggered TLR1/2, TLR4, and TLR5. Our data indicate that OMVs have potential as a platform for influenza A vaccine development due to their unique adjuvant profile and intrinsic pathogen-mimetic nature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rituximab impairs immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG (subclass) responses after influenza vaccination in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Westra, J; van Assen, S; Wilting, K R; Land, J; Horst, G; de Haan, A; Bijl, M

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX) treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients severely hampers humoral response after influenza vaccination as determined by haemagglutination inhibition assay (HI). It is not known whether HI reflects both immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG (subclass) influenza response, and whether IgM antibodies contribute to the low rate of influenza infection seen in RA patients. Twenty RA patients on methotrexate (MTX), 23 on RTX and 28 healthy controls (HC) received trivalent influenza subunit vaccination. Before and 28 days after vaccination, H1N1- and H3N2-specific antibodies were measured by HI and by IgM and IgG (subclass) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels were determined in serum samples before vaccination. Vaccination induced a significant increase of IgM and IgG (IgG1 and IgG3) antibodies against both strains in the HC and MTX groups (all P < 0·01), but not in the RTX group. HI correlated significantly in all cases with IgG (IgG1) but not with IgM. In RTX late patients (RTX treatment 6–10 months before vaccination), IgG (IgG1 and IgG3) response to vaccination was restored, but not IgM response. BAFF levels were significantly increased in RA-RTX patients and correlated with total IgG levels. Haemagglutination inhibition assay, used as gold standard, detects primarily IgG (IgG1) responses. IgM- and IgG influenza-specific antibodies increase after vaccination in HC and RA patients except in patients on RTX treatment. BAFF levels are increased in both early and late RTX-treated patients, but do not correlate with an influenza-specific antibody response. PMID:24889761

  6. Highly conserved M2e and hemagglutinin epitope-based recombinant proteins induce protection against influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; He, Lei; Song, Nianping; Li, Pei; Sun, Shihui; Zhao, Guangyu; Tai, Wanbo; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying; Zhou, Yusen

    2017-09-10

    Highly pathogenic influenza viruses continue to cause serious threat to public health due to their pandemic potential, calling for an urgent need to develop effective, safe, convenient, and universal vaccines against influenza virus infection. In this study, we constructed two recombinant protein vaccines, 2H5M2e-2H7M2e-H5FP-H7FP (hereinafter M2e-FP-1) and 2H5M2e-H5FP-2H7M2e-H7FP (hereinafter M2e-FP-2), by respectively linking highly conserved sequences of two molecules of ectodomain of M2 (M2e) and one molecule of fusion peptide (FP) epitope of hemagglutinin (HA) of H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses in different orders. The Escherichia coli-expressed M2e-FP-1 and M2e-FP-2 proteins induced similarly high-titer M2e-FP-specific antibodies in the immunized mice. Importantly, both proteins were able to prevent lethal challenge of heterologous H1N1 influenza virus, with significantly reduced viral titers and alleviated pathological changes in the lungs, as well as increased body weight and complete survivals, in the challenge mice. Taken together, our study demonstrates that highly conserved M2e and FP epitope of HA of H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses can be used as important targets for development of safe and economical universal influenza vaccines, and that the position of H7N9 M2e and H5N1 HA epitope sequences in the vaccine components has no significant effects on the immunogenicity and efficacy of M2e-FP-based subunit vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Swine origin influenza (swine flu).

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Meghna R; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

    2009-08-01

    Swine origin influenza was first recognized in the border area of Mexico and United States in April 2009 and during a short span of two months became the first pandemic. The currently circulating strain of swine origin influenza virus of the H1N1 strain has undergone triple reassortment and contains genes from the avian, swine and human viruses. It is transmitted by droplets or fomites. Incubation period is 2 to 7 days. Common clinical symptoms are indistinguishable by any viral respiratory illness, and include fever, cough, sore throat and myalgia. A feature seen more frequently with swine origin influenza is GI upset. Less than 10% of patients require hospitalization. Patients at risk of developing severe disease are - younger than five years, elderly, pregnant women, with chronic systemic illnesses, adolescents on aspirin. Of the severe manifestations of swine origin influenza, pneumonia and respiratory failure are the most common. Unusual symptoms reported are conjunctivitis, parotitis, hemophagocytic syndrome. Infants may present with fever and lethargy with no respiratory symptoms. Diagnosis is based on RT PCR, Viral culture or increasing neutralizing antibodies. Principle of treatment consist of isolation, universal precautions, good infection control practices, supportive care and use of antiviral drugs. Antiviral drugs effective against H1N1 virus include: oseltamivir and zamanavir. With good supportive care case fatality is less than 1%. Preventive measures include: social distancing, practicing respiratory etiquette, hand hygiene and use of chemoprohylaxis with antiviral drugs. Vaccine against H1N1 is not available at present, but will be available in near future.

  8. Influenza vaccines for avian species.

    PubMed

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in Southeast Asia in 2003, a multinational epizootic outbreak of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was identified in commercial poultry and wild bird species. This lineage, originally identified in Southern China in 1996 and then Hong Kong in 1997, caused severe morbidity and mortality in many bird species, was responsible for considerable economic losses via trade restrictions, and crossed species barriers (including its recovery from human cases). To date, these H5N1 HPAI viruses have been isolated in European, Middle Eastern, and African countries, and are considered endemic in many areas where regulatory control and different production sectors face substantial hurdles in controlling the spread of this disease. While control of avian influenza (AI) virus infections in wild bird populations may not be feasible at this point, control and eradiation of AI from commercial, semicommercial, zoo, pet, and village/backyard birds will be critical to preventing events that could lead to the emergence of epizootic influenza virus. Efficacious vaccines can help reduce disease, viral shedding, and transmission to susceptible cohorts. However, only when vaccines are used in a comprehensive program including biosecurity, education, culling, diagnostics and surveillance can control and eradication be considered achievable goals. In humans, protection against influenza is provided by vaccines that are chosen based on molecular, epidemiologic, and antigenic data. In poultry and other birds, AI vaccines are produced against a specific hemagglutinin subtype of AI, and use is decided by government and state agricultural authorities based on risk and economic considerations, including the potential for trade restrictions. In the current H5N1 HPAI epizootic, vaccines have been used in a variety of avian species as a part of an overall control program to aid in disease management and control.

  9. Subunit organization in cytoplasmic dynein subcomplexes

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Bonilla, Myriam; Rodgers, Michael E.; Schroer, Trina A.

    2002-01-01

    Because cytoplasmic dynein plays numerous critical roles in eukaryotic cells, determining the subunit composition and the organization and functions of the subunits within dynein are important goals. This has been difficult partly because of accessory polypeptide heterogeneity of dynein populations. The motor domain containing heavy chains of cytoplasmic dynein are associated with multiple intermediate, light intermediate, and light chain accessory polypeptides. We examined the organization of these subunits within cytoplasmic dynein by separating the molecule into two distinct subcomplexes. These subcomplexes were competent to reassemble into a molecule with dynein-like properties. One subcomplex was composed of the dynein heavy and light intermediate chains whereas the other subcomplex was composed of the intermediate and light chains. The intermediate and light chain subcomplex could be further separated into two pools, only one of which contained dynein light chains. The two pools had distinct intermediate chain compositions, suggesting that intermediate chain isoforms have different light chain–binding properties. When the two intermediate chain pools were characterized by analytical velocity sedimentation, at least four molecular components were seen: intermediate chain monomers, intermediate chain dimers, intermediate chain monomers with bound light chains, and a mixture of intermediate chain dimers with assorted bound light chains. These data provide new insights into the compositional heterogeneity and assembly of the cytoplasmic dynein complex and suggest that individual dynein molecules have distinct molecular compositions in vivo. PMID:11967380

  10. How Experience Shapes Health Beliefs: The Case of Influenza Vaccination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahrabani, Shosh; Benzion, Uri

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact of past experience with influenza and the influenza vaccine on four categories of the Health Belief Model: beliefs about susceptibility to contracting influenza, severity of illness, perceived benefits of the vaccine in preventing influenza, and perceived barriers to getting vaccinated. The study population comprised…

  11. How Experience Shapes Health Beliefs: The Case of Influenza Vaccination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahrabani, Shosh; Benzion, Uri

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact of past experience with influenza and the influenza vaccine on four categories of the Health Belief Model: beliefs about susceptibility to contracting influenza, severity of illness, perceived benefits of the vaccine in preventing influenza, and perceived barriers to getting vaccinated. The study population comprised…

  12. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Host Pyruvate Kinase M Which Interacts with Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yukari; Ishii, Kosuke; Honda, Ayae

    2017-01-01

    Influenza virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a heterotrimer of three viral proteins, PB1, PB2, and PA and is involved in both transcription and replication of the negative strand of the viral RNA (vRNA) genome. RdRp is multifunctional, possessing RNA polymerase, cap binding, and endonuclease activities. The enzyme synthesizes three different RNAs, complementary RNA (cRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) from vRNA, and vRNA from cRNA. To synthesize these three RNAs, RdRp requires conversion of its function by host factor. Here, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening to identify the relevant host factor, revealing that pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) interacted with the PA subunit of influenza virus RdRp. PKM2 is one of two enzymes (PKM1 and PKM2) produced by alternative splicing of the pyruvate kinase M (PKM) pre-mRNA. We determined the interacting regions in both PKM2 and PA, the expression level of PKM by western blotting at different time points after viral infection, and the effects of transfection of siRNA targeting PKM on influenza virus replication. The results demonstrated that the C-terminal region of PKM2 interacted with the C-terminus of the PA subunit, that the expression level of PKM2 increased with influenza virus infection time, and that this enzyme is essential for influenza virus multiplication. Moreover, isoelectric focusing of uninfected and influenza virus infected cell extracts, followed by gradient gel electrophoresis to separate the PKM1 and PKM2 isoforms and western blotting indicated that PKM2 became more acidic after influenza infection. The decreased pH of PKM2 may have been due to phosphorylation, and phosphorylated PKM2 is active as a pyruvate kinase and protein kinase; therefore, it is possible that PKM2 may transfer a phosphate group to PA and consequently transform the function of RdRp from transcriptase to replicase.

  13. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Host Pyruvate Kinase M Which Interacts with Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Yukari; Ishii, Kosuke; Honda, Ayae

    2017-01-01

    Influenza virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a heterotrimer of three viral proteins, PB1, PB2, and PA and is involved in both transcription and replication of the negative strand of the viral RNA (vRNA) genome. RdRp is multifunctional, possessing RNA polymerase, cap binding, and endonuclease activities. The enzyme synthesizes three different RNAs, complementary RNA (cRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) from vRNA, and vRNA from cRNA. To synthesize these three RNAs, RdRp requires conversion of its function by host factor. Here, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening to identify the relevant host factor, revealing that pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) interacted with the PA subunit of influenza virus RdRp. PKM2 is one of two enzymes (PKM1 and PKM2) produced by alternative splicing of the pyruvate kinase M (PKM) pre-mRNA. We determined the interacting regions in both PKM2 and PA, the expression level of PKM by western blotting at different time points after viral infection, and the effects of transfection of siRNA targeting PKM on influenza virus replication. The results demonstrated that the C-terminal region of PKM2 interacted with the C-terminus of the PA subunit, that the expression level of PKM2 increased with influenza virus infection time, and that this enzyme is essential for influenza virus multiplication. Moreover, isoelectric focusing of uninfected and influenza virus infected cell extracts, followed by gradient gel electrophoresis to separate the PKM1 and PKM2 isoforms and western blotting indicated that PKM2 became more acidic after influenza infection. The decreased pH of PKM2 may have been due to phosphorylation, and phosphorylated PKM2 is active as a pyruvate kinase and protein kinase; therefore, it is possible that PKM2 may transfer a phosphate group to PA and consequently transform the function of RdRp from transcriptase to replicase. PMID:28232820

  14. Equine influenza - surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Cullinane, Ann; Elton, Debra; Mumford, Jenny

    2010-11-01

    Equine influenza virus (EIV) is considered the most important respiratory virus of horses because it is highly contagious and has the potential to disrupt major equestrian events. Equine influenza (EI) can be controlled by vaccination but it has been demonstrated repeatedly in the field that antigenic drift impacts on vaccine efficacy. EI surveillance maintains awareness of emergence and international spread of antigenic variants. It not only serves as an early warning system for horse owners, trainers and veterinary clinicians but is fundamental to influenza control programmes based on vaccination. Data on outbreaks of EI and strain characterisation is reviewed annually by an Expert Surveillance Panel (ESP) including representatives from OIE and WHO. This panel makes recommendations on the need to update vaccines based on analysis of evidence of disease in well vaccinated horses, antigenic changes, genetic changes and when possible, experimental challenge data. However, the disparity in the level of surveillance and virus collection in different countries results in potentially biased information about the relative prevalence of different viruses. There is a need for increased surveillance on a global level and a greater awareness of the benefits of updating the vaccines. The vaccine companies have traditionally been slow to respond to the ESP recommendations. Veterinary clinicians have a major role to play in purchasing vaccines with epidemiologically relevant strains and promoting their benefits to their clients. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Pandemic influenza guidance for corporations.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this guidance document is to assist members of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM), and the organizations for which they work, in managing the impact of a pandemic of influenza or other contagious respiratory disease on patients, employees, and business. This guidance document outlines actions to take before and during an influenza pandemic on the basis of two main strategies: (1) reducing the spread of the virus within facilities; and (2) providing medical care and medical surveillance to client/patient populations. Facilities in which ACOEM members serve include government agencies and the military, universities, and corporations, which generally have multiple locations/sites and their own medical staff, with members responsible for medical care and disease control. This guidance is for organizations with outpatient occupational medicine services, to be used as appropriate. Medical centers should also use guidance that addresses additional employee and external patient care needs.1–3 The ACOEM fully supports implementation of occupational influenza programs that conform with guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with other guidance from the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations and guidance.

