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Sample records for einstein affine gravity

  1. Weyl-Eddington-Einstein affine gravity in the context of modern cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. T.

    2010-06-01

    We propose new models of the “affine” theory of gravity in multidimensional space-times with symmetric connections. We use and develop ideas of Weyl, Eddington, and Einstein, in particular, Einstein’s proposed method for obtaining the geometry using the Hamilton principle. More specifically, the connection coefficients are determined using a “geometric” Lagrangian that is an arbitrary function of the generalized (nonsymmetric) Ricci curvature tensor (and, possibly, other fundamental tensors) expressed in terms of the connection coefficients regarded as independent variables. Such a theory supplements the standard Einstein theory with dark energy (the cosmological constant, in the first approximation), a neutral massive (or tachyonic) meson, and massive (or tachyonic) scalar fields. These fields couple only to gravity and can generate dark matter and/or inflation. The new field masses (real or imaginary) have a geometric origin and must appear in any concrete model. The concrete choice of the Lagrangian determines further details of the theory, for example, the nature of the fields that can describe massive particles, tachyons, or even “phantoms.” In “natural” geometric theories, dark energy must also arise. The basic parameters of the theory (cosmological constant, mass, possible dimensionless constants) are theoretically indeterminate, but in the framework of modern “multiverse” ideas, this is more a virtue than a defect. We consider further extensions of the affine models and in more detail discuss approximate effective (“physical”) Lagrangians that can be applied to the cosmology of the early Universe.

  2. From conformal to Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Giorgos; Olea, Rodrigo

    2016-10-01

    We provide a simple derivation of the equivalence between Einstein and conformal gravity (CG) with Neumann boundary conditions given by Maldacena. As Einstein spacetimes are Bach flat, a generic solution to CG would contain both Einstein and non-Einstein parts. Using this decomposition of the spacetime curvature in the Weyl tensor makes manifest the equivalence between the two theories, both at the level of the action and the variation of it. As a consequence, we show that the on-shell action for critical gravity in four dimensions is given uniquely in terms of the Bach tensor.

  3. Schwinger's Approach to Einstein's Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kim

    2012-05-01

    Albert Einstein was one of Julian Schwinger's heroes, and Schwinger was greatly honored when he received the first Einstein Prize (together with Kurt Godel) for his work on quantum electrodynamics. Schwinger contributed greatly to the development of a quantum version of gravitational theory, and his work led directly to the important work of (his students) Arnowitt, Deser, and DeWitt on the subject. Later in the 1960's and 1970's Schwinger developed a new formulation of quantum field theory, which he dubbed Source Theory, in an attempt to get closer contact to phenomena. In this formulation, he revisited gravity, and in books and papers showed how Einstein's theory of General Relativity emerged naturally from one physical assumption: that the carrier of the gravitational force is a massless, helicity-2 particle, the graviton. (There has been a minor dispute whether gravitational theory can be considered as the massless limit of a massive spin-2 theory; Schwinger believed that was the case, while Van Dam and Veltman concluded the opposite.) In the process, he showed how all of the tests of General Relativity could be explained simply, without using the full machinery of the theory and without the extraneous concept of curved space, including such effects as geodetic precession and the Lense-Thirring effect. (These effects have now been verified by the Gravity Probe B experiment.) This did not mean that he did not accept Einstein's equations, and in his book and full article on the subject, he showed how those emerge essentially uniquely from the assumption of the graviton. So to speak of Schwinger versus Einstein is misleading, although it is true that Schwinger saw no necessity to talk of curved spacetime. In this talk I will lay out Schwinger's approach, and the connection to Einstein's theory.

  4. Gravity Before Einstein and Schwinger Before Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2012-05-01

    Julian Schwinger was a child prodigy, and Albert Einstein distinctly not; Schwinger had something like 73 graduate students, and Einstein very few. But both thought gravity was important. They were not, of course, the first, nor is the disagreement on how one should think about gravity that is being highlighted here the first such dispute. The talk will explore, first, several of the earlier dichotomies: was gravity capable of action at a distance (Newton), or was a transmitting ether required (many others). Did it act on everything or only on solids (an odd idea of the Herschels that fed into their ideas of solar structure and sunspots)? Did gravitational information require time for its transmission? Is the exponent of r precisely 2, or 2 plus a smidgeon (a suggestion by Simon Newcomb among others)? And so forth. Second, I will try to say something about Scwinger's lesser known early work and how it might have prefigured his "source theory," beginning with "On the Interaction of Several Electrons (the unpublished, 1934 "zeroth paper," whose title somewhat reminds one of "On the Dynamics of an Asteroid," through his days at Berkeley with Oppenheimer, Gerjuoy, and others, to his application of ideas from nuclear physics to radar and of radar engineering techniques to problems in nuclear physics. And folks who think good jobs are difficult to come by now might want to contemplate the couple of years Schwinger spent teaching elementary physics at Purdue before moving on to the MIT Rad Lab for war work.

  5. Focus on quantum Einstein gravity Focus on quantum Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjorn, Jan; Reuter, Martin; Saueressig, Frank

    2012-09-01

    The gravitational asymptotic safety program summarizes the attempts to construct a consistent and predictive quantum theory of gravity within Wilson's generalized framework of renormalization. Its key ingredient is a non-Gaussian fixed point of the renormalization group flow which controls the behavior of the theory at trans-Planckian energies and renders gravity safe from unphysical divergences. Provided that the fixed point comes with a finite number of ultraviolet-attractive (relevant) directions, this construction gives rise to a consistent quantum field theory which is as predictive as an ordinary, perturbatively renormalizable one. This opens up the exciting possibility of establishing quantum Einstein gravity as a fundamental theory of gravity, without introducing supersymmetry or extra dimensions, and solely based on quantization techniques that are known to work well for the other fundamental forces of nature. While the idea of gravity being asymptotically safe was proposed by Steven Weinberg more than 30 years ago [1], the technical tools for investigating this scenario only emerged during the last decade. Here a key role is played by the exact functional renormalization group equation for gravity, which allows the construction of non-perturbative approximate solutions for the RG-flow of the gravitational couplings. Most remarkably, all solutions constructed to date exhibit a suitable non-Gaussian fixed point, lending strong support to the asymptotic safety conjecture. Moreover, the functional renormalization group also provides indications that the central idea of a non-Gaussian fixed point providing a safe ultraviolet completion also carries over to more realistic scenarios where gravity is coupled to a suitable matter sector like the standard model. These theoretical successes also triggered a wealth of studies focusing on the consequences of asymptotic safety in a wide range of phenomenological applications covering the physics of black holes, early

  6. Contravariant gravity on Poisson manifolds and Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Yukio; Muraki, Hisayoshi; Watamura, Satoshi

    2017-06-01

    A relation between gravity on Poisson manifolds proposed in Asakawa et al (2015 Fortschr. Phys. 63 683-704) and Einstein gravity is investigated. The compatibility of the Poisson and Riemann structures defines a unique connection, the contravariant Levi-Civita connection, and leads to the idea of the contravariant gravity. The Einstein-Hilbert-type action yields an equation of motion which is written in terms of the analog of the Einstein tensor, and it includes couplings between the metric and the Poisson tensor. The study of the Weyl transformation reveals properties of those interactions. It is argued that this theory can have an equivalent description as a system of Einstein gravity coupled to matter. As an example, it is shown that the contravariant gravity on a two-dimensional Poisson manifold can be described by a real scalar field coupled to the metric in a specific manner.

  7. Cosmic censorship in quantum Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Koch, B.; Platania, A.

    2017-05-01

    We study the quantum gravity modification of the Kuroda-Papapetrou model induced by the running of the Newton’s constant at high energy in quantum Einstein gravity. We argue that although the antiscreening character of the gravitational interaction favours the formation of a naked singularity, quantum gravity effects turn the classical singularity into a ‘whimper’ singularity which remains naked for a finite amount of advanced time.

  8. Gravitation, Electromagnetism and Cosmological Constant in Purely Affine Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popławski, Nikodem J.

    2009-03-01

    The Ferraris-Kijowski purely affine Lagrangian for the electromagnetic field, that has the form of the Maxwell Lagrangian with the metric tensor replaced by the symmetrized Ricci tensor, is dynamically equivalent to the metric Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangian, except the zero-field limit, for which the metric tensor is not well-defined. This feature indicates that, for the Ferraris-Kijowski model to be physical, there must exist a background field that depends on the Ricci tensor. The simplest possibility, supported by recent astronomical observations, is the cosmological constant, generated in the purely affine formulation of gravity by the Eddington Lagrangian. In this paper we combine the electromagnetic field and the cosmological constant in the purely affine formulation. We show that the sum of the two affine (Eddington and Ferraris-Kijowski) Lagrangians is dynamically inequivalent to the sum of the analogous ( ΛCDM and Einstein-Maxwell) Lagrangians in the metric-affine/metric formulation. We also show that such a construction is valid, like the affine Einstein-Born-Infeld formulation, only for weak electromagnetic fields, on the order of the magnetic field in outer space of the Solar System. Therefore the purely affine formulation that combines gravity, electromagnetism and cosmological constant cannot be a simple sum of affine terms corresponding separately to these fields. A quite complicated form of the affine equivalent of the metric Einstein-Maxwell- Λ Lagrangian suggests that Nature can be described by a simpler affine Lagrangian, leading to modifications of the Einstein-Maxwell- ΛCDM theory for electromagnetic fields that contribute to the spacetime curvature on the same order as the cosmological constant.

  9. Einstein, Mach, and the Fortunes of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, David

    2005-04-01

    Early in his life, Albert Einstein considered himself a devoted student of the physicist and philosopher Ernst Mach. Mach's famous critiques of Newton's absolute space and time -- most notably Mach's explanation of Newton's bucket experiment -- held a strong sway over Einstein as he struggled to formulate general relativity. Einstein was convinced that his emerging theory of gravity should be consistent with Mach's principle, which states that local inertial effects arise due to gravitational interactions with distant matter. Once completed, Einstein's general relativity enjoyed two decades of worldwide attention, only to fall out of physicists' interest during the 1930s and 1940s, when topics like nuclear physics claimed center stage. Gravity began to return to the limelight during the 1950s and especially the 1960s, and once again Mach proved to be a major spur: Princeton physicists Carl Brans and Robert Dicke introduced a rival theory of gravity in 1961 which they argued satisfied Mach's principle better than Einstein's general relativity did. The Brans-Dicke theory, and the new generation of experiments designed to test its predictions against those of general relativity, played a major role in bringing Einstein's beloved topic back to the center of physics.

  10. Gravity theory through affine spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-08-01

    In this work it is argued that in order to improve our understanding of gravity and spacetime our most successful theory, general relativity, must be destructured. That is, some geometrical assumptions must be dropped and recovered just under suitable limits. Along this line of thought we pursue the idea that the roundness of the light cone, and hence the isotropy of the speed of light, must be relaxed and that, in fact, the shape of light cones must be regarded as a dynamical variable. Mathematically, we apply some important results from affine differential geometry to this problem, the idea being that in the transition we should preserve the identification of the spacetime continuum with a manifold endowed with a cone structure and a spacetime volume form. To that end it is suggested that the cotangent indicatrix (dispersion relation) must be described by an equation of Monge-Ampère type determining a hyperbolic affine sphere, at least whenever the matter content is negligible. Non-relativistic spacetimes fall into this description as they are recovered whenever the center of the affine sphere is at infinity. In the more general context of Lorentz-Finsler theories it is shown that the lightlike unparametrized geodesic flow is completely determined by the distribution of light cones. Moreover, the transport of lightlike momenta is well defined though there could be no notion of affine parameter. Finally, we show how the perturbed indicatrix can be obtained from the perturbed light cone.

  11. Finding Horndeski theories with Einstein gravity limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, Ryan; Lombriser, Lucas; Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2016-11-01

    The Horndeski action is the most general scalar-tensor theory with at most second-order derivatives in the equations of motion, thus evading Ostrogradsky instabilities and making it of interest when modifying gravity at large scales. To pass local tests of gravity, these modifications predominantly rely on nonlinear screening mechanisms that recover Einstein's Theory of General Relativity in regions of high density. We derive a set of conditions on the four free functions of the Horndeski action that examine whether a specific model embedded in the action possesses an Einstein gravity limit or not. For this purpose, we develop a new and surprisingly simple scaling method that identifies dominant terms in the equations of motion by considering formal limits of the couplings that enter through the new terms in the modified action. This enables us to find regimes where nonlinear terms dominate and Einstein's field equations are recovered to leading order. Together with an efficient approximation of the scalar field profile, one can then further evaluate whether these limits can be attributed to a genuine screening effect. For illustration, we apply the analysis to both a cubic galileon and a chameleon model as well as to Brans-Dicke theory. Finally, we emphasise that the scaling method also provides a natural approach for performing post-Newtonian expansions in screened regimes.

  12. Einstein's Universe - Gravity at Work and Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zee, A.

    2001-07-01

    On Albert Einstein's seventy-sixth and final birthday, a friend gave him a simple toy made from a broomstick, a brass ball attached to a length of string, and a weak spring. Einstein was delighted: the toy worked on a principle he had conceived fifty years earlier when he was working on his revolutionary theory of gravitya principle whose implications are still confounding physicists today.Starting with this winning anecdote, Anthony Zee begins his animated discussion of phenomena ranging from the emergence of galaxies to the curvature of space-time, evidence for the existence of gravity waves, and the shape of the universe in the first nanoseconds of creation and today. Making complex ideas accessible without oversimplifying, Zee leads the reader through the implications of Einstein's theory and its influence on modern physics. His playful and lucid style conveys the excitement of some of the latest developments in physics, and his new Afterword brings things even further up-to-date.

  13. Unification of Einstein's Gravity with Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfatti, Jack

    2010-02-01

    The four tetrad and six spin-connection Cartan 1-forms of Einstein's GeoMetroDynamic (GMD) field emerge from the eight virtual gluon macro-quantum coherent QCD post-inflation vacuum condensates that form in the inflationary phase transition. This joint emergence of gravity and the strong force is similar to the emergence of irrotational superflow with vortex defects in liquid helium below the Lambda Point. Repulsive dark energy is from the residual random virtual bosons that did not cohere in the moment of inflation. Similarly, attractive dark matter is from the residual random virtual fermion-antifermion pairs. Therefore, I predict that the LHC will not detect any on-mass-shell real particles that can explain φDM˜0.23. As first suggested by Abdus Salam (f-gravity) the low energy tail of the nuclear force can be explained as strong short-range Yukawa gravity. QCD's IR confinement and UV asymptotic freedom are elementary consequences in this simple model. )

  14. Einstein gravity, massive gravity, multi-gravity and nonlinear realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goon, Garrett; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Joyce, Austin; Trodden, Mark

    2015-07-01

    The existence of a ghost free theory of massive gravity begs for an interpre-tation as a Higgs phase of General Relativity. We revisit the study of massive gravity as a Higgs phase. Absent a compelling microphysical model of spontaneous symmetry breaking in gravity, we approach this problem from the viewpoint of nonlinear realizations. We employ the coset construction to search for the most restrictive symmetry breaking pattern whose low energy theory will both admit the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) potentials and nonlinearly realize every symmetry of General Relativity, thereby providing a new perspective from which to build theories of massive gravity. In addition to the known ghost-free terms, we find a novel parity violating interaction which preserves the constraint structure of the theory, but which vanishes on the normal branch of the theory. Finally, the procedure is extended to the cases of bi-gravity and multi-vielbein theories. Analogous parity violating interactions exist here, too, and may be non-trivial for certain classes of multi-metric theories.

  15. Extended Horava gravity and Einstein-aether theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Ted

    2010-05-15

    Einstein-aether theory is general relativity coupled to a dynamical, unit timelike vector. If this vector is restricted in the action to be hypersurface orthogonal, the theory is identical to the IR limit of the extension of Horava gravity proposed by Blas, Pujolas and Sibiryakov. Hypersurface orthogonal solutions of Einstein-aether theory are solutions to the IR limit of this theory, hence numerous results already obtained for Einstein-aether theory carry over.

  16. A Demonstration of Einstein's Equivalence of Gravity and Acceleration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    In 1907, Einstein described a "Gedankenexperiment" in which he showed that free fall in a gravitational field is indistinguishable from a body at rest in an elevator accelerated upwards in zero gravity. This paper describes an apparatus, which is simple to make and simple to operate, that acts as an observable footnote to Einstein's example. It…

  17. A Demonstration of Einstein's Equivalence of Gravity and Acceleration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    In 1907, Einstein described a "Gedankenexperiment" in which he showed that free fall in a gravitational field is indistinguishable from a body at rest in an elevator accelerated upwards in zero gravity. This paper describes an apparatus, which is simple to make and simple to operate, that acts as an observable footnote to Einstein's example. It…

  18. Gravity Probe B: Testing Einstein with Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geveden, Rex D.; May, Todd

    2003-01-01

    Some 40 years in the making, NASA' s historic Gravity Probe B (GP-B) mission is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II in 2003. GP-B will test two extraordinary predictions from Einstein's General Relativity: geodetic precession and the Lense-Thirring effect (frame-dragging). Employing tiny, ultra-precise gyroscopes, GP-B features a measurement accuracy of 0.5 milli-arc-seconds per year. The extraordinary measurement precision is made possible by a host of breakthrough technologies, including electro-statically suspended, super-conducting quartz gyroscopes; virtual elimination of magnetic flux; a solid quartz star tracking telescope; helium microthrusters for drag-free control of the spacecraft; and a 2400 liter superfluid helium dewar. This paper will provide an overview of the science, key technologies, flight hardware, integration and test, and flight operations of the GP-B space vehicle. It will also examine some of the technical management challenges of a large-scale, technology-driven, Principal Investigator-led mission.

  19. Gravity Probe B: Testing Einstein with Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geveden, Rex D.; May, Todd

    2003-01-01

    Some 40 years in the making, NASA s historic Gravity Probe B (GP-B) mission is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta I1 in 2003. GP-B will test two extraordinary predictions from Einstein s General Relativity: geodetic precession and the Lense-Thirring effect (frame-dragging). Employing tiny, ultra-precise gyroscopes, GP-B features a measurement accuracy of 0.5 milli-arc-seconds per year. The extraordinary measurement precision is made possible by a host of breakthrough technologies, including electro-statically suspended, super-conducting quartz gyroscopes; virtual elimination of magnetic flux; a solid quartz star- tracking telescope; helium microthrusters for drag-free control of the spacecraft; and a 2400 liter superfluid helium dewar. This paper will provide an overview of the science, key technologies, flight hardware, integration and test, and flight operations of the GP-B space vehicle. It will also examine some of the technical management challenges of a large-scale, technology-driven, Principal Investigator-led mission.

  20. Induced matter brane gravity and Einstein static universe

    SciTech Connect

    Heydarzade, Y.; Darabi, F. E-mail: f.darabi@azaruniv.edu

    2015-04-01

    We investigate stability of the Einstein static universe against the scalar, vector and tensor perturbations in the context of induced matter brane gravity. It is shown that in the framework of this model, the Einstein static universe has a positive spatial curvature. In contrast to the classical general relativity, it is found that a stable Einstein static universe against the scalar perturbations does exist provided that the variation of time dependent geometrical equation of state parameter is proportional to the minus of the variation of the scale factor, δ ω{sub g}(t) = −Cδ a(t). We obtain neutral stability against the vector perturbations, and the stability against the tensor perturbations is guaranteed due to the positivity of the spatial curvature of the Einstein static universe in induced matter brane gravity.

  1. Einstein's theory of gravity and the problem of missing mass.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro G; Starkman, Glenn D

    2009-11-06

    The observed matter in the universe accounts for just 5% of the observed gravity. A possible explanation is that Newton's and Einstein's theories of gravity fail where gravity is either weak or enhanced. The modified theory of Newtonian dynamics (MOND) reproduces, without dark matter, spiral-galaxy orbital motions and the relation between luminosity and rotation in galaxies, although not in clusters. Recent extensions of Einstein's theory are theoretically more complete. They inevitably include dark fields that seed structure growth, and they may explain recent weak lensing data. However, the presence of dark fields reduces calculability and comes at the expense of the original MOND premise, that the matter we see is the sole source of gravity. Observational tests of the relic radiation, weak lensing, and the growth of structure may distinguish modified gravity from dark matter.

  2. Effectively nonlocal metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey; Koivisto, Tomi; Sandstad, Marit

    2016-03-01

    In metric-affine theories of gravity such as the C-theories, the spacetime connection is associated to a metric that is nontrivially related to the physical metric. In this article, such theories are rewritten in terms of a single metric, and it is shown that they can be recast as effectively nonlocal gravity. With some assumptions, known ghost-free theories with nonsingular and cosmologically interesting properties may be recovered. Relations between different formulations are analyzed at both perturbative and nonperturbative levels, taking carefully into account subtleties with boundary conditions in the presence of integral operators in the action, and equivalences between theories related by nonlocal redefinitions of the fields are verified at the level of equations of motion. This suggests a possible geometrical interpretation of nonlocal gravity as an emergent property of non-Riemannian spacetime structure.

  3. Einstein-Cartan gravity with Holst term and fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmierczak, Marcin

    2009-03-15

    We investigate the consequences of the ambiguity of the minimal coupling procedure for Einstein-Cartan gravity with the Holst term and fermions. A new insight is provided into the nature and physical relevance of coupling procedures considered hitherto in the context of Ashtekar-Barbero-Immirzi formalism with fermions. The issue of physical effects of the Immirzi parameter in semiclassical theory is reinvestigated. We argue that the conclusive answer to the question of its measurability will not be possible until the more fundamental problem of nonuniqueness of gravity-induced fermion interaction in Einstein-Cartan theory is solved.

  4. Exact solutions with noncommutative symmetries in Einstein and gauge gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2005-04-01

    We present new classes of exact solutions with noncommutative symmetries constructed in vacuum Einstein gravity (in general, with nonzero cosmological constant), five-dimensional (5D) gravity and (anti) de Sitter gauge gravity. Such solutions are generated by anholonomic frame transforms and parametrized by generic off-diagonal metrics. For certain particular cases, the new classes of metrics have explicit limits with Killing symmetries but, in general, they may be characterized by certain anholonomic noncommutative matrix geometries. We argue that different classes of noncommutative symmetries can be induced by exact solutions of the field equations in commutative gravity modeled by a corresponding moving real and complex frame geometry. We analyze two classes of black ellipsoid solutions (in the vacuum case and with cosmological constant) in four-dimensional gravity and construct the analytic extensions of metrics for certain classes of associated frames with complex valued coefficients. The third class of solutions describes 5D wormholes which can be extended to complex metrics in complex gravity models defined by noncommutative geometric structures. The anholonomic noncommutative symmetries of such objects are analyzed. We also present a descriptive account how the Einstein gravity can be related to gauge models of gravity and their noncommutative extensions and discuss such constructions in relation to the Seiberg-Witten map for the gauge gravity. Finally, we consider a formalism of vielbeins deformations subjected to noncommutative symmetries in order to generate solutions for noncommutative gravity models with Moyal (star) product.

  5. Universe in a Black Hole in Einstein-Cartan Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popławski, Nikodem

    2016-12-01

    The conservation law for the angular momentum in curved spacetime, consistent with relativistic quantum mechanics, requires that the antisymmetric part of the affine connection (torsion tensor) is a variable in the principle of least action. The coupling between the spin of elementary particles and torsion in the Einstein-Cartan theory of gravity generates gravitational repulsion at extremely high densities in fermionic matter, approximated as a spin fluid, and thus avoids the formation of singularities in black holes. The collapsing matter in a black hole should therefore bounce at a finite density and then expand into a new region of space on the other side of the event horizon, which may be regarded as a nonsingular, closed universe. We show that quantum particle production caused by an extremely high curvature near a bounce can create enormous amounts of matter, produce entropy, and generate a finite period of exponential expansion (inflation) of this universe. This scenario can thus explain inflation without a scalar field and reheating. We show that, depending on the particle production rate, such a universe may undergo several nonsingular bounces until it has enough matter to reach a size at which the cosmological constant starts cosmic acceleration. The last bounce can be regarded as the big bang of this universe.

  6. Avoiding degenerate coframes in an affine gauge approach to quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, E.W.; McCrea, J.D.; Ne`eman, Y.; Hehl, F.W.

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following concepts on quantum gravity: The affine gauge approach; affine gauge transformations versus active differomorphisms; affine gauge approach to quantum gravity with topology change.

  7. Exact solutions of three-dimensional black holes: Einstein gravity versus F(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Eslam Panah, B.; Saffari, R.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we consider Einstein gravity in the presence of a class of nonlinear electrodynamics, called power Maxwell invariant (PMI). We take into account (2 + 1)-dimensional spacetime in Einstein-PMI gravity and obtain its black hole solutions. Then, we regard pure F(R) gravity as well as F(R)-conformally invariant Maxwell (CIM) theory to obtain exact solutions of the field equations with black hole interpretation. Finally, we investigate the conserved and thermodynamic quantities and discuss about the first law of thermodynamics for the mentioned gravitational models.

  8. Stability analysis of Einstein universe in f(𝒢,T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Ikram, Ayesha

    This paper explores the stability of the Einstein universe against linear homogeneous perturbations in the background of f(𝒢,T) gravity. We construct static as well as perturbed field equations and investigate stability regions for the specific forms of generic function f(𝒢,T) corresponding to conserved as well as nonconserved energy-momentum tensor. We use the equation-of-state parameter to parameterize the stability regions. The graphical analysis shows that the suitable choice of parameters lead to stable regions of the Einstein universe.

  9. New stability results for Einstein scalar gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Thomas; Horowitz, Gary T.; Roberts, Matthew M.

    2010-10-01

    We consider asymptotically anti de Sitter gravity coupled to a scalar field with mass slightly above the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. This theory admits a large class of consistent boundary conditions characterized by an arbitrary function W. An important open question is to determine which W admit stable ground states. It has previously been shown that the total energy is bounded from below if W is bounded from below, and the bulk scalar potential V(phi) admits a suitable superpotential. We extend this result and show that the energy remains bounded even in some cases where W can become arbitrarily negative. As one application, this leads to the possibility that in gauge/gravity duality, one can add a double trace operator with negative coefficient to the dual field theory and still have a stable vacuum.

  10. NASA's Gravity Probe B Mission: Was Einstein Right?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Range, Shannon K.

    2006-12-01

    The most sophisticated and precise test of Einstein's theory of curved spacetime is finally complete after 46 years of development and study. What did we discover? THE MISSION: In 1960, NASA began developing the most sophisticated and precise test of Einstein's theory of general relativity -the Gravity Probe B mission based at Stanford University. Was Einstein right about the shape of curved spacetime around the Earth? Did Earth's rotation actually "twist" spacetime around with it? After four decades of physics and engineering innovations, Gravity Probe B was ready to go. In 2004, NASA launched the Earth-orbiting satellite containing four near-perfect spinning spheres (gyroscopes) designed to reveal the shape of spacetime curvature near the Earth and the presence of "frame-dragging." After 16 months of observations and a year-and-a-half of data analysis, we nearly have our answers. Stanford scientists and theorists are making the final verifications to our data and analysis in preparation for the release of the results. IN YOUR CLASSROOM: We have translated the sophisticated science and technology of this unique mission into a teacher's guide, demonstration activities, and a mission DVD/CD. Each of these items is available to all and will help you engage your students in Einstein's ideas of spacetime, our work with gyroscopes and the exciting work of conducting research in space.

  11. Gravitation, Electromagnetism and the Cosmological Constant in Purely Affine Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popławski, Nikodem J.

    The Eddington Lagrangian in the purely affine formulation of general relativity generates the Einstein equations with the cosmological constant. The Ferraris-Kijowski purely affine Lagrangian for the electromagnetic field, which has the form of the Maxwell Lagrangian with the metric tensor replaced by the symmetrized Ricci tensor, is dynamically equivalent to the Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangian in the metric formulation. We show that the sum of the two affine Lagrangians is dynamically inequivalent to the sum of the analogous Lagrangians in the metric-affine/metric formulation. We also show that such a construction is valid only for weak electromagnetic fields. Therefore the purely affine formulation that combines gravitation, electromagnetism and the cosmological constant cannot be a simple sum of terms corresponding to separate fields. Consequently, this formulation of electromagnetism seems to be unphysical, unlike the purely metric and metric-affine pictures, unless the electromagnetic field couples to the cosmological constant.

  12. Testing Brans-Dicke gravity using the Einstein telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Yu, Jiming; Liu, Tan; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Anzhong

    2017-06-01

    Gravitational radiation is an excellent field for testing theories of gravity in strong gravitational fields. The current observations on the gravitational-wave (GW) bursts by LIGO have already placed various constraints on the alternative theories of gravity. In this paper, we investigate the possible bounds which could be placed on the Brans-Dicke gravity using GW detection from inspiraling compact binaries with the proposed Einstein Telescope, a third-generation GW detector. We first calculate in detail the waveforms of gravitational radiation in the lowest post-Newtonian approximation, including the tensor and scalar fields, which can be divided into the three polarization modes, i.e., "plus mode," "cross mode," and "breathing mode." Applying the stationary phase approximation, we obtain their Fourier transforms, and derive the correction terms in amplitude, phase, and polarization of GWs, relative to the corresponding results in general relativity. Imposing the noise level of the Einstein Telescope, we find that the GW detection from inspiraling compact binaries, composed of a neutron star and a black hole, can place stringent constraints on the Brans-Dicke gravity. The bound on the coupling constant ωBD depends on the mass, sky position, inclination angle, polarization angle, luminosity distance, redshift distribution, and total observed number NGW of the binary systems. Taking into account all the burst events up to redshift z =5 , we find that the bound could be ωBD≳1 06×(NGW/1 04)1/2. Even for the conservative estimation with 1 04 observed events, the bound is still more than one order tighter than the current limit from Solar System experiments. So, we conclude that the Einstein Telescope will provide a powerful platform to test alternative theories of gravity.

  13. Black hole merger estimates in Einstein-Maxwell and Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jai-akson, Puttarak; Chatrabhuti, Auttakit; Evnin, Oleg; Lehner, Luis

    2017-08-01

    The recent birth of gravitational wave astronomy invites a new generation of precision tests of general relativity. Signatures of black hole (BH) mergers must be systematically explored in a wide spectrum of modified gravity theories. Here, we turn to one such theory in which the initial value problem for BH mergers is well posed, the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton system. We present conservative estimates for the merger parameters (final spins, quasinormal modes) based on techniques that have worked well for ordinary gravity mergers and utilize information extracted from test particle motion in the final BH metric. The computation is developed in parallel for the modified gravity BHs (we specifically focus on the Kaluza-Klein value of the dilaton coupling, for which analytic BH solutions are known) and ordinary Kerr-Newman BHs. We comment on the possibility of obtaining final BHs with spins consistent with current observations.

  14. Unified Geometrodynamics:. A Complementarity of Newton's and Einstein's Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    Newton claimed the influence of gravity is instantaneous; Einstein insisted no influence could propagate faster than the speed of light. Recent experiments to test the speed of gravity have been controversial and inconclusive on technical grounds. Considerable effort is currently expended in the search for a Quantum Gravity; but there is no a priori reason there should be one. We propose that is not the regime of integration which instead occurs in the arena of the Unified Field, UF; further that a completed model of Geometrodynamics inherently includes a Newton/Einstein duality which introduces shock effects in certain arenas. The unified theory predicts that there is no graviton of the usual phenomenal form (an artifact of the incompleteness of Gauge Theory, i.e. gauge theory is only an approximation suggesting new physics). A new Large Scale Additional Dimensional (LSXD) M-Theoretic topological charge alternative is presented. We also attempt to show how the Titius-Bode Law for solar and exoplanetary configurations appears to provide indicia of this multiverse gravitational model. Applications of the dual geometrodynamics formulation include an interpretation of quasar luminosity as the result of gravitational shock waves in a manner countering explanations of large redshift, Z in Big Bang cosmology putatively based on Doppler recession. Instead redshift occurs as the result of a periodic minute photon mass anisotropy caused by periodic coupling to a covariant polarized Dirac vacuum.

  15. Testing Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with the reflection spectrum of accreting black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Menglei; Bambi, Cosimo; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen

    2017-05-01

    Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity is a theoretically well-motivated alternative theory of gravity emerging as a low-energy four-dimensional model from heterotic string theory. Its rotating black hole solutions are known numerically and can have macroscopic deviations from the Kerr black holes of Einstein's gravity. Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity can thus be tested with observations of astrophysical black holes. In the present paper, we simulate observations of the reflection spectrum of thin accretion disks with present and future x-ray facilities to understand whether x-ray reflection spectroscopy can distinguish the black holes in Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity from those in Einstein's gravity. We find that this is definitively out of reach for present x-ray missions, but it may be achieved with the next generation of facilities.

  16. Einstein equations and MOND theory from Debye entropic gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sheykhi, A.; Sarab, K. Rezazadeh E-mail: kazem.rezazadeh.sarab@gmail.com

    2012-10-01

    Verlinde's proposal on the entropic origin of gravity is based strongly on the assumption that the equipartition law of energy holds on the holographic screen induced by the mass distribution of the system. However, from the theory of statistical mechanics we know that the equipartition law of energy does not hold in the limit of very low temperature. Inspired by the Debye model for the equipartition law of energy in statistical thermodynamics and adopting the viewpoint that gravitational systems can be regarded as a thermodynamical system, we modify Einstein field equations. We also perform the study for Poisson equation and modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). Interestingly enough, we find that the origin of the MOND theory can be understood from Debye entropic gravity perspective. Thus our study may fill in the gap existing in the literature understanding the theoretical origin of MOND theory. In the limit of high temperature our results reduce to their respective standard gravitational equations.

  17. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauder’s affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and Yang–Mills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the Yang–Mills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with York’s integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the Chern–Simons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: •Wheeler–DeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauder’s program. •WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. •WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. •Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. •Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  18. Membrane paradigm for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Ted; Mohd, Arif; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2017-03-01

    We construct the membrane paradigm for black objects in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in spacetime dimensions ≥5 . As in the case of general relativity, the horizon can be modeled as a membrane endowed with fluidlike properties. We derive the stress tensor for this membrane fluid and study the perturbation around static backgrounds with constant curvature horizon cross section, for which the stress tensor can be regularized with the usual redshift factor, and expressed in the form of a Newtonian viscous fluid with pressure, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity. We evaluate the transport coefficients for black holes with constant curvature horizons and negative or zero cosmological constant. For the black brane geometry our result for the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density agrees with that obtained previously in different frameworks.

  19. Extremal Einstein-Born-Infeld black holes in dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, Masoud Sepehri; Hendi, Seyed Hossein; Matsuno, Ken; Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by considerable interests of Myers-Perry black holes, we employ the perturbative method to obtain a family of extremal charged rotating black hole solutions in odd dimensional Einstein-Born-Infeld-dilaton gravity. We start with an extremal Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta, and then by adding the dilaton field and the nonlinear Born-Infeld electrodynamics, we find an extremal nonlinearly charged rotating black holes. The perturbative parameter is assumed to be the electric charge q and the perturbations are performed up to the third order. We then study the physical properties of these Born-Infeld-dilaton black holes. In particular, we show that the perturbative parameter, q, the dilaton coupling constant, α, and the Born-Infeld parameter, β, modify the Smarr formula and the values of the gyromagnetic ratio of the extremal charged rotating black holes.

  20. Cohomogeneity-one solutions in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yen-Kheng

    2017-05-01

    The field equations for Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity in D dimensions are reduced to an effective one-dimensional system under the influence of exponential potentials. Various cases where exact solutions can be found are explored. With this procedure, we present interesting solutions such as a one-parameter generalization of the dilaton-Melvin spacetime and a three-parameter solution that interpolates between the Reissner-Nordström and Bertotti-Robinson solutions. This procedure also allows simple, alternative derivations of known solutions such as the Lifshitz spacetime and the planar anti-de Sitter naked singularity. In the latter case, the metric is cast in a simpler form which reveals the presence of an additional curvature singularity.

  1. One-loop quantum gravity in the Einstein universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramidi, Ivan G.; Collopy, Samuel J.

    2015-11-01

    We study quantum gravity with the Einstein-Hilbert action including the cosmological constant on the Euclidean Einstein universe S 1 × S 3. We compute exactly the spectra and the heat kernels of the relevant operators on S 3 and use these results to compute the heat trace of the graviton and ghost operators and the exact one-loop effective action on S 1 × S 3. We show that the system is unstable in the infrared limit due to the presence of the negative modes of the graviton and the ghost operators. We study the thermal properties of the model with the temperature T = (2 πa 1)-1 determined by the radius a 1 of the circle S 1. We show that the heat capacity C v is well defined and behaves like ˜ T 3 in the high temperature limit and has a singularity of the type ˜ ( T - T c )-1, indicating a second-order phase transition, with the critical temperature T c determined by the cosmological constant Λ and the radius a of the sphere S 3. We also discuss some peculiar properties of the model such as the negative heat capacity as well as possible physical applications.

  2. Conformal and Weyl-Einstein gravity: Classical geometrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Claus; Nikolić, Branislav

    2017-04-01

    We present a new formulation for the canonical approach to conformal (Weyl-squared) gravity and its extension by the Einstein-Hilbert term and a nonminimally coupled scalar field. For this purpose we use a unimodular decomposition of the three-metric and introduce unimodular-conformal canonical variables. The important feature of this choice is that only the scale part of the three-metric and the rescaled trace part of the extrinsic curvature change under a conformal transformation. This significantly simplifies the constraint analysis and manifestly reveals the conformal properties of a theory that contains the conformally invariant Weyl-tensor term. The conformal symmetry breaking which occurs in the presence of the Einstein-Hilbert term and a nonconformally coupled scalar field can then be interpreted directly in terms of this scale and this trace. We also discuss in detail the generator for the conformal transformations. This new Hamiltonian formulation is especially suitable for quantization, which is the subject of a separate paper.

  3. On static black holes solutions in Einstein and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with topology [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Dadhich, Naresh; Pons, Josep M

    We study static black hole solutions in Einstein and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with the topology of the product of two spheres, [Formula: see text], in higher dimensions. There is an unusual new feature of the Gauss-Bonnet black hole: the avoidance of a non-central naked singularity prescribes a mass range for the black hole in terms of [Formula: see text]. For an Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black hole a limited window of negative values for [Formula: see text] is also permitted. This topology encompasses black strings, branes, and generalized Nariai metrics. We also give new solutions with the product of two spheres of constant curvature.

  4. The Hamiltonian of Einstein affine-metric formulation of General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriushcheva, N.; Kuzmin, S. V.

    2010-11-01

    It is shown that the Hamiltonian of the Einstein affine-metric (first-order) formulation of General Relativity (GR) leads to a constraint structure that allows the restoration of its unique gauge invariance, four-diffeomorphism, without the need of any field dependent redefinition of gauge parameters as in the case of the second-order formulation. In the second-order formulation of ADM gravity the need for such a redefinition is the result of the non-canonical change of variables ( arXiv:0809.0097 ). For the first-order formulation, the necessity of such a redefinition "to correspond to diffeomorphism invariance" (reported by Ghalati, arXiv:0901.3344 ) is just an artifact of using the Henneaux-Teitelboim-Zanelli ansatz (Nucl. Phys. B 332:169, 1990), which is sensitive to the choice of linear combination of tertiary constraints. This ansatz cannot be used as an algorithm for finding a gauge invariance, which is a unique property of a physical system, and it should not be affected by different choices of linear combinations of non-primary first class constraints. The algorithm of Castellani (Ann. Phys. 143:357, 1982) is free from such a deficiency and it leads directly to four-diffeomorphism invariance for first, as well as for second-order Hamiltonian formulations of GR. The distinct role of primary first class constraints, the effect of considering different linear combinations of constraints, the canonical transformations of phase-space variables, and their interplay are discussed in some detail for Hamiltonians of the second- and first-order formulations of metric GR. The first-order formulation of Einstein-Cartan theory, which is the classical background of Loop Quantum Gravity, is also discussed.

  5. Einstein Gravity and Beyond: Aspects of Higher-Curvature Gravity and Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saugata

    This thesis explores the different aspects of higher curvature gravity. The "membrane paradigm" of black holes in Einstein gravity is extended to black holes in f(R) gravity and it is shown that the higher curvature effects of f( R) gravity causes the membrane fluid to become non-Newtonian. Next a modification of the null energy condition in gravity is provided. The purpose of the null energy condition is to filter out ill-behaved theories containing ghosts. Conformal transformations, which are simple redefinitions of the spacetime, introduces serious violations of the null energy condition. This violation is shown to be spurious and a prescription for obtaining a modified null energy condition, based on the universality of the second law of thermodynamics, is provided. The thermodynamic properties of the black holes are further explored using merger of extremal black holes whose horizon entropy has topological contributions coming from the higher curvature Gauss-Bonnet term. The analysis refutes the prevalent belief in the literature that the second law of black hole thermodynamics is violated in the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term in four dimensions. Subsequently a specific class of higher derivative scalar field theories called the galileons are obtained from a Kaluza-Klein reduction of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Galileons are null energy condition violating theories which lead to violations of the second law of thermodynamics of black holes. These higher derivative scalar field theories which are non-minimally coupled to gravity required the development of a generalized method for obtaining the equations of motion. Utilizing this generalized method, it is shown that the inclusion of the Gauss-Bonnet term made the theory of gravity to become higher derivative, which makes it difficult to make any statements about the connection between the violation of the second law of thermodynamics and the galileon fields.

  6. An axially symmetric solution of metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachynsky, E. J.; Tresguerres, R.; Obukhov, Yu N.; Hehl, F. W.

    1996-12-01

    We present an exact stationary axially symmetric vacuum solution of metric-affine gravity (MAG) which generalizes the recently reported spherically symmetric solution; besides the metric, it carries nonmetricity and torsion as post-Riemannian geometrical structures. The parameters of the solution are interpreted as mass and angular momentum and as dilation, shear and spin charges.

  7. Nonlinear dynamics in the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkai, Hisa-aki; Torii, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    We numerically investigated how nonlinear dynamics depends on the dimensionality and on the higher-order curvature corrections in the form of Gauss-Bonnet (GB) terms. We especially monitored the processes of appearances of a singularity (or black hole) in two models: (i) a perturbed wormhole throat in spherically symmetric space-time, and (ii) colliding scalar pulses in plane-symmetric space-time. We used a dual-null formulation for evolving the field equations, which enables us to locate the trapping horizons directly, and also enables us to follow close to the large-curvature region due to its causal integrating scheme. We observed that the fate of a perturbed wormhole is either a black hole or an expanding throat depending on the total energy of the structure, and its threshold depends on the coupling constant of the GB terms (αGB ). We also observed that a collision of large scalar pulses will produce a large-curvature region, of which the magnitude also depends on αGB. For both models, the normal corrections (αGB>0 ) work for avoiding the appearance of singularity, although it is inevitable. We also found that in the critical situation for forming a black hole, the existence of the trapped region in the Einstein-GB gravity does not directly indicate the formation of a black hole.

  8. On the breakdown of asymptotic Poincare invariance in D = 3 Einstein gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deser, S.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown through a series of calculations that neither momentum nor boosts are definable for finite energy solutions of Einstein gravity in D = 3. The contrast between the effects of Lorentz transformations on the corresponding metrics for D = 3 and D = 4 gravity is demonstrated, and some comparisons with the vector gauge treatment of the problem are offered.

  9. An Exact Solution of Einstein-Maxwell Gravity Coupled to a Scalar Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    The general solution to low-energy string theory representing static spherically symmetric solution of the Einstein-Maxwell gravity with a massless scalar field has been found. Some of the partial cases appear to coincide with known solutions to black holes, naked singularities, and gravity and electromagnetic fields.

  10. An Exact Solution of Einstein-Maxwell Gravity Coupled to a Scalar Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    The general solution to low-energy string theory representing static spherically symmetric solution of the Einstein-Maxwell gravity with a massless scalar field has been found. Some of the partial cases appear to coincide with known solutions to black holes, naked singularities, and gravity and electromagnetic fields.

  11. Stability of the Einstein static universe in f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Hollenstein, Lukas; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2007-10-15

    We analyze the stability of the Einstein static universe by considering homogeneous scalar perturbations in the context of f(R) modified theories of gravity. By considering specific forms of f(R), the stability regions of the solutions are parametrized by a linear equation of state parameter w=p/{rho}. Contrary to classical general relativity, it is found that in f(R) gravity a stable Einstein cosmos with a positive cosmological constant does indeed exist. Thus, we are lead to conclude that, in principle, modifications in f(R) gravity stabilize solutions which are unstable in general relativity.

  12. Generation of magnetic fields in Einstein-aether gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saga, Shohei; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2013-05-01

    Recently the lower bounds of the intergalactic magnetic fields 10-16˜10-20G are set by gamma-ray observations while it is unlikely to generate such large scale magnetic fields through astrophysical processes. It is known that large scale magnetic fields could be generated if there exist cosmological vector-mode perturbations in the primordial plasma. The vector mode, however, has only a decaying solution in general relativity if the plasma consists of perfect fluids. In order to investigate a possible mechanism of magnetogenesis in the primordial plasma, here we consider cosmological perturbations in the Einstein-aether gravity model, in which the aether field can act as a new source of vector metric perturbations. The vector metric perturbations induce the velocity difference between baryons and photons which then generate magnetic fields. This velocity difference arises from effects at the second order in the tight-coupling approximation. We estimate the angular power spectra of temperature and B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies in this model and put a rough constraint on the aether field parameters from latest observations. We then estimate the power spectrum of associated magnetic fields around the recombination epoch within this limit. It is found that the spectrum has a characteristic peak at k=0.1hMpc-1, and at that scale the amplitude can be as large as B˜10-22G where the upper bound comes from cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. The magnetic fields with this amplitude can be seeds of large scale magnetic fields observed today if the sufficient dynamo mechanism takes place. Analytic interpretation for the power spectra is also given.

  13. pp-waves with torsion and metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasic, Vedad; Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2005-10-01

    A classical pp-wave is a four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetime which admits a nonvanishing parallel spinor field; here the connection is assumed to be Levi-Civita. We generalize this definition to metric compatible spacetimes with torsion and describe basic properties of such spacetimes. We use our generalized pp-waves for constructing new explicit vacuum solutions of quadratic metric-affine gravity.

  14. The metric-affine formalism of f(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Liberati, Stefano

    2007-05-01

    Recently a class of alternative theories of gravity which goes under the name f(R) gravity, has received considerable attention, mainly due to its interesting applications in cosmology. However, the phenomenology of such theories is not only relevant to cosmological scales, especially when it is treated within the framework of the so called Palatini variation, an independent variation with respect to the metric and the connection, which is not considered a priori to be the Levi Civita connection of the metric. If this connection has its standard geometrical meaning the resulting theory will be a metric-affine theory of gravity, as will be discussed in this talk. The general formalism will be presented and several aspects of the theory will be covered, mainly focusing on the enriched phenomenology that such theories exhibit with respect to General Relativity, relevant not only to large scales (cosmology) but also to small scales (e.g. torsion).

  15. Stability of the Einstein static universe in modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2009-03-15

    We analyze the stability of the Einstein static universe by considering linear homogeneous perturbations in the context of f(G) modified Gauss-Bonnet theories of gravity. By considering a generic form of f(G), the stability region of the Einstein static universe is parametrized by the linear equation of state parameter w=p/{rho} and the second derivative f{sup ''}(G) of the Gauss-Bonnet term.

  16. Variational principle and one-point functions in three-dimensional flat space Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Stephane; Grumiller, Daniel; Schöller, Friedrich; Simón, Joan

    2014-04-01

    We provide a well-defined variational principle for three-dimensional flat space Einstein gravity by adding one-half of the Gibbons-Hawking-York boundary term to the bulk action. We check the zero-point function, recovering consistency with thermodynamics of flat space cosmologies. We then apply our result to calculate the one-point functions in flat space Einstein gravity for the vacuum and all flat space cosmologies. The results are compatible with the ones for the zero-mode charges obtained by canonical analysis.

  17. Quasispherical gravitational collapse in 5D Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Sushant G.; Jhingan, S.

    2010-07-15

    We obtain a general five-dimensional quasispherical collapsing solutions of irrotational dust in Einstein gravity with the Gauss-Bonnet combination of quadratic curvature terms. These solutions are a generalization, to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, of the five-dimensional quasispherical Szkeres like collapsing solutions in general relativity. It is found that the collapse proceeds in the same way as in the analogous spherical collapse, i.e., there exists regular initial data such that the collapse proceed to form naked singularities violating cosmic censorship conjecture. The effect of Gauss-Bonnet quadratic curvature terms on the formation and locations of the apparent horizon is deduced.

  18. Modified gravity in three dimensional metric-affine scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Ghasemi-Nodehi, M.; Rubiera-Garcia, D.

    2015-08-01

    We consider metric-affine scenarios where a modified gravitational action is sourced by electrovacuum fields in a three dimensional space-time. We first study the case of f (R ) theories, finding deviations near the center as compared to the solutions of general relativity. We then consider Born-Infeld gravity, which has raised a lot of interest in the last few years regarding its applications in astrophysics and cosmology, and show that new features always arise at a finite distance from the center. Several properties of the resulting space-times, in particular in presence of a cosmological constant term, are discussed.

  19. Einstein versus the Simple Pendulum Formula: Does Gravity Slow All Clocks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puri, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    According to the Newtonian formula for a simple pendulum, the period of a pendulum is inversely proportional to the square root of "g", the gravitational field strength. Einstein's theory of general relativity leads to the result that time slows down where gravity is intense. The two claims look contradictory and can muddle student and…

  20. Einstein versus the Simple Pendulum Formula: Does Gravity Slow All Clocks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puri, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    According to the Newtonian formula for a simple pendulum, the period of a pendulum is inversely proportional to the square root of "g", the gravitational field strength. Einstein's theory of general relativity leads to the result that time slows down where gravity is intense. The two claims look contradictory and can muddle student and…

  1. Einstein Revisited - Gravity in Curved Spacetime Without Event Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiter, Darryl

    2000-04-01

    In terms of covariant derivatives with respect to flat background spacetimes upon which the physical curved spacetime is imposed (1), covariant conservation of energy momentum requires, via the Bianchi Identity, that the Einstein tensor be equated to the matter energy momentum tensor. However the Einstein tensor covariantly splits (2) into two tensor parts: (a) a term proportional to the gravitational stress energy momentum tensor, and (b) an anti-symmetric tensor which obeys a covariant 4-divergence identity called the Freud Identity. Hence covariant conservation of energy momentum requires, via the Freud Identity, that the Freud tensor be equal to a constant times the matter energy momentum tensor. The resultant field equations (3) agree with the Einstein equations to first order, but differ in higher orders (4) such that black holes are replaced by "red holes" i.e., dense objects collapsed inside of their photon orbits with no event horizons. (1) Rosen, N., (1963), Ann. Phys. v22, 1; (2) Rund, H., (1991), Alg. Grps. & Geom. v8, 267; (3) Yilmaz, Hl, (1992), Nuo. Cim. v107B, 946; (4) Roberstson, S., (1999),Ap.J. v515, 365.

  2. Einstein's Gravity as Seen by a Cosmic Lighthouse Keeper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Michael

    The last years have seen continuing activities in the exploration of our understanding of gravity, motivated by results from precision cosmology and new precision astrophysical experiments. At the centre of attention lies the question as to whether general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. In answering this question, we work not only towards correctly interpreting the phenomenon of "dark energy" but also towards the goal of achieving a quantum theory of gravity. In these efforts, the observations of pulsars, especially those in binary systems, play an important role. Pulsars do not only provide the only evidence for the existence of gravitational waves so far, but they also provide precision tests of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity. This talk summarizes the current state-of-art in these experiments and looks into the future.

  3. Correspondence of F(R) gravity singularities in Jordan and Einstein frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahamonde, Sebastian; Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.; Wright, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    We study the finite time singularity correspondence between the Jordan and Einstein frames for various F(R) gravity theories. Particularly we investigate the ordinary pure F(R) gravity case and the unimodular F(R) gravity cases, in the absence of any matter fluids. In the ordinary F(R) gravity cases, by using specific illustrative examples, we show that it is possible to have various correspondences of finite time singularities, and in some cases it is possible a singular cosmology in one frame might be non-singular in the other frame. In the unimodular F(R) gravity case, the unimodular constraint is affected by the conformal transformation, so this has an effect on the metric we choose. Moreover, we study the Einstein frame counterpart theory of the unimodular F(R) gravity case, and we investigate the correspondences of the singularities in the two theories by considering specific illustrative examples. Finally, a brief dynamical system analysis is performed for the vacuum unimodular F(R) gravity and we demonstrate how the dynamical system behaves near the future Big Rip singularity.

  4. DBI Galileons in the Einstein frame: Local gravity and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumalacárregui, Miguel; Koivisto, Tomi S.; Mota, David F.

    2013-04-01

    It is shown that a disformally coupled theory in which the gravitational sector has the Einstein-Hilbert form is equivalent to a quartic Dirac-Born-Infeld Galileon Lagrangian, possessing nonlinear higher derivative interactions, and hence allowing for the Vainshtein effect. This Einstein frame description considerably simplifies the dynamical equations and highlights the role of the different terms. The study of highly dense, nonrelativistic environments within this description unravels the existence of a disformal screening mechanism, while the study of static vacuum configurations reveals the existence of a Vainshtein radius, at which the asymptotic solution breaks down. Disformal couplings to matter also allow the construction of dark energy models, which behave differently than conformally coupled ones and introduce new effects on the growth of large scale structure over cosmological scales, on which the scalar force is not screened. We consider a simple disformally coupled dark matter model in detail, in which standard model particles follow geodesics of the gravitational metric and only dark matter is affected by the disformal scalar field. This particular model is not compatible with observations in the linearly perturbed regime. Nonetheless, disformally coupled theories offer enough freedom to construct realistic cosmological scenarios, which can be distinguished from the standard model through characteristic signatures.

  5. Existence of Einstein static universes and their stability in fourth-order theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Rituparno; Goheer, Naureen; Dunsby, Peter K S

    2008-08-15

    We investigate whether or not an Einstein static universe is a solution to the cosmological equations in f(R) gravity. It is found that only one class of f(R) theories admits an Einstein static model, and that this class is neutrally stable with respect to vector and tensor perturbations for all equations of state on all scales. Scalar perturbations are only stable on all scales if the matter fluid equation of state satisfies c{sub s}{sup 2}>({radical}(5)-1/6){approx_equal}0.21. This result is remarkably similar to the general relativity case, where it was found that the Einstein static model is stable for c{sub s}{sup 2}>(1/5)

  6. Why does a ball fall?: A new visualization for Einstein's model of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Roy R.

    2016-05-01

    Many physics teachers seek a simple illustration of Einstein's model of gravity, suitable for the introductory physics classroom. In this article, we show that an ordinary wall map of the world can be used to contrast Newton's and Einstein's explanations for why a ball falls when released. Trajectories on the map are analogous to the trajectories of the ball through spacetime, because the geometry of the map is remarkably similar to the geometry of spacetime near Earth's surface. To aid in the pedagogy, we focus on the concept of scale rather than curvature. We show that, contrary to popular visualizations of Einstein's model, it is primarily the warping of time, not space, that causes a ball to fall, and we address the question of why we do not see the distortion of spacetime around us. Finally, we recover Newton's results for the falling ball from our geometrical treatment.

  7. Einstein equation from covariant loop quantum gravity in semiclassical continuum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Muxin

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we explain how four-dimensional general relativity and, in particular, the Einstein equation, emerge from the spin-foam amplitude in loop quantum gravity. We propose a new limit that couples both the semiclassical limit and continuum limit of spin-foam amplitudes. The continuum Einstein equation emerges in this limit. Solutions of the Einstein equation can be approached by dominant configurations in spin-foam amplitudes. A running scale is naturally associated to the sequence of refined triangulations. The continuum limit corresponds to the infrared limit of the running scale. An important ingredient in the derivation is a regularization for the sum over spins, which is necessary for the semiclassical continuum limit. We also explain in this paper the role played by the so-called flatness in spin-foam formulation, and how to take advantage of it.

  8. Stability of anti-de sitter space in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity.

    PubMed

    Deppe, Nils; Kolly, Allison; Frey, Andrew; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2015-02-20

    Recently it has been argued that in Einstein gravity anti-de Sitter spacetime is unstable against the formation of black holes for a large class of arbitrarily small perturbations. We examine the effects of including a Gauss-Bonnet term. In five dimensions, spherically symmetric Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity has two key features: Choptuik scaling exhibits a radius gap, and the mass function goes to a finite value as the horizon radius vanishes. These suggest that black holes will not form dynamically if the total mass-energy content of the spacetime is too small, thereby restoring the stability of anti-de Sitter spacetime in this context. We support this claim with numerical simulations and uncover a rich structure in horizon radii and formation times as a function of perturbation amplitude.

  9. Light Aberration, Deflection and Frequency Shift in Einstein-aether Gravity Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai

    2009-05-01

    Einstein-Aether gravity theory has been proven successful in passing experiments of different scales. Especially its Eddington parameters γand βhave the same numerical values as those in general relativity. Recently Xie and Huang (2008) have advanced this theory to a second post-Newtonian approximation for an N-body model and obtained a explicit metric when the bodies are point-like masses. This research considers light propagation in the above gravitational field, explore the light aberration, deflection, time delay, frequency shift etc. The results will provide for future experiments in testing gravity theories.

  10. Asymptotically free scalar curvature-ghost coupling in quantum Einstein gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, Astrid; Gies, Holger; Scherer, Michael M.

    2009-11-15

    We consider the asymptotic-safety scenario for quantum gravity which constructs a nonperturbatively renormalizable quantum gravity theory with the help of the functional renormalization group (RG). We verify the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point and include a running curvature-ghost coupling as a first step towards the flow of the ghost sector of the theory. We find that the scalar curvature-ghost coupling is asymptotically free and RG relevant in the ultraviolet. Most importantly, the property of asymptotic safety discovered so far within the Einstein-Hilbert truncation and beyond remains stable under the inclusion of the ghost flow.

  11. Exact solutions with AdS asymptotics of Einstein and Einstein-Maxwell gravity minimally coupled to a scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Cadoni, Mariano; Serra, Matteo; Mignemi, Salvatore

    2011-10-15

    We propose a general method for solving exactly the static field equations of Einstein and Einstein-Maxwell gravity minimally coupled to a scalar field. Our method starts from an ansatz for the scalar field profile, and determines, together with the metric functions, the corresponding form of the scalar self-interaction potential. Using this method we prove a new no-hair theorem about the existence of hairy black-hole and black-brane solutions and derive broad classes of static solutions with radial symmetry of the theory, which may play an important role in applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence to condensed matter and strongly coupled QFTs. These solutions include: (1) four- or generic (d+2)-dimensional solutions with planar, spherical or hyperbolic horizon topology; (2) solutions with anti-de Sitter, domain wall and Lifshitz asymptotics; (3) solutions interpolating between an anti-de Sitter spacetime in the asymptotic region and a domain wall or conformal Lifshitz spacetime in the near-horizon region.

  12. The phase and critical point of quantum Einstein-Cartan gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, She-Sheng

    2012-05-01

    By introducing diffeomorphism and local Lorentz gauge invariant holonomy fields, we study in the recent article [S.-S. Xue, Phys. Rev. D 82 (2010) 064039] the quantum Einstein-Cartan gravity in the framework of Regge calculus. On the basis of strong coupling expansion, mean-field approximation and dynamical equations satisfied by holonomy fields, we present in this Letter calculations and discussions to show the phase structure of the quantum Einstein-Cartan gravity, (i) the order phase: long-range condensations of holonomy fields in strong gauge couplings; (ii) the disorder phase: short-range fluctuations of holonomy fields in weak gauge couplings. According to the competition of the activation energy of holonomy fields and their entropy, we give a simple estimate of the possible ultra-violet critical point and correlation length for the second-order phase transition from the order phase to disorder one. At this critical point, we discuss whether the continuum field theory of quantum Einstein-Cartan gravity can be possibly approached when the macroscopic correlation length of holonomy field condensations is much larger than the Planck length.

  13. Non-Einstein source effects in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Waldron, A.

    2014-01-01

    We exhibit novel effects (absent in GR) of sources in massive gravity. First, we show that removing its ghost mode forces a field-current identity: The metric's trace is locally proportional to that of its stress tensor; a point source implies a metric singularity enhanced by the square of the graviton's range. Second, exterior solutions acquire spatial stress hair—their metric components depend on the interior Tij. Also, in contrast to naïve expectations, the Newtonian potential of a source is now determined by both its spatial stress and mass. Our explicit results are obtained at linear, Fierz-Pauli, level but qualitatively persist nonlinearly.

  14. Cosmological Dynamics of f(R) Gravity Scalar Degree of Freedom in Einstein Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Umananda Dev; Deka, Kabita

    2013-12-01

    f(R) gravity models belong to an important class of modified gravity models where the late time cosmic accelerated expansion is considered as a manifestation of the large scale modification of the force of gravity. f(R) gravity models can be expressed in terms of a scalar degree of freedom by redefinition of model's variable. The conformal transformation of the action from Jordan frame to Einstein frame makes the scalar degree of freedom more explicit and can be studied conveniently. We have investigated the features of the scalar degree of freedoms and the consequent cosmological implications of the power-law (ξRn) and the Starobinsky (disappearing cosmological constant) f(R) gravity models numerically in the Einstein frame. Both the models show interesting behavior of their scalar degree of freedom and could produce the accelerated expansion of the universe in the Einstein frame with the negative equation of state of the scalar field. However, the scalar field potential for the power-law model is the well-behaved function of the field, whereas the potential becomes flat for higher value of field in the case of the Starobinsky model. Moreover, the equation of state of the scalar field for the power-law model is always negative and less than -1/3, which corresponds to the behavior of the dark energy, that produces the accelerated expansion of the universe. This is not always the case for the Starobinsky model. At late times, the Starobinsky model behaves as cosmological constant Λ as behaves by power-law model for the values of n → 2 at all times.

  15. Avoidance of singularities in asymptotically safe Quantum Einstein Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kofinas, Georgios; Zarikas, Vasilios E-mail: vzarikas@teilam.gr

    2015-10-01

    New general spherically symmetric solutions have been derived with a cosmological ''constant'' Λ as a source. This Λ term is not constant but it satisfies the properties of the asymptotically safe gravity at the ultraviolet fixed point. The importance of these solutions comes from the fact that they may describe the near to the centre region of black hole spacetimes as this is modified by the Renormalization Group scaling behaviour of the fields. The consistent set of field equations which respect the Bianchi identities is derived and solved. One of the solutions (with conventional sign of temporal-radial metric components) is timelike geodesically complete, and although there is still a curvature divergent origin, this is never approachable by an infalling massive particle which is reflected at a finite distance due to the repulsive origin. Another family of solutions (of both signatures) range from a finite radius outwards, they cannot be extended to the centre of spherical symmetry, and the curvature invariants are finite at the minimum radius.

  16. Avoidance of singularities in asymptotically safe Quantum Einstein Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kofinas, Georgios; Zarikas, Vasilios

    2015-10-30

    New general spherically symmetric solutions have been derived with a cosmological “constant” Λ as a source. This Λ term is not constant but it satisfies the properties of the asymptotically safe gravity at the ultraviolet fixed point. The importance of these solutions comes from the fact that they may describe the near to the centre region of black hole spacetimes as this is modified by the Renormalization Group scaling behaviour of the fields. The consistent set of field equations which respect the Bianchi identities is derived and solved. One of the solutions (with conventional sign of temporal-radial metric components) is timelike geodesically complete, and although there is still a curvature divergent origin, this is never approachable by an infalling massive particle which is reflected at a finite distance due to the repulsive origin. Another family of solutions (of both signatures) range from a finite radius outwards, they cannot be extended to the centre of spherical symmetry, and the curvature invariants are finite at the minimum radius.

  17. Stability in Einstein-scalar gravity with a logarithmic branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Roberts, Matthew M.

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the nonperturbative stability of asymptotically anti-de Sitter gravity coupled to tachyonic scalar fields with mass saturating the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. Such “designer gravity” theories admit a large class of boundary conditions at asymptotic infinity. At this mass, the asymptotic behavior of the scalar field develops a logarithmic branch, and previous attempts at proving a minimum energy theorem failed due to a large radius divergence in the spinor charge. In this paper, we finally resolve this issue and derive a lower bound on the conserved energy. Just as for masses slightly above the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound, a given scalar potential can admit two possible branches of the corresponding superpotential, one analytic and one nonanalytic. The key point again is that existence of the nonanalytic branch is necessary for the energy bound to hold. We discuss several AdS/CFT applications of this result, including the use of double-trace deformations to induce spontaneous symmetry breaking.

  18. Impact of topology in foliated quantum Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houthoff, W. B.; Kurov, A.; Saueressig, F.

    2017-07-01

    We use a functional renormalization group equation tailored to the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner formulation of gravity to study the scale dependence of Newton's coupling and the cosmological constant on a background spacetime with topology S^1 × S^d. The resulting beta functions possess a non-trivial renormalization group fixed point, which may provide the high-energy completion of the theory through the asymptotic safety mechanism. The fixed point is robust with respect to changing the parametrization of the metric fluctuations and regulator scheme. The phase diagrams show that this fixed point is connected to a classical regime through a crossover. In addition the flow may exhibit a regime of "gravitational instability", modifying the theory in the deep infrared. Our work complements earlier studies of the gravitational renormalization group flow on a background topology S^1 × T^d (Biemans et al. Phys Rev D 95:086013, 2017, Biemans et al. arXiv:1702.06539, 2017) and establishes that the flow is essentially independent of the background topology.

  19. Generalized spheroidal spacetimes in 5-D Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansraj, Sudan

    2017-08-01

    The field equations for static EGBM gravity are obtained and transformed to an equivalent form through a coordinate redefinition. A form for one of the metric potentials that generalizes the spheroidal ansatz of Vaidya-Tikekar superdense stars and additionally prescribing the electric field intensity yields viable solutions. Some special cases of the general solution are considered and analogous classes in the Einstein framework are studied. In particular the Finch-Skea ansatz is examined in detail and found to satisfy the elementary physical requirements. These include positivity of pressure and density, the existence of a pressure free hypersurface marking the boundary, continuity with the exterior metric, a subluminal sound speed as well as the energy conditions. Moreover, the solution possesses no coordinate singularities. It is found that the impact of the Gauss-Bonnet term is to correct undesirable features in the pressure profile and sound speed index when compared to the equivalent Einstein gravity model. Furthermore graphical analyses suggest that higher densities are achievable for the same radial values when compared to the 5-dimensional Einstein case. The case of a constant gravitational potential, isothermal distribution as well as an incompressible fluid are studied. All exact solutions derived exhibit an equation of state explicitly.

  20. An exact solution of (2 + 1)-dimensional topological gravity in metric-affine spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresguerres, Romualdo

    1992-08-01

    We present a solution of a generalized topological theory of gravity defined in a three-dimensional metric-affine spacetime. The solution includes nonmetricity and torsion. Both are functions of the conformal factor present in the triads ϑ α.

  1. Delayed collapses of Bose-Einstein condensates in relation to anti-de Sitter gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, Anxo F.; Mas, Javier; Paredes, Angel

    2017-03-01

    We numerically investigate spherically symmetric collapses in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with attractive nonlinearity in a harmonic potential. Even below threshold for direct collapse, the wave function bounces off from the origin and may eventually become singular after a number of oscillations in the trapping potential. This is reminiscent of the evolution of Einstein gravity sourced by a scalar field in anti de Sitter space where collapse corresponds to black-hole formation. We carefully examine the long time evolution of the wave function for continuous families of initial states in order to sharpen out this qualitative coincidence which may bring new insights in both directions. On the one hand, we comment on possible implications for the so-called Bosenova collapses in cold atom Bose-Einstein condensates. On the other hand, Gross-Pitaevskii provides a toy model to study the relevance of either the resonance conditions or the nonlinearity for the problem of anti de Sitter instability.

  2. Delayed collapses of Bose-Einstein condensates in relation to anti-de Sitter gravity.

    PubMed

    Biasi, Anxo F; Mas, Javier; Paredes, Angel

    2017-03-01

    We numerically investigate spherically symmetric collapses in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with attractive nonlinearity in a harmonic potential. Even below threshold for direct collapse, the wave function bounces off from the origin and may eventually become singular after a number of oscillations in the trapping potential. This is reminiscent of the evolution of Einstein gravity sourced by a scalar field in anti de Sitter space where collapse corresponds to black-hole formation. We carefully examine the long time evolution of the wave function for continuous families of initial states in order to sharpen out this qualitative coincidence which may bring new insights in both directions. On the one hand, we comment on possible implications for the so-called Bosenova collapses in cold atom Bose-Einstein condensates. On the other hand, Gross-Pitaevskii provides a toy model to study the relevance of either the resonance conditions or the nonlinearity for the problem of anti de Sitter instability.

  3. Spatially covariant theories of gravity: disformal transformation, cosmological perturbations and the Einstein frame

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Gao, Xian; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi E-mail: gao@th.phys.titech.ac.jp

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the cosmological background evolution and perturbations in a general class of spatially covariant theories of gravity, which propagates two tensor modes and one scalar mode. We show that the structure of the theory is preserved under the disformal transformation. We also evaluate the primordial spectra for both the gravitational waves and the curvature perturbation, which are invariant under the disformal transformation. Due to the existence of higher spatial derivatives, the quadratic Lagrangian for the tensor modes itself cannot be transformed to the form in the Einstein frame. Nevertheless, there exists a one-parameter family of frames in which the spectrum of the gravitational waves takes the standard form in the Einstein frame.

  4. On a new approach for constructing wormholes in Einstein-Born-Infeld gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Park, Mu-In

    2016-11-01

    We study a new approach for the wormhole construction in Einstein-Born-Infeld gravity, which does not require exotic matters in the Einstein equation. The Born-Infeld field equation is not modified by coordinate independent conditions of continuous metric tensor and its derivatives, even though the Born-Infeld fields have discontinuities in their derivatives at the throat in general. We study the relation of the newly introduced conditions with the usual continuity equation for the energy-momentum tensor and the gravitational Bianchi identity. We find that there is no violation of energy conditions for the Born-Infeld fields contrary to the usual approaches. The exoticity of the energy-momentum tensor is not essential for sustaining wormholes. Some open problems are discussed.

  5. Inhomogeneous dust collapse in 5D Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingan, S.; Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2010-01-15

    We consider a Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi type space-time in Einstein gravity with the Gauss-Bonnet combination of quadratic curvature terms, and present an exact solution in closed form. It turns out that the presence of the coupling constant of the Gauss-Bonnet terms {alpha}>0 completely changes the causal structure of the singularities from the analogous general relativistic case. The gravitational collapse of inhomogeneous dust in the five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet extended Einstein equations leads to formation of a massive, but weak, timelike singularity which is forbidden in general relativity. Interestingly, this is a counterexample to three conjectures, viz., cosmic censorship conjecture, hoop conjecture, and Seifert's conjecture.

  6. Particle creation phenomenology, Dirac sea and the induced Weyl and Einstein-dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, V. A.; Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2017-01-01

    We constructed the conformally invariant model for scalar particle creation induced by strong gravitational fields. Starting from the "usual" hydrodynamical description of the particle motion written in the Eulerian coordinates we substituted the particle number conservation law (which enters the formalism) by "the particle creation law", proportional to the square of the Weyl tensor (following the famous result by Ya.B. Zel'dovich and A.A. Starobinsky). Then, demanding the conformal invariance of the whole dynamical system, we have got both the (Weyl)-conformal gravity and the Einstein-Hilbert gravity action integral with dilaton field. Thus, we obtained something like the induced gravity suggested first by A.D. Sakharov. It is shown that the resulting system is self-consistent. We considered also the vacuum equations. It is shown that, beside the "empty vacuum", there may exist the "dynamical vacuum", which is nothing more but the Dirac sea. The latter is described by the unexpectedly elegant equation which includes both the Bach and Einstein tensors and the cosmological terms.

  7. - criticality of AdS black hole in the Einstein-Maxwell-power-Yang-Mills gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Zou, De-Cheng; Xu, Wei; Yue, Rui-Hong

    2015-02-01

    We study the - critical behaivor of N-dimensional AdS black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-power-Yang-Mills gravity. Our results show the existence of the Van der Waals like small-large black hole phase transitions when taking some special values of charges of the Maxwell and Yang-Mills fields. Further to calculate the critical exponents of the black holes at the critical point, we find that they are the same as those in the Van der Waals liquid-gas system.

  8. Holographic superconductors with various condensates in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Qiyuan; Wang Bin; Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios; Oliveira, Jeferson de; Pavan, A. B.

    2010-05-15

    We study holographic superconductors in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We consider two particular backgrounds: a d-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole and a Gauss-Bonnet-AdS soliton. We discuss in detail the effects that the mass of the scalar field, the Gauss-Bonnet coupling and the dimensionality of the AdS space have on the condensation formation and conductivity. We also study the ratio {omega}{sub g}/T{sub c} for various masses of the scalar field and Gauss-Bonnet couplings.

  9. Addendum to ''Thin-shell wormholes supported by ordinary matter in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity''

    SciTech Connect

    Simeone, Claudio

    2011-04-15

    Thin-shell wormholes are constructed starting from the exotic branch of the Wiltshire spherically symmetric solution of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. The energy-momentum tensor of the shell is studied, and it is shown that configurations supported by matter satisfying the energy conditions exist for certain values of the parameters. Differing from the previous result associated with the normal branch of the Wiltshire solution, this is achieved for small positive values of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter and for vanishing charge.

  10. Mass, angular momentum, and charge inequalities for black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-axion-dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogatko, Marek

    2014-02-01

    Mass, angular momentum, and charge inequalities for axisymmetric maximal time-symmetric initial data invariant under an action of U(1) group, in Einstein-Maxwell-axion-dilaton gravity being the low-energy limit of the heterotic string theory, is established. We assume that a data set with two asymptotically flat regions is given on a smooth simply connected manifold. We also pay attention to the area momentum charge inequalities for a closed orientable two-dimensional spacelike surface embedded in the spacetime of the considered theory.

  11. Constant curvature black holes in Einstein-AdS gravity: Conserved quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilleminot, Pablo; Olea, Rodrigo; Petrov, Alexander N.

    2017-06-01

    We study physical properties of constant curvature black holes in Einstein-anti-de Sitter (AdS) gravity. These objects, which are locally AdS throughout the space, are constructed from identifications of global AdS spacetime, in a similar fashion as the Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole in three dimensions. We find that, in dimensions equal to or greater than 4, constant curvature black holes have zero mass and angular momentum. Only in odd dimensions are we able to associate a nonvanishing conserved quantity to these solutions, which corresponds to the vacuum (Casimir) energy of the spacetime.

  12. Stability of the Einstein static Universe in the scalar-tensor theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Haitao; Wu, Puxun; Yu, Hongwei

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the viability of a singularity-free emergent scenario in the scalar-tensor theory of gravity by analyzing the stability of the Einstein static (ES) Universe. In order to obtain analytical results, we assume the perfect fluid which fills our Universe to be radiation or pressureless matter. We find that there are no stable ES solutions when scalar perturbations and tensor ones are considered together. Thus, in the scalar-tensor theory of gravity with a normal perfect fluid, such as radiation or pressureless matter, the emergent mechanism cannot be used to avoid the big bang singularity as the Universe cannot stay at the ES state past-eternally.

  13. Most general flat space boundary conditions in three-dimensional Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumiller, Daniel; Merbis, Wout; Riegler, Max

    2017-09-01

    We consider the most general asymptotically flat boundary conditions in three-dimensional Einstein gravity in the sense that we allow for the maximal number of independent free functions in the metric, leading to six towers of boundary charges and six associated chemical potentials. We find as associated asymptotic symmetry algebra an isl(2)k current algebra. Restricting the charges and chemical potentials in various ways recovers previous cases, such as bms3 , Heisenberg or Detournay–Riegler, all of which can be obtained as contractions of corresponding AdS3 constructions. Finally, we show that a flat space contraction can induce an additional Carrollian contraction. As examples we provide two novel sets of boundary conditions for Carroll gravity.

  14. `Third' Quantization of Vacuum Einstein Gravity and Free Yang-Mills Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raptis, Ioannis

    2007-05-01

    Certain pivotal results from various applications of Abstract Differential Geometry (ADG) to gravity and gauge theories are presently collected and used to argue that we already possess a geometrically (pre)quantized, second quantized and manifestly background spacetime manifold independent vacuum Einstein gravitational field dynamics. The arguments carry also mutatis mutandis to the case of free Yang-Mills theories, since from the ADG-theoretic perspective gravity is regarded as another gauge field theory. The powerful algebraico-categorical, sheaf cohomological conceptual and technical machinery of ADG is then employed, based on the fundamental ADG-theoretic conception of a field as a pair ({mathcal{E}},{mathcal{D}}) consisting of a vector sheaf {mathcal{E}} and an algebraic connection {mathcal{D}} acting categorically as a sheaf morphism on {mathcal{E}}'s local sections, to introduce a ‘universal’, because expressly functorial, field quantization scenario coined third quantization. Although third quantization is fully covariant, on intuitive and heuristic grounds alone it formally appears to follow a canonical route; albeit, in a purely algebraic and, in contradistinction to geometric (pre)quantization and (canonical) second quantization, manifestly background geometrical spacetime manifold independent fashion, as befits ADG. All in all, from the ADG-theoretic vantage, vacuum Einstein gravity and free Yang-Mills theories are regarded as external spacetime manifold unconstrained, third quantized, pure gauge field theories. The paper abounds with philosophical smatterings and speculative remarks about the potential import and significance of our results to current and future Quantum Gravity research. A postscript gives a brief account of this author's personal encounters with Rafael Sorkin and his work.

  15. A new functional flow equation for Einstein-Cartan quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harst, U.; Reuter, M.

    2015-03-01

    We construct a special-purpose functional flow equation which facilitates non-perturbative renormalization group (RG) studies on theory spaces involving a large number of independent field components that are prohibitively complicated using standard methods. Its main motivation are quantum gravity theories in which the gravitational degrees of freedom are carried by a complex system of tensor fields, a prime example being Einstein-Cartan theory, possibly coupled to matter. We describe a sequence of approximation steps leading from the functional RG equation of the Effective Average Action to the new flow equation which, as a consequence, is no longer fully exact on the untruncated theory space. However, it is by far more "user friendly" when it comes to projecting the abstract equation on a concrete (truncated) theory space and computing explicit beta-functions. The necessary amount of (tensor) algebra reduces drastically, and the usually very hard problem of diagonalizing the pertinent Hessian operator is sidestepped completely. In this paper we demonstrate the reliability of the simplified equation by applying it to a truncation of the Einstein-Cartan theory space. It is parametrized by a scale dependent Holst action, depending on a O(4) spin-connection and the tetrad as the independent field variables. We compute the resulting RG flow, focusing in particular on the running of the Immirzi parameter, and compare it to the results of an earlier computation where the exact equation had been applied to the same truncation. We find consistency between the two approaches and provide further evidence for the conjectured non-perturbative renormalizability (asymptotic safety) of quantum Einstein-Cartan gravity. We also investigate a duality symmetry relating small and large values of the Immirzi parameter (γ → 1 / γ) which is displayed by the beta-functions in the absence of a cosmological constant.

  16. Thermodynamics of Taub-NUT/bolt-AdS black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Khodam-Mohammadi, A.; Monshizadeh, M.

    2009-02-15

    We give a review of the existence of Taub-NUT/bolt solutions in Einstein Gauss-Bonnet gravity with the parameter {alpha} in six dimensions. Although the spacetime with base space S{sup 2}xS{sup 2} has a curvature singularity at r=N, which does not admit NUT solutions, we may proceed with the same computations as in the CP{sup 2} case. The investigation of thermodynamics of NUT/bolt solutions in six dimensions is carried out. We compute the finite action, mass, entropy, and temperature of the black hole. Then the validity of the first law of thermodynamics is demonstrated. It is shown that in NUT solutions all thermodynamic quantities for both base spaces are related to each other by substituting {alpha}{sup CP{sup k}}=[(k+1)/k]{alpha}{sup S{sup 2}}{sup xS{sup 2}}{sup x...S{sub k}{sup 2}}. So, no further information is given by investigating NUT solutions in the S{sup 2}xS{sup 2} case. This relation is not true for bolt solutions. A generalization of the thermodynamics of black holes to arbitrary even dimensions is made using a new method based on the Gibbs-Duhem relation and Gibbs free energy for NUT solutions. According to this method, the finite action in Einstein Gauss-Bonnet is obtained by considering the generalized finite action in Einstein gravity with an additional term as a function of {alpha}. Stability analysis is done by investigating the heat capacity and entropy in the allowed range of {alpha}, {lambda}, and N. For NUT solutions in d dimensions, there exists a stable phase at a narrow range of {alpha}. In six-dimensional bolt solutions, the metric is completely stable for B=S{sup 2}xS{sup 2} and is completely unstable for the B=CP{sup 2} case.

  17. Einstein Gravity Explorer-a medium-class fundamental physics mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, S.; Tino, G. M.; Gill, P.; Salomon, C.; Sterr, U.; Peik, E.; Nevsky, A.; Görlitz, A.; Svehla, D.; Ferrari, G.; Poli, N.; Lusanna, L.; Klein, H.; Margolis, H.; Lemonde, P.; Laurent, P.; Santarelli, G.; Clairon, A.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E.; Müller, J.; Iorio, L.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Dittus, H.; Gill, E.; Rothacher, M.; Flechner, F.; Schreiber, U.; Flambaum, V.; Ni, Wei-Tou; Liu, Liang; Chen, Xuzong; Chen, Jingbiao; Gao, Kelin; Cacciapuoti, L.; Holzwarth, R.; Heß, M. P.; Schäfer, W.

    2009-03-01

    The Einstein Gravity Explorer mission (EGE) is devoted to a precise measurement of the properties of space-time using atomic clocks. It tests one of the most fundamental predictions of Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity, the gravitational redshift, and thereby searches for hints of quantum effects in gravity, exploring one of the most important and challenging frontiers in fundamental physics. The primary mission goal is the measurement of the gravitational redshift with an accuracy up to a factor 104 higher than the best current result. The mission is based on a satellite carrying cold atom-based clocks. The payload includes a cesium microwave clock (PHARAO), an optical clock, a femtosecond frequency comb, as well as precise microwave time transfer systems between space and ground. The tick rates of the clocks are continuously compared with each other, and nearly continuously with clocks on earth, during the course of the 3-year mission. The highly elliptic orbit of the satellite is optimized for the scientific goals, providing a large variation in the gravitational potential between perigee and apogee. Besides the fundamental physics results, as secondary goals EGE will establish a global reference frame for the Earth’s gravitational potential and will allow a new approach to mapping Earth’s gravity field with very high spatial resolution. The mission was proposed as a class-M mission to ESA’s Cosmic Vision Program 2015-2025.

  18. Anamorphic quasiperiodic universes in modified and Einstein gravity with loop quantum gravity corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Marcelo M.; Aschheim, Raymond; Bubuianu, Laurenţiu; Irwin, Klee; Vacaru, Sergiu I.; Woolridge, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this work is to elaborate on new geometric methods of constructing exact and parametric quasiperiodic solutions for anamorphic cosmology models in modified gravity theories, MGTs, and general relativity, GR. There exist previously studied generic off-diagonal and diagonalizable cosmological metrics encoding gravitational and matter fields with quasicrystal like structures, QC, and holonomy corrections from loop quantum gravity, LQG. We apply the anholonomic frame deformation method, AFDM, in order to decouple the (modified) gravitational and matter field equations in general form. This allows us to find integral varieties of cosmological solutions determined by generating functions, effective sources, integration functions and constants. The coefficients of metrics and connections for such cosmological configurations depend, in general, on all spacetime coordinates and can be chosen to generate observable (quasi)-periodic/aperiodic/fractal/stochastic/(super) cluster/filament/polymer like (continuous, stochastic, fractal and/or discrete structures) in MGTs and/or GR. In this work, we study new classes of solutions for anamorphic cosmology with LQG holonomy corrections. Such solutions are characterized by nonlinear symmetries of generating functions for generic off-diagonal cosmological metrics and generalized connections, with possible nonholonomic constraints to Levi–Civita configurations and diagonalizable metrics depending only on a time like coordinate. We argue that anamorphic quasiperiodic cosmological models integrate the concept of quantum discrete spacetime, with certain gravitational QC-like vacuum and nonvacuum structures. And, that of a contracting universe that homogenizes, isotropizes and flattens without introducing initial conditions or multiverse problems.

  19. Bouncing dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates under the effects of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekh, Golam Ali

    2017-03-01

    Bouncing dynamics of quasi-one dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) falling under gravity on delta-function potentials is investigated. First, we consider a single component BEC in the presence of cubic-quintic nonlinearity and study dynamical behavior of different parameters of the system using variational and numerical approaches. We see that the quintic nonlinearity plays a dominant role over cubic nonlinear interaction to extend the bouncing dynamics in the non-linear regime. We find that a matter-wave performs bouncing motion only for certain discrete values of initial position above the reflecting potential. We then consider bouncing dynamics of binary BECs. It is shown that the pair of matter-waves bounces together if inter-species interaction is attractive. However, their pairing breaks down if the inter-species interaction is made repulsive.

  20. Thermodynamics of black holes in (n+1)-dimensional Einstein-Born-Infeld-dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sheykhi, A.; Riazi, N.

    2007-01-15

    We construct a new class of (n+1)-dimensional (n{>=}3) black hole solutions in Einstein-Born-Infeld-dilaton gravity with Liouville-type potential for the dilaton field and investigate their properties. These solutions are neither asymptotically flat nor (anti)-de Sitter. We find that these solutions can represent black holes, with inner and outer event horizons, an extreme black hole, or a naked singularity provided the parameters of the solutions are chosen suitably. We compute the thermodynamic quantities of the black hole solutions and find that these quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We also perform a stability analysis and investigate the effect of dilaton on the stability of the solutions.

  1. Primordial massive gravitational waves from Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations during de Sitter inflation in the Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity. Primordial massive gravitational waves are composed of one scalar, two vector and four tensor circularly polarized modes. We show that the vector power spectrum decays quickly like a transversely massive vector in the superhorizon limit z → 0. In this limit, the power spectrum coming from massive tensor modes decays quickly, leading to the conventional tensor power spectrum. Also, we find that in the limit of m{sup 2} → 0 (keeping the Weyl-squared term only), the vector and tensor power spectra disappear. It implies that their power spectra are not gravitationally produced because they (vector and tensor) are decoupled from the expanding de Sitter background, as a result of conformal invariance.

  2. Electric hyperscaling violating solutions in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity with R2 corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Daniel K.; Peet, Amanda W.

    2014-07-01

    In the context of holography applied to condensed matter physics, we study Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with curvature squared corrections. This theory has three couplings ηi for the three R2 invariants and two theory functions: a dilaton potential V(ϕ) and a dilaton-dependent gauge coupling f(ϕ). We find hyperscaling violating (HSV) solutions of this theory, parametrized by dynamical critical exponent z and HSV parameter θ. We obtain restrictions on the form of the theory functions required to support HSV-type solutions using three physical inputs: the null energy condition, causality z≥1, and deff≡d-θ lying in the range 0Einstein-Weyl gravity, we further narrow down the theory functions and solution parameters required for crossover solutions interpolating between HSV, AdSd +2 near the boundary, and AdS2×Rd in the deep interior.

  3. Thermodynamics of (2 +1 )-dimensional black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the linearly charged three-dimensional Einstein's theory coupled to a dilatonic field has been considered. It has been shown that the dilatonic potential must be considered in a form of generalized Liouville-type potential. Two new classes of charged dilatonic black hole solutions, as the exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton (EMd) gravity, have been obtained and their properties have been studied. The conserved charge and mass related to both of the new EMd black holes have been calculated. Through comparison of the thermodynamical extensive quantities (i.e., temperature and entropy) obtained from both, the geometrical and the thermodynamical methods, the validity of first law of black hole thermodynamics has been investigated for both of the new black holes we just obtained. At the final stage, making use of the canonical ensemble method and regarding the black hole heat capacity, the thermal stability or phase transition of the new black hole solutions have been analyzed. It has been shown that there is a specific range for the horizon radius in such a way that the black holes with the horizon radius in that range are locally stable. Otherwise, they are unstable and may undergo type one or type two phase transitions to be stabilized.

  4. A noncompact Weyl-Einstein-Yang-Mills model: A semiclassical quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengiz, Suat

    2017-08-01

    We construct and study perturbative unitarity (i.e., ghost and tachyon analysis) of a 3 + 1-dimensional noncompact Weyl-Einstein-Yang-Mills model. The model describes a local noncompact Weyl's scale plus SU(N) phase invariant Higgs-like field,conformally coupled to a generic Weyl-invariant dynamical background. Here, the Higgs-like sector generates the Weyl's conformal invariance of system. The action does not admit any dimensionful parameter and genuine presence of de Sitter vacuum spontaneously breaks the noncompact gauge symmetry in an analogous manner to the Standard Model Higgs mechanism. As to flat spacetime, the dimensionful parameter is generated within the dimensional transmutation in quantum field theories, and thus the symmetry is radiatively broken through the one-loop Effective Coleman-Weinberg potential. We show that the mere expectation of reducing to Einstein's gravity in the broken phases forbids anti-de Sitter space to be its stable vacua. The model is unitary in de Sitter and flat vacua around which a massless graviton, N2 - 1 massless scalar bosons, N massless Dirac fermions, N2 - 1 Proca-type massive Abelian and non-Abelian vector bosons are generically propagated.

  5. Topological gravity in a three-dimensional metric-affine space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresguerres, Romualdo

    1992-12-01

    The topological gauge model of gravity in three dimensions is extended to a metric-affine space-time with nonvanishing torsion and nonmetricity and signature (-++). We find an exact vacuum solution the connection of which includes a Weyl 1-form field.

  6. The role of nonmetricity in metric-affine theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo

    2014-02-01

    The intriguing choice to treat alternative theories of gravity by means of the Palatini approach, namely elevating the affine connection to the role of independent variable, contains the seed of some interesting (usually under-explored) generalizations of General Relativity, the metric-affine theories of gravity. The peculiar aspect of these theories is to provide a natural way for matter fields to be coupled to the independent connection through the covariant derivative built from the connection itself. Adopting a procedure borrowed from the effective field theory prescriptions, we study the dynamics of metric-affine theories of increasing order, that in the complete version include invariants built from curvature, nonmetricity and torsion. We show that even including terms obtained from nonmetricity and torsion to the second order density Lagrangian, the connection lacks dynamics and acts as an auxiliary field that can be algebraically eliminated, resulting in some extra interactions between metric and matter fields. Dedicated to the memory of Francesco Caracciolo

  7. Stability of the Einstein static universe in f( R, T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Hamid; Ziaie, Amir Hadi

    2017-01-01

    The Einstein static (ES) universe has played a major role in various emergent scenarios recently proposed in order to cure the problem of the initial singularity of the standard model of cosmology. In the model we address, we study the existence and stability of an ES universe in the context of f( R, T) modified theories of gravity. Considering specific forms of the f( R, T) function, we seek for the existence of solutions representing ES state. Using dynamical system techniques along with numerical analysis, we find two classes of solutions: the first one is always unstable of the saddle type, while the second is always stable so that its dynamical behavior corresponds to a center equilibrium point. The importance of the second class of solutions is due to the significant role they play in constructing non-singular emergent models in which the universe could have experienced past-eternally a series of infinite oscillations about such an initial static state after which it enters, through a suitable physical mechanism, to an inflationary era. Considering specific forms for the functionality of f( R, T), we show that this theory is capable of providing cosmological solutions which admit emergent universe (EU) scenarios. We also investigate homogeneous scalar perturbations for the mentioned models. The stability regions of the solutions are parametrized by a linear equation of state (EoS) parameter and other free parameters that will be introduced for the models. Our results suggest that modifications in f( R, T) gravity would lead to stable solutions which are unstable in f( R) gravity model.

  8. Solar neutrinos, helicity effects and new affine gravity with torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirilo-Lombardo, Diego Julio

    2013-12-01

    New f(R, T) model of gravitation, introduced previously by the author, is considered. It is based on an affine geometrical construction in which the torsion is a dynamical field, the coupling is minimal and the theory is Lorentz invariant by construction. It was shown that the Dirac equation emerges from the same space time and acquires a modification (coupling-like) of the form γα j 1-d/d γ5hα , with hα the torsion axial vector, j a parameter of pure geometrical nature and d, the spacetime dimension. In the present work it is shown that this interaction produces a mechanism of spin (helicity) flipping, with its consequent weak symmetry violation. The cross section of this process is explicitly calculated and a logarithmic energy dependence (even at high energies) is found. This behavior is reminiscent of similar computations made by Hans Bethe in the context of neutrino astrophysics. These results are applied to the solar neutrino case and compared with similar results coming from a gravitational model with torsion of string theory type and within the standard model context respectively.

  9. Uniqueness theorem for black holes with Kaluza-Klein asymptotic in 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho

    2010-07-15

    In the present paper, we prove a uniqueness theorem for stationary multi-black hole configurations with Kaluza-Klein asymptotic in a certain sector of 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity. As a part of the technical assumptions in the theorem, we assume that the Killing vector associated with the compact dimension is orthogonal to the other Killing vectors and that it is also hypersurface orthogonal. About the Maxwell field, we assume that it is invariant under the Killing symmetries and has a nonzero component only along the Killing vector associated with the compact dimension. We show that such multi-black hole configurations are uniquely specified by the interval structure, angular momenta of the horizons, magnetic charges, and the magnetic flux. A straightforward generalization of the uniqueness theorem for 5D Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity is also given.

  10. Rotating black holes in Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with finite coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Andrea; Pani, Paolo; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Ferrari, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Among various strong-curvature extensions of general relativity, Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity stands out as the only nontrivial theory containing quadratic curvature corrections while being free from the Ostrogradsky instability to any order in the coupling parameter. We derive an approximate stationary and axisymmetric black hole solution of this gravitational theory in closed form, which is of fifth order in the black hole spin and of seventh order in the coupling parameter of the theory. This extends previous work that obtained the corrections to the metric only to second order in the spin and at the leading order in the coupling parameter, and allows us to consider values of the coupling parameter close to the maximum permitted by theoretical constraints. We compute some quantities which characterize this solution, such as the dilaton charge, the moment of inertia, and the quadrupole moment, and its geodesic structure, including the innermost stable circular orbit and the epicyclic frequencies for massive particles. The latter provides a valuable tool to test general relativity against strong-curvature corrections through observations of the electromagnetic spectrum of accreting black holes.

  11. Static and symmetric wormholes respecting energy conditions in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Hideki; Nozawa, Masato

    2008-07-15

    Properties of n({>=}5)-dimensional static wormhole solutions are investigated in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with or without a cosmological constant {lambda}. We assume that the spacetime has symmetries corresponding to the isometries of an (n-2)-dimensional maximally symmetric space with the sectional curvature k={+-}1, 0. It is also assumed that the metric is at least C{sup 2} and the (n-2)-dimensional maximally symmetric subspace is compact. Depending on the existence or absence of the general relativistic limit {alpha}{yields}0, solutions are classified into general relativistic (GR) and non-GR branches, respectively, where {alpha} is the Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant. We show that a wormhole throat respecting the dominant energy condition coincides with a branch surface in the GR branch, otherwise the null energy condition is violated there. In the non-GR branch, it is shown that there is no wormhole solution for k{alpha}{>=}0. For the matter field with zero tangential pressure, it is also shown in the non-GR branch with k{alpha}<0 and {lambda}{<=}0 that the dominant energy condition holds at the wormhole throat if the radius of the throat satisfies some inequality. In the vacuum case, a fine-tuning of the coupling constants is shown to be necessary and the radius of a wormhole throat is fixed. Explicit wormhole solutions respecting the energy conditions in the whole spacetime are obtained in the vacuum and dust cases with k=-1 and {alpha}>0.

  12. Classical defects in higher-dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to nonlinear σ -models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyo, Ilham; Ramadhan, Handhika S.

    2017-09-01

    We construct solutions of higher-dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to nonlinear σ -model with cosmological constant. The σ -model can be perceived as exterior configuration of a spontaneously-broken SO(D-1) global higher-codimensional "monopole". Here we allow the kinetic term of the σ -model to be noncanonical; in particular we specifically study a quadratic-power-law type. This is some possible higher-dimensional generalization of the Bariola-Vilenkin (BV) solutions with k-global monopole studied recently. The solutions can be perceived as the exterior solution of a black hole swallowing up noncanonical global defects. Even in the absence of comological constant its surrounding spacetime is asymptotically non-flat; it suffers from deficit solid angle. We discuss the corresponding horizons. For Λ >0 in 4 d there can exist three extremal conditions (the cold, ultracold, and Nariai black holes), while in higher-than-four dimensions the extremal black hole is only Nariai. For Λ <0 we only have black hole solutions with one horizon, save for the 4 d case where there can exist two horizons. We give constraints on the mass and the symmetry-breaking scale for the existence of all the extremal cases. In addition, we also obtain factorized solutions, whose topology is the direct product of two-dimensional spaces of constant curvature (M_2, dS_2, or AdS_2) with (D-2)-sphere. We study all possible factorized channels.

  13. Gravity beyond Einstein? Part I: Physics and the Trouble with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Jochem; Dröscher, Walter

    2017-05-01

    This article provides a review of the latest experimental results in quantum physics and astrophysics, discussing their repercussions on the advanced physical theories that go beyond both the SMs (standard models) of particle physics and cosmology. It will be shown that many of the essential concepts of the advanced theoretical models developed over the past 40 years are no longer tenable because they are contradicting the novel data. Most recent results (December 2016) from the Large Hadron Collider revealed no new matter particles up to particle masses of 1.6 TeV/c2, which is in accordance with recent ACME experimental data (2014) that saw no electric dipole moment for the electron as predicted by these theories. Moreover, the LUX experiment (since 2013) did not see any dark matter particles either, thus independently supporting LHC and ACME measurements. Furthermore, experimental particle physics seems to be telling us that dark matter particles (LHC results) do not exist, suggesting that dark matter particles either are more exotic or are more difficult to detect than had been predicted in the past decades (less likely with recent LHC results). Astrophysical observations since 1933, starting with Caltech astronomer Zwicky, however, have provided irrefutable evidence for the existence of dark matter, for instance, based on the phenomenon of gravitational lensing as well as observed rotational velocities of stars orbiting the galactic center that are deviating from Newton's law. Surprisingly, recent astronomical observations by Bidin, ESO (2010, 2012, 2014), seem to indicate the absence of dark matter within galaxies. In addition, cosmology at present has no explanation for about 68 % of the energy in the Universe that comes in the form of dark energy. Recently, measured data from three entirely different types of experiments both on earth and in space (2006-2011) are hinting at completely novel features of gravity that, if confirmed, must be outside Einstein

  14. Affine group representation formalism for four-dimensional, Lorentzian, quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo E.; Soo, Chopin

    2013-03-01

    Within the context of the Ashtekar variables, the Hamiltonian constraint of four-dimensional pure general relativity with cosmological constant, Λ, is re-expressed as an affine algebra with the commutator of the imaginary part of the Chern-Simons functional, Q, and the positive-definite volume element. This demonstrates that the affine algebra quantization program of Klauder can indeed be applicable to the full Lorentzian signature theory of quantum gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant, and it facilitates the construction of solutions to all of the constraints. Unitary, irreducible representations of the affine group exhibit a natural Hilbert space structure, and coherent states and other physical states can be generated from a fiducial state. It is also intriguing that formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint or the Wheeler-DeWitt equation as an affine algebra requires a non-vanishing cosmological constant, and a fundamental uncertainty relation of the form {Δ{V}/{< {V}> }Δ {Q}≥ 2π Λ L^2_{Planck} (wherein V is the total volume) may apply to all physical states of quantum gravity.

  15. Spin precession of slow neutrons in Einstein-Cartan gravity with torsion, chameleon, and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze a spin precession of slow neutrons in the Einstein-Cartan gravity with torsion, chameleon and magnetic field. For the derivation of the Heisenberg equation of motion of the neutron spin we use the effective low-energy potential, derived by Ivanov and Wellenzohn [Phys. Rev. D 92, 125004 (2015)] for slow neutrons, coupled to gravitational, chameleon, and torsion fields to order 1 /m , where m is the neutron mass. In addition to these low-energy interactions we switch on the interaction of slow neutrons with a magnetic field. We show that to linear order approximation with respect to gravitational, chameleon, and torsion fields the Dirac Hamilton operator for fermions (neutrons), moving in spacetimes created by rotating coordinate systems, contains the anti-Hermitian operators of torsion-fermion (neutron) interactions, caused by torsion scalar and tensor space-space-time and time-space-space degrees of freedom. Such anti-Hermitian operators violate C P and T invariance. In the low-energy approximation the C P and T violating torsion-fermion (neutron) interactions appear only to order O (1 /m ). One may assume that in the rotating Universe and galaxies the obtained anti-Hermitian torsion-fermion interactions might be an origin of (i) violation of C P and T invariance in the Universe and (ii) of baryon asymmetry. We show that anti-Hermitian torsion-fermion interactions of relativistic fermions, violating C P and T invariance, (i) cannot be removed by nonunitary transformations of the Dirac fermion wave functions and (ii) are conformal invariant. According to general requirements of conformal invariance of massive particle theories in gravitational fields [see R. H. Dicke, Phys. Rev. 125, 2163 (1962) and A. J. Silenko, Phys. Rev. D 91, 065012 (2015)], conformal invariance of anti-Hermitian torsion-fermion interactions is valid only if the fermion mass is changed by a conformal factor.

  16. Thermodynamics of Taub-NUT/bolt black holes in Einstein-Maxwell gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.; Khodam-Mohammadi, A.

    2006-06-15

    First, we construct the Taub-NUT/bolt solutions of (2k+2)-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell gravity, when all the factor spaces of 2k-dimensional base space B have positive curvature. These solutions depend on two extra parameters, other than the mass and the NUT charge. These are electric charge q and electric potential at infinity V. We investigate the existence of Taub-NUT solutions and find that in addition to the two conditions of uncharged NUT solutions, there exist two extra conditions. These two extra conditions come from the regularity of vector potential at r=N and the fact that the horizon at r=N should be the outer horizon of the NUT charged black hole. We find that the NUT solutions in 2k+2 dimensions have no curvature singularity at r=N, when the 2k-dimensional base space is chosen to be CP{sup 2k}. For bolt solutions, there exists an upper limit for the NUT parameter which decreases as the potential parameter increases. Second, we study the thermodynamics of these spacetimes. We compute temperature, entropy, charge, electric potential, action and mass of the black hole solutions, and find that these quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We perform a stability analysis by computing the heat capacity, and show that the NUT solutions are not thermally stable for even k's, while there exists a stable phase for odd k's, which becomes increasingly narrow with increasing dimensionality and wide with increasing V. We also study the phase behavior of the 4 and 6 dimensional bolt solutions in canonical ensemble and find that these solutions have a stable phase, which becomes smaller as V increases.

  17. Finitary Topos for Locally Finite, Causal and Quantal Vacuum Einstein Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raptis, Ioannis

    2007-03-01

    The pentalogy (Mallios, A. and Raptis, I. (2001). International Journal of Theoretical Physics 40, 1885; Mallios, A. and Raptis, I. (2002). International Journal of Theoretical Physics 41, 1857; Mallios, A. and Raptis, I. (2003).International Journal of Theoretical Physics 42, 1479; Mallios, A. and Raptis, I. (2004). ‘paper-book’/research monograph); I. Raptis (2005). International Journal of Theoretical Physics (to appear)is brought to its categorical climax by organizing the curved finitary spacetime sheaves of quantumcausal sets involved therein, on which a finitary (:locally finite), singularity-free, background manifold independent and geometrically prequantized version of the gravitational vacuum Einstein field equations were seen to hold, into a topos structure [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.]. We show that the category of finitary differential triads [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] is a finitary instance of an elementary topos proper in the original sense dueto Lawvere and Tierney. We present in the light of Abstract Differential Geometry (ADG) a Grothendieck-type of generalization of Sorkin’s finitary substitutes of continuous spacetime manifoldtopologies, the latter’s topological refinement inverse systems of locally finite coverings and their associated coarse graining sieves, the upshot being that [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] is also a finitary example of a Grothendieck topos. In the process, we discover that the subobject classifier Ω fcq of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] is a Heyting algebra type of object, thus we infer that the internal logic of our finitary topos is intuitionistic, as expected. We also introduce the new notion of ‘finitary differential geometric morphism’ which, as befits ADG, gives a differential geometric slant to Sorkin’s purely topological acts of refinement (:coarse graining). Based on finitary differential geometric morphisms regarded as

  18. Modified Einstein's gravity as a possible missing link between sub- and super-Chandrasekhar type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata E-mail: bm@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2015-05-01

    We explore the effect of modification to Einstein's gravity in white dwarfs for the first time in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. This leads to significantly sub- and super-Chandrasekhar limiting masses of white dwarfs, determined by a single model parameter. On the other hand, type Ia supernovae (SNeIa), a key to unravel the evolutionary history of the universe, are believed to be triggered in white dwarfs having mass close to the Chandrasekhar limit. However, observations of several peculiar, under- and over-luminous SNeIa argue for exploding masses widely different from this limit. We argue that explosions of the modified gravity induced sub- and super-Chandrasekhar limiting mass white dwarfs result in under- and over-luminous SNeIa respectively, thus unifying these two apparently disjoint sub-classes and, hence, serving as a missing link. Our discovery raises two fundamental questions. Is the Chandrasekhar limit unique? Is Einstein's gravity the ultimate theory for understanding astronomical phenomena? Both the answers appear to be no!.

  19. Quantum statistical relation for black holes in nonlinear electrodynamics coupled to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet AdS gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2011-03-15

    We consider curvature-squared corrections to Einstein-Hilbert gravity action in the form of a Gauss-Bonnet term in D>4 dimensions. In this theory, we study the thermodynamics of charged static black holes with anti-de Sitter (AdS) asymptotics, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics. These objects have received considerable attention in recent literature on gravity/gauge dualities. It is well-known that, within the framework of anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence, there exists a nonvanishing Casimir contribution to the internal energy of the system, manifested as the vacuum energy for global AdS spacetime in odd dimensions. Because of this reason, we derive a quantum statistical relation directly from the Euclidean action and not from the integration of the first law of thermodynamics. To this end, we employ a background-independent regularization scheme which consists, in addition to the bulk action, of counterterms that depend on both extrinsic and intrinsic curvatures of the boundary (Kounterterm series). This procedure results in a consistent inclusion of the vacuum energy and chemical potential in the thermodynamic description for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet AdS gravity regardless of the explicit form of the nonlinear electrodynamics Lagrangian.

  20. Modified Einstein's gravity as a possible missing link between sub- and super-Chandrasekhar type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2015-05-01

    We explore the effect of modification to Einstein's gravity in white dwarfs for the first time in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. This leads to significantly sub- and super-Chandrasekhar limiting masses of white dwarfs, determined by a single model parameter. On the other hand, type Ia supernovae (SNeIa), a key to unravel the evolutionary history of the universe, are believed to be triggered in white dwarfs having mass close to the Chandrasekhar limit. However, observations of several peculiar, under- and over-luminous SNeIa argue for exploding masses widely different from this limit. We argue that explosions of the modified gravity induced sub- and super-Chandrasekhar limiting mass white dwarfs result in under- and over-luminous SNeIa respectively, thus unifying these two apparently disjoint sub-classes and, hence, serving as a missing link. Our discovery raises two fundamental questions. Is the Chandrasekhar limit unique? Is Einstein's gravity the ultimate theory for understanding astronomical phenomena? Both the answers appear to be no!

  1. Einstein equations for generalized theories of gravity and the thermodynamic relation deltaQ=TdeltaS are equivalent.

    PubMed

    Brustein, Ram; Hadad, Merav

    2009-09-04

    We show that the equations of motion of generalized theories of gravity are equivalent to the thermodynamic relation deltaQ=TdeltaS. Our proof relies on extending previous arguments by using a more general definition of the Noether charge entropy. We have thus completed the implementation of Jacobson's proposal to express Einstein's equations as a thermodynamic equation of state. Additionally, we find that the Noether charge entropy obeys the second law of thermodynamics if the energy-momentum tensor obeys the null energy condition. Our results support the idea that gravitation on a macroscopic scale is a manifestation of the thermodynamics of the vacuum.

  2. Stability of thin-shell wormholes supported by normal matter in Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Halilsoy, M.; Amirabi, Z.

    2010-05-15

    Recently in [Phys. Rev. D 76, 087502 (2007) and Phys. Rev. D 77, 089903 (2008)] a thin-shell wormhole has been introduced in five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity which was supported by normal matter. We wish to consider this solution and investigate its stability. Our analysis shows that for the Gauss-Bonnet parameter {alpha}<0, stability regions form for a narrow band of finely tuned mass and charge. For the case {alpha}>0, we iterate once more that no stable, normal matter thin-shell wormhole exists.

  3. Topological formation of a multiply charged vortex in the Rb Bose-Einstein condensate: Effectiveness of the gravity compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakura, M.; Hirotani, T.; Okano, M.; Yabuzaki, T.; Takahashi, Y.

    2006-06-15

    In a Bose-Einstein condensate of {sup 87}Rb (F=2,m{sub F}=2) atoms we have topologically created a quantized vortex with a charge of 4 by reversing the magnetic field of the trap. Experimental conditions of reversal time and initial magnetic field strength for the successful vortex creation were restricted within narrower ranges, compared to those in the case of the {sup 23}Na condensate. The experimental difficulty was explained in terms of a non-negligible gravitational sag arising from its large atomic mass. We have successfully stabilized the vortex formation by compensating gravity with a blue-detuned laser beam.

  4. Conformally related Einstein-Langevin equations for metric fluctuations in stochastic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satin, Seema; Cho, H. T.; Hu, Bei Lok

    2016-09-01

    For a conformally coupled scalar field we obtain the conformally related Einstein-Langevin equations, using appropriate transformations for all the quantities in the equations between two conformally related spacetimes. In particular, we analyze the transformations of the influence action, the stress energy tensor, the noise kernel and the dissipation kernel. In due course the fluctuation-dissipation relation is also discussed. The analysis in this paper thereby facilitates a general solution to the Einstein-Langevin equation once the solution of the equation in a simpler, conformally related spacetime is known. For example, from the Minkowski solution of Martín and Verdaguer, those of the Einstein-Langevin equations in conformally flat spacetimes, especially for spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models, can be readily obtained.

  5. Gravity Probe B: Examining Einstein's Spacetime with Gyroscopes. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Space Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Range, Shannon K'doah; Mullins, Jennifer

    This teaching guide introduces a relativity gyroscope experiment aiming to test two unverified predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. An introduction to the theory includes the following sections: (1) "Spacetime, Curved Spacetime, and Frame-Dragging"; (2) "'Seeing' Spacetime with Gyroscopes"; (3)…

  6. Thin-shell wormholes supported by ordinary matter in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Richarte, Martin G.; Simeone, Claudio

    2007-10-15

    The generalized Darmois-Israel formalism for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory is applied to construct thin-shell Lorentzian wormholes with spherical symmetry. We calculate the energy localized on the shell, and we find that for certain values of the parameters wormholes could be supported by matter not violating the energy conditions.

  7. AdS/CFT connection between Boltzmann and Einstein equations: Kinetic theory and pure gravity in AdS space

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan

    2010-04-15

    The AdS/CFT correspondence defines a sector with universal strongly coupled dynamics in the field theory as the dual of pure gravity in AdS described by Einstein's equation with a negative cosmological constant. We explain here, from the field-theoretic viewpoint how the dynamics in this sector gets determined by the expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor alone. We first show that the Boltzmann equation has very special solutions which could be functionally completely determined in terms of the energy-momentum tensor alone. We call these solutions conservative solutions. We indicate why conservative solutions should also exist when we refine this kinetic description to go closer to the exact microscopic theory or even move away from the regime of weak coupling so that no kinetic description could be employed. We argue that these conservative solutions form the universal sector dual to pure gravity at strong coupling and large N. Based on this observation, we propose a regularity condition on the energy-momentum tensor so that the dual solution in pure gravity has a smooth future horizon. We also study if irreversibility emerges only at long time scales of observation, unlike the case of the Boltzmann equation.

  8. Testing Gravity with Quasi-periodic Oscillations from Accreting Black Holes: The Case of Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Andrea; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Pani, Paolo; Stella, Luigi; Ferrari, Valeria

    2015-03-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the X-ray flux emitted by accreting black holes are associated with phenomena occurring near the horizon. Future very large area X-ray instruments will be able to measure QPO frequencies with very high precision, thus probing this strong-field region. Using the relativistic precession model, we show the way in which QPO frequencies could be used to test general relativity (GR) against those alternative theories of gravity which predict deviations from the classical theory in the strong-field and high-curvature regimes. We consider one of the best-motivated high-curvature corrections to GR, namely, the Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet theory, and show that a detection of QPOs with the expected sensitivity of the proposed ESA M-class mission LOFT would set the most stringent constraints on the parameter space of this theory.

  9. The relaxed Einstein equations in the context of a mixed UV-IR modified theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkes, Alain

    2017-03-01

    In this article we will modify the Einstein field equations by promoting Newton’s constant G to a covariant differential operator {{G} Λ }≤ft({{\\square}g}\\right) composed of two terms which operate in different energy regimes (IR and UV). The IR term inside the covariant differential operator acts like a high-pass filter with a macroscopic distance filter scale \\sqrt{ Λ } and effectively degravitates energy sources characterized by wavelengths larger than the filter scale. While this term is predominant for cosmological energy processes it is almost inessential on astrophysical scales where the UV contribution inside {{G} Λ }≤ft({{\\square}g}\\right) leads to much stronger deviations compared to GR. In the context of this particular theory of gravity we work out the effective relaxed Einstein equations, the effective 1.5 post-Newtonian near zone mass for n-body systems as well as the IR and UV modified Schwarzschild metrics. We use these results in the context of the Double Pulsar binary system and observe that we recover, in the limit of vanishing UV-IR modification parameters, the corresponding general relativistic results.

  10. A Generalization of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Chethan

    2015-12-01

    I consider theories of gravity built not just from the metric and affine connection, but also other (possibly higher rank) symmetric tensor(s). The Lagrangian densities are scalars built from them, and the volume forms are related to Cayley's hyperdeterminants. The resulting diff-invariant actions give rise to geometric theories that go beyond the metric paradigm (even metric-less theories are possible), and contain Einstein gravity as a special case. Examples contain theories with generalizeations of Riemannian geometry. The 0-tensor case is related to dilaton gravity. These theories can give rise to new types of spontaneous Lorentz breaking and might be relevant for "dark" sector cosmology.

  11. Celebrating Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Joey; Yunes, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    The Gravity Group at Montana State University (MSU) hosted Celebrating Einstein, a free public arts and multimedia event celebrating Einstein and his ideas in Bozeman, Montana April 2-6, 2013. The products of our efforts are now available to any party interested in hosting a similar event. Celebrating Einstein is a truly interdisciplinary effort including art, film, dance, music, physics, history, and education. Events included a black hole immersive art installation, a series of public talks by physicists, and Einstein lessons in the public schools leading up to a live free public multimedia performance including a professional dance company, a live interview with a renowned physicist, and an original score composed for the MSU student symphony to be performed with an original film produced by the Science and Natural History film program at MSU. This project is funded by the Montana Space Grant Consortium, Montana State University, and the National Science Foundation.

  12. Conserved charges for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mišković, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by possible applications within the framework of anti-de Sitter gravity/conformal field theory correspondence, charged black holes with AdS asymptotics, which are solutions to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D dimensions, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics are studied. For a topological static black hole ansatz, the field equations are exactly solved in terms of the electromagnetic stress tensor for an arbitrary nonlinear electrodynamic Lagrangian in any dimension D and for arbitrary positive values of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In particular, this procedure reproduces the black hole metric in Born-Infeld and conformally invariant electrodynamics previously found in the literature. Altogether, it extends to D>4 the four-dimensional solution obtained by Soleng in logarithmic electrodynamics, which comes from vacuum polarization effects. Falloff conditions for the electromagnetic field that ensure the finiteness of the electric charge are also discussed. The black hole mass and vacuum energy as conserved quantities associated to an asymptotic timelike Killing vector are computed using a background-independent regularization of the gravitational action based on the addition of counterterms which are a given polynomial in the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures.

  13. Conserved charges for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS space

    SciTech Connect

    Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2011-01-15

    Motivated by possible applications within the framework of anti-de Sitter gravity/conformal field theory correspondence, charged black holes with AdS asymptotics, which are solutions to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D dimensions, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics are studied. For a topological static black hole ansatz, the field equations are exactly solved in terms of the electromagnetic stress tensor for an arbitrary nonlinear electrodynamic Lagrangian in any dimension D and for arbitrary positive values of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In particular, this procedure reproduces the black hole metric in Born-Infeld and conformally invariant electrodynamics previously found in the literature. Altogether, it extends to D>4 the four-dimensional solution obtained by Soleng in logarithmic electrodynamics, which comes from vacuum polarization effects. Falloff conditions for the electromagnetic field that ensure the finiteness of the electric charge are also discussed. The black hole mass and vacuum energy as conserved quantities associated to an asymptotic timelike Killing vector are computed using a background-independent regularization of the gravitational action based on the addition of counterterms which are a given polynomial in the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures.

  14. Five-dimensional Eguchi-Hanson solitons in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, A. W. C.; Mann, R. B.

    2012-02-01

    Eguchi-Hanson solitons are odd-dimensional generalizations of the four-dimensional Eguchi-Hanson metric and are asymptotic to AdS5/Zp when the cosmological constant is either positive or negative. We find soliton solutions to Lovelock gravity in 5 dimensions that are generalizations of these objects.

  15. Black hole formation in AdS Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppe, Nils; Kolly, Allison; Frey, Andrew R.; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2016-10-01

    AdS spacetime has been shown numerically to be unstable against a large class of arbitrarily small perturbations. In [1], the authors presented a preliminary study of the effects on stability of changing the local dynamics by adding a Gauss-Bonnet term to the Einstein action. Here we provide further details as well as new results with improved numerical methods. In particular, we elucidate new structure in Choptuik scaling plots. We also provide evidence of chaotic behavior at the transition between immediate horizon formation and horizon formation after the matter pulse reflects from the AdS conformal boundary. Finally, we present data suggesting the formation of naked singularities in spacetimes with ADM mass below the algebraic bound for black hole formation.

  16. Higher-dimensional thin-shell wormholes in Einstein-Yang-Mills-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Halilsoy, M.; Amirabi, Z.

    2011-01-01

    We present thin-shell wormhole solutions in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-Gauss-Bonnet (EYMGB) theory in higher dimensions d >= 5. Exact black hole solutions are employed for this purpose where the radius of the thin shell lies outside the event horizon. For some reasons the cases d = 5 and d > 5 are treated separately. The surface energy-momentum of the thin shell creates surface pressures to resist against collapse and rendering stable wormholes possible. We test the stability of the wormholes against spherical perturbations through a linear energy-pressure relation and plot stability regions. Apart from this restricted stability we investigate the possibility of normal (i.e. non-exotic) matter which satisfies the energy conditions. For negative values of the Gauss-Bonnet (GB) parameter we obtain such physical wormholes.

  17. Enhanced instability of de Sitter space in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Maulik

    2011-08-01

    We show that the addition of a topological Gauss-Bonnet term to the gravitational action can greatly increase the instability of four-dimensional de Sitter space by favoring the nucleation of black holes. The pair-production rate given by the Euclidean action for the instanton takes the form exp⁡(ΔS) where S is the entropy in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory. The coefficient of the Gauss-Bonnet term in the action sets a stability bound on the curvature of empty de Sitter space. For that coefficient in the low-energy effective action of heterotic string theory, the maximal curvature of de Sitter space is, in general, much lower than the Planck scale.

  18. Posing Einstein's Question: Questioning Einstein's Pose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topper, David; Vincent, Dwight E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the events surrounding a famous picture of Albert Einstein in which he poses near a blackboard containing a tensor form of his 10 field equations for pure gravity with a question mark after it. Speculates as to the content of Einstein's lecture and the questions he might have had about the equation. (Contains over 30 references.) (WRM)

  19. Posing Einstein's Question: Questioning Einstein's Pose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topper, David; Vincent, Dwight E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the events surrounding a famous picture of Albert Einstein in which he poses near a blackboard containing a tensor form of his 10 field equations for pure gravity with a question mark after it. Speculates as to the content of Einstein's lecture and the questions he might have had about the equation. (Contains over 30 references.) (WRM)

  20. On the integrability of Einstein-Maxwell-(A)dS gravity in the presence of Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Dietmar; Nozawa, Masato; Rabbiosi, Marco

    2015-10-01

    We study symmetry and integrability properties of four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell gravity with a nonvanishing cosmological constant in the presence of Killing vectors. First of all, we consider stationary spacetimes, which lead, after a timelike Kaluza-Klein reduction followed by a dualization of the two vector fields, to a three-dimensional nonlinear sigma model coupled to gravity, whose target space is a noncompact version of {{C}}{{{P}}}2 with an {{SU}}(2,1) isometry group. It is shown that the potential for the scalars that arises from the cosmological constant in four dimensions breaks three of the eight {{SU}}(2,1) symmetries, corresponding to the generalized Ehlers and the two Harrison transformations. This leaves a semidirect product of a one-dimensional Heisenberg group and a translation group {{{R}}}2 as residual symmetry. We show that, under the additional assumptions that the three-dimensional manifold is conformal to a product space {{R}}× {{Σ }} and all fields depend only on the coordinate along {{R}}, the equations of motion are integrable. This generalizes the results of Leigh et al in arXiv:1403.6511 to the case where electromagnetic fields are also present. In the second part of the paper we consider the purely gravitational spacetime admitting a second Killing vector that commutes with the timelike one. We write down the resulting two-dimensional action and discuss its symmetries. If the fields depend only on one of the two coordinates, the equations of motion are again integrable, and the solution turns out to be one constructed by Krasiński many years ago.

  1. Energy-momentum tensors in linearized Einstein's theory and massive gravity: The question of uniqueness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bičák, Jiří; Schmidt, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The question of the uniqueness of energy-momentum tensors in the linearized general relativity and in the linear massive gravity is analyzed without using variational techniques. We start from a natural ansatz for the form of the tensor (for example, that it is a linear combination of the terms quadratic in the first derivatives), and require it to be conserved as a consequence of field equations. In the case of the linear gravity in a general gauge we find a four-parametric system of conserved second-rank tensors which contains a unique symmetric tensor. This turns out to be the linearized Landau-Lifshitz pseudotensor employed often in full general relativity. We elucidate the relation of the four-parametric system to the expression proposed recently by Butcher et al. "on physical grounds" in harmonic gauge, and we show that the results coincide in the case of high-frequency waves in vacuum after a suitable averaging. In the massive gravity we show how one can arrive at the expression which coincides with the "generalized linear symmetric Landau-Lifshitz" tensor. However, there exists another uniquely given simpler symmetric tensor which can be obtained by adding the divergence of a suitable superpotential to the canonical energy-momentum tensor following from the Fierz-Pauli action. In contrast to the symmetric tensor derived by the Belinfante procedure which involves the second derivatives of the field variables, this expression contains only the field and its first derivatives. It is simpler than the generalized Landau-Lifshitz tensor but both yield the same total quantities since they differ by the divergence of a superpotential. We also discuss the role of the gauge conditions in the proofs of the uniqueness. In the Appendix, the symbolic tensor manipulation software cadabra is briefly described. It is very effective in obtaining various results which would otherwise require lengthy calculations.

  2. Einstein versus the simple pendulum formula: does gravity slow all clocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Avinash

    2015-07-01

    According to the Newtonian formula for a simple pendulum, the period of a pendulum is inversely proportional to the square root of g, the gravitational field strength. Einstein’s theory of general relativity leads to the result that time slows down where gravity is intense. The two claims look contradictory and can muddle student and teacher alike. There is, however, no real paradox. This article, which aims to clarify the conceptual issues, identifies two sources of confusion. One is a failure to distinguish a pendulum from a pendulum clock. The other is a failure to distinguish between two distinct gravitational fields.

  3. Einstein-vector gravity, emerging gauge symmetry, and de Sitter bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Wei-Jian; Lü, H.

    2016-02-01

    We construct a class of Einstein-vector theories where the vector field couples bilinearly to the curvature polynomials of arbitrary order in such a way that only the Riemann tensor rather than its derivative enters the equations of motion. The theories can thus be ghost free. The U (1 ) gauge symmetry may emerge in the vacuum and also in some weak-field limit. We focus on the two-derivative theory and study a variety of applications. We find that in this theory, the energy-momentum tensor of dark matter provides a position-dependent gauge-violating term to the Maxwell field. We also use the vector as an inflaton and construct cosmological solutions. We find that the expansion can accelerate without a bare cosmological constant, indicating a new candidate for dark energy. Furthermore, we obtain exact solutions of de Sitter bounce, generated by the vector which behaves like a Maxwell field at later times. We also obtain a few new exact black holes that are asymptotic to flat and Lifshitz spacetimes. In addition, we construct exact wormholes and Randall-Sundrum II domain walls.

  4. Effective low-energy potential for slow Dirac fermions in Einstein-Cartan gravity with torsion and chameleon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2015-12-01

    We derive the most general effective low-energy potential to order O (1 /m ) for slow Dirac fermions with mass m , coupled to gravitational, chameleon and torsion fields in the Einstein-Cartan gravity. The obtained results can be applied to the experimental analysis of gravitational, chameleon and torsion interactions in terrestrial laboratories. We discuss the use of rotating coordinate systems, caused by rotations of devices, for measurements of the torsion vector and tensor components, caused by minimal torsion-fermion couplings [A. N. Ivanov and M. Wellenzohn, Phys. Rev. D 92, 065006 (2015)]. Using the most general form of a metric tensor of curved spacetimes in rotating coordinate systems, proposed by Obukhov, Silenko, and Teryaev [Phys. Rev. D 84, 024025 (2011)], we extend this metric by the inclusion of the chameleon field and calculate the set of vierbein fields, in terms of which Dirac fermions couple to the torsion vector and tensor components through minimal torsion-fermion couplings. For such a set of vierbein fields we discuss a part of the effective low-energy potential for slow Dirac fermions, coupled to gravitational, chameleon and torsion fields to order O (1 ) in the large fermion mass expansion.

  5. Non-parametric reconstruction of an inflaton potential from Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble gravity with particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shantanu; Popławski, Nikodem J.

    2016-04-01

    The coupling between spin and torsion in the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity generates gravitational repulsion at very high densities, which prevents a singularity in a black hole and may create there a new universe. We show that quantum particle production in such a universe near the last bounce, which represents the Big Bang, gives the dynamics that solves the horizon, flatness, and homogeneity problems in cosmology. For a particular range of the particle production coefficient, we obtain a nearly constant Hubble parameter that gives an exponential expansion of the universe with more than 60 e-folds, which lasts about ∼10-42 s. This scenario can thus explain cosmic inflation without requiring a fundamental scalar field and reheating. From the obtained time dependence of the scale factor, we follow the prescription of Ellis and Madsen to reconstruct in a non-parametric way a scalar field potential which gives the same dynamics of the early universe. This potential gives the slow-roll parameters of cosmic inflation, from which we calculate the tensor-to-scalar ratio, the scalar spectral index of density perturbations, and its running as functions of the production coefficient. We find that these quantities do not significantly depend on the scale factor at the Big Bounce. Our predictions for these quantities are consistent with the Planck 2015 observations.

  6. Perturbed black holes in Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity: Stability, ringdown, and gravitational-wave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blázquez-Salcedo, Jose Luis; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Cardoso, Vitor; Ferrari, Valeria; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Khoo, Fech Scen; Kunz, Jutta; Pani, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Gravitational waves emitted by distorted black holes—such as those arising from the coalescence of two neutron stars or black holes—carry not only information about the corresponding spacetime but also about the underlying theory of gravity. Although general relativity remains the simplest, most elegant, and viable theory of gravitation, there are generic and robust arguments indicating that it is not the ultimate description of the gravitational universe. Here, we focus on a particularly appealing extension of general relativity, which corrects Einstein's theory through the addition of terms which are second order in curvature: the topological Gauss-Bonnet invariant coupled to a dilaton. We study gravitational-wave emission from black holes in this theory and (i) find strong evidence that black holes are linearly (mode) stable against both axial and polar perturbations, (ii) discuss how the quasinormal modes of black holes can be excited during collisions involving black holes, and finally (iii) show that future ringdown detections with a large signal-to-noise ratio would improve current constraints on the coupling parameter of the theory.

  7. Beyond Einstein

    SciTech Connect

    Primack, Joel

    2007-10-08

    The National Academy of Sciences was commissioned in 2006 to report on how to restart the Beyond Einstein program, which includes missions to understand dark energy, test general relativity, and observe gravity waves from merging supermassive black holes. This colloquium by one of the members of the recently released Academy study will explain the research strategy that the report proposes and its implications for continued U.S. participation in the exploration of the universe.

  8. Beyond Einstein

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Joel Primack

    2007-10-08

    The National Academy of Sciences was commissioned in 2006 to report on how to restart the Beyond Einstein program, which includes missions to understand dark energy, test general relativity, and observe gravity waves from merging supermassive black holes. This colloquium by one of the members of the recently released Academy study will explain the research strategy that the report proposes and its implications for continued U.S. participation in the exploration of the universe.

  9. AdS black hole solutions in dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kei-ichi; Ohta, Nobuyoshi; Sasagawa, Yukinori

    2011-02-15

    We find that anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime with a nontrivial linear dilaton field is an exact solution in the effective action of the string theory, which is described by gravity with the Gauss-Bonnet curvature terms coupled to a dilaton field in the string frame without a cosmological constant. The AdS radius is determined by the spacetime dimensions and the coupling constants of curvature corrections. We also construct the asymptotically AdS black hole solutions with a linear dilaton field numerically. We find these AdS black holes for hyperbolic topology and in dimensions higher than four. We discuss the thermodynamical properties of those solutions. Extending the model to the case with the even-order higher Lovelock curvature terms, we also find the exact AdS spacetime with a nontrivial dilaton. We further find a cosmological solution with a bounce of three-dimensional space and a solitonic solution with a nontrivial dilaton field, which is regular everywhere and approaches an asymptotically AdS spacetime.

  10. Field redefinitions in theories beyond Einstein gravity using the language of differential forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquiaga, Jose María; García-Bellido, Juan; Zumalacárregui, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    We study the role of field redefinitions in general scalar-tensor theories. In particular, we first focus on the class of field redefinitions linear in the spin-2 field and involving derivatives of the spin-0 mode, generically known as disformal transformations. We start by defining the action of a disformal transformation in the tangent space. Then, we take advantage of the great economy of means of the language of differential forms to compute the full transformation of Horndeski's theory under general disformal transformations. We obtain that Horndeski's action maps onto itself modulo a reduced set of non-Horndeski Lagrangians. These new Lagrangians are found to be invariant under disformal transformation that depend only in the first derivatives of the scalar. Moreover, these combinations of Lagrangians precisely appear when expressing in our basis the constraints of the recently proposed extended scalar-tensor theories. These results allow us to classify the different orbits of scalar-tensor theories invariant under particular disformal transformations, namely, the special disformal, kinetic disformal, and disformal Horndeski orbits. In addition, we consider generalizations of this framework. We find that there are possible well-defined extended disformal transformations that have not been considered in the literature. However, they generically cannot link Horndeski theory with extended scalar-tensor theories. Finally, we study further generalizations in which extra fields with different spin are included. These field redefinitions can be used to connect different gravity theories such as multiscalar-tensor theories, generalized Proca theories, and bigravity. We discuss how the formalism of differential forms could be useful for future developments in these lines.

  11. Counterterm method in Einstein dilaton gravity and the critical behavior of dilaton black holes with a power-Maxwell field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayyani, Z.; Sheykhi, A.; Dehghani, M. H.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the critical behavior of a (n +1 )-dimensional topological dilaton black holes in an extended phase space in both canonical and grand-canonical ensembles, when the gauge field is in the form of a power-Maxwell field. In order to do this, we introduce for the first time the counterterms that remove the divergences of the action in dilaton gravity for the solutions with curved boundary. Using the counterterm method, we calculate the conserved quantities and the action and, therefore, the Gibbs free energy in both the canonical and grand-canonical ensembles. We treat the cosmological constant as a thermodynamic pressure, and its conjugate quantity as a thermodynamic volume. In the presence of the power-Maxwell field, we find an analogy between the topological dilaton black holes with a van der Walls liquid-gas system in all dimensions provided the dilaton coupling constant α and the power parameter p are chosen properly. Interestingly enough, we observe that the power-Maxwell dilaton black holes admit the phase transition in both canonical and grand-canonical ensembles. This is in contrast to RN-AdS, Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton and Born-Infeld-dilaton black holes, which only admit the phase transition in the canonical ensemble. In addition, we calculate the critical quantities and show that they depend on α , n and p . Finally, we obtain the critical exponents in the two ensembles and show that they are independent of the model parameters and have the same values as in the mean-field theory.

  12. Solving the Riddle of the Incompatibility Between Renormalizability and Unitarity in N-Dimensional Einstein Gravity Enlarged by Curvature-Squared Terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accioly, Antonio; Helayël-Neto, José; Scatena, Eslley; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2013-09-01

    One of the puzzling aspects of N-dimensional Einstein Gravity (NDEG) augmented by curvature-squared terms is why renormalizability and unitarity, two of the most important properties of any physical theory, cannot be reconciled in its framework. Actually, the reason why these properties are mutually incompatible within the context of generic higher-derivative models, not necessarily related to gravity, is one of the unsolved mysteries of physics. Here, a simple solution to the NDEG riddle, based on the analysis of the interparticle gravitational potential, is presented. The main argument used to support our discussion is that tree-level unitarity and the existence of a singularity in the potential are intertwined.

  13. Exact static vacuum solution of four-dimensional metric-affine gravity with nontrivial torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresguerres, Romualdo

    1995-02-01

    We present an exact spherically symmetric vacuum solution for a metric-affine quadratic Lagrangian. The metric part of the solution is of Reissner-Nordström type. The connection part includes nonmetricity depending on a dilatation charge and a shear charge. Furthermore, a nontrivial torsion depending on a certain torsion mass and with intrinsic contributions is present.

  14. Torsion and Weyl convector in metric-affine models of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, Alfredo; Mielke, Eckehard W.; Morales-Técotl, Hugo A.; Tresguerres, Romualdo

    1995-10-01

    In this work, we analyze the projective transformations of nonlinear curvature scalar Lagrangians and show that only the Weyl covector piece of the nonmetricity and the vector part of the torsion are affected by these transformations in an opposite manner. It is pointed out that, since the Dirac equation couples only to the axial piece of the torsion, it is projectively invariant. Moreover, we look at a generalized topological 3D gravity by supplementing a translational Chern-Simons term. We obtain an exact solution, with a conformal de Sitter background which implys that, for very large times, Poincaré invariance becomes exact.

  15. Is nonrelativistic gravity possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharyan, A. A.

    2009-07-15

    We study nonrelativistic gravity using the Hamiltonian formalism. For the dynamics of general relativity (relativistic gravity) the formalism is well known and called the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We show that if the lapse function is constrained correctly, then nonrelativistic gravity is described by a consistent Hamiltonian system. Surprisingly, nonrelativistic gravity can have solutions identical to relativistic gravity ones. In particular, (anti-)de Sitter black holes of Einstein gravity and IR limit of Horava gravity are locally identical.

  16. String or branelike solutions in four-dimensional Einstein gravity in the presence of a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Youngone; Kang, Gungwon; Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2011-10-15

    We investigate string or branelike solutions for four-dimensional vacuum Einstein equations in the presence of a cosmological constant. For the case of negative cosmological constant, the Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black string is the only warped stringlike solution. The general solutions for nonwarped branelike configurations are found and they are characterized by the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass density and two tensions. Interestingly, the sum of these tensions is equal to the minus of the mass density. Other than the well-known black string and soliton spacetimes, all the static solutions possess naked singularities. The time-dependent solutions can be regarded as the anti-de Sitter extension of the well-known Kasner solutions. The speciality of those static regular solutions and the implication of singular solutions are also discussed in the context of cylindrical matter collapse. For the case of positive cosmological constant, the Kasner-de Sitter spacetime appears as time-dependent solutions and all static solutions are found to be naked singular.

  17. New forms and thermodynamics of the neutral rotating squashed black hole in five-dimensional vacuum Einstein gravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao-Dan; Wu, Di; Wu, Shuang-Qing; Yang, Shu-Zheng

    2016-12-01

    We initiated the program to look for new and simple forms for the five-dimensional rotating squashed black holes by solving directly the equation of motion. In a recent paper, the metric ansatz of dimensional reduction along the fifth spatial dimension was used to obtain a new but rather simple form for the five-dimensional rotating uncharged black hole solution with squashed horizons via solving the vacuum Einstein field equations. In this work, we continue to seek for another new but relatively simple form for the neutral rotating squashed black hole solution by using a different metric ansatz of time-like dimensional reduction. We then find its relation to our previous solution and investigate its thermodynamics by means of the counterterm method. Compared with the previous results given by the other author, both of our new metric forms and their associated thermodynamic expressions are very concise and elegant. Both of two new forms for the neutral rotating squashed black hole solution presented in this paper can be used as the seed to generate its charged generalization in D=5 minimal supergravity.

  18. Fresh look at the scalar-tensor theory of gravity in Jordan and Einstein frames from undiscussed standpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Krishnakanta; Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2017-03-01

    We study the scalar-tensor theory of gravity profoundly in the action level as well as in the thermodynamic level. Contrary to the usual description in the literature about the equivalence in the two conformally connected frames, this paper addresses several incomplete inferences regarding it and mentions some inequivalences which were not pointed out earlier. In the thermodynamic level, our analysis shows the two frames are equivalent. In that process, we identify the entropy, the energy and the temperature for the thermodynamic description, and we find these quantities are conformally invariant even without any prior assumption. The same conclusion is reached from the gravitational action as well as from the Gibbons-Hawking-York boundary term, establishing the result in a more convincing manner.

  19. Final fate of spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of a dust cloud in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Hideki

    2006-05-15

    We give a model of the higher-dimensional spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of a dust cloud including the perturbative effects of quantum gravity. The n({>=}5)-dimensional action with the Gauss-Bonnet term for gravity is considered and a simple formulation of the basic equations is given for the spacetime M{approx_equal}M{sup 2}xK{sup n-2} with a perfect fluid and a cosmological constant. This is a generalization of the Misner-Sharp formalism of the four-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime with a perfect fluid in general relativity. The whole picture and the final fate of the gravitational collapse of a dust cloud differ greatly between the cases with n=5 and n{>=}6. There are two families of solutions, which we call plus-branch and the minus-branch solutions. A plus-branch solution can be attached to the outside vacuum region which is asymptotically anti-de Sitter in spite of the absence of a cosmological constant. Bounce inevitably occurs in the plus-branch solution for n{>=}6, and consequently singularities cannot be formed. Since there is no trapped surface in the plus-branch solution, the singularity formed in the case of n=5 must be naked. On the other hand, a minus-branch solution can be attached to the outside asymptotically flat vacuum region. We show that naked singularities are massless for n{>=}6, while massive naked singularities are possible for n=5. In the homogeneous collapse represented by the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker solution, the singularity formed is spacelike for n{>=}6, while it is ingoing-null for n=5. In the inhomogeneous collapse with smooth initial data, the strong cosmic censorship hypothesis holds for n{>=}10 and for n=9 depending on the parameters in the initial data, while a naked singularity is always formed for 5{<=}n{<=}8. These naked singularities can be globally naked when the initial surface radius of the dust cloud is fine-tuned, and then the weak cosmic censorship hypothesis is violated.

  20. On the equivalence of the Einstein-Hilbert and the Einstein-Palatini formulations of general relativity for an arbitrary connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadhich, Naresh; Pons, Josep M.

    2012-09-01

    In the framework of the Einstein-Palatini formalism, even though the projective transformation connecting the arbitrary connection with the Levi-Civita connection has been floating in the literature for a long time and perhaps the result was implicitly known in the affine gravity community, yet as far as we know Julia and Silva were the first to realise its gauge character. We rederive this result by using the Rosenfeld-Dirac-Bergmann approach to constrained Hamiltonian systems and do a comprehensive self contained analysis establishing the equivalence of the Einstein-Palatini and the metric formulations without having to impose the gauge choice that the connection is symmetric. We also make contact with the the Einstein-Cartan theory when the matter Lagrangian has fermions.

  1. Fluid/gravity correspondence for massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wen-Jian; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the fluid/gravity correspondence in the framework of massive Einstein gravity. Treating the gravitational mass terms as an effective energy-momentum tensor and utilizing the Petrov-like boundary condition on a timelike hypersurface, we find that the perturbation effects of massive gravity in bulk can be completely governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation living on the cutoff surface under the near horizon and nonrelativistic limits. Furthermore, we have concisely computed the ratio of dynamical viscosity to entropy density for two massive Einstein gravity theories, and found that they still saturate the Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) bound.

  2. Einstein's 1919 View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2012-10-01

    When Rutherford discovered the nuclear force in 1919, he felt the force he discovered reflected some deviation of Newtonian gravity. Einstein too in his 1919 paper published the failure of the general relativity and Newtonian gravity to explain nuclear force and, in his concluding remarks, he retracted his earlier introduction of the cosmological constant. Consistent with his genius, we modify Newtonian gravity as probabilistic gravity using natural Planck units for a realistic study of nature. The result is capable of expressing both (1) nuclear force [strong coupling], and (2) Newtonian gravity in one equation, implying in general, in layman's words, that gravity is the cumulative effect of all quantum mechanical forces which are impossible to measure at long distances. Non discovery of graviton and quantum gravity silently support our findings. Continuing to climb on the shoulders of the giants enables us to see horizons otherwise unseen, as reflected in our book: ``Quantum Consciousness - The Road to Reality,'' and physics/0210040, where we derive the fine structure constant as a function of the age of the universe in Planck times consistent with Gamow's hint, using natural logarithm consistent with Feynman's hint.

  3. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  4. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  5. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This seal illustrates the mission of the Gravity Probe B spacecraft and the organizations who developed the experiment: Stanford University, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and Lockheed Martin. The Gravity Probe B mission will test the theory of curved spacetime and "frame-dragging," depicted graphically in the lower half, that was developed by Einstein and other scientists. Above the graphic is a drawing of GP-B circling the Earth.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-30

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This seal illustrates the mission of the Gravity Probe B spacecraft and the organizations who developed the experiment: Stanford University, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and Lockheed Martin. The Gravity Probe B mission will test the theory of curved spacetime and "frame-dragging," depicted graphically in the lower half, that was developed by Einstein and other scientists. Above the graphic is a drawing of GP-B circling the Earth.

  7. Einstein and Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earman, John; Eisenstaedt, Jean

    Except for a few brief periods, Einstein was uninterested in analysing the nature of the spacetime singularities that appeared in solutions to his gravitational field equations for general relativity. The existence of such monstrosities reinforced his conviction that general relativity was an incomplete theory which would be superseded by a singularity-free unified field theory. Nevertheless, on a number of occasions between 1916 and the end of his life, Einstein was forced to confront singularities. His reactions show a strange asymmetry: he tended to be more disturbed by (what today we would call) merely apparent singularities and less disturbed by (what we would call) real singularities. Einstein had strong a priori ideas about what results a correct physical theory should deliver. In the process of searching through theoretical possibilities, he tended to push aside technical problems and jump over essential difficulties. Sometimes this method of working produced brilliant new ideas-such as the Einstein-Rosen bridge-and sometimes it lead him to miss important implications of his theory of gravity-such as gravitational collapse.

  8. Enhancing separation of histidine from amino acids via free-flow affinity electrophoresis with gravity-induced uniform hydrodynamic flow.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Shao, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Geng, Jia-Zhen; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Hou, Jing-Li

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, a novel mode of free-flow affinity electrophoresis (FFAE) was developed to indirectly enhance the separation of free-flow electrophoresis (FFE). In the mode of FFAE, a Ni(II) with high electric charge density and histidine (His) is chosen as a model ligand and target solute, respectively. Through the controlling of experimental conditions (10 mM pH 6.0 Na(2)HPO(4)-NaH(2)PO(4) with 2.0 mM NiCl(2)·6H(2)O background buffer), Ni(II) can combine with His and the combination leads to the high electric charge density of affinity complex of His-Ni(II) in contrast to the low density of free His molecule. But the ligand has weak interaction with uninterested amino acids. Thus, the mobility of His existing as His-Ni(II) is greatly increased from 14.5×10(-8) m(2) V(-1) s(-1) to 30.2 × 10(-8) m(2) V(-1) s(-1), while those mobilities of uninterested amino acids are almost constant. By virtue of the mode, we developed the FFAE procedure and conducted the relevant experiments. The experiments demonstrated the following merits of the FFAE technique: (i) clear enhancement of separation between the target solute of His and uninterested amino acids; (ii) simplicity, and (iii) low cost. Furthermore, the technique was used for the continuous separation of His from its complex sample, and the purity of His was near to 100%. All of the results demonstrate the feasibility of affinity separation in FFE. The developed FFAE may be used in the separation and pretreatment of some biological molecules (e.g. peptides).

  9. Duality in Yang's theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Eckehard W.; Rincón Maggiolo, Alí A.

    2005-05-01

    The historical route and the current status of a curvature-squared model of gravity, in the affine form proposed by Yang, is briefly reviewed. Due to its inherent scale invariance, it enjoys some advantage for quantization, similarly as internal Yang-Mills fields. However, the exact vacuum solutions with double duality properties exhibit a ‘vacuum degeneracy’. By modifying the duality via a scale breaking term, we demonstrate that only the Einstein equations with induced cosmological constant emerge for the classical background, even when coupled to matter sources.

  10. Einstein's boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norsen, Travis

    2005-02-01

    At the 1927 Solvay conference, Albert Einstein presented a thought experiment intended to demonstrate the incompleteness of the quantum mechanical description of reality. In the following years, the experiment was modified by Einstein, de Broglie, and several other commentators into a simple scenario involving the splitting in half of the wave function of a single particle in a box. This paper collects together several formulations of this thought experiment from the literature, analyzes and assesses it from the point of view of the Einstein-Bohr debates, the EPR dilemma, and Bell's theorem, and argues for "Einstein's Boxes" taking its rightful place alongside similar but historically better known quantum mechanical thought experiments such as EPR and Schrödinger's Cat.

  11. Beyond Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Anne; White, Nicholas; Wanjek, Christopher

    2005-10-01

    NASA plans a scientific journey to answer three pressing questions raised yet unanswered by Einstein's theories: What is dark energy? What happens at the edge of a black hole? What powered the Big Bang?

  12. Centenarian Einstein

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Commémoration de A.Einstein avec 4 orateurs pour honnorer sa mémoire: le prof.Weisskopf parlera de l'homme de science engagé, Daniel Amati du climat de la physique aux années 1920, Sergio Fubini de l'heure scientifique d'A.Einstein et le prof.Berob(?)

  13. Stability of the Einstein static universe in Einstein-Cartan theory

    SciTech Connect

    Atazadeh, K.

    2014-06-01

    The existence and stability of the Einstein static solution have been built in the Einstein-Cartan gravity. We show that this solution in the presence of perfect fluid with spin density satisfying the Weyssenhoff restriction is cyclically stable around a center equilibrium point. Thus, study of this solution is interesting because it supports non-singular emergent cosmological models in which the early universe oscillates indeterminately about an initial Einstein static solution and is thus past eternal.

  14. Dynamical spacetimes in conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2017-08-01

    The conformal gravity remarkably boosts our prehension of gravity theories. We find a series of dynamical solutions in the W2-conformal gravity, including generalized Schwarzschild-Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (GSFRW), charged generalized Schwarzschild-Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (CGSFRW), especially rotating Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (RFRW), charged rotating Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (CRFRW), and a dynamical cylindrically symmetric solutions. The RFRW, CRFRW and the dynamical cylindrically symmetric solutions are never found in the Einstein gravity and modified gravities. The GSFRW and CGSFRW solutions take different forms from the corresponding solutions in the Einstein gravity.

  15. Einstein's meanders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, C.

    2007-05-01

    What does Einstein have to do with subduction? Good question. Peaceful Lake Budi, lying at the heart of an Indian reservation in the Deep South of Chile, had subsided by two meters in the 1960 mega-thrust earthquake. This unique South American salt lake was hiding an awful secret: it was actually an oxbow, not a lake. But Einstein had realized in 1926 that meanders are natural freaks. Rivers will not flow uphill, yet - he claimed - they don't flow down the path of steepest descent either. This anomaly was put at the doorstep of a weak Coriolis Force. Thus Einstein problematized the dilemma of the earth sciences. How can a non-force produce margin-parallel compression in a convergent margin where extension is expected? In fact, where does the energy for meander formation come from? Good question . . . Even Wikipedia knows that Coriolis is not a “force” but an “effect”. So is the obliquity of plate convergence in subduction. Where did Einstein err, and where was he a pioneer? Coastal ablation plus alternating subsidence and emergence in giant earthquakes may yield an answer. Einstein, A. (1926). Die Ursache der Maeanderbildung der Flusslaeufe und das sogenannte Baersche Gesetz, Naturwissenschaften, 14, fascicle II.

  16. Test of Einstein equivalence principle for 0-spin and half-integer-spin atoms: search for spin-gravity coupling effects.

    PubMed

    Tarallo, M G; Mazzoni, T; Poli, N; Sutyrin, D V; Zhang, X; Tino, G M

    2014-07-11

    We report on a conceptually new test of the equivalence principle performed by measuring the acceleration in Earth's gravity field of two isotopes of strontium atoms, namely, the bosonic (88)Sr isotope which has no spin versus the fermionic (87)Sr isotope which has a half-integer spin. The effect of gravity on the two atomic species has been probed by means of a precision differential measurement of the Bloch frequency for the two atomic matter waves in a vertical optical lattice. We obtain the values η=(0.2±1.6)×10(-7) for the Eötvös parameter and k=(0.5±1.1)×10(-7) for the coupling between nuclear spin and gravity. This is the first reported experimental test of the equivalence principle for bosonic and fermionic particles and opens a new way to the search for the predicted spin-gravity coupling effects.

  17. Comment on "Why does a ball fall?: A new visualization for Einstein's model of gravity" [Am. J. Phys. 84, 396-402 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RÈ©bilas, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    A simple analytical approach that allows us to recover Newtonian physics from Schwarzschild's metric is proposed. The method elucidates why the tiny modification of the metric due to gravity entails a significant change of motion of a freely falling body.

  18. Gravity from the Ground Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, Bernard

    2003-12-01

    Preface; 1. Gravity on Earth: the inescapable force; 2. And then came Newton: gravity takes center stage; 3. Satellites: what goes up doesn't always come down; 4. The Solar System: a triumph for Newtonian gravity; 5. Tides and tidal forces: the real signature of gravity; 6. Interplanetary travel: the cosmic roller-coaster; 7. Atmospheres: keeping planets covered; 8. Gravity in the Sun: keeping the heat on; 9. Reaching for the stars: the emptiness of outer space; 10. The colors of stars: why they are black (bodies); 11. Stars at work: factories for the Universe; 12. Birth to death: the life cycle of the stars; 13. Binary stars: tidal forces on a huge scale; 14. Galaxies: atoms in the Universe; 15. Physics near the speed of light: Einstein stands on Galileo's shoulders; 16. Relating to Einstein: logic and experiment in relativity; 17. Spacetime geometry: finding out what is not relative; 18. Einstein's gravity: the curvature of spacetime in the Solar System; 19. Einstein's recipe: fashioning the geometry of gravity; 20. Neutron stars: laboratories of strong gravity; 21. Black holes: gravity's one-way street; 22. Gravitational waves: gravity speaks; 23. Gravitational lenses: bringing the Universe into focus; 24. Cosmology: the study of everything; 25. Big Bang: the seed from which we grew; 26. Einstein's Universe: the geometry of cosmology; 27. Ask the Universe: cosmic questions at the frontiers of gravity; Appendix A. Useful constants: values used in this book; Appendix B. Background: what you need to know before you start.

  19. Affine dynamics with torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültekin, Kemal

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we give a thorough analysis of a general affine gravity with torsion. After a brief exposition of the affine gravities considered by Eddington and Schrödinger, we construct and analyze different affine gravities based on the determinants of the Ricci tensor, the torsion tensor, the Riemann tensor, and their combinations. In each case we reduce equations of motion to their simplest forms and give a detailed analysis of their solutions. Our analyses lead to the construction of the affine connection in terms of the curvature and torsion tensors. Our solutions of the dynamical equations show that the curvature tensors at different points are correlated via non-local, exponential rescaling factors determined by the torsion tensor.

  20. Einstein Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    A brief description on the work and life of the great physicist scientist Albert Einstein is presented. The photoelectric paper written by him in 1905 led him to the study of fluctuations in the energy density of radiation and from there to the incomplete nature of the equipartition theorem of classical mechanics, which failed to account for…

  1. Einstein Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    A brief description on the work and life of the great physicist scientist Albert Einstein is presented. The photoelectric paper written by him in 1905 led him to the study of fluctuations in the energy density of radiation and from there to the incomplete nature of the equipartition theorem of classical mechanics, which failed to account for…

  2. Einstein's Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity. The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a…

  3. Einstein's Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity. The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a…

  4. Nonlocal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhoon, Bahram

    2017-05-01

    Relativity theory is based on a postulate of locality, which means that the past history of the observer is not directly taken into account. This book argues that the past history should be taken into account. In this way, nonlocality 1R 2i1nr-in the sense of history dependence-is introduced into relativity theory. The deep connection between inertia and gravitation suggests that gravity could be nonlocal, and in nonlocal gravity the fading gravitational memory of past events must then be taken into account. Along this line of thought, a classical nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation has recently been developed. A significant consequence of this theory is that the nonlocal aspect of gravity appears to simulate dark matter. According to nonlocal gravity theory, what astronomers attribute to dark matter should instead be due to the nonlocality of gravitation. Nonlocality dominates on the scale of galaxies and beyond. Memory fades with time; therefore, the nonlocal aspect of gravity becomes weaker as the universe expands. The implications of nonlocal gravity are explored in this book for gravitational lensing, gravitational radiation, the gravitational physics of the Solar System and the internal dynamics of nearby galaxies, as well as clusters of galaxies. This approach is extended to nonlocal Newtonian cosmology, where the attraction of gravity fades with the expansion of the universe. Thus far, scientists have only compared some of the consequences of nonlocal gravity with astronomical observations.

  5. Einstein's Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-10-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity.1-4 The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a constant velocity.5 Einstein showed an intriguing fact that the usual law of reflection would not hold in the case of a uniformly moving mirror, that is, the angles of incidence and reflection of the light would not equal each other. Later on, it has been shown that the law of reflection at a moving mirror can be obtained in various alternative ways,6-10 but none of them seems suitable for bringing this interesting subject into the high school classroom.

  6. Einstein unmasked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Brian

    2008-09-01

    This is a remarkable and, at times, bewilderingly diverse volume. Consisting of 20 essays that represent the proceedings of a conference held in 2005 in Berlin, Germany, during the International Year of Physics, it offers insights into Einstein's influence on a swathe of human activity. In the introduction the distinguished editors make some remarkable claims for the book, calling it "an unique attempt" and saying that "there is no better introduction to...string theory", while the first essay states "Not since Newton's Principia..." Clearly this is a volume that aspires to high standards.

  7. Einstein, Picasso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Arthur I.

    2004-11-01

    How the 20th century’s most important scientist—Albert Einstein—and its most important artist—Pablo Picasso—made their greatest discoveries at almost the same time is a remarkable story: Einstein's relativity theory in 1905 and Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon two years later. A scientist and an artist confronted the same problem—the nature of time and simultaneity—and resolved it after realizing a new aesthetic. At the nascent moment of creativity boundaries dissolve between disciplines. This article explores the similarities in the early work of two of the greatest icons of Art and Science of the last century.

  8. Einstein Manifolds as Yang-Mills Instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, John J.; Yang, Hyun Seok

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that Einstein gravity can be formulated as a gauge theory of Lorentz group where spin connections play a role of gauge fields and Riemann curvature tensors correspond to their field strengths. One can then pose an interesting question: What is the Einstein equation from the gauge theory point of view? Or equivalently, what is the gauge theory object corresponding to Einstein manifolds? We show that the Einstein equations in four dimensions are precisely self-duality equations in Yang-Mills gauge theory and so Einstein manifolds correspond to Yang-Mills instantons in SO(4) = SU(2)L × SU(2)R gauge theory. Specifically, we prove that any Einstein manifold with or without a cosmological constant always arises as the sum of SU(2)L instantons and SU(2)R anti-instantons. This result explains why an Einstein manifold must be stable because two kinds of instantons belong to different gauge groups, instantons in SU(2)L and anti-instantons in SU(2)R, and so they cannot decay into a vacuum. We further illuminate the stability of Einstein manifolds by showing that they carry nontrivial topological invariants.

  9. Modes of log gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Rosseel, Jan; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K.

    2011-05-15

    The physical modes of a recently proposed D-dimensional 'critical gravity', linearized about its anti-de Sitter vacuum, are investigated. All 'log mode' solutions, which we categorize as 'spin-2' or 'Proca', arise as limits of the massive spin-2 modes of the noncritical theory. The linearized Einstein tensor of a spin-2 log mode is itself a 'nongauge' solution of the linearized Einstein equations whereas the linearized Einstein tensor of a Proca mode takes the form of a linearized general coordinate transformation. Our results suggest the existence of a holographically dual logarithmic conformal field theory.

  10. f(T) teleparallel gravity and cosmology.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Capozziello, Salvatore; De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Saridakis, Emmanuel N

    2016-10-01

    Over recent decades, the role of torsion in gravity has been extensively investigated along the main direction of bringing gravity closer to its gauge formulation and incorporating spin in a geometric description. Here we review various torsional constructions, from teleparallel, to Einstein-Cartan, and metric-affine gauge theories, resulting in extending torsional gravity in the paradigm of f (T) gravity, where f (T) is an arbitrary function of the torsion scalar. Based on this theory, we further review the corresponding cosmological and astrophysical applications. In particular, we study cosmological solutions arising from f (T) gravity, both at the background and perturbation levels, in different eras along the cosmic expansion. The f (T) gravity construction can provide a theoretical interpretation of the late-time universe acceleration, alternative to a cosmological constant, and it can easily accommodate with the regular thermal expanding history including the radiation and cold dark matter dominated phases. Furthermore, if one traces back to very early times, for a certain class of f (T) models, a sufficiently long period of inflation can be achieved and hence can be investigated by cosmic microwave background observations-or, alternatively, the Big Bang singularity can be avoided at even earlier moments due to the appearance of non-singular bounces. Various observational constraints, especially the bounds coming from the large-scale structure data in the case of f (T) cosmology, as well as the behavior of gravitational waves, are described in detail. Moreover, the spherically symmetric and black hole solutions of the theory are reviewed. Additionally, we discuss various extensions of the f (T) paradigm. Finally, we consider the relation with other modified gravitational theories, such as those based on curvature, like f (R) gravity, trying to illuminate the subject of which formulation, or combination of formulations, might be more suitable

  11. f(T) teleparallel gravity and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Capozziello, Salvatore; De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2016-10-01

    Over recent decades, the role of torsion in gravity has been extensively investigated along the main direction of bringing gravity closer to its gauge formulation and incorporating spin in a geometric description. Here we review various torsional constructions, from teleparallel, to Einstein-Cartan, and metric-affine gauge theories, resulting in extending torsional gravity in the paradigm of f (T) gravity, where f (T) is an arbitrary function of the torsion scalar. Based on this theory, we further review the corresponding cosmological and astrophysical applications. In particular, we study cosmological solutions arising from f (T) gravity, both at the background and perturbation levels, in different eras along the cosmic expansion. The f (T) gravity construction can provide a theoretical interpretation of the late-time universe acceleration, alternative to a cosmological constant, and it can easily accommodate with the regular thermal expanding history including the radiation and cold dark matter dominated phases. Furthermore, if one traces back to very early times, for a certain class of f (T) models, a sufficiently long period of inflation can be achieved and hence can be investigated by cosmic microwave background observations—or, alternatively, the Big Bang singularity can be avoided at even earlier moments due to the appearance of non-singular bounces. Various observational constraints, especially the bounds coming from the large-scale structure data in the case of f (T) cosmology, as well as the behavior of gravitational waves, are described in detail. Moreover, the spherically symmetric and black hole solutions of the theory are reviewed. Additionally, we discuss various extensions of the f (T) paradigm. Finally, we consider the relation with other modified gravitational theories, such as those based on curvature, like f (R) gravity, trying to illuminate the subject of which formulation, or combination of formulations, might be more

  12. Polymer Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, E.; Chacón-Acosta, G.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we analyze a non-interacting one-dimensional polymer Bose-Einstein condensate in a harmonic trap within the semiclassical approximation. We use an effective Hamiltonian coming from the polymer quantization that arises in loop quantum gravity. We calculate the number of particles in order to obtain the critical temperature. The Bose-Einstein functions are replaced by series, whose high order terms are related to powers of the polymer length. It is shown that the condensation temperature presents a shift respect to the standard case, for small values of the polymer scale. In typical experimental conditions, it is possible to establish a bound for λ2 up to ≲10-16 m2. To improve this bound we should decrease the frequency of the trap and also decrease the number of particles.

  13. Fixed points of quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Litim, Daniel F

    2004-05-21

    Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with renormalization group methods. Analytical results for a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point are found for arbitrary dimensions and gauge fixing parameters in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. Implications for quantum gravity in four dimensions are discussed.

  14. The role of conformal symmetry in gravity and the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucat, Stefano; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we consider conformal symmetry in the context of manifolds with general affine connection. We extend the conformal transformation law of the metric to a general metric compatible affine connection, and find that it is a symmetry of both the geodesic equation and the Riemann tensor. We derive the generalised Jacobi equation and Raychaudhuri equation and show that they are both conformally invariant. Using the geodesic deviation (Jacobi) equation we analyse the behaviour of geodesics in different conformal frames. Since we find that our version of conformal symmetry is exact in classical pure Einstein's gravity, we ask whether one can extend it to the standard model. We find that it is possible to write conformal invariant Lagrangians in any dimensions for vector, fermion and scalar fields, but that such Lagrangians are only gauge invariant in four dimensions. Provided one introduces a dilaton field, gravity can be conformally coupled to matter.

  15. Einstein as Evaluator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caulley, Darrel N.

    1982-01-01

    Like any other person, Albert Einstein was an informal evaluator, engaged in placing value on various aspects of his life, work, and the world. Based on Einstein's own statements, this paper speculates about what Einstein would have been like as a connoisseur evaluator, a conceptual evaluator, or a responsive evaluator. (Author/BW)

  16. Einstein as Evaluator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caulley, Darrel N.

    1982-01-01

    Like any other person, Albert Einstein was an informal evaluator, engaged in placing value on various aspects of his life, work, and the world. Based on Einstein's own statements, this paper speculates about what Einstein would have been like as a connoisseur evaluator, a conceptual evaluator, or a responsive evaluator. (Author/BW)

  17. Dark matter from R2 gravity.

    PubMed

    Cembranos, Jose A R

    2009-04-10

    The modification of Einstein gravity at high energies is mandatory from a quantum approach. In this work, we point out that this modification necessarily introduces new degrees of freedom. We analyze the possibility that these new gravitational states can provide the main contribution to the nonbaryonic dark matter of the Universe. By following an effective field theory approach, we illustrate this idea with the first and simplest high energy modification of the Einstein-Hilbert action: R2 gravity.

  18. Growth histories in bimetric massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Marcus; Buchberger, Igor; Enander, Jonas; Mörtsell, Edvard; Sjörs, Stefan E-mail: igor.buchberger@kau.se E-mail: edvard@fysik.su.se

    2012-12-01

    We perform cosmological perturbation theory in Hassan-Rosen bimetric gravity for general homogeneous and isotropic backgrounds. In the de Sitter approximation, we obtain decoupled sets of massless and massive scalar gravitational fluctuations. Matter perturbations then evolve like in Einstein gravity. We perturb the future de Sitter regime by the ratio of matter to dark energy, producing quasi-de Sitter space. In this more general setting the massive and massless fluctuations mix. We argue that in the quasi-de Sitter regime, the growth of structure in bimetric gravity differs from that of Einstein gravity.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This logo for the Gravity Probe B mission portrays the theory of curved spacetime and "frame-dragging," developed by Einstein and other scientists, that the mission will test. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit. Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring the effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and Lockheed Martin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-30

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This logo for the Gravity Probe B mission portrays the theory of curved spacetime and "frame-dragging," developed by Einstein and other scientists, that the mission will test. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit. Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring the effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and Lockheed Martin.

  20. Partial masslessness and conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Joung, E.; Waldron, A.

    2013-05-01

    We use conformal, but ghostful, Weyl gravity to study its ghost-free, second derivative, partially massless (PM) spin-2 component in the presence of Einstein gravity with positive cosmological constant. Specifically, we consider both gravitational- and self-interactions of PM via the fully nonlinear factorization of conformal gravity’s Bach tensor into Einstein times Schouten operators. We find that extending PM beyond linear order suffers from familiar higher spin consistency obstructions: it propagates only in Einstein backgrounds, and the conformal gravity route generates only the usual safe, Noether, cubic order vertices. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Higher spin theories and holography’.

  1. Universal Themes of Bose-Einstein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proukakis, Nick P.; Snoke, David W.; Littlewood, Peter B.

    2017-04-01

    . Bose–Einstein condensation of photons and grand-canonical condensate fluctuations J. Klaers and M. Weitz; 20. Laser operation and Bose–Einstein condensation: analogies and differences A. Chiocchetta, A. Gambassi and I. Carusotto; 21. Vortices in resonant polariton condensates in semiconductor microcavities D. N. Krizhanovskii, K. Guda, M. Sich, M. S. Skolnick, L. Dominici and D. Sanvitto; 22. Optical control of polariton condensates G. Christmann, P. G. Savvidis and J. J. Baumberg; 23. Disorder, synchronization and phase-locking in non-equilibrium Bose–Einstein condensates P. R. Eastham and B. Rosenow; 24. Collective topological excitations in 1D polariton quantum fluids H. Terças, D. D. Solnyshkov and G. Malpuech; 25. Microscopic theory of Bose–Einstein condensation of magnons at room temperature H. Salman, N. G. Berloff and S. O. Demokritov; 26. Spintronics and magnon Bose–Einstein condensation R. A. Duine, A. Brataas, S. A. Bender and Y. Tserkovnyak; 27. Spin-superfluidity and spin-current mediated non-local transport H. Chen and A. H. MacDonald; 28. Bose–Einstein condensation in quantum magnets C. Kollath, T. Giamarchi and C. Rüegg; Part V. Condensates in Astrophysics and Cosmology: Editorial notes; 29. Bose–Einstein condensates in neutron stars C. J. Pethick, T. Schäfer and A. Schwenk; 30. A simulated cosmological metric: the superfluid 3He condensate G. R. Pickett; 31. Cosmic axion Bose–Einstein condensation N. Banik and P. Sikivie; 32. Graviton BECs: a new approach to quantum gravity G. Dvali and C. Gomez; Universal Bose–Einstein condensation workshop; Index.

  2. Repulsive gravity in tension stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J.; Lynden-Bell, D.

    1991-09-01

    In stars, pressure opposes the attractive force of gravity. In general relativity, if the pressure is negative (a tension) and P is less than -1/3 rho(c)-squared, then the resulting gravity is repulsive. Such material is invoked in cosmology to give the inflation of the universe. In tension stars, this repulsive gravity is balanced by the tension. The simplest tension stars only exist in esoteric situations beyond the neck of an Einstein-Rosen bridge in Schwarzschild space. Here, tension material is confined within a massive shell of normal matter. The resulting object, while still repulsive inside, has an attractive exterior gravity and can, in principle, exist without horizons.

  3. Classical Weyl transverse gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2017-05-01

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge-fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a "fake" symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields, i.e. the Weyl-invariant scalar, vector and spinor fields. Fourthly, it is explicitly shown that in the WTDiff gravity the Schwarzschild black hole metric and a charged black hole one are classical solutions to the equations of motion only when they are expressed in the Cartesian coordinate system. Finally, we consider the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology and provide some exact solutions.

  4. Exact solutions to quadratic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.; Podolský, J.; Švarc, R.

    2017-04-01

    Since all Einstein spacetimes are vacuum solutions to quadratic gravity in four dimensions, in this paper we study various aspects of non-Einstein vacuum solutions to this theory. Most such known solutions are of traceless Ricci and Petrov type N with a constant Ricci scalar. Thus we assume the Ricci scalar to be constant which leads to a substantial simplification of the field equations. We prove that a vacuum solution to quadratic gravity with traceless Ricci tensor of type N and aligned Weyl tensor of any Petrov type is necessarily a Kundt spacetime. This will considerably simplify the search for new non-Einstein solutions. Similarly, a vacuum solution to quadratic gravity with traceless Ricci type III and aligned Weyl tensor of Petrov type II or more special is again necessarily a Kundt spacetime. Then we study the general role of conformal transformations in constructing vacuum solutions to quadratic gravity. We find that such solutions can be obtained by solving one nonlinear partial differential equation for a conformal factor on any Einstein spacetime or, more generally, on any background with vanishing Bach tensor. In particular, we show that all geometries conformal to Kundt are either Kundt or Robinson-Trautman, and we provide some explicit Kundt and Robinson-Trautman solutions to quadratic gravity by solving the above mentioned equation on certain Kundt backgrounds.

  5. Testing gravity in space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Dvali, Gia

    General concept of non-minimal field theory is discussed and a catalog of models describing the curvature coupling of gravity field with scalar, electromagnetic, vector and gauge fields is presented. Non-minimal extensions of the Einstein-Maxwell, Einstein-Yang-Mills and Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs theories are considered in detail. New exact solutions of the self-consistent non-minimally extended field equations, which describe non-minimal Wu-Yang monopole, non-minimal Wu-Yang wormhole, non-minimal Dirac monopole, non-minimal electrically charged objects, are presented. Physical phenomena induced by the curvature coupling are discussed, the main attention is focused on the problem of alternative explanation of the accelerated expansion of the universe and on an effective cosmological constant formation due to the non-minimal coupling.

  6. Einstein Up in Smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisle, John

    2016-01-01

    Albert Einstein's biographers have not explained why he developed the abdominal aortic aneurysm that led to his death. Early conjectures proposed that it was caused by syphilis, without accurate evidence. The present article gives evidence to the contrary, and argues that the principal cause of Einstein's death was smoking.

  7. When Art Meets Einstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with a pale blue sculpture entitled "A New World View", as an homage to the most famous scientist in modern history, Albert Einstein. It has 32 bas-relief squares composed of glass and steel that represent one aspect of the life and legacy of Albert Einstein. Images of children's faces peer out from behind the glass squares,…

  8. Einstein for Everyone

    SciTech Connect

    Piccioni, Robert

    2010-10-05

    Young Einstein was a rebel who seemed doomed to fail. How did he overcome rejection to become the most famous scientist in history? We will discuss and explain all his theories in plain English and without math, and we will discover how Einstein's achievements impact our lives through DVDs, GPS, iPods, computers and green energy.

  9. When Art Meets Einstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with a pale blue sculpture entitled "A New World View", as an homage to the most famous scientist in modern history, Albert Einstein. It has 32 bas-relief squares composed of glass and steel that represent one aspect of the life and legacy of Albert Einstein. Images of children's faces peer out from behind the glass squares,…

  10. Einstein for Everyone

    ScienceCinema

    Piccioni, Robert

    2016-07-12

    Young Einstein was a rebel who seemed doomed to fail. How did he overcome rejection to become the most famous scientist in history? We will discuss and explain all his theories in plain English and without math, and we will discover how Einstein's achievements impact our lives through DVDs, GPS, iPods, computers and green energy.

  11. Einstein and Boltzmann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2005-03-01

    In 1916 Einstein published a remarkable paper entitled ``On the Quantum Theory of Radiation''ootnotetextA. Einstein ``On the Quantum theory of Radiation,'' Phys. Zeitschrift 18 (1917) 121. First printed in Mitteilungender Physikalischen Gesellschaft Zurich. No 18, 1916. Translated into English in Van der Waerden ``Sources of Quantum Mechanics'' (North Holland 1967) pp. 63-77. in which he obtained Planck's formula for black-body radiation by introducing a new statistical hypothesis for the emmision and absorption of electromagneic radiation based on discrete bundles of energy and momentum which are now called photons. Einstein radiation theory replaced Maxwell's classical theory by a stochastic process which, when properly interpreted, also gives well known statistics of massless particles with even spin.^2 This quantum distribution, however, was not discovered by Einstein but was communicated to him by Bose in 1924. Like Boltzmann's classical counterpart, Einstein's statistical theory leads to an irreversible approach to thermal equilibrium, but because this violates time reversal, Einstein theory can not be regarded as a fundamental theory of physical process.ootnotetextM. Nauenberg ``The evolution of radiation towards thermal equilibrium: A soluble model which illustrates the foundations of statistical mechanics,'' American Journal of Physics 72 (2004) 313 Apparently Einstein and his contemporaries were unaware of this problem, and even today this problem is ignored in contemporary discussions of Einstein's treatment of the black-body spectrum.

  12. 5D Einstein-Maxwell solitons and concentric rotating dipole black rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2008-09-15

    We discuss the application of the solitonic techniques to the 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity. As an illustration we construct a new exact solution describing two concentric rotating dipole black rings. The properties of the solution are investigated.

  13. U-duality covariant gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohm, Olaf; Samtleben, Henning

    2013-09-01

    We extend the techniques of double field theory to more general gravity theories and U-duality symmetries, having in mind applications to the complete D = 11 supergravity. In this paper we work out a (3 + 3)-dimensional `U-duality covariantization' of D = 4 Einstein gravity, in which the Ehlers group SL(2, ) is realized geometrically, acting in the 3 representation on half of the coordinates. We include the full (2 + 1)-dimensional metric, while the `internal vielbein' is a coset representative of SL(2, )/SO(2) and transforms under gauge transformations via generalized Lie derivatives. In addition, we introduce a gauge connection of the `C-bracket', and a gauge connection of SL(2, ), albeit subject to constraints. The action takes the form of (2 + 1)-dimensional gravity coupled to a Chern-Simons-matter theory but encodes the complete D = 4 Einstein gravity. We comment on generalizations, such as an ` E 8(8) covariantization' of M-theory.

  14. Crystal clear lessons on the microstructure of spacetime and modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D.

    2015-06-01

    We argue that a microscopic structure for spacetime such as that expected in a quantum foam scenario, in which microscopic wormholes and other topological structures should play a relevant role, might lead to an effective metric-affine geometry at larger scales. This idea is supported by the role that microscopic defects play in crystalline structures. With an explicit model, we show that wormhole formation is possible in a metric-affine scenario, where the wormhole and the matter fields play a role analogous to that of defects in crystals. Such wormholes also arise in Born-Infeld gravity, which is favored by an analogy with the estimated mass of a point defect in condensed matter systems. We also point out that in metric-affine geometries, Einstein's equations with an effective cosmological constant appear as an attractor in the vacuum limit for a vast family of theories of gravity. This illustrates how lessons from solid state physics can be useful in unveiling the properties of the microcosmos and defining new avenues for modified theories of gravity.

  15. Einstein's Theory Fights off Challengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    Two new and independent studies have put Einstein's General Theory of Relativity to the test like never before. These results, made using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, show Einstein's theory is still the best game in town. Each team of scientists took advantage of extensive Chandra observations of galaxy clusters, the largest objects in the Universe bound together by gravity. One result undercuts a rival gravity model to General Relativity, while the other shows that Einstein's theory works over a vast range of times and distances across the cosmos. The first finding significantly weakens a competitor to General Relativity known as "f(R) gravity". "If General Relativity were the heavyweight boxing champion, this other theory was hoping to be the upstart contender," said Fabian Schmidt of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, who led the study. "Our work shows that the chances of its upsetting the champ are very slim." In recent years, physicists have turned their attention to competing theories to General Relativity as a possible explanation for the accelerated expansion of the universe. Currently, the most popular explanation for the acceleration is the so-called cosmological constant, which can be understood as energy that exists in empty space. This energy is referred to as dark energy to emphasize that it cannot be directly detected. In the f(R) theory, the cosmic acceleration comes not from an exotic form of energy but from a modification of the gravitational force. The modified force also affects the rate at which small enhancements of matter can grow over the eons to become massive clusters of galaxies, opening up the possibility of a sensitive test of the theory. Schmidt and colleagues used mass estimates of 49 galaxy clusters in the local universe from Chandra observations, and compared them with theoretical model predictions and studies of supernovas, the cosmic microwave background, and the large-scale distribution of galaxies. They

  16. Diagrammar in an extended theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, David C.; Godwin, John H.; Jehu, Guy R.; Perkins, Warren B.

    2017-08-01

    We show how the S-matrix of an extended theory of gravity defined by its three-point amplitudes can be constructed by demanding factorisation. The resultant S-matrix has tree amplitudes obeying the same soft singularity theorems as Einstein gravity including the sub-sub-leading terms.

  17. Einstein and the Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Milo; Haselhurst, Geoff

    2005-03-01

    Querying Einstein. In his later years, physicists queried Einstein about the plethora of particles found with high-energy accelerators. They wanted Einstein's thought on basic matter. Einstein, a careful thinker, seriously replied, ``I would just like to know what an electron is.'' He implied that the prosaic electron, was more important to science than billions spent on accelerators. Little attention was paid to his remark. But Einstein saw the electron as the leading player of the Universe, because most activity is energy transfers between electrons. At the time, no one understood the energy mechanism of the electron; Although electron forces can be calculated with rules of Physics 101, the rules did not always match Nature. The electron did not appear to be a discrete particle. Something was wrong and Einstein knew it. We follow a suggestion by Clifford and Schroedinger to reject the discrete electron and replace it with a Wave Structure of Matter. This has all the electron's experimental properties, including the origins of the natural laws, fulfilling Einstein's intuition. (www.SpaceAndMotion.com)

  18. Einstein and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, John

    2005-03-01

    As an editor of the Annalen der Physik, Max Planck published Einstein's early papers on thermodynamics and on special relativity, which Planck probably was the first major physicist to appreciate. They respected one another not only as physicists but also, for their inspired creation of world pictures, as artists. Planck helped to establish Einstein in a sinecure at the center of German physics, Berlin. Despite their differences in scientific style, social life, politics, and religion, they became fast friends. Their mutual admiration survived World War I, during which Einstein advocated pacifism and Planck signed the infamous Manifesto of the 93 Intellectuals supporting the German invasion of Belgium. It also survived the Weimar Republic, which Einstein favored and Planck disliked. Physics drew them together, as both opposed the Copenhagen Interpretation; so did common decency, as Planck helped to protect Einstein from anti-semitic attacks. Their friendship did not survive the Nazis. As a standing secretary of the Berlin Academy, Planck had to advise Einstein to resign from it before his colleagues, outraged at his criticism of the new Germany from the safety of California, expelled him. Einstein never forgave his old friend and former fellow artist for not protesting publicly against his expulsion and denigration, and other enormities of National Socialism. .

  19. Einstein, Bose and Bose-Einstein Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wali, Kameshwar C.

    2005-05-01

    In June 1924, a relatively unknown Satyendra Nath Bose from Dacca, India, wrote a letter to Einstein beginning with ``Respected Sir, I have ventured to send you the accompanying article for your perusal. I am anxious to know what you think of it. You will see that I have ventured to deduce the coefficient 8πυ^2/c^3 in Planck's law independent of the classical electrodynamics, only assuming that the ultimate elementary regions in Phase-space have the content h^3. I do not know sufficient German to translate the paper. If you think the paper worth publication, I shall be grateful if you arrange for its publication in Zeitschrift für Physik.'' Einstein did translate the article himself and got it published. He wrote to Ehrenfest: ``The Indian Bose has given a beautiful derivation of Planck's law, including the constant [i.e.8πυ^2/c^3].'' Einstein extended the ideas of Bose that implied, among other things, a new statistics for the light-quanta to the molecules of an ideal gas and wrote to Ehrenfest, `from a certain temperature on, the molecules ``condense'' without attractive forces, that is, they accumulate at zero velocity. The theory is pretty, but is there also some truth to it?' Abraham Pais has called Bose's paper ``the fourth and the last revolutionary papers of the old quantum theory.'' My paper will present the works of Bose and Einstein in their historical perspective and the eventual birth of the new quantum Bose-Einstein statistics.

  20. Einstein and Millikan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Charlotte

    2005-03-01

    Albert Einstein traveled to America by boat during the great depression to consult with scientists at the California Institute of Technology. He was a theoretical physicist, a Nobel Prize winner, and a 20th century folk hero. Few members of the general public understood his theories, but they idolized him all the same. The invitation came from physicist Robert Millikan, who had initiated a visiting-scholars program at Caltech shortly after he became head of the school in 1921. Einstein's visits to the campus in 1931, 1932, and 1933 capped Millikan's campaign to make Caltech one of the physics capitals of the world. Mount Wilson astronomer Edwin Hubble's discovery that redshifts are proportional to their distances from the observer challenged Einstein's cosmological picture of a static universe. The big question at Caltech in 1931 was whether Einstein would give up his cosmological constant and accept the idea of an expanding universe. By day, Einstein discussed his theory and its interpretation at length with Richard Tolman, Hubble, and the other scientists on the campus. By night, Einstein filled his travel diary with his personal impressions. During his third visit, Einstein sidestepped as long as possible the question of whether conditions in Germany might prevent his return there. After the January 30 announcement that Hitler had become chancellor of Germany, the question could no longer be evaded. He postponed his return trip for a few weeks and then went to Belgium for several months instead of to Berlin. In the fall of 1933, Albert Einstein returned to the United States as an emigre and became a charter member of Abraham Flexner's new Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Why did Einstein go to Princeton and not Pasadena?

  1. Kinematics of Einstein-Cartan universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmatsiou, Klaountia; Tsagas, Christos G.; Barrow, John D.

    2017-05-01

    We analyze the kinematics of cosmological spacetimes with nonzero torsion, in the framework of the classical Einstein-Cartan gravity. After a brief introduction to the basic features of spaces with nonvanishing torsion, we consider a family of observers moving along timelike worldlines and focus on their kinematic behavior. In so doing, we isolate the irreducible variables monitoring the observers' motion and derive their evolution formulas and associated constraint equations. Our aim is to identify the effects of spacetime torsion, and the changes they introduce into the kinematics of the standard, torsion-free, cosmological models. We employ a fully geometrical approach, imposing no restrictions on the material content, or any a priori couplings between torsion and spin. Also, we do not apply the familiar splitting of the equations, into a purely Riemannian component plus a torsion/spin part, at the start of our study, but only introduce it at the very end. With the general formulas at hand, we use the Einstein-Cartan field equations to incorporate explicitly the spin of the matter. The resulting formulas fully describe the kinematics of dynamical spacetimes within the framework of the Einstein-Cartan gravity, while in the special case of the so-called Weyssenhoff fluid, they recover results previously reported in the literature.

  2. Einstein: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormos-Buchwald, Diana

    2015-04-01

    In late 1915, Albert Einstein (1879-1955) completed as series of papers on a generalized theory of gravitation that were to constitute a major conceptual change in the history of modern physics and the crowning achievement of his scientific career. But this accomplishment came after a decade of intense intellectual struggle and was received with muted enthusiasm. Einstein's previously unpublished writings and massive correspondence, edited by the Einstein Papers Project, provide vivid insights into the historical, personal, and scientific context of the formulation, completion, and reception of GR during the first decades of the 20th century.

  3. Einstein and 1905

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigden, John

    2005-05-01

    From March 17 to September 29, 1905, just over six months, Einstein wrote five papers that shifted the tectonic foundations of physics and changed the face of Nature. Three of these papers, the March paper presenting the particle of light, the May paper on Brownian motion, and the June paper on the Special Theory of Relativity are universally recognized as fundamental; however, the Brownian motion paper cannot be divorced from Einstein's April paper, A New Determination of the Dimensions of Molecules, and the September paper that gave the world its most famous equation, E = mc^2, cannot be separated from the June paper. These five papers reveal characteristics of Einstein's approach to physics.

  4. Oscillatons formed by nonlinear gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Obregon, Octavio; Urena-Lopez, L. Arturo; Schunck, Franz E.

    2005-07-15

    Oscillatons are solutions of the coupled Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations that are globally regular and asymptotically flat. By means of a Legendre transformation we are able to visualize the behavior of the corresponding objects in nonlinear gravity where the scalar field has been absorbed by means of the conformal mapping.

  5. Light, Gravity and Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falla, David

    2012-01-01

    The nature of light and how it is affected by gravity is discussed. Einstein's prediction of the deflection of light as it passes near the Sun was verified by observations made during the solar eclipse of 1919. Another prediction was that of gravitational redshift, which occurs when light emitted by a star loses energy in the gravitational field…

  6. Light, Gravity and Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falla, David

    2012-01-01

    The nature of light and how it is affected by gravity is discussed. Einstein's prediction of the deflection of light as it passes near the Sun was verified by observations made during the solar eclipse of 1919. Another prediction was that of gravitational redshift, which occurs when light emitted by a star loses energy in the gravitational field…

  7. Conformal gravity from the AdS/CFT mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Aros, Rodrigo; Romo, Mauricio; Zamorano, Nelson

    2007-03-15

    We explicitly calculate the induced gravity theory at the boundary of an asymptotically anti-de Sitter five dimensional Einstein gravity. We also display the action that encodes the dynamics of radial diffeomorphisms. It is found that the induced theory is a four dimensional conformal gravity plus a scalar field. This calculation confirms some previous results found by a different approach.

  8. Gravitational dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Girelli, F.; Liberati, S.; Sindoni, L.

    2008-10-15

    Analogue models for gravity intend to provide a framework where matter and gravity, as well as their intertwined dynamics, emerge from degrees of freedom that have a priori nothing to do with what we call gravity or matter. Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) are a natural example of an analogue model since one can identify matter propagating on a (pseudo-Riemannian) metric with collective excitations above the condensate of atoms. However, until now, a description of the 'analogue gravitational dynamics' for such model was missing. We show here that in a BEC system with massive quasiparticles, the gravitational dynamics can be encoded in a modified (semiclassical) Poisson equation. In particular, gravity is of extreme short range (characterized by the healing length) and the cosmological constant appears from the noncondensed fraction of atoms in the quasiparticle vacuum. While some of these features make the analogue gravitational dynamics of our BEC system quite different from standard Newtonian gravity, we nonetheless show that it can be used to draw some interesting lessons about 'emergent gravity' scenarios.

  9. Einstein in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Ian

    1996-01-01

    Describes "Einstein's Adventurarium," a science center housed in an empty shopping mall in Gillette, Wyoming, created through school, business, and city-county government partnership. Describes how interactive exhibits allow exploration of life sciences, physics, and paleontology. (KDFB)

  10. Einstein in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Ian

    1996-01-01

    Describes "Einstein's Adventurarium," a science center housed in an empty shopping mall in Gillette, Wyoming, created through school, business, and city-county government partnership. Describes how interactive exhibits allow exploration of life sciences, physics, and paleontology. (KDFB)

  11. The speed of gravity in general relativity and theoretical interpretation of the Jovian deflection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2004-07-01

    According to Einstein, the notions of geodesic, parallel transport (affine connection) and curvature of the spacetime manifold have a pure geometric origin and do not correlate with any electromagnetic concepts. At the same time, curvature is generated by matter which is not affiliated with the spacetime geometric concepts. For this reason, the fundamental constant c entering the geometric and matter sectors of the general theory of relativity has different conceptual meanings. Specifically, the letter c on the left-hand side of the Einstein equations (geometric sector) entering the Christoffel symbols and its time derivatives is the ultimate speed of gravity characterizing the upper limit on the speed of its propagation as well as the maximal rate of change of time derivatives of the metric tensor, that is gravitational field. The letter c on the right-hand side of the Einstein equations (matter sector) is the maximal speed of propagation of any other field rather than gravity. Einstein's general principle of relativity extends his principle of special relativity and equates the numerical value of the ultimate speed of gravity to that of the speed of light in the special theory of relativity but this general principle must be tested experimentally. To this end, we work out the speed of gravity parametrization of the Einstein equations (cg-parametrization) to keep track of the time-dependent effects associated with the geometric sector of general relativity and to separate them from the time-dependent effects of the matter sector. Parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) approximation of the Einstein equations is derived in order to explain the gravitational physics of the Jovian deflection VLBI experiment conducted on 8 September 2002. The post-Newtonian series expansion in the cg-parametrized general relativity is with respect to a small parameter that is proportional to the ratio of the characteristic velocity of the bodies to the speed of propagation of the

  12. Albert Einstein's Hypothetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    This paper would like to show that Albert Einstein preceded Karl Popper in formulating the fundamental ideas of the so-called hypothetism. The ideas closest to Popper''s later view were presented by Einstein in a very interesting, yet little known article entitled ''Induction and Deduction in Physics'' published in a Berlin daily Berliner Tageblatt on Christmas Day of 1919. The text and ideas of this article will be presented (with German original appended) and comments will be made on them.

  13. 2010 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    NASA has announced the selection of the 2010 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2010. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Simona Giacintucci (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Boaz Katz (Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton, N.J.) * Matthew Kerr (Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.) * Matthew Kistler (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Emily Levesque (University of Colorado, Boulder) * Xin Liu (Harvard, Cambridge, Mass.) * Tony Mroczkowski (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia) * Ryan O'Leary (University of California at Berkeley) * Dov Poznanski (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Berkeley, Calif.) * Nicolas Yunes (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) The Einstein Fellowships are administered for NASA by the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Along with the Hubble and Sagan Fellowships, the Einstein Fellowships are made possible by the Astrophysics Division within NASA's Science Mission Directorate. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/CfPfellow.2009.html

  14. Fake conformal symmetry in unimodular gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    We study Weyl symmetry (local conformal symmetry) in unimodular gravity. It is shown that the Noether currents for both Weyl symmetry and global scale symmetry vanish exactly as in conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. We clearly explain why in the class of conformally invariant gravitational theories, the Noether currents vanish by starting with conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. Moreover, we comment on both classical and quantum-mechanical equivalences in Einstein's general relativity, conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity, and the Weyl-transverse gravity. Finally, we discuss the Weyl current in the conformally invariant scalar action and see that it is also vanishing.

  15. Einstein's Foil & the Emergence of Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, David F.

    2011-01-01

    Before introducing his cosmological constant, Einstein considered a difficulty with Newtonian theory: a steady-state, infinite Newtonian stellar system cannot exist at all. He continues: "It seems hardly possible to surmount these difficulties on the basis of Newtonian theory. We may ask ourselves the question whether they can be removed by a modification of the Newtonian theory. First of all we will indicate a method which does not in itself claim to be taken seriously; it merely serves as a foil for what is to follow. In place of Poisson's equation we write Δφ -λ φ = 4 π κ ρ where κ denotes a universal constant. If ρ be the uniform density of a distribution of mass, then φ=-4π κρ/λ is a solution." Einstein discarded this foil because it is not compatible with his famed equation for general relativity. In 2004 I proposed a graviton of imaginary mass and a photon of real mass, both equal to 10 -25 eV. Classically this graviton satisfies Einstein's first equation with an empirical value of 2 π/√-λ=Ro/20 = 400 pc. I now suggest an equivalent absolute value -λ= (1/2)EH4 2 π G. where EH is the Hartree energy 2 × 13.6 eV and c=(h/2π) = 1. I will show why this choice and Einstein's second equation gives an emergence of structure at a lookback Z=5.65 dex, a time between nucleosynthesis and recombination when the universe was a plasma of photons, protons, electrons, and helium nuclei. The particular strong structure that I approximate is shown in Hartnett and Hirano (2008). The talk is 3 slides. There will be time for questions. References- "Analogies between electricity and gravity", Metrologia 41(2004)S115-S124. books: Laughlin (2005), Feynman(1995), Weinberg (1977), Lorentz, Einstein, Minkowski, and Weyl (English) (1923).

  16. Vacuum tunneling in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Pak, D. G.

    2011-08-01

    Topologically non-trivial vacuum structures in gravity models with Cartan variables (vielbein and contortion) are considered. We study the possibility of vacuum spacetime tunneling in Einstein gravity assuming that the vielbein may play a fundamental role in quantum gravitational phenomena. It has been shown that in the case of RP3 space topology, the tunneling between non-trivial topological vacuums can be realized by means of Eguchi-Hanson gravitational instanton. In the Riemann-Cartan geometric approach to quantum gravity, the vacuum tunneling can be provided by means of contortion quantum fluctuations. We define a double self-duality condition for the contortion and give explicit self-dual configurations which can contribute to vacuum tunneling amplitude.

  17. Horizon thermodynamics from Einstein's equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Devin; Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.

    2017-08-01

    By regarding the Einstein equations as equation(s) of state, we demonstrate that a full cohomogeneity horizon first law can be derived in horizon thermodynamics. In this approach both the entropy and the free energy are derived concepts, while the standard (degenerate) horizon first law is recovered by a Legendre projection from the more general one we derive. These results readily generalize to higher curvature gravities where they naturally reproduce a formula for the entropy without introducing Noether charges. Our results thus establish a way of how to formulate consistent black hole thermodynamics without conserved charges.

  18. Dynamically Broken Anti-De Sitter Action for Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresguerres, Romualdo

    Due to a suitable Higgs mechanism, a standard Anti-de Sitter gauge theory becomes spontaneously broken. The resulting Lorentz invariant gravitational action includes the Hilbert-Einstein term of ordinary Einstein-Cartan gravity with cosmological constant, plus contributions quadratic in curvature and torsion, and a scalar Higgs sector.

  19. Cosmological reconstruction and Om diagnostic analysis of Einstein-Aether theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqua, Antonio; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Momeni, Davood; Raza, Muhammad; Myrzakulov, Ratbay; Faizal, Mir

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze the cosmological models in Einstein-Aether gravity, which is a modified theory of gravity in which a time-like vector field breaks the Lorentz symmetry. We use this formalism to analyse different cosmological models with different behavior of the scale factor. In this analysis, we use a certain functional dependence of the Dark Energy (DE) on the Hubble parameter H. It will be demonstrated that the Aether vector field has a non-trivial effect on these cosmological models. We also perform the Om diagnostic in Einstein-Aether gravity and we fit the parameters of the cosmological models using recent observational data.

  20. Conversations With Albert Einstein. II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shankland, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses Einstein's views on the role of Michelson-Morley, Fizeau, and Miller experiments in the development of relativity and his attitude toward the theories of new quantum mechanics. Indicates that Einstein's opposition to quantum mechanics is beyond dispute. (CC)

  1. Conversations With Albert Einstein. II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shankland, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses Einstein's views on the role of Michelson-Morley, Fizeau, and Miller experiments in the development of relativity and his attitude toward the theories of new quantum mechanics. Indicates that Einstein's opposition to quantum mechanics is beyond dispute. (CC)

  2. Black holes in the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory and the geometry of their thermodynamics—II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ritabrata; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2010-03-01

    In the present work we study (i) the charged black hole in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet (EGB) theory, known as the Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet (EMGB) black hole and (ii) the black hole in EGB gravity with a Yang-Mills field. The thermodynamic geometry of these two black hole solutions has been investigated, using the modified entropy in Gauss-Bonnet theory.

  3. Non-local F(R)-mimetic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrzakulov, Ratbay; Sebastiani, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study non-local F(R)-mimetic gravity. We implement mimetic gravity in the framework of non-local F(R)-theories of gravity. Given some specific class of models and using a potential on the mimetic field, we investigate some scenarios related to the early-time universe, namely the inflation and the cosmological bounce, which bring to Einstein's gravity with cold dark matter at the late-time.

  4. The Happiest thought of Einstein's Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Michael

    Finally, let us have a closer look at the place of the equivalence principle in the logical scheme of Einstein's general relativity theory. First, Einstein new well, from Minkowski's geometric formulation of his own special relativity, that accelerated motions should be represented as curved lines in a flat space-time. Second, the Galileo principle asserts that all bodies are accelerated in the same way in a given gravitational field, and consequently their motions are represented in the flat space-time by curved lines, all exactly in the same way. Third, since all lines representing free motions are curved exactly in the same way in the flat space-time, one can say that the lines remain straight (as far as possible) but the space-time itself becomes curved. Fourth, and last, since acceleration is (locally) equivalent to a gravitational field (here we have the equivalence principle), one is entitled to assert that it is the gravitational field (and not acceleration) that is represented as the curvature of space-time. This looks almost like an Aristotelian syllogism. However, to put all the pieces of evidence into the logical chain took Einstein a few years of hard thinking. The result has been incorporated into the field equations which quantitatively show how the curvature of space-time and gravity are linked together.

  5. Einstein and a century of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raine, D. J.

    2005-09-01

    In a world overabundant in information, a subject is defined by its iconography. Physics is the falling apple, the planetary atom, the laser, the mushroom cloud and the image of the later Einstein - images that represent, respectively, gravity, atomic theory, quantum theory, mass-energy and the scientist who had a hand in all four. It is therefore appropriate that World Year of Physics is called Einstein Year in the UK. Of course one can argue that progress in science depends on the contributions of many people; that there are other geniuses in physics, even some colourful personalities. Nevertheless there are fundamental reasons why Einstein's early achievements stand out even in their company. When at last the thought came to him that 'time itself was suspect', Einstein had found a new insight into the nature of the physical universe. It is this: that the universal properties of material objects tell us about the nature of space and time, and it is through these properties, not philosophical logic or common sense, that we discover the structure of spacetime. The later Einstein turned this successful formula on its head and sought to use the properties of spacetime to define those of material objects, thereby seeking to abolish matter entirely in favour of geometry. Before I introduce this special feature of European Journal of Physics I will say a few words about what is not here. Like all great geniuses Einstein can be seen as the climax of what went before him and the initiation of what was to follow. Looking back we can see the influence of Mach's positivism, according to which the role of science is to relate observations to other observations; hence only observations can tell us what is 'real'. But Einstein also grew up with the family electromechanical businesses, which testifies to the reality of the Maxwellian electromagnetic fields: thus only theory can tell us what is real! As is well known, Einstein himself refused to accept the full consequences of

  6. Large Quantum Gravity Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, María E.; Mena Marugán, Guillermo A.; Ashtekar, A.

    Linearly polarized cylindrical waves in four-dimensional vacuum gravity are mathematically equivalent to rotationally symmetric gravity coupled to a Maxwell (or Klein-Gordon) field in three dimensions. The quantization of this latter system was performed by Ashtekar and Pierri in a recent work. Employing that quantization, we obtain here a complete quantum theory which describes the four-dimensional geometry of the Einstein-Rosen waves. In particular, we construct regularized operators to represent the metric. It is shown that the results achieved by Ashtekar about the existence of important quantum gravity effects in the Einstein-Maxwell system at large distances from the symmetry axis continue to be valid from a four-dimensional point of view. The only significant difference is that, in order to admit an approximate classical description in the asymptotic region, states that are coherent in the Maxwell field need not contain a large number of photons anymore. We also analyze the metric fluctuations on the symmetry axis and argue that they are generally relevant for all of the coherent states.

  7. Einstein and baseball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesic, Peter

    1999-04-01

    Although Albert Einstein disliked games, he used the game of dice to illustrate his criticisms of quantum theory. If, however, he had considered basebal, he would have confronted a game whose unpredictable plays rise in wavelike rhythms analogous to quantum physics.

  8. 2011 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    ASA has announced the selection of the 2011 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2011. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Akos Bogdan (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Samuel Gralla (University of Maryland, College Park, Md.) * Philip Hopkins (University of California at Berkeley) * Matthew Kunz (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.) * Laura Lopez (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) * Amy Reines (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, Virg.) * Rubens Reis (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) * Ken Shen (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif.) * Jennifer Siegal-Gaskins (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Lorenzo Sironi (Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.) NASA has two other astrophysics theme-based fellowship programs: the Sagan Fellowship Program, which supports research into exoplanet exploration, and the Hubble Fellowship Program, which supports research into cosmic origins. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/

  9. Examining the Enigmatic Einstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoon, Koh Aik

    2007-01-01

    Albert Einstein is the icon of scientific genius. His is one the most recognizable faces in the history of mankind. This paper takes a cursory look at the man who is commonly perceived to be the epitome of eccentricity. We manage to sum up his salient traits which are associated with his name. The traits are based on anecdotal evidence. This…

  10. From Newton to Einstein.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, L. H.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the history of scientific thought in terms of the theories of inertia and absolute space, relativity and gravitation. Describes how Sir Isaac Newton used the work of earlier scholars in his theories and how Albert Einstein used Newton's theories in his. (CW)

  11. The Einstein Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Frank

    2012-03-01

    The Einstein Toolkit Consortium is developing and supporting open software for relativistic astrophysics. Its aim is to provide the core computational tools that can enable new science, broaden our community, facilitate interdisciplinary research and take advantage of petascale computers and advanced cyberinfrastructure. The Einstein Toolkit currently consists of an open set of over 100 modules for the Cactus framework, primarily for computational relativity along with associated tools for simulation management and visualization. The toolkit includes solvers for vacuum spacetimes as well as relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics, along with modules for initial data, analysis and computational infrastructure. These modules have been developed and improved over many years by many different researchers. The Einstein Toolkit is supported by a distributed model, combining core support of software, tools, and documentation in its own repositories and through partnerships with other developers who contribute open software and coordinate together on development. As of January 2012 it has 68 registered members from 30 research groups world-wide. This talk will present the current capabilities of the Einstein Toolkit and will point to information how to leverage it for future research.

  12. Examining the Enigmatic Einstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoon, Koh Aik

    2007-01-01

    Albert Einstein is the icon of scientific genius. His is one the most recognizable faces in the history of mankind. This paper takes a cursory look at the man who is commonly perceived to be the epitome of eccentricity. We manage to sum up his salient traits which are associated with his name. The traits are based on anecdotal evidence. This…

  13. Einstein in My Hometown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamola, Karl

    2005-12-01

    During the 22 years Albert Einstein lived and worked in the United States, he frequently took long summer vacations. Generally he chose quiet, out-of-the-way vacation spots, and because of his love of sailing, places close to bodies of water. Among other locations, he vacationed at Saranac Lake in upstate New York, the Rhode Island coast, and, during the summers of 1937-39, at Nassau Point on the North Fork of Long Island. Nassau Point is a part of the small town of Cutchogue and is located on Peconic Bay, about 90 miles from New York City. It was an ideal spot for Einstein both because it was off the beaten path and because of the outstanding sailing conditions on Peconic Bay. Einstein rented a cabin just a stone's throw from the bay. I myself have a special interest in Cutchogue because it's the place where I was born and where I spent the first few years of my life. Unfortunately, I came along five or six years too late to have actually seen Einstein there, but he did have encounters with some of my older friends and relatives.

  14. From Newton to Einstein.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, L. H.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the history of scientific thought in terms of the theories of inertia and absolute space, relativity and gravitation. Describes how Sir Isaac Newton used the work of earlier scholars in his theories and how Albert Einstein used Newton's theories in his. (CW)

  15. Einstein and Einstein A: A Study in Crater Morphology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA image release May 14, 2010 Einstein and Einstein A: A Study in Crater Morphology Located on the western limb of the Moon, Einstein and Einstein A craters (16.3oN, 271.3oE ) are only visible to Earth-based observers during certain lunar lighting and orientation conditions. Einstein A is younger than Einstein, as indicated by the fact that it lies squarely in the middle of the floor of Einstein. When viewed in topographic data, these two craters reveal much about the relative age and shape of an impact crater. To understand further, let's first take a look at Einstein. Einstein is a fairly large crater that spans 198 km across. A crater's size alone however cannot reveal much about age. ÊEinstein's relative age can be determined by examining the frequency and distribution of impact craters overprinted on its rim and floor. Younger craters have had fewer impacts, which enables them to retain their original morphology. Einstein A reveals most of its original structure, including a raised rim and ejecta blanket, and is therefore a relatively young crater as compared to Einstein, whose original structure has been somewhat degraded over time by smaller impacts. The Einstein craters were named after famed physicist, philosopher, and scientist Albert Einstein (1879-1955). To learn more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/multimedia/lroimages/lola-... NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe.

  16. Black holes in higher derivative gravity.

    PubMed

    Lü, H; Perkins, A; Pope, C N; Stelle, K S

    2015-05-01

    Extensions of Einstein gravity with higher-order derivative terms arise in string theory and other effective theories, as well as being of interest in their own right. In this Letter we study static black-hole solutions in the example of Einstein gravity with additional quadratic curvature terms. A Lichnerowicz-type theorem simplifies the analysis by establishing that they must have vanishing Ricci scalar curvature. By numerical methods we then demonstrate the existence of further black-hole solutions over and above the Schwarzschild solution. We discuss some of their thermodynamic properties, and show that they obey the first law of thermodynamics.

  17. Einstein and Bose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wali, Kameshwar C.

    2005-04-01

    In June 1924, a relatively unknown Satyendra Nath Bose from Dacca, India, wrote a letter to Einstein beginning with ``Respected Sir, I have ventured to send you the accompanying article for your perusal. I am anxious to know what you think of it. You will see that I have ventured to deduce the coefficient 8πυ^2/c^3 in Planck's law independent of the classical electrodynamics, only assuming that the ultimate elementary regions in Phase-space have the content h^3. I do not know sufficient German to translate the paper. If you think the paper worth publication, I shall be grateful if you arrange for its publication in Zeitschrift für Physik.'' Einstein did translate the article himself and got it published. He wrote to Ehrenfest: ``The Indian Bose has given a beautiful derivation of Planck's law, including the constant [i.e.8πυ^2/c^3].'' Einstein extended the ideas of Bose that implied, among other things, a new statistics for the light-quanta to the molecules of an ideal gas and wrote to Ehrenfest, `from a certain temperature on, the molecules ``condense'' without attractive forces, that is, they accumulate at zero velocity. The theory is pretty, but is there also some truth to it?' Abraham Pais has called Bose's paper ``the fourth and the last revolutionary papers of the old quantum theory.'' My paper will present the works of Bose and Einstein in their historical perspective and the eventual birth of the new quantum Bose-Einstein statistics.

  18. Weyl gravity revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Enrique; González-Martín, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    The on shell equivalence of first order and second order formalisms for the Einstein-Hilbert action does not hold for those actions quadratic in curvature. It would seem that by considering the connection and the metric as independent dynamical variables, there are no quartic propagators for any dynamical variable. This suggests that it is possible to get both renormalizability and unitarity along these lines. We have studied a particular instance of those theories, namely Weyl gravity. In this first paper we show that it is not possible to implement this program with the Weyl connection alone.

  19. From the Komar Mass and Entropic Force Scenarios to the Einstein Field Equations on the Ads Brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradpour, H.; Sheykhi, A.

    2016-02-01

    By bearing the Komar's definition for the mass, together with the entropic origin of gravity in mind, we find the Einstein field equations in ( n + 1)-dimensional spacetime. Then, by reflecting the (4 + 1)-dimensional Einstein equations on the (3 + 1)-hypersurface, we get the Einstein equations onto the 3-brane. The corresponding energy conditions are also addressed. Since the higher dimensional considerations modify the Einstein field equations in the (3 + 1)-dimensions and thus the energy-momentum tensor, we get a relation for the Komar mass on the brane. In addition, the strongness of this relation compared with existing definition for the Komar mass on the brane is addressed.

  20. Unexpected Cancellations in Gravity Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.; Carrasco, J.J.; Forde, D.; Ita, H.; Johansson, H.; /UCLA

    2007-07-13

    Recent computations of scattering amplitudes show that N = 8 supergravity is surprisingly well behaved in the ultraviolet and may even be ultraviolet finite in perturbation theory. The novel cancellations necessary for ultraviolet finiteness first appear at one loop in the guise of the ''no-triangle hypothesis''. We study one-loop amplitudes in pure Einstein gravity and point out the existence of cancellations similar to those found previously in N = 8 supergravity. These cancellations go beyond those found in the one-loop effective action. Using unitarity, this suggests that generic theories of quantum gravity based on the Einstein-Hilbert action may be better behaved in the ultraviolet at higher loops than suggested by naive power counting, though without additional (supersymmetric) cancellations they diverge. We comment on future studies that should be performed to support this proposal.

  1. [The Einstein sign].

    PubMed

    Treska, V

    2003-02-01

    Untreated rupture of an aneurysm of the abdominal aorta is fatal in almost 100% of the patients. In the majority of cases the assessment of a correct, early diagnosis is simple (hypotension, backache, abdominal pain, pulsating resistance in the abdomen) and makes a prompt surgical or endovascular operation possible. In some instances however rupture of aneurysms of the abdominal aorta simulates other clinical conditions (acute cholecystitis, acute diverculitis of the sigmoid) which may delay the correct diagnosis and reduce the patient's chance of survival. The author describes, based on historical documents, the treacherous course of the disease in the scientific genius Albert Einstein where rupture of an aneurysm simulated acute cholecystitis, and in the world literature this symptomatology was subsequently described as Einstein's sign.

  2. Seeking an African Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Matin

    2008-07-01

    A new postgraduate centre for maths and computer science is set to open in the Nigerian capital of Abuja this month as part of an ambitious plan to find the "next Einstein" in Africa. The centre will provide advanced training to graduate students from across Africa in maths and related fields. It will seek to attract the best young African scientists and nurture their talents as problem-solvers and teachers.

  3. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2005-03-17

    This article gives a brief review of Bose-Einstein condensation. It is an exotic quantum phenomenon that was observed in dilute atomic gases for the first time in 1995. It exhibits a new state of matter in which a group of atoms behaves as a single particle. Experiments on this form of matter are relevant to many different areas of physics- from atomic clocks and quantum computing to super fluidity, superconductivity and quantum phase transition.

  4. Einstein's Years in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plendl, Hans S.

    2005-11-01

    Albert Einstein left Germany, the country of his birth, in 1894 and moved to Switzerland in 1895. He studied, worked and taught there, except for a year's stay in Prague, until1914. That year he returned to Germany, where he lived until his emigration to the United States in 1933. In 1905, while living with his wife Mileva and their first son Hans Albert in Bern and working as a technical expert at the Swiss Patent Office, he published his dissertation on the determination of molecular dimensions, his papers on Brownian Motion that helped to establish the Kinetic Theory of Heat and on the Photo-Electric Effect that validated the Quantum Theory of Light, and the two papers introducing the Special Theory of Relativity. How the young Einstein could help to lay the foundations of these theories while still working on his dissertation, holding a full-time job and helping to raise a family has evoked much discussion among his biographers. In this contribution, the extent to which living within Swiss society and culture could have made this feat possible will be examined. Old and recent photos of places in Switzerland where Einstein has lived and worked will be shown.

  5. Positive signs in massive gravity

    DOE PAGES

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small islandmore » in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.« less

  6. Positive signs in massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  7. Positive signs in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    We derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. The high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. While the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  8. Critical gravity in four dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lü, H; Pope, C N

    2011-05-06

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This "critical" theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical "new massive gravity" with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

  9. Critical Gravity in Four Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, H.; Pope, C. N.

    2011-05-06

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This ''critical'' theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical 'new massive gravity' with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

  10. A chiral perturbation expansion for gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Zeid, Mohab; Hull, Christopher M.

    2006-02-01

    A formulation of Einstein gravity, analogous to that for gauge theory arising from the Chalmers-Siegel action, leads to a perturbation theory about an asymmetric weak coupling limit that treats positive and negative helicities differently. We find power counting rules for amplitudes that suggest the theory could find a natural interpretation in terms of a twistor-string theory for gravity with amplitudes supported on holomorphic curves in twistor space.

  11. Some interesting features of new massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accioly, Antonio; Helayël-Neto, José; Scatena, Eslley; Morais, Jefferson; Turcati, Rodrigo; Pereira-Dias, Bruno

    2011-11-01

    A sketch of a proof that new massive gravity—the massive 3D gravity model proposed by Bergshoeff, Hohm and Townsend (BHT)—is the only unitary system at the tree level that can be constructed by augmenting 3D general relativity through (curvature)2-terms is presented. Two interesting gravitational properties of the BHT model, namely, time dilation and time delay, which have no counterpart in the usual Einstein 3D gravity, are analyzed as well.

  12. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  13. Analogue gravitational phenomena in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finazzi, Stefano

    2012-08-01

    Analogue gravity is based on the simple observation that perturbations propagating in several physical systems can be described by a quantum field theory in a curved spacetime. While phenomena like Hawking radiation are hardly detectable in astrophysical black holes, these effects may be experimentally tested in analogue systems. In this Thesis, focusing on Bose-Einstein condensates, we present our recent results about analogue models of gravity from three main perspectives: as laboratory tests of quantum field theory in curved spacetime, for the techniques that they provide to address various issues in general relativity, and as toy models of quantum gravity. The robustness of Hawking-like particle creation is investigated in flows with a single black hole horizon. Furthermore, we find that condensates with two (white and black) horizons develop a dynamical instability known in general relativity as black hole laser effect. Using techniques borrowed from analogue gravity, we also show that warp drives, which are general relativistic spacetimes allowing faster-than-light travel, are unstable. Finally, the cosmological constant issue is investigated from an analogue gravity perspective and relativistic Bose-Einstein condensates are proposed as new analogue systems with novel interesting properties.

  14. Testing local Lorentz invariance with short-range gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    The Newton limit of gravity is studied in the presence of Lorentz-violating gravitational operators of arbitrary mass dimension. The linearized modified Einstein equations are obtained and the perturbative solutions are constructed and characterized. We develop a formalism for data analysis in laboratory experiments testing gravity at short range and demonstrate that these tests provide unique sensitivity to deviations from local Lorentz invariance.

  15. Testing local Lorentz invariance with short-range gravity

    DOE PAGES

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2017-01-10

    The Newton limit of gravity is studied in the presence of Lorentz-violating gravitational operators of arbitrary mass dimension. The linearized modified Einstein equations are obtained and the perturbative solutions are constructed and characterized. We develop a formalism for data analysis in laboratory experiments testing gravity at short range and demonstrate that these tests provide unique sensitivity to deviations from local Lorentz invariance.

  16. On coupling NEC-violating matter to gravity

    DOE PAGES

    Chatterjee, Saugata; Parikh, Maulik; van der Schaar, Jan Pieter

    2015-03-16

    We show that effective theories of matter that classically violate the null energy condition cannot be minimally coupled to Einstein gravity without being inconsistent with both string theory and black hole thermodynamics. We argue however that they could still be either non-minimally coupled or coupled to higher-curvature theories of gravity.

  17. Disformal transformations, veiled General Relativity and Mimetic Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Deruelle, Nathalie; Rua, Josephine E-mail: rua@cbpf.br

    2014-09-01

    In this Note we show that Einstein's equations for gravity are generically invariant under ''disformations''. We also show that the particular subclass when this is not true yields the equations of motion of ''Mimetic Gravity''. Finally we give the ''mimetic'' generalization of the Schwarzschild solution.

  18. Massive Gravity.

    PubMed

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware-Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alternative and related models of massive gravity such as new massive gravity, Lorentz-violating massive gravity and non-local massive gravity.

  19. The stolen brain of Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Kavan

    2008-03-01

    Pathologist Thomas Stoltz Harvey performed an autopsy on Einstein after his death in 1955. During the autopsy Harvey removed Einstein's brain, took pictures of it and then cut it into several pieces. A lot of scientific attention has been devoted to Einstein' brain, and it still comes up once in a while. We've all heard something or other about Einstein's brain, as it has become somewhat of a folk lore. What is less known is that Harvey in actuality did not have the permission to remove the brain. Only later Harvey convinced Einstein's Hans Albert Einstein son that this was for a good purpose. The brain would only be used for scientific purpose, which will be published reputable journals. I will try to describe in some detail the long journey this brain has taken in last fifty two years.

  20. Einstein, Bohr, and Bell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    The final form of quantum physics, in the particular case of wave mechanics, was established in the years 1925-1927 by Heisenberg, Schrödinger, Born and others, but the synthesis was the work of Bohr who gave an epistemological interpretation of all the technicalities built up over those years; this interpretation will be examined briefly in Chapter 10. Although Einstein acknowledged the success of quantum mechanics in atomic, molecular and solid state physics, he disagreed deeply with Bohr's interpretation. For many years, he tried to find flaws in the formulation of quantum theory as it had been more or less accepted by a large majority of physicists, but his objections were brushed away by Bohr. However, in an article published in 1935 with Podolsky and Rosen, universally known under the acronym EPR, Einstein thought he had identified a difficulty in the by then standard interpretation. Bohr's obscure, and in part beyond the point, answer showed that Einstein had hit a sensitive target. Nevertheless, until 1964, the so-called Bohr-Einstein debate stayed uniquely on a philosophical level, and it was actually forgotten by most physicists, as the few of them aware of it thought it had no practical implication. In 1964, the Northern Irish physicist John Bell realized that the assumptions contained in the EPR article could be tested experimentally. These assumptions led to inequalities, the Bell inequalities, which were in contradiction with quantum mechanical predictions: as we shall see later on, it is extremely likely that the assumptions of the EPR article are not consistent with experiment, which, on the contrary, vindicates the predictions of quantum physics. In Section 3.2, the origin of Bell's inequalities will be explained with an intuitive example, then they will be compared with the predictions of quantum theory in Section 3.3, and finally their experimental status will be reviewed in Section 3.4. The debate between Bohr and Einstein goes much beyond a

  1. Open questions in classical gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mannheim, P.D. )

    1994-04-01

    In this work, the authors discuss some outstanding open questions regarding the validity and uniqueness of the standard second-order Newton-Einstein classical gravitational theory. On the observational side the authors discuss the degree to which the realm of validity of Newton's law of gravity can actually be extended to distances much larger than the solar system distance scales on which the law was originally established. On the theoretical side the authors identify some commonly accepted (but actually still open to question) assumptions which go into the formulation of the standard second-order Einstein theory in the first place. In particular, it is shown that while the familiar second-order Poisson gravitational equation (and accordingly its second-order covariant Einstein generalization) may be sufficient to yield Newton's law of gravity they are not in fact necessary. The standard theory thus still awaits the identification of some principle which would then make it necessary too. It is shown that current observational information does not exclusively mandate the standard theory, and that the conformal invariant fourth-order theory of gravity considered recently by Mannheim and Kazanas is also able to meet the constraints of data, and in fact to do so without the need for any so far unobserved nonluminous or dark matter. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Einstein Toolkit for Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collaborative Effort

    2011-02-01

    The Einstein Toolkit is a collection of software components and tools for simulating and analyzing general relativistic astrophysical systems. Such systems include gravitational wave space-times, collisions of compact objects such as black holes or neutron stars, accretion onto compact objects, core collapse supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The Einstein Toolkit builds on numerous software efforts in the numerical relativity community including CactusEinstein, Whisky, and Carpet. The Einstein Toolkit currently uses the Cactus Framework as the underlying computational infrastructure that provides large-scale parallelization, general computational components, and a model for collaborative, portable code development.

  3. Colliding plane waves in F(R)=RN gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahamtan, T.; Halilsoy, M.; Habib Mazharimousavi, S.

    2016-10-01

    We identify a region of a specific F( R)= R N gravity solution without external sources which is isometric to the spacetime of colliding plane waves (CPW). The analogy renders construction and collision of plane waves in F( R)= R N gravity possible. The geometry of the interaction region is equivalent to the Reissner-Nordström (RN) one, however there is no Einstein-Maxwell (EM) source --this is made possible by using the model of RN gravity and the parameter N>1 creates the source. For N=1, we naturally recover the plane waves (and their collision) in Einstein's theory.

  4. In the Beginning Was Quantum Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1983-01-01

    Cosmology is the theory by which the structure and history of the universe is described. Discusses the relationship between cosmology, gravity, and quantum mechanics, and whether the relationship can be formulated through Einstein's theory or a modification of it. Also discusses progress made in these scientific areas. (JN)

  5. In the Beginning Was Quantum Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1983-01-01

    Cosmology is the theory by which the structure and history of the universe is described. Discusses the relationship between cosmology, gravity, and quantum mechanics, and whether the relationship can be formulated through Einstein's theory or a modification of it. Also discusses progress made in these scientific areas. (JN)

  6. NOTE: Circular symmetry in topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Franklin, J.

    2010-05-01

    We re-derive, compactly, a topologically massive gravity (TMG) decoupling theorem: source-free TMG separates into its Einstein and Cotton sectors for spaces with a hypersurface-orthogonal Killing vector, here concretely for circular symmetry. We then generalize the theorem to include matter; surprisingly, the single Killing symmetry also forces conformal invariance, requiring the sources to be null.

  7. Van der Waals like behavior of topological AdS black holes in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Mann, R. B.; Panahiyan, S.; Eslam Panah, B.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by recent developments in black hole thermodynamics, we investigate van der Waals phase transitions of charged black holes in massive gravity. We find that massive gravity theories can exhibit strikingly different thermodynamic behavior compared to that of Einstein gravity, and that the mass of the graviton can generate a range of new phase transitions for topological black holes that are otherwise forbidden.

  8. The Einstein Dossiers: Science and Politics - Einstein's Berlin Period with an Appendix on Einstein's FBI File

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, Siegfried

    In 1919 the Prussian Ministry of Science, Arts and Culture opened a dossier on "Einstein's Theory of Relativity." It was rediscovered by the author in 1961 and is used in conjunction with numerous other subsequently identified 'Einstein' files as the basis of this fascinating book. In particular, the author carefully scrutinizes Einstein's FBI file from 1950-55 against mostly unpublished material from European including Soviet sources and presents hitherto unknown documentation on Einstein's alleged contacts with the German Communist Party and the Comintern.

  9. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  10. Horizon thermodynamics in fourth-order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Meng-Sen

    2017-03-01

    In the framework of horizon thermodynamics, the field equations of Einstein gravity and some other second-order gravities can be rewritten as the thermodynamic identity: dE = TdS - PdV. However, in order to construct the horizon thermodynamics in higher-order gravity, we have to simplify the field equations firstly. In this paper, we study the fourth-order gravity and convert it to second-order gravity via a so-called ;Legendre transformation; at the cost of introducing two other fields besides the metric field. With this simplified theory, we implement the conventional procedure in the construction of the horizon thermodynamics in 3 and 4 dimensional spacetime. We find that the field equations in the fourth-order gravity can also be written as the thermodynamic identity. Moreover, we can use this approach to derive the same black hole mass as that by other methods.

  11. Albert Einstein 1879-1955.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Today, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Celebrates the centennial of Einstein's birth with an eight-page pictorial biography and two special articles: (1) Einstein the catalyst; and (2) Unitary field theories. His special and general theories of relativity and his contributions to quantum physics and other topics are also presented. (HM)

  12. Albert Einstein 1879-1955.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Today, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Celebrates the centennial of Einstein's birth with an eight-page pictorial biography and two special articles: (1) Einstein the catalyst; and (2) Unitary field theories. His special and general theories of relativity and his contributions to quantum physics and other topics are also presented. (HM)

  13. Einstein and the "Crucial" Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, Gerald

    1969-01-01

    Examines the widespread view that it was the crucial Michelson-Morley experiment that led Einstein to formulate the special relativity theory. From Einstein's writings, evidence is presented that no such direct genetic connection exists. The author suggests that the historian of science must resist the experimenticist's fallacy of imposing a…

  14. Einstein, Entropy and Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirtes, Daniel; Oberheim, Eric

    2006-11-01

    This paper strengthens and defends the pluralistic implications of Einstein's successful, quantitative predictions of Brownian motion for a philosophical dispute about the nature of scientific advance that began between two prominent philosophers of science in the second half of the twentieth century (Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend). Kuhn promoted a monistic phase-model of scientific advance, according to which a paradigm driven `normal science' gives rise to its own anomalies, which then lead to a crisis and eventually a scientific revolution. Feyerabend stressed the importance of pluralism for scientific progress. He rejected Kuhn's model arguing that it fails to recognize the role that alternative theories can play in identifying exactly which phenomena are anomalous in the first place. On Feyerabend's account, Einstein's predictions allow for a crucial experiment between two incommensurable theories, and are an example of an anomaly that could refute the reigning paradigm only after the development of a competitor. Using Kuhn's specification of a disciplinary matrix to illustrate the incommensurability between the two paradigms, we examine the different research strategies available in this peculiar case. On the basis of our reconstruction, we conclude by rebutting some critics of Feyerabend's argument.

  15. Einstein: The Standard of Greatness

    SciTech Connect

    Rigdon, John

    2005-03-16

    Einstein's seven-month performance in 1905 has no equal in the history of physics. Beginning with his revolutionary paper, completed on March 17, and continuing to September 26, Einstein wrote a total of five papers that changed the infrastructure of physics and today, a century later, these papers remain part of the tectonic bedrock of the discipline. How Einstein approached his physics and what he accomplished certainly provided the basis for his world fame. But while the What? and the How? were, and remain, of primary importance, can they explain Einstein's celebrity standing after 1922 and his iconic status today, fifty years after his death? The question remains: Why is Einstein the standard of greatness?

  16. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Michael; Uhlemann, Cora; Haugg, Thomas E-mail: cora.uhlemann@physik.lmu.de

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves.

  17. From Navier-Stokes to Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredberg, Irene; Keeler, Cynthia; Lysov, Vyacheslav; Strominger, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    We show by explicit construction that for every solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation in p + 1 dimensions, there is a uniquely associated "dual" solution of the vacuum Einstein equations in p + 2 dimensions. The dual geometry has an intrinsically flat timelike boundary segment Σc whose extrinsic curvature is given by the stress tensor of the Navier-Stokes fluid. We consider a "near-horizon" limit in which Σc becomes highly accelerated. The near-horizon expansion in gravity is shown to be mathematically equivalent to the hydrodynamic expansion in fluid dynamics, and the Einstein equation reduces to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation. For p = 2, we show that the full dual geometry is algebraically special Petrov type II. The construction is a mathematically precise realization of suggestions of a holographic duality relating fluids and horizons which began with the membrane paradigm in the 70's and resurfaced recently in studies of the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  18. On perturbative gravity and gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, L.

    2000-02-14

    The authors review some applications of tree-level (classical) relations between gravity and gauge theory that follow from string theory. Together with D-dimensional unitarily, these relations can be used to perturbatively quantize gravity theories, i.e. They contain the necessary information for obtaining loop contributions. The authors also review recent applications of these ideas showing that N = 1, D = 11 supergravity diverges, and review arguments that N = 8, D = 4 supergravity is less divergent than previously thought, though it does appear to diverge at five loops. Finally, the authors describe field variables for the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian that help clarify the perturbative relationship between gravity and gauge theory.

  19. Nonsingular universe in massive gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Momennia, M.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the fundamental open questions in cosmology is whether we can regard the universe evolution without singularity like a Big Bang or a Big Rip. This challenging subject stimulates one to regard a nonsingular universe in the far past with an arbitrarily large vacuum energy. Considering the high energy regime in the cosmic history, it is believed that Einstein gravity should be corrected to an effective energy dependent theory which could be acquired by gravity's rainbow. On the other hand, employing massive gravity provided us with solutions to some of the long standing fundamental problems of cosmology such as cosmological constant problem and self acceleration of the universe. Considering these aspects of gravity's rainbow and massive gravity, in this paper, we initiate studying FRW cosmology in the massive gravity's rainbow formalism. At first, we show that although massive gravity modifies the FRW cosmology, but it does not itself remove the big bang singularity. Then, we generalize the massive gravity to the case of energy dependent spacetime and find that massive gravity's rainbow can remove the early universe singularity. We bring together all the essential conditions for having a nonsingular universe and the effects of both gravity's rainbow and massive gravity generalizations on such criteria are determined.

  20. The spherically symmetric Standard Model with gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasin, H.; Böhmer, C. G.; Grumiller, D.

    2005-08-01

    Spherical reduction of generic four-dimensional theories is revisited. Three different notions of "spherical symmetry" are defined. The following sectors are investigated: Einstein-Cartan theory, spinors, (non-)abelian gauge fields and scalar fields. In each sector a different formalism seems to be most convenient: the Cartan formulation of gravity works best in the purely gravitational sector, the Einstein formulation is convenient for the Yang-Mills sector and for reducing scalar fields, and the Newman-Penrose formalism seems to be the most transparent one in the fermionic sector. Combining them the spherically reduced Standard Model of particle physics together with the usually omitted gravity part can be presented as a two-dimensional (dilaton gravity) theory.

  1. Lorentzian wormholes in Lovelock gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M. H.; Dayyani, Z.

    2009-03-15

    In this paper, we introduce the n-dimensional Lorentzian wormhole solutions of third order Lovelock gravity. In contrast to Einstein gravity and as in the case of Gauss-Bonnet gravity, we find that the wormhole throat radius r{sub 0} has a lower limit that depends on the Lovelock coefficients, the dimensionality of the spacetime, and the shape function. We study the conditions of having normal matter near the throat, and find that the matter near the throat can be normal for the region r{sub 0}{<=}r{<=}r{sub max}, where r{sub max} depends on the Lovelock coefficients and the shape function. We also find that the third order Lovelock term with negative coupling constant enlarges the radius of the region of normal matter, and conclude that the higher order Lovelock terms with negative coupling constants enlarge the region of normal matter near the throat.

  2. Toward Understanding the Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, V. A.; Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2017-03-01

    We constructed the conformally invariant model for scalar particle creation induced by strong gravitational fields. Starting from the usual hydrodynamic description of the particle motion written in the Eulerian coordinates, we substituted the particle number conservation law (which enters the formalism) by the particle creation law, proportional to the square of the Weyl tensor, following the famous result by Ya. B. Zel'dovich and A. A. Starobinsky. Then, demanding the conformal invariance of the whole dynamical system, we have got both the Weyl-conformal gravity and the Einstein-Hilbert dilaton gravity action integral. Thus, we obtained something like the induced gravity suggested first by A. D. Sakharov. It is shown that the resulting system is self-consistent.

  3. A nonmetric theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    2016-09-01

    A nonmetric theory of gravity is presented, which agrees with all experiments to date. It possesses a Lagrangian-based nonmetric (i.e. nonminimum) coupling between electromagnetism and gravity which has complete continuous-coordinate-transformation symmetry but violates parity and time-reversal-invariance. The theory predicts the universality of free fall for test bodies, i.e. it obeys the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP). But due to the nonmetrical coupling between electromagnetism and gravity, it violates the Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP). Hence, this theory disproves the conjecture due to Schiff which states that any gravitation theory that obeys the WEP must also, unavoidably, obey the EEP. Further examination of the empirical status implications of the EEP is therefore urged.

  4. Toward Understanding the Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, V. A.; Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2017-03-01

    We constructed the conformally invariant model for scalar particle creation induced by strong gravitational fields. Starting from the usual hydrodynamic description of the particle motion written in the Eulerian coordinates, we substituted the particle number conservation law (which enters the formalism) by the particle creation law, proportional to the square of the Weyl tensor, following the famous result by Ya. B. Zel'dovich and A. A. Starobinsky. Then, demanding the conformal invariance of the whole dynamical system, we have got both the Weyl-conformal gravity and the Einstein-Hilbert dilaton gravity action integral. Thus, we obtained something like the induced gravity suggested first by A. D. Sakharov. It is shown that the resulting system is self-consistent.

  5. Einstein and Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-15

    In February 1917, Albert Einstein wrote in a letter: "It is a pity that we do not live on Mars and just observe man's nasty antics by telescope." We do have a telescope at Mars, but we use it to image Mars rather than Earth, such as this image of bizarre landforms in Gorgonum Basin. This basin may have contained an ancient lake, with channels draining into the lake from the sides. After sediments are deposited, they become hardened to varying degrees, then eroded by the wind. More hardened bedrock will remain as high-standing topography following erosion of the weaker materials, perhaps inverting the initial forms. For example, high-standing linear or meandering topography may have been fluvial channels. The enhanced-color cutout shows some of the bedrock as well as dark sand. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20811

  6. Twistor-strings and gravity tree amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Tim; Mason, Lionel

    2013-04-01

    Recently we discussed how Einstein supergravity tree amplitudes might be obtained from the original Witten and Berkovits twistor-string theory when external conformal gravitons are restricted to be Einstein gravitons. Here we obtain a more systematic understanding of the relationship between conformal and Einstein gravity amplitudes in that twistor-string theory. We show that although it does not in general yield Einstein amplitudes, we can nevertheless obtain some partial twistor-string interpretation of the remarkable formulae recently been found by Hodges and generalized to all tree amplitudes by Cachazo and Skinner. The Hodges matrix and its higher degree generalizations encode the world sheet correlators of the twistor string. These matrices control both Einstein amplitudes and those of the conformal gravity arising from the Witten and Berkovits twistor-string. Amplitudes in the latter case arise from products of the diagonal elements of the generalized Hodges matrices and reduced determinants give the former. The reduced determinants arise if the contractions in the worldsheet correlator are restricted to form connected trees at MHV. The (generalized) Hodges matrices arise as weighted Laplacian matrices for the graph of possible contractions in the correlators and the reduced determinants of these weighted Laplacian matrices give the sum of the connected tree contributions by an extension of the matrix-tree theorem.

  7. Quasi-Einstein metrics on hypersurface families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Stuart James

    2013-02-01

    We construct quasi-Einstein metrics on some hypersurface families. The hypersurfaces are circle bundles over the product of Fano, Kähler-Einstein manifolds. The quasi-Einstein metrics are related to various gradient Kähler-Ricci solitons constructed by Dancer and Wang and some Hermitian, non-Kähler, Einstein metrics constructed by Wang and Wang on the same manifolds.

  8. Einstein static universe from GUP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atazadeh, K.; Darabi, F.

    2017-06-01

    We consider the existence and stability of the Einstein static universe under the Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) effects. We show that this solution in the presence of perfect fluid with a minimal length is cyclically stable around a center equilibrium point. By taking linear homogeneous perturbations, we find that the scale factor of Einstein static universe for closed deformed isotropic and homogeneous FLRW universe depends on the GUP coupling parameter α. Thus, in the model by GUP effects, our universe can stay at the Einstein static state past-eternally, which means that the big bang singularity might be resolved successfully by an emergent scenario.

  9. Spinfoam Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Eugenio

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Topological Field Theory and Gravity * Classical Spinfoam Gravity: Degrees of Freedom and Foams * Unitary Representations of the Rotation and the Lorentz Group * Boundary Variables and the Loop Quantum Gravity Hilbert Space * Spinfoam Partition Function and the Vertex Amplitude * Cellular Quantum Geometry: A Single Atom of Space * Cellular Quantum Geometry: Coherent Spin-networks * Vertex-amplitude Asymptotics and Regge Gravity * Reconstructing a Semiclassical Spacetime * Conclusions * References

  10. Beyond Einstein's General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2015-04-01

    Modern astrophysical and cosmological models are plagued with two severe theoretical difficulties, namely, the dark energy and the dark matter problems. Relative to the former, high-precision observational data have confirmed with startling evidence that the Universe is undergoing a phase of accelerated expansion. This phase, one of the most important and challenging current problems in cosmology, represents a new imbalance in the governing gravitational equations. Several candidates, responsible for this expansion, have been proposed in the literature, in particular, dark energy models and modified gravity, amongst others. Outstanding questions are related to the nature of this so-called “dark energy” that is driving the acceleration of the universe, and whether it is due to the vacuum energy or a dynamical field. On the other hand, the late-time cosmic acceleration may be due to modifications of General Relativity, which introduce new degrees of freedom to the gravitational sector itself. We analyze some of the modified theories of gravity that address these intriguing and exciting problems facing modern physics, and explore the foundations of gravitation theory, essential for the construction of modified theories of gravity.

  11. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  12. Einstein's Equations for Spin 2 Mass 0 from Noether's Converse Hilbertian Assertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, J. Brian

    2016-11-01

    An overlap between the general relativist and particle physicist views of Einstein gravity is uncovered. Noether's 1918 paper developed Hilbert's and Klein's reflections on the conservation laws. Energy-momentum is just a term proportional to the field equations and a 'curl' term with identically zero divergence. Noether proved a converse "Hilbertian assertion": such "improper" conservation laws imply a generally covariant action.

  13. Thermodynamics of Einstein-Born-Infeld black holes in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Kim, Yong-Wan; Park, Young-Jai

    2008-08-15

    We show that all thermodynamic quantities of the Einstein-Born-Infeld black holes in three dimensions can be obtained from the dilaton and its potential of two-dimensional dilaton gravity through dimensional reduction. These are all between nonrotating uncharged BTZ (Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli) black hole (NBTZ) and charged BTZ black hole (CBTZ)

  14. Rainbow gravity and scale-invariant fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Arzano, Michele; Gubitosi, Giulia; Magueijo, João

    2013-08-01

    We reexamine a recently proposed scenario where the deformed dispersion relations associated with a flow of the spectral dimension to a UV value of 2 leads to a scale-invariant spectrum of cosmological fluctuations, without the need for inflation. In that scenario Einstein gravity was assumed. The theory displays a wavelength-dependent speed of light but by transforming to a suitable “rainbow frame” this feature can be removed, at the expense of modifying gravity. We find that the ensuing rainbow gravity theory is such that gravity switches off at high energy (or at least leads to a universal conformal coupling). This explains why the fluctuations are scale invariant on all scales: there is no horizon scale as such. For dispersion relations that do not lead to exact scale invariance we find instead esoteric inflation in the rainbow frame. We argue that these results shed light on the behavior of gravity under the phenomenon of dimensional reduction.

  15. A cosmological study in massive gravity theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Supriya Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2015-09-15

    A detailed study of the various cosmological aspects in massive gravity theory has been presented in the present work. For the homogeneous and isotropic FLRW model, the deceleration parameter has been evaluated, and, it has been examined whether there is any transition from deceleration to acceleration in recent past, or not. With the proper choice of the free parameters, it has been shown that the massive gravity theory is equivalent to Einstein gravity with a modified Newtonian gravitational constant together with a negative cosmological constant. Also, in this context, it has been examined whether the emergent scenario is possible, or not, in massive gravity theory. Finally, we have done a cosmographic analysis in massive gravity theory.

  16. Causality in 3D massive gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, José D.; Giribet, Gaston; Gómez, Carolina; Kilicarslan, Ercan; Leoni, Matías; Tekin, Bayram

    2017-05-01

    We study the constraints coming from the local causality requirement in various 2 +1 dimensional dynamical theories of gravity. In topologically massive gravity, with a single parity noninvariant massive degree of freedom, and in new massive gravity, with two massive spin-2 degrees of freedom, causality and unitarity are compatible with each other and both require the Newton's constant to be negative. In their extensions, such as the Born-Infeld gravity and the minimal massive gravity the situation is similar and quite different from their higher dimensional counterparts, such as quadratic (e.g., Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet) or cubic theories, where causality and unitarity are in conflict. We study the problem both in asymptotically flat and asymptotically anti-de Sitter spaces.

  17. Holographic complexity and action growth in massive gravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wen-Jian; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the growth rates of action for the anti-de Sitter black holes in massive-Einstein gravity models and obtain the universal behaviors of the growth rates of action (the rates of holographic complexity) within the "Wheeler-DeWitt" (WDW) patch at the late limit. Furthermore, we find that, for the static neutral cases, when the same mass of black holes is given, the computational speed of the neutral massive black hole is the same as its Einstein gravity counterpart, which is independent with the effect of the graviton mass terms; nevertheless, for the static charged cases, when the same mass and charge parameters of black holes are given, the growth rates of action for the massive charged black holes are always superior to the growth rates of action without graviton mass terms, which directly shows that the massive charged black holes as computers on the computational speeds are faster than their Einstein gravity counterparts.

  18. Einstein's steady-state cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac

    2014-09-01

    Last year, a team of Irish scientists discovered an unpublished manuscript by Einstein in which he attempted to construct a "steady-state" model of the universe. Cormac O'Raifeartaigh describes the excitement of finding this previously unknown work.

  19. Einstein: The Gourmet of Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Joel

    1979-01-01

    Reports a psychiatrist's analysis of Einstein's personal account of how he developed the theory of relativity. The psychiatrist cites Janusian thinking, actively conceiving two or more opposite concepts simultaneously, as a characteristic of much creative thought in general. (MA)

  20. Einstein: The Gourmet of Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Joel

    1979-01-01

    Reports a psychiatrist's analysis of Einstein's personal account of how he developed the theory of relativity. The psychiatrist cites Janusian thinking, actively conceiving two or more opposite concepts simultaneously, as a characteristic of much creative thought in general. (MA)

  1. Energy momentum distributions of monopole metric in teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygün, Sezgin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigate energy and momentum distributions of Monopole metric. For this purpose, we have used Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson and Landau-Lifshitz energy and momentum densities in Teleparallel Gravity (TG). We obtained that: (i) The solutions of Einstein and Bergmann-Thomson energy and momentum distributions give the same results but Landau-Lifshitz energy distribution does not provide same results in TG. (ii) The momentum densities of Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson and Landau-Lifshitz are vanish in TG for monopole metric. (iii) The obtained energy-momentum solutions are different from the earlier results in General Relativity (GR).

  2. Some notes on Einstein relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Michael P.; Masters, Andrew J.

    Transport coefficients are often expressed in the form of an Einstein relationship. In this report we point out some possibly surprising properties of the correlation functions appearing in such expressions and we discuss under what conditions the relationships are true. We further consider the Einstein relationship for the shear viscosity proposed by McQuarrie [in Statistical Mechanics (Harper and Row), 1976]. On the basis both of theoretical analysis and computer simulation, we conclude that this expression is incorrect.

  3. The NASA Beyond Einstein Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2004-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is part of NASA s Beyond Einstein program. This program seeks to answer the questions What Powered the Big Bang?, What happens at the edge of a Black Hole?, and What is Dark Energy?. LISA IS the first mission to be launched in this new program. This paper will give an overview of the Beyond Einstein program, its current status and where LISA fits in.

  4. The NASA Beyond Einstein Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2006-01-01

    Einstein's legacy is incomplete, his theory of General relativity raises -- but cannot answer --three profound questions: What powered the big bang? What happens to space, time, and matter at the edge of a black hole? and What is the mysterious dark energy pulling the Universe apart? The Beyond Einstein program within NASA's Office of Space Science aims to answer these questions, employing a series of missions linked by powerful new technologies and complementary approaches towards shared science goals. The Beyond Einstein program has three linked elements which advance science and technology towards two visions; to detect directly gravitational wave signals from the earliest possible moments of the BIg Bang, and to image the event horizon of a black hole. The central element is a pair of Einstein Great Observatories, Constellation-X and LISA. Constellation-X is a powerful new X-ray observatory dedicated to X-Ray Spectroscopy. LISA is the first spaced based gravitational wave detector. These powerful facilities will blaze new paths to the questions about black holes, the Big Bang and dark energy. The second element is a series of competitively selected Einstein Probes, each focused on one of the science questions and includes a mission dedicated resolving the Dark Energy mystery. The third element is a program of technology development, theoretical studies and education. The Beyond Einstein program is a new element in the proposed NASA budget for 2004. This talk will give an overview of the program and the missions contained within it.

  5. The NASA Beyond Einstein Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2006-01-01

    Einstein's legacy is incomplete, his theory of General relativity raises -- but cannot answer --three profound questions: What powered the big bang? What happens to space, time, and matter at the edge of a black hole? and What is the mysterious dark energy pulling the Universe apart? The Beyond Einstein program within NASA's Office of Space Science aims to answer these questions, employing a series of missions linked by powerful new technologies and complementary approaches towards shared science goals. The Beyond Einstein program has three linked elements which advance science and technology towards two visions; to detect directly gravitational wave signals from the earliest possible moments of the BIg Bang, and to image the event horizon of a black hole. The central element is a pair of Einstein Great Observatories, Constellation-X and LISA. Constellation-X is a powerful new X-ray observatory dedicated to X-Ray Spectroscopy. LISA is the first spaced based gravitational wave detector. These powerful facilities will blaze new paths to the questions about black holes, the Big Bang and dark energy. The second element is a series of competitively selected Einstein Probes, each focused on one of the science questions and includes a mission dedicated resolving the Dark Energy mystery. The third element is a program of technology development, theoretical studies and education. The Beyond Einstein program is a new element in the proposed NASA budget for 2004. This talk will give an overview of the program and the missions contained within it.

  6. Polymer quantization of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstatter, Gabor; Louko, Jorma; Peltola, Ari

    2010-01-01

    We present a polymer quantization of spherically symmetric Einstein gravity in which the polymerized variable is the area of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat. In the classical polymer theory, the singularity is replaced by a bounce at a radius that depends on the polymerization scale. In the polymer quantum theory, we show numerically that the area spectrum is evenly spaced and in agreement with a Bohr-Sommerfeld semiclassical estimate, and this spectrum is not qualitatively sensitive to issues of factor ordering or boundary conditions except in the lowest few eigenvalues. In the limit of small polymerization scale we recover, within the numerical accuracy, the area spectrum obtained from a Schrödinger quantization of the wormhole throat dynamics. The prospects of recovering from the polymer throat theory a full quantum-corrected spacetime are discussed.

  7. General relativity at 75: how right was einstein?

    PubMed

    Will, C M

    1990-11-09

    The status of experimental tests of general relativity is reviewed on the occasion of its 75th anniversary. Einstein's equivalence principle is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of special relativity, and the gravitational redshift experiment. Tests of general relativity have reached high precision, including the light deflection and the perihelion advance of Mercury, proposed by Einstein 75 years ago, and new tests such as the Shapiro time delay and the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion. Gravitational wave damping has been detected to an accuracy of 1 percent on the basis of measurements of the binary pulsar. The status of the "fifth force" is discussed, along with the frontiers of experimental relativity, including proposals for testing relativistic gravity with advanced technology and spacecraft.

  8. Polymer quantization of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat

    SciTech Connect

    Kunstatter, Gabor; Peltola, Ari; Louko, Jorma

    2010-01-15

    We present a polymer quantization of spherically symmetric Einstein gravity in which the polymerized variable is the area of the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat. In the classical polymer theory, the singularity is replaced by a bounce at a radius that depends on the polymerization scale. In the polymer quantum theory, we show numerically that the area spectrum is evenly spaced and in agreement with a Bohr-Sommerfeld semiclassical estimate, and this spectrum is not qualitatively sensitive to issues of factor ordering or boundary conditions except in the lowest few eigenvalues. In the limit of small polymerization scale we recover, within the numerical accuracy, the area spectrum obtained from a Schroedinger quantization of the wormhole throat dynamics. The prospects of recovering from the polymer throat theory a full quantum-corrected spacetime are discussed.

  9. Transverse gravity versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J.J. E-mail: anton.fernandez@uam.es

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂{sub μ}ξ{sup μ} = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  10. Pseudotopological quasilocal energy of torsion gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Sheng-Lan; Lin, Feng-Li; Ning, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Torsion gravity is a natural extension to Einstein gravity in the presence of fermion matter sources. In this paper we adopt Wald's covariant method of calculating the Noether charge to construct the quasilocal energy of the Einstein-Cartan-fermion system, and find that its explicit expression is formally independent of the coupling constant between the torsion and axial current. This seemingly topological nature is unexpected and is reminiscent of the quantum Hall effect and topological insulators. However, a coupling dependence does arise when evaluating it on shell, and thus the situation is pseudotopological. Based on the expression for the quasilocal energy, we evaluate it for a particular solution on the entanglement wedge and find agreement with the holographic relative entropy obtained before. This shows the equivalence of these two quantities in the Einstein-Cartan-fermion system. Moreover, the quasilocal energy in this case is not always positive definite, and thus it provides an example of a swampland in torsion gravity. Based on the covariant Noether charge, we also derive the nonzero fermion effect on the Komar angular momentum. The implications of our results for future tests of torsion gravity in gravitational-wave astronomy are also discussed.

  11. Numerical solutions of Einstein's equations for cosmological spacetimes with spatial topology S3 and symmetry group U(1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, F.; Escobar, L.; Frauendiener, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we consider the single patch pseudospectral scheme for tensorial and spinorial evolution problems on the 2-sphere presented by Beyer et al. [Classical Quantum Gravity 32, 175013 (2015); Classical Quantum Gravity31, 075019 (2014)], which is based on the spin-weighted spherical harmonics transform. We apply and extend this method to Einstein's equations and certain classes of spherical cosmological spacetimes. More specifically, we use the hyperbolic reductions of Einstein's equations obtained in the generalized wave map gauge formalism combined with Geroch's symmetry reduction, and focus on cosmological spacetimes with spatial S3 -topologies and symmetry groups U(1) or U (1 )×U (1 ) . We discuss analytical and numerical issues related to our implementation. We test our code by reproducing the exact inhomogeneous cosmological solutions of the vacuum Einstein field equations obtained by Beyer and Hennig [Classical Quantum Gravity 31, 095010 (2014)].

  12. The Einstein Slew Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Plummer, David; Schachter, Jonathan; Fabbiano, G.

    1992-01-01

    A catalog of 819 sources detected in the Einstein IPC Slew Survey of the X-ray sky is presented; 313 of the sources were not previously known as X-ray sources. Typical count rates are 0.1 IPC count/s, roughly equivalent to a flux of 3 x 10 exp -12 ergs/sq cm s. The sources have positional uncertainties of 1.2 arcmin (90 percent confidence) radius, based on a subset of 452 sources identified with previously known pointlike X-ray sources (i.e., extent less than 3 arcmin). Identifications based on a number of existing catalogs of X-ray and optical objects are proposed for 637 of the sources, 78 percent of the survey (within a 3-arcmin error radius) including 133 identifications of new X-ray sources. A public identification data base for the Slew Survey sources will be maintained at CfA, and contributions to this data base are invited.

  13. Variational principle for the P(4) affine theory of gravitation and electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Chilton, J.H.; Norris, L.K.

    1992-07-01

    We propose a Lagrangian for the P(4) theory of gravitation and electromagnetism which is a straightforward generalization of the Einstein Lagrangian. A constrained Palatini variation of this Lagrangian yields the geometrical Einstein-Maxwell affine field equations. We show that these results can be extended easily to include both electric and magnetic charges. Finally, we consider conservation laws arising from the invariance properties of the Lagrangian. 14 refs.

  14. Exact Quantization of Einstein-Rosen Waves Coupled to Massless Scalar Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero G., J. Fernando; Garay, Iñaki; Villaseñor, Eduardo J.

    2005-07-01

    We show in this Letter that gravity coupled to a massless scalar field with full cylindrical symmetry can be exactly quantized by an extension of the techniques used in the quantization of Einstein-Rosen waves. This system provides a useful test bed to discuss a number of issues in quantum general relativity, such as the emergence of the classical metric, microcausality, and large quantum gravity effects. It may also provide an appropriate framework to study gravitational critical phenomena from a quantum point of view, issues related to black hole evaporation, and the consistent definition of test fields and particles in quantum gravity.

  15. Semiclassical unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Fiol, Bartomeu; Garriga, Jaume E-mail: jaume.garriga@ub.edu

    2010-08-01

    Classically, unimodular gravity is known to be equivalent to General Relativity (GR), except for the fact that the effective cosmological constant Λ has the status of an integration constant. Here, we explore various formulations of unimodular gravity beyond the classical limit. We first consider the non-generally covariant action formulation in which the determinant of the metric is held fixed to unity. We argue that the corresponding quantum theory is also equivalent to General Relativity for localized perturbative processes which take place in generic backgrounds of infinite volume (such as asymptotically flat spacetimes). Next, using the same action, we calculate semiclassical non-perturbative quantities, which we expect will be dominated by Euclidean instanton solutions. We derive the entropy/area ratio for cosmological and black hole horizons, finding agreement with GR for solutions in backgrounds of infinite volume, but disagreement for backgrounds with finite volume. In deriving the above results, the path integral is taken over histories with fixed 4-volume. We point out that the results are different if we allow the 4-volume of the different histories to vary over a continuum range. In this ''generalized'' version of unimodular gravity, one recovers the full set of Einstein's equations in the classical limit, including the trace, so Λ is no longer an integration constant. Finally, we consider the generally covariant theory due to Henneaux and Teitelboim, which is classically equivalent to unimodular gravity. In this case, the standard semiclassical GR results are recovered provided that the boundary term in the Euclidean action is chosen appropriately.

  16. Building a holographic superconductor with a scalar field coupled kinematically to Einstein tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Xiao-Mei; Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    We study the holographic dual description of a superconductor in which the gravity sector consists of a Maxwell field and a charged scalar field which except its minimal coupling to gravity it is also coupled kinematically to Einstein tensor. As the strength of the new coupling is increased, the critical temperature below which the scalar field condenses is lowering, the condensation gap decreases faster than the temperature, the width of the condensation gap is not proportional to the size of the condensate and at low temperatures the condensation gap tends to zero for the strong coupling. These effects which are the result of the presence of the coupling of the scalar field to the Einstein tensor in the gravity bulk, provide a dual description of impurities concentration in a superconducting state on the boundary.

  17. Venus gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The anomalous gravity field of Venus shows high correlation with surface features revealed by radar. We extract gravity models from the Doppler tracking data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) by means of a two-step process. In the first step, we solve the nonlinear spacecraft state estimation problem using a Kalman filter-smoother. The Kalman filter was evaluated through simulations. This evaluation and some unusual features of the filter are discussed. In the second step, we perform a geophysical inversion using a linear Bayesian estimator. To allow an unbiased comparison between gravity and topography, we use a simulation technique to smooth and distort the radar topographic data so as to yield maps having the same characteristics as our gravity maps. The maps presented cover 2/3 of the surface of Venus and display the strong topography-gravity correlation previously reported. The topography-gravity scatter plots show two distinct trends.

  18. Massive gravity in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Bergshoeff, Eric A; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K

    2009-05-22

    A particular higher-derivative extension of the Einstein-Hilbert action in three spacetime dimensions is shown to be equivalent at the linearized level to the (unitary) Pauli-Fierz action for a massive spin-2 field. A more general model, which also includes "topologically-massive" gravity as a special case, propagates the two spin-2 helicity states with different masses. We discuss the extension to massive N-extended supergravity, and we present a "cosmological" extension that admits an anti-de Sitter vacuum.

  19. Equivalence of Jordan and Einstein frames at the quantum level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sachin; Banerjee, Narayan

    2017-03-01

    It is shown that the Jordan frame and its conformally transformed version, the Einstein frame of nonminimally coupled theories of gravity, are actually equivalent at the quantum level. The example of the theory taken up is the Brans-Dicke theory, and the wave packet calculations are done for a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model in the purest form of the theory, i.e., in the absence of any additional matter sector. The calculations are clean and exact, and the result obtained are unambiguous.

  20. Einstein-scalar-Yang-Mills black holes: a thermodynamical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ritabrata

    2013-12-01

    We try to find out the nature of different thermodynamical parameters for a black hole solution drawn for a special case in Einstein-Scalar-Yang-Mills gravity. Whether a phase transition occurs for the solution or not is a matter of interest. The nature of the phase transition is tried to understand. Ruppeiner metric and the corresponding Ricci scalar is constructed. It is noticed that the metric is not of positive Ricci for all the parametric values and there exist(s) point(s) in thermodynamic space where the Ricci scalar becomes zero.

  1. Quantum gravity as Escher's Dragon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilga, A. V.

    2003-11-01

    The main obstacle in attempts to construct a consistent quantum gravity is the absence of independent flat time. This can in principle be cured by going out to higher dimensions. The modern paradigm assumes that the fundamental theory of everything is some form of string theory living in space of more than four dimensions. We advocate another possibility that the fundamental theory is a form of D=4 higher-derivative gravity. This class of theories has a nice feature of renormalizability so that perturbative calculations are feasible. There are also finite N=4 supersymmetric conformal supergravity theories. This possibility is particularly attractive. Einstein's gravity is obtained in a natural way as an effective low-energy theory. The N=1 supersymmetric version of the theory has a natural higher-dimensional interpretation due to Ogievetsky and Sokatchev, which involves embedding of our curved Minkowsky space-time manifold into flat 8-dimensional space. Assuming that a variant of the finite N=4 theory also admit a similar interpretation, this may eventually allow one to construct consistent quantum theory of gravity. We argue, however, that even though future gravity theory will probably use higher dimensions as construction scaffolds, its physical content and meaning should refer to 4 dimensions where observer lives.

  2. My Half Hour with Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, Robert H.

    2005-03-01

    "So you're studying at Princeton. Would you like to meet Einstein?" That question, during a brief two-body collision at a cocktail party, a collision that was over before I could think of an appropriate response, led—over a year later—to one of the more memorable half hours of my life. It was an elastic collision, we drifted apart, and I thought it had simply been a casual remark until a few days later when the mail brought me a carbon copy [sic] of a letter (dated "25.XII.52") from the speaker, Dr. Tilly Edinger, to Albert Einstein. Accompanying the letter to Einstein was a card that Dr. Edinger advised me to send around to Einstein's home on Mercer Street to request a meeting. (What is perhaps most truly astonishing in connection with this event is that not only do I still have that carbon copy—and the eventual letter from Mercer Street that invited me to Einstein's home—but that I was able to find both documents in my attic!)

  3. Phantom dark ghost in Einstein-Cartan gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Chiao; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Chen, Pisin

    2017-05-01

    A class of dynamical dark energy models is constructed through an extended version of fermion fields corresponding to phantom dark ghost spinors, which are spin 1/2 with mass dimension 1. We find that if these spinors interact with torsion fields in a homogeneous and isotropic universe, then it does not imply any future dark energy singularity or any abrupt event, though the fermion has a negative kinetic energy. In fact, the equation of state of this dark energy model will asymptotically approach the value w=-1 from above without crossing the phantom divide and inducing therefore a de Sitter state. Consequently, we expect the model to be stable because no real phantom fields will be created. At late time, the torsion fields will vanish as the corresponding phantom dark ghost spinors dilute. As would be expected, intuitively, this result is unaffected by the presence of cold dark matter although the proof is not as straightforward as in general relativity.

  4. Newtonian limit of fully nonlinear cosmological perturbations in Einstein's gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim E-mail: hr@kasi.re.kr

    2013-04-01

    We prove that in the infinite speed-of-light limit (i.e., non-relativistic and subhorizon limits), the relativistic fully nonlinear cosmological perturbation equations in two gauge conditions, the zero-shear gauge and the uniform-expansion gauge, exactly reproduce the Newtonian hydrodynamic perturbation equations in the cosmological background; as a consequence, in the same two gauge conditions, the Newtonian hydrodynamic equations are exactly recovered in the Minkowsky background.

  5. Unified theory of nonlinear electrodynamics and gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Gomez, Alexander; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2011-01-15

    We describe a class of unified theories of electromagnetism and gravity. The Lagrangian is of the BF type, with a potential for the B field, the gauge group is U(2) (complexified). Given a choice of the potential function the theory is a deformation of (complex) general relativity and electromagnetism, and describes just two propagating polarizations of the graviton and two of the photon. When gravity is switched off the theory becomes the usual nonlinear electrodynamics with a general structure function. The Einstein-Maxwell theory can be recovered by sending some of the parameters of the defining potential to zero, but for any generic choice of the potential the theory is indistinguishable from Einstein-Maxwell at low energies. A real theory is obtained by imposing suitable reality conditions. We also study the spherically-symmetric solution and show how the usual Reissner-Nordstrom solution is recovered.

  6. Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The texts of four speeches, given at the 1979 Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy held in Rome, are presented. Each address relates to some aspect of the life and times of Albert Einstein. (SA)

  7. Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The texts of four speeches, given at the 1979 Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy held in Rome, are presented. Each address relates to some aspect of the life and times of Albert Einstein. (SA)

  8. Canonical Chern-Simons gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Souvik; Vaz, Cenalo

    2017-07-01

    We study the canonical description of the axisymmetric vacuum in 2 +1 -dimensional gravity, treating Einstein's gravity as a Chern-Simons gauge theory on a manifold with the restriction that the dreibein is invertible. Our treatment is in the spirit of Kuchař's description of the Schwarzschild black hole in 3 +1 dimensions, where the mass and angular momentum are expressed in terms of the canonical variables and a series of canonical transformations that turn the curvature coordinates and their conjugate momenta into new canonical variables is performed. In their final form, the constraints are seen to require that the momenta conjugate to the Killing time and curvature radius vanish, and what remains is the mass, the angular momentum, and their conjugate momenta, which we derive. The Wheeler-DeWitt equation is trivial and describes time independent systems with wave functions described only by the total mass and total angular momentum.

  9. Binary Inspiral in Quadratic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Quadratic gravity is a general class of quantum-gravity-inspired theories, where the Einstein-Hilbert action is extended through the addition of all terms quadratic in the curvature tensor coupled to a scalar field. In this article, we focus on the scalar Gauss- Bonnet (sGB) theory and consider the black hole binary inspiral in this theory. By applying the post-Newtonian (PN) formalism, we found that there is a scalar dipole radiation which leads to -1PN correction in the energy flux relative to gravitational radiation in general relativity. From the orbital decay rate of a low-mass X-ray binary A0600-20, we obtain the bound that is six orders of magnitude stronger than the current solar system bound. Furthermore, we show that the excess in the orbital decay rate of XTE J1118+480 can be explained by the scalar radiation in sGB theory.

  10. Brane-induced-gravity shock waves.

    PubMed

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2005-05-13

    We construct exact gravitational field solutions for a relativistic particle localized on a tensional brane in brane-induced gravity. They are a generalization of gravitational shock waves in 4D de Sitter space. We provide the metrics for both the normal branch and the self-inflating branch Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati brane worlds, and compare them to the 4D Einstein gravity solution and to the case when gravity resides only in the 5D bulk, without any brane-localized curvature terms. At short distances the wave profile looks the same as in four dimensions. The corrections appear only far from the source, where they differ from the long distance corrections in 4D de Sitter space. We also discover a new nonperturbative channel for energy emission into the bulk from the self-inflating [corrected] branch, when gravity is modified at the de Sitter radius.

  11. Rainich conditions in (2 + 1)-dimensional gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krongos, D. S.; Torre, C. G.

    2017-01-01

    In (3 + 1) spacetime dimensions, the Rainich conditions are a set of equations expressed solely in terms of the metric tensor which are equivalent to the Einstein-Maxwell equations for non-null electromagnetic fields. Here we provide the analogous conditions for (2 + 1)-dimensional gravity coupled to electromagnetism. Both the non-null and null cases are treated. The construction of these conditions is based upon reducing the problem to that of gravity coupled to a scalar field, which we have treated elsewhere. These conditions can be easily extended to other theories of (2 + 1)-dimensional gravity. For example, we apply the geometrization conditions to topologically massive gravity coupled to the electromagnetic field and obtain a family of plane-fronted wave solutions.

  12. Effective fermion kinematics from modified quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, J.; Leite, J.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a classical fermion and a classical scalar, propagating on two different kinds of four-dimensional diffeomorphism breaking gravity backgrounds, and we derive the one-loop effective dispersion relation for matter, after integrating out gravitons. One gravity model involves quadratic divergences at one-loop, as in Einstein gravity, and the other model is the z = 3 non-projectable Horava-Lifshitz gravity, which involves logarithmic divergences only. Although these two models behave differently in the ultraviolet, the IR phenomenology for matter fields is comparable: (i) for generic values for the parameters, both models identify 1010 GeV as the characteristic scale above which they are not consistent with current upper bounds on Lorentz symmetry violation; (ii) for both models, there is always a fine-tuning of parameters which allows the cancellation of the indicator for Lorentz symmetry violation.

  13. Quantum gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maślanka, K.

    A model of reality based on quantum fields, but with a classical treatment of gravity, is inconsistent. Finding a solution has proved extremely difficult, possibly due to the beauty and conceptual simplicity of general relativity. There is a variety of approaches to a consistent theory of quntum gravity. At present, it seems that superstring theory is the most promising candidate.

  14. Gravity investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, D.L.

    1983-12-31

    A large density contrast exists between the Paleozoic rocks (including the rocks of Climax stock) and less dense, Tertiary volcanic rocks and alluvium. This density contrast ranges widely, and herein for interpretive purposes, is assumed to average 0.85 Mg/m{sup 3} (megagrams per cubic meter). The large density contrast makes the gravity method a useful tool with which to study the interface between these rock types. However, little or no density contrast is discernible between the sedimentary Paleozoic rocks that surround the Climax stock and the intrusive rocks of the stock itself. Therefore the gravity method can not be used to define the configuration of the stock. Gravity highs coincide with outcrops of the dense Paleozoic rocks, and gravity lows overlie less-dense Tertiary volcanic rocks and Quaternary alluvium. The positions of three major faults (Boundary, Yucca, and Butte faults) are defined by steep gravity gradients. West of the Climax stock, the Tippinip fault has juxtaposed Paleozoic rocks of similar density, and consequently, has no expression in the gravity data in that area. The gravity station spacing, across Oak Spring Butte, is not sufficient to adequately define any gravity expression of the Tippinip fault. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Binary neutron star mergers: a review of Einstein's richest laboratory.

    PubMed

    Baiotti, Luca; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2017-09-01

    In a single process, the merger of binary neutron star systems combines extreme gravity, the copious emission of gravitational waves, complex microphysics and electromagnetic processes, which can lead to astrophysical signatures observable at the largest redshifts. We review here the recent progress in understanding what could be considered Einstein's richest laboratory, highlighting in particular the numerous significant advances of the last decade. Although special attention is paid to the status of models, techniques and results for fully general-relativistic dynamical simulations, a review is also offered on the initial data and advanced simulations with approximate treatments of gravity. Finally, we review the considerable amount of work carried out on the post-merger phase, including black-hole formation, torus accretion onto the merged compact object, the connection with gamma-ray burst engines, ejected material, and its nucleosynthesis.

  16. Stress-Energy Tensor in Einstein-Cartan Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kur, Eugene

    2016-03-01

    We present a proof connecting the Noether stress-energy tensor with the Hilbert stress-energy tensor for theories coupled to an arbitrary background metric. In particular, we show how applying Noether's theorem to spacetime diffeomorphisms leads to Hilbert's formula Tμν ~δS/δgμν . The proof immediately yields the symmetry of the stress-energy tensor as well as the vanishing of its covariant divergence. In the case that the theory is coupled to a background tetrad and a background connection, we show that the stress-energy tensor receives contributions from the torsion of the background connection and the spin current of the matter. We discuss the applications of these results to fermions coupled to Einstein-Cartan gravity and to theories of gravity with no matter coupling.

  17. On the universality of Einstein(-Cartan) field equations in the presence of matter fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubilar, Guillermo F.

    1998-01-01

    Within the context of gravity formulated as a gauge theory of the Lorentz group, we derive the field equations for a gravitational action consisting of a generic analytic function of the curvature scalar, in the presence of general matter fields. In the vacuum case we obtain universal equations in agreement with Ferraris et al. We also show explicit non-trivial examples of universal behaviour in the presence of matter fields, which in the general case produces a non-zero torsion field, leading to an Einstein-Cartan geometry and universal Einstein-Cartan field equations.

  18. New variables for classical and quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    1986-01-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity based on certain spinorial variables is introduced. These variables simplify the constraints of general relativity considerably and enable one to imbed the constraint surface in the phase space of Einstein's theory into that of Yang-Mills theory. The imbedding suggests new ways of attacking a number of problems in both classical and quantum gravity. Some illustrative applications are discussed.

  19. Differential geometry, Palatini gravity and reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Capriotti, S.

    2014-01-15

    The present article deals with a formulation of the so called (vacuum) Palatini gravity as a general variational principle. In order to accomplish this goal, some geometrical tools related to the geometry of the bundle of connections of the frame bundle LM are used. A generalization of Lagrange-Poincaré reduction scheme to these types of variational problems allows us to relate it with the Einstein-Hilbert variational problem. Relations with some other variational problems for gravity found in the literature are discussed.

  20. Modified coupling procedure for the Poincare gauge theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmierczak, Marcin

    2009-06-15

    The minimal coupling procedure, which is employed in standard Yang-Mills theories, appears to be ambiguous in the case of gravity. We propose a slight modification of this procedure, which removes the ambiguity. Our modification justifies some earlier results concerning the consequences of the Poincare gauge theory of gravity. In particular, the predictions of the Einstein-Cartan theory with fermionic matter are rendered unique.

  1. Actions for particles and strings and Chern-Simons gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiusi, Lei; Nair, V. P.

    2017-09-01

    We consider actions for particles and strings, including twistorial descriptions on 4D Minkowski and AdS5 spacetimes from the point of view of coadjoint orbits for the isometry group. We also consider the collective coordinate dynamics of singular solutions in Chern-Simons (CS) theories and CS theories of gravity. This is a generalization of the work of Einstein, Infeld, and Hoffmann and also has potential points of contact with fluid-gravity correspondence.

  2. Einstein for Schools and the General Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Kozma, C; Nilsson, Ch

    2006-01-01

    In April 2005 the World Year of Physics (Einstein Year in the UK and Ireland) was celebrated with an Einstein week in Stockholm House of Science. Seven experiments illustrated Einstein's remarkable work in 1905 on Brownian motion, the photoelectric effect and special relativity. Thirteen school classes with 260 pupils, 30 teachers and 25 members…

  3. Einstein for Schools and the General Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Kozma, C; Nilsson, Ch

    2006-01-01

    In April 2005 the World Year of Physics (Einstein Year in the UK and Ireland) was celebrated with an Einstein week in Stockholm House of Science. Seven experiments illustrated Einstein's remarkable work in 1905 on Brownian motion, the photoelectric effect and special relativity. Thirteen school classes with 260 pupils, 30 teachers and 25 members…

  4. Series expansion of the modified Einstein Procedure

    Treesearch

    Seema Chandrakant Shah-Fairbank

    2009-01-01

    This study examines calculating total sediment discharge based on the Modified Einstein Procedure (MEP). A new procedure based on the Series Expansion of the Modified Einstein Procedure (SEMEP) has been developed. This procedure contains four main modifications to MEP. First, SEMEP solves the Einstein integrals quickly and accurately based on a series expansion. Next,...

  5. Wald Entropy for Ghost-Free, Infinite Derivative Theories of Gravity.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Aindriú; Mazumdar, Anupam; Teimouri, Ali

    2015-05-22

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the Wald entropy for any spherically symmetric black hole within an infinite derivative theory of gravity that is quadratic in curvature is determined solely by the area law. Thus, the infrared behavior of gravity is captured by the Einstein-Hilbert term, provided that the massless graviton remains the only propagating degree of freedom in the spacetime.

  6. The Gravity Probe B Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    This presentation briefly describes the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) Experiment which is designed to measure parts of Einstein's general theory of relativity by monitoring gyroscope orientation relative to a distant guide star. To measure the miniscule angles predicted by Einstein's theory, it was necessary to build near-perfect gyroscopes that were approximately 50 million times more precise than the best navigational gyroscopes. A telescope mounted along the central axis of the dewar and spacecraft provided the experiment's pointing reference to a guide star. The telescope's image divide precisely split the star's beam into x-axis and y-axis components whose brightness could be compared. GP-B's 650-gallon dewar, kept the science instrument inside the probe at a cryogenic temperature for 17.3 months and also provided the thruster propellant for precision attitude and translation control. Built around the dewar, the GP-B spacecraft was a total-integrated system, comprising both the space vehicle and payload, dedicated as a single entity to experimentally testing predictions of Einstein's theory.

  7. Deduction of Einstein equation from homogeneity of Riemann spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Jun

    2012-03-01

    The symmetry of spacetime translation leads to the energy-momentum conservation. However, the Lagrange depends on spacetime coordinates, which makes the symmetry of spacetime translation different with other symmetry invariant explicitly under symmetry transformation. We need an equation to guarantee the symmetry of spacetime translation. In this talk, I will show that the Einstein equation can be deduced purely from the general covariant principle and the homogeneity of spacetime in the frame of quantum field theory. The Einstein equation is shown to be the equation to guarantee the symmetry of spacetime translation. Gravity is an apparent force due to the curvature of spacetime resulted from the conservation of energy-momentum. In the action of quantum field, only electroweak-strong interactions appear with curved spacetime metric determined by the Einstein equation.. The general covariant principle and the homogeneity of spacetime are merged into one basic principle: Any Riemann spacetime metric guaranteeing the energy-momentum conservation are equivalent, which can be called as the conserved general covariant principle. [4pt] [1] Jun Ni, Chin. Phys. Lett. 28, 110401 (2011).

  8. Static trace free Einstein equations and stellar distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansraj, Sudan; Goswami, Rituparno; Mkhize, Njabulo; Ellis, George

    2017-08-01

    We construct models of static spherical distributions of the perfect fluid in trace free Einstein gravity theory. The equations governing the gravitational field are equivalent to standard Einstein's equations; however, their presentation is manifestly different, which motivates the question whether new information would emerge due to the nonlinearity of the field equations. The incompressible fluid assumption does not lead to the well known Schwarzschild interior metric of Einstein gravity, and a term denoting the presence of a cosmological constant is present on account of the integration process. The Schwarzschild interior is regained as a special case of a richer geometry. On the other hand, when the Schwarzschild geometry is prescribed, a constant density fluid emerges consistent with the standard equations. A complete model of an isothermal fluid sphere with pressure and density obeying the inverse square law is obtained. Corrections to the model previously presented in the literature by Saslaw et al. are exhibited. The isothermal ansatz does not yield a constant gravitational potential in general, but both potentials are position dependent. Conversely, it is shown that assuming a constant gr r gravitational potential does not yield an isothermal fluid in general as is the case in standard general relativity. The results of the standard Einstein equations are special cases of the models reported here. Noteworthy is the fact that whereas the previously reported isothermal solution was only of cosmological interest, the solution reported herein admits compact objects by virtue of the fact that a pressure free hypersurface exists. Finally we analyze the consequences of selecting the Finch-Skea metric as the seed solution. The density profiles match; however, there is a deviation between the pressure profiles with the Einstein case although the qualitative behavior is the same. It is shown in detail that the model satisfies elementary requirements for physical

  9. Dutch museum marks Einstein anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Calmthout, Matijn

    2016-01-01

    A new painting of Albert Einstein's field equation from his 1915 general theory of relativity was unveiled in a ceremony in November 2015 by the Dutch physicist Robbert Dijkgraaf, who is director of the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study in the US.

  10. Approaching Bose-Einstein Condensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Loris

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is discussed at the level of an advanced course of statistical thermodynamics, clarifying some formal and physical aspects that are usually not covered by the standard pedagogical literature. The non-conventional approach adopted starts by showing that the continuum limit, in certain cases, cancels out the crucial…

  11. Approaching Bose-Einstein Condensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Loris

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is discussed at the level of an advanced course of statistical thermodynamics, clarifying some formal and physical aspects that are usually not covered by the standard pedagogical literature. The non-conventional approach adopted starts by showing that the continuum limit, in certain cases, cancels out the crucial…

  12. Probing modified gravity via the mass-temperature relation of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, A.; Mota, D. F.

    2017-02-01

    We propose that the mass-temperature relation of galaxy clusters is a prime candidate for testing gravity theories beyond Einstein's general relativity, for modified gravity models with universal coupling between matter and the scalar field. For non-universally coupled models, we discover that the impact of modified gravity can remain hidden from the mass-temperature relation. Using non-radiative hydrodynamic cosmological simulations, we find that in modified gravity the hydrostatic mass-temperature relation varies significantly from the standard gravity relation of M ∝ T1.73. To be specific, for symmetron models with a coupling factor of β = 1 we find a lower limit to the power law as M ∝ T1.6; and for f(R) gravity we compute predictions based on the model parameters. We show that the mass-temperature relation, for screened modified gravities, is significantly different from that of standard gravity for the less massive and colder galaxy clusters, while being indistinguishable from Einstein's gravity for massive, hot galaxy clusters. We further investigate the mass-temperature relation for other mass estimates than the hydrostatic mass estimate and discover that the gas mass-temperature results show even more significant deviations from Einstein's gravity than the hydrostatic mass-temperature.

  13. The Einstein equations on the 3-brane world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Maeda, Kei-Ichi; Sasaki, Misao

    2000-07-01

    We carefully investigate the gravitational equations of the brane world, in which all the matter forces except gravity are confined on the 3-brane in a 5-dimensional spacetime with Z2 symmetry. We derive the effective gravitational equations on the brane, which reduce to the conventional Einstein equations in the low energy limit. From our general argument we conclude that the first Randall-Sundrum-type theory predicts that the brane with a negative tension is an antigravity world and hence should be excluded from the physical point of view. Their second-type theory where the brane has a positive tension provides the correct signature of gravity. In this latter case, if the bulk spacetime is exactly anti-de Sitter spacetime, generically the matter on the brane is required to be spatially homogeneous because of the Bianchi identities. By allowing deviations from anti-de Sitter spacetime in the bulk, the situation will be relaxed and the Bianchi identities give just the relation between the Weyl tensor and the energy momentum tensor. In the present brane world scenario, the effective Einstein equations cease to be valid during an era when the cosmological constant on the brane is not well defined, such as in the case of the matter dominated by the potential energy of the scalar field.

  14. Einstein Universe Revisited and End of Dark ERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurgaliev, Ildus S.

    2015-01-01

    Historically the earliest general relativistic cosmological solution was received by Einstein himself as homogenous, isotropic one. In accordance with European cosmology it was expected static. The Eternal Universe as scientific model is conflicting with the existed theological model of the Universe created by God, therefore, of the limited age. Christianity, younger Islam, older Judaism are based on creationism. Much older oriental traditions such us Hinduism and Buddhism are based on conceptions of eternal and cyclic Universe which are closer to scientific worldview. To have static universe Einstein needed a factor to counteract gravity and postulated cosmological term and considered it as a disadvantage of the theory. This aesthetic dissatisfaction was amplified by interpretation distance-redshift relationship as a cosmological expansion effect. Emerged scientific cosmological community (excluding Hubble himself - almost always) endorsed the concept of expanding Universe. At the same time, as it is shown in this report, a natural well known factors do exist to counteract gravity. They are inertial centrifugal and Coriolis forces finding their geometrical presentation in the relativity theory.

  15. Deflection of Light by Gravity: A Physical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Joshua B.

    1982-01-01

    Einstein's equivalence principle relates effects seen by an accelerating observer to those experienced by an observer in a gravitational field, providing an explanation of bending of a light beam by gravity. Because the calculations lead to results one-half the value found experimentally, obtaining the correct light deflection is discussed.…

  16. Deflection of Light by Gravity: A Physical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Joshua B.

    1982-01-01

    Einstein's equivalence principle relates effects seen by an accelerating observer to those experienced by an observer in a gravitational field, providing an explanation of bending of a light beam by gravity. Because the calculations lead to results one-half the value found experimentally, obtaining the correct light deflection is discussed.…

  17. Revisiting the Brans solutions of scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraoni, Valerio; Hammad, Fayçal; Belknap-Keet, Shawn D.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by statements in the literature which contradict two general theorems, the static and spherically symmetric Brans solutions of scalar-tensor gravity are analyzed explicitly in both the Jordan and the Einstein conformal frames. Depending on the parameter range, these solutions describe wormholes or naked singularities but not black holes.

  18. Positivity of Curvature-Squared Corrections in Gravity.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N

    2017-02-03

    We study the Gauss-Bonnet (GB) term as the leading higher-curvature correction to pure Einstein gravity. Assuming a tree-level ultraviolet completion free of ghosts or tachyons, we prove that the GB term has a nonnegative coefficient in dimensions greater than 4. Our result follows from unitarity of the spectral representation for a general ultraviolet completion of the GB term.

  19. Positivity of Curvature-Squared Corrections in Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2017-02-01

    We study the Gauss-Bonnet (GB) term as the leading higher-curvature correction to pure Einstein gravity. Assuming a tree-level ultraviolet completion free of ghosts or tachyons, we prove that the GB term has a nonnegative coefficient in dimensions greater than 4. Our result follows from unitarity of the spectral representation for a general ultraviolet completion of the GB term.

  20. Boundary stress tensor and asymptotically AdS3 non-Einstein spaces at the chiral point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giribet, Gaston; Goya, Andrés; Leston, Mauricio

    2011-09-01

    Chiral gravity admits asymptotically AdS3 solutions that are not locally equivalent to AdS3; meaning that solutions do exist which, while obeying the strong boundary conditions usually imposed in general relativity, happen not to be Einstein spaces. In topologically massive gravity (TMG), the existence of non-Einstein solutions is particularly connected to the question about the role played by complex saddle points in the Euclidean path integral. Consequently, studying (the existence of) nonlocally AdS3 solutions to chiral gravity is relevant to understanding the quantum theory. Here, we discuss a special family of nonlocally AdS3 solutions to chiral gravity. In particular, we show that such solutions persist when one deforms the theory by adding the higher-curvature terms of the so-called new massive gravity. Moreover, the addition of higher-curvature terms to the gravity action introduces new nonlocally AdS3 solutions that have no analogues in TMG. Both stationary and time-dependent, axially symmetric solutions that asymptote AdS3 space without being locally equivalent to it appear. Defining the boundary stress tensor for the full theory, we show that these non-Einstein geometries have associated vanishing conserved charges.

  1. Gravity brake

    DOEpatents

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  2. Logamediate Inflation in f(T) Teleparallel Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezazadeh, Kazem; Abdolmaleki, Asrin; Karami, Kayoomars

    2017-02-01

    We study logamediate inflation in the context of f(T) teleparallel gravity. f(T)-gravity is a generalization of the teleparallel gravity which is formulated on the Weitzenbock spacetime, characterized by the vanishing curvature tensor (absolute parallelism) and the non-vanishing torsion tensor. We consider an f(T)-gravity model which is sourced by a canonical scalar field. Assuming a power-law f(T) function in the action, we investigate an inflationary universe with a logamediate scale factor. Our results show that, although logamediate inflation is completely ruled out by observational data in the standard inflationary scenario based on Einstein gravity, it can be compatible with the 68% confidence limit joint region of Planck 2015 TT,TE,EE+lowP data in the framework of f(T)-gravity.

  3. Is Electromagnetic Gravity Control Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Jose G.; Torr, Douglas G.

    2004-02-04

    We study the interplay of Einstein's Gravitation (GR) and Maxwell's Electromagnetism, where the distribution of energy-momentum is not presently known (The Feynman Lectures, Vol 2, Chapter 27, section 4). As Feynman himself stated, one might in principle use Einstein's equations of GR to find such a distribution. GR (born in 1915) presently uses the Levi-Civita connection, LCC (the LCC was born two years after GR as a new concept, and not just as the pre-existing Christoffel symbols that represent it). Around 1927, Einstein proposed for physics an alternative to the LCC that constitutes a far more sensible and powerful affine enrichment of metric Riemannian geometry. It is called teleparallelism (TP). Its Finslerian version (i.e. in the space-time-velocity arena) permits an unequivocal identification of the EM field as a geometric quantity. This in turn permits one to identify a completely geometric set of Einstein equations from curvature equations. From their right hand side, one may obtain the actual distribution of EM energy-momentum. It is consistent with Maxwell's equations, since these also are implied by the equations of structure of TP. We find that the so-far-unknown terms in this distribution amount to a total differential and do not, therefore, alter the value of the total EM energy-momentum. And yet these extra terms are at macroscopic distances enormously larger than the standard quadratic terms. This allows for the generation of measurable gravitational fields by EM fields. We thus answer affirmatively the question of the title.

  4. Is Electromagnetic Gravity Control Possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Jose G.; Torr, Douglas G.

    2004-02-01

    We study the interplay of Einstein's Gravitation (GR) and Maxwell's Electromagnetism, where the distribution of energy-momentum is not presently known (The Feynman Lectures, Vol 2, Chapter 27, section 4). As Feynman himself stated, one might in principle use Einstein's equations of GR to find such a distribution. GR (born in 1915) presently uses the Levi-Civita connection, LCC (the LCC was born two years after GR as a new concept, and not just as the pre-existing Christoffel symbols that represent it). Around 1927, Einstein proposed for physics an alternative to the LCC that constitutes a far more sensible and powerful affine enrichment of metric Riemannian geometry. It is called teleparallelism (TP). Its Finslerian version (i.e. in the space-time-velocity arena) permits an unequivocal identification of the EM field as a geometric quantity. This in turn permits one to identify a completely geometric set of Einstein equations from curvature equations. From their right hand side, one may obtain the actual distribution of EM energy-momentum. It is consistent with Maxwell's equations, since these also are implied by the equations of structure of TP. We find that the so-far-unknown terms in this distribution amount to a total differential and do not, therefore, alter the value of the total EM energy-momentum. And yet these extra terms are at macroscopic distances enormously larger than the standard quadratic terms. This allows for the generation of measurable gravitational fields by EM fields. We thus answer affirmatively the question of the title.

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Once Upon Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetto, E.

    2007-07-01

    Thibault Damour is a theoretical physicist, and a member of the French Academy of Sciences. This book is the translation, by Eric Novak, of the original French Si Einstein m'etait conté (Le Cherche Midi, 2005). It is neither a book of theoretical physics nor a biography of Einstein. It is not a book of history nor philosophy of science. In Damour's words it was written to encourage the reader to share with Einstein `those times when he understood some part of the hidden order of the universe'. It is a relatively short book, written in a very fluent style, but it deals with all the major problems and achievements of Einstein's works. Starting from special relativity, it continues with general relativity, quantum theories, unified field theory and a brief overview of the actual research related to Einstein's legacy. It is essentially a popular science book with some related exploration in history and philosophy to interpret physical theories. The most important problem discussed by Damour is the nature of time. On this subject, there is a very interesting short paragraph (pp 33--35) dedicated to the reception of the relativity idea by the great writer Marcel Proust and its counterpart within À la Recherche du Temps Perdu. A correct discussion of the implications of a relativistic time should imply the distinction of the different possible interpretations of this concept. Damour seems to conclude that only one interpretation is possible: `time does not exist', flowing of time is an illusion. One has to know that Einstein's ideas on time were related to Spinoza's perspective of a knowledge sub specie aeternitatis. However, other interpretations are possible and are related to the idea of time as an actuality. Damour speaks about the controversy between Einstein and Bergson, but Bergson is considered as a philosopher who did not understand relativity. This philosophical problem of relativistic time is indeed related to a historical problem briefly discussed by Damour

  6. New class of exact solutions in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezelbash, A. M.

    2017-03-01

    We find new solutions to the five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with cosmological constant where the dilaton field couples to the electromagnetic field as well as to the cosmological term with two different coupling constants. The five-dimensional spacetime is nonstationary and is a conformally regular spacetime, everywhere. Both the dilaton field and the electromagnetic field depend on time and two spatial directions. The cosmological constant takes a positive, negative, or zero value, depending on the value of the coupling constant. We study the physical properties of the spacetime, and we show that the solutions are unique in five dimensions and that they cannot be uplifted to higher-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory or Einstein gravity in the presence of the cosmological constant. Moreover, we construct new solutions to the theory in which both coupling constants are equal.

  7. Nonlinear Dynamics of Bose-Einstein Condensates with Long-Range Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wunner, G.; Cartarius, H.; Fabcic, T.; Koeberle, P.; Main, J.; Schwidder, T.

    2008-11-13

    The motto of this paper is: Let's face Bose-Einstein condensation through nonlinear dynamics. We do this by choosing variational forms of the condensate wave functions (of given symmetry classes), which convert the Bose-Einstein condensates via the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation into Hamiltonian systems that can be studied using the methods of nonlinear dynamics. We consider in particular cold quantum gases where long-range interactions between the neutral atoms are present, in addition to the conventional short-range contact interaction, viz. gravity-like interactions, and dipole-dipole interactions. The results obtained serve as a useful guide in the search for nonlinear dynamics effects in numerically exact quantum calculations for Bose-Einstein condensates. A main result is the prediction of the existence of stable islands as well as chaotic regions for excited states of dipolar condensates, which could be checked experimentally.

  8. Gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David

    1987-01-01

    Gravity waves contributed to the establishment of the thermal structure, small scale (80 to 100 km) fluctuations in velocity (50 to 80 m/sec) and density (20 to 30%, 0 to peak). Dominant gravity wave spectrum in the middle atmosphere: x-scale, less than 100 km; z-scale, greater than 10 km; t-scale, less than 2 hr. Theorists are beginning to understand middle atmosphere motions. There are two classes: Planetary waves and equatorial motions, gravity waves and tidal motions. The former give rise to variability at large scales, which may alter apparent mean structure. Effects include density and velocity fluctuations, induced mean motions, and stratospheric warmings which lead to the breakup of the polar vortex and cooling of the mesosphere. On this scale are also equatorial quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations. Gravity wave and tidal motions produce large rms fluctuations in density and velocity. The magnitude of the density fluctuations compared to the mean density is of the order of the vertical wavelength, which grows with height. Relative density fluctuations are less than, or of the order of 30% below the mesopause. Such motions may cause significant and variable convection, and wind shear. There is a strong seasonal variation in gravity wave amplitude. Additional observations are needed to address and quantify mean and fluctuation statistics of both density and mean velocity, variability of the mean and fluctuations, and to identify dominant gravity wave scales and sources as well as causes of variability, both temporal and geographic.

  9. From the Einstein-Cartan to the Ashtekar-Barbero canonical constraints, passing through the Nieh-Yan functional

    SciTech Connect

    Mercuri, Simone

    2008-01-15

    The Ashtekar-Barbero constraints for general relativity with fermions are derived from the Einstein-Cartan canonical theory rescaling the state functional of the gravity-spinor coupled system by the exponential of the Nieh-Yan functional. A one parameter quantization ambiguity naturally appears and can be associated with the Immirzi parameter.

  10. Perturbations of cosmological and black hole solutions in massive gravity and bi-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Siino, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yoshida, Daisuke

    2016-10-01

    We investigate perturbations of a class of spherically symmetric solutions in massive gravity and bi-gravity. The background equations of motion for the particular class of solutions we are interested in reduce to a set of the Einstein equations with a cosmological constant. Thus, the solutions in this class include all the spherically symmetric solutions in general relativity, such as the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker solution and the Schwarzschild (-de Sitter) solution, though the one-parameter family of two parameters of the theory admits such a class of solutions. We find that the equations of motion for the perturbations of this class of solutions also reduce to the perturbed Einstein equations at first and second order. Therefore, the perturbative stability of the solutions coincides with that of the corresponding solutions in general relativity at least up to the second-order perturbations.

  11. Perturbations of cosmological and black hole solutions in massive gravity and bi-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Siino, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yoshida, Daisuke

    2016-10-01

    We investigate perturbations of a class of spherically symmetric solutions in massive gravity and bi-gravity. The background equations of motion for the particular class of solutions we are interested in reduce to a set of the Einstein equations with a cosmological constant. Thus, the solutions in this class include all the spherically symmetric solutions in general relativity, such as the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker solution and the Schwarzschild (-de Sitter) solution, though the one-parameter family of two parameters of the theory admits such a class of solutions. We find that the equations of motion for the perturbations of this class of solutions also reduce to the perturbed Einstein equations at first and second order. Therefore, the perturbative stability of the solutions coincides with that of the corresponding solutions in general relativity at least up to the second-order perturbations.

  12. Affine projective Osserman structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkey, P.; Nikčević, S.

    2013-08-01

    By considering the projectivized spectrum of the Jacobi operator, we introduce the concept of projective Osserman manifold in both the affine and in the pseudo-Riemannian settings. If M is an affine projective Osserman manifold, then the deformed Riemannian extension metric on the cotangent bundle is both spacelike and timelike projective Osserman. Since any rank-1-symmetric space is affine projective Osserman, this provides additional information concerning the cotangent bundle of a rank-1 Riemannian symmetric space with the deformed Riemannian extension metric. We construct other examples of affine projective Osserman manifolds where the Ricci tensor is not symmetric and thus the connection in question is not the Levi-Civita connection of any metric. If the dimension is odd, we use methods of algebraic topology to show the Jacobi operator of an affine projective Osserman manifold has only one non-zero eigenvalue and that eigenvalue is real.

  13. Analyzing modified unimodular gravity via Lagrange multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez-Gómez, Diego

    2016-06-01

    The so-called unimodular version of general relativity is revisited. Unimodular gravity is constructed by fixing the determinant of the metric, which leads to the trace-free part of the equations instead of the usual Einstein field equations. Then a cosmological constant naturally arises as an integration constant. While unimodular gravity turns out to be equivalent to general relativity (GR) at the classical level, it provides important differences at the quantum level. Here we extend the unimodular constraint to some extensions of general relativity that have drawn a lot of attention over the last years—f (R ) gravity (or its scalar-tensor picture) and Gauss-Bonnet gravity. The corresponding unimodular version of such theories is constructed as well as the conformal transformation that relates the Einstein and Jordan frames for these nonminimally coupled theories. From the classical point of view, the unimodular versions of such extensions are completely equivalent to their originals, but an effective cosmological constant arises naturally, which may provide a richer description of the evolution of the Universe. Here we analyze the case of Starobisnky inflation and compare it with the original one.

  14. Albert Einstein, Cosmos and Religion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djokovic, V.; Grujic, P.

    2007-06-01

    We consider Einstein's attitude regarding religious as such, from both cosmological and epistemological points of view. An attempt to put it into a wider socio-historical perspective was made, with the emphasis on ethnic and religious background. It turns out that the great scientist was neither atheist nor believer in the orthodox sense and the closest labels one might stick to him in this respect would be pantheism/cosmism (ontological aspect) and agnosticism (epistemological aspect). His ideas on divine could be considered as a continuation of line traced by Philo of Alexandria, who himself followed Greek Stoics and (Neo-) Platonists and especially Baruch Spinoza. It turns out that Einstein's both scientific (rational aspects) and religious (intuitive aspects) thinking were deeply rooted in the Hellenic culture. His striving to unravel the secrets of the universe and the roots of cosmological order resembles much the ancient ideas of the role of knowledge in fathoming the divine as such, as ascribed to Gnostics.

  15. Quintessence background for 5D Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sushant G.; Amir, Muhammed; Maharaj, Sunil D.

    2017-08-01

    As we know that the Lovelock theory is an extension of the general relativity to the higher-dimensions, in this theory the first- and the second-order terms correspond to general relativity and the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, respectively. We obtain a 5D black hole solution in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity surrounded by the quintessence matter, and we also analyze their thermodynamical properties. Owing to the quintessence corrected black hole, the thermodynamic quantities have also been corrected except for the black hole entropy, and a phase transition is achievable. The phase transition for the thermodynamic stability is characterized by a discontinuity in the specific heat at r=r_C, with the stable (unstable) branch for r < (>) r_C.

  16. Modified gravity black holes and their observable shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    The shadows cast by non-rotating and rotating modified gravity black holes are determined by the two parameters mass and angular momentum . The sizes of the shadows cast by the spherically symmetric static modified gravity-Schwarzschild and modified gravity-Kerr rotating black holes increase significantly as the free parameter is increased from zero. The Event Horizon Telescope shadow image measurements can determine whether Einstein's general relativity is correct or whether it should be modified in the presence of strong gravitational fields.

  17. Gravity, antigravity and gravitational shielding in (2+1) dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accioly, Antonio; Helayël-Neto, José; Lobo, Matheus

    2009-07-01

    Higher-derivative terms are introduced into three-dimensional gravity, thereby allowing for a dynamical theory. The resulting system, viewed as a classical field model, is endowed with a novel and peculiar feature: its nonrelativistic potential describes three gravitational regimes. Depending on the choice of the parameters in the action functional, one obtains gravity, antigravity or gravitational shielding. Interesting enough, this potential is very similar, mutatis mutandis, to the potential for the interaction of two superconducting vortices. Furthermore, the gravitational deflection angle of a light ray, unlike that of Einstein gravity in (2+1) dimensions, is dependent on the impact parameter.

  18. Flat space (higher spin) gravity with chemical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, Michael; Grumiller, Daniel; Riegler, Max; Rosseel, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We introduce flat space spin-3 gravity in the presence of chemical potentials and discuss some applications to flat space cosmology solutions, their entropy, free energy and flat space orbifold singularity resolution. Our results include flat space Einstein gravity with chemical potentials as special case. We discover novel types of phase transitions between flat space cosmologies with spin-3 hair and show that the branch that continuously connects to spin-2 gravity becomes thermodynamically unstable for sufficiently large temperature or spin-3 chemical potential.

  19. Emergent Gravity from Vanishing Energy-Momentum Tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlich, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    We propose a constraint of vanishing energy-momentum tensor for quantum gravity. We are led to a metric-independent effective theory similar to the Dirac-Born-Infeld theory with vanishing gauge fields, modulated by a scalar potential. In the limit of a large number of fields, we explicitly demonstrate the existence of a composite massless spin-2 graviton in the spectrum that couples to matter as in Einstein gravity. We comment on the cosmological constant problem, the generalization to theories of fermions and gauge fields, and the relation to other approaches to quantum gravity. This work was supported by the NSF under Grant PHY-1519644.

  20. Surface singularities in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity.

    PubMed

    Pani, Paolo; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2012-12-21

    Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity was recently proposed as an alternative to general relativity that offers a resolution of spacetime singularities. The theory differs from Einstein's gravity only inside matter due to nondynamical degrees of freedom, and it is compatible with all current observations. We show that the theory is reminiscent of Palatini f(R) gravity and that it shares the same pathologies, such as curvature singularities at the surface of polytropic stars and unacceptable Newtonian limit. This casts serious doubt on its viability.

  1. Analogue Gravity.

    PubMed

    Barceló, Carlos; Liberati, Stefano; Visser, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Analogue gravity is a research programme which investigates analogues of general relativistic gravitational fields within other physical systems, typically but not exclusively condensed matter systems, with the aim of gaining new insights into their corresponding problems. Analogue models of (and for) gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. In this review article we will discuss the history, aims, results, and future prospects for the various analogue models. We start the discussion by presenting a particularly simple example of an analogue model, before exploring the rich history and complex tapestry of models discussed in the literature. The last decade in particular has seen a remarkable and sustained development of analogue gravity ideas, leading to some hundreds of published articles, a workshop, two books, and this review article. Future prospects for the analogue gravity programme also look promising, both on the experimental front (where technology is rapidly advancing) and on the theoretical front (where variants of analogue models can be used as a springboard for radical attacks on the problem of quantum gravity).

  2. Dyonic (A)dS black holes in Einstein-Born-Infeld theory in diverse dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shoulong; Lü, H.; Wei, Hao

    2016-07-01

    We study Einstein-Born-Infeld gravity and construct the dyonic (A)dS planar black holes in general even dimensions, that carry both the electric charge and magnetic fluxes along the planar space. In four dimensions, the solution can be constructed with also spherical and hyperbolic topologies. We study the black hole thermodynamics and obtain the first law. We also classify the singularity structure.

  3. Gravitational light deflection, time delay and frequency shift in Einstein-Aether theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai; Huang, Tian-Yi; Tang, Zheng-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Einstein-Aether gravity theory has been proven successful in passing experiments of different scales. Especially its Eddington parameters β and γ have the same numerical values as those in general relativity. Recently Xie and Huang (2008) have advanced this theory to a second post-Newtonian approximation for an N-body model and obtained an explicit metric when the bodies are point-like masses. This research considers light propagation in the above gravitational field, and explores the light deflection, time delay, frequency shift etc. The results will provide for future experiments in testing gravity theories.

  4. Affinity in electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Niels H H

    2009-06-01

    The journal Electrophoresis has greatly influenced my approaches to biomolecular affinity studies. The methods that I have chosen as my main tools to study interacting biomolecules--native gel and later capillary zone electrophoresis--have been the topic of numerous articles in Electrophoresis. Below, the role of the journal in the development and dissemination of these techniques and applications reviewed. Many exhaustive reviews on affinity electrophoresis and affinity CE have been published in the last few years and are not in any way replaced by the present deliberations that are focused on papers published by the journal.

  5. A dielectric affinity microbiosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Schultz, Jerome S.; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2010-01-01

    We present an affinity biosensing approach that exploits changes in dielectric properties of a polymer due to its specific, reversible binding with an analyte. The approach is demonstrated using a microsensor comprising a pair of thin-film capacitive electrodes sandwiching a solution of poly(acrylamide-ran-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid), a synthetic polymer with specific affinity to glucose. Binding with glucose induces changes in the permittivity of the polymer, which can be measured capacitively for specific glucose detection, as confirmed by experimental results at physiologically relevant concentrations. The dielectric affinity biosensing approach holds the potential for practical applications such as long-term continuous glucose monitoring.

  6. On the stability of Einstein static universe in doubly general relativity scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadi, M.; Heydarzade, Y.; Nozari, K.; Darabi, F.

    2015-12-01

    By presenting a relation between the average energy of the ensemble of probe photons and the energy density of the universe, in the context of gravity's rainbow or the doubly general relativity scenario, we introduce a rainbow FRW universe model. By analyzing the fixed points in the flat FRW model modified by two well-known rainbow functions, we find that the finite time singularity avoidance (i.e. Big Bang) may still remain as a problem. Then we follow the "emergent universe" scenario in which there is no beginning of time and consequently there is no Big-Bang singularity. Moreover, we study the impact of high energy quantum gravity modifications related to the gravity's rainbow on the stability conditions of an "Einstein static universe" (ESU). We find that independent of the particular rainbow function, the positive energy condition dictates a positive spatial curvature for the universe. In fact, without raising a nonphysical energy condition in the quantum gravity regimes, we can observe agreement between gravity's rainbow scenario and the basic assumption of the modern version of the "emergent universe". We show that in the absence and presence of an energy-dependent cosmological constant Λ (ɛ ), a stable Einstein static solution is available versus the homogeneous and linear scalar perturbations under the variety of the obtained conditions. Also, we explore the stability of ESU against the vector and tensor perturbations.

  7. Action growth in f (R ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang; Ying, Shuxuan

    2017-08-01

    Inspired by the recent "complexity=action " conjecture, we use the approach proposed by Lehner et al. to calculate the rate of the action of the Wheeler-DeWitt patch at late times for static uncharged and charged black holes in f (R ) gravity. Our results have the same expressions in terms of the mass, charge, and electrical potentials at the horizons of black holes as in Einstein's gravity. In the context of f (R ) gravity, the Lloyd bound is saturated for uncharged black holes but violated for charged black holes near extremality. For charged black holes far away from the ground states, the Lloyd bound is violated in four dimensions but satisfied in higher dimensions.

  8. Cosmological particle creation in conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Victor; Dokuchaev, Vyacheslav; Eroshenko, Yury

    2016-10-01

    We constructed the conformally invariant model for scalar particle creation induced by strong gravitational fields. Starting from the "usual" hydrodynamical description of the particle motion written in the Eulerian coordinates we substituted the particle number conservation law (which enters the formalism) by "the particle creation law", proportional to the square of the Weyl tensor (following the famous result by Ya. B. Zel`dovich and A. A. Starobinsky). Then, demanding the conformal invariance of the whole dynamical system, we have got both the (Weyl)-conformal gravity and the Einstein-Hilbert-dilaton gravity action integral. Thus, we obtained something like the induced gravity suggested first by A. D. Sakharov. It is shown that the resulting system is self-consistent. Some future developments of the theory are discussed in the concluding Chapter.

  9. Cosmological bounces in spatially flat FRW spacetimes in metric f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Niladri; Chakrabarty, Saikat Nil; Bhattacharya, Kaushik E-mail: snilch@iitk.ac.in

    2014-10-01

    The present work analyzes the various conditions in which there can be a bouncing universe solution in f(R) gravity. In the article an interesting method, to analyze the bouncing FRW solutions in a spatially flat universe using f(R) gravity models using an effective Einstein frame description of the process, is presented. The analysis shows that a cosmological bounce in the f(R) theory need not be described by an equivalent bounce in the Einstein frame description of the process where actually there may be no bounce at all. Nevertheless the Einstein frame description of the bouncing phenomena turns out to be immensely important as the dynamics of the bounce becomes amenable to logic based on general relativistic intuition. The theory of scalar cosmological perturbations in the bouncing universe models in f(R) theories has also been worked out in the Einstein frame.

  10. [Boltzmann's principle and Einstein's first quantum theories].

    PubMed

    Navarro Veguillas, Luis; Pérez Canals, Enric

    2002-01-01

    The crucial role played by statistical mechanics in Einstein's work on quantum theory has been repeatedly stressed. Nevertheless, in this paper we argue that Einstein's attitude to Boltzmann's principle was more complex than is usually understood. In fact, there are significant differences and nuances that in our opinion have yet to be sufficiently considered, in the various interpretations and uses Einstein made of this principle in his work on quantum theory, more specifically between 1905 and the First Solvay Conference, in 1911.

  11. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  12. Gravity Anomalies

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-15

    Analysis of radio tracking data have enabled maps of the gravity field of Mercury to be derived. In this image, overlain on a mosaic obtained by MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System and illuminated with a shape model determined from stereo-photoclinometry, Mercury's gravity anomalies are depicted in colors. Red tones indicate mass concentrations, centered on the Caloris basin (center) and the Sobkou region (right limb). Such large-scale gravitational anomalies are signatures of subsurface structure and evolution. The north pole is near the top of the sunlit area in this view. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19285

  13. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  14. Einstein as a Missionary of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renn, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    The paper reviews Einstein's engagement as a mediator and popularizer of science. It discusses the formative role of popular scientific literature for the young Einstein, showing that not only his broad scientific outlook but also his internationalist political views were shaped by these readings. Then, on the basis of recent detailed studies, Einstein's travels and their impact on the dissemination of relativity theory are examined. These activities as well as Einstein's own popular writings are interpreted in the context of his understanding of science as part of human culture.

  15. Topics in Theories of Quantum Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Perelstein, M.

    2005-04-05

    In this thesis, the author addresses several issues involving gravity. The first half of the thesis is devoted to studying quantum properties of Einstein gravity and its supersymmetric extensions in the perturbative regime. String theory suggests that perturbative scattering amplitudes in the theories of gravity are related to the amplitudes in gauge theories. This connection has been studied at classical (tree) level by Kawai, Lewellen and Tye. Here, they will explore the relationship between gravity and gauge theory at quantum (loop) level. This relationship, together with the cut-based approach to computing loop amplitudes, allow us to obtain new non-trivial results for quantum gravity. IN particular, they present two infinite sequences of one-loop n-graviton scattering amplitudes: the maximally helicity violating amplitudes in N = 8 supergravity, and the ''all-plus'' helicity amplitudes in Einstein gravity with any minimally coupled massless matter content. The results for n {le} 6 will be obtained by an explicit calculation, while those for n > 6 is inferred from the soft and collinear properties of the amplitudes. They also present an explicit expression for the two-loop contribution to the four-particle scattering amplitude in N = 8 supergravity, and observe a simple relation between this result and its counterpart in N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory. Furthermore, the simple structure of the two-particle unitarity cuts in these theories suggests that similar relations exist to all loop orders. If this is the case, the first ultraviolet divergence in N = 8 supergravity should appear at five loops, contrary to the earlier expectation of a three-loop counterterm.

  16. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  17. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  18. Induced gravity II: grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einhorn, Martin B.; Jones, D. R. Timothy

    2016-05-01

    As an illustration of a renormalizable, asymptotically-free model of induced gravity, we consider an SO(10) gauge theory interacting with a real scalar multiplet in the adjoint representation. We show that dimensional transmutation can occur, spontaneously breaking SO(10) to SU(5)⊗U(1), while inducing the Planck mass and a positive cosmological constant, all proportional to the same scale v. All mass ratios are functions of the values of coupling constants at that scale. Below this scale (at which the Big Bang may occur), the model takes the usual form of Einstein-Hilbert gravity in de Sitter space plus calculable corrections. We show that there exist regions of parameter space in which the breaking results in a local minimum of the effective action giving a positive dilaton (mass)2 from two-loop corrections associated with the conformal anomaly. Furthermore, unlike the singlet case we considered previously, some minima lie within the basin of attraction of the ultraviolet fixed point. Moreover, the asymptotic behavior of the coupling constants also lie within the range of convergence of the Euclidean path integral, so there is hope that there will be candidates for sensible vacua. Although open questions remain concerning unitarity of all such renormalizable models of gravity, it is not obvious that, in curved backgrounds such as those considered here, unitarity is violated. In any case, any violation that may remain will be suppressed by inverse powers of the reduced Planck mass.

  19. Gravity settling

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Hyman R.; Long, R. H.; Simone, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    Solids are separated from a liquid in a gravity settler provided with inclined solid intercepting surfaces to intercept the solid settling path to coalesce the solids and increase the settling rate. The intercepting surfaces are inverted V-shaped plates, each formed from first and second downwardly inclined upwardly curved intersecting conical sections having their apices at the vessel wall.

  20. Simulating Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  1. Simulating Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  2. The affine structure of gravitational theories: Symplectic groups and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Cirilo-Lombardo, D. J.; de Laurentis, Mariafelicia

    2014-09-01

    We give a geometrical description of gravitational theories from the viewpoint of symmetries and affine structure. We show how gravity, considered as a gauge theory, can be consistently achieved by the nonlinear realization of the conformal-affine group in an indirect manner: due to the partial isomorphism between CA(3, 1) and the centrally extended Sp( 8), we perform a nonlinear realization of the centrally extended (CE)Sp( 8) in its semi-simple version. In particular, starting from the bundle structure of gravity, we derive the conformal-affine Lie algebra and then, by the nonlinear realization, we define the coset field transformations, the Cartan forms and the inverse Higgs constraints. Finally, we discuss the geometrical Lagrangians where all the information on matter fields and their interactions can be contained.

  3. Studying planet populations with Einstein's blip.

    PubMed

    Dominik, Martin

    2010-08-13

    Although Einstein originally judged that 'there is no great chance of observing this phenomenon', the 'most curious effect' of the bending of starlight by the gravity of intervening foreground stars--now commonly referred to as 'gravitational microlensing'--has become one of the successfully applied techniques to detect planets orbiting stars other than the Sun, while being quite unlike any other. With more than 400 extra-solar planets known altogether, the discovery of a true sibling of our home planet seems to have become simply a question of time. However, in order to properly understand the origin of Earth, carrying all its various life forms, models of planet formation and orbital evolution need to be brought into agreement with the statistics of the full variety of planets like Earth and unlike Earth. Given the complementarity of the currently applied planet detection techniques, a comprehensive picture will only arise from a combination of their respective findings. Gravitational microlensing favours a range of orbital separations that covers planets whose orbital periods are too long to allow detection by other indirect techniques, but which are still too close to their host star to be detected by means of their emitted or reflected light. Rather than being limited to the Solar neighbourhood, a unique opportunity is provided for inferring a census of planets orbiting stars belonging to two distinct populations within the Milky Way, with a sensitivity not only reaching down to Earth mass, but even below, with ground-based observations. The capabilities of gravitational microlensing extend even to obtaining evidence of a planet orbiting a star in another galaxy.

  4. Strong binary pulsar constraints on Lorentz violation in gravity.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kent; Blas, Diego; Yunes, Nicolás; Barausse, Enrico

    2014-04-25

    Binary pulsars are excellent laboratories to test the building blocks of Einstein's theory of general relativity. One of these is Lorentz symmetry, which states that physical phenomena appear the same for all inertially moving observers. We study the effect of violations of Lorentz symmetry in the orbital evolution of binary pulsars and find that it induces a much more rapid decay of the binary's orbital period due to the emission of dipolar radiation. The absence of such behavior in recent observations allows us to place the most stringent constraints on Lorentz violation in gravity, thus verifying one of the cornerstones of Einstein's theory much more accurately than any previous gravitational observation.

  5. Intricacies of cosmological bounce in polynomial metric f(R) gravity for flat FLRW spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Chakrabarty, Saikat E-mail: snilch@iitk.ac.in

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the techniques for computing cosmological bounces in polynomial f(R) theories, whose order is more than two, for spatially flat FLRW spacetime. In these cases the conformally connected Einstein frame shows up multiple scalar potentials predicting various possibilities of cosmological evolution in the Jordan frame where the f(R) theory lives. We present a reasonable way in which one can associate the various possible potentials in the Einstein frame, for cubic f(R) gravity, to the cosmological development in the Jordan frame. The issue concerning the energy conditions in f(R) theories is presented. We also point out the very important relationships between the conformal transformations connecting the Jordan frame and the Einstein frame and the various instabilities of f(R) theory. All the calculations are done for cubic f(R) gravity but we hope the results are sufficiently general for higher order polynomial gravity.

  6. Ordinary matter in non-linear affine gauge theories of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Pinto, A.; Tiemblo, A.; Tresguerres, R.

    1995-06-01

    We present a general framework to include ordinary fermionic matter in the metric--affine gauge theories of gravity. It is based on a nonlinear gauge realization of the affine group, with the Lorentz group as the classification subgroup of the matter and gravitational fields.

  7. Einstein equations with fluctuating volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Quevedo, Hernando

    2017-07-01

    We develop a simple model to study classical fields on the background of a fluctuating spacetime volume. It is applied to formulate the stochastic Einstein equations with a perfect-fluid source. We investigate the particular case of a stochastic Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show that the resulting field equations can lead to solutions which avoid the initial big bang singularity. By interpreting the fluctuations as the result of the presence of a quantum spacetime, we conclude that classical singularities can be avoided even within a stochastic model that include quantum effects in a very simple manner.

  8. Albert Einstein:. Opportunity and Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    The year 1905 has been called Albert Einstein's "Annus Mirabilis." It was during that year that he caused revolutionary changes in man's primordial concepts about the physical world: space, time, energy, light and matter. How could a 26-year-old clerk, previously unknown, cause such profound conceptual changes, and thereby open the door to the era of modern scientific technological world? No one, of course, can answer that question. But one can, perhaps, analyze some factors that were essential to his stepping into such a historic role...

  9. Einstein-Cartan wormhole solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Ziaie, Amir Hadi

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, we investigate wormhole structures and the energy conditions supporting them in Einstein-Cartan theory. The matter content consists of a Weyssenhoff fluid along with an anisotropic matter which together generalize the anisotropic energy momentum tensor in general relativity (GR) to include spin effects. Assuming that the radial pressure and energy density obey a linear equation of state, we introduce exact asymptotically flat and anti-de-Sitter spacetimes that admit traversable wormholes and respect energy conditions. Such wormhole solutions are studied in detail for two specific forms for the redshift function, namely a constant redshift function and the one with power law dependency.

  10. The lagrangian of q- Poincar é gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Leonardo

    1994-05-01

    The gauging of the q- Poincar é algebra of L. Castellani [Differential calculus on ISOq( N), quantum Poincaré algebra and q-gravity, Torino preprint DFTT-70/93, hep-th 9312179] yields a non-commutative generalization of the Einstein-Cartan lagrangian. We prove its invariance under local q-Lorentz rotations and, up to a total derivative, under q-diffeomorphisms. The variations of the fields are given by their q-Lie derivative, in analogy with the q = 1 case. The algebra of q-Lie derivatives is shown to close with field dependent structure functions. The equations of motion are found, generalizing the Einstein equations and the zero-torsion condition.

  11. Einstein as a Missionary of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renn, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The paper reviews Einstein's engagement as a mediator and popularizer of science. It discusses the formative role of popular scientific literature for the young Einstein, showing that not only his broad scientific outlook but also his internationalist political views were shaped by these readings. Then, on the basis of recent detailed…

  12. Einstein as a Missionary of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renn, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The paper reviews Einstein's engagement as a mediator and popularizer of science. It discusses the formative role of popular scientific literature for the young Einstein, showing that not only his broad scientific outlook but also his internationalist political views were shaped by these readings. Then, on the basis of recent detailed…

  13. Books on Einstein--Collectors' Delight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoon, Koh Aik; Jalal, Azman; Abd-Shukor, R.; Yatim, Baharudin; Talib, Ibrahim Abu; Daud, Abdul Razak; Samat, Supian

    2009-01-01

    A survey of thirteen books on Einstein is presented. Its gives an idea on how much is written about the man and how frequent are the publications. The year 2005 saw the most publications. It is the centenary for the Miraculous Year. Interestingly some books can just sustain their readers' interest with just words. Einstein comes alive with the…

  14. What Einstein Can Teach Us about Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Denis

    2007-01-01

    People are more likely to associate Einstein with complex scientific theories and mathematical calculations than with education theory. In fact, Einstein's own experiences of schooling and his reflections on the meaning of life and the significance of education are profound and oddly relevant to the situation that pertains in England today. It is…

  15. Books on Einstein--Collectors' Delight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoon, Koh Aik; Jalal, Azman; Abd-Shukor, R.; Yatim, Baharudin; Talib, Ibrahim Abu; Daud, Abdul Razak; Samat, Supian

    2009-01-01

    A survey of thirteen books on Einstein is presented. Its gives an idea on how much is written about the man and how frequent are the publications. The year 2005 saw the most publications. It is the centenary for the Miraculous Year. Interestingly some books can just sustain their readers' interest with just words. Einstein comes alive with the…

  16. What Einstein Can Teach Us about Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Denis

    2007-01-01

    People are more likely to associate Einstein with complex scientific theories and mathematical calculations than with education theory. In fact, Einstein's own experiences of schooling and his reflections on the meaning of life and the significance of education are profound and oddly relevant to the situation that pertains in England today. It is…

  17. Constraining some Horndeski gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Chakraborty, Sumanta

    2017-02-01

    We discuss two spherically symmetric solutions admitted by the Horndeski (or scalar-tensor) theory in the context of Solar System and astrophysical scenarios. One of these solutions is derived for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, while the other originates from the coupling of the Gauss-Bonnet invariant with a scalar field. Specifically, we discuss the perihelion precession and the bending angle of light for these two different spherically symmetric spacetimes derived in Maeda and Dadhich [Phys. Rev. D 75, 044007 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.044007] and Sotiriou and Zhou [Phys. Rev. D 90, 124063 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.124063], respectively. The latter, in particular, applies only to black-hole spacetimes. We further delineate on the numerical bounds of relevant parameters of these theories from such computations.

  18. Bose-Einstein condensate strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2015-02-01

    We consider the possible existence of gravitationally bound general relativistic strings consisting of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) matter which is described, in the Newtonian limit, by the zero temperature time-dependent nonlinear Schrödinger equation (the Gross-Pitaevskii equation), with repulsive interparticle interactions. In the Madelung representation of the wave function, the quantum dynamics of the condensate can be formulated in terms of the classical continuity equation and the hydrodynamic Euler equations. In the case of a condensate with quartic nonlinearity, the condensates can be described as a gas with two pressure terms, the interaction pressure, which is proportional to the square of the matter density, and the quantum pressure, which is without any classical analogue, though, when the number of particles in the system is high enough, the latter may be neglected. Assuming cylindrical symmetry, we analyze the physical properties of the BEC strings in both the interaction pressure and quantum pressure dominated limits, by numerically integrating the gravitational field equations. In this way we obtain a large class of stable stringlike astrophysical objects, whose basic parameters (mass density and radius) depend sensitively on the mass and scattering length of the condensate particle, as well as on the quantum pressure of the Bose-Einstein gas.

  19. Optical Devices for Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Gaaloul, Naceur; Jaouadi, Amine; Telmini, Mourad; Pruvost, Laurence; Charron, Eric

    2007-09-19

    The manipulation of cold atoms with optical fields is a very promising technique for a variety of applications ranging from laser cooling and trapping to coherent atom transport and matter wave interferometry. Optical fields have also been proposed as interesting tools for quantum information processing with cold atoms. In this paper, we present a theoretical study of the dynamics of a cold {sup 87}Rb atomic cloud falling in the gravity field in the presence of two crossing dipole guides. The cloud is either deflected or split between the two branches of this guide. We explore the possibilities of optimization of this device and present preliminary results obtained in the case of zero-temperature dilute Bose-Einstein condensates.

  20. Generic features of Einstein-Aether black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, Takashi; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2008-01-15

    We reconsider spherically symmetric black hole solutions in Einstein-Aether theory with the condition that this theory has identical parametrized post-Newtonian parameters as those for general relativity, which is the main difference from the previous research. In contrast with previous study, we allow superluminal propagation of a spin-0 Aether-gravity wave mode. As a result, we obtain black holes having a spin-0 'horizon' inside an event horizon. We allow a singularity at a spin-0 horizon since it is concealed by the event horizon. If we allow such a configuration, the kinetic term of the Aether field can be large enough for black holes to be significantly different from Schwarzschild black holes with respect to Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass, innermost stable circular orbit, Hawking temperature, and so on. We also discuss whether or not the above features can be seen in more generic vector-tensor theories.

  1. Albert Einstein's Magic Mountain: An Aarau Education*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    For economic reasons, the electrotechnical factory J. Einstein & Cie. (co-owned by Albert Einstein's father Hermann) had to be closed in the summer of 1894. While Albert's parents emigrated to Italy to build a new existence, he remained in Munich to complete his studies at the Gymnasium. Left behind, however, he had a difficult time with what he considered the rigid educational practices at the Munich Luitpold-Gymnasium and quit without a diploma. The present article discusses Einstein's richly winding path to the Aargau Cantonal School (Switzerland), especially its history and educational philosophy during the time of his stay in Aarau. There, Einstein met some outstanding teachers, who could serve him as models of scholars and human beings. In spite of Einstein's distinct independence of mind, these personalities may well have had a significant influence on the alignment of his inner compass.

  2. Emergent scenario in the Einstein-Cartan theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qihong; Wu, Puxun; Yu, Hongwei

    2015-05-01

    We study the emergent scenario, which is proposed to avoid the big bang singularity, in the Einstein-Cartan (EC) theory with a positive cosmological constant and a perfect fluid by analyzing the existence and stability of the Einstein static (ES) solutions. We find that there is no stable ES solution for a spatially flat or open universe. However, for a spatially closed universe, the stable ES solution does exist, and in the same existence parameter regions, there also exists an unstable one. With the slow decrease of the equation of state w of the perfect fluid, the stable and unstable critical points move close gradually and coincide once w reaches a critical value, so that the stable critical point becomes an unstable one. As a result, if w approaches a constant at t →-∞, the universe can stay at the stable ES state past eternally, and furthermore it can naturally exit from this state and evolve into an inflationary era if w decreases slowly as time goes forward. Therefore, the emergent scenario that avoids the big bang singularity can be successfully implemented in the EC theory of gravity.

  3. Atom Interferometry on Sounding Rockets with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Stephan T.; Becker, Dennis; Lachmann, Maike D.; Herr, Waldemar; Rasel, Ernst M.; Quantus Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    One of the fundamental postulates of our description of nature is the universality of free fall, stating that the force exerted upon an object due to gravity is independent of its constitution. A precise test of this assumption is the comparison of the free fall of two ultra-cold clouds of different atomic species via atom interferometry. Since the sensitivity of the measurement is proportional to the square of the propagation time in the interferometer, it can be increased by performing the experiments in microgravity. In order to fully utilize the potential of the experiments the usage of a Bose-Einstein-Condensate as the initial state is necessary, because it is characterized by a small initial size and a low expansion velocity. As a step towards the transfer of such a system into space three sounding rocket missions with atom interferometers are currently being prepared. The launch of the first mission, aimed at the first demonstration of a Bose-Einstein-Condensate in space and an atom interferometer based on it is planned for 2016 from ESRANGE, Sweden. It will be followed by two more missions that extend the scientific goals to the creation of degenerate mixtures and dual-species atom interferometry. This research is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under Grant Number DLR 50 1131-37.

  4. Cosmological perturbation theory in generalized Einstein-Aether models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Pace, Francesco; Trinh, Damien

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations in models of dark energy described by a timelike unit normalized vector field specified by a general function F (K ), so-called generalized Einstein-Aether models. First we study the background dynamics of such models via a designer approach in an attempt to model this theory as dark energy. We find that only one specific form of this designer approach matches Λ CDM at background order, and we also obtain a differential equation which F (K ) must satisfy for general w CDM cosmologies, where CDM refers to cold dark matter. We also present the equations of state for perturbations in generalized Einstein-Aether models, which completely parametrize these models at the level of linear perturbations. A generic feature of modified gravity models is that they introduce new degrees of freedom. By fully eliminating these we are able to express the gauge invariant entropy perturbation and the scalar, vector, and tensor anisotropic stresses in terms of the perturbed fluid variables and metric perturbations only. These can then be used to study the evolution of perturbations in the scalar, vector, and tensor sectors, and we use these to evolve the Newtonian gravitational potentials.

  5. Stochastic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, D. K.; Moreau, William

    1995-08-01

    We investigate stochastic gravity as a potentially fruitful avenue for studying quantum effects in gravity. Following the approach of stochastic electrodynamics ( sed), as a representation of the quantum gravity vacuum we construct a classical state of isotropic random gravitational radiation, expressed as a spin-2 field,h µυ (x), composed of plane waves of random phase on a flat spacetime manifold. Requiring Lorentz invariance leads to the result that the spectral composition function of the gravitational radiation,h(ω), must be proportional to 1/ω 2. The proportionality constant is determined by the Planck condition that the energy density consist ofħω/2 per normal mode, and this condition sets the amplitude scale of the random gravitational radiation at the order of the Planck length, giving a spectral composition functionh(ω) =√16πc 2Lp/ω2. As an application of stochastic gravity, we investigate the Davies-Unruh effect. We calculate the two-point correlation function (R iojo(Oτ-δτ/2)R kolo(O,τ+δτ/2)) of the measureable geodesic deviation tensor field,R iojo, for two situations: (i) at a point detector uniformly accelerating through the random gravitational radiation, and (ii) at an inertial detector in a heat bath of the random radiation at a finite temperature. We find that the two correlation functions agree to first order inaδτ/c provided that the temperature and acceleration satisfy the relationkT=ħa/2πc.

  6. Einstein Ring in Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, Rémi Cabanac and his European colleagues have discovered an amazing cosmic mirage, known to scientists as an Einstein Ring. This cosmic mirage, dubbed FOR J0332-3557, is seen towards the southern constellation Fornax (the Furnace), and is remarkable on at least two counts. First, it is a bright, almost complete Einstein ring. Second, it is the farthest ever found. ESO PR Photo 20a/05 ESO PR Photo 20a/05 Deep Image of a Region in Fornax (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 434 pix - 60k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 867 pix - 276k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1859 x 2015 pix - 3.8M] ESO PR Photo 20b/05 ESO PR Photo 20b/05 Zoom-in on the Newly Found Einstein Ring (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 575 pix - 168k] [Normal - JPEG: 630 x 906 pix - 880k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 20a/05 is a composite image taken in two bands (B and R) with VLT/FORS1 of a small portion of the sky (field-of-view 7x7' or 1/15th of the area of the full moon). The faintest object seen in the image has a magnitude 26, that is, it is 100 million times fainter than what can be observed with the unaided eye. The bright elliptical galaxy on the lower-left quadrant is a dwarf galaxy part of a large nearby cluster in the Fornax constellation. As for all deep images of the sky, this field shows a variety of objects, the brightest ponctual sources being stars from our Galaxy. By far the field is dominated by thousands of faint background galaxies the colours of which are related to the age of their dominant stellar population, their dust content and their distance. The newly found Einstein ring is visible in the top right part of the image. ESO PR Photo 20b/05 zooms-in on the position of the newly found cosmic mirage. ESO PR Photo 20c/05 ESO PR Photo 20c/05 Einstein Ring in Distant Universe (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 584 pix - 104k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1168 pix - 292k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1502 x 2192 pix - 684k] Caption of ESO PR Photo 20c/05: The left image is magnified and centred

  7. Phenomenological Model of Multiphase Cosmological Scenario in Theory of Induced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaripov, F. Sh.

    2017-03-01

    Equations that describe the theory have solutions that can both match with the solutions of the standard theory of gravity as well as can differ from it. This is due to the fact that the fundamental constants of the theory, such as gravitational and cosmological, can evolve over time and also depend on the coordinates. Thus, in a rather general case the theory describes the two systems (stages): Einstein and evolving. This process is similar to the phenomenon of phase transition, where different phases (Einstein gravity system, but with different constants) transit into each other. This article is a continuation of the author research with application to the cosmological model.

  8. The Canarias Einstein ring: a newly discovered optical Einstein ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettinelli, M.; Simioni, M.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Cassisi, S.; Walker, A. R.; Piotto, G.; Valdes, F.

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of an optical Einstein ring in the Sculptor constellation, IAC J010127-334319, in the vicinity of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. It is an almost complete ring (˜300°) with a diameter of ˜4.5 arcsec. The discovery was made serendipitously from inspecting Dark Energy Camera (DECam) archive imaging data. Confirmation of the object nature has been obtained by deriving spectroscopic redshifts for both components, lens and source, from observations at the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) with the spectrograph OSIRIS. The lens, a massive early-type galaxy, has a redshift of z = 0.581, while the source is a starburst galaxy with redshift of z = 1.165. The total enclosed mass that produces the lensing effect has been estimated to be Mtot = (1.86 ± 0.23) × 1012 M⊙.

  9. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  10. Gauge invariance of quantum gravity in the causal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schorn, Ivo

    1997-03-01

    We investigate gauge invariance of perturbative quantum gravity without matter fields in the causal Epstein - Glaser approach. This approach uses free fields only so that all objects of the theory are mathematically well defined. The first-order graviton self-couplings are obtained from the Einstein - Hilbert Lagrangian written in terms of Goldberg variables and expanded to lowest order on the flat Minkowski background metric (linearized Einstein theory). Similar to Yang - Mills theory, gauge invariance to first order requires an additional coupling to fermionic ghost fields. For second-order tree graphs, gauge invariance generates four-graviton normalization terms, which agree exactly with the next order of the expansion of the Einstein - Hilbert Lagrangian. Gauge invariance of the ghost sector is then examined in detail. It is stressed that, despite some formal similarities, the concept of operator gauge invariance used in the causal method is different from the conventional BRS-invariance commonly used in the literature.

  11. Scaling solutions for dilaton quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henz, T.; Pawlowski, J. M.; Wetterich, C.

    2017-06-01

    Scaling solutions for the effective action in dilaton quantum gravity are investigated within the functional renormalization group approach. We find numerical solutions that connect ultraviolet and infrared fixed points as the ratio between scalar field and renormalization scale k is varied. In the Einstein frame the quantum effective action corresponding to the scaling solutions becomes independent of k. The field equations derived from this effective action can be used directly for cosmology. Scale symmetry is spontaneously broken by a non-vanishing cosmological value of the scalar field. For the cosmology corresponding to our scaling solutions, inflation arises naturally. The effective cosmological constant becomes dynamical and vanishes asymptotically as time goes to infinity.

  12. SO(2, 3) noncommutative gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, M.; Radovanović, V.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper the noncommutative gravity is treated as a gauge theory of the non-commutative SO(2, 3)★ group, while the noncommutativity is canonical. The Seiberg-Witten (SW) map is used to express noncommutative fields in terms of the corresponding commutative fields. The commutative limit of the model is the Einstein-Hilbert action plus the cosmological term and the topological Gauss-Bonnet term. We calculate the second order correction to this model and obtain terms that are zeroth, first, ... and fourth power of the curvature tensor. Finally, we discuss physical consequences of those correction terms in the limit of big cosmological constant.

  13. Tensor f (R ) theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowiak, Tomasz

    2017-08-01

    I propose an alternative f (R ) theory of gravity constructed by applying the function f directly to the Ricci tensor instead of the Ricci scalar. The main goal of this study is to derive the resulting modified Einstein equations for the metric case with the Levi-Cività connection, as well as for the general nonmetric connection with torsion. The modification is then applied to the Robertson-Walker metric so that the cosmological evolution corresponding to the standard model can be studied. An appealing feature is that even in the vacuum case, scenarios without initial singularity and exponential expansion can be recovered. Finally, formulas for possible observational tests are given.

  14. Conformal gravity and the flatness problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannheim, Philip D.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation and matter-dominated cosmologies associated with fourth-order conformal Weyl gravity, a theory which is currently being explored as a candidate alternative to the standard second-order Einstein theory, are presented. The theory naturally yields an open though nonetheless recollapsing universe which can even oscillate indefinitely, which appears to possess no flatness problem, which has a cosmology which could potentially be created out of nothing, which is singularity free, and which does not appear to require any cosmological dark matter.

  15. Curvature and gravity actions for matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Daniel N.; Steinacker, Harold

    2010-08-01

    We show how gravitational actions, in particular the Einstein-Hilbert action, can be obtained from additional terms in Yang-Mills matrix models. This is consistent with recent results on induced gravitational actions in these matrix models, realizing spacetime as four-dimensional brane solutions. It opens up the possibility for a controlled non-perturbative description of gravity through simple matrix models, with interesting perspectives for the problem of vacuum energy. The relation with UV/IR mixing and non-commutative gauge theory is discussed.

  16. Thermodynamics of 5D dilaton-gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Megias, E.

    2011-05-23

    We calculate the free energy, spatial string tension and Polyakov loop of the gluon plasma using the dilaton potential of Ref. [1] in the dilaton-gravity theory of AdS/QCD. The free energy is computed from the Black Hole solutions of the Einstein equations in two ways: first, from the Bekenstein-Hawking proportionality of the entropy with the area of the horizon, and secondly from the Page-Hawking computation of the free energy. The finite temperature behaviour of the spatial string tension and Polyakov loop follow from the corresponding string theory in AdS{sub 5}. Comparison with lattice data is made.

  17. Gravity, black holes, and the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolson, I.

    1981-01-01

    The book treats current understandings of the nature and properties of gravity, with particular emphasis on its role in the physics of black holes and the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. The development of modern ideas on force, motion and gravity is traced from the systems of Aristotle and Ptolemy through the work of Copernicus, Galileo and Kepler to Newton's law of universal gravitation and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Particular attention is then given to the role of gravity in stellar motions and to the phenomena determined by the immense gravitational forces associated with bodies of such great density, including relativistic effects, tidal forces, space-time effects, event horizons, rotation, mass and electrical charge, the existence of naked singularities and white holes, and black-hole thermodynamics. The existence of actual black holes in the universe is considered, and various black-hole candidates in the Galaxy, quasars and galactic nuclei are indicated. The role of gravity in cosmology is then examined, with attention given to the implications of general relativity, the Hubble law, the age of the universe, the density of the universe and its eventual fate. Possible alternative to general relativity as a theory of gravitation are considered, including theories of variable gravitational constant, grand unified theories, and quantum gravity.

  18. Gravity, black holes and the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolson, I.

    The book treats current understandings of the nature and properties of gravity, with particular emphasis on its role in the physics of black holes and the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. The development of modern ideas on force, motion and gravity is traced from the systems of Aristotle and Ptolemy through the work of Copernicus, Galileo and Kepler to Newton's law of universal gravitation and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Particular attention is then given to the role of gravity in stellar motions and to the phenomena determined by the immense gravitational forces associated with bodies of such great density, including relativistic effects, tidal forces, space-time effects, event horizons, rotation, mass and electrical charge, the existence of naked singularities and white holes, and black-hole thermodynamics. The existence of actual black holes in the universe is considered, and various black-hole candidates in the Galaxy, quasars and galactic nuclei are indicated. The role of gravity in cosmology is then examined, with attention given to the implications of general relativity, the Hubble law, the age of the universe, the density of the universe and its eventual fate. Possible alternative to general relativity as a theory of gravitation are considered, including theories of variable gravitational constant, grand unified theories, and quantum gravity.

  19. Non-thermal Einstein relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichardaz, Robin; Pumir, Alain; Wilkinson, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We consider a particle moving with equation of motion \\dot x=f(t) , where f(t) is a random function with statistics which are independent of x and t, with a finite drift velocity v=< f> and in the presence of a reflecting wall. Far away from the wall, translational invariance implies that the stationary probability distribution is P(x)∼ \\exp(α x) . A classical example of a problem of this type is sedimentation equilibrium, where α is determined by temperature. In this work we do not introduce a thermal reservoir and α is determined from the equation of motion. We consider a general approach to determining α which is not always in agreement with Einstein's relation between the mean velocity and the diffusion coefficient. We illustrate our results with a model inspired by the Boltzmann equation.

  20. A centennial gift from Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswalt, T. D.

    2017-06-01

    The 1919 detection of the apparent displacement of background stars near the edge of the eclipsed Sun's disk provided one of the first convincing proofs of Einstein's theory of general relativity (1, 2). Almost 100 years later, Sahu et al. report on page 1046 of this issue the first measurement of the gravitational deflection of starlight by a star other than the Sun (3). Using the superior angular resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), they measured shifts in the apparent position of a distant background star as a nearby dense stellar remnant called a white dwarf passed almost in front of it in 2014. Because of the relative distances involved, the deflections they observed were about 1000 times smaller than those seen in 1919, but also in agreement with general relativity theory.

  1. Entanglement Equilibrium and the Einstein Equation.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Ted

    2016-05-20

    A link between the semiclassical Einstein equation and a maximal vacuum entanglement hypothesis is established. The hypothesis asserts that entanglement entropy in small geodesic balls is maximized at fixed volume in a locally maximally symmetric vacuum state of geometry and quantum fields. A qualitative argument suggests that the Einstein equation implies the validity of the hypothesis. A more precise argument shows that, for first-order variations of the local vacuum state of conformal quantum fields, the vacuum entanglement is stationary if and only if the Einstein equation holds. For nonconformal fields, the same conclusion follows modulo a conjecture about the variation of entanglement entropy.

  2. Rediscovering Einstein's legacy: How Einstein anticipates Kuhn and Feyerabend on the nature of science.

    PubMed

    Oberheim, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend promote incommensurability as a central component of their conflicting accounts of the nature of science. This paper argues that in so doing, they both develop Albert Einstein's views, albeit in different directions. Einstein describes scientific revolutions as conceptual replacements, not mere revisions, endorsing 'Kant-on-wheels' metaphysics in light of 'world change'. Einstein emphasizes underdetermination of theory by evidence, rational disagreement in theory choice, and the non-neutrality of empirical evidence. Einstein even uses the term 'incommensurable' specifically to apply to challenges posed to comparatively evaluating scientific theories in 1949, more than a decade before Kuhn and Feyerabend. This analysis shows how Einstein anticipates substantial components of Kuhn and Feyerabend's views, and suggests that there are strong reasons to suspect that Kuhn and Feyerabend were directly inspired by Einstein's use of the term 'incommensurable', as well as his more general methodological and philosophical reflections.

  3. Dispersion relation and surface gravity of universal horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, ChiKun; Liu, ChangQing

    2017-05-01

    In Einstein-aether theory, violating Lorentz invariance permits some super-luminal communications, and the universal horizon can trap excitations traveling at arbitrarily high velocities. To better understand the nature of these universal horizons, we first modify the ray tracing method, and then use it to study their surface gravity in charged Einstein-aether black hole spacetime. Instead of the previous result by Cropp et al., our results show that the surface gravity of the universal horizon is dependent on the specific dispersion relation, K UH = 2( z - 1) K uh/ z, where z denotes the power of the leading term in the superluminal dispersion relation, characterizing different species of particles. And the associated Hawking temperatures also are different with z. These findings, which coincide with those derived by the tunneling method, provide some full understanding of black hole thermodynamics in Lorentz-violating theories.

  4. Gravitational perfect fluid collapse in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, G.; Tahir, M.

    2017-08-01

    The Einstein Gauss-Bonnet theory of gravity is the low-energy limit of heterotic super-symmetric string theory. This paper deals with gravitational collapse of a perfect fluid in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity by considering the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric. For this purpose, the closed form of the exact solution of the equations of motion has been determined by using the conservation of the stress-energy tensor and the condition of marginally bound shells. It has been investigated that the presence of a Gauss-Bonnet coupling term α >0 and the pressure of the fluid modifies the structure and time formation of singularity. In this analysis a singularity forms earlier than a horizon, so the end state of the collapse is a naked singularity depending on the initial data. But this singularity is weak and timelike, which goes against the investigation of general relativity.

  5. Energy conditions of non-singular black hole spacetimes in conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshmatov, Bobir; Bambi, Cosimo; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2017-08-01

    Conformal gravity can elegantly solve the problem of spacetime singularities present in Einstein's gravity. For every physical spacetime, there is an infinite family of conformally equivalent singularity-free metrics. In the unbroken phase, every non-singular metric is equivalent and can be used to infer the physical properties of the spacetime. In the broken phase, a Higgs-like mechanism should select a certain vacuum, which thus becomes the physical one. However, in the absence of the complete theoretical framework we do not know how to select the right vacuum. In this paper, we study the energy conditions of non-singular black hole spacetimes obtained in conformal gravity assuming they are solutions of Einstein's gravity with an effective energy-momentum tensor. We check whether such conditions can be helpful to select the vacuum of the broken phase.

  6. Non-Schwarzschild black-hole metric in four dimensional higher derivative gravity: Analytical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkotas, K. D.; Konoplya, R. A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2017-09-01

    Higher derivative extensions of Einstein gravity are important within the string theory approach to gravity and as alternative and effective theories of gravity. H. Lü, A. Perkins, C. Pope, and K. Stelle [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 171601 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.171601] found a numerical solution describing a spherically symmetric non-Schwarzschild asymptotically flat black hole in Einstein gravity with added higher derivative terms. Using the general and quickly convergent parametrization in terms of the continued fractions, we represent this numerical solution in the analytical form, which is accurate not only near the event horizon or far from the black hole, but in the whole space. Thereby, the obtained analytical form of the metric allows one to study easily all the further properties of the black hole, such as thermodynamics, Hawking radiation, particle motion, accretion, perturbations, stability, quasinormal spectrum, etc. Thus, the found analytical approximate representation can serve in the same way as an exact solution.

  7. Gravity Virgins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benish, Richard

    2008-05-01

    As an exercise in imagining a first encounter with gravity, let's begin with the barest gravitational circumstance. On a planet-sized spherical mass we find rigid poles extending to astronomical distances. At regular intervals along each pole there are Instrument Stations containing a clock, an accelerometer and light senders and receivers. Now imagine a civilization (the RC's) that has evolved in a huge self-sustaining Rotating Cylinder far removed from the sphere or any other astronomical body. The RC's are totally ignorant of gravity but understand well light propagation and the effect of motion on clocks, lengths, etc. Motion is sacred to the RC's because they know they'd die if their cylinder stopped rotating. Their clocks are synchronized so as to reflect the anisotropy of light sent in opposite directions along the cylinder's wall. When they set out to explore the Universe, they come upon the top of one of our tall poles. The RC's inspect the instruments, take data and leave their rocket off except when, in the nick of time, they turn it back on to navigate a soft landing. In their attempt to make sense of their experience, will they prefer a hypothesis resembling General Relativity or a hypothesis more like the one found at GravitationLab.com?

  8. Gravity Probe B Assembled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being assembled at the Sunnyvale, California location of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  9. Gravity: A gauge theory perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nester, James M.; Chen, Chiang-Mei

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of a generally covariant theory is under-determined. One hundred years ago such dynamics had never before been considered; its ramifications were perplexing, its future important role for all the fundamental interactions under the name gauge principle could not be foreseen. We recount some history regarding Einstein, Hilbert, Klein and Noether and the novel features of gravitational energy that led to Noether’s two theorems. Under-determined evolution is best revealed in the Hamiltonian formulation. We developed a covariant Hamiltonian formulation. The Hamiltonian boundary term gives covariant expressions for the quasi-local energy, momentum and angular momentum. Gravity can be considered as a gauge theory of the local Poincaré group. The dynamical potentials of the Poincaré gauge theory of gravity are the frame and the connection. The spacetime geometry has in general both curvature and torsion. Torsion naturally couples to spin; it could have a significant magnitude and yet not be noticed, except on a cosmological scale where it could have significant effects.

  10. Affine generalization of the Komar complex of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2001-02-01

    On the basis of the ``on shell'' Noether identities of the metric-affine gauge approach of gravity, an affine superpotential is derived which comprises the energy- and angular-momentum content of exact solutions. In the special case of general relativity (GR) or its teleparallel equivalent, the Komar or Freud complex, respectively, are recovered. Applying this to the spontaneously broken anti-de Sitter gauge model of McDowell and Mansouri with an induced Euler term automatically yields the correct mass and spin of the Kerr-AdS solution of GR with a (induced) cosmological constant without the factor two discrepancy of the Komar formula.

  11. EINSTEIN'S SIGNATURE IN COSMOLOGICAL LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Bruni, Marco; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Wands, David

    2014-10-10

    We show how the nonlinearity of general relativity generates a characteristic nonGaussian signal in cosmological large-scale structure that we calculate at all perturbative orders in a large-scale limit. Newtonian gravity and general relativity provide complementary theoretical frameworks for modeling large-scale structure in ΛCDM cosmology; a relativistic approach is essential to determine initial conditions, which can then be used in Newtonian simulations studying the nonlinear evolution of the matter density. Most inflationary models in the very early universe predict an almost Gaussian distribution for the primordial metric perturbation, ζ. However, we argue that it is the Ricci curvature of comoving-orthogonal spatial hypersurfaces, R, that drives structure formation at large scales. We show how the nonlinear relation between the spatial curvature, R, and the metric perturbation, ζ, translates into a specific nonGaussian contribution to the initial comoving matter density that we calculate for the simple case of an initially Gaussian ζ. Our analysis shows the nonlinear signature of Einstein's gravity in large-scale structure.

  12. Superstrings:. why Einstein would Love Spaghetti in Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. James

    2001-09-01

    There are some questions in physics that until recently could not be answered due to the lack of a complete theory of gravitation. Some of these were, "How does the force of gravity work on objects a billion billions times smaller than the hydrogen atom?" or "What was the universe like, the very instant after the BIG BANG?" or "What is the complete physics of Black Holes?" In these arenas, the effects of gravity and all the other forces must be very different from those seen in everyday experience. Einstein suspected this and it led him to the belief that there must exist a "unified field theory" to describe our world at the tiniest scales. He spent the last forty years of his life unsuccessfully searching for this construction. More recently there appeared new mathematical models called "superstring theory" that have apparently succeeded in reaching his goal. This talk is an introduction to the idea of superstrings and heterotic strings as well as a progress report on the newest frontiers of this subject, "M-theory."

  13. Black hole thermodynamics in MOdified Gravity (MOG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mureika, Jonas R.; Moffat, John W.; Faizal, Mir

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the thermodynamical properties of black holes in a modified theory of gravity, which was initially proposed to obtain correct dynamics of galaxies and galaxy clusters without dark matter. The thermodynamics of non-rotating and rotating black hole solutions resembles similar solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with the electric charge being replaced by a new mass dependent gravitational charge Q =√{ αGN } M. This new mass dependent charge modifies the effective Newtonian constant from GN to G =GN (1 + α), and this in turn critically affects the thermodynamics of the black holes. We also investigate the thermodynamics of regular solutions, and explore the limiting case when no horizons forms. So, it is possible that the modified gravity can lead to the absence of black hole horizons in our universe. Finally, we analyze corrections to the thermodynamics of a non-rotating black hole and obtain the usual logarithmic correction term.

  14. Testing conformal gravity with astrophysical black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Cao, Zheng; Modesto, Leonardo

    2017-03-01

    Weyl conformal symmetry can solve the problem the spacetime singularities present in Einstein's gravity. In a recent paper, two of us have found a singularity-free rotating black hole solution in conformal gravity. In addition to the mass M and the spin angular momentum J of the black hole, the new solution has a new parameter, L , which here we consider to be proportional to the black hole mass. Since the solution is conformally equivalent to the Kerr metric, photon trajectories are unchanged, while the structure of an accretion disk around a black hole is affected by the value of the parameter L . In this paper, we show that x-ray data of astrophysical black holes require L /M <1.2 .

  15. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  16. Chaotic inflation in higher derivative gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrzakul, Shynaray; Myrzakulov, Ratbay; Sebastiani, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate chaotic inflation from a scalar field subjected to a potential in the framework of -gravity, where we add a correction to Einstein's gravity based on a function of the square of the Ricci scalar , the contraction of the Ricci tensor , and the contraction of the Riemann tensor . The Gauss-Bonnet case is also discussed. We give the general formalism of inflation, deriving the slow-roll parameters, the -fold number, and the spectral indices. Several explicit examples are furnished; namely, we will consider the cases of a massive scalar field and a scalar field with quartic potential and some power-law function of the curvature invariants under investigation in the gravitational action of the theory. A viable approach to inflation according with observations is analyzed.

  17. Mimicking dark matter in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Massimiliano

    2017-06-01

    Since the rediscovery of Horndeski gravity, a lot of work has been devoted to the exploration of its properties, especially in the context of dark energy. However, one sector of this theory, namely the one containing the coupling of the Einstein tensor to the kinetic term of the scalar field, shows some surprising features in the construction of black holes and neutron stars. Motivated by these new results, I explore the possibility that this sector of Horndeski gravity can mimic cold dark matter at cosmological level and also explain the flattening of galactic rotation curves. I will show that, in principle, it is possible to achieve both goals with at least two scalar fields and a minimal set of assumptions.

  18. Generalized parallel transport and coordinate transformations in f( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dil, Emre

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we study the generalized parallel transport of vectors and generalized coordinate transformations between generalized reference frames described in f( R) gravity. After constructing the generalized parallel transport relations and the generalized transformation laws in f( R) gravity, we discuss the implications of these laws and present the differences between f( R) gravity and Einstein's general relativity. For a constant Ricci scalar case with de Sitter-like behavior for a de Sitter space-time, we find that the parallel transport is invariant under the conformal transformation from general relativity to f( R) gravity. However, for a non-de Sitter space-time, parallel transport differs by an extra field term.

  19. Gravitational collapse of massless scalar field in f (R ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng-Yong; Tang, Zi-Yu; Wang, Bin

    2016-11-01

    We study the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of massless scalar matter field in asymptotic flat spacetime in the Starobinsky R2 gravity, one specific model in the f (R ) gravity. In the Einstein frame of f (R ) gravity, an additional scalar field arises due to the conformal transformation. We find that in addition to the usual competition between gravitational energy and kinetic energy in the process of gravitational collapse, the new scalar field brought by the conformal transformation adds one more competing force in the dynamical system. The dynamical competition can be controlled by tuning the amplitudes of the initial perturbations of the new scalar field and the matter field. To understand the physical reasons behind these phenomena, we analyze the gravitational potential behavior and calculate the Ricci scalar at center with the change of initial amplitudes of perturbations. We find rich physics on the formation of black holes through gravitational collapse in f (R ) gravity.

  20. Cosmological data analysis of f(R) gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Gironés, Z.; Marchetti, A.; Mena, O.; Peña-Garay, C.; Rius, N. E-mail: alida.marchetti@unimi.it E-mail: carlos.penya@ific.uv.es

    2010-11-01

    A class of well-behaved modified gravity models with long enough matter domination epoch and a late-time accelerated expansion is confronted with SNIa, CMB, SDSS, BAO and H(z) galaxy ages data, as well as current measurements of the linear growth of structure. We show that the combination of geometrical probes and growth data exploited here allows to rule out f(R) gravity models, in particular, the logarithmic of curvature model. We also apply solar system tests to the models in agreement with the cosmological data. We find that the exponential of the inverse of the curvature model satisfies all the observational tests considered and we derive the allowed range of parameters. Current data still allows for small deviations of Einstein gravity. Future, high precision growth data, in combination with expansion history data, will be able to distinguish tiny modifications of standard gravity from the ΛCDM model.

  1. Aberration and the Fundamental Speed of Gravity in the Jovian Deflection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, S. M.; Fomalont, E. B.

    2006-08-01

    We describe our explicit Lorentz-invariant solution of the Einstein and null geodesic equations for the deflection experiment of 2002 September 8 when a massive moving body, Jupiter, passed within 3.7' of a line-of-sight to a distant quasar. We develop a general relativistic framework which shows that our measurement of the retarded position of a moving light-ray deflecting body (Jupiter) by making use of the gravitational time delay of quasar's radio wave is equivalent to comparison of the relativistic laws of the Lorentz transformation for gravity and light. Because, according to Einstein, the Lorentz transformation of gravity field variables must depend on a fundamental speed c, its measurement through the retarded position of Jupiter in the gravitational time delay allows us to study the causal nature of gravity and to set an upper limit on the speed of propagation of gravity in the near zone of the solar system as contrasted to the speed of the radio waves. In particular, the v/c term beyond of the standard Einstein's deflection, which we measured to 20% accuracy, is associated with the aberration of the null direction of the gravity force ("aberration of gravity") caused by the Lorentz transformation of the Christoffel symbols from the static frame of Jupiter to the moving frame of observer. General relativistic formulation of the experiment identifies the aberration of gravity with the retardation of gravity because the speed of gravitational waves in Einstein's theory is equal to the speed of propagation of the gravity force. We discuss the misconceptions which have inhibited the acceptance of this interpretation of the experiment. We also comment on other interpretations of this experiment by Asada, Will, Samuel, Pascual-Sánchez, and Carlip and show that their "speed of light" interpretations confuse the Lorentz transformation for gravity with that for light, and the fundamental speed of gravity with the physical speed of light from the quasar. For this

  2. Recent developments in Bose-Einstein condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, G.

    1997-09-22

    This paper contains viewgraphs on developments on Bose-Einstein condensation. Some topics covered are: strongly coupled coulomb systems; standard response functions of the first and second kind; dynamical mean field theory; quasi localized charge approximation; and the main equations.

  3. Einstein/Roosevelt Letters: A Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodle, Walter S.

    1985-01-01

    The letters in this unit of study intended for secondary students are facsimile reproductions of the correspondence between Albert Einstein and President Roosevelt on the possibility of constructing an atomic bomb. Classroom activities are also suggested. (RM)

  4. Einstein/Roosevelt Letters: A Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodle, Walter S.

    1985-01-01

    The letters in this unit of study intended for secondary students are facsimile reproductions of the correspondence between Albert Einstein and President Roosevelt on the possibility of constructing an atomic bomb. Classroom activities are also suggested. (RM)

  5. The creativity of Einstein and astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldovich, Y. B.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion of Einstein's scientific achievements for the 100th anniversary of his birth is presented. His works dealing with thermodynamics are described, along with his quantum theory of radiation. Most of the article discusses his general theory of relativity.

  6. The happiest thought of Einstein's life.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, M.

    It is a commonly told story that Einstein formulated his famous principle of equivalence when thinking about what happens in a freely falling elevator, and that it was an original idea of his genius distinguished by the rare capability to see deep problems in the most ordinary things. In the reading of Einstein's and Ernst Mach's works the author has discovered that it was not a physicist in an elevator which led to the principle of equivalence but rather somebody falling from a roof; moreover, the idea behind the principle was not invented by Einstein himself but rather read by him from the book by Mach entitled The Science of Mechanics. The influence this book had on young Einstein is very well known.

  7. How History Helped Einstein in Special Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    I will discuss how the German intellectual movement known as ``critical history'' motivated several physicists in the late 1900s to radically analyze the fundamental principles of mechanics, leading eventually to Einstein's special theory of relativity. Eugen Karl Dühring, Johann Bernhard Stallo, Ludwig Lange, and Ernst Mach wrote critical histories of mechanics, some of which emphasized notions of relativity and observation, in opposition to old metaphysical concepts that seemed to infect the foundations of physics. This strand of critical history included the ``genetic method'' of analyzing how concepts develop over time, in our minds, by way of ordinary experiences, which by 1904 was young Albert Einstein's favorite approach for examining fundamental notions. Thus I will discuss how history contributed in Einstein's path to relativity, as well as comment more generally on Einstein's views on history.

  8. White Holes in Einstein-Aether Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkle, David; Akhoury, Ratindranath; Gupta, Nishant

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed of gravitational collapse in Einstein-aether theory. We find that under certain circumstances the collapse results in the temporary formation of a white hole horizon. NSF grant PHY-1505565.

  9. Forming a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-26

    This sequence of false-color images shows the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in the Cold Atom Laboratory prototype at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory as the temperature gets progressively closer to absolute zero.

  10. Einstein and General Relativity: Historical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presented in the 1978 Oppenheimer Memorial Lecture at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories on August 17, 1978, discusses Einstein's contributions to physics, in particular, his discovery of the general theory of relativity. (HM)

  11. Einstein and General Relativity: Historical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presented in the 1978 Oppenheimer Memorial Lecture at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories on August 17, 1978, discusses Einstein's contributions to physics, in particular, his discovery of the general theory of relativity. (HM)

  12. General Motors sued for 'denigrating' Einstein's image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2010-07-01

    The US car giant General Motors (GM) has played down the consequences of a lawsuit against it for using the likeness of Albert Einstein in an advertisement for its Terrain sports utility vehicle (SUV).

  13. Hedgehogs in higher dimensional gravity with curvature self-interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2001-04-01

    Static solutions of the higher dimensional Einstein-Hilbert gravity supplemented by quadratic curvature self-interactions are discussed in the presence of hedgehog configurations along the transverse dimensions. The quadratic part of the action is parametrized in terms of the (ghost-free) Euler-Gauss-Bonnet curvature invariant. Spherically symmetric profiles of the transverse metric admit exponentially decaying warp factors both for positive and negative bulk cosmological constants.

  14. Black Hole Evaporation in Horava and New Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Payan, S.; Sabido, M.

    2010-07-12

    Recently it has been a lot of interest in the theory proposed by Horava due to the renormalizability properties of the theory and as a candidate for the UV completion of Einstein gravity. On the other hand, we also investigate three dimensional black holes at a Lifshitz point. In the present work we study thermodynamical properties in this setups. In particular we are able to obtain time of evaporation for black hole solutions for the two formalisim.

  15. Chaos in Non-Abelian Gauge Fields, Gravity and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matinyan, S. G.

    2002-12-01

    This talk describes the evolution of studies of chaos in Yang-Mills fields, gravity, and cosmology. The main subject is a BKL regime near the singularity t = 0 and its survival in higher dimensions and in string theory. We also describe the recent progress in the search for particle-like solutions of the Einstein-Yang-Mills system (monopoles and dyons), colored black holes and the problem of their stability.

  16. Self-accelerating universe in modified gravity with dynamical torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforova, V.; Randjbar-Daemi, S.; Rubakov, V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider a model belonging to the class of gravities with dynamical torsion. The model is free of ghosts and gradient instabilities about Minkowski and torsionless Einstein backgrounds. We find that at zero cosmological constant, the model admits a self-accelerating solution with a non-Riemannian connection. Small value of the effective cosmological constant is obtained at the expense of the hierarchy between the dimensionless couplings.

  17. On Quantum Gravity, Asymptotic Safety, and Paramagnetic Dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nink, Andreas; Reuter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the conceptual ideas underlying the Asymptotic Safety approach to the nonperturbative renormalization of gravity. By now numerous functional renormalization group studies predict the existence of a suitable nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point. We use an analogy to elementary magnetic systems to uncover the physical mechanism behind the emergence of this fixed point. It is seen to result from the dominance of certain paramagnetic-type interactions over diamagnetic ones. Furthermore, the spacetimes of Quantum Einstein Gravity behave like a polarizable medium with a "paramagnetic" response to external perturbations. Similarities with the vacuum state of Yang-Mills theory are pointed out.

  18. Analysis of rotation curves in the framework of Rn gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigerio Martins, C.; Salucci, P.

    2007-11-01

    We present an analysis of a devised sample of rotation curves (RCs), with the aim of checking the consequences of a modified f(R) gravity on galactic scales. Originally motivated by the mystery of dark energy, this theory may explain the observed non-Keplerian profiles of galactic RCs in terms of a breakdown of Einstein general relativity. We show that, in general, the power-law f(R) version could fit the observations well, with reasonable values for the mass model parameters. This could encourage further investigation into Rn gravity from both observational and theoretical points of view.

  19. Newtonian self-gravity in trapped quantum systems and experimental tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Großardt, André

    2017-08-01

    No experimental evidence exists, to date, whether or not the gravitational field must be quantised. Theoretical arguments in favour of quantisation are inconclusive. The most straightforward alternative to quantum gravity, a coupling between classical gravity and quantum matter according to the semi-classical Einstein equations, yields a nonlinear modification of the Schrödinger equation. Here, effects of this so-called Schrödinger-Newton equation are discussed, which allow for technologically feasible experimental tests.

  20. Experimental constraints on metric and non-metric theories of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental constraints on metric and non-metric theories of gravitation are reviewed. Tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle indicate that only metric theories of gravity are likely to be viable. Solar system experiments constrain the parameters of the weak field, post-Newtonian limit to be close to the values predicted by general relativity. Future space experiments will provide further constraints on post-Newtonian gravity.