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Sample records for elastic fiber interactions

  1. Hydrodynamic and elastic interactions of sedimenting flexible fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekiel-Jezewska, Maria L.; Bukowicki, Marek

    2017-11-01

    Dynamics of flexible micro and nano filaments in fluids is intensively investigated in many laboratories, with a perspective of numerous applications in biology, medicine or modern technology. In the literature, different theoretical models of elastic interactions between flexible fiber segments are applied. The task of this work is to examine the impact of a chosen elastic model on the dynamics of fibers settling in a viscous fluid under low Reynolds number. To this goal, we construct two trumbbells, each made of three beads connected by springs and with a bending resistance, and we describe hydrodynamic interactions of the beads in terms of the Rotne-Prager mobility tensors. Using the harmonic bending potential, and coupling it to the spring potential by the Young's modulus, we find simple benchmark solutions: stable stationary configurations of a single elastic trumbbell and a fast horizontal attraction of two elastic trumbbells towards a periodic long-lasting orbit. We show that for sufficiently large bending angles, other models of bending interactions can lead to qualitatively and quantitatively different spurious effects. We also demonstrate examples of essential differences between the dynamics of elastic dumbbells and trumbbells. This work was supported in part by Narodowe Centrum Nauki under Grant No. 2014/15/B/ST8/04359.

  2. Striated Acto-Myosin Fibers Can Reorganize and Register in Response to Elastic Interactions with the Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Buxboim, Amnon; Discher, Dennis E.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2011-01-01

    The remarkable striation of muscle has fascinated many for centuries. In developing muscle cells, as well as in many adherent, nonmuscle cell types, striated, stress fiberlike structures with sarcomere-periodicity tend to register: Based on several studies, neighboring, parallel fibers at the basal membrane of cultured cells establish registry of their respective periodic sarcomeric architecture, but, to our knowledge, the mechanism has not yet been identified. Here, we propose for cells plated on an elastic substrate or adhered to a neighboring cell, that acto-myosin contractility in striated fibers close to the basal membrane induces substrate strain that gives rise to an elastic interaction between neighboring striated fibers, which in turn favors interfiber registry. Our physical theory predicts a dependence of interfiber registry on externally controllable elastic properties of the substrate. In developing muscle cells, registry of striated fibers (premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils) has been suggested as one major pathway of myofibrillogenesis, where it precedes the fusion of neighboring fibers. This suggests a mechanical basis for the optimal myofibrillogenesis on muscle-mimetic elastic substrates that was recently observed by several groups in cultures of mouse-, human-, and chick-derived muscle cells. PMID:21641316

  3. Flame resistant elastic elastomeric fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Massucco, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of materials to improve flame resistance of elastic elastomeric fibers is discussed. Two approaches, synthesis of polyether based urethanes and modification of synthesized urethanes with flame ratardant additives, are described. Specific applications of both techniques are presented.

  4. The role of elastic fibers in pathogenesis of conjunctivochalasis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Jing-Yun; Li, Qing-Song; Zhang, Zhen-Yong; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xing-Ru

    2017-01-01

    The PubMed, MEDLINE databases and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for information regarding the etiology and pathogenesis of conjunctivochalasis (CCh) and the synthesis and degradation of elastic fibers. After analysis of the literature, we found elastic fibers was a complex protein molecule from the structure and composition; the degradation of elastic fibers was one of the histopathological features of the disease; the vast majority of the factors related to the pathogenesis of CCh ultimately pointed to abnormal elastic fibers. By reasonably speculating, we considered that abnormal elastic fibers cause the conjunctival relaxation. In conclusion, we hypothesize that elastic fibers play an important role in the pathogenesis of CCh. Studies on the mechanism of synthesis, degradation of elastic fibers are helpful to clarify the pathogenesis of the disease and to find effective treatment methods. PMID:28944209

  5. Multiple roles for elastic fibers in the skin.

    PubMed

    Starcher, Barry; Aycock, Ronnie L; Hill, Charles H

    2005-04-01

    Dermal elastic fibers are believed to have a primary role in providing elastic stretch and recoil to the skin. Here we compare the structural arrangement of dermal elastic fibers of chick skin and different animal species. Most elastic fibers in chick skin are derived from cells that line the feather follicle and/or smooth muscle that connects the pterial and apterial muscle bundles to feather follicles. Elastic fibers in the dermis of animals with single, primary hair follicles are derived from cells lining the hair follicle or from the ends of the pili muscle, which anchors the muscle to the matrix or to the hair follicle. Each follicle is interconnected with elastic fibers. Follicles of animals with primary and secondary (wool) hair follicles are also interconnected by elastic fibers, yet only the elastic fibers derived from the primary follicle are connected to each primary follicle. Only the primary hair follicles are connected to the pili muscle. Human skin, but not the skin of other primates, is significantly different from other animals with respect to elastic fiber organization and probably cell of origin. The data suggest that the primary role for elastic fibers in animals, with the possible exception of humans, is movement and/or placement of feathers or hair.

  6. Elastic fiber-mediated enthesis in the human middle ear

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Tetsuaki; Shibata, Shunichi; Katori, Yukio; Ohtsuka, Aiji; Murakami, Gen; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to constant vibration (acoustic oscillation) is likely to confer a specific morphology at the bone–tendon and bone–ligament interfaces at the ear ossicles, which therefore represent an exciting target of enthesis research. We histologically examined (i) the bone attachments of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles and (ii) the annular ligament of the incudostapedial joint obtained from seven elderly donated cadavers. Notably, both aldehyde-fuchsin and elastic-Masson staining demonstrated that the major fibrous component of the entheses was not collagen fibers but mature elastic fibers. The positive controls for elastic fiber staining were the arterial wall elastic laminae included in the temporal bone materials. The elastic fibers were inserted deeply into the type II collagen-poor fibrocartilage covering the ear ossicles. The muscle tendons were composed of an outer thin layer of collagen fibers and an inner thick core of elastic fibers near the malleus or stapes. In the unique elastic fiber-mediated entheses, hyaluronan, versican and fibronectin were expressed strongly along the elastic fibers. The hyaluronan seemed to act as a friction-reducing lubricant for the elastic fibers. Aggrecan was labeled strongly in a disk- or plica-like fibrous mass on the inner side of the elastic fiber-rich ligament, possibly due to compression stress from the ligament. Tenascin-c was not evident in the entheses. The elastic fiber-mediated entheses appeared resistant to tissue destruction in an environment exposed to constant vibration. The morphology was unlikely to be the result of age-related degeneration. PMID:22803514

  7. Elastic fiber-mediated enthesis in the human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Tetsuaki; Shibata, Shunichi; Katori, Yukio; Ohtsuka, Aiji; Murakami, Gen; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2012-10-01

    Adaptation to constant vibration (acoustic oscillation) is likely to confer a specific morphology at the bone-tendon and bone-ligament interfaces at the ear ossicles, which therefore represent an exciting target of enthesis research. We histologically examined (i) the bone attachments of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles and (ii) the annular ligament of the incudostapedial joint obtained from seven elderly donated cadavers. Notably, both aldehyde-fuchsin and elastic-Masson staining demonstrated that the major fibrous component of the entheses was not collagen fibers but mature elastic fibers. The positive controls for elastic fiber staining were the arterial wall elastic laminae included in the temporal bone materials. The elastic fibers were inserted deeply into the type II collagen-poor fibrocartilage covering the ear ossicles. The muscle tendons were composed of an outer thin layer of collagen fibers and an inner thick core of elastic fibers near the malleus or stapes. In the unique elastic fiber-mediated entheses, hyaluronan, versican and fibronectin were expressed strongly along the elastic fibers. The hyaluronan seemed to act as a friction-reducing lubricant for the elastic fibers. Aggrecan was labeled strongly in a disk- or plica-like fibrous mass on the inner side of the elastic fiber-rich ligament, possibly due to compression stress from the ligament. Tenascin-c was not evident in the entheses. The elastic fiber-mediated entheses appeared resistant to tissue destruction in an environment exposed to constant vibration. The morphology was unlikely to be the result of age-related degeneration. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  8. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment’s shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object. PMID:27608021

  9. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-09-06

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment's shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object.

  10. Energy in elastic fiber embedded in elastic matrix containing incident SH wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James H., Jr.; Nagem, Raymond J.

    1989-01-01

    A single elastic fiber embedded in an infinite elastic matrix is considered. An incident plane SH wave is assumed in the infinite matrix, and an expression is derived for the total energy in the fiber due to the incident SH wave. A nondimensional form of the fiber energy is plotted as a function of the nondimensional wavenumber of the SH wave. It is shown that the fiber energy attains maximum values at specific values of the wavenumber of the incident wave. The results obtained here are interpreted in the context of phenomena observed in acousto-ultrasonic experiments on fiber reinforced composite materials.

  11. Elastic properties of uniaxial-fiber reinforced composites - General features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Subhendu; Ledbetter, Hassel; Lei, Ming

    The salient features of the elastic properties of uniaxial-fiber-reinforced composites are examined by considering the complete set of elastic constants of composites comprising isotropic uniaxial fibers in an isotropic matrix. Such materials exhibit transverse-isotropic symmetry and five independent elastic constants in Voigt notation: C(11), C(33), C(44), C(66), and C(13). These C(ij) constants are calculated over the entire fiber-volume-fraction range 0.0-1.0, using a scattered-plane-wave ensemple-average model. Some practical elastic constants such as the principal Young moduli and the principal Poisson ratios are considered, and the behavior of these constants is discussed. Also presented are the results for the four principal sound velocities used to study uniaxial-fiber-reinforced composites: v(11), v(33), v(12), and v(13).

  12. Submillisecond elastic recoil reveals molecular origins of fibrin fiber mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Nathan E; Ding, Feng; Bucay, Igal; O'Brien, E Timothy; Gorkun, Oleg V; Superfine, Richard; Lord, Susan T; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Falvo, Michael R

    2013-06-18

    Fibrin fibers form the structural scaffold of blood clots. Thus, their mechanical properties are of central importance to understanding hemostasis and thrombotic disease. Recent studies have revealed that fibrin fibers are elastomeric despite their high degree of molecular ordering. These results have inspired a variety of molecular models for fibrin's elasticity, ranging from reversible protein unfolding to rubber-like elasticity. An important property that has not been explored is the timescale of elastic recoil, a parameter that is critical for fibrin's mechanical function and places a temporal constraint on molecular models of fiber elasticity. Using high-frame-rate imaging and atomic force microscopy-based nanomanipulation, we measured the recoil dynamics of individual fibrin fibers and found that the recoil was orders of magnitude faster than anticipated from models involving protein refolding. We also performed steered discrete molecular-dynamics simulations to investigate the molecular origins of the observed recoil. Our results point to the unstructured αC regions of the otherwise structured fibrin molecule as being responsible for the elastic recoil of the fibers. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Submillisecond Elastic Recoil Reveals Molecular Origins of Fibrin Fiber Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Nathan E.; Ding, Feng; Bucay, Igal; O’Brien, E. Timothy; Gorkun, Oleg V.; Superfine, Richard; Lord, Susan T.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Falvo, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrin fibers form the structural scaffold of blood clots. Thus, their mechanical properties are of central importance to understanding hemostasis and thrombotic disease. Recent studies have revealed that fibrin fibers are elastomeric despite their high degree of molecular ordering. These results have inspired a variety of molecular models for fibrin’s elasticity, ranging from reversible protein unfolding to rubber-like elasticity. An important property that has not been explored is the timescale of elastic recoil, a parameter that is critical for fibrin’s mechanical function and places a temporal constraint on molecular models of fiber elasticity. Using high-frame-rate imaging and atomic force microscopy-based nanomanipulation, we measured the recoil dynamics of individual fibrin fibers and found that the recoil was orders of magnitude faster than anticipated from models involving protein refolding. We also performed steered discrete molecular-dynamics simulations to investigate the molecular origins of the observed recoil. Our results point to the unstructured αC regions of the otherwise structured fibrin molecule as being responsible for the elastic recoil of the fibers. PMID:23790375

  14. Mechanics of Fluctuating Elastic Plates and Fiber Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaojun

    Lipid membranes and fiber networks in biological systems perform important mechanical functions at the cellular and tissue levels. In this thesis I delve into two detailed problems--thermal fluctuation of membranes and non-linear compression response of fiber networks. Typically, membrane fluctuations are analysed by decomposing into normal modes or by molecular simulations. In the first part of my thesis, I propose a new semi-analytic method to calculate the partition function of a membrane. The membrane is viewed as a fluctuating von Karman plate and discretized into triangular elements. Its energy is expressed as a function of nodal displacements, and then the partition function and co-variance matrix are computed using Gaussian integrals. I recover well-known results for the dependence of the projected area of a lipid bilayer membrane on the applied tension, and recent simulation results on the ependence of membrane free energy on geometry, spontaneous curvature and tension. As new applications I use this technique to study a membrane with heterogeneity and different boundary conditions. I also use this technique to study solid membranes by taking account of the non-linear coupling of in-plane strains with out-of-plane deflections using a penalty energy, and apply it to graphene, an ultra-thin two-dimensional solid. The scaling of graphene fluctuations with membrane size is recovered. I am able to capture the dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient of graphene on temperature. Next, I study curvature mediated interactions between inclusions in membranes. I assume the inclusions to be rigid, and show that the elastic and entropic forces between them can compete to yield a local maximum in the free energy if the membrane bending modulus is small. If the spacing between the inclusions is less than this local maximum then the attractive entropic forces dominate and the separation between the inclusions will be determined by short range interactions; if the

  15. Elastic properties of rigid fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Thorpe, M. F.; Davis, L. C.

    1995-05-01

    We study the elastic properties of rigid fiber-reinforced composites with perfect bonding between fibers and matrix, and also with sliding boundary conditions. In the dilute region, there exists an exact analytical solution. Around the rigidity threshold we find the elastic moduli and Poisson's ratio by decomposing the deformation into a compression mode and a rotation mode. For perfect bonding, both modes are important, whereas only the compression mode is operative for sliding boundary conditions. We employ the digital-image-based method and a finite element analysis to perform computer simulations which confirm our analytical predictions.

  16. Elastic Fiber Supercapacitors for Wearable Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Qin, Si; Seyedin, Shayan; Zhang, Jizhen; Wang, Zhiyu; Yang, Fangli; Liu, Yuqing; Chen, Jun; Razal, Joselito M

    2018-05-17

    The development of wearable devices such as smart watches, intelligent garments, and wearable health-monitoring devices calls for suitable energy storage devices which have matching mechanical properties and can provide sufficient power for a reasonable duration. Stretchable fiber-based supercapacitors are emerging as a promising candidates for this purpose because they are lightweight, flexible, have high energy and power density, and the potential for easy integration into traditional textile processes. An important characteristic that is oftentimes ignored is stretchability-fiber supercapacitors should be able to accommodate large elongation during use, endure a range of bending motions, and then revert to its original form without compromising electrical and electrochemical performance. This article summarizes the current research progress on stretchable fiber-based supercapacitors and discusses the existing challenges on material preparation and fiber-based device fabrication. This article aims to help researchers in the field to better understand the challenges related to material design and fabrication approaches of fiber-based supercapacitors, and to provide insights and guidelines toward their wearability. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Perforating elastic fibers ('elastic fiber trapping') in the differentiation of keratoacanthoma, conventional squamous cell carcinoma and pseudocarcinomatous epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kabeer; Kazlouskaya, Viktoryia; Lal, Karan; Molina, David; Elston, Dirk M

    2014-02-01

    Keratoacanthoma (KA), an epithelial neoplasm occurring in sun-exposed skin of the elderly, is considered a well-differentiated form of conventional squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) that often follows a course of spontaneous regression. Distinguishing KA from conventional SCC or pseudocarcinomatous epithelial hyperplasia ensures proper diagnosis, treatment and management. For some time, perforating elastic fibers have been utilized in differentiating KA from SCC. This phenomenon may also occur in association with scars and hypertrophic lupus erythematosus (LE). To assess the diagnostic utility of perforating elastic fibers, we compared their incidence in KA, SCC, scars with overlying pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia, hypertrophic LE, hypertrophic lichen planus (LP) and lichen simplex chronicus (LSC). A retrospective case search identified 359 lesions and the presence of perforating elastic fibers was evaluated using routinely stained sections. This phenomenon was documented in all studied groups except hypertrophic LP. The incidence was found to be 71% in KA, 37% in SCC, and was lowest in inflammatory conditions with associated pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia (hypertrophic LP 0%, hypertrophic LE 5.9% and LSC 28.2%). The observed frequency in pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia overlying scars (57.8%) vs. KA (71%) was not statistically different. Although elastic fiber trapping has potential value as a diagnostic criterion for KA, dermatopathologists should consider its limitations. Its diagnostic utility was greatest in distinguishing KA from hypertrophic LE and hypertrophic LP. Conversely, elastic trapping is not helpful differentiating pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia from recurrent/persistent KA following surgery. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Elastic/viscoplastic behavior of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C.; Sun, C. T.; Gates, T. S.

    1990-01-01

    An elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model was used to characterize the nonlinear and rate dependent behavior of a continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite. This model was incorporated into a finite element program for the analysis of laminated plates and shells. Details on the finite element formulation with the proposed constitutive model were presented. The numerical results were compared with experimental data for uniaxial tension and three-point bending tests of (+ or - 45 deg)3s APC-2 laminates.

  19. Differential Regulation of Elastic Fiber Formation by Fibulin-4 and -5*

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Rawshan; McGovern, Amanda; Ridley, Caroline; Cain, Stuart A.; Baldwin, Andrew; Wang, Ming-Chuan; Guo, Chun; Mironov, Aleksandr; Drymoussi, Zoe; Trump, Dorothy; Shuttleworth, Adrian; Baldock, Clair; Kielty, Cay M.

    2009-01-01

    Fibulin-4 and -5 are extracellular glycoproteins with essential non-compensatory roles in elastic fiber assembly. We have determined how they interact with tropoelastin, lysyl oxidase, and fibrillin-1, thereby revealing how they differentially regulate assembly. Strong binding between fibulin-4 and lysyl oxidase enhanced the interaction of fibulin-4 with tropoelastin, forming ternary complexes that may direct elastin cross-linking. In contrast, fibulin-5 did not bind lysyl oxidase strongly but bound tropoelastin in terminal and central regions and could concurrently bind fibulin-4. Both fibulins differentially bound N-terminal fibrillin-1, which strongly inhibited their binding to lysyl oxidase and tropoelastin. Knockdown experiments revealed that fibulin-5 controlled elastin deposition on microfibrils, although fibulin-4 can also bind fibrillin-1. These experiments provide a molecular account of the distinct roles of fibulin-4 and -5 in elastic fiber assembly and how they act in concert to chaperone cross-linked elastin onto microfibrils. PMID:19570982

  20. Elastic fibers in human skin: quantitation of elastic fibers by computerized digital image analyses and determination of elastin by radioimmunoassay of desmosine.

    PubMed

    Uitto, J; Paul, J L; Brockley, K; Pearce, R H; Clark, J G

    1983-10-01

    The elastic fibers in the skin and other organs can be affected in several disease processes. In this study, we have developed morphometric techniques that allow accurate quantitation of the elastic fibers in punch biopsy specimens of skin. In this procedure, the elastic fibers, visualized by elastin-specific stains, are examined through a camera unit attached to the microscope. The black and white images sensing various gray levels are then converted to binary images after selecting a threshold with an analog threshold selection device. The binary images are digitized and the data analyzed by a computer program designed to express the properties of the image, thus allowing determination of the volume fraction occupied by the elastic fibers. As an independent measure of the elastic fibers, alternate tissue sections were used for assay of desmosine, an elastin-specific cross-link compound, by a radioimmunoassay. The clinical applicability of the computerized morphometric analyses was tested by examining the elastic fibers in the skin of five patients with pseudoxanthoma elasticum or Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome. In the skin of 10 healthy control subjects, the elastic fibers occupied 2.1 +/- 1.1% (mean +/- SD) of the dermis. The volume fractions occupied by the elastic fibers in the lesions of pseudoxanthoma elasticum or Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome were increased as much as 6-fold, whereas the values in the unaffected areas of the skin in the same patients were within normal limits. A significant correlation between the volume fraction of elastic fibers, determined by computerized morphometric analyses, and the concentration of desmosine, quantitated by radioimmunoassay, was noted in the total material. These results demonstrate that computerized morphometric techniques are helpful in characterizing disease processes affecting skin. This methodology should also be applicable to other tissues that contain elastic fibers and that are affected in various heritable and

  1. Confocal microscopy for automatic texture analysis of elastic fibers in histologic preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, R. L.; Vieira, G.; Ferro, D. P.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Cesar, C., L.; Metze, K.

    2009-07-01

    Elastic fibers are an important component of many organs and tissues, such as skin, lungs, arteries, ligaments, intervertebral discs and cartilage Their function is to endow tissues with elastic recoil and resilience, to act as an important adhesion template for cells, and to regulate growth factor availability (1,2). Loss or remodeling of the elastic fiber texture occurs in many diseases. Degeneration and fragmentation of elastic fibers and aging are intimately related (3). Recently, the importance of elastin for the study of malignant tumor progression has been emphasized (4,5). Elastic tissue may be a significant reservoir of angiostatic molecules and soluble elastin as well as elastin peptides, that are inhibitors of the metastatic process in experimental tumor models (4). Elastic fibers are involved in the anatomic remodeling of chronic pulmonary diseases (6) and, especially, of diseases of the arterial wall (7, 8). The study of these phenomena is important for the understanding of the pathophysiologic basis of the diseases. Recently the role of elastic fibers in small diameter vascular graft design has been emphasized (2). The possibility to regenerate or engineer elastic fibres and tissues creates an important challenge, not only to understand the molecular basis of elastic-fibre biology (1,2), but also of its spatial arrangement and remodeling in the diseased tissues. Subtle changes of the complex elastic fiber network may be involved in the pathogenesis of diseases. Therefore a precise and objective histopathologic description is necessary.

  2. Serum Factors from Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum Patients Alter Elastic Fiber Formation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Le Saux, Olivier; Bunda, Severa; VanWart, Christopher M.; Douet, Vanessa; Got, Laurence; Martin, Ludovic; Hinek, Aleksander

    2017-01-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a heritable disorder mainly characterized by calcified elastic fibers in cutaneous, ocular, and vascular tissues. PXE is caused by mutations in ABCC6, a gene encoding an ABC transporter predominantly expressed in liver and kidneys. The functional relationship between ABCC6 and elastic fiber calcification is unknown. We speculated that ABCC6 deficiency in PXE patients induces a persistent imbalance in circulating metabolite(s), which may impair the synthetic abilities of normal elastoblasts or specifically alter elastic fiber assembly. Therefore, we compared the deposition of elastic fiber proteins in cultures of fibroblasts derived from PXE and unaffected individuals. PXE fibroblasts cultured with normal human serum expressed and deposited increased amounts of proteins, but structurally normal elastic fibers. Interestingly, normal and PXE fibroblasts as well as normal smooth muscle cells deposited abnormal aggregates of elastic fibers when maintained in the presence of serum from PXE patients. The expression of tropoelastin and other elastic fiber-associated genes was not significantly modulated by the presence of PXE serum. These results indicated that certain metabolites present in PXE sera interfered with the normal assembly of elastic fibers in vitro and suggested that PXE is a primary metabolic disorder with secondary connective tissue manifestations. PMID:16543900

  3. Dynamics of elastic interactions in soft and biological matter.

    PubMed

    Yuval, Janni; Safran, Samuel A

    2013-04-01

    Cells probe their mechanical environment and can change the organization of their cytoskeletons when the elastic and viscous properties of their environment are modified. We use a model in which the forces exerted by small, contractile acto-myosin filaments (e.g., nascent stress fibers in stem cells) on the extracellular matrix are modeled as local force dipoles. In some cases, the strain field caused by these force dipoles propagates quickly enough so that only static elastic interactions need be considered. On the other hand, in the case of significant energy dissipation, strain propagation is slower and may be eliminated completely by the relaxation of the cellular cytoskeleton (e.g., by cross-link dissociation). Here, we consider several dissipative mechanisms that affect the propagation of the strain field in adhered cells and consider these effects on the interaction between force dipoles and their resulting mutual orientations. This is a first step in understanding the development of orientational (nematic) or layering (smectic) order in the cytoskeleton. We use the theory to estimate the propagation time of the strain fields over a cellular distance for different mechanisms and find that in some cases it can be of the order of seconds, thus competing with the cytoskeletal relaxation time. Furthermore, for a simple system of two force dipoles, we predict that in some cases the orientation of force dipoles might change significantly with time, e.g., for short times the dipoles exhibit parallel alignment while for later times they align perpendicularly.

  4. Histochemical study of the elastic fibers in pathologic human temporomandibular joint discs.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, R; Villari, L; Bernasconi, G; Caltabiano, M

    2001-10-01

    This study investigated histochemically the elastic fibers in human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs with varying degrees of tissue degeneration/regeneration to determine whether there are differences that correlate with the histologic findings. Ten diseased human TMJ discs and 2 control specimens were studied histochemically by staining with Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin after oxidation with peracetic acid. This technique selectively stains elastic, elaunin, (pre-elastic), and oxytalan fibers. In TMJ discs with an abnormal collagen fiber arrangement, an increased number of oxytalan fibers could be observed, contrary to discs with scar-like tissue transformation in which oxytalan fibers were decreased in number. In discs showing tears and clefts, the oxytalan fibers run perpendicular to the defects, whereas elaunin and elastic fibers were mainly circumferentially arranged. In discs with chondroid metaplasia, elastic, elaunin, and oxytalan fibers were extensively detected. It is hypothesized that the elastic, elaunin, and oxytalan fibers found in severely damaged discs appear to ensure biomechanical compliance by reinforcing regions devoid of collagen bundles and thus function as shock absorbers of stretch and compression. Copyright 2001 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

  5. Fetal development of the elastic-fiber-mediated enthesis in the human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Yoshitaka; Shibata, Shunichi; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shinichi; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Kawase, Tetsuaki

    2013-10-01

    In the human middle ear, the annular ligament of the incudostapedial joint and the insertions of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles contain abundant elastic fibers; i.e., the elastic-fiber-mediated entheses. Hyaluronan also coexists with the elastic fibers. In the present study using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated the distribution of elastin not only in the incudostapedial joint but also in the other two joints of the middle ear in adults and fetuses. In adults, the expression of elastin did not extend out of the annular ligament composed of mature elastic fibers but clearly overlapped with it. Electron microscopic observations of the annular ligament demonstrated a few microfibrils along the elastic fibers. Thus, in contrast to the vocal cord, the middle ear entheses seemed not to contain elaunin and oxytalan fibers. In mid-term fetuses (at approximately 15-16 weeks of gestation) before opening of the external acoustic meatus, the incudostapedial joint showed abundant elastic fibers, but the incudomalleolar and stapediovestibular joints did not. At this stage, hyaluronan was not colocalized, but distributed diffusely in loose mesenchymal tissues surrounding the ear ossicles. Therefore, fetal development of elastin and elastic fibers in the middle ear entheses is unlikely to require acoustic oscillation. In late-stage fetuses (25-30 weeks), whose ear ossicles were almost the same size as those in adults, we observed bundling and branching of elastic fibers. However, hyaluronan expression was not as strong as in adults. Colocalization between elastic fibers and hyaluronan appeared to be a result of postnatal maturation of the entheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural and stereological analysis of elastic fibers in the glans penis of young men.

    PubMed

    Andrade, F; Cardoso, G P; Bastos, Ana Luiza; Costa, W; Chagas, M; Babinski, M

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is an important element in penile function and pathology, although little is known about its components in human glans. This study evaluates the morphological organization and volumetric density of elastic fibers in the glans penis of young men without any evidence of urogenital disease at autopsy or medical history. Penile glans were obtained from five young men who died of causes not related to the urogenital tract, ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (mean 24 years). Samples were fixed in formalin, embedded in paraffin, and histologically processed. Tissue was analyzed by light microscopy using Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin, after previous oxidation with oxone. The point-counting method was used for morphometrical evaluation. Quantities were expressed as volumetric densities (Vv) and were determined on 25 random fields for each individual. Elastic system fibers were easily identified. These fibers had tortuous profile and surrounded sinusoids in the glans penis. An irregular elastic fibers network was identified in the mucosa, while in the corpus spongiosum the elastic fibers were longitudinally distributed. Volumetric density of elastic fibers in the glans penis is 29.4% ± 3.1. These data could provide valuable information in order to draw parallels regarding patients with erectile dysfunction. Further studies regarding extracellular matrix of the penis are necessary to better elucidate the relation between elastic fibers and erectile dysfunction.

  7. Distribution of elastic fibers in the head and neck: a histological study using late-stage human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hideaki; Umezawa, Takashi; Omine, Yuya; Kasahara, Masaaki; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shinichi

    2013-03-01

    There is little or no information about the distribution of elastic fibers in the human fetal head. We examined this issue in 15 late-stage fetuses (crown-rump length, 220-320 mm) using aldehyde-fuchsin and elastica-Masson staining, and we used the arterial wall elastic laminae and external ear cartilages as positive staining controls. The posterior pharyngeal wall, as well as the ligaments connecting the laryngeal cartilages, contained abundant elastic fibers. In contrast with the sphenomandibular ligament and the temporomandibular joint disk, in which elastic fibers were partly present, the discomalleolar ligament and the fascial structures around the pterygoid muscles did not have any elastic fibers. In addition, the posterior marginal fascia of the prestyloid space did contain such fibers. Notably, in the middle ear, elastic fibers accumulated along the tendons of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles and in the joint capsules of the ear ossicle articulations. Elastic fibers were not seen in any other muscle tendons or vertebral facet capsules in the head and neck. Despite being composed of smooth muscle, the orbitalis muscle did not contain any elastic fibers. The elastic fibers in the sphenomandibular ligament seemed to correspond to an intermediate step of development between Meckel's cartilage and the final ligament. Overall, there seemed to be a mini-version of elastic fiber distribution compared to that in adults and a different specific developmental pattern of connective tissues. The latter morphology might be a result of an adaptation to hypoxic conditions during development.

  8. Distribution of elastic fibers in the head and neck: a histological study using late-stage human fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Hideaki; Umezawa, Takashi; Omine, Yuya; Kasahara, Masaaki; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen

    2013-01-01

    There is little or no information about the distribution of elastic fibers in the human fetal head. We examined this issue in 15 late-stage fetuses (crown-rump length, 220-320 mm) using aldehyde-fuchsin and elastica-Masson staining, and we used the arterial wall elastic laminae and external ear cartilages as positive staining controls. The posterior pharyngeal wall, as well as the ligaments connecting the laryngeal cartilages, contained abundant elastic fibers. In contrast with the sphenomandibular ligament and the temporomandibular joint disk, in which elastic fibers were partly present, the discomalleolar ligament and the fascial structures around the pterygoid muscles did not have any elastic fibers. In addition, the posterior marginal fascia of the prestyloid space did contain such fibers. Notably, in the middle ear, elastic fibers accumulated along the tendons of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles and in the joint capsules of the ear ossicle articulations. Elastic fibers were not seen in any other muscle tendons or vertebral facet capsules in the head and neck. Despite being composed of smooth muscle, the orbitalis muscle did not contain any elastic fibers. The elastic fibers in the sphenomandibular ligament seemed to correspond to an intermediate step of development between Meckel's cartilage and the final ligament. Overall, there seemed to be a mini-version of elastic fiber distribution compared to that in adults and a different specific developmental pattern of connective tissues. The latter morphology might be a result of an adaptation to hypoxic conditions during development. PMID:23560235

  9. Adhesive interaction of elastically deformable spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'yachenko, E. N.; Dueck, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Two spherical particles that attract each other by van der Waals volume forces and can undergo deformation as a result of the attraction are considered. Small deformations of such particles can be described by the solution of the Hertz problem. The deformation of particles, in turn, alters the force of attraction between them. It has been established that the relationship between the adhesion and elasticity of the indicated particles is determined by the degree to which these particles deform and that the adhesion force acting between the particles depends on their elasticity, size, and the Hamaker constants.

  10. To improve the flame resistance of spandex elastic elastomeric fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Strength characteristics of fibers were improved to pass the 70% oxygen/30% nitrogen specification. Spinning techniques and information about incorporating these fibers in fabric structures using wrapping materials of Beta Fiberglas, Nomex, and PBI were developed.

  11. Elastomeric optical fiber sensors and method for detecting and measuring events occurring in elastic materials

    DOEpatents

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Capps, Gary J.; Smith, David B.; White, Clifford P.

    1994-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing means for the detection and measurement of events such as dynamic loadings imposed upon elastic materials including cementitious materials, elastomers, and animal body components and/or the attrition of such elastic materials are provided. One or more optical fibers each having a deformable core and cladding formed of an elastomeric material such as silicone rubber are embedded in the elastic material. Changes in light transmission through any of the optical fibers due the deformation of the optical fiber by the application of dynamic loads such as compression, tension, or bending loadings imposed on the elastic material or by the attrition of the elastic material such as by cracking, deterioration, aggregate break-up, and muscle, tendon, or organ atrophy provide a measurement of the dynamic loadings and attrition. The fiber optic sensors can be embedded in elastomers subject to dynamic loadings and attrition such as commonly used automobiles and in shoes for determining the amount and frequency of the dynamic loadings and the extent of attrition. The fiber optic sensors are also useable in cementitious material for determining the maturation thereof.

  12. Elastic interaction of hydrogen atoms on graphene: A multiscale approach from first principles to continuum elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branicio, Paulo S.; Vastola, Guglielmo; Jhon, Mark H.; Sullivan, Michael B.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Srolovitz, David J.

    2016-10-01

    The deformation of graphene due to the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms on its surface and the long-range elastic interaction between hydrogen atoms induced by these deformations are investigated using a multiscale approach based on first principles, empirical interactions, and continuum modeling. Focus is given to the intrinsic low-temperature structure and interactions. Therefore, all calculations are performed at T =0 , neglecting possible temperature or thermal fluctuation effects. Results from different methods agree well and consistently describe the local deformation of graphene on multiple length scales reaching 500 Å . The results indicate that the elastic interaction mediated by this deformation is significant and depends on the deformation of the graphene sheet both in and out of plane. Surprisingly, despite the isotropic elasticity of graphene, within the linear elastic regime, atoms elastically attract or repel each other depending on (i) the specific site they are chemisorbed; (ii) the relative position of the sites; (iii) and if they are on the same or on opposite surface sides. The interaction energy sign and power-law decay calculated from molecular statics agree well with theoretical predictions from linear elasticity theory, considering in-plane or out-of-plane deformations as a superposition or in a coupled nonlinear approach. Deviations on the exact power law between molecular statics and the linear elastic analysis are evidence of the importance of nonlinear effects on the elasticity of monolayer graphene. These results have implications for the understanding of the generation of clusters and regular formations of hydrogen and other chemisorbed atoms on graphene.

  13. Steroid Hormones Are Key Modulators of Tissue Mechanical Function via Regulation of Collagen and Elastic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Nallasamy, Shanmugasundaram; Yoshida, Kyoko; Akins, Meredith; Myers, Kristin; Iozzo, Renato

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an active and dynamic role that both reflects and facilitates the functional requirements of a tissue. The mature ECM of the nonpregnant cervix is drastically reorganized during pregnancy to drive changes in tissue mechanics that ensure safe birth. In this study, our research on mice deficient in the proteoglycan decorin have led to the finding that progesterone and estrogen play distinct and complementary roles to orchestrate structural reorganization of both collagen and elastic fibers in the cervix during pregnancy. Abnormalities in collagen and elastic fiber structure and tissue mechanical function evident in the cervix of nonpregnant and early pregnant decorin-null mice transiently recover for the remainder of pregnancy only to return 1 month postpartum. Consistent with the hypothesis that pregnancy levels of progesterone and estrogen may regulate ECM organization and turnover, expressions of factors required for assembly and synthesis of collagen and elastic fibers are temporally regulated, and the ultrastructure of collagen fibrils and elastic fibers is markedly altered during pregnancy in wild-type mice. Finally, utilizing ovariectomized nonpregnant decorin-null mice, we demonstrate structural resolution of collagen and elastic fibers by progesterone or estrogen, respectively, and the potential for both ECM proteins to contribute to mechanical function. These investigations advance understanding of regulatory factors that drive specialized ECM organization and contribute to an understanding of the cervical remodeling process, which may provide insight into potential complications associated with preterm birth that impact 9.6% of live births in the United States. PMID:28204185

  14. Morphological alterations in the elastic fibers of the rabbit craniomandibular joint following experimentally induced anterior disk displacement.

    PubMed

    Ali, A M; Sharawy, M; O'Dell, N L; al-Behery, G

    1993-01-01

    Elastic fibers are important components of the connective tissue that attaches the articular disk of the craniomandibular joint (CMJ) to the skull and mandible. Biopsies of the articular disk proper and bilaminar zone (BZ) tissues from patients with anterior disk displacement (ADD) have shown previously that there is a marked loss of elastic fibers. In the present study, the effects of inducing ADD on the elastic fibers in the rabbit CMJ disk proper, BZ and condylar cartilage were investigated. The right CMJ was exposed surgically and the discal attachments were severed except for the BZ attachments. Then, the disk was displaced anteriorly and sutured to the zygomatic arch. The CMJs were removed after 1, 2 or 6 weeks and processed for histochemical demonstration of elastic fibers. The results showed osteoarthritic changes following ADD, and a significant decrease in the number of the elastic fibers in the disk proper and BZ. The remaining elastic fibers were abnormal in their appearance and orientation. In addition, ADD led to the appearance of fine elastic fibers among the chondrocytes in the hyaline cartilage of the condyle that were not present in the cartilage of the control condyle. We conclude that induced ADD can lead to a significant loss of elastic fibers in the articular disk, and result in the appearance of elastic fibers within the cartilage of the mandibular condyle.

  15. FIBER AND INTEGRATED OPTICS: Magnetooptic interaction in fiber waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, S. N.; Bulyuk, A. N.; Gulyaev, Yurii V.

    1989-11-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies were made of the effects of a distributed magnetooptic interaction in fiber waveguides. Analytic solutions were obtained for relating light modulation at the exit of a waveguide to the parameters of its winding in the form of a coil and to an external magnetic field under conditions ensuring the exact spatial phase matching. It was confirmed experimentally that the interaction length of the order of several tens of meters was quite acceptable and could ensure a sensitivity of at least 10 - 4 Oe in the case of a quartz fiber waveguide.

  16. Chondroitinase injection improves keloid pathology by reorganizing the extracellular matrix with regenerated elastic fibers.

    PubMed

    Ishiko, Toshihiro; Naitoh, Motoko; Kubota, Hiroshi; Yamawaki, Satoko; Ikeda, Mika; Yoshikawa, Katsuhiro; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Kurahashi, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2013-05-01

    Keloids are a proliferative fibrotic disease characterized by abnormal accumulation of extracellular matrix in the dermis. Keloid lesions lack skin plasticity due to deficiencies in elastic fiber formation in the extracellular matrix. The loss of elastic fiber is caused by excessive accumulation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), a sulfated glycosaminoglycan. However, there is no radical cure for keloids. Using a model system, we show herein that treatment of keloid tissues with chondroitinase ABC, an enzyme that specifically digests CS, improves clinical features of keloids. Keloid tissues obtained from patients were grafted on nude mice, and chondroitinase ABC was injected into the grafted keloid tissues. Chondroitinase ABC treatment significantly reduced the volume of keloid implants concomitant with recovery of elastic fiber formation. These results suggest that chondroitinase ABC injection is an effective therapy for keloid. © 2013 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  17. Homeostatic maintenance via degradation and repair of elastic fibers under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Calebe; Araújo, Ascanio D.; Oliveira, Cláudio L. N.; Imsirovic, Jasmin; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Andrade, José S.; Suki, Béla

    2016-06-01

    Cellular maintenance of the extracellular matrix requires an effective regulation that balances enzymatic degradation with the repair of collagen fibrils and fibers. Here, we investigate the long-term maintenance of elastic fibers under tension combined with diffusion of general degradative and regenerative particles associated with digestion and repair processes. Computational results show that homeostatic fiber stiffness can be achieved by assuming that cells periodically probe fiber stiffness to adjust the production and release of degradative and regenerative particles. However, this mechanism is unable to maintain a homogeneous fiber. To account for axial homogeneity, we introduce a robust control mechanism that is locally governed by how the binding affinity of particles is modulated by mechanical forces applied to the ends of the fiber. This model predicts diameter variations along the fiber that are in agreement with the axial distribution of collagen fibril diameters obtained from scanning electron microscopic images of normal rat thoracic aorta. The model predictions match the experiments only when the applied force on the fiber is in the range where the variance of local stiffness along the fiber takes a minimum value. Our model thus predicts that the biophysical properties of the fibers play an important role in the long-term regulatory maintenance of these fibers.

  18. Flexible fiber in interaction with a dense granular flow close to the jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algarra, Nicolas; Leang, Marguerite; Lazarus, Arnaud; Vandembroucq, Damien; Kolb, Evelyne

    2017-06-01

    We propose a new fluid/structure interaction in the unusual case of a dense granular medium flowing against an elastic fiber acting as a flexible intruder. We study experimentally the reconfiguration and the forces exerted on the flexible fiber produced by the flow at a constant and low velocity of a two-dimensional disordered packing of grains close but below the jamming transition.

  19. Ultrasonic Determination of the Elastic Constants of Epoxy-natural Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, C. A. Meza; Pazos-Ospina, J. F.; Franco, E. E.; Ealo, Joao L.; Collazos-Burbano, D. A.; Garcia, G. F. Casanova

    This paper shows the applications ultrasonic through-transmission technique to determine the elastic constants of two polymer-natural fiber composite materials with potential industrial application and economic and environmental advantages. The transversely isotropic coconut-epoxy and fique-epoxy samples were analyzed using an experimental setup which allows the sample to be rotated with respect to transducers faces and measures the time-of-flight at different angles of incidence. Then, the elastic properties of the material were obtained by fitting the experimental data to the Christoffel equation. Results show a good agreement between the measured elastic constants and the values predicted by an analytical model. The velocities as a function of the incidence angle are reported and the effect of the natural fiber on the stiffness of the composite is discussed.

  20. Effects of birth trauma and estrogen on urethral elastic fibers and elastin expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guiting; Ning, Hongxiu; Wang, Guifang; Banie, Lia; Lue, Tom F; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the effects of birth trauma and estrogen on urethral elastic fibers and elastin expression. Pregnant rats were subjected to sham operation (Delivery-only), DVDO (delivery, vaginal distension and ovariectomy), or DVDO + E₂ (estrogen). At 2, 4, 8, or 12 weeks, their urethras were harvested for elastic fiber staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Urethral cells were treated with transforming growth factor- β1 (TGFβ1) and/or estrogen and analyzed for elastin mRNA expression. Urethral cells were also examined for the activities of Smad1- and Smad3/4-responsive elements in response to TGFβ1 and estrogen. At 8 weeks post-treatment, the urethras of DVDO rats had fewer and shorter elastic fibers when compared with Delivery-only rats, and those of DVDO + E₂ rats had fewer and shorter elastic fibers when compared with DVDO rats. Elastin mRNA was expressed at low levels in Delivery-only rats and at increasingly higher levels in DVDO rats at 2, 4, and 8 weeks but at sharply lower levels in DVDO + E₂ rats when compared with DVDO rats at 8 weeks. Urethral cells expressed increasingly higher levels of elastin mRNA in response to increasing concentrations of TGFβ1 up to 1 ng/mL. At this TGFβ1 concentration, urethral cells expressed significantly lower levels of elastin mRNA when treated with estrogen before or after TGFβ1 treatment. Both Smad1- and Smad3/4-responsive elements were activated by TGFβ1 and such activation was suppressed by estrogen. Birth trauma appears to activate urethral elastin expression via TGFβ1 signaling. Estrogen interferes with this signaling, resulting in improper assembly of elastic fibers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunohistochemical study of extracellular matrices and elastic fibers in a human sternoclavicular joint.

    PubMed

    Shimada, K; Takeshige, N; Moriyama, H; Miyauchi, Y; Shimada, S; Fujimaki, E

    1997-12-01

    In this study, we clarified the distribution of elastic and oxytalan fibers in a human sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) using a color image system and in extracellular matrices using immunoperoxidase staining. Fine elastic fibers (EFs) were scattered in the fibrous layer of the sternoclavicular disk. This articular disk was composed of a collagenous bundle on the sternum side of the articular disk in the SCJ and cellular components including connective tissue on the clavicular side of the articular disk. The thickness of the disk gradually increased from the inferior to superior portion. Collagen fibers type I, III and V and other extracellular matrices (ECMs) were detected in the hypertrophic zone in the clavicular and sternum side of the SCJ and in the connective tissue of the articulatio condylar. On the cervical surface of the articular disk, cellular activity was higher than on the sternum surface.

  2. Critical Buckling Pressure in Mouse Carotid Arteries with Altered Elastic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Luetkemeyer, Callan M.; James, Rhys H.; Devarakonda, Siva Teja; Le, Victoria P.; Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao; Wagenseil, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Arteries can buckle axially under applied critical buckling pressure due to a mechanical instability. Buckling can cause arterial tortuosity leading to flow irregularities and stroke. Genetic mutations in elastic fiber proteins are associated with arterial tortuosity in humans and mice, and may be the result of alterations in critical buckling pressure. Hence, the objective of this study is to investigate how genetic defects in elastic fibers affect buckling pressure. We use mouse models of human disease with reduced amounts of elastin (Eln+/−) and with defects in elastic fiber assembly due to the absence of fibulin-5 (Fbln5−/−). We find that Eln+/− arteries have reduced buckling pressure compared to their wild-type controls. Fbln5−/− arteries have similar buckling pressure to wild-type at low axial stretch, but increased buckling pressure at high stretch. We fit material parameters to mechanical test data for Eln+/−, Fbln5−/− and wild-type arteries using Fung and four-fiber strain energy functions. Fitted parameters are used to predict theoretical buckling pressure based on equilibrium of an inflated, buckled, thick-walled cylinder. In general, the theoretical predictions underestimate the buckling pressure at low axial stretch and overestimate the buckling pressure at high stretch. The theoretical predictions with both models replicate the increased buckling pressure at high stretch for Fbln5−/− arteries, but the four-fiber model predictions best match the experimental trends in buckling pressure changes with axial stretch. This study provides experimental and theoretical methods for further investigating the influence of genetic mutations in elastic fibers on buckling behavior and the development of arterial tortuosity. PMID:25771258

  3. Tapered fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometers for vibration and elasticity sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan-Kuang; Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Yi-Kun

    2013-05-06

    We demonstrate the optical measurements of heart-beat pulse rate and also elasticity of a polymeric tube, using a tapered fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. This device has two abrupt tapers in the Er/Yb codoped fiber and thus fractional amount of core mode is converted into cladding modes at the first abrupt taper. The core and cladding modes propagate through different optical paths and meet again at the second abrupt taper to produce interferences. The mechanical vibration signals generated by the blood vessels and by an inflated polymeric tube can perturb the optical paths of resonant modes to move around the resonant wavelengths. Thus, the cw laser signal is modulated to become pulses to reflect the heart-beat pulse rate and the elasticity of a polymeric tube, respectively.

  4. Interaction of Droplets Separated by an Elastic Film.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianshu; Xu, Xuejuan; Nadermann, Nichole; He, Zhenping; Jagota, Anand; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2017-01-10

    The Laplace pressure of a droplet placed on one side of an elastic thin film can cause significant deformation in the form of a bulge on its opposite side. Here, we show that this deformation can be detected by other droplets suspended on the opposite side of the film, leading to interaction between droplets separated by the solid (but deformable) film. The interaction is repulsive when the drops have a large overlap and attractive when they have a small overlap. Thus, if two identical droplets are placed right on top of each other (one on either side of the thin film), they tend to repel each other, eventually reaching an equilibrium configuration where there is a small overlap. This observation can be explained by analyzing the energy landscape of the droplets interacting via an elastically deformed film. We further demonstrate this idea by designing a pattern comprising a big central drop with satellite droplets. This phenomenon can lead to techniques for directed motion of droplets confined to one side of a thin elastic membrane by manipulations on the other side.

  5. Arterial elastic fiber structure. Function and potential roles in acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Pratt, B; Curci, J

    2010-10-01

    The lethality of acute aortic dissection is well recognized. Successful treatment and prevention of aortic dissection is going to be dependent upon an improved understanding of the molecular and physiologic events which predispose to dissection development and propagation. In this review, we will focus on the elastic fiber, one of the critical elements of the aortic wall matrix. Mechanical or functional failure of the elastin in the wall of the aorta likely predisposes to dissection as well as the post-dissection aortic degeneration with aneurysm formation. Insight into the role of the elastin and the elastic fiber in aortic dissection has recently been accelerated by research into the molecular mechanisms associated with hereditary propensity for aortic dissection, such as Marfan syndrome. These studies have implicated both structural and metabolic contributions of alterations in the scaffolding proteins in matrix elastic fibers. In particular, increased transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activity may play a prominent role in predisposing the aortic wall to dissection. The events which predispose to post-dissection aortic degeneration are somewhat less well defined. However, the loss of the structural integrity of the remaining elastic fibers leaves the wall weaker and prone to dilatation and rupture. It appears likely that the upregulation of several potent proteases, particularly those of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family such as MMP-9, are participating in the subsequent matrix damage. Novel medical treatments based on this pathologic data have been proposed and in some cases have made it to clinical trials. The ongoing study evaluating whether therapeutic inhibition of TGF-β may be useful in reducing the risk of aortic dissection in patients at high risk represents one promising new strategy in the treatment of this deadly disease.

  6. Crosslinked elastic fibers are necessary for low energy loss in the ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsil; Staiculescu, Marius Catalin; Cocciolone, Austin J; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Mecham, Robert P; Wagenseil, Jessica E

    2017-08-16

    In the large arteries, it is believed that elastin provides the resistance to stretch at low pressure, while collagen provides the resistance to stretch at high pressure. It is also thought that elastin is responsible for the low energy loss observed with cyclic loading. These tenets are supported through experiments that alter component amounts through protease digestion, vessel remodeling, normal growth, or in different artery types. Genetic engineering provides the opportunity to revisit these tenets through the loss of expression of specific wall components. We used newborn mice lacking elastin (Eln -/- ) or two key proteins (lysyl oxidase, Lox -/- , or fibulin-4, Fbln4 -/- ) that are necessary for the assembly of mechanically-functional elastic fibers to investigate the contributions of elastic fibers to large artery mechanics. We determined component content and organization and quantified the nonlinear and viscoelastic mechanical behavior of Eln -/- , Lox -/- , and Fbln4 -/- ascending aorta and their respective controls. We confirmed that the lack of elastin, fibulin-4, or lysyl oxidase leads to absent or highly fragmented elastic fibers in the aortic wall and a 56-97% decrease in crosslinked elastin amounts. We found that the resistance to stretch at low pressure is decreased only in Eln -/- aorta, confirming the role of elastin in the nonlinear mechanical behavior of the aortic wall. Dissipated energy with cyclic loading and unloading is increased 53-387% in Eln -/- , Lox -/- , and Fbln4 -/- aorta, indicating that not only elastin, but properly assembled and crosslinked elastic fibers, are necessary for low energy loss in the aorta. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adaptive alterations of elastic fibers in the bilaminar zone of rabbit temporomandibular joint following disc displacement.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhiyuan; Wu, Huiling; Feng, Jianying; Shibata, Takanori; Hu, Ji'an; Zhang, Yinkai; Xie, Zhijian

    2002-12-01

    To study the adaptive alterations of elastic fibers in the bilaminar zone (BZ) of rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ) following disc displacement. Twenty-eight Japanese white rabbits were used in this study. The right temporomandibular joints of 20 of 28 rabbits were subjected to the surgical procedure of anterior disc displacement (ADD). Four rabbits in the surgical group were sacrificed at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after operation. Their temporomandibular joints were studied histochemically. Elastic fibers were reduced in number and ran irregularly in the superior lamina of BZ from ADD rabbits. The jungly elastic fibers (EFs) could still be seen at 2 weeks after operation. At 4 weeks, the number of EFs decreased significantly; EFs lost their jungly arrangement and were shaped like rough dots, of which the arrangement and the lengths were different. Six weeks after operation, many EFs were replaced by distorted, uneven, non-oriented fine EFs, distributed unevenly and some thick or fine EFs that ran irregularly. The number of EFs decreased further and their arrangement was more deranged at 8 weeks. At 10 and 12 weeks, EFs in the superior lamina of BZ were similar to those at 8 weeks. Our results show that EFs lost their function as well as their distribution and arrangement after disc displacement.

  8. Measurement of the elastic modulus of spider mite silk fibers using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Stephen D.; Zhurov, Vladimir; Grbić, Vojislava; Grbić, Miodrag; Hutter, Jeffrey L.

    2013-04-01

    Bio-nanomaterials are one of the fastest developing sectors of industry and technology. Spider silk, a highly attractive light-weight biomaterial, has high tensile strength and elasticity and is compatible with human tissues, allowing for many areas of application. In comparison to spider silk fibers with diameters of several micrometers, spider mite silk fibers have much smaller diameters of tens of nanometers, making conventional tensile testing methods impractical. To determine the mechanical properties of adult and larval Tetranychus urticae silk fibers, we have performed three-point bending tests with an atomic force microscope. We found that because of the small diameters of these fibers, axial tension—due to both the applied force and a pre-existing strain—has a significant effect on the fiber response, even in the small-deformation limit. As a result, the typical Euler-Bernoulli-Timoshenko theory cannot be applied. We therefore follow the approach of Heidelberg et al. to develop a mechanical model of the fiber response that accounts for bending, an initial tension in the fibers, and a tension due to elongation during testing. This model provides self-consistent results, allowing us to determine that adult and larval fibers have Young's moduli of 24±3 GPa and 15±3 GPa, respectively. Both adult and larval fibers have an estimated ultimate strength of 200-300 MPa and a toughness of order 9 MJ/m3. We note that with increasing interest in the mechanical properties of very high aspect ratio nanomaterials, the influence of pre-existing tension must be considered in any measurements involving a bending test.

  9. Dynamic interrogator for elastic wave sensing using Fabry Perot filters based on fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Harish, Achar V; Varghese, Bibin; Rao, Babu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Srinivasan, Balaji

    2015-07-01

    Use of in-fiber Fabry-Perot (FP) filters based on fiber Bragg gratings as both sensor as well as an interrogator for enhancing the detection limit of elastic wave sensing is investigated in this paper. The sensitivity of such a demodulation scheme depends on the spectral discrimination of the sensor and interrogator gratings. Simulations have shown that the use of in-fiber FP filters with high finesse provide better performance in terms of sensitivity compared to the demodulation using fiber Bragg gratings. Based on these results, a dynamic interrogator capable of sensing acoustic waves with amplitude of less than 1 micro-strain over frequencies of 10 kHz to several 100 kHz has been implemented. Frequency response of the fiber Bragg gratings in the given experimental setup has been compared to that of the conventional piezo sensors demonstrating that fiber Bragg gratings can be used over a relatively broad frequency range. Dynamic interrogator has been packaged in a compact box without any degradation in its performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Variation of nanostructures, molecular interactions, and anisotropic elastic moduli of lignocellulosic cell walls with moisture

    Treesearch

    S. Youssefian; J. E. Jakes; N. Rahbar

    2017-01-01

    A combination of experimental, theoretical and numerical studies is used to investigate the variation of elastic moduli of lignocellulosic (bamboo) fiber cell walls with moisture content (MC). Our Nanoindentation results show that the longitudinal elastic modulus initially increased to a maximum value at about 3% MC and then decreased linearly with increasing MC. In...

  11. Fiber/collagen composites for ligament tissue engineering: influence of elastic moduli of sparse aligned fibers on mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Patrick S; Verbridge, Scott S; Dahlgren, Linda A; Kakar, Sanjeev; Guelcher, Scott A; Goldstein, Aaron S

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun microfibers are attractive for the engineering of oriented tissues because they present instructive topographic and mechanical cues to cells. However, high-density microfiber networks are too cell-impermeable for most tissue applications. Alternatively, the distribution of sparse microfibers within a three-dimensional hydrogel could present instructive cues to guide cell organization while not inhibiting cell behavior. In this study, thin (∼5 fibers thick) layers of aligned microfibers (0.7 μm) were embedded within collagen hydrogels containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cultured for up to 14 days, and assayed for expression of ligament markers and imaged for cell organization. These microfibers were generated through the electrospinning of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(ester-urethane) (PEUR), or a 75/25 PEUR/PCL blend to produce microfiber networks with elastic moduli of 31, 15, and 5.6 MPa, respectively. MSCs in composites containing 5.6 MPa fibers exhibited increased expression of the ligament marker scleraxis and the contractile phenotype marker α-smooth muscle actin versus the stiffer fiber composites. Additionally, cells within the 5.6 MPa microfiber composites were more oriented compared to cells within the 15 and 31 MPa microfiber composites. Together, these data indicate that the mechanical properties of microfiber/collagen composites can be tuned for the engineering of ligament and other target tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1894-1901, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Elastic interactions between two-dimensional geometric defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshe, Michael; Sharon, Eran; Kupferman, Raz

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a methodology applicable to a wide range of localized two-dimensional sources of stress. This methodology is based on a geometric formulation of elasticity. Localized sources of stress are viewed as singular defects—point charges of the curvature associated with a reference metric. The stress field in the presence of defects can be solved using a scalar stress function that generalizes the classical Airy stress function to the case of materials with nontrivial geometry. This approach allows the calculation of interaction energies between various types of defects. We apply our methodology to two physical systems: shear-induced failure of amorphous materials and the mechanical interaction between contracting cells.

  13. Elliptic flow from Coulomb interaction and low density elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuliang; Li, Qingfeng; Wang, Fuqiang

    2018-04-01

    In high energy heavy ion collisions and interacting cold atom systems, large elliptic flow anisotropies have been observed. For the large opacity (ρ σ L ˜103 ) of the latter hydrodynamics is a natural consequence, but for the small opacity (ρ σ L ˜1 ) of the former the hydrodynamic description is questionable. To shed light onto the situation, we simulate the expansion of a low density argon ion (or atom) system, initially trapped in an elliptical region, under the Coulomb interaction (or elastic scattering). Significant elliptic anisotropy is found in both cases, and the anisotropy depends on the initial spatial eccentricity and the density of the system. The results may provide insights into the physics of anisotropic flow in high energy heavy ion collisions and its role in the study of quantum chromodynamics.

  14. Clusterin associates with altered elastic fibers in human photoaged skin and prevents elastin from ultraviolet-induced aggregation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Janig, Elke; Haslbeck, Martin; Aigelsreiter, Ariane; Braun, Nathalie; Unterthor, Daniela; Wolf, Peter; Khaskhely, Noor M; Buchner, Johannes; Denk, Helmut; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2007-11-01

    Clusterin is a secreted glycoprotein with stress-induced expression in various diseased and aged tissues. It shares basic features with small heat shock proteins because it may stabilize proteins in a folding-competent state. Besides its presence in all human body fluids, clusterin associates with altered extracellular matrix proteins, such as beta-amyloid in Alzheimer senile plaques in the brain. Because dermal connective tissue alterations occur because of aging and UV radiation, we explored the occurrence of clusterin in young, aged, and sun-exposed human skin. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that clusterin is constantly associated with altered elastic fibers in aged human skin. Elastotic material of sun-damaged skin (solar elastosis), in particular, revealed a strong staining for clusterin. Because of the striking co-localization of clusterin with abnormal elastic material, we investigated the interaction of clusterin with elastin in vitro. A chaperone assay was established in which elastin was denatured by UV irradiation in the absence or presence of clusterin. This assay demonstrated that clusterin exerted a chaperone-like activity and effectively inhibited UV-induced aggregation of elastin. The interaction of both proteins was further analyzed by electron microscopy, size exclusion chromatography, and mass spectrometry, in which clusterin was found in a stable complex with elastin after UV exposure.

  15. Clusterin Associates with Altered Elastic Fibers in Human Photoaged Skin and Prevents Elastin from Ultraviolet-Induced Aggregation in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Janig, Elke; Haslbeck, Martin; Aigelsreiter, Ariane; Braun, Nathalie; Unterthor, Daniela; Wolf, Peter; Khaskhely, Noor M.; Buchner, Johannes; Denk, Helmut; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    Clusterin is a secreted glycoprotein with stress-induced expression in various diseased and aged tissues. It shares basic features with small heat shock proteins because it may stabilize proteins in a folding-competent state. Besides its presence in all human body fluids, clusterin associates with altered extracellular matrix proteins, such as β-amyloid in Alzheimer senile plaques in the brain. Because dermal connective tissue alterations occur because of aging and UV radiation, we explored the occurrence of clusterin in young, aged, and sun-exposed human skin. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that clusterin is constantly associated with altered elastic fibers in aged human skin. Elastotic material of sun-damaged skin (solar elastosis), in particular, revealed a strong staining for clusterin. Because of the striking co-localization of clusterin with abnormal elastic material, we investigated the interaction of clusterin with elastin in vitro. A chaperone assay was established in which elastin was denatured by UV irradiation in the absence or presence of clusterin. This assay demonstrated that clusterin exerted a chaperone-like activity and effectively inhibited UV-induced aggregation of elastin. The interaction of both proteins was further analyzed by electron microscopy, size exclusion chromatography, and mass spectrometry, in which clusterin was found in a stable complex with elastin after UV exposure. PMID:17872975

  16. Ultrashort optical waveguide excitations in uniaxial silica fibers: elastic collision scenarios.

    PubMed

    Kuetche, Victor K; Youssoufa, Saliou; Kofane, Timoleon C

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics of an uniaxial silica fiber under the viewpoint of propagation of ultimately ultrashort optical waveguide channels. As a result, we unveil the existence of three typical kinds of ultrabroadband excitations whose profiles strongly depend upon their angular momenta. Looking forward to surveying their scattering features, we unearth some underlying head-on scenarios of elastic collisions. Accordingly, we address some useful and straightforward applications in nonlinear optics through secured data transmission systems, as well as laser physics and soliton theory with optical soliton dynamics.

  17. [Study of collagen and elastic fibers of connective tissue in patients with and without primary inguinal hernia].

    PubMed

    Bórquez, Pablo; Garrido, Luis; Manterola, Carlos; Peña, Patricio; Schlageter, Carol; Orellana, Juan José; Ulloa, Hugo; Peña, Juan Luis

    2003-11-01

    There are few studies looking for collagen matrix defects in patients with inguinal bernia. To study the skin connective tissue in patients with and without inguinal bernia. Skin from the surgical wound was obtained from 23 patients with and 23 patients without inguinal bernia. The samples were processed for conventional light microscopy. Collagen fibers were stained with Van Giesson and elastic fibers with Weigert stain. Patients without hernia had compact collagen tracts homogeneously distributed towards the deep dermis. In contrast, patients with hernia had zones in the dermis with thinner and disaggregated collagen tracts. Connective tissue had a lax aspect in these patients. Collagen fiber density was 52% lower in patients with hernia, compared to subjects without hernia. No differences in elastic fiber density or distribution was observed between groups. Patients with inguinal bernia have alterations in skin collagen fiber quality and density.

  18. Extremely Elastic Wearable Carbon Nanotube Fiber Strain Sensor for Monitoring of Human Motion.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seongwoo; Lee, Phillip; Chou, Jeffrey B; Xu, Ruize; Zhao, Rong; Hart, Anastasios John; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2015-06-23

    The increasing demand for wearable electronic devices has made the development of highly elastic strain sensors that can monitor various physical parameters an essential factor for realizing next generation electronics. Here, we report an ultrahigh stretchable and wearable device fabricated from dry-spun carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers. Stretching the highly oriented CNT fibers grown on a flexible substrate (Ecoflex) induces a constant decrease in the conductive pathways and contact areas between nanotubes depending on the stretching distance; this enables CNT fibers to behave as highly sensitive strain sensors. Owing to its unique structure and mechanism, this device can be stretched by over 900% while retaining high sensitivity, responsiveness, and durability. Furthermore, the device with biaxially oriented CNT fiber arrays shows independent cross-sensitivity, which facilitates simultaneous measurement of strains along multiple axes. We demonstrated potential applications of the proposed device, such as strain gauge, single and multiaxial detecting motion sensors. These devices can be incorporated into various motion detecting systems where their applications are limited to their strain.

  19. Weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus elastic scattering response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2014-06-01

    Background: A model-independent formulation of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-nucleon scattering was recently developed in Galilean-invariant effective field theory. Purpose: Here we complete the embedding of this effective interaction in the nucleus, constructing the most general elastic nuclear cross section as a factorized product of WIMP and nuclear response functions. This form explicitly defines what can and cannot be learned about the low-energy constants of the effective theory—and consequently about candidate ultraviolet theories of dark matter—from elastic scattering experiments. Results: We identify those interactions that cannot be reliably treated in a spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation: For derivative- or velocity-dependent couplings, the SI/SD formulation generally mischaracterizes the relevant nuclear operator and its multipolarity (e.g., scalar or vector) and greatly underestimates experimental sensitivities. This can lead to apparent conflicts between experiments when, in fact, none may exist. The new nuclear responses appearing in the factorized cross section are related to familiar electroweak nuclear operators such as angular momentum l⃗(i) and the spin-orbit coupling σ⃗(i).l⃗(i). Conclusions: To unambiguously interpret experiments and to extract all of the available information on the particle physics of dark matter, experimentalists will need to (1) do a sufficient number of experiments with nuclear targets having the requisite sensitivities to the various operators and (2) analyze the results in a formalism that does not arbitrarily limit the candidate operators. In an appendix we describe a code that is available to help interested readers implement such an analysis.

  20. Influence of fiber architecture on the elastic an d inelastic response of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Wilt, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    This three part paper focuses on the effect of fiber architecture (i.e., shape and distribution) on the elastic and inelastic response of metal matrix composites. The first part provides an annotative survey of the literature, presented as a historical perspective, dealing with the effects of fiber shape and distribution on the response of advanced polymeric matrix and metal matrix composites. Previous investigations dealing with both continuously and discontinuously reinforced composites are included. A summary of the state-of-the-art will assist in defining new directions in this quickly reviving area of research. The second part outlines a recently developed analytical micromechanics model that is particularly well suited for studying the influence of these effects on the response of metal matrix composites. This micromechanics model, referred to as the generalized method of cells (GMC), is capable of predicting the overall, inelastic behavior of unidirectional, multi-phased composites given the properties of the constituents. In particular, the model is sufficiently general to predict the response of unidirectional composites reinforced by either continuous or discontinuous fibers with different inclusion shapes and spatial arrangements in the presence of either perfect or imperfect interfaces and/or interfacial layers. Recent developments regarding this promising model, as well as directions for future enhancements of the model's predictive capability, are included. Finally, the third pan provides qualitative results generated using GMC for a representative titanium matix composite system, SCS-6/TlMETAL 21S. Results are presented that correctly demonstrate the relative effects of fiber arrangement and shape on the longitudinal and transverse stress-strain and creep response, with both strong and weak fiber/matrix interfacial bonds. The fiber arrangements include square, square diagonal, hexagonal and rectangular periodic arrays, as well as a random array. The

  1. Interaction between carbon fibers and polymer sizing: Influence of fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosburger-Will, Judith; Bauer, Matthias; Laukmanis, Eva; Horny, Robert; Wetjen, Denise; Manske, Tamara; Schmidt-Stein, Felix; Töpker, Jochen; Horn, Siegfried

    2018-05-01

    Different aspects of the interaction of carbon fibers and epoxy-based polymer sizings are investigated, e.g. the wetting behavior, the strength of adhesion between fiber and sizing, and the thermal stability of the sizing layer. The influence of carbon fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity is investigated using fibers of different degree of anodic oxidation and sizings with different number of reactive epoxy groups per molecule. Wetting of the carbon fibers by the sizing dispersion is found to be specified by both, the degree of fiber activation and the sizing reactivity. In contrast, adhesion strength between fibers and sizing is dominated by the surface chemistry of the carbon fibers. Here, the number of surface oxygen groups seems to be the limiting factor. We also find that the sizing and the additional functionalities induced by anodic oxidation are removed by thermal treatment at 600 °C, leaving the carbon fiber in its original state after carbonization.

  2. Compressible Fluids Interacting with a Linear-Elastic Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breit, Dominic; Schwarzacher, Sebastian

    2018-05-01

    We study the Navier-Stokes equations governing the motion of an isentropic compressible fluid in three dimensions interacting with a flexible shell of Koiter type. The latter one constitutes a moving part of the boundary of the physical domain. Its deformation is modeled by a linearized version of Koiter's elastic energy. We show the existence of weak solutions to the corresponding system of PDEs provided the adiabatic exponent satisfies {γ > 12/7} ({γ >1 } in two dimensions). The solution exists until the moving boundary approaches a self-intersection. This provides a compressible counterpart of the results in Lengeler and Růžičkaka (Arch Ration Mech Anal 211(1):205-255, 2014) on incompressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  3. Elasticity and photoelasticity relationships for polyethylene terephthalate fiber networks by molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Kapileswar; Das, Sushanta; Nanavati, Hemant

    2008-01-01

    We present a framework for the development of elasticity and photoelasticity relationships for polyethylene terephthalate fiber networks, incorporating aspects of the primary molecular structure. Semicrystalline polymeric fiber networks are modeled as sequentially arranged crystalline and amorphous regions. Rotational isomeric states-Monte Carlo simulations of amorphous chains of up to 360 bonds (degree of polymerization, DP =60), confined between and bridging infinite impenetrable crystalline walls, have been characterized by Ω, the probability density of the intercrystal separation h, and Δβ, the polarizability anisotropy. lnΩ and Δβ have been modeled as functions of h, yielding the chain deformation relationships. The development has been extended to the fiber network to yield the photoelasticity relationships. We execute our framework by fitting to experimental stress-elongation data and employing the single fitted parameter to directly predict the birefringence-elongation behavior, without any further fitting. Incorporating the effect of strain-induced crystallization into the framework makes it physically more meaningful and yields accurate predictions of the birefringence-elongation behavior.

  4. Bundling of elastic filaments induced by hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Yi; Page, William; Poole, Robert J.; Lauga, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Peritrichous bacteria swim in viscous fluids by rotating multiple helical flagellar filaments. As the bacterium swims forward, all its flagella rotate in synchrony behind the cell in a tight helical bundle. When the bacterium changes its direction, the flagellar filaments unbundle and randomly reorient the cell for a short period of time before returning to their bundled state and resuming swimming. This rapid bundling and unbundling is, at its heart, a mechanical process whereby hydrodynamic interactions balance with elasticity to determine the time-varying deformation of the filaments. Inspired by this biophysical problem, we present in this paper what is perhaps the simplest model of bundling whereby two or more straight elastic filaments immersed in a viscous fluid rotate about their centerline, inducing rotational flows which tend to bend the filaments around each other. We derive an integrodifferential equation governing the shape of the filaments resulting from mechanical balance in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number. We show that such equation may be evaluated asymptotically analytically in the long-wavelength limit, leading to a local partial differential equation governed by a single dimensionless bundling number. A numerical study of the dynamics predicted by the model reveals the presence of two configuration instabilities with increasing bundling numbers: first to a crossing state where filaments touch at one point and then to a bundled state where filaments wrap along each other in a helical fashion. We also consider the case of multiple filaments and the unbundling dynamics. We next provide an intuitive physical model for the crossing instability and show that it may be used to predict analytically its threshold and adapted to address the transition to a bundling state. We then use a macroscale experimental implementation of the two-filament configuration in order to validate our theoretical predictions and obtain excellent agreement. This long

  5. Controlling of water collection ability by an elasticity-regulated bioinspired fiber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sijie; Feng, Shile; Hou, Yongping; Zheng, Yongmei

    2015-03-01

    A special artificial spider silk is presented which is fabricated by using both an elastic polymer and a fiber, and the water collection behavior is investigated. Through exerting tension in varying degree, the length of the three-phase contact line (TCL) and the area of spindle knot can be regulated readily, which makes a great contribution to the improvement of collecting efficiency and water-hanging ability. The water-hanging ability can be predicted at a given stretching ratio according to the given expression of the TCL. As a result, liquid capture or release of distinct measure can be achieved via exerting tension. This research is helpful to design smart materials for developing applications in fogwater collection, dehumidification, high-efficiency humidity control, and controllable adhesion. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Virtual optical network mapping and core allocation in elastic optical networks using multi-core fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Hejun; Wang, Yuping; Xu, Zhanqi; Hao, Shanshan; Wang, Xiaoli

    2017-11-01

    Virtualization technology can greatly improve the efficiency of the networks by allowing the virtual optical networks to share the resources of the physical networks. However, it will face some challenges, such as finding the efficient strategies for virtual nodes mapping, virtual links mapping and spectrum assignment. It is even more complex and challenging when the physical elastic optical networks using multi-core fibers. To tackle these challenges, we establish a constrained optimization model to determine the optimal schemes of optical network mapping, core allocation and spectrum assignment. To solve the model efficiently, tailor-made encoding scheme, crossover and mutation operators are designed. Based on these, an efficient genetic algorithm is proposed to obtain the optimal schemes of the virtual nodes mapping, virtual links mapping, core allocation. The simulation experiments are conducted on three widely used networks, and the experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed model and algorithm.

  7. Deposition of tropoelastin into the extracellular matrix requires a competent elastic fiber scaffold but not live cells.

    PubMed

    Kozel, Beth A; Ciliberto, Christopher H; Mecham, Robert P

    2004-04-01

    The initial steps of elastic fiber assembly were investigated using an in vitro assembly model in which purified recombinant tropoelastin (rbTE) was added to cultures of live or dead cells. The ability of tropoelastin to associate with preexisting elastic fibers or microfibrils in the extracellular matrix was then assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy using species-specific tropoelastin antibodies. Results show that rbTE can associate with elastic fiber components in the absence of live cells through a process that does not depend on crosslink formation. Time course studies show a transformation of the deposited protein from an initial globular appearance early in culture to a more fibrous structure as the matrix matures. Deposition required the C-terminal region of tropoelastin and correlated with the presence of preexisting elastic fibers or microfibrils. Association of exogenously added tropoelastin to the cellular extracellular matrix was inhibited by the addition of heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfate sugars. Together, these results suggest that the matrix elaborated by the cell is sufficient for the initial deposition of tropoelastin in the extracellular space and that elastin assembly may be influenced by the composition of sulfated proteoglycans in the matrix.

  8. Nucleon-nucleon interactions from dispersion relations: Elastic partial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaladejo, M.; Oller, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    We consider nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions from chiral effective field theory. In this work we restrict ourselves to the elastic NN scattering. We apply the N/D method to calculate the NN partial waves taking as input the one-pion exchange discontinuity along the left-hand cut. This discontinuity is amenable to a chiral power counting as discussed by Lacour, Oller, and Meißner [Ann. Phys. (NY)APNYA60003-491610.1016/j.aop.2010.06.012 326, 241 (2011)], with one-pion exchange as its leading order contribution. The resulting linear integral equation for a partial wave with orbital angular momentum ℓ≥2 is solved in the presence of ℓ-1 constraints, so as to guarantee the right behavior of the D- and higher partial waves near threshold. The calculated NN partial waves are based on dispersion relations and are independent of regulator. This method can also be applied to higher orders in the calculation of the discontinuity along the left-hand cut and extended to triplet coupled partial waves.

  9. The Structural Role of Elastic Fibers in the Cornea Investigated Using a Mouse Model for Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    White, Tomas L.; Lewis, Philip; Hayes, Sally; Fergusson, James; Bell, James; Farinha, Luis; White, Nick S.; Pereira, Lygia V.; Meek, Keith M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The presence of fibrillin-rich elastic fibers in the cornea has been overlooked in recent years. The aim of the current study was to elucidate their functional role using a mouse model for Marfan syndrome, defective in fibrillin-1, the major structural component of the microfibril bundles that constitute most of the elastic fibers. Methods Mouse corneas were obtained from animals with a heterozygous fibrillin-1 mutation (Fbn1+/−) and compared to wild type controls. Corneal thickness and radius of curvature were calculated using optical coherence tomography microscopy. Elastic microfibril bundles were quantified and visualized in three-dimensions using serial block face scanning electron microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was used to analyze stromal ultrastructure and proteoglycan distribution. Center-to-center average interfibrillar spacing was determined using x-ray scattering. Results Fbn1+/− corneas were significantly thinner than wild types and displayed a higher radius of curvature. In the Fbn1+/− corneas, elastic microfibril bundles were significantly reduced in density and disorganized compared to wild-type controls, in addition to containing a higher average center-to-center collagen interfibrillar spacing in the center of the cornea. No other differences were detected in stromal ultrastructure or proteoglycan distribution between the two groups. Proteoglycan side chains appeared to colocalize with the microfibril bundles. Conclusions Elastic fibers have an important, multifunctional role in the cornea as highlighted by the differences observed between Fbn1+/− and wild type animals. We contend that the presence of normal quantities of structurally organized elastic fibers are required to maintain the correct geometry of the cornea, which is disrupted in Marfan syndrome. PMID:28395026

  10. Theory of equilibria of elastic 2-braids with interstrand interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostin, E. L.; van der Heijden, G. H. M.

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by continuum models for DNA supercoiling we formulate a theory for equilibria of 2-braids, i.e., structures formed by two elastic rods winding around each other in continuous contact and subject to a local interstrand interaction. No assumption is made on the shape of the contact curve. The theory is developed in terms of a moving frame of directors attached to one of the strands. The other strand is tracked by including in this frame the normalised closest-approach chord connecting the two strands. The kinematic constant-distance constraint is formulated at strain level through the introduction of what we call braid strains. As a result the total potential energy involves arclength derivatives of these strains, thus giving rise to a second-order variational problem. The Euler-Lagrange equations for this problem give balance equations for the overall braid force and moment referred to the moving frame as well as differential equations that can be interpreted as effective constitutive relations encoding the effect that the second strand has on the first as the braid deforms under the action of end loads. Hard contact models are used to obtain the normal contact pressure between strands that has to be non-negative for a physically realisable solution without the need for external devices such as clamps or glue to keep the strands together. The theory is first illustrated by a number of problems that can be solved analytically and then applied to several new problems that have not hitherto been treated.

  11. On boundary-element models of elastic fault interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Schott, B.

    2002-12-01

    We present the freely available, modular, and UNIX command-line based boundary-element program interact. It is yet another implementation of Crouch and Starfield's (1983) 2-D and Okada's (1992) half-space solutions for constant slip on planar fault segments in an elastic medium. Using unconstrained or non-negative, standard-package matrix routines, the code can solve for slip distributions on faults given stress boundary conditions, or vice versa, both in a local or global reference frame. Based on examples of complex fault geometries from structural geology, we discuss the effects of different stress boundary conditions on the predicted slip distributions of interacting fault systems. Such one-step calculations can be useful to estimate the moment-release efficiency of alternative fault geometries, and so to evaluate the likelihood which system may be realized in nature. A further application of the program is the simulation of cyclic fault rupture based on simple static-kinetic friction laws. We comment on two issues: First, that of the appropriate rupture algorithm. Cellular models of seismicity often employ an exhaustive rupture scheme: fault cells fail if some critical stress is reached, then cells slip once-only by a given amount, and subsequently the redistributed stress is used to check for triggered activations on other cells. We show that this procedure can lead to artificial complexity in seismicity if time-to-failure is not calculated carefully because of numerical noise. Second, we address the question if foreshocks can be viewed as direct expressions of a simple statistical distribution of frictional strength on individual faults. Repetitive failure models based on a random distribution of frictional coefficients initially show irregular seismicity. By repeatedly selecting weaker patches, the fault then evolves into a quasi-periodic cycle. Each time, the pre-mainshock events build up the cumulative moment release in a non-linear fashion. These

  12. Interactions between Surfactants in Solution and Electrospun Protein Fibers: Effects on Release Behavior and Fiber Properties.

    PubMed

    Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming; Chronakis, Ioannis S; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2016-03-07

    Intermolecular interaction phenomena occurring between endogenous compounds, such as proteins and bile salts, and electrospun compounds are so far unreported, despite the exposure of fibers to such biorelevant compounds when applied for biomedical purposes, e.g., tissue engineering, wound healing, and drug delivery. In the present study, we present a systematic investigation of how surfactants and proteins, as physiologically relevant components, interact with insulin-loaded fish sarcoplasmic protein (FSP) electrospun fibers (FSP-Ins fibers) in solution and thereby affect fiber properties such as accessible surface hydrophilicity, physical stability, and release characteristics of an encapsulated drug. Interactions between insulin-loaded protein fibers and five anionic surfactants (sodium taurocholate, sodium taurodeoxycholate, sodium glycocholate, sodium glycodeoxycholate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate), a cationic surfactant (benzalkonium chloride), and a neutral surfactant (Triton X-100) were studied. The anionic surfactants increased the insulin release in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the neutral surfactant had no significant effect on the release. Interestingly, only minute amounts of insulin were released from the fibers when benzalkonium chloride was present. The FSP-Ins fibers appeared dense after incubation with this cationic surfactant, whereas high fiber porosity was observed after incubation with anionic or neutral surfactants. Contact angle measurements and staining with the hydrophobic dye 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid indicated that the FSP-Ins fibers were hydrophobic, and showed that the fiber surface properties were affected differently by the surfactants. Bovine serum albumin also affected insulin release in vitro, indicating that also proteins may affect the fiber performance in an in vivo setting.

  13. Drug interactions with the dietary fiber Plantago ovata husk.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Nelida; Lopez, Cristina; Díez, Raquel; Garcia, Juan J; Diez, Maria Jose; Sahagun, Ana; Sierra, Matilde

    2012-11-01

    Plantago ovata husk is a viscous water-soluble fiber obtained by milling the seed of Plantago ovata. The increased use of this compound for the treatment of diseases makes it necessary to know of its potential drug interactions. The present paper reviews the literature concerning interactions between drugs and the dietary fiber Plantago ovata husk. All publications which might describe interactions between the dietetic fiber Plantago ovata husk and other drugs were identified by searches using databases such as MEDLINE or EMBASE. Drug interactions have been the subject of numerous studies, but few of them have been carried out with dietary fiber and the results obtained have often been variable. The incidence and importance of interactions between fiber and drugs has increased due to a worldwide rise in the use of dietary fiber. Plantago ovata husk has the potential for producing both benefits and risks with both desirable and undesirable effects when coadministered with drugs. More clinical studies are justifiably needed to improve treatments and to better evaluate patient safety.

  14. Coulomb-like elastic interaction induced by symmetry breaking in nematic liquid crystal colloids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom-Kyu; Kim, Sung-Jo; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lev, Bohdan

    2017-11-21

    It is generally thought that colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal do not generate the first multipole term called deformation elastic charge as it violates the mechanical equilibrium. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this is not the case, and deformation elastic charges, as well as dipoles and quadrupoles, can be induced through anisotropic boundary conditions. We report the first direct observation of Coulomb-like elastic interactions between colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal. The behaviour of two spherical colloidal particles with asymmetric anchoring conditions induced by asymmetric alignment is investigated experimentally; the interaction of two particles located at the boundary of twist and parallel aligned regions is observed. We demonstrate that such particles produce deformation elastic charges and interact by Coulomb-like interactions.

  15. Bioreactor-induced mesenchymal progenitor cell differentiation and elastic fiber assembly in engineered vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shigang; Mequanint, Kibret

    2017-09-01

    In vitro maturation of engineered vascular tissues (EVT) requires the appropriate incorporation of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and extracellular matrix (ECM) components similar to native arteries. To this end, the aim of the current study was to fabricate 4mm inner diameter vascular tissues using mesenchymal progenitor cells seeded into tubular scaffolds. A dual-pump bioreactor operating either in perfusion or pulsatile perfusion mode was used to generate physiological-like stimuli to promote progenitor cell differentiation, extracellular elastin production, and tissue maturation. Our data demonstrated that pulsatile forces and perfusion of 3D tubular constructs from both the lumenal and ablumenal sides with culture media significantly improved tissue assembly, effectively inducing mesenchymal progenitor cell differentiation to SMCs with contemporaneous elastin production. With bioreactor cultivation, progenitor cells differentiated toward smooth muscle lineage characterized by the expression of smooth muscle (SM)-specific markers smooth muscle alpha actin (SM-α-actin) and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). More importantly, pulsatile perfusion bioreactor cultivation enhanced the synthesis of tropoelastin and its extracellular cross-linking into elastic fiber compared with static culture controls. Taken together, the current study demonstrated progenitor cell differentiation and vascular tissue assembly, and provides insights into elastin synthesis and assembly to fibers. Incorporation of elastin into engineered vascular tissues represents a critical design goal for both mechanical and biological functions. In the present study, we seeded porous tubular scaffolds with multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells and cultured in dual-pump pulsatile perfusion bioreactor. Physiological-like stimuli generated by bioreactor not only induced mesenchymal progenitor cell differentiation to vascular smooth muscle lineage but also actively promoted elastin synthesis and

  16. Tensile and compressive modulus of elasticity of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Park, J. K.; Choi, W. C.; Yoon, S. J.

    2018-06-01

    Many researches focused on the mechanical properties of steel and concrete have been carried out for applications in the construction industry. However, in order to clarify the mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (PFRP) structural members for construction, testing is needed. Deriving the mechanical properties of PFRP structural members through testing is difficult, however, because some members cannot be tested easily due to their cross-section dimensions. This paper reports a part of studies that attempt to present conservative results in the case of members that cannot be tested reasonably. The authors obtained and compared experimental and theoretical modulus of elasticity values. If the mechanical properties of PFRP members can be predicted using reasonable and conservative values, then the structure can be designed economically and safely even in the early design stages. To this end, this paper proposes a strain energy approach as a conservative and convenient way to predict the mechanical properties of PFRP structural members. The strain energy data obtained can be used to predict the mechanical properties of PFRP members in the construction field.

  17. Examining platelet-fibrin interactions during traumatic shock in a swine model using platelet contractile force and clot elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan J; Martin, Erika J; Brophy, Donald F; Ward, Kevin R

    2011-07-01

    A significant proportion of severely injured patients develop early coagulopathy, characterized by abnormal clot formation, which impairs resuscitation and increases mortality. We have previously demonstrated an isolated decrease in clot strength by thrombelastography in a swine model of nonresuscitated traumatic shock. In order to more closely examine platelet-fibrin interactions in this setting, we define the observed decrease in clot strength in terms of platelet-induced clot contraction and clot elastic modulus using the Hemostasis Analysis System (HAS) (Hemodyne Inc., Richmond, Virginia, USA). Whole blood was sampled for HAS measurements, metabolic measurements, cell counts, and fibrinogen concentration at baseline prior to injury and again at a predetermined level of traumatic shock defined by oxygen debt. Male swine (N=17) received femur fracture and controlled arterial hemorrhage to achieve an oxygen debt of 80 ml/kg. Platelet counts were unchanged, but fibrinogen concentration was reduced significantly during shock (167.6 vs. 66.7 mg/dl, P=0.0007). Platelet contractile force generated during clot formation did not change during shock (11.7 vs. 10.4 kdynes, P=0.41), but clot elastic modulus was dynamically altered, resulting in a lower final value (22.9 vs. 17.3 kdynes/cm, P<0.0001). In this model of traumatic shock, platelet function was preserved, whereas terminal clot elastic modulus was reduced during shock in a manner most consistent with early changes in the mechanical properties of the developing fibrin fiber network.

  18. Cascaded interactions between Raman induced solitons and dispersive waves in photonic crystal fibers at the advanced stage of supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Driben, Rodislav; Mitschke, Fedor; Zhavoronkov, Nickolai

    2010-12-06

    The complex mechanism of multiple interactions between solitary and dispersive waves at the advanced stage of supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber is studied in experiment and numerical simulations. Injection of high power negatively chirped pulses near zero dispersion frequency results in an effective soliton fission process with multiple interactions between red shifted Raman solitons and dispersive waves. These interactions may result in relative acceleration of solitons with further collisions between them of quasi-elastic or quasi-plastic kinds. In the spectral domain these processes result in enhancement of certain wavelength regions within the spectrum or development of a new significant band at the long wavelength side of the spectrum.

  19. Numerical Estimation of the Elastic Properties of Thin-Walled Structures Manufactured from Short-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbach, H.; Naumenko, K.; L'vov, G. I.; Pilipenko, S. N.

    2003-05-01

    A model which allows us to estimate the elastic properties of thin-walled structures manufactured by injection molding is presented. The starting step is the numerical prediction of the microstructure of a short-fiber-reinforced composite developed during the filling stage of the manufacturing process. For this purpose, the Moldflow Plastic Insight® commercial program is used. As a result of simulating the filling process, a second-rank orientation tensor characterizing the microstructure of the material is obtained. The elastic properties of the prepared material locally depend on the orientational distribution of fibers. The constitutive equation is formulated by means of orientational averaging for a given orientation tensor. The tensor of elastic material properties is computed and translated into the format for a stress-strain analysis based on the ANSYSÒ finite-element code. The numerical procedure and the convergence of results are discussed for a thin strip, a rectangular plate, and a shell of revolution. The influence of manufacturing conditions on the stress-strain state of statically loaded thin-walled elements is illustrated.

  20. Effect of vaginal distention on elastic fiber synthesis and matrix degradation in the vaginal wall: potential role in the pathogenesis of pelvic organ prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, D. D.; Acevedo, J. F.; Word, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity is increased in the postpartum vagina of wild-type (WT) animals. This degradative activity is also accompanied by a burst in elastic fiber synthesis and assembly. The mechanisms that precipitate these changes are unclear. The goals of this study were to determine how vaginal distention (such as in parturition) affects elastic fiber homeostasis in the vaginal wall and the potential significance of these changes in the pathogenesis of pelvic organ prolapse. Vaginal distention with a balloon simulating parturition resulted in increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the vaginal wall of nonpregnant and pregnant animals. This was accompanied by visible fragmented and disrupted elastic fibers in the vaginal wall. In nonpregnant animals, the abundant amounts of tropoelastin and fibulin-5 in the vagina were not increased further by distention. In contrast, in pregnant animals, the suppressed levels of both proteins were increased 3-fold after vaginal distention. Distention performed in fibulin-5-deficient (Fbln5−/−) mice with defective elastic fiber synthesis and assembly induced accelerated pelvic organ prolapse, which never recovered. We conclude that, in pregnant mice, vaginal distention results in increased protease activity in the vaginal wall but also increased synthesis of proteins important for elastic fiber assembly. Distention may thereby contribute to the burst of elastic fiber synthesis in the postpartum vagina. The finding that distention results in accelerated pelvic organ prolapse in Fbln5−/− animals, but not in WT, indicates that elastic fiber synthesis is crucial for recovery of the vaginal wall from distention-induced increases in vaginal protease activity. PMID:18635445

  1. Generation of narrowband elastic waves with a fiber laser and its application to the imaging of defects in a plate.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Ishihara, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Pulsed laser equipment can be used to generate elastic waves through the instantaneous reaction of thermal expansion or ablation of the material; however, we cannot control the waveform generated by the laser in the same manner that we can when piezoelectric transducers are used as exciters. This study investigates the generation of narrowband tone-burst waves using a fiber laser of the type that is widely used in laser beam machining. Fiber lasers can emit laser pulses with a high repetition rate on the order of MHz, and the laser pulses can be modulated to a burst train by external signals. As a consequence of the burst laser emission, a narrowband tone-burst elastic wave is generated. We experimentally confirmed that the elastic waves agreed well with the modulation signals in time domain waveforms and their frequency spectra, and that waveforms can be controlled by the generation technique. We also apply the generation technique to defect imaging with a scanning laser source. In the experiments, with small laser emission energy, we were not able to obtain defect images from the signal amplitude due to low signal-to-noise ratio, whereas using frequency spectrum peaks of the tone-burst signals gave clear defect images, which indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio is improved in the frequency domain by using this technique for the generation of narrowband elastic waves. Moreover, even for defect imaging at a single receiving point, defect images were enhanced by taking an average of distributions of frequency spectrum peaks at different frequencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. P16INK4a Positive Cells in Human Skin Are Indicative of Local Elastic Fiber Morphology, Facial Wrinkling, and Perceived Age

    PubMed Central

    Waaijer, Mariëtte E. C.; Gunn, David A.; Adams, Peter D.; Pawlikowski, Jeff S.; Griffiths, Christopher E. M.; van Heemst, Diana; Slagboom, P. Eline; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Maier, Andrea B.

    2016-01-01

    Senescent cells are more prevalent in aged human skin compared to young, but evidence that senescent cells are linked to other biomarkers of aging is scarce. We counted cells positive for the tumor suppressor and senescence associated protein p16INK4a in sun-protected upper-inner arm skin biopsies from 178 participants (aged 45–81 years) of the Leiden Longevity Study. Local elastic fiber morphology, facial wrinkles, and perceived facial age were compared to tertiles of p16INK4a counts, while adjusting for chronological age and other potential confounders. The numbers of epidermal and dermal p16INK4a positive cells were significantly associated with age-associated elastic fiber morphologic characteristics, such as longer and a greater number of elastic fibers. The p16INK4a positive epidermal cells (identified as primarily melanocytes) were also significantly associated with more facial wrinkles and a higher perceived age. Participants in the lowest tertile of epidermal p16INK4a counts looked 3 years younger than those in the highest tertile, independently of chronological age and elastic fiber morphology. In conclusion, p16INK4a positive cell numbers in sun-protected human arm skin are indicative of both local elastic fiber morphology and the extent of aging visible in the face. PMID:26286607

  3. Numerical simulation of fiber interaction in short-fiber injection-molded composite using different cavity geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato

    2016-03-01

    The theoretical fiber-interaction model for calculating the fiber orientation in the injection molded short fiber/thermoplastic composite parts was proposed. The proposed model included the fiber dynamics simulation in order to obtain an equation of the global interaction coefficient and accurate estimate of the fiber interacts at all orientation states. The steps to derive the equation for this coefficient in short fiber suspension as a function of the fiber aspect ratio, volume fraction and general shear rate are delineated. Simultaneously, the high-resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160α was used to observe fiber distribution of short-glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide specimens using different cavity geometries. The fiber orientation tensor components are then calculated. Experimental orientation measurements of short-glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide is used to check the ability of present theory for predicting orientation. The experiments and predictions show a quantitative agreement and confirm the basic understanding of fiber orientation in injection-molded composites.

  4. Numerical simulation of fiber interaction in short-fiber injection-molded composite using different cavity geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen, E-mail: nttbinh@kit.ac.jp; Yokoyama, Atsushi, E-mail: yokoyama@kit.ac.jp; Hamanaka, Senji

    The theoretical fiber-interaction model for calculating the fiber orientation in the injection molded short fiber/thermoplastic composite parts was proposed. The proposed model included the fiber dynamics simulation in order to obtain an equation of the global interaction coefficient and accurate estimate of the fiber interacts at all orientation states. The steps to derive the equation for this coefficient in short fiber suspension as a function of the fiber aspect ratio, volume fraction and general shear rate are delineated. Simultaneously, the high-resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160α was used to observe fiber distribution of short-glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide specimens using different cavitymore » geometries. The fiber orientation tensor components are then calculated. Experimental orientation measurements of short-glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide is used to check the ability of present theory for predicting orientation. The experiments and predictions show a quantitative agreement and confirm the basic understanding of fiber orientation in injection-molded composites.« less

  5. Determining the elastic properties of aptamer-ricin single molecule multiple pathway interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Park, Bosoon; Kwon, Yongkuk; Xu, Bingqian

    2014-05-01

    We report on the elastic properties of ricin and anti-ricin aptamer interactions, which showed three stable binding conformations, each of which has its special elastic properties. These different unbinding pathways were investigated by the dynamic force spectroscopy. A series-spring model combining the worm-like-chain model and Hook's law was used to estimate the apparent spring constants of the aptamer and linker molecule polyethylene glycol. The aptamer in its three different unbinding pathways showed different apparent spring constants. The two reaction barriers in the unbinding pathways also influence the apparent spring constant of the aptamer. This special elastic behavior of aptamer was used to distinguish its three unbinding pathways under different loading rates. This method also offered a way to distinguish and discard the non-specific interactions in single molecule experiments.

  6. A loosely-coupled scheme for the interaction between a fluid, elastic structure and poroelastic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukač, M.

    2016-05-01

    We model the interaction between an incompressible, viscous fluid, thin elastic structure and a poroelastic material. The poroelastic material is modeled using the Biot's equations of dynamic poroelasticity. The fluid, elastic structure and the poroelastic material are fully coupled, giving rise to a nonlinear, moving boundary problem with novel energy estimates. We present a modular, loosely coupled scheme where the original problem is split into the fluid sub-problem, elastic structure sub-problem and poroelasticity sub-problem. An energy estimate associated with the stability of the scheme is derived in the case where one of the coupling parameters, β, is equal to zero. We present numerical tests where we investigate the effects of the material properties of the poroelastic medium on the fluid flow. Our findings indicate that the flow patterns highly depend on the storativity of the poroelastic material and cannot be captured by considering fluid-structure interaction only.

  7. Determination of Elastic Moduli of Fiber-Resin Composites Using an Impulse Excitation Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.; Johnson, Jeffrey J.

    1996-01-01

    The elastic moduli of graphite/epoxy and graphite/cyanate ester composite specimens with various laminate lay-ups was determined using an impulse excitation/acoustic resonance technique and compared to those determined using traditional strain gauge and extensometer techniques. The stiffness results were also compared to those predicted from laminate theory using uniaxial properties. The specimen stiffnesses interrogated ranged from 12 to 30 Msi. The impulse excitation technique was found to be a relatively quick and accurate method for determining elastic moduli with minimal specimen preparation and no requirement for mechanical loading frames. The results of this investigation showed good correlation between the elastic modulus determined using the impulse excitation technique, strain gauge and extensometer techniques, and modulus predicted from laminate theory. The flexural stiffness determined using the impulse excitation was in good agreement with that predicted from laminate theory. The impulse excitation/acoustic resonance interrogation technique has potential as a quality control test.

  8. Local interaction simulation approach to modelling nonclassical, nonlinear elastic behavior in solids.

    PubMed

    Scalerandi, Marco; Agostini, Valentina; Delsanto, Pier Paolo; Van Den Abeele, Koen; Johnson, Paul A

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies show that a broad category of materials share "nonclassical" nonlinear elastic behavior much different from "classical" (Landau-type) nonlinearity. Manifestations of "nonclassical" nonlinearity include stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasistatic experiments, and specific dependencies of the harmonic amplitudes with respect to the drive amplitude in dynamic wave experiments, which are remarkably different from those predicted by the classical theory. These materials have in common soft "bond" elements, where the elastic nonlinearity originates, contained in hard matter (e.g., a rock sample). The bond system normally comprises a small fraction of the total material volume, and can be localized (e.g., a crack in a solid) or distributed, as in a rock. In this paper a model is presented in which the soft elements are treated as hysteretic or reversible elastic units connected in a one-dimensional lattice to elastic elements (grains), which make up the hard matrix. Calculations are performed in the framework of the local interaction simulation approach (LISA). Experimental observations are well predicted by the model, which is now ready both for basic investigations about the physical origins of nonlinear elasticity and for applications to material damage diagnostics.

  9. Three-body interactions and the elastic constants of hcp solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Ashleigh L.; Hinde, Robert J.

    2017-09-01

    The effect of three-body interactions on the elastic properties of hexagonal close packed solid 4He is investigated using variational path integral (VPI) Monte Carlo simulations. The solid's nonzero elastic constants are calculated, at T = 0 K and for a range of molar volumes from 7.88 cm3/mol to 20.78 cm3/mol, from the bulk modulus and the three pure shear constants C0, C66, and C44. Three-body interactions are accounted for using our recently reported perturbative treatment based on the nonadditive three-body potential of Cencek et al. Previous studies have attempted to account for the effect of three-body interactions on the elastic properties of solid 4He; however, these calculations have treated zero point motions using either the Einstein or Debye approximations, which are insufficient in the molar volume range where solid 4He is characterized as a quantum solid. Our VPI calculations allow for a more accurate treatment of the zero point motions which include atomic correlation. From these calculations, we find that agreement with the experimental bulk modulus is significantly improved when three-body interactions are considered. In addition, three-body interactions result in non-negligible differences in the calculated pure shear constants and nonzero elastic constants, particularly at higher densities, where differences of up to 26.5% are observed when three-body interactions are included. We compare to the available experimental data and find that our results are generally in as good or better agreement with experiment as previous theoretical investigations.

  10. Certain bright soliton interactions of the Sasa-Satsuma equation in a monomode optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Tian, Bo; Chai, Han-Peng; Yuan, Yu-Qiang

    2017-03-01

    Under investigation in this paper is the Sasa-Satsuma equation, which describes the propagation of ultrashort pulses in a monomode fiber with the third-order dispersion, self-steepening, and stimulated Raman scattering effects. Based on the known bilinear forms, through the modified expanded formulas and symbolic computation, we construct the bright two-soliton solutions. Through classifying the interactions under different parameter conditions, we reveal six cases of interactions between the two solitons via an asymptotic analysis. With the help of the analytic and graphic analysis, we find that such interactions are different from those of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Hirota equation. When those solitons interact with each other, the singular-I soliton is shape-preserving, while the singular-II and nonsingular solitons may be shape preserving or shape changing. Such elastic and inelastic interaction phenomena in a scalar equation might enrich the knowledge of soliton behavior, which could be expected to be experimentally observed.

  11. Certain bright soliton interactions of the Sasa-Satsuma equation in a monomode optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Tian, Bo; Chai, Han-Peng; Yuan, Yu-Qiang

    2017-03-01

    Under investigation in this paper is the Sasa-Satsuma equation, which describes the propagation of ultrashort pulses in a monomode fiber with the third-order dispersion, self-steepening, and stimulated Raman scattering effects. Based on the known bilinear forms, through the modified expanded formulas and symbolic computation, we construct the bright two-soliton solutions. Through classifying the interactions under different parameter conditions, we reveal six cases of interactions between the two solitons via an asymptotic analysis. With the help of the analytic and graphic analysis, we find that such interactions are different from those of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Hirota equation. When those solitons interact with each other, the singular-I soliton is shape-preserving, while the singular-II and nonsingular solitons may be shape preserving or shape changing. Such elastic and inelastic interaction phenomena in a scalar equation might enrich the knowledge of soliton behavior, which could be expected to be experimentally observed.

  12. Elastic fields, dipole tensors, and interaction between self-interstitial atom defects in bcc transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, S. L.; Ma, Pui-Wai

    2018-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that self-interstitial atom (SIA) defects in nonmagnetic body-centered-cubic (bcc) metals adopt strongly anisotropic configurations, elongated in the <111 > direction [S. Han et al., Phys. Rev. B 66, 220101 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.66.220101; D. Nguyen-Manh et al., Phys. Rev. B 73, 020101 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevB.73.020101; P. M. Derlet et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 054107 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevB.76.054107; S. L. Dudarev, Annu. Rev. Mater. Res. 43, 35 (2013), 10.1146/annurev-matsci-071312-121626]. Elastic distortions, associated with such anisotropic atomic structures, appear similar to distortions around small prismatic dislocation loops, although the extent of this similarity has never been quantified. We derive analytical formulas for the dipole tensors of SIA defects, which show that, in addition to the prismatic dislocation looplike character, the elastic field of a SIA defect also has a significant isotropic dilatation component. Using empirical potentials and DFT calculations, we parametrize dipole tensors of <111 > defects for all the nonmagnetic bcc transition metals. This enables a quantitative evaluation of the energy of elastic interaction between the defects, which also shows that in a periodic three-dimensional simple cubic arrangement of crowdions, long-range elastic interactions between a defect and all its images favor a <111 > orientation of the defect.

  13. Chronic Treatment with Minoxidil Induces Elastic Fiber Neosynthesis and Functional Improvement in the Aorta of Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Coquand-Gandit, Marion; Jacob, Marie-Paule; Fhayli, Wassim; Romero, Beatriz; Georgieva, Miglena; Bouillot, Stéphanie; Estève, Eric; Andrieu, Jean-Pierre; Brasseur, Sandrine; Bouyon, Sophie; Garcia-Honduvilla, Natalio; Huber, Philippe; Buján, Julia; Atanasova, Milena; Faury, Gilles

    2017-06-01

    Normal arterial aging processes involve vascular cell dysfunction associated with wall stiffening, the latter being due to progressive elastin and elastic fiber degradation, and elastin and collagen cross-linking by advanced glycation end products (AGEs). These processes progressively lead to cardiovascular dysfunction during aging. Elastin is only synthesized during late gestation and childhood, and further degradation occurring throughout adulthood cannot be physiologically compensated by replacement of altered material. However, the ATP-dependent K + channel opener minoxidil has been shown to stimulate elastin expression in vitro and in vivo in the aorta of young adult rats. Therefore, we have studied the effect of a 10-week chronic oral treatment with minoxidil (120 mg/L in drinking water) on the aortic structure and function in aged 24-month-old mice. Minoxidil treatment increased tropoelastin, fibulin-5, and lysyl-oxidase messenger RNA levels, reinduced a moderate expression of elastin, and lowered the levels of AGE-related molecules. This was accompanied by the formation of newly synthesized elastic fibers, which had diverse orientations in the wall. A decrease in the glycation capacity of aortic elastin was also produced by minoxidil treatment. The ascending aorta also underwent a minoxidil-induced increase in diameter and decrease in wall thickness, which partly reversed the age-associated thickening and returned the wall thickness value and strain-stress relation closer to those of younger adult animals. In conclusion, our results suggest that minoxidil presents an interesting potential for arterial remodeling in an antiaging perspective, even when treating already aged animals.

  14. The hyperthermia-enhanced association between tropoelastin and its 67-kDa chaperone results in better deposition of elastic fibers.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brooke A; Bunda, Severa; Mitts, Thomas; Hinek, Aleksander

    2010-12-17

    The results of our in vitro experiments indicate that exposing cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells and dermal fibroblasts to 39 to 41 °C induces a significant up-regulation in the net deposition of elastic fibers, but not of collagen I or fibronectin, and also decreases the deposition of chondroitin sulfate-containing moieties. We further demonstrate that mild hyperthermia also rectifies the insufficient elastogenesis notable in cultures of fibroblasts derived from the stretch-marked skin of adult patients and in cultures of dermal fibroblasts from children with Costello syndrome, which is characterized by the accumulation of chondroitin 6-sulfate glycosaminoglycans that induce shedding and inactivation of the 67-kDa elastin-binding protein. We have previously established that this protein serves as a reusable chaperone for tropoelastin and that its recycling is essential for the normal deposition of elastic fibers. We now report that hyperthermia not only inhibits deposition of chondroitin 6-sulfate moieties and the consequent preservation of elastin-binding protein molecules but also induces their faster recycling. This, in turn, triggers a more efficient preservation of tropoelastin, enhancement of its secretion and extracellular assembly into elastic fibers. The presented results encourage using mild hyperthermia to restore elastic fiber production in damaged adult skin and to enhance elastogenesis in children with genetic elastinopathies.

  15. Elastic poly(ε-caprolactone)-polydimethylsiloxane copolymer fibers with shape memory effect for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kai, Dan; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Chan, Benjamin Qi Yu; Liow, Sing Shy; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Xu, Fujian; Loh, Xian Jun

    2016-02-02

    A porous shape memory scaffold with biomimetic architecture is highly promising for bone tissue engineering applications. In this study, a series of new shape memory polyurethanes consisting of organic poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) segments and inorganic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) segments in different ratios (9 : 1, 8 : 2 and 7 : 3) was synthesised. These PCL-PDMS copolymers were further engineered into porous fibrous scaffolds by electrospinning. With different ratios of PCL: PDMS, the fibers showed various fiber diameters, thermal behaviour and mechanical properties. Even after being processed into fibrous structures, these PCL-PDMS copolymers maintained their shape memory properties, and all the fibers exhibited excellent shape recovery ratios of  >90% and shape fixity ratios of  >92% after 7 thermo-mechanical cycles. Biological assay results corroborated that the fibrous PCL-PDMS scaffolds were biocompatible by promoting osteoblast proliferation, functionally enhanced biomineralization-relevant alkaline phosphatase expression and mineral deposition. Our study demonstrated that the PCL-PDMS fibers with excellent shape memory properties are promising substrates as bioengineered grafts for bone regeneration.

  16. Quasi-elastic light-scattering studies of single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Haskell, R C; Carlson, F D

    1981-01-01

    Measurements were made of the intensity autocorrelation function, g(2)[tau], of light scattered from intact frog muscle fibers. During the tension plateau of an isometric tenanus, scattered field statistics were approximately Gaussian and intensity fluctuations were quasi-stationary. The half time, tau 1/2, for the decay of g(2)[tau] was typically 70 ms at a scattering angle of 30 degrees. The decay rate, 1/tau 1/2, of g(2)[tau] varied roughly linearly with the projection of the scattering vector on the fiber axis. 1/tau 1/2 was greater during the tension creep phase of tetani of highly stretched fibers, but was roughly independent of sarcomere length during the tension plateau. g(2)[tau] measured during rest or on diffraction pattern maxima during isometric contraction were flat with low amplitudes. These results are consistent with a model of a 200-mu m segment of an isometrically contracting fiber in which scattering material possesses relative axial velocities of 1-2 mu m/s accompanied by relative axial displacements greater than 0.1 mu m. The slow (1-2 mu m/s) motion of one portion of the fiber relative to another observed under the microscope (500X) during isometric contraction is consistent with the light-scattering results. Structural fluctuations on the scale of the myofibrillar sarcomere which may arise from asynchronous cycling of cross-bridges must involve relative axial velocities less than 3 mu m/s or relative axial displacements less than 0.05 mu m. PMID:6974014

  17. Elastic interaction among transition metals in one-dimensional spin-crossover solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukheddaden, K.; Miyashita, S.; Nishino, M.

    2007-03-01

    We present an exact examination of a one-dimensional (1D) spin-phonon model describing the thermodynamical properties of spin-crossover (SC) solids. This model has the advantage of giving a physical mechanism for the interaction between the SC units. The origin of the interaction comes from the fact that the elastic constant of the spring linking two atoms depends on their electronic states. This leads to local variation of the elastic constant. Up to now, all the statistical studies of this model have been performed in the frame of the mean-field (MF) approach, which is not adequate to describe 1D systems with short-range interactions. An alternative method, based on the variational approach and taking into account the short-range correlations between neighboring molecules, was also suggested, but it consists in an extension of the previous MF approximation. Here, we solve exactly this Hamiltonian in the frame of classical statistical mechanics using the transfer-matrix technique. The temperature dependence of the high spin fraction and that of the total energy are obtained analytically. Our results clearly show that there is a clear tendency to a sharp transition when we tune the elastic constants adequately, which indicates that first-order phase transition takes place at higher dimensions. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of an interesting isomorphism between the present model and Ising model under effective interaction and effective ligand field energy, in which both depend linearly on temperature and both come from the phonon contribution. We have also studied the effect of the pressure (the tension) on the thermodynamical properties of the high spin (HS) fraction and have found a nontrivial pressure effect that while for weak tension values, the low spin state is stabilized for the pressure above a threshold value, it enhances the interaction between the HS states. Finally, we have also introduced elastic interactions between the chains. Treating

  18. Elastic effects on vibration of bilayer graphene sheets incorporating integrated VdWs interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, Kamran; Nazemnezhad, Reza; Zare, Mojtaba

    2018-03-01

    The following study addresses the free vibration analysis of a bilayer graphene sheet (BLGS) embedded in an elastic medium in the presence of shear and tensile-compressive effects of van der Waals (vdWs) interactions. To ascertain the contribution of each force, the effects are considered separately and simultaneously. To model the geometry of the BLGS, the sandwich plate theory and the Hamilton’s principle are considered to derive the governing equations of motion. The Harmonic differential quadrature method is applied to solve the coupled equations and obtain the natural frequencies and related mode shapes. The results reveal that the contribution of tensile-compressive modulus of elastic medium is the most in changing the frequency of BLGSs.

  19. Lysyl Oxidase Is Essential for Normal Development and Function of the Respiratory System and for the Integrity of Elastic and Collagen Fibers in Various Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mäki, Joni M.; Sormunen, Raija; Lippo, Sari; Kaarteenaho-Wiik, Riitta; Soininen, Raija; Myllyharju, Johanna

    2005-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases, a family comprising LOX and four LOX-like enzymes, catalyze crosslinking of elastin and collagens. Mouse Lox was recently shown to be crucial for development of the cardiovascular system because null mice died perinatally of aortic aneurysms and cardiovascular dysfunction. We show here that Lox is also essential for development of the respiratory system and the integrity of elastic and collagen fibers in the lungs and skin. The lungs of E18.5 Lox−/− embryos showed impaired development of the distal and proximal airways. Elastic fibers in E18.5 Lox−/− lungs were markedly less intensely stained and more disperse than in the wild type, especially in the mesenchyme surrounding the distal airways, bronchioles, bronchi, and trachea, and were fragmented in pulmonary arterial walls. The organization of individual collagen fibers into tight bundles was likewise abnormal. Similar elastic and collagen fiber abnormalities were seen in the skin. Lysyl oxidase activity in cultured Lox−/− skin fibroblasts and aortic smooth muscle cells was reduced by ∼80%, indicating that Lox is the main isoenzyme in these cells. LOX abnormalities may thus be critical for the pathogenesis of several common diseases, including pulmonary, skin, and cardiovascular disorders. PMID:16192629

  20. Determination of Spearman Correlation Coefficient (r) to Evaluate the Linear Association of Dermal Collagen and Elastic Fibers in the Perspectives of Skin Injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naveen; Kumar, Pramod; Badagabettu, Satheesha Nayak; Lewis, Melissa Glenda; Adiga, Murali; Padur, Ashwini Aithal

    2018-01-01

    Difference in scar formation at different sites, in different directions at the same site, but with changes in the elasticity of skin with age, sex, and race or in some pathological conditions, is well known to clinicians. The inappropriate collagen syntheses and delayed or lack of epithelialization are known to induce scar formation with negligible elasticity at the site of damage. Changes in the elasticity of scars may be due to an unequal distribution of dermal collagen (C) and elastic (E) fibers. Spearman correlation coefficients ( r ) of collagen and elastic fibers in horizontal (H) and in vertical (V) directions (variables CV, CH, EV, and EH) were measured from the respective quantitative fraction data in 320 skin samples from 32 human cadavers collected at five selected sites over extremities. Spearman's correlation analysis revealed the statistically significant ( p < 0.01) strong positive correlation between C H and C V in all the areas, that is, shoulder joint area ( r = 0.66), wrist ( r = 0.75), forearm ( r = 0.75), and thigh ( r = 0.80), except at the ankle ( r = 0.26, p = 0.14) region. Similarly, positive correlation between E H and E V has been observed at the forearm ( r = 0.65, moderate) and thigh ( r = 0.42, low) regions. However, a significant moderate negative correlation was observed between C V and E V at the forearm ( r = -0.51) and between C H and E H at the thigh region ( r = -0.65). Significant differences of correlations of collagen and elastic fibers in different directions from different areas of extremities were noted. This may be one of the possible anatomical reasons of scar behavior in different areas and different directions of the same area.

  1. Forces and torques on rigid inclusions in an elastic environment: Resulting matrix-mediated interactions, displacements, and rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puljiz, Mate; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2017-05-01

    Embedding rigid inclusions into elastic matrix materials is a procedure of high practical relevance, for instance, for the fabrication of elastic composite materials. We theoretically analyze the following situation. Rigid spherical inclusions are enclosed by a homogeneous elastic medium under stick boundary conditions. Forces and torques are directly imposed from outside onto the inclusions or are externally induced between them. The inclusions respond to these forces and torques by translations and rotations against the surrounding elastic matrix. This leads to elastic matrix deformations, and in turn results in mutual long-ranged matrix-mediated interactions between the inclusions. Adapting a well-known approach from low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics, we explicitly calculate the displacements and rotations of the inclusions from the externally imposed or induced forces and torques. Analytical expressions are presented as a function of the inclusion configuration in terms of displaceability and rotateability matrices. The role of the elastic environment is implicitly included in these relations. That is, the resulting expressions allow a calculation of the induced displacements and rotations directly from the inclusion configuration, without having to explicitly determine the deformations of the elastic environment. In contrast to the hydrodynamic case, compressibility of the surrounding medium is readily taken into account. We present the complete derivation based on the underlying equations of linear elasticity theory. In the future, the method will, for example, be helpful to characterize the behavior of externally tunable elastic composite materials, to accelerate numerical approaches, as well as to improve the quantitative interpretation of microrheological results.

  2. Theory of elastic interaction between arbitrary colloidal particles in confined nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Tovkach, O M; Chernyshuk, S B; Lev, B I

    2012-12-01

    We develop the method proposed by Chernyshuk and Lev [Phys. Rev. E 81, 041701 (2010)] for theoretical investigation of elastic interactions between colloidal particles of arbitrary shape and chirality (polar as well as azimuthal anchoring) in the confined nematic liquid crystal (NLC). General expressions for six different types of multipole elastic interactions are obtained in the confined NLC: monopole-monopole (Coulomb type), monopole-dipole, monopole-quadrupole, dipole-dipole, dipole-quadrupole, and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. The obtained formulas remain valid in the presence of the external electric or magnetic fields. The exact equations are found for all multipole coefficients for the weak anchoring case. For the strong anchoring coupling, the connection between the symmetry of the shape or director and multipole coefficients is obtained, which enables us to predict which multipole coefficients vanish and which remain nonzero. The particles with azimuthal helicoid anchoring are considered as an example. Dipole-dipole interactions between helicoid cylinders and cones are found in the confined NLC. In addition, the banana-shaped particles in homeotropic and planar nematic cells are considered. It is found that the dipole-dipole interaction between banana-shaped particles differs greatly from the dipole-dipole interaction between the axially symmetrical particles in the nematic cell. There is a crossover from attraction to repulsion between banana particles along some directions in nematic cells. It is shown that monopoles do not "feel" the type of nematic cell: monopole-monopole interaction turns out to be the same in homeotropic and planar nematic cells and converges to the Coulomb law as thickness increases, L→∞.

  3. Search for neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment by using quasi-elastic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Piteira, Rodolphe

    2005-09-29

    The enthusiasm of the scientific community for studying oscillations of neutrinos is equaled only by the mass of their detectors. The MINOS experiment determines and compares the near spectrum of muonic neutrinos from the NUMI beam to the far one, in order to measure two oscillation parameters: Δmmore » $$2\\atop{23}$$ and sin 2 (2θ 23). The spectra are obtained by analyzing the charged current interactions which difficulty lies in identifying the interactions products (e.g. muons). An alternative method identifying the traces of muons, bent by the magnetic field of the detectors, and determining their energies is presented in this manuscript. The sensitivity of the detectors is optimal for the quasi-elastic interactions, for which a selection method is proposed, to study their oscillation. Even though it reduces the statistics, such a study introduces fewer systematic errors, constituting the ideal method on the long range.« less

  4. Contact interaction of thin-walled elements with an elastic layer and an infinite circular cylinder under torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanetsyan, E. G.; Mkrtchyan, M. S.; Mkhitaryan, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    We consider a class of contact torsion problems on interaction of thin-walled elements shaped as an elastic thin washer – a flat circular plate of small height – with an elastic layer, in particular, with a half-space, and on interaction of thin cylindrical shells with a solid elastic cylinder, infinite in both directions. The governing equations of the physical models of elastic thin washers and thin circular cylindrical shells under torsion are derived from the exact equations of mathematical theory of elasticity using the Hankel and Fourier transforms. Within the framework of the accepted physical models, the solution of the contact problem between an elastic washer and an elastic layer is reduced to solving the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind with a kernel representable as a sum of the Weber–Sonin integral and some integral regular kernel, while solving the contact problem between a cylindrical shell and solid cylinder is reduced to a singular integral equation (SIE). An effective method for solving the governing integral equations of these problems are specified.

  5. An efficient immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for the hydrodynamic interaction of elastic filaments

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Luo, Haoxiang; Zhu, Luoding; Liao, James C.; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2012-01-01

    We have introduced a modified penalty approach into the flow-structure interaction solver that combines an immersed boundary method (IBM) and a multi-block lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to model an incompressible flow and elastic boundaries with finite mass. The effect of the solid structure is handled by the IBM in which the stress exerted by the structure on the fluid is spread onto the collocated grid points near the boundary. The fluid motion is obtained by solving the discrete lattice Boltzmann equation. The inertial force of the thin solid structure is incorporated by connecting this structure through virtual springs to a ghost structure with the equivalent mass. This treatment ameliorates the numerical instability issue encountered in this type of problems. Thanks to the superior efficiency of the IBM and LBM, the overall method is extremely fast for a class of flow-structure interaction problems where details of flow patterns need to be resolved. Numerical examples, including those involving multiple solid bodies, are presented to verify the method and illustrate its efficiency. As an application of the present method, an elastic filament flapping in the Kármán gait and the entrainment regions near a cylinder is studied to model fish swimming in these regions. Significant drag reduction is found for the filament, and the result is consistent with the metabolic cost measured experimentally for the live fish. PMID:23564971

  6. An efficient immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for the hydrodynamic interaction of elastic filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Luo, Haoxiang; Zhu, Luoding; Liao, James C.; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2011-08-01

    We have introduced a modified penalty approach into the flow-structure interaction solver that combines an immersed boundary method (IBM) and a multi-block lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to model an incompressible flow and elastic boundaries with finite mass. The effect of the solid structure is handled by the IBM in which the stress exerted by the structure on the fluid is spread onto the collocated grid points near the boundary. The fluid motion is obtained by solving the discrete lattice Boltzmann equation. The inertial force of the thin solid structure is incorporated by connecting this structure through virtual springs to a ghost structure with the equivalent mass. This treatment ameliorates the numerical instability issue encountered in this type of problems. Thanks to the superior efficiency of the IBM and LBM, the overall method is extremely fast for a class of flow-structure interaction problems where details of flow patterns need to be resolved. Numerical examples, including those involving multiple solid bodies, are presented to verify the method and illustrate its efficiency. As an application of the present method, an elastic filament flapping in the Kármán gait and the entrainment regions near a cylinder is studied to model fish swimming in these regions. Significant drag reduction is found for the filament, and the result is consistent with the metabolic cost measured experimentally for the live fish.

  7. Effects of fiber/matrix interactions on the interfacial deformation micromechanics of cellulose-fiber/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tze, William Tai-Yin

    The overall objective of this dissertation was to gain an understanding of the relationship between interfacial chemistry and the micromechanics of the cellulose-fiber/polymer composites. Regenerated cellulose (lyocell) fibers were treated with amine-, phenylamine-, phenyl-, and octadecyl-silanes, and also styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer. Inverse gas chromatography was conducted to evaluate the modified surfaces and to examine the adsorption behavior of ethylbenzene, a model compound for polystyrene, onto the fibers. Micro-composites were formed by depositing micro-droplets of polystyrene onto single fibers. The fiber was subjected to a tensile strain, and Raman spectroscopy was employed to determine the point-to-point variation of the strain- and stress-sensitive 895 cm-1 band of cellulose along the embedded region. Inverse gas chromatography studies reveal that the Ia-b values, calculated by matching the Lewis acid parameter ( KA) and basic parameter (KB) between polystyrene and different fibers, were closely correlated to the acid-base adsorption enthalpies of ethylbenzene onto the corresponding fibers. Hence, Ia-b was subsequently used as a convenient indicator for fiber/matrix acid-base interaction. The Raman micro-spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the interfacial tensile strain and stress are highest at the edge of the droplet, and these values decline from the edge region to the middle region of the embedment. The maximum of these local strains corresponds to a strain-control fracture of the matrix polymer. The minimum of the local tensile stress corresponds to the extent of fiber-to-matrix load transfer. The slope of the tensile stress profile allows for an estimation of the maximum interfacial shear stress, which is indicative of fiber/polymer (practical) adhesion. As such, a novel micro-Raman tensile technique was established for evaluating the ductile-fiber/brittle-polymer system in this study. The micro-Raman tensile technique provided maximum

  8. [Pathologic change of elastic fibers with difference of microvessel density and expression of angiogenesis-related proteins in internal hemorrhoid tissues].

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Wang, Zhen-jun; Zhao, Bo; Yang, Xin-qing; Wang, Dong; Wang, Jian-pin; Tang, Xiu-ying; Zhao, Fa; Hung, Yan-ting

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the pathological variations in internal hemorrhoid and evaluate the expression of nitric- oxide synthase(NOS),vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF),matrix metalloproteinase- 2(MMP2) and MMP9. Normal anal cushion and internal hemorrhoids tissue samples were obtained from 24 patients with iii degree hemorrhoids after procedure for prolapse and hemorrhoids(PPH) procedure. The expression of NOS, VEGF, MMP2, MMP9 and CD34 were detected by immunohistochemical staining; the microvessel density (MVD) was counted by anti- CD34 antibody; the elastic fibers were detected by orcein staining. There were statistically significant differences in the expression of MVD, VEGF, MMP9 between internal hemorrhoid tissue and normal anal cushions(P< 0.05). iNOS was significantly increased in hemorrhoid tissue, but no significant difference between normal anal cushions and hemorrhoid tissue. Morphological abnormalities such as breaking, distortion, mortality, hyaline degeneration were found in elastic fibers of internal hemorrhoid tissue, but not in normal anal cushions. Angiogenesis is evident in hemorrhoid tissue, suggesting the possible mechanism in the pathogenesis of hemorrhoids. The direct degeneration effect of MMP9 on supporting structure elastic fibers in anal cushion is another important mechanism. The high expression of iNOS suggests the inflammatory factors involve in the pathogenesis of hemorrhoids, and NO may be involve in pathological effect on hemorrhoids.

  9. Neutrino-nucleus neutral current elastic interactions measurement in MiniBooNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevalov, Denis

    The MiniBooNE experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) was designed to search for numu → nu e neutrino oscillations at Deltam 2 ˜ 1 eV2 using an intense neutrino flux with an average energy Enu ˜ 700 MeV. From 2002 to 2009 MiniBooNE has accumulated more than 1.0x1021 protons on target (POT) in both neutrino and antineutrino modes. MiniBooNE provides a perfect platform for detailed measurements of exclusive and semi-inclusive neutrino cross-sections, for which MiniBooNE has the largest samples of events up to date, such as neutral current elastic (NCE), neutral current pi 0, charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE), charged current pi +, and other channels. These measured cross-sections, in turn, allow to improve the knowledge of nucleon structure. This thesis is devoted to the study of NCE interactions. Neutrino-nucleus neutral current elastic scattering (nuN → nu N) accounts for about 18% of all neutrino interactions in MiniBooNE. Using a high-statistics, high purity sample of NCE interactions in MiniBooNE, the flux-averaged NCE differential cross-section has been measured and is being reported here. Further study of the NCE cross-section allowed for probing the structure of nuclei. The main interest in the NCE cross-section is that it may be sensitive to the strange quark contribution to the nucleon spin, Deltas, this however requires a separation of NCE proton (nup → nu p) from NCE neutron (nun → nun ) events, which in general is a challenging task. MiniBooNE uses a Cherenkov detector, which imposes restrictions on the measured nucleon kinematic variables, mainly due to the impossibility to reconstruct the nucleon direction below the Cherenkov threshold. However, at kinetic energies above this threshold MiniBooNE is able to identify NCE proton events that do not experience final state interactions (FSI). These events were used for the Deltas measurement. In this thesis MiniBooNE reports the NCE (n+p) cross-section, the measurement

  10. Neutrino-nucleus neutral current elastic interactions measurement in MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, Denis

    2009-12-01

    The MiniBooNE experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) was designed to search for v μ → v e neutrino oscillations at Δm 2 ~ 1 eV 2 using an intense neutrino flux with an average energy E v ~ 700 MeV. From 2002 to 2009 MiniBooNE has accumulated more than 1.0 x 10 21 protons on target (POT) in both neutrino and antineutrino modes. MiniBooNE provides a perfect platform for detailed measurements of exclusive and semiinclusive neutrino cross-sections, for which MiniBooNE has the largest samples of events up to date, such as neutral current elastic (NCE), neutral currentmore » π 0, charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE), charged current π +, and other channels. These measured cross-sections, in turn, allow to improve the knowledge of nucleon structure. This thesis is devoted to the study of NCE interactions. Neutrino-nucleus neutral current elastic scattering (vN → vN) accounts for about 18% of all neutrino interactions in MiniBooNE. Using a high-statistics, high purity sample of NCE interactions in MiniBooNE, the flux-averaged NCE differential cross-section has been measured and is being reported here. Further study of the NCE cross-section allowed for probing the structure of nuclei. The main interest in the NCE cross-section is that it may be sensitive to the strange quark contribution to the nucleon spin, Δs, this however requires a separation of NCE proton (vp → vp) from NCE neutron (vn → vn) events, which in general is a challenging task. MiniBooNE uses a Cherenkov detector, which imposes restrictions on the measured nucleon kinematic variables, mainly due to the impossibility to reconstruct the nucleon direction below the Cherenkov threshold. However, at kinetic energies above this threshold MiniBooNE is able to identify NCE proton events that do not experience final state interactions (FSI). These events were used for the Δs measurement. In this thesis MiniBooNE reports the NCE (n+p) cross-section, the measurement of the

  11. Polarization dependence of laser interaction with carbon fibers and CFRP.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Christian; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2014-01-27

    A key factor for laser materials processing is the absorptivity of the material at the laser wavelength, which determines the fraction of the laser energy that is coupled into the material. Based on the Fresnel equations, a theoretical model is used to determine the absorptivity for carbon fiber fabrics and carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). The surface of each carbon fiber is considered as multiple layers of concentric cylinders of graphite. With this the optical properties of carbon fibers and their composites can be estimated from the well-known optical properties of graphite.

  12. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of an unidirectional, 9 vol percent tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling via elastic-plastic finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects that the residual stresses and the degree of matrix work hardening (i.e., cold-worked, annealed) have upon the behavior of a 9 vol percent, unidirectional W/Cu composite, undergoing tensile loading. The inclusion of the residual stress-containing state as well as the simulated matrix material conditions proved to be significant since the Cu matrix material exhibited plastic deformation, which affected the subsequent tensile response of the composite system. The stresses generated during cooldown to room temperature from the manufacturing temperature were more of a factor on the annealed-matrix composite, since they induced the softened matrix to plastically flow. This event limited the total load-carrying capacity of this matrix-dominated, ductile-ductile type material system. Plastic deformation of the hardened-matrix composite during the thermal cooldown stage was not considerable, therefore, the composite was able to sustain a higher stress before showing any appreciable matrix plasticity. The predicted room temperature, stress-strain response, and deformation stages under both material conditions represented upper and lower bounds characteristic of the composite's tensile behavior. The initial deformation stage for the hardened material condition showed negligible matrix plastic deformation while for the annealed state, its initial deformation stage showed extensive matrix plasticity. Both material conditions exhibited a final deformation stage where the fiber and matrix were straining plastically. The predicted stress-strain results were compared to the experimental, room temperature, tensile stress-strain curve generated from this particular composite system. The analyses indicated that the actual thermal-mechanical state of the composite's Cu matrix, represented by the experimental data, followed the annealed material condition.

  13. Elastic scattering and soft diffraction with ALFA

    SciTech Connect

    Puzo, P.

    The ALFA detector in ATLAS aims at measuring the absolute luminosity and the total cross-section with 2-3% accuracy. Its uses elastically scattered protons whose impact position on a fiber detector, located 240 m away from the interaction point, allow a measurement of the scattering angle.

  14. Towards Improved Finite Element Modelling of the Interaction of Elastic Waves with Complex Defect Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, P.; Drozdz, M.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2009-03-01

    A solution to the problem of improving the finite element (FE) modeling of elastic wave-defect interaction is sought by reconsidering the conventional opinion on meshing strategy. The standard approach using uniform square elements imposes severe limitations in representing complex defect outlines but this is thought to improve when the mesh is made finer. Free meshing algorithms available widely in commercial packages of late can cope with difficult features well but they are thought to cause scattering by the irregular mesh itself. This paper examines whether the benefits offered by free meshing in representing defects better outweigh the inaccuracies due to mesh scattering. If using the standard mesh, the questions whether mesh refinement leads to improved results and whether a practical strategy can be constructed are considered.

  15. Elastic interactions between single microcrack and single osteon microstructure of human femur cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansor, N. N.; Daud, R.; Basaruddin, K. S.; Mat, F.; Bajuri, Y.; Ariffin, A. K.

    2017-09-01

    Inmultiscale Haversian system of cortical bone fracture, a homogenous bone modeling consideration is limited to only one Young modulus was significant for each cortex without having any constituents in that bone. A two dimension model of human femur cortical bone is presented by considering the anatomical positions of four cortices, e.g anterior, posterior, medial and lateral. The Haversian system is modeled under tensile loading by considering the interstitial matrix, osteon and cement line mechanical properties. The interaction between single microcrack and single osteon is evaluated using linear elastic fracture mechanics theory, and was determined using of stress intensity factor, strain energy release rate, and the critical stress intensity factor and critical strain energy release rate parameter. The results indicate that the medial cortex has the highest SIFs while the lowest was posterior cortex. The Young modulus of material was greatly influence the fracture parameters. More stiff the material, the SIF was reduced.

  16. Selection of the elastic scattering events in interactions of the NICA colliding proton (deuteron) beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharov, Vasily

    2017-03-01

    The features of the kinematics of elastic pp (dd) scattering in the collider system, as well as some issues concerning registration and selection of elastic scattering events in the NICA colliding beams are considered. Equality and the opposite direction of the scattered particle momenta provide a powerful selection criterion for elastic collisions. Variants of the organization of the trigger signal for recording tracks of secondary particles and DAQ system are given. The estimates of the characteristics of elastic NN processes are obtained from available dσ/dΩCM data for the elastic pp and np scattering. The paper presents examples of simulations using the Monte-Carlo of elastic pp scattering in the colliding proton beams and quasi-elastic np scattering in the colliding deuteron beams and evaluates the outputs of these processes at the NICA collider.

  17. Micromechanical analysis of a hybrid composite—effect of boron carbide particles on the elastic properties of basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Golla, Sai; Prasanthi, P.

    2016-11-01

    A fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite is an important material for structural application. The diversified application of FRP composites has become the center of attention for interdisciplinary research. However, improvements in the mechanical properties of this class of materials are still under research for different applications. The reinforcement of inorganic particles in a composite improves its structural properties due to their high stiffness. The present research work is focused on the prediction of the mechanical properties of the hybrid composites where continuous fibers are reinforced in a micro boron carbide particle mixed polypropylene matrix. The effectiveness of the addition of 30 wt. % of boron carbide (B4C) particle contributions regarding the longitudinal and transverse properties of the basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite at various fiber volume fractions is examined by finite element analysis (FEA). The experimental approach is the best way to determine the properties of the composite but it is expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, the finite element method (FEM) and analytical methods are the viable methods for the determination of the composite properties. The FEM results were obtained by adopting a micromechanics approach with the support of FEM. Assuming a uniform distribution of reinforcement and considering one unit-cell of the whole array, the properties of the composite materials are determined. The predicted elastic properties from FEA are compared with the analytical results. The results suggest that B4C particles are a good reinforcement for the enhancement of the transverse properties of basalt fiber reinforced polypropylene.

  18. A strategy for prediction of the elastic properties of epoxy-cellulose nanocrystal-reinforced fiber networks

    Treesearch

    Johnathan E. Goodsell; Robert J. Moon; Alionso Huizar; R. Byron Pipes

    2014-01-01

    The reinforcement potential of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) additions on an idealized 2-dirmensional (2-D) fiber network structure consisting of micron sized fiber elements was investigated. The reinforcement mechanism considered in this study was through the stiffening of the micron sized fiber elements via a CNC-epoxy coating. A hierarchical analytical modeling...

  19. Electrostatic, elastic and hydration-dependent interactions in dermis influencing volume exclusion and macromolecular transport.

    PubMed

    Øien, Alf H; Wiig, Helge

    2016-07-07

    Interstitial exclusion refers to the limitation of space available for plasma proteins and other macromolecules based on collagen and negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the interstitial space. It is of particular importance to interstitial fluid and plasma volume regulation. Here we present a novel mechanical and mathematical model of the dynamic interactions of structural elements within the interstitium of the dermis at the microscopic level that may explain volume exclusion of charged and neutral macroparticles. At this level, the interstitium is considered to consist of elements called extracellular matrix (ECM) cells, again containing two main interacting structural components on a fluid background including anions and cations setting up osmotic forces: one smaller GAG component, having an intrinsic expansive electric force, and one bigger collagen component, having an intrinsic elastic force. Because of size differences, the GAG component interacts with a fraction of the collagen component only at normal hydration. This fraction, however, increases with rising hydration as a consequence of the modeled form of the interaction force between the GAGs and collagen. Collagen is locally displaced at variable degrees as hydration changes. Two models of GAGs are considered, having largely different geometries which demands different, but related, forms of GAG-collagen interaction forces. The effects of variable fixed charges on GAGs and of GAG density in tissue are evaluated taking into account observed volume exclusion properties of charged macromolecules as a function of tissue hydration. The presented models may improve our biophysical understanding of acting forces influencing tissue fluid dynamics. Such knowledge is significant when evaluating the transport of electrically charged and neutral macromolecules into and through the interstitium, and therefore to drug uptake and the therapeutic effects of macromolecular agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  20. Non-collinear interaction of guided elastic waves in an isotropic plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Yosuke; Biwa, Shiro; Adachi, Tadaharu

    2018-04-01

    The nonlinear wave propagation in a homogeneous and isotropic elastic plate is analyzed theoretically to investigate the non-collinear interaction of plate wave modes. In the presence of two primary plate waves (Rayleigh-Lamb or shear horizontal modes) propagating in arbitrary directions, an explicit expression for the modal amplitude of nonlinearly generated wave fields with the sum or difference frequency of the primary modes is derived by using the perturbation analysis. The modal amplitude is shown to grow in proportion with the propagation distance when the resonance condition is satisfied, i.e., when the wavevector of secondary wave coincides with the sum or difference of those of primary modes. Furthermore, the non-collinear interaction of two symmetric or two antisymmetric modes is shown to produce the secondary wave fields consisting only of the symmetric modes, while a pair of symmetric and antisymmetric primary modes is shown to produce only the antisymmetric modes. The influence of the intersection angle, the primary frequencies, and the mode combinations on the modal amplitude of secondary wave is examined for a low-frequency range where the lowest-order symmetric and antisymmetric Rayleigh-Lamb waves and the lowest-order symmetric shear horizontal wave are the only propagating modes.

  1. Use of various versions of Schwarz method for solving the problem of contact interaction of elastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanin, M. P.; Lukin, V. V.; Rodin, A. S.

    2018-04-01

    A definition of a sufficiently common problem of mechanical contact interaction in a system of elastic bodies is given. Various versions of realization of the Schwarz method for solving the contact problem numerically are described and the results of solution of a number of problems are presented. Special attention is paid to calculations where the grids in the bodies significantly differ in steps.

  2. On the contact interaction of two identical stringers with an elastic semi-infinite continuous or vertically cracked plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    This paper considers two connected contact problems on the interaction of stringers with an elastic semi-infinite plate. In the first problem, an elastic half-infinite continuous plate is reinforced on its boundary by two identical stringers exposed to a tensile external force. In the second problem, in the presence of the same stringers, the plate contains a collinear system of cracks on its vertical axis. The solution of both problems is reduced to the solution of singular integral equations (SIE) that are solved by a known numerical-analytical method.

  3. On some problems in a theory of thermally and mechanically interacting continuous media. Ph.D. Thesis; [linearized theory of interacting mixture of elastic solid and viscous fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. M.

    1971-01-01

    Using a linearized theory of thermally and mechanically interacting mixture of linear elastic solid and viscous fluid, we derive a fundamental relation in an integral form called a reciprocity relation. This reciprocity relation relates the solution of one initial-boundary value problem with a given set of initial and boundary data to the solution of a second initial-boundary value problem corresponding to a different initial and boundary data for a given interacting mixture. From this general integral relation, reciprocity relations are derived for a heat-conducting linear elastic solid, and for a heat-conducting viscous fluid. An initial-boundary value problem is posed and solved for the mixture of linear elastic solid and viscous fluid. With the aid of the Laplace transform and the contour integration, a real integral representation for the displacement of the solid constituent is obtained as one of the principal results of the analysis.

  4. A thermodynamic framework for thermo-chemo-elastic interactions in chemically active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, XiaoLong; Zhong, Zheng

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a general thermodynamic framework is developed to describe the thermo-chemo-mechanical interactions in elastic solids undergoing mechanical deformation, imbibition of diffusive chemical species, chemical reactions and heat exchanges. Fully coupled constitutive relations and evolving laws for irreversible fluxes are provided based on entropy imbalance and stoichiometry that governs reactions. The framework manifests itself with a special feature that the change of Helmholtz free energy is attributed to separate contributions of the diffusion-swelling process and chemical reaction-dilation process. Both the extent of reaction and the concentrations of diffusive species are taken as independent state variables, which describe the reaction-activated responses with underlying variation of microstructures and properties of a material in an explicit way. A specialized isothermal formulation for isotropic materials is proposed that can properly account for volumetric constraints from material incompressibility under chemo-mechanical loadings, in which inhomogeneous deformation is associated with reaction and diffusion under various kinetic time scales. This framework can be easily applied to model the transient volumetric swelling of a solid caused by imbibition of external chemical species and simultaneous chemical dilation arising from reactions between the diffusing species and the solid.

  5. The effect of pressure on open-framework silicates: elastic behaviour and crystal-fluid interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatta, G. D.; Lotti, P.; Tabacchi, G.

    2018-02-01

    The elastic behaviour and the structural evolution of microporous materials compressed hydrostatically in a pressure-transmitting fluid are drastically affected by the potential crystal-fluid interaction, with a penetration of new molecules through the zeolitic cavities in response to applied pressure. In this manuscript, the principal mechanisms that govern the P-behaviour of zeolites with and without crystal-fluid interaction are described, on the basis of previous experimental findings and computational modelling studies. When no crystal-fluid interaction occurs, the effects of pressure are mainly accommodated by tilting of (quasi-rigid) tetrahedra around O atoms that behave as hinges. Tilting of tetrahedra is the dominant mechanism at low-mid P-regime, whereas distortion and compression of tetrahedra represent the mechanisms which usually dominate the mid-high P regime. One of the most common deformation mechanisms in zeolitic framework is the increase of channels ellipticity. The deformation mechanisms are dictated by the topological configuration of the tetrahedral framework; however, the compressibility of the cavities is controlled by the nature and bonding configuration of the ionic and molecular content, resulting in different unit-cell volume compressibility in isotypic structures. The experimental results pertaining to compression in "penetrating" fluids, and thus with crystal-fluid interaction, showed that not all the zeolites experience a P-induced intrusion of new monoatomic species or molecules from the P-transmitting fluids. For example, zeolites with well-stuffed channels at room conditions (e.g. natural zeolites) tend to hinder the penetration of new species through the zeolitic cavities. Several variables govern the sorption phenomena at high pressure, among those: the "free diameters" of the framework cavities, the chemical nature and the configuration of the extra-framework population, the partial pressure of the penetrating molecule in the

  6. Cross-section measurement for quasi-elastic production of charmed baryons in νN interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Onengüt, G.; van Dantzig, R.; de Jong, M.; Melzer, O.; Oldeman, R. G. C.; Pesen, E.; Spada, F. R.; Visschers, J. L.; Güler, M.; Köse, U.; Serin-Zeyrek, M.; Sever, R.; Tolun, P.; Zeyrek, M. T.; Catanesi, M. G.; de Serio, M.; Ieva, M.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Radicioni, E.; Simone, S.; Bülte, A.; Winter, K.; van de Vyver, B.; Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G.; Pittoni, G. L.; Saitta, B.; di Capua, E.; Ogawa, S.; Shibuya, H.; Artamonov, A.; Chizhov, M.; Doucet, M.; Hristova, I. R.; Kawamura, T.; Kolev, D.; Meinhard, H.; Panman, J.; Papadopoulos, I. M.; Ricciardi, S.; Rozanov, A.; Tsenov, R.; Uiterwijk, J. W. E.; Zucchelli, P.; Goldberg, J.; Chikawa, M.; Arik, E.; Song, J. S.; Yoon, C. S.; Kodama, K.; Ushida, N.; Aoki, S.; Hara, T.; Delbar, T.; Favart, D.; Grégoire, G.; Kalinin, S.; Maklioueva, I.; Gorbunov, P.; Khovansky, V.; Shamanov, V.; Tsukerman, I.; Bruski, N.; Frekers, D.; Hoshino, K.; Kawada, J.; Komatsu, M.; Miyanishi, M.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Narita, K.; Niu, K.; Niwa, K.; Nonaka, N.; Sato, O.; Toshito, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cocco, A. G.; D'Ambrosio, N.; de Lellis, G.; De Rosa, G.; di Capua, F.; Ereditato, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Marotta, A.; Messina, M.; Migliozzi, P.; Pistillo, C.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Strolin, P.; Tioukov, V.; Nakamura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Dore, U.; Loverre, P. F.; Ludovici, L.; Righini, P.; Rosa, G.; Santacesaria, R.; Satta, A.; Barbuto, E.; Bozza, C.; Grella, G.; Romano, G.; Sirignano, C.; Sorrentino, S.; Sato, Y.; Tezuka, I.; CHORUS Collaboration

    2003-11-01

    A study of quasi-elastic production of charmed baryons in charged-current interactions of neutrinos with the nuclear emulsion target of CHORUS is presented. In a sample of about 46 000 interactions located in the emulsion, candidates for decays of short-lived particles were identified by using new automatic scanning systems and later confirmed through visual inspection. Criteria based both on the topological and kinematical characteristics of quasi-elastic charm production allowed a clear separation between events of this type and those in which charm is produced in deep inelastic processes. A final sample containing 13 candidates consistent with quasi-elastic production of a charmed baryon with an estimated background of 1.7 events was obtained. At the average neutrino energy of 27 GeV the cross-section for the total quasi-elastic production of charmed baryons relative to the νN charged-current cross-section was measured to be σ(QE)/σ(CC)=(0.23+0.12-0.06(stat)+0.02-0.03(syst))×10-2. Through an analysis of the topology at the production and decay vertices the relative cross-sections were measured separately for singly (Λc+,Σc+,Σc+∗) and doubly (Σc++,Σc++∗) charged baryons.

  7. Multiscale characterization of chemical–mechanical interactions between polymer fibers and cementitious matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández-Cruz, Daniel; Hargis, Craig W.; Bae, Sungchul

    2014-04-01

    Together with a series of mechanical tests, the interactions and potential bonding between polymeric fibers and cementitious materials were studied using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and microtomography (lCT). Experimental results showed that these techniques have great potential to characterize the polymer fiber-hydrated cement-paste matrix interface, as well as differentiating the chemistry of the two components of a bi-polymer (hybrid) fiber the polypropylene core and the ethylene acrylic acid copolymer sheath. Similarly, chemical interactions between the hybrid fiber and the cement hydration products were observed, indicating the chemical bonding between the sheath and the hardened cement paste matrix. Microtomography allowedmore » visualization of the performance of the samples, and the distribution and orientation of the two types of fiber in mortar. Beam flexure tests confirmed improved tensile strength of mixes containing hybrid fibers, and expansion bar tests showed similar reductions in expansion for the polypropylene and hybrid fiber mortar bars.« less

  8. Symmetrical or Non-Symmetrical Debonds at Fiber-Matrix Interfaces: A Study by BEM and Finite Fracture Mechanics on Elastic Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Reja, Mar; Távara, Luis; Mantič, Vladislav

    A recently proposed criterion is used to study the behavior of debonds produced at a fiber-matrix interface. The criterion is based on the Linear Elastic-(Perfectly) Brittle Interface Model (LEBIM) combined with a Finite Fracture Mechanics (FFM) approach, where the stress and energy criteria are suitably coupled. Special attention is given to the discussion about the symmetry of the debond onset and growth in an isolated single fiber specimen under uniaxial transverse tension. A common composite material system, glass fiber-epoxy matrix, is considered. The present methodology uses a two-dimensional (2D) Boundary Element Method (BEM) code to carry out the analysis of interface failure. The present results show that a non-symmetrical interface crack configuration (debonds at one side only) is produced by a lower critical remote load than the symmetrical case (debonds at both sides). Thus, the non-symmetrical solution is the preferred one, which agrees with the experimental evidences found in the literature.

  9. Loss-less propagation, elastic and inelastic interaction of electromagnetic soliton in an anisotropic ferromagnetic nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Kumar, V.; Kavitha, L.; Boopathy, C.; Gopi, D.

    2017-10-01

    Nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic solitons leads to a plethora of interesting physical phenomena in the diverse area of science that include magneto-optics based data storage industry. We investigate the nonlinear magnetization dynamics of a one-dimensional anisotropic ferromagnetic nanowire. The famous Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation (LLG) describes the magnetization dynamics of the ferromagnetic nanowire and the Maxwell's equations govern the propagation dynamics of electromagnetic wave passing through the axis of the nanowire. We perform a uniform expansion of magnetization and magnetic field along the direction of propagation of electromagnetic wave in the framework of reductive perturbation method. The excitation of magnetization of the nanowire is restricted to the normal plane at the lowest order of perturbation and goes out of plane for higher orders. The dynamics of the ferromagnetic nanowire is governed by the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation and the perturbed modified Korteweg-de Vries (pmKdV) equation for the lower and higher values of damping respectively. We invoke the Hirota bilinearization procedure to mKdV and pmKdV equation to construct the multi-soliton solutions, and explicitly analyze the nature of collision phenomena of the co-propagating EM solitons for the above mentioned lower and higher values of Gilbert-damping due to the precessional motion of the ferromagnetic spin. The EM solitons appearing in the higher damping regime exhibit elastic collision thus yielding the fascinating state restoration property, whereas those of lower damping regime exhibit inelastic collision yielding the solitons of suppressed intensity profiles. The propagation of EM soliton in the nanoscale magnetic wire has potential technological applications in optimizing the magnetic storage devices and magneto-electronics.

  10. An inhibitory interaction of human cortical responses to stimuli preferentially exciting Aδ or C fibers

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tuan D.; Matre, Dagfinn; Casey, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    Finely myelinated (type Aδ) and unmyelinated (type C) fibers are the major afferent inputs to spinothalamic tract neurons mediating sensory and reflex responses to noxious and thermal stimuli. These two fiber types differ in their sensory and biophysical properties, raising questions about the interaction of their supraspinal responses. Therefore, we investigated the interaction of cortical responses to stimuli that preferentially excite these fibers in human subjects using evoked potential recordings in a paired conditioning stimulation (CS) and test stimulation (TS) paradigm. There were two experiments, one with Aδ as CS and C as TS (Aδ-C) and another with these stimuli reversed (C-Aδ). We used intra-epidermal electrical pulses applied to the dorsal left hand at 2 and 1 × pinprick threshold (pp) for the preferential stimulation of Aδ fibers and 37 – 50°C contact heat pulses applied to the left or right thenar and left hypothenar eminences for the preferential stimulation of C fibers. We found that the cortical response to preferential Aδ or C fiber stimulation was attenuated whenever either cortical response preceded the other. Standardized values of peak and integrated amplitudes were < 1 in all paring conditions and in all subjects in both experiments. The suppressive effect varied in magnitude with the intensity of the conditioning stimulus in both Aδ-C and C-Aδ experiments. Furthermore, intra-segmental interaction was differentially effective for Aδ conditioning, (peak amplitude, p < 0.008; ANOVA). Our experiments provide the first neurophysiological evidence for a somatotopically distributed, mutually suppressive interaction between cortical responses to preferentially activated Aδ and C afferents in humans. This suppressive interaction of cortical responses suggests contrasting and possibly mutually exclusive sensori-motor functions mediated through the Aδ and C fiber afferent channels. PMID:18308475

  11. The interactive optical fiber fabrics for smart interior environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Z. Q.; Dong, A. H.; Du, Z. Y.; Tan, J.

    2017-10-01

    Comparing to conventional textiles, interactive photonic textiles can emit light, present different colors, change the surface pattern and can interact with users. They are particularly suitable for decorative purpose. Home furniture is one possible application [1]. With attractive illumination and color effect, the photonic textiles can also be used in hotels, exhibition halls, restaurants and many other circumstances to enhance the interior environment. However, the functionality of the interactive photonic textile for interior purpose is still underdeveloped, since there are still sever challenges about how to improve the usability and functionality of the interactive textile. This project aims to study how to improve the interactive function of photonic textiles, which can enhance the well-being of the end-user. In the end, a color-changeable interactive cushion which can detect the main primary particulate matter (PM) 2.5 was developed.

  12. Static and sliding contact of rough surfaces: Effect of asperity-scale properties and long-range elastic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulikal, Srivatsan; Lapusta, Nadia; Bhattacharya, Kaushik

    2018-07-01

    Friction in static and sliding contact of rough surfaces is important in numerous physical phenomena. We seek to understand macroscopically observed static and sliding contact behavior as the collective response of a large number of microscopic asperities. To that end, we build on Hulikal et al. (2015) and develop an efficient numerical framework that can be used to investigate how the macroscopic response of multiple frictional contacts depends on long-range elastic interactions, different constitutive assumptions about the deforming contacts and their local shear resistance, and surface roughness. We approximate the contact between two rough surfaces as that between a regular array of discrete deformable elements attached to a elastic block and a rigid rough surface. The deformable elements are viscoelastic or elasto/viscoplastic with a range of relaxation times, and the elastic interaction between contacts is long-range. We find that the model reproduces the main macroscopic features of evolution of contact and friction for a range of constitutive models of the elements, suggesting that macroscopic frictional response is robust with respect to the microscopic behavior. Viscoelasticity/viscoplasticity contributes to the increase of friction with contact time and leads to a subtle history dependence. Interestingly, long-range elastic interactions only change the results quantitatively compared to the meanfield response. The developed numerical framework can be used to study how specific observed macroscopic behavior depends on the microscale assumptions. For example, we find that sustained increase in the static friction coefficient during long hold times suggests viscoelastic response of the underlying material with multiple relaxation time scales. We also find that the experimentally observed proportionality of the direct effect in velocity jump experiments to the logarithm of the velocity jump points to a complex material-dependent shear resistance at the

  13. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... short period of time can cause intestinal gas ( flatulence ), bloating , and abdominal cramps . This problem often goes ... 213. National Research Council. Dietary reference intakes for energy, carbohydrate, fiber, fat, fatty acids, cholesterol, protein, and ...

  14. Effects of fiber/matrix interactions on the properties of graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, P. E.; Ying, L.

    1982-01-01

    A state-of-the-art literature review of the interactions between fibers and resin within graphite epoxy composite materials was performed. Emphasis centered on: adhesion theory; wetting characteristics of carbon fiber; load transfer mechanisms; methods to evaluate and measure interfacial bond strengths; environmental influence at the interface; and the effect of the interface/interphase on composite performance, with particular attention to impact toughness. In conjunction with the literature review, efforts were made to design experiments to study the wetting behavior of carbon fibers with various finish variants and their effect on adhesion joint strength. The properties of composites with various fiber finishes were measured and compared to the base-line properties of a control. It was shown that by tailoring the interphase properties, a 30% increase in impact toughness was achieved without loss of mechanical properties at both room and elevated temperatures.

  15. An auxiliary graph based dynamic traffic grooming algorithm in spatial division multiplexing enabled elastic optical networks with multi-core fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Tian, Rui; Yu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Jiawei; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-01

    A proper traffic grooming strategy in dynamic optical networks can improve the utilization of bandwidth resources. An auxiliary graph (AG) is designed to solve the traffic grooming problem under a dynamic traffic scenario in spatial division multiplexing enabled elastic optical networks (SDM-EON) with multi-core fibers. Five traffic grooming policies achieved by adjusting the edge weights of an AG are proposed and evaluated through simulation: maximal electrical grooming (MEG), maximal optical grooming (MOG), maximal SDM grooming (MSG), minimize virtual hops (MVH), and minimize physical hops (MPH). Numeric results show that each traffic grooming policy has its own features. Among different traffic grooming policies, an MPH policy can achieve the lowest bandwidth blocking ratio, MEG can save the most transponders, and MSG can obtain the fewest cores for each request.

  16. Influence of functionalized silicones on hair fiber-fiber interactions and on the relationship with the macroscopic behavior of hair assembly.

    PubMed

    Dussaud, Anne; Fieschi-Corso, Lara

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that silicones alter hair surface properties and that silicones have a significant impact on the macroscopic behavior of hair assembly, such as visual appearance, combing performance and manageability of the hair. In order to fine-tune the chemistry of functionlized silicones for specific consumer benefits and hair types, we investigated the influence of silicones on hair fiber-fiber interactions and their correlation to hair volume. The incline plane fiber loop method, implemented with a high-precision motorized rotary stage, was used to quantify the fiber-fiber interactions. Low load static friction was studied as a function of polymer molecular weight, dose and chemical architecture. This information was related to the macroscopic behavior of hair assembly, using virgin curly hair in high humidity.

  17. Elastic strain relaxation in interfacial dislocation patterns: II. From long- and short-range interactions to local reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vattré, A.

    2017-08-01

    The long- and short-range interactions as well as planar reactions between two infinitely periodic sets of crossing dislocations are investigated using anisotropic elasticity theory in face- (fcc) and body- (bcc) centered cubic materials. Two preliminary cases are proposed to examine the substantial changes in the elastic stress states and the corresponding strain energies due to a slight rearrangement in the internal dislocation geometries and characters. In general, significant differences and discrepancies resulting from the considered cubic crystal structure and the approximation of isotropic elasticity are exhibited. In a third scenario, special attention is paid to connecting specific internal dislocation structures from the previous cases with non-equilibrium configurations predicted by the quantized Frank-Bilby equation for the (111) fcc and (110) bcc twist grain boundaries. The present solutions lead to the formation of energetically favorable dislocation junctions with non-randomly strain-relaxed configurations of lower energy. In particular, the local dislocation interactions and reactions form equilibrium hexagonal-shaped patterns with planar three-fold dislocation nodes without producing spurious far-field stresses.Numerical application results are presented from a selection of cubic metals including aluminum, copper, tantalum, and niobium. In contrast to the fcc materials, asymmetric dislocation nodes occur in the anisotropic bcc cases, within which the minimum-energy paths for predicting the fully strain-relaxed dislocation patterns depend on the Zener anisotropic factor with respect to unity. The associated changes in the dislocation structures as well as the removal of the elastic strain energy upon relaxations are quantified and also discussed.

  18. Role of non-covalent interactions in the production of visco-elastic material from zein

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zein has been used in the production of a wide variety of materials during the last century. One of the more intriguing developments in zein utilization has been the discovery that zein can be made to form a visco-elastic dough for bread production. Although significant research has been conducted t...

  19. Revisiting Marshall's Third Law: Why Does Labor's Share Interact with the Elasticity of Substitution to Decrease the Elasticity of Labor Demand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Saul D.

    2009-01-01

    The third Marshall-Hicks-Allen rule of elasticity of derived demand purports to show that labor demand is less elastic when labor is a smaller share of total costs. As Hicks, Allen, and then Bronfenbrenner showed, this rule is not quite correct, and actually is complicated by an unexpected negative relationship involving labor's share of total…

  20. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... meals instead of white rice. Add beans (kidney, black, navy, and pinto) to rice dishes for even more fiber. Spice up salads with berries and almonds, chickpeas, cooked artichokes, and beans (kidney, black, navy, or pinto). Use whole-grain (corn or ...

  1. Graphene mode-lockers for fiber lasers functioned with evanescent field interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Won; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Han, Won-Suk; Bae, Mi-Kyung

    2010-02-01

    Employing graphene as an intracavity passive power modulating element, we demonstrate the efficient laser pulsation in high pulse-energy regime with evanescent field interaction between the propagating light and graphene layer. Graphene is prepared by the solution based reduction of graphene oxide, and dispersed homogeneously into the water for spray onto an all-fiber substrate, side-polished fiber. With the intracavity power up to 21.41 dBm, we ensure the robust high-energy operation without any thermal damage of graphene. Resultant output pulses have center wavelength, spectral width, and repetition rate of 1561.6 nm, 1.96 nm, and 6.99 MHz, respectively.

  2. Vector rectangular-shape laser based on reduced graphene oxide interacting with a long fiber taper.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Zhu, Tao; Huang, Wei; Zeng, Jing

    2014-10-01

    A vector dual-wavelength rectangular-shape laser (RSL) based on a long fiber taper deposited with reduced graphene oxide is proposed, where nonlinearity is enhanced due to a large evanescent-field-interacting length and strong field confinement of an 8 mm fiber taper with a waist diameter of 4 μm. Graphene flakes are deposited uniformly on the taper waist with light pressure effect, so this structure guarantees both excellent saturable absorption and high nonlinearity. The RSL with a repetition rate of 7.9 MHz shows fast polarization switching in two orthogonal polarization directions, and temporal and spectral characteristics are investigated.

  3. Numerical simulation of the solitary wave interacting with an elastic structure using MPS-FEM coupled method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Chengping; Zhang, Youlin; Wan, Decheng

    2017-12-01

    Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) caused by fluid impacting onto a flexible structure commonly occurs in naval architecture and ocean engineering. Research on the problem of wave-structure interaction is important to ensure the safety of offshore structures. This paper presents the Moving Particle Semi-implicit and Finite Element Coupled Method (MPS-FEM) to simulate FSI problems. The Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method is used to calculate the fluid domain, while the Finite Element Method (FEM) is used to address the structure domain. The scheme for the coupling of MPS and FEM is introduced first. Then, numerical validation and convergent study are performed to verify the accuracy of the solver for solitary wave generation and FSI problems. The interaction between the solitary wave and an elastic structure is investigated by using the MPS-FEM coupled method.

  4. Nonadiabatic tapered optical fiber sensor for measuring interaction nicotine with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Pourbeyram, H.; Gholami, M.; Taghipour, Z.; Saeedian, Z.; Hosseini, S. M.

    2011-05-01

    A nonadiabatic tapered optical fiber sensor was utilized for studying of bimolecular interactions including DNA-DNA and DNA-Drug interaction. This work presents a simple evanescent wave sensing system based on an interferometric approach, suitable to meet the requirements of lable-free sensor systems for detecting biomolecular interactions. We have demonstrated the measuring refractive index and the real time detection of interactions between biomolecules. Furthermore basic experiments were carried out, for detecting the hybridization of 25-mer DNA with an immobilized counterpart on the surface. The overall shift after the successful DNA hybridization was 9.5 nm. In this work, a new approach for studying DNA-drug interactions was successfully tested. Nicotine as a carcinogenic compound in cigarette smoke plays an important role in interaction with DNA. Different concentrations of nicotine were applied to observe the Longmuir interaction with DNA.

  5. Magnetic Snell's law and spin-wave fiber with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Weichao; Lan, Jin; Wu, Ruqian; Xiao, Jiang

    2016-10-01

    Spin waves are collective excitations propagating in the magnetic medium with ordered magnetizations. Magnonics, utilizing the spin wave (magnon) as an information carrier, is a promising candidate for low-dissipation computation and communication technologies. We discover that, due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the scattering behavior of the spin wave at a magnetic domain wall follows a generalized Snell's law, where two magnetic domains work as two different mediums. Similar to optical total reflection that occurs at water-air interfaces, spin waves may experience total reflection at the magnetic domain walls when their incident angle is larger than a critical value. We design a spin-wave fiber using a magnetic domain structure with two domain walls, and demonstrate that such a spin-wave fiber can transmit spin waves over long distances by total internal reflections, in analogy to an optical fiber.

  6. The role of local interaction mechanics in fiber optic smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirkis, J. S.; Dasgupta, A.

    1993-04-01

    The concept of using 'smart' composite materials/structures with built-in self-diagnostic capabilities for health monitoring involves embedding discrete and/or distributed sensory networks in the host composite material, along with a central and/or distributed artificial intelligence capability for signal processing, data collection, interpretation and diagnostic evaluations. This article concentrates on the sensory functions in 'smart' structure applications and concentrates in particular on optical fiber sensors. Specifically, we present an overview of recent research dealing with the basic mechanics of local interactions between the embedded optical fiber sensors and the surrounding host composite. The term 'local' is defined by length scales on the order of several optical fiber diameters. We examine some generic issues, such as the 'calibration' and 'obtrusivity' of the sensor, and the inherent damage caused by the sensor inclusions to the surrounding host and vice-versa under internal and/or external applied loads. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are presented regarding the influence of local strain concentrations caused by the sensory inclusions on sensor and host performance. The important issues examined are the local mechanistic effects of optical fiber coatings on the behavior of the sensor and the host, and mechanical survivability of optical fibers experiencing quasi-static and time-varying thermomechanical loading.

  7. Elastic moduli of biological fibers in a coarse-grained model: crystalline cellulose and β-amyloids.

    PubMed

    Poma, Adolfo B; Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2017-10-25

    We study the mechanical response of cellulose and β-amyloid microfibrils to three types of deformation: tensile, indentational, and shear. The cellulose microfibrils correspond to the allomorphs Iα or Iβ whereas the β-amyloid microfibrils correspond to the polymorphs of either two- or three-fold symmetry. This response can be characterized by three elastic moduli, namely, Y L , Y T , and S. We use a structure-based coarse-grained model to analyze the deformations in a unified manner. We find that each of the moduli is almost the same for the two allomorphs of cellulose but Y L is about 20 times larger than Y T (140 GPa vs. 7 GPa), indicating the existence of significant anisotropy. For cellulose we note that the anisotropy results from the involvement of covalent bonds in stretching. For β-amyloid, the sense of anisotropy is opposite to that of cellulose. In the three-fold symmetry case, Y L is about half of Y T (3 vs. 7) whereas for two-fold symmetry the anisotropy is much larger (1.6 vs. 21 GPa). The S modulus is derived to be 1.2 GPa for three-fold symmetry and one half of it for the other symmetry and 3.0 GPa for cellulose. The values of the moduli reflect deformations in the hydrogen-bond network. Unlike in our theoretical approach, no experiment can measure all three elastic moduli with the same apparatus. However, our theoretical results are consistent with various measured values: typical Y L for cellulose Iβ ranges from 133 to 155 GPa, Y T from 2 to 25 GPa, and S from 1.8 to 3.8 GPa. For β-amyloid, the experimental values of S and Y T are about 0.3 GPa and 3.3 GPa respectively, while the value of Y L has not been reported.

  8. Simulation of guided wave interaction with in-plane fiber waviness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2017-02-01

    Reducing the timeline for certification of composite materials and enabling the expanded use of advanced composite materials for aerospace applications are two primary goals of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP). A key a technical challenge area for accomplishing these goals is the development of rapid composite inspection methods with improved defect characterization capabilities. Ongoing work at NASA Langley is focused on expanding ultrasonic simulation capabilities for composite materials. Simulation tools can be used to guide the development of optimal inspection methods. Custom code based on elastodynamic finite integration technique is currently being developed and implemented to study ultrasonic wave interaction