  16. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes for producing the A and B subunits of cholera toxin and preparations containing so-obtained subunit or subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Harford, N.; De Wilde, M.

    1987-05-19

    A recombinant DNA molecule is described comprising at least a portion coding for subunits A and B of cholera toxin, or a fragment or derivative of the portion wherein the fragment or derivative codes for a polypeptide have an activity which can induce an immune response to subunit A; can induce an immune response to subunit A and cause epithelial cell penetration and the enzymatic effect leading to net loss of fluid into the gut lumen; can bind to the membrane receptor for the B subunit of cholera toxin; can induce an immune response to subunit B; can induce an immune response to subunit B and bind to the membrane receptor; or has a combination of the activities.

  17. Genetic strategy to prevent influenza virus infections in animals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianzhu; Chen, Steve C-Y; Stern, Patrick; Scott, Benjamin B; Lois, Carlos

    2008-02-15

    The natural reservoirs of influenza viruses are aquatic birds. After adaptation, avian viruses can acquire the ability to infect humans and cause severe disease. Because domestic poultry serves as a key link between the natural reservoir of influenza viruses and epidemics and pandemics in human populations, an effective measure to control influenza would be to eliminate or reduce influenza virus infection in domestic poultry. The development and distribution of influenza-resistant poultry represents a proactive strategy for controlling the origin of influenza epidemics and pandemics in both poultry and human populations. Recent developments in RNA interference and transgenesis in birds should facilitate the development of influenza-resistant poultry.

  18. Benefits to mother and child of influenza vaccination during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Omer, Saad B; Bednarczyk, Robert; Madhi, Shabir A; Klugman, Keith P

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus infection contributes to substantial morbidity and mortality globally. Included in the list of groups at higher risk of either influenza infection or severe complications following influenza infection are pregnant women and their newborns. Influenza vaccination offers a safe and effective means to prevent or lessen the severity of influenza infections. Recent research has helped elucidate the impact of influenza infection and vaccination on pregnant women and their newborn children and young infants. This review summarizes recent findings in this area and identifies additional gaps in the evidence base that need to be addressed to appropriately inform vaccination policies worldwide, to protect pregnant women and their children from influenza and related complications.

  19. Identification of Rare PB2-D701N Mutation from a Patient with Severe Influenza: Contribution of the PB2-D701N Mutation to the Pathogenicity of Human Influenza.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Amelia; Pozo, Francisco; Vidal-García, Matxalen; Omeñaca, Manuel; Casas, Inmaculada; Falcón, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Several amino acid changes have been previously implicated in adaptation of avian influenza viruses to human hosts, among them the D701N change in the PB2 polymerase subunit that also is the main determinant of avian virus pathogenesis in animal models. However, previous studies using recombinant viruses did not provide conclusive information of the contribution of this PB2 residue to pathogenicity in human influenza virus strains. We identified this mutation in an A(H1N1)pdm09-like human influenza virus isolated from an infected patient with pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, admitted to the intensive care unit. An exhaustive search has revealed PB2-D701 as a highly conserved position in all available H1N1 human virus sequences in NCBI database, showing a very low prevalence of PB2-D701N change. Presence of PB2-701N amino acid correlates with severe or fatal outcome in those scarce cases with known disease outcome of the infection. In these patients, the residue PB2-701N may contribute to pathogenicity as it was previously reported in humans infected with avian viruses. This study helps to clarify a debate that has arisen regarding the role of PB2-D701N in human influenza virus pathogenicity.

  20. Identification of Rare PB2-D701N Mutation from a Patient with Severe Influenza: Contribution of the PB2-D701N Mutation to the Pathogenicity of Human Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Amelia; Pozo, Francisco; Vidal-García, Matxalen; Omeñaca, Manuel; Casas, Inmaculada; Falcón, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Several amino acid changes have been previously implicated in adaptation of avian influenza viruses to human hosts, among them the D701N change in the PB2 polymerase subunit that also is the main determinant of avian virus pathogenesis in animal models. However, previous studies using recombinant viruses did not provide conclusive information of the contribution of this PB2 residue to pathogenicity in human influenza virus strains. We identified this mutation in an A(H1N1)pdm09-like human influenza virus isolated from an infected patient with pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, admitted to the intensive care unit. An exhaustive search has revealed PB2-D701 as a highly conserved position in all available H1N1 human virus sequences in NCBI database, showing a very low prevalence of PB2-D701N change. Presence of PB2-701N amino acid correlates with severe or fatal outcome in those scarce cases with known disease outcome of the infection. In these patients, the residue PB2-701N may contribute to pathogenicity as it was previously reported in humans infected with avian viruses. This study helps to clarify a debate that has arisen regarding the role of PB2-D701N in human influenza virus pathogenicity. PMID:28421062

  1. Pandemic Influenza Pediatric Office Plan Template

    SciTech Connect

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    This is a planning tool developed by pediatric stakeholders that is intended to assist pediatric medical offices that have no pandemic influenza plan in place, but may experience an increase in patient calls/visits or workload due to pandemic influenza.

  2. Summary of Control Issues for Swine Influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multiple subtypes of endemic swine influenza virus (SIV) co-circulate in the U.S. and Canada (H3N2, H1N1, and H1N2 with a triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) constellation derived from swine, avian and human influenza viruses). As a result of reassortment events and antigenic drift, four H1 SIV...

  3. Influenza-Specific Antibody-Dependent Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Vanderven, Hillary; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Johnston, Angus; Rockman, Steven; Laurie, Karen; Barr, Ian; Reading, Patrick; Lichtfuss, Marit; Kent, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunity to human influenza A virus (IAV) infection is only partially understood. Broadly non-neutralizing antibodies may assist in reducing disease but have not been well characterized. Methods We measured internalization of opsonized, influenza protein-coated fluorescent beads and live IAV into a monocytic cell line to study antibody-dependent phagocytosis (ADP) against multiple influenza hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes. We analyzed influenza HA-specific ADP in healthy human donors, in preparations of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and following IAV infection of humans and macaques. Results We found that both sera from healthy adults and IVIG preparations had broad ADP to multiple seasonal HA proteins and weak cross-reactive ADP to non-circulating HA proteins. The ADP in experimentally influenza-infected macaque plasma and naturally influenza-infected human sera mediated phagocytosis of both homologous and heterologous IAVs. Further, the IAV phagocytosed in an antibody-mediated manner had reduced infectivity in vitro. Conclusion We conclude that IAV infections in humans and macaques leads to the development of influenza-specific ADP that can clear IAV infection in vitro. Repeated exposure of humans to multiple IAV infections likely leads to the development of ADP that is cross-reactive to strains not previously encountered. Further analyses of the protective capacity of broadly reactive influenza-specific ADP is warranted. PMID:27124730

  4. A brief introduction to avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) causes a disease of high economic importance for poultry production worldwide. The earliest recorded cases of probable high pathogenicity AIV in poultry were reported in Italy in the 1870’s and avian influenza been recognized in domestic poultry through the modern era of ...

  5. Reassortment patterns in Swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Khiabanian, Hossein; Trifonov, Vladimir; Rabadan, Raul

    2009-10-07

    Three human influenza pandemics occurred in the twentieth century, in 1918, 1957, and 1968. Influenza pandemic strains are the results of emerging viruses from non-human reservoirs to which humans have little or no immunity. At least two of these pandemic strains, in 1957 and in 1968, were the results of reassortments between human and avian viruses. Also, many cases of swine influenza viruses have reportedly infected humans, in particular, the recent H1N1 influenza virus of swine origin, isolated in Mexico and the United States. Pigs are documented to allow productive replication of human, avian, and swine influenza viruses. Thus it has been conjectured that pigs are the "mixing vessel" that create the avian-human reassortant strains, causing the human pandemics. Hence, studying the process and patterns of viral reassortment, especially in pigs, is a key to better understanding of human influenza pandemics. In the last few years, databases containing sequences of influenza A viruses, including swine viruses, collected since 1918 from diverse geographical locations, have been developed and made publicly available. In this paper, we study an ensemble of swine influenza viruses to analyze the reassortment phenomena through several statistical techniques. The reassortment patterns in swine viruses prove to be similar to the previous results found in human viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, that the surface glycoprotein coding segments reassort most often. Moreover, we find that one of the polymerase segments (PB1), reassorted in the strains responsible for the last two human pandemics, also reassorts frequently.

  6. Triggering Interventions for Influenza: The ALERT Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Nicholas G.; Cummings, Derek A. T.; Lauer, Stephen A.; Zorn, Martha; Robinson, Christine; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Price, Connie S.; Simberkoff, Michael; Radonovich, Lewis J.; Perl, Trish M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Early, accurate predictions of the onset of influenza season enable targeted implementation of control efforts. Our objective was to develop a tool to assist public health practitioners, researchers, and clinicians in defining the community-level onset of seasonal influenza epidemics. Methods. Using recent surveillance data on virologically confirmed infections of influenza, we developed the Above Local Elevated Respiratory Illness Threshold (ALERT) algorithm, a method to identify the period of highest seasonal influenza activity. We used data from 2 large hospitals that serve Baltimore, Maryland and Denver, Colorado, and the surrounding geographic areas. The data used by ALERT are routinely collected surveillance data: weekly case counts of laboratory-confirmed influenza A virus. The main outcome is the percentage of prospective seasonal influenza cases identified by the ALERT algorithm. Results. When ALERT thresholds designed to capture 90% of all cases were applied prospectively to the 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 influenza seasons in both hospitals, 71%–91% of all reported cases fell within the ALERT period. Conclusions. The ALERT algorithm provides a simple, robust, and accurate metric for determining the onset of elevated influenza activity at the community level. This new algorithm provides valuable information that can impact infection prevention recommendations, public health practice, and healthcare delivery. PMID:25414260

  7. Anti-influenza virus effects of cocoa.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Masanori; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toshio; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Inokuchi, Koichi; Mato, Takashi; Takahashi, Kazuo

    2016-03-15

    Cocoa contains biologically active ingredients that have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, which includes an inhibitory effect on influenza virus infection. A cocoa extract (CE) was prepared by treating defatted cocoa powder with boiling water. The extract demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of infection in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells infected with human influenza virus A (H1N1, H3N2), human influenza virus B and avian influenza viruses (H5N1, H5N9). CE inhibited viral adsorption to MDCK cells. Animal experiments showed that CE significantly improved survival in mice after intra-nasal administration of a lethal dose of influenza virus. In human intervention trials, participants were allocated to two groups, one in which the participants ingested cocoa for 3 weeks before and after vaccination against A(H1N1)pdm2009 influenza virus and another in which the participants did not ingest cocoa. Neutralizing antibody titers against A(H1N1)pdm2009 influenza virus increased significantly in both groups; however, the extent of the increase was not significantly different between the two groups. Although natural killer cell activity was also elevated in both groups, the increase was more substantial in the cocoa intake group. Drinking cocoa activates natural immunity and enhances vaccination-induced immune response, providing stronger protection against influenza virus infection and disease onset. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Antigenic relationship between influenza B viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Chakraverty, Pratima

    1971-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether antigenic groupings exist among influenza B viruses. Altogether, 22 influenza type B strains isolated during the years 1940-68 were examined by reciprocal haemagglutination-inhibition, strain-specific complement-fixation, and serum neutralization tests with sera produced in ferrets and guinea-pigs. It was found that the strain-specific complement-fixation test was superior for separating influenza B viruses into groups whereas the haemagglutination-inhibition and serum neutralization tests were better for demonstrating similarities. The results obtained with these three immunological techniques confirmed that antigenic variation exists among influenza B viruses, although it is not as clearcut as among influenza A viruses. The results were subjected to numerical taxonomic analysis. Dendrograms and minimum-spanning trees were constructed, using methods based on cluster analysis of similarity coefficients. Four main groups of influenza B viruses were established, although they were all interlinked. The results of this study do not justify the separation of influenza B viruses into subtypes similar to those of influenza A viruses. PMID:5317011

  9. [Is avian influenza a risk for humans?].

    PubMed

    Allwinn, R; Doerr, H W

    2005-04-15

    Avian influenza is an infectious disease of birds, caused by type A strains of the influenza virus. The disease, which was first identified in Italy more than 100 years ago, occurs worldwide. Avian influenza viruses are mainly distributed by migratory birds. Different mammals like swine, horse and finally humans are susceptible for avian influenza viruses. The high possibility of genomic changes like gene shift and drift is caused by the segmented RNA genome. During the avian flu outbreak in East Asia at the end of 2003 the virus also killed several humans in Vietnam and Thailand. That avian influenza could also infect humans has been known since 1997. The H5N1 flu outbreak seemed successfully controlled, but currently new cases in poultry and humans in Vietnam, Thailand, China and Indonesia are recognized. Also another avian influenza A strain type H9N2 was prevalent in chickens of local markets in Hong Kong. Because of the natural virus reservoir like wild and/ or domesticated ducks and others, actually there is little chance of eradicating avian influenza. Furthermore the virus could mutate and jump to humans with the threat of a global influenza pandemic.

  10. Societal and economic consequences of influenza.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Pedro A

    2008-10-01

    High rates of vaccination coverage for preschool and school-aged children can reduce morbidity and mortality related to influenza outbreak. More focused and effective influenza prevention strategies are necessary to improve quality of life and to limit the burden of flu complications.

  11. The global nature of avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus is a global virus which knows no geographic boundaries, has no political agenda, and can infect poultry irrespective of their agricultural or anthropocentric production systems. Avian influenza viruses or evidence of their infection have been detected in poultry and wild birds...

  12. Nicotinamide ribosyl uptake mutants in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiss, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease.

  13. Detection sensitivity of influenza rapid diagnostic tests

    PubMed Central

    Sakai-Tagawa, Yuko; Ozawa, Makoto; Yamada, Shinya; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko; Takahashi, Kazuo; Sugaya, Norio; Tashiro, Masato; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity of influenza rapid diagnostic tests (IRDTs) currently available in Japan for various influenza virus strains, including human H7N9 and H5N1 isolates. We found that all of the IRDTs examined detected these viruses, but their detection sensitivities differed. PMID:25079880

  14. Absolute Humidity and Pandemic Versus Epidemic Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Goldstein, Edward; Lipsitch, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiologic evidence indicates that variations of absolute humidity account for the onset and seasonal cycle of epidemic influenza in temperate regions. A role for absolute humidity in the transmission of pandemic influenza, such as 2009 A/H1N1, has yet to be demonstrated and, indeed, outbreaks of pandemic influenza during more humid spring, summer, and autumn months might appear to constitute evidence against an effect of humidity. However, here the authors show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions, as well as wintertime transmission of epidemic influenza. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility, and changes in population-mixing and contact rates. PMID:21081646

  15. Subacute thyroiditis following seasonal influenza vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Altay, Fatma Aybala; Güz, Galip; Altay, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    abstract A peritoneal dialysis patient who experienced a repeating attack after a vaccination for influenza while she was being followed and treated succesfully for subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is presented. This case shows SAT as a rare condition following vaccination.. Thus, SAT should be considered as a possible outcome following influenza vaccination and flu-like syndrome. PMID:26809709

  16. Nosocomial influenza: new concepts and practice.

    PubMed

    Maltezou, Helen C

    2008-08-01

    Nosocomial influenza constitutes a serious risk among patients with underlying diseases and those of extreme age, and is associated with excess health-care costs. This article will review recent literature on this area. Despite longstanding recommendations and the fact that influenza vaccination of health-care workers improves patient and employee safety, vaccine coverage among health-care workers remains low worldwide. The Centers for Disease Prevention and Control recommends the use of signed declination forms for those health-care workers who refuse vaccination. Rapid antigen detection tests may accurately diagnose influenza at the point of care, and their use has been associated with reduced antibiotic use, diagnostic tests, and costs. Multiplex molecular methods may simultaneously detect several respiratory viruses and might prove advantageous for surveillance within hospitals. The beginning of the 2007-2008 influenza season was marked by the detection of a significant proportion of influenza A/H1N1 viruses resistant to oseltamivir in Europe. Given the prohibiting rates of resistance to adamantanes worldwide, our means for containing outbreaks within health-care facilities may narrow. Provision of influenza vaccine at no cost and at the work site, education to promote vaccination, and switch to a mandatory influenza vaccination policy should be implemented in order to achieve high and sustained vaccine coverage among health-care workers. Surveillance to monitor antiviral resistance in influenza viruses should be enhanced. Development of new antivirals is needed.

  17. Coping with the influenza vaccine shortage.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2004-12-01

    Faced with a shortage of the inactivated intramuscular influenza vaccine this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has revised its guidelines for immunization and use of antiviral agents. The most rational solution at this time is to direct the supply of scarce vaccine to patients at highest risk of influenza-related complications.

  18. DNA-based influenza vaccines as immunoprophylactic agents toward universality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is an illness of global public health concern. Influenza viruses have been responsible for several pandemics affecting humans. Current influenza vaccines have proved satisfactory safety; however, they have limitations and do not provide protection against unexpected emerging influenza virus strains. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative approaches to conventional influenza vaccines. The development of universal influenza vaccines will help alleviate the severity of influenza pandemics. Influenza DNA vaccines have been the subject of many studies over the past decades due to their ability to induce broad-based protective immune responses in various animal models. The present review highlights the recent advances in influenza DNA vaccine research and its potential as an affordable universal influenza vaccine.

  19. Adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines and perpetual viral metamorphosis: the importance of cross-protection.

    PubMed

    Ansaldi, Filippo; Canepa, Paola; Parodi, Valentina; Bacilieri, Sabrina; Orsi, Andrea; Compagnino, Federica; Icardi, Giancarlo; Durando, Paolo

    2009-05-26

    Vaccination is considered the most effective means of reducing influenza burden, providing substantial benefits in terms of reduction of morbidity, complications, hospitalizations and deaths, even if vaccines have been associated with a reduced immune response and lower effectiveness in older adults, in particular when a mismatch between the vaccine and the circulating virus strains occurred. Several strategies have been proposed to enhance vaccine protection against drifted strains, including the use of adjuvants. Among oil-emulsion adjuvants, MF-59 was approved for human use more than a decade ago and it is largely used for adjuvantation of influenza vaccine. Recent studies have demonstrated that addition of the MF-59 to subunit influenza vaccine can lead to higher haemagglutination-inhibiting seroprotection rates and to higher neutralization antibody titers against drifted strains not included in the vaccine respect to non-adjuvanted vaccine. Promising results were obtained using a new generation of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvants, named AS, offering cross-protection against heterologous challenge in ferrets.

  20. Intranasal Flu Vaccine Protective against Seasonal and H5N1 Avian Influenza Infections

    PubMed Central

    Alsharifi, Mohammed; Lobigs, Mario; Koskinen, Aulikki; Regner, Matthias; Trinidad, Lee; Boyle, David B.; Müllbacher, Arno

    2009-01-01

    Background Influenza A (flu) virus causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, and current vaccines require annual updating to protect against the rapidly arising antigenic variations due to antigenic shift and drift. In fact, current subunit or split flu vaccines rely exclusively on antibody responses for protection and do not induce cytotoxic T (Tc) cell responses, which are broadly cross-reactive between virus strains. We have previously reported that γ-ray inactivated flu virus can induce cross-reactive Tc cell responses. Methodology/Principal Finding Here, we report that intranasal administration of purified γ-ray inactivated human influenza A virus preparations (γ-Flu) effectively induces heterotypic and cross-protective immunity. A single intranasal administration of γ-A/PR8[H1N1] protects mice against lethal H5N1 and other heterotypic infections. Conclusions/Significance Intranasal γ-Flu represents a unique approach for a cross-protective vaccine against both seasonal as well as possible future pandemic influenza A virus infections. PMID:19401775

  1. Structure-based design of novel naproxen derivatives targeting monomeric nucleoprotein of Influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Tarus, Bogdan; Bertrand, Hélène; Zedda, Gloria; Di Primo, Carmelo; Quideau, Stéphane; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2015-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) binds the viral RNA genome as oligomers assembled with the polymerase in a ribonucleoprotein complex required for transcription and replication of influenza A virus. Novel antiviral candidates targeting the nucleoprotein either induced higher order oligomers or reduced NP oligomerization by targeting the oligomerization loop and blocking its insertion into adjacent nucleoprotein subunit. In this study, we used a different structure-based approach to stabilize monomers of the nucleoprotein by drugs binding in its RNA-binding groove. We recently identified naproxen as a drug competing with RNA binding to NP with antiinflammatory and antiviral effects against influenza A virus. Here, we designed novel derivatives of naproxen by fragment extension for improved binding to NP. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that among these derivatives, naproxen A and C0 were most promising. Their chemical synthesis is described. Both derivatives markedly stabilized NP monomer against thermal denaturation. Naproxen C0 bound tighter to NP than naproxen at a binding site predicted by MD simulations and shown by competition experiments using wt NP or single-point mutants as determined by surface plasmon resonance. MD simulations suggested that impeded oligomerization and stabilization of monomeric NP is likely to be achieved by drugs binding in the RNA grove and inducing close to their binding site conformational changes of key residues hosting the oligomerization loop as observed for the naproxen derivatives. Naproxen C0 is a potential antiviral candidate blocking influenza nucleoprotein function. PMID:25333630

  2. Structure-based design of novel naproxen derivatives targeting monomeric nucleoprotein of Influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Tarus, Bogdan; Bertrand, Hélène; Zedda, Gloria; Di Primo, Carmelo; Quideau, Stéphane; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2015-09-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) binds the viral RNA genome as oligomers assembled with the polymerase in a ribonucleoprotein complex required for transcription and replication of influenza A virus. Novel antiviral candidates targeting the nucleoprotein either induced higher order oligomers or reduced NP oligomerization by targeting the oligomerization loop and blocking its insertion into adjacent nucleoprotein subunit. In this study, we used a different structure-based approach to stabilize monomers of the nucleoprotein by drugs binding in its RNA-binding groove. We recently identified naproxen as a drug competing with RNA binding to NP with antiinflammatory and antiviral effects against influenza A virus. Here, we designed novel derivatives of naproxen by fragment extension for improved binding to NP. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that among these derivatives, naproxen A and C0 were most promising. Their chemical synthesis is described. Both derivatives markedly stabilized NP monomer against thermal denaturation. Naproxen C0 bound tighter to NP than naproxen at a binding site predicted by MD simulations and shown by competition experiments using wt NP or single-point mutants as determined by surface plasmon resonance. MD simulations suggested that impeded oligomerization and stabilization of monomeric NP is likely to be achieved by drugs binding in the RNA grove and inducing close to their binding site conformational changes of key residues hosting the oligomerization loop as observed for the naproxen derivatives. Naproxen C0 is a potential antiviral candidate blocking influenza nucleoprotein function.

  3. Managing influenza: amantadine, rimantadine and beyond.

    PubMed

    Fleming, D M

    2001-04-01

    Amantadine and rimantadine are effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza A. Neither drug, however, has achieved widespread acceptance because of the rapid development of viral resistance, their lack of activity against influenza B and, in the case of amantadine, adverse events. Complete cross-resistance occurs with these compounds and is associated with a single nucleotide change in the M2 protein. Resistant variants are transmissible and fully pathogenic. Zanamivir is the first widely approved neuraminidase inhibitor for the treatment of influenza. It is delivered directly to the primary site of viral replication, the respiratory tract, and is well tolerated and effective in the treatment of both influenza A and B. Data in prophylaxis are also encouraging. During the extensive clinical programme no evidence for the emergence of drug-resistant strains with acute therapy was found. Zanamivir represents a significant advance over older agents in the management of influenza A and B.

  4. [An overview on swine influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuai; Zhu, Wen-Fei; Shu, Yue-Long

    2013-05-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIVs) are respiratory pathogens of pigs. They cause both economic bur den in livestock-dependent industries and serious global public health concerns in humans. Because of their dual susceptibility to human and avian influenza viruses, pigs are recognized as intermediate hosts for genetic reassortment and interspecies transmission. Subtypes H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 circulate in swine populations around the world, with varied origin and genetic characteristics among different continents and regions. In this review, the role of pigs in evolution of influenza A viruses, the genetic evolution of SIVs and interspecies transmission of SIVs are described. Considering the possibility that pigs might produce novel influenza viruses causing more outbreaks and pandemics, routine epidemiological surveillance of influenza viruses in pig populations is highly recommended.

  5. Influenza virus and cell signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Pratibha; Munjal, Ashok; Lal, Sunil K.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Influenza viruses comprise a major class of human respiratory pathogens, responsible for causing morbidity and mortality worldwide. Influenza A virus, due to its segmented RNA genome, is highly subject to mutation, resulting in rapid formation of variants. During influenza infection, viral proteins interact with host proteins and exploit a variety of cellular pathways for their own benefit. Influenza virus inhibits the synthesis of these cellular proteins and facilitates expression of its own proteins for viral transcription and replication. Infected cell pathways are hijacked by an array of intracellular signaling cascades such as NF-κB signaling, PI3K/Akt pathway, MAPK pathway, PKC/PKR signaling and TLR/RIG-I signaling cascades. This review presents a research update on the subject and discusses the impact of influenza viral infection on these cell signaling pathways. PMID:21629204

  6. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  7. Pandemic influenza and the hospitalist: apocalypse when?

    PubMed

    Pile, James C; Gordon, Steven M

    2006-03-01

    Beginning with a cluster of human cases in Hong Kong in 1997, avian influenza (H5N1) has spread progressively through, and beyond, Asia in poultry and other birds; and has resulted in sporadic cases of human disease associated with high mortality. The potential for H5N1 influenza to cause a pandemic of human disease continues to be the subject of intense scrutiny by both the media and the scientific community. While the likelihood of such a prospect is uncertain, the inevitability of future pandemics of influenza is clear. Planning for the eventuality of a virulent influenza pandemic at the local, national and global level is critical to limiting the mortality and morbidity of such an occurrence. Hospitalists have a key role to play in institutional efforts to prepare for a influenza pandemic, and should be aware of lessons that my be applied from both the response to Hurricane Katrina, as well as the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic.

  8. Viral vector-based influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rory D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses and the occasional introduction of influenza viruses of novel subtypes into the human population complicate the timely production of effective vaccines that antigenically match the virus strains that cause epidemic or pandemic outbreaks. The development of game-changing vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity against a wide variety of influenza viruses is an unmet need, in which recombinant viral vectors may provide. Use of viral vectors allows the delivery of any influenza virus antigen, or derivative thereof, to the immune system, resulting in the optimal induction of virus-specific B- and T-cell responses against this antigen of choice. This systematic review discusses results obtained with vectored influenza virus vaccines and advantages and disadvantages of the currently available viral vectors. PMID:27455345

  9. Differential accumulation of ribonucleotide reductase subunits in clam oocytes: the large subunit is stored as a polypeptide, the small subunit as untranslated mRNA

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Within minutes of fertilization of clam oocytes, translation of a set of maternal mRNAs is activated. One of the most abundant of these stored mRNAs encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (Standart, N. M., S. J. Bray, E. L. George, T. Hunt, and J. V. Ruderman, 1985, J. Cell Biol., 100:1968-1976). Unfertilized oocytes do not contain any ribonucleotide reductase activity; such activity begins to appear shortly after fertilization. In virtually all organisms, this enzyme is composed of two dissimilar subunits with molecular masses of approximately 44 and 88 kD, both of which are required for activity. This paper reports the identification of the large subunit of clam ribonucleotide reductase isolated by dATP-Sepharose chromatography as a relatively abundant 86-kD polypeptide which is already present in oocytes, and whose level remains constant during early development. The enzyme activity of this large subunit was established in reconstitution assays using the small subunit isolated from embryos by virtue of its binding to the anti-tubulin antibody YL 1/2. Thus the two components of clam ribonucleotide reductase are differentially stored in the oocyte: the small subunit in the form of untranslated mRNA and the large subunit as protein. When fertilization triggers the activation of translation of the maternal mRNA, the newly synthesized small subunit combines with the preformed large subunit to generate active ribonucleotide reductase. PMID:3536960

  10. Evaluation of the immunogenic property of NT H. influenzae protein D with Neisseria meningitidis OMV in BALB/c.

    PubMed

    Behrouzi, Ava; Bouzari, Saeid; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Oloomi, Mana; Davari, Mehdi; Mazaheri, Hoora

    2016-12-30

    Identifying ideal non typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) vaccine candidates has not been easy due to extensive sequence and antigenic variation among gene products interacting with the immune system. Protein D (PD) is a highly conserved 42 kDa surface lipoprotein available in all H. influenzae, including NTHi. In this study, the gene encoding PD was cloned from H. influenzae and expressed in Escheriachia coli TOPO10 cell in pBAD vector. Arabinose was used to express recombinant protein. In order to purify the protein, Ni-NTA agarose was used to perform affinity chromatography. Purified PD and PD mixed with outer membrane vesicle (OMV) and alum adjuvant were used for subcutaneous immunization in BALB/c mice. After vaccination, IgG responses to PD-OMV, PD-alum, and PD alone were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The recombinant PD containing His6 residues showed a molecular weight of 42 kDa. Anti-PD IgG was detected after first immunization in all groups of mice compared to the negative control group, and it increased after first vaccination, but results showed that the addition of OMV to PD led to a remarkable increase in IgG responses. Our results suggest an important role for OMV as an adjuvant and show how it could potentially be used when conjugated to H. influenzae PD or other safe subunit vaccine candidates.

  11. The Influenza Virus Polymerase Complex: An Update on Its Structure, Functions, and Significance for Antiviral Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve

    2016-11-01

    Influenza viruses cause seasonal epidemics and pandemic outbreaks associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and a huge cost. Since resistance to the existing anti-influenza drugs is rising, innovative inhibitors with a different mode of action are urgently needed. The influenza polymerase complex is widely recognized as a key drug target, given its critical role in virus replication and high degree of conservation among influenza A (of human or zoonotic origin) and B viruses. We here review the major progress that has been made in recent years in unravelling the structure and functions of this protein complex, enabling structure-aided drug design toward the core regions of the PA endonuclease, PB1 polymerase, or cap-binding PB2 subunit. Alternatively, inhibitors may target a protein-protein interaction site, a cellular factor involved in viral RNA synthesis, the viral RNA itself, or the nucleoprotein component of the viral ribonucleoprotein. The latest advances made for these diverse pharmacological targets have yielded agents in advanced (i.e., favipiravir and VX-787) or early clinical testing, besides several experimental inhibitors in various stages of development, which are all covered here.

  12. Non-responders to egg grown influenza vaccine seroconvert after booster immunization with MDCK cell grown vaccine.

    PubMed

    Oxford, John S; Al-Jabri, Ali A; Lambkin, Robert; Palache, A M; Fleming, D M

    2003-06-20

    We have investigated whether 'at risk' subjects who did not respond serologically during a pre-study vaccination with a commercial egg grown influenza sub-unit vaccine would respond to a subsequent vaccination with either a single dose of MDCK cell grown influenza vaccine or a standard egg grown influenza vaccine containing the same virus strains. We studied 48 non-responder subjects with a mean age 67.5, range: 34-82 years. In this non-responder group the increased immune response that was detected after boosting with an MDCK cell derived vaccine response was variable and relatively modest, except for the A/Texas strain in the vaccine. The proportion of subjects, with an HI titre of >/=40 (protective antibody titre) increased from 50 to 83% (A/Texas strain), from 13 to 25% (B/Harbin strain) and from 38 to 46% (A/Wuhan strain). In comparison a booster vaccination with egg-derived influenza vaccine resulted in an increase immune response with an HI antibody titre >/=40 for two of the three strains, namely from 17 to 58% for the B/Harbin strain and from 8 to 33% for the A/Wuhan strain.

  13. The Influenza Virus Polymerase Complex: An Update on Its Structure, Functions, and Significance for Antiviral Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Stevaert, Annelies

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Influenza viruses cause seasonal epidemics and pandemic outbreaks associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and a huge cost. Since resistance to the existing anti‐influenza drugs is rising, innovative inhibitors with a different mode of action are urgently needed. The influenza polymerase complex is widely recognized as a key drug target, given its critical role in virus replication and high degree of conservation among influenza A (of human or zoonotic origin) and B viruses. We here review the major progress that has been made in recent years in unravelling the structure and functions of this protein complex, enabling structure‐aided drug design toward the core regions of the PA endonuclease, PB1 polymerase, or cap‐binding PB2 subunit. Alternatively, inhibitors may target a protein–protein interaction site, a cellular factor involved in viral RNA synthesis, the viral RNA itself, or the nucleoprotein component of the viral ribonucleoprotein. The latest advances made for these diverse pharmacological targets have yielded agents in advanced (i.e., favipiravir and VX‐787) or early clinical testing, besides several experimental inhibitors in various stages of development, which are all covered here. PMID:27569399

  14. Human CD4+ T-cell repertoire of responses to influenza A virus hemagglutinin after recent natural infection.

    PubMed Central

    Gelder, C M; Welsh, K I; Faith, A; Lamb, J R; Askonas, B A

    1995-01-01

    The human CD4+ T-cell repertoire of responses to hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus A/Beijing/32/92 was examined 3 to 6 months after natural infection by using a panel of 16-mer peptides overlapping by 11 residues. Short-term CD4+ T-cell lines were derived by using full-length HAs of virus A/Beijing/32/92 from 12 unrelated, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II haplotyped adults with a history of influenza in November and December 1993 and from 6 adults with no history of influenza during the preceding 4 years but who responded to HA. In contrast to recent murine studies, the human CD4+ T-cell repertoire of responses was dominated by the recognition of highly conserved epitopes. The HA2 subunit, widely regarded as nonimmunogenic, induced strong responses in every donor. This resulted in functional cross-reactivity among influenza A viruses. Our study included one pair of unrelated donors expressing identical HLA DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and two pairs of donors sharing low-resolution MHC class II types. These pairs responded to identical peptides; furthermore, clearly identifiable patterns of response were seen in donors sharing single class II haplotypes, irrespective of the presence of other alleles and exposure history. Two conserved regions which induced responses in 17 of 18 donors were identified (residues 295 to 328 and 407 to 442). Possible implications for cross-reactive T-cell vaccines are discussed. PMID:7494256

  15. North American Plan for Avian and Pandemic Influenza

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    Canada, Mexico and the United States face a growing threat posed by the spread of avian influenza and the potential emergence of a human influenza...pandemic. The highly pathogenic (HPAI) H5N1 avian influenza virus, which re-emerged in Asia in late 2003, has already spread to Europe, the Middle East...to work together to combat an outbreak of avian influenza or an influenza pandemic in North America. The Plan complements national emergency

  16. Avian influenza: a pandemic waiting in the wings?

    PubMed

    Hampson, Alan W

    2006-01-01

    Recent widespread outbreaks of avian influenza and, associated with these a growing number of human infections with a high mortality rate, have raised concerns that this might be the prelude to a severe pandemic of human influenza. As a background to these concerns the present article reviews influenza as a human disease, its origins and the involvement of other species, properties of the influenza viruses and the current status of influenza prevention and control.

  17. Proposed Surveillance for Influenza A in Feral Pigs.

    PubMed

    Dalziel, Antonia E; Peck, Heidi A; Hurt, Aeron C; Cooke, Julie; Cassey, Phillip

    2016-06-01

    Pigs carry receptors for both avian- and human-adapted influenza viruses and have previously been proposed as a mixing and amplification vessel for influenza. Until now, there has been no investigation of influenza A viruses within feral pigs in Australia. We collected samples from feral pigs in Ramsar listed wetlands of South Australia and demonstrated positive antibodies to influenza A viruses. We propose feral pigs, and their control programs, as an available resource for future surveillance for influenza A viruses.

  18. Effectiveness and safety of inactivated influenza vaccination in pediatric liver transplant recipients over three influenza seasons.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Kensei; Ito, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Eitaro; Kaneko, Kenitiro; Kiuchi, Tetsuya; Ando, Hisami; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2011-02-01

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for pediatric liver transplant recipients, who are at high risk of influenza-related complications. However, effectiveness and safety of vaccination may differ among influenza seasons in this population and have not been fully evaluated. Subjects comprised 38 pediatric liver transplant recipients with or without influenza vaccination through the 2006-2007, 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 influenza seasons. Recipients received inactivated trivalent (AH1/AH3/B) influenza vaccine, and comparisons were made to non-vaccinated recipients with regard to effectiveness and safety. No significant differences were seen between recipient groups for acute allograft rejection, acute febrile illness, or influenza virus infection. No serious systemic adverse events were observed in vaccinated recipients. Seroprotection rate (defined as the proportion of recipients with HI antibody titer ≥ 1:40), seroconversion rate (proportion of recipients with a ≥ 4-fold increase in HI titers), and geometric mean titers were mostly elevated after vaccination for the three influenza antigens in each season. These three indicators of immunogenicity showed similar results in both vaccinated recipients and vaccinated healthy children in the 2007-2008 season. These findings suggest that pediatric liver transplant patients may respond safely to inactivated seasonal influenza vaccines in a similar manner to healthy children, and effectiveness varies among influenza seasons.

  19. Influenza epidemiology in patients admitted to sentinel Australian hospitals in 2015: the Influenza Complications Alert Network.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Holmes, Mark; Dwyer, Dominic E; Irving, Louis B; Korman, Tony M; Senenayake, Sanjaya; Macartney, Kristine K; Blyth, Christopher C; Brown, Simon; Waterer, Grant; Hewer, Robert; Friedman, N Deborah; Wark, Peter A; Simpson, Graham; Upham, John; Bowler, Simon D; Lessing, Albert; Kotsimbos, Tom; Kelly, Paul M

    2016-12-24

    The Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN) is a sentinel hospital-based surveillance program that operates at sites in all states and territories in Australia. This report summarises the epidemiology of hospitalisations with laboratory-confirmed influenza during the 2015 influenza season. In this observational study, cases were defined as patients admitted to one of the sentinel hospitals with an acute respiratory illness with influenza confirmed by nucleic acid detection. During the period 1 April to 30 October 2015 (the 2015 influenza season), 2,070 patients were admitted with confirmed influenza to one of 17 FluCAN sentinel hospitals. Of these, 46% were elderly (≥ 65 years), 15% were children (< 16 years), 5% were Indigenous Australians, 2.1% were pregnant and 75% had chronic co-morbidities. A high proportion were due to influenza B (51%). There were a large number of hospital admissions detected with confirmed influenza in this national observational surveillance system in 2015 with case numbers similar to that reported in 2014. The national immunisation program is estimated to avert 46% of admissions from confirmed influenza across all at-risk groups, but more complete vaccination coverage in target groups could further reduce influenza admissions by as much as 14%.

  20. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Pregnant Women - United States, 2016-17 Influenza Season.

    PubMed

    Ding, Helen; Black, Carla L; Ball, Sarah; Fink, Rebecca V; Williams, Walter W; Fiebelkorn, Amy Parker; Lu, Peng-Jun; Kahn, Katherine E; D'Angelo, Denise V; Devlin, Rebecca; Greby, Stacie M

    2017-09-29

    Pregnant women and their infants are at increased risk for severe influenza-associated illness (1), and since 2004, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recommended influenza vaccination for all women who are or might be pregnant during the influenza season, regardless of the trimester of the pregnancy (2). To assess influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women during the 2016-17 influenza season, CDC analyzed data from an Internet panel survey conducted during March 28-April 7, 2017. Among 1,893 survey respondents pregnant at any time during October 2016-January 2017, 53.6% reported having received influenza vaccination before (16.2%) or during (37.4%) pregnancy, similar to coverage during the preceding four influenza seasons. Also similar to the preceding influenza season, 67.3% of women reported receiving a provider offer for influenza vaccination, 11.9% reported receiving a recommendation but no offer, and 20.7% reported receiving no recommendation; among these women, reported influenza vaccination coverage was 70.5%, 43.7%, and 14.8%, respectively. Among women who received a provider offer for vaccination, vaccination coverage differed by race/ethnicity, education, insurance type, and other sociodemographic factors. Use of evidence-based practices such as provider reminders and standing orders could reduce missed opportunities for vaccination and increase vaccination coverage among pregnant women.

  1. Modelling the effect of seasonal influenza vaccination on the risk of pandemic influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine resulted in an apparent higher risk of infection with pandemic influenza H1N1 2009. A simple mathematical model incorporating strain competition and a hypothesised temporary strain-transcending immunity is constructed to investigate this observation. The model assumes that seasonal vaccine has no effect on the risk of infection with pandemic influenza. Results Results of the model over a range of reproduction numbers and effective vaccination coverage confirm this apparent increased risk in the Northern, but not the Southern, hemisphere. This is due to unvaccinated individuals being more likely to be infected with seasonal influenza (if it is circulating) and developing hypothesised temporary immunity to the pandemic strain. Because vaccinated individuals are less likely to have been infected with seasonal influenza, they are less likely to have developed the hypothesised temporary immunity and are therefore more likely to be infected with pandemic influenza. If the reproduction number for pandemic influenza is increased, as it is for children, an increase in the apparent risk of seasonal vaccination is observed. The maximum apparent risk effect is found when seasonal vaccination coverage is in the range 20-40%. Conclusions Only when pandemic influenza is recently preceded by seasonal influenza circulation is there a modelled increased risk of pandemic influenza infection associated with prior receipt of seasonal vaccine. PMID:21356130

  2. Safe Recombinant Outer Membrane Vesicles that Display M2e Elicit Heterologous Influenza Protection.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Hannah C; Rappazzo, C Garrett; Higgins, Jaclyn S; Sun, Xiangjie; Brock, Nicole; Chau, Annie; Misra, Aditya; Cannizzo, Joseph P B; King, Michael R; Maines, Taronna R; Leifer, Cynthia A; Whittaker, Gary R; DeLisa, Matthew P; Putnam, David

    2017-04-05

    Recombinant, Escherichia coli-derived outer membrane vesicles (rOMVs), which display heterologous protein subunits, have potential as a vaccine adjuvant platform. One drawback to rOMVs is their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) content, limiting their translatability to the clinic due to potential adverse effects. Here, we explore a unique rOMV construct with structurally remodeled lipids containing only the lipid IVa portion of LPS, which does not stimulate human TLR4. The rOMVs are derived from a genetically engineered B strain of E. coli, ClearColi, which produces lipid IVa, and which was further engineered in our laboratory to hypervesiculate and make rOMVs. We report that rOMVs derived from this lipid IVa strain have substantially attenuated pyrogenicity yet retain high levels of immunogenicity, promote dendritic cell maturation, and generate a balanced Th1/Th2 humoral response. Additionally, an influenza A virus matrix 2 protein-based antigen displayed on these rOMVs resulted in 100% survival against a lethal challenge with two influenza A virus strains (H1N1 and H3N2) in mice with different genetic backgrounds (BALB/c, C57BL/6, and DBA/2J). Additionally, a two-log reduction of lung viral titer was achieved in a ferret model of influenza infection with human pandemic H1N1. The rOMVs reported herein represent a potentially safe and simple subunit vaccine delivery platform. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Prefoldin Subunits Are Protected from Ubiquitin-Proteasome System-mediated Degradation by Forming Complex with Other Constituent Subunits*

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Makoto; Tashiro, Erika; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Suto, Hiroo; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The molecular chaperone prefoldin (PFD) is a complex comprised of six different subunits, PFD1-PFD6, and delivers newly synthesized unfolded proteins to cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT to facilitate the folding of proteins. PFD subunits also have functions different from the function of the PFD complex. We previously identified MM-1α/PFD5 as a novel c-Myc-binding protein and found that MM-1α suppresses transformation activity of c-Myc. However, it remains unclear how cells regulate protein levels of individual subunits and what mechanisms alter the ratio of their activities between subunits and their complex. In this study, we found that knockdown of one subunit decreased protein levels of other subunits and that transfection of five subunits other than MM-1α into cells increased the level of endogenous MM-1α. We also found that treatment of cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of transfected/overexpressed MM-1α but not that of endogenous MM-1α, indicating that overexpressed MM-1α, but not endogenous MM-1α, was degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Experiments using other PFD subunits showed that the UPS degraded a monomer of PFD subunits, though extents of degradation varied among subunits. Furthermore, the level of one subunit was increased after co-transfection with the respective subunit, indicating that there are specific combinations between subunits to be stabilized. These results suggest mutual regulation of protein levels among PFD subunits and show how individual subunits form the PFD complex without degradation. PMID:21478150

  4. Prefoldin subunits are protected from ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation by forming complex with other constituent subunits.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Makoto; Tashiro, Erika; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Suto, Hiroo; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-06-03

    The molecular chaperone prefoldin (PFD) is a complex comprised of six different subunits, PFD1-PFD6, and delivers newly synthesized unfolded proteins to cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT to facilitate the folding of proteins. PFD subunits also have functions different from the function of the PFD complex. We previously identified MM-1α/PFD5 as a novel c-Myc-binding protein and found that MM-1α suppresses transformation activity of c-Myc. However, it remains unclear how cells regulate protein levels of individual subunits and what mechanisms alter the ratio of their activities between subunits and their complex. In this study, we found that knockdown of one subunit decreased protein levels of other subunits and that transfection of five subunits other than MM-1α into cells increased the level of endogenous MM-1α. We also found that treatment of cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of transfected/overexpressed MM-1α but not that of endogenous MM-1α, indicating that overexpressed MM-1α, but not endogenous MM-1α, was degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Experiments using other PFD subunits showed that the UPS degraded a monomer of PFD subunits, though extents of degradation varied among subunits. Furthermore, the level of one subunit was increased after co-transfection with the respective subunit, indicating that there are specific combinations between subunits to be stabilized. These results suggest mutual regulation of protein levels among PFD subunits and show how individual subunits form the PFD complex without degradation.

  5. Influenza vaccination coverage among medical residents

    PubMed Central

    Costantino, Claudio; Mazzucco, Walter; Azzolini, Elena; Baldini, Cesare; Bergomi, Margherita; Biafiore, Alessio Daniele; Bianco, Manuela; Borsari, Lucia; Cacciari, Paolo; Cadeddu, Chiara; Camia, Paola; Carluccio, Eugenia; Conti, Andrea; De Waure, Chiara; Di Gregori, Valentina; Fabiani, Leila; Fallico, Roberto; Filisetti, Barbara; Flacco, Maria E; Franco, Elisabetta; Furnari, Roberto; Galis, Veronica; Gallea, Maria R; Gallone, Maria F; Gallone, Serena; Gelatti, Umberto; Gilardi, Francesco; Giuliani, Anna R; Grillo, Orazio C; Lanati, Niccolò; Mascaretti, Silvia; Mattei, Antonella; Micò, Rocco; Morciano, Laura; Nante, Nicola; Napoli, Giuseppe; Nobile, Carmelo; Palladino, Raffaele; Parisi, Salvatore; Passaro, Maria; Pelissero, Gabriele; Quarto, Michele; Ricciardi, Walter; Romano, Gabriele; Rustico, Ennio; Saponari, Anita; Schioppa, Francesco S; Signorelli, Carlo; Siliquini, Roberta; Trabacchi, Valeria; Triassi, Maria; Varetta, Alessia; Ziglio, Andrea; Zoccali, Angela; Vitale, Francesco; Amodio, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Although influenza vaccination is recognized to be safe and effective, recent studies have confirmed that immunization coverage among health care workers remain generally low, especially among medical residents (MRs). Aim of the present multicenter study was to investigate attitudes and determinants associated with acceptance of influenza vaccination among Italian MRs. A survey was performed in 2012 on MRs attending post-graduate schools of 18 Italian Universities. Each participant was interviewed via an anonymous, self-administered, web-based questionnaire including questions on attitudes regarding influenza vaccination. A total of 2506 MRs were recruited in the survey and 299 (11.9%) of these stated they had accepted influenza vaccination in 2011–2012 season. Vaccinated MRs were older (P = 0.006), working in clinical settings (P = 0.048), and vaccinated in the 2 previous seasons (P < 0.001 in both seasons). Moreover, MRs who had recommended influenza vaccination to their patients were significantly more compliant with influenza vaccination uptake in 2011–2012 season (P < 0.001). “To avoid spreading influenza among patients” was recognized as the main reason for accepting vaccination by less than 15% of vaccinated MRs. Italian MRs seem to have a very low compliance with influenza vaccination and they seem to accept influenza vaccination as a habit that is unrelated to professional and ethical responsibility. Otherwise, residents who refuse vaccination in the previous seasons usually maintain their behaviors. Promoting correct attitudes and good practice in order to improve the influenza immunization rates of MRs could represent a decisive goal for increasing immunization coverage among health care workers of the future. PMID:24603089

  6. Influenza-associated cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Justin R; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Victor, John C; Wald, Anna; Aitken, Moira L; Goss, Christopher H

    2010-04-01

    Although cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common inherited respiratory disease, the burden of influenza among individuals with CF is not well characterized. We used the CF Foundation Patient Registry to determine the relationship between pulmonary exacerbation incidence rate and influenza virus season from July 2003 through June 2007. The outcome of interest, pulmonary exacerbation, was defined as treatment of a respiratory illness with IV antibiotics. Each influenza season was defined as all months during which >/= 15% of laboratory tests for influenza virus were positive in the US influenza virologic surveillance system. We calculated incidence rates of pulmonary exacerbation during the influenza and summertime seasons as well as relative rates with 95% CIs. A multivariate regression model adjusted for demographic and clinical predictors. In 2003, the patient cohort size was 21,506 patients, and 7,727 patients experienced at least one pulmonary exacerbation. The overall pulmonary exacerbation incidence rate in the influenza season was 595.0 per 10,000 person-months compared with a summertime baseline of 549.6 per 10,000 person-months. The incidence rate ratio was 1.08 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.10). Multivariate analysis did not change our estimate of risk (adjusted odds ratio: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.10). An estimated annual excess of 147.6 per 10,000 person-months or an excess 2.1% of total exacerbations occur during the influenza season. Our data demonstrate a substantial contribution of the influenza season to CF morbidity. Further studies to determine any causal link between influenza infection and CF pulmonary exacerbations are necessary.

  7. Architecture of ribonucleoprotein complexes in influenza A virus particles.

    PubMed

    Noda, Takeshi; Sagara, Hiroshi; Yen, Albert; Takada, Ayato; Kida, Hiroshi; Cheng, R Holland; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-26

    In viruses, as in eukaryotes, elaborate mechanisms have evolved to protect the genome and to ensure its timely replication and reliable transmission to progeny. Influenza A viruses are enveloped, spherical or filamentous structures, ranging from 80 to 120 nm in diameter. Inside each envelope is a viral genome consisting of eight single-stranded negative-sense RNA segments of 890 to 2,341 nucleotides each. These segments are associated with nucleoprotein and three polymerase subunits, designated PA, PB1 and PB2; the resultant ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) resemble a twisted rod (10-15 nm in width and 30-120 nm in length) that is folded back and coiled on itself. Late in viral infection, newly synthesized RNPs are transported from the nucleus to the plasma membrane, where they are incorporated into progeny virions capable of infecting other cells. Here we show, by transmission electron microscopy of serially sectioned virions, that the RNPs of influenza A virus are organized in a distinct pattern (seven segments of different lengths surrounding a central segment). The individual RNPs are suspended from the interior of the viral envelope at the distal end of the budding virion and are oriented perpendicular to the budding tip. This finding argues against random incorporation of RNPs into virions, supporting instead a model in which each segment contains specific incorporation signals that enable the RNPs to be recruited and packaged as a complete set. A selective mechanism of RNP incorporation into virions and the unique organization of the eight RNP segments may be crucial to maintaining the integrity of the viral genome during repeated cycles of replication.

  8. [Vaccination against influenza A (H1N1) in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Cherdantsev, A P; Kostinov, M P; Kuselman, A I; Voznesenskaia, N V

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of alterations of immune response regulation and possible risk of antenatal development of fetus in postvaccination period in pregnant women immunized against influenza A (H1N1). Women were vaccinated with MonoGrippol plus vaccine in the II trimester of physiological pregnancy. At certain intervals ofthe vaccination period (before the vaccination, 7 and 30 days after the vaccination) major biochemical markers in blood sera (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine, urea) and levels of key cytokines in spontaneous and stimulated test (IL-1alpha, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IFNgamma, TNFalpha) were evaluated. Vaccination safety for the fetus and trophoblast development was evaluated by using human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and trophoblasitc beta-1-glycoprotein (TBG) levels. During vaccination in 13% of cases mild local reactions were noted, in 26.1%--general systemic reactions in the form of weakness, dizziness and headaches. Levels of major biochemical markers at days 7 and 30 after the vaccination did not have any significant difference from the initial values (p > 0.05). Cytokine levels in spontaneous and stimulated tests also did not change significantly. Markers of the course of pregnancy and fetus development (HCG, AFP and TBG) in the two groups observed had comparable values. Vaccination of pregnant women against influenza A (H1N1) by Russian subunit formulation (MonoGrippol plus) showed reactogenicity comparable to control group by the level of influence on general metabolic and immunologic homeostasis and on the course of pregnancy, which is an evidence of its safety.

  9. Inherent conformational flexibility of F1-ATPase α-subunit.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Herrera, Otto; Salcedo, Guillermo; Barril, Xavier; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The core of F1-ATPase consists of three catalytic (β) and three noncatalytic (α) subunits, forming a hexameric ring in alternating positions. A wealth of experimental and theoretical data has provided a detailed picture of the complex role played by catalytic subunits. Although major conformational changes have only been seen in β-subunits, it is clear that α-subunits have to respond to these changes in order to be able to transmit information during the rotary mechanism. However, the conformational behavior of α-subunits has not been explored in detail. Here, we have combined unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calorimetrically measured thermodynamic signatures to investigate the conformational flexibility of isolated α-subunits, as a step toward deepening our understanding of its function inside the α3β3 ring. The simulations indicate that the open-to-closed conformational transition of the α-subunit is essentially barrierless, which is ideal to accompany and transmit the movement of the catalytic subunits. Calorimetric measurements of the recombinant α-subunit from Geobacillus kaustophilus indicate that the isolated subunit undergoes no significant conformational changes upon nucleotide binding. Simulations confirm that the nucleotide-free and nucleotide-bound subunits show average conformations similar to that observed in the F1 crystal structure, but they reveal an increased conformational flexibility of the isolated α-subunit upon MgATP binding, which might explain the evolutionary conserved capacity of α-subunits to recognize nucleotides with considerable strength. Furthermore, we elucidate the different dependencies that α- and β-subunits show on Mg(II) for recognizing ATP.

  10. Influenza virus in human exhaled breath: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Patricia; McDevitt, James J; DeHaan, Wesley H; Fung, Rita O P; Cowling, Benjamin J; Chan, Kwok Hung; Leung, Gabriel M; Milton, Donald K

    2008-07-16

    Recent studies suggest that humans exhale fine particles during tidal breathing but little is known of their composition, particularly during infection. We conducted a study of influenza infected patients to characterize influenza virus and particle concentrations in their exhaled breath. Patients presenting with influenza-like-illness, confirmed influenza A or B virus by rapid test, and onset within 3 days were recruited at three clinics in Hong Kong, China. We collected exhaled breath from each subject onto Teflon filters and measured exhaled particle concentrations using an optical particle counter. Filters were analyzed for influenza A and B viruses by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Twelve out of thirteen rapid test positive patients provided exhaled breath filter samples (7 subjects infected with influenza B virus and 5 subjects infected with influenza A virus). We detected influenza virus RNA in the exhaled breath of 4 (33%) subjects--three (60%) of the five patients infected with influenza A virus and one (14%) of the seven infected with influenza B virus. Exhaled influenza virus RNA generation rates ranged from <3.2 to 20 influenza virus RNA particles per minute. Over 87% of particles exhaled were under 1 microm in diameter. These findings regarding influenza virus RNA suggest that influenza virus may be contained in fine particles generated during tidal breathing, and add to the body of literature suggesting that fine particle aerosols may play a role in influenza transmission.

  11. Performance of the Quidel Sofia Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Test During the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 Influenza Seasons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-23

    Performance of the Quidel Sofia rapid influenza diagnostic test during the 2012–2013 and 2013–2014 influenza seasons Peter E. Kammerer, Jennifer M... Influenza A+B Fluorescent Immunoassay was used to test nasal swab specimens from patients with influenza -like illness at US–Mexico border-area clinics in...the 2012–2013 and 2013–2014 influenza seasons. Compared with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, the overall sensitivities and

  12. [Present data on influenza virus isolated from ducks and chickens, and influenza virus C. Anti-influenza drugs].

    PubMed

    Fernández del Campo, José Antonio Cabezas

    2004-01-01

    Present data on influenza virus isolated from ducks and chickens, and influenza virus C. Anti-influenza drugs. Within the broad field of Glycopathology and Glycotherapeutics, research on influenza virus types A, B and C from humans and several bird species (particularly migratory birds such as ducks, since they are reservoirs for viruses), as well as the search for improved drugs designed for the prevention or treatment of epidemics/pandemics produced by most of those viruses are issues of relevant interest not only from a scientific point of view but also for repercussions on health and the important economical consequences. The research work begun by the author and collaborators at the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Salamanca (Spain) in the middle of the 1970's, developed later in close cooperation with the "(Unité d'Ecologie Virale" of the Pasteur Institute of Paris (Prof. Claude Hannoun and collaborators), has been published in about twenty papers that mainly focus on the theoretic-experimental study of: The sialidase (neuraminidase) activity of human influenza viruses types A and B. The acetylesterase activity of type C virus from humans and dogs. The sialidase activity of type A virus from ducks and pigs, in comparison with that of humans. Certain sialidase inhibitors as useful anti-influenza drugs, especially in the case of possible future influenza pandemics of avian origin.

  13. Enhanced growth of influenza vaccine seed viruses in vero cells mediated by broadening the optimal pH range for virus membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shin; Horimoto, Taisuke; Ito, Mutsumi; Takano, Ryo; Katsura, Hiroaki; Shimojima, Masayuki; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2012-02-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective preventive measures to combat influenza. Prospectively, cell culture-based influenza vaccines play an important role for robust vaccine production in both normal settings and urgent situations, such as during the 2009 pandemic. African green monkey Vero cells are recommended by the World Health Organization as a safe substrate for influenza vaccine production for human use. However, the growth of influenza vaccine seed viruses is occasionally suboptimal in Vero cells, which places limitations on their usefulness for enhanced vaccine production. Here, we present a strategy for the development of vaccine seed viruses with enhanced growth in Vero cells by changing an amino acid residue in the stem region of the HA2 subunit of the hemagglutinin (HA) molecule. This mutation optimized the pH for HA-mediated membrane fusion in Vero cells and enhanced virus growth 100 to 1,000 times in the cell line, providing a promising strategy for cell culture-based influenza vaccines.

  14. Infection of influenza virus neuraminidase-vaccinated mice with homologous influenza virus leads to strong protection against heterologous influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Biao; Chang, Haiyan; Liu, Zhihua; Huang, Chaoyang; Liu, Xueying; Zheng, Dan; Fang, Fang; Sun, Bing; Chen, Ze

    2014-12-01

    Vaccination is the best measure to prevent influenza pandemics. Here, we studied the protective effect against heterologous influenza viruses, including A/reassortant/NYMC X-179A (pH1N1), A/Chicken/Henan/12/2004 (H5N1), A/Chicken/Jiangsu/7/2002 (H9N2) and A/Guizhou/54/89×A/PR/8/34 (A/Guizhou-X) (H3N2), in mice first vaccinated with a DNA vaccine of haemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA) of A/PR/8/34 (PR8) and then infected with the homologous virus. We showed that PR8 HA or NA vaccination both protected mice against a lethal dose of the homologous virus; PR8 HA or NA DNA vaccination and then PR8 infection in mice offered poor or excellent protection, respectively, against a second, heterologous influenza virus challenge. In addition, before the second heterologous influenza infection, the highest antibody level against nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix (M1 and M2) proteins was found in the PR8 NA-vaccinated and PR8-infected group. The level of induced cellular immunity against NP and M1 showed a trend consistent with that seen in antibody levels. However, PR8 HA+NA vaccination and then PR8 infection resulted in limited protection against heterologous influenza virus challenge. Results of the present study demonstrated that infection of the homologous influenza virus in mice already immunized with a NA vaccine could provide excellent protection against subsequent infection of a heterologous influenza virus. These findings suggested that NA, a major antigen of influenza virus, could be an important candidate antigen for universal influenza vaccines.

  15. [Nose surgical anatomy in six aesthetic subunits].

    PubMed

    Chaput, B; Lauwers, F; Lopez, R; Saboye, J; André, A; Grolleau, J-L; Chavoin, J-P

    2013-04-01

    The nose is a complex entity, combining aesthetic and functional roles. Descriptive anatomy is a fundamental science that it can be difficult to relate directly to our daily surgical activity. Reasoning in terms of aesthetic subunits to decide on his actions appeared to us so obvious. The aim of this paper is to resume the anatomical bases relevant to our daily practice in order to fully apprehend the restorative or cosmetic procedures. We discuss the limits of the systematization of these principles in nasal oncology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of influenza activity based on virological surveillance of influenza-like illness in tropical Singapore, 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Ang, Li Wei; Tien, Wee Siong; Lin, Raymond Tzer-Pin; Cui, Lin; Cutter, Jeffery; James, Lyn; Goh, Kee Tai

    2016-12-01

    Singapore is situated in the tropics where the seasonality of influenza is not as well defined as that of temperate countries. We examined the circulation of influenza viruses in the community in terms of the characteristics of influenza activity. We reviewed laboratory-confirmed virological data collected between 2010 and 2014 under the national influenza surveillance programme. Influenza activity was measured by the proportion of specimens from outpatients with influenza-like illness tested positive for influenza virus based on 4-weekly moving interval. Seasonal epidemics occurred around the end of previous year or the beginning and middle of the year. Increases in influenza positivity were more pronounced when there was a change in the predominant circulating influenza virus type/subtype to influenza A(H3N2). Influenza epidemics lasted about 12 weeks on average, with longer duration when there was a change in the predominant influenza type/subtype and especially when it was associated with influenza A(H3N2). Continuous influenza surveillance is important as it could provide early warning of imminent surges in virus transmission, and allow for timely implementation of public health prevention and control interventions to minimize influenza-associated disease burden. J. Med. Virol. 88:2069-2077, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Amino-terminal truncations of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit influence catalysis and subunit interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, K; Morell, M K; Andrews, T J

    1993-01-01

    The first 20 residues at the amino terminus of the small subunit of spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase form an irregular arm that makes extensive contacts with the large subunit and also with another small subunit (S. Knight, I. Andersson, and C.-I. Brändén [1990] J Mol Biol 215: 113-160). The influence of these contacts on subunit binding and, indirectly, on catalysis was investigated by constructing truncations from the amino terminus of the small subunit of the highly homologous enzyme from Synechococcus PCC 6301 expressed in Escherichia coli. Removal of the first six residues (and thus the region of contact with a neighboring small subunit) affected neither the affinity with which the small subunits bound to the large subunits nor the catalytic properties of the assembled holoenzyme. Extending the truncation to include the first 12 residues (which encroaches into a highly conserved region that interacts with the large subunit) also did not weaken intersubunit binding appreciably, but it reduced the catalytic activity of the holoenzyme nearly 5-fold. Removal of an additional single residue (i.e. removal of a total of 13 residues) weakened intersubunit binding approximately 80-fold. Paradoxically, this partially restored catalytic activity to approximately 40% of that of the wild-type holoenzyme. None of these truncations materially affected the Km values for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate or CO2. Removal of all 20 residues of the irregular arm (thereby deleting the conserved region of contact with large subunits) totally abolished the small subunit's ability to bind to large subunits to form a stable holoenzyme. However, this truncated small subunit was still synthesized by the E. coli cells. These data are interpreted in terms of the role of the amino-terminal arm of the small subunit in maintaining the structure of the holoenzyme. PMID:8278544

  18. Dry influenza vaccines: towards a stable, effective and convenient alternative to conventional parenteral influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Jasmine; Born, Philip A; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hinrichs, Wouter L J

    2016-11-01

    Cold-chain requirements, limited stockpiling potential and the lack of potent immune responses are major challenges of parenterally formulated influenza vaccines. Decreased cold chain dependence and stockpiling can be achieved if vaccines are formulated in a dry state using suitable excipients and drying technologies. Furthermore, having the vaccine in a dry state enables the development of non-parenteral patient friendly dosage forms: microneedles for transdermal administration, tablets for oral administration, and powders for epidermal, nasal or pulmonary administration. Moreover, these administration routes have the potential to elicit an improved immune response. This review highlights the rationale for the development of dried influenza vaccines, as well as processes used for the drying and stabilization of influenza vaccines; it also compares the immunogenicity of dried influenza vaccines administered via non-invasive routes with that of parenterally administered influenza vaccines. Finally, it discusses unmet needs, challenges and future developments in the field of dried influenza vaccines.

  19. PATH Influenza Vaccine Project: accelerating the development of new influenza vaccines for low-resource countries.

    PubMed

    Neuzil, Kathleen M; Tsvetnitsky, Vadim; Nyari, Linda J; Bright, Rick A; Boslego, John W

    2012-08-01

    The 2009 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic demonstrated that a pandemic influenza virus has the potential to spread more rapidly in today's highly interconnected world than in the past. While pandemic morbidity and mortality are likely to be greatest in low-resource countries, manufacturing capacity and access to influenza vaccines predominantly exist in countries with greater resources and infrastructure. Even with recently expanded manufacturing capacity, the number of doses available within a 6-month timeframe would be inadequate to fully immunize the global population if the decision to implement a global vaccination program were made today. Improved, affordable vaccines are needed to limit the consequences of a global influenza outbreak and protect low-resource populations. PATH's Influenza Vaccine Project is supporting a range of activities in collaboration with private- and public-sector partners to advance the development of promising influenza vaccines that can be accessible and affordable for people in low-resource countries.

  20. Genetic diversity of influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus circulating during the season 2010-2011 in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Juan; Pozo, Francisco; Reina, Gabriel; Blasco, Miriam; Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Montes, Milagrosa; López-Miragaya, Isabel; Salvador, Carmen; Reina, Jordi; Ortíz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Egido, Pilar; López Barba, José; Delgado, Concepción; Cuevas, María Teresa; Casas, Inmaculada

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity of influenza A(H1N1)2009 viruses has been reported since the pandemic virus emerged in April 2009. Different genetic clades have been identified and defined based on amino acid substitutions found in the haemagglutinin (HA) protein sequences. In Spain, circulating influenza viruses are monitored each season by the regional laboratories enrolled in the Spanish Influenza Surveillance System (SISS). The analysis of the HA gene sequence helps to detect the genetic diversity and viral evolution. To perform an analysis of the genetic diversity of influenza A(H1N1)2009 viruses circulating in Spain during the season 2010-2011 based on analysis of the HA sequence gene. Phylogenetic analysis based on the HA1 subunit of the haemagglutinin gene was carried out on 220 influenza A(H1N1)2009 viruses circulating during the season 2010-2011. Six different genetic groups were identified among circulating A(H1N1)2009 viruses, five of them were previously reported during season 2010-2011. A new group, characterized by E172K and K308E changes and a proline at position 83, was observed in 12.27% of the Spanish viruses. Co-circulation of six different genetic groups of influenza A(H1N1)2009 viruses was identified in Spain during the season 2010-2011. Nevertheless, at this stage, none of the groups identified to date have resulted in significant antigenic changes according to data collected by World Health Organization Collaborating Centres for influenza surveillance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Generation and Protective Ability of Influenza Virus-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Humans Elicited by Vaccination, Natural Infection, and Experimental Challenge.

    PubMed

    Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Luke, Catherine; Hickman, Heather D; Sangster, Mark Y; Wieland-Alter, Wendy F; McBride, Jacqueline M; Yewdell, Jon W; Wright, Peter F; Treanor, John; Rosenberger, Carrie M; Subbarao, Kanta

    2016-09-15

    Nonneutralizing antibodies (Abs) involved in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) may provide some protection from influenza virus infection. The ability of influenza vaccines to induce ADCC-mediating Abs (ADCC-Abs) in adults and children is unclear. We quantified ADCC-Abs in serum samples from adults who received a dose of inactivated subunit vaccine (ISV) targeting monovalent 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus or live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) or who had laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1) virus infection. We also measured ADCC-Abs in children who either received a dose of trivalent seasonal ISV followed by trivalent seasonal LAIV or 2 doses of LAIV. Finally, we assessed the ability of low and high ADCC-Ab titers to protect adults from experimental challenge with influenza A/Wisconsin/67/131/2005(H3N2) virus. Adults and children who received a dose of ISV had a robust increase in ADCC-Ab titers to both recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA) protein and homologous virus-infected cells. There was no detectable increase in titers of ADCC-Abs to rHA or virus-infected cells in adults and children who received LAIV. Higher titers (≥320) of preexisting ADCC-Abs were associated with lower virus replication and a significant reduction in total symptom scores in experimentally infected adults. ADCC-Ab titers increased following experimental influenza virus infection in adults and after ISV administration in both children and adults. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. An RNA Hybridization Assay for Screening Influenza A Virus Polymerase Inhibitors Using the Entire Ribonucleoprotein Complex.

    PubMed

    Roch, Franz-Ferdinand; Hinterkörner, Georg; Menke, John; Tang, Guo-Qing; Cusack, Stephen; Butzendobler, Barbara; Buschmann, Helmut; Datta, Kausiki; Wolkerstorfer, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Novel antiviral drugs, which are less prone to resistance development, are desirable alternatives to the currently approved drugs for the treatment of potentially serious influenza virus infections. The viral polymerase is highly conserved and serves as an attractive target for antiviral drugs since potent inhibitors would directly stop viral replication at an early stage. Recent structural studies on the functional domains of the heterotrimeric influenza polymerase, which comprises subunits PA, PB1, and PB2, opened the way to a structure-based approach for optimizing inhibitors of viral replication. These strategies, however, are limited by the use of isolated protein fragments instead of employing the entire ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP), which represents the functional form of the influenza polymerase in infected cells. In this study, we have established a screening assay for efficient and reliable analysis of potential influenza polymerase inhibitors of various molecular targets such as monoselective polymerase inhibitors targeting the endonuclease site, the cap-binding domain, and the polymerase active site, respectively. By utilizing whole viral RNPs and a radioactivity-free endpoint detection with the capability for efficient compound screening while offering high-content information on potential inhibitors to drive medicinal chemistry program in a reliable manner, this biochemical assay provides significant advantages over the currently available conventional assays. We propose that this assay can eventually be adapted for coinstantaneous analysis and subsequent optimization of two or more different chemical scaffold classes targeting multiple active sites within the polymerase complex, thus enabling the evaluation of drug combinations and characterization of molecules with dual functionality.

  3. Structural Basis for Suppression of a Host Antiviral Response by Influenza A Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Das,K.; Ma, L.; Xiao, R.; Radvansky, B.; Aramini, J.; Zhao, L.; Marklund, J.; Kuo, R.; Twu, K.; Arnold, E.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are responsible for seasonal epidemics and high mortality pandemics. A major function of the viral NS1A protein, a virulence factor, is the inhibition of the production of IFN-{beta}{beta} mRNA and other antiviral mRNAs. The NS1A protein of the human influenza A/Udorn/72 (Ud) virus inhibits the production of these antiviral mRNAs by binding the cellular 30-kDa subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30), which is required for the 3' end processing of all cellular pre-mRNAs. Here we report the 1.95- Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of the complex formed between the second and third zinc finger domain (F2F3) of CPSF30 and the C-terminal domain of the Ud NS1A protein. The complex is a tetramer, in which each of two F2F3 molecules wraps around two NS1A effector domains that interact with each other head-to-head. This structure identifies a CPSF30 binding pocket on NS1A comprised of amino acid residues that are highly conserved among human influenza A viruses. Single amino acid changes within this binding pocket eliminate CPSF30 binding, and a recombinant Ud virus expressing an NS1A protein with such a substitution is attenuated and does not inhibit IFN-{beta} pre-mRNA processing. This binding pocket is a potential target for antiviral drug development. The crystal structure also reveals that two amino acids outside of this pocket, F103 and M106, which are highly conserved (>99%) among influenza A viruses isolated from humans, participate in key hydrophobic interactions with F2F3 that stabilize the complex.

  4. Clonogenic assay of type a influenza viruses reveals noninfectious cell-killing (apoptosis-inducing) particles.

    PubMed

    Ngunjiri, John M; Sekellick, Margaret J; Marcus, Philip I

    2008-03-01

    Clonogenic (single-cell plating) assays were used to define and quantify subpopulations of two genetically closely related variants of influenza virus A/TK/OR/71 that differed primarily in the size of the NS1 gene product; they expressed a full-size (amino acids [aa] 1 to 230) or truncated (aa 1 to 124) NS1 protein. Monolayers of Vero cells were infected with different amounts of virus, monodispersed, and plated. Cell survival curves were generated from the fraction of cells that produced visible colonies as a function of virus multiplicity. The exponential loss of colony-forming capacity at low multiplicities demonstrated that a single virus particle sufficed to kill a cell. The ratios of cell-killing particles (CKP) to plaque-forming particles (PFP) were 1:1 and 7:1 in populations of variants NS1(1-124) and NS1(1-230), respectively. This study revealed a new class of particles in influenza virus populations-noninfectious CKP. Both infectious and noninfectious CKP were 6.3 times more resistant to UV radiation than PFP activity. Based on UV target theory, a functional polymerase subunit was implicated in a rate-limiting step in cell killing. Since influenza viruses kill cells by apoptosis (programmed cell death), CKP are functionally apoptosis-inducing particles. Noninfectious CKP are present in excess of PFP in virus populations with full-size NS1 and induce apoptosis that is temporally delayed and morphologically different than that initiated by infectious CKP present in the virus population expressing truncated NS1. The identification and quantification of both infectious and noninfectious CKP defines new phenotypes in influenza virus populations and presents a challenge to determine their role in regulating infectivity, pathogenesis, and vaccine efficacy.

  5. In Vivo Validation of Predicted and Conserved T Cell Epitopes in a Swine Influenza Model

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Andres H.; Loving, Crystal; Moise, Leonard; Terry, Frances E.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Martin, William D.; De Groot, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection in pigs that is responsible for significant financial losses to pig farmers annually. Current measures to protect herds from infection include: inactivated whole-virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, and alpha replicon-based vaccines. As is true for influenza vaccines for humans, these strategies do not provide broad protection against the diverse strains of influenza A virus (IAV) currently circulating in U.S. swine. Improved approaches to developing swine influenza vaccines are needed. Here, we used immunoinformatics tools to identify class I and II T cell epitopes highly conserved in seven representative strains of IAV in U.S. swine and predicted to bind to Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) alleles prevalent in commercial swine. Epitope-specific interferon-gamma (IFNγ) recall responses to pooled peptides and whole virus were detected in pigs immunized with multi-epitope plasmid DNA vaccines encoding strings of class I and II putative epitopes. In a retrospective analysis of the IFNγ responses to individual peptides compared to predictions specific to the SLA alleles of cohort pigs, we evaluated the predictive performance of PigMatrix and demonstrated its ability to distinguish non-immunogenic from immunogenic peptides and to identify promiscuous class II epitopes. Overall, this study confirms the capacity of PigMatrix to predict immunogenic T cell epitopes and demonstrate its potential for use in the design of epitope-driven vaccines for swine. Additional studies that match the SLA haplotype of animals with the study epitopes will be required to evaluate the degree of immune protection conferred by epitope-driven DNA vaccines in pigs. PMID:27411061

  6. ISCOM-matrix-based equine influenza (EIV) vaccine stimulates cell-mediated immunity in the horse.

    PubMed

    Paillot, R; Prowse, L

    2012-01-15

    The humoral immune response induced by ISCOM-matrix (Immuno Stimulating COMplex-Matrix)-adjuvanted equine influenza virus (EIV) vaccine is well documented in horses. ISCOM-matrix adjuvanted vaccines against human influenza are strong inducers of cell-mediated immunity (CMI), including T cell proliferation and virus-specific cytotoxic T cell. In the horse, the CMI response to equine influenza vaccination is less well characterised. An ISCOM-based vaccine has been shown to induce interferon gamma (IFN-γ) synthesis, a CMI marker, in the horse, but this has not been shown for the ISCOM-matrix vaccine, which is a different formulation. The objective of this study was to measure EIV-specific IFN-γ synthesis after vaccination with an ISCOM-matrix-adjuvanted EIV vaccine. Equilis Prequenza is a commercialised inactivated EIV vaccine containing purified haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) subunits adjuvanted with ISCOM-matrix. Six influenza-naïve Welsh mountain ponies were vaccinated twice with Equilis Prequenza at an interval of four weeks. Six control ponies received a placebo of physiological water. EIV-specific IFN-γ synthesis by peripheral blood lymphocytes and the antibody response to a panel of representative EIV isolates were measured prior to and after both injections. Immunisation with the ISCOM-matrix-based EIV vaccine stimulated significant EIV-specific IFN-γ synthesis and EIV-specific single radial haemolysis (SRH) antibody. In conclusion, EIV vaccine adjuvanted with ISCOM-matrix stimulates both antibody and a cellular immune response in the horse.

  7. Glycine receptor subunits expression in the developing rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel Ángel; Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Salceda, Rocío

    2017-09-01

    Glycine receptor (GlyR) consists of two α (1-4) and three β subunits. Considerable evidence indicates that the adult retina expresses the four types of α subunits; however, the proportion of these subunits in adult and immature retina is almost unknown. In this report we have studied mRNA and the protein expression of GlyR subunits in the retina during postnatal rat development by Real-Time qRT-PCR and western blot. mRNA and protein expression indicated a gradual increase of the α1, α3, α4 and β GlyR subunits during postnatal ages tested. The mRNA β subunit showed higher expression levels (∼3 fold) than those observed for the α1 and α3 subunits. Very interestingly, the α2 GlyR subunit had the highest expression in the retina, even in the adult. These results revealed the expression of GlyR at early postnatal ages, supporting its role in retina development. In addition, our results indicated that the adult retina expressed a high proportion of the α2 subunit, suggesting the expression of monomeric and/or heteromeric receptors. A variety of studies are needed to further characterize the role of the specific subunits in both adult and immature retina. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-02-01

    Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9' serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose-response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9'S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Economic and policy implications of pandemic influenza.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Braeton J.; Starks, Shirley J.; Loose, Verne W.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-03-01

    Pandemic influenza has become a serious global health concern; in response, governments around the world have allocated increasing funds to containment of public health threats from this disease. Pandemic influenza is also recognized to have serious economic implications, causing illness and absence that reduces worker productivity and economic output and, through mortality, robs nations of their most valuable assets - human resources. This paper reports two studies that investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic flu outbreak. Policy makers can use the growing number of economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. Experts recognize that pandemic influenza has serious global economic implications. The illness causes absenteeism, reduced worker productivity, and therefore reduced economic output. This, combined with the associated mortality rate, robs nations of valuable human resources. Policy makers can use economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this paper economists examine two studies which investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Resulting policy implications are also discussed. The research uses the Regional Economic Modeling, Inc. (REMI) Policy Insight + Model. This model provides a dynamic, regional, North America Industrial Classification System (NAICS) industry-structured framework for forecasting. It is supported by a population dynamics model that is well-adapted to investigating macro-economic implications of pandemic influenza, including possible demand side effects. The studies reported in this paper exercise all of these capabilities.

  10. Increasing herd immunity with influenza revaccination.

    PubMed

    Mooring, E Q; Bansal, S

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal influenza is a significant public health concern globally. While influenza vaccines are the single most effective intervention to reduce influenza morbidity and mortality, there is considerable debate surrounding the merits and consequences of repeated seasonal vaccination. Here, we describe a two-season influenza epidemic contact network model and use it to demonstrate that increasing the level of continuity in vaccination across seasons reduces the burden on public health. We show that revaccination reduces the influenza attack rate not only because it reduces the overall number of susceptible individuals, but also because it better protects highly connected individuals, who would otherwise make a disproportionately large contribution to influenza transmission. We also demonstrate that our results hold on an empirical contact network, in the presence of assortativity in vaccination status, and are robust for a range of vaccine coverage and efficacy levels. Our work contributes a population-level perspective to debates about the merits of repeated influenza vaccination and advocates for public health policy to incorporate individual vaccine histories.

  11. Global Seasonal Influenza Epidemics and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamerius, James

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that low specific humidity conditions facilitate the transmission of the influenza virus in temperate regions and result in annual winter epidemics. However, this relationship does not account for the epidemiology of influenza in tropical and subtropical regions where epidemics often occur during the rainy season or transmit year-round without a well-defined season. We assessed the role of specific humidity and other local climatic variables on influenza virus seasonality by modeling epidemiological and climatic information from 78 study sites sampled globally. We substantiated that there are two types of environmental conditions associated with seasonal influenza epidemics: "cold-dry" and "humid-rainy". For sites where monthly average specific humidity or temperature decreases below thresholds of approximately 11-12 g/kg and 18-21 °C during the year, influenza activity peaks during the cold-dry season (i.e., winter) when specific humidity and temperature are at minimal levels. For sites where specific humidity and temperature do not decrease below these thresholds, seasonal influenza activity is more likely to peak in months when average precipitation totals are maximal and greater than 150 mm per month. Based on these findings, we develop Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Recovered-Susceptible (SEIRS) models forced by daily weather observations of specific humidity and precipitation that simulate the diversity of seasonal influenza signals worldwide.

  12. Geographic prioritization of distributing pandemic influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Araz, Ozgur M; Galvani, Alison; Meyers, Lauren A

    2012-09-01

    Pandemic influenza is an international public health concern. In light of the persistent threat of H5N1 avian influenza and the recent pandemic of A/H1N1swine influenza outbreak, public health agencies around the globe are continuously revising their preparedness plans. The A/H1N1 pandemic of 2009 demonstrated that influenza activity and severity might vary considerably among age groups and locations, and the distribution of an effective influenza vaccine may be significantly delayed and staggered. Thus, pandemic influenza vaccine distribution policies should be tailored to the demographic and spatial structures of communities. Here, we introduce a bi-criteria decision-making framework for vaccine distribution policies that is based on a geospatial and demographically-structured model of pandemic influenza transmission within and between counties of Arizona in the Unites States. Based on data from the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, the policy predicted to reduce overall attack rate most effectively is prioritizing counties expected to experience the latest epidemic waves (a policy that may be politically untenable). However, when we consider reductions in both the attack rate and the waiting period for those seeking vaccines, the widely adopted pro rata policy (distributing according to population size) is also predicted to be an effective strategy.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics of avian influenza epidemic models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanhong; Ruan, Shigui; Zhang, Xinan

    2017-01-01

    Avian influenza is a zoonotic disease caused by the transmission of the avian influenza A virus, such as H5N1 and H7N9, from birds to humans. The avian influenza A H5N1 virus has caused more than 500 human infections worldwide with nearly a 60% death rate since it was first reported in Hong Kong in 1997. The four outbreaks of the avian influenza A H7N9 in China from March 2013 to June 2016 have resulted in 580 human cases including 202 deaths with a death rate of nearly 35%. In this paper, we construct two avian influenza bird-to-human transmission models with different growth laws of the avian population, one with logistic growth and the other with Allee effect, and analyze their dynamical behavior. We obtain a threshold value for the prevalence of avian influenza and investigate the local or global asymptotical stability of each equilibrium of these systems by using linear analysis technique or combining Liapunov function method and LaSalle's invariance principle, respectively. Moreover, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for the occurrence of periodic solutions in the avian influenza system with Allee effect of the avian population. Numerical simulations are also presented to illustrate the theoretical results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Influenza diagnosis and vaccination in Poland.

    PubMed

    Brydak, L B; Wozniak-Kosek, A; Nitsch-Osuch, A

    2013-06-01

    In Poland between several thousand and several million cases of influenza and suspected influenza cases are registered, depending on the epidemic season. A variety of methods are available for the detection of the influenza viruses responsible for respiratory infection starting with the isolation of the virus in chick embryos or in cell lines such as MDCK, VERO, etc., and finishing with a variety of modifications of the classical PCR molecular biology such as PCR multiplex and Real-Time. The most effective way to combat influenza is through vaccination. Regular vaccination is one of the few steps that may be taken to protect individuals, especially in high-risk groups, from the potential and serious complications of influenza. In many countries, including Poland, despite the recommendations, the rate of vaccination against influenza is still low in all age groups. In the epidemic season 2011/2012, the level of distribution of the seasonal influenza vaccines was 4.5% of the population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced detection of infectious airborne influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Blachere, Francoise M; Cao, Gang; Lindsley, William G; Noti, John D; Beezhold, Donald H

    2011-09-01

    Current screening methodologies for detecting infectious airborne influenza virus are limited and lack sensitivity. To increase the sensitivity for detecting infectious influenza virus in an aerosol sample, the viral replication assay was developed. With this assay, influenza virus is first amplified by replication in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells followed by detection with quantitative PCR (qPCR). Spanning a 20-h replication period, matrix gene expression levels from infectious virus were measured at several time points using qPCR and found to exponentially increase. Compared with the traditional culture-based viral plaque assay, the viral replication assay resulted in a 4.6 × 10(5) fold increase in influenza virus detection. Furthermore, viral replication assay results were obtained in half the time of the viral plaque assay. To demonstrate that the viral replication assay is capable of detecting airborne influenza virus, dilute preparations of strain A/WS/33 were loaded into a nebulizer, aerosolized within a calm-air settling chamber and subsequently collected using NIOSH Two-Stage Bioaerosol Samplers. At the most diluted concentration corresponding to a chicken embryo infectious dose 50% endpoint (CEID(50)) of 2.8E+02/ml, the viral replication assay was able to detect infectious influenza virus that was otherwise undetectable by viral plaque assay. The results obtained demonstrate that the viral replication assay is highly sensitive at detecting infectious influenza virus from aerosol samples. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Performance of case definitions for influenza surveillance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Lee, V J; Lim, W Y; Chen, M I; Chen, Y; Tan, L; Lin, R T; Leo, Y S; Barr, I; Cook, A R

    2015-06-04

    Influenza-like illness (ILI) case definitions, such as those from the European Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization (WHO) and United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, are commonly used for influenza surveillance. We assessed how various case definitions performed during the initial wave of influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 infections in Singapore on a cohort of 727 patients with two to three blood samples and whose symptoms were reviewed fortnightly from June to October 2009. Using seroconversion (≥ 4-fold rise) to A/California/7/2009 (H1N1), we identified 36 presumptive influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 episodes and 664 episodes unrelated to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Cough, fever and headache occurred more commonly in presumptive influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Although the sensitivity was low (36%), the recently revised WHO ILI case definition gave a higher positive predictive value (42%) and positive likelihood ratio (13.3) than the other case definitions. Results including only episodes with primary care consultations were similar. Individuals who worked or had episodes with fever, cough or sore throat were more likely to consult a physician, while episodes with Saturday onset were less likely, with some consultations skipped or postponed. Our analysis supports the use of the revised WHO ILI case definition, which includes only cough in the presence of fever defined as body temperature ≥ 38 °C for influenza surveillance.

  17. Assessing the burden of paediatric influenza in Europe: the European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project.

    PubMed

    Paget, W John; Balderston, Catherine; Casas, Inmaculada; Donker, Gé; Edelman, Laurel; Fleming, Douglas; Larrauri, Amparo; Meijer, Adam; Puzelli, Simona; Rizzo, Caterina; Simonsen, Lone

    2010-08-01

    The European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project is a multi-country project that was created to collect, analyse and present data regarding the paediatric influenza burden in European countries, with the purpose of providing the necessary information to make evidence-based decisions regarding influenza immunisation recommendations for children. The initial approach taken is based on existing weekly virological and age-specific influenza-like illness (ILI) data from surveillance networks across Europe. We use a multiple regression model guided by longitudinal weekly patterns of influenza virus to attribute the weekly ILI consultation incidence pattern to each influenza (sub)type, while controlling for the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemics. Modelling the ILI consultation incidence during 2002/2003-2008 revealed that influenza infections that presented for medical attention as ILI affected between 0.3% and 9.8% of children aged 0-4 and 5-14 years in England, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain in an average season. With the exception of Spain, these rates were always higher in children aged 0-4 years. Across the six seasons analysed (five seasons were analysed from the Italian data), the model attributed 47-83% of the ILI burden in primary care to influenza virus infection in the various countries, with the A(H3N2) virus playing the most important role, followed by influenza viruses B and A(H1N1). National season averages from the four countries studied indicated that between 0.4% and 18% of children consulted a physician for ILI, with the percentage depending on the country and health care system. Influenza virus infections explained the majority of paediatric ILI consultations in all countries. The next step will be to apply the EPIA modelling approach to severe outcomes indicators (i.e. hospitalisations and mortality data) to generate a complete range of mild and severe influenza burden estimates needed for decision making concerning

  18. Realities and enigmas of human viral influenza: pathogenesis, epidemiology and control.

    PubMed

    Hilleman, Maurice R

    2002-08-19

    Influenza A is a viral disease of global dimension, presenting with high morbidity and mortality in annual epidemics, and in pandemics which are of infrequent occurrence but which have very high attack rates. Influenza probes reveal a continuing battle for survival between host and parasite in which the host population updates the specificity of its pool of humoral immunity by contact with and response to infection with the most recent viruses which possess altered antigenic specificity in their hemagglutinin (HA) ligand. HA ligand binds the virus to the cell to bring about infection. Viral survival relies on escape from host immunity through antigenic alterations in nature which arise through genetic drift by point mutation principally of the HA gene, or through genetic shift by reassortment exchange of the HA ligand with that of viruses retained in avian species. Partial control of influenza is by use of killed whole, subunit, or possible live virus vaccines, all of which rely on worldwide surveillance to provide early detection of the altered immunologic specificity of the next virus to come. Future global surveillance may be aided by studies of sampled viral isolates in laboratories having capabilities for accelerated genetic sequencing and for automated rapid throughput analyses as well. Influenza vaccines of the future must be directed toward use of conserved group-specific viral antigens, such as are present in transitional proteins which are exposed during the fusion of virus to the host cell. Chemotherapy, though still primordial, must eventually provide the ultimate solution to vaccine failures. Probing the enigma of the severe influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 is an exciting contemporary venture in which genetic reconstruction of the viral genome from surviving archival RNA is being conducted with great success. Present evidence reveals successive recycling in pandemics, of only 3 of the 15 possible avian viral HAs. Pandemics are believed, conventionally

  19. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination: patient perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, P.; Gibbons, Y; Primrose, W; Ellis, G; Downie, G

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of the influenza vaccine in reducing mortality and hospital admissions is established, particularly in the elderly. However, up to 50% of those at risk do not receive the vaccine. These patients are also at risk from pneumococcal infection and there is considerable overlap between the target group for each vaccine.
This study sought to identify at risk individuals from consecutive admissions to an acute geriatric unit and to gain an insight into their perceptions with regard to vaccination. The awareness of each vaccine was recorded, together with the vaccination history.
Seventy four per cent of the final cohort had heard of the influenza vaccine, while only 13% had heard of the pneumococcal vaccine. Fifty per cent perceived themselves to be at risk from influenza and its complications and 87% of the cohort believed it to be a serious infection.
Influenza vaccine was judged to confer good protection by 72% of the sample and yet up to 50% believed that the vaccine can make the recipient ill.
Influenza is perceived as a serious infection by patients and yet many do not believe themselves to be at particular risk. Although influenza vaccination is believed to confer protection, the decision whether, or not, to accept the vaccine is coloured by many factors, including popular myths and anecdotal information from friends and relatives. The uptake of influenza vaccine is suboptimal and the awareness of the pneumococcal vaccine certainly in the elderly is poor. The need for a comprehensive nationwide education campaign promoting both influenza and pneumococcal vaccine is highlighted.


Keywords: influenza vaccine; pneumococcal vaccine PMID:10727564

  20. Forecasting Influenza Epidemics in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan; Cowling, Benjamin J; Lau, Eric H Y; Shaman, Jeffrey

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in mathematical modeling and inference methodologies have enabled development of systems capable of forecasting seasonal influenza epidemics in temperate regions in real-time. However, in subtropical and tropical regions, influenza epidemics can occur throughout the year, making routine forecast of influenza more challenging. Here we develop and report forecast systems that are able to predict irregular non-seasonal influenza epidemics, using either the ensemble adjustment Kalman filter or a modified particle filter in conjunction with a susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. We applied these model-filter systems to retrospectively forecast influenza epidemics in Hong Kong from January 1998 to December 2013, including the 2009 pandemic. The forecast systems were able to forecast both the peak timing and peak magnitude for 44 epidemics in 16 years caused by individual influenza strains (i.e., seasonal influenza A(H1N1), pandemic A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and B), as well as 19 aggregate epidemics caused by one or more of these influenza strains. Average forecast accuracies were 37% (for both peak timing and magnitude) at 1-3 week leads, and 51% (peak timing) and 50% (peak magnitude) at 0 lead. Forecast accuracy increased as the spread of a given forecast ensemble decreased; the forecast accuracy for peak timing (peak magnitude) increased up to 43% (45%) for H1N1, 93% (89%) for H3N2, and 53% (68%) for influenza B at 1-3 week leads. These findings suggest that accurate forecasts can be made at least 3 weeks in advance for subtropical and tropical regions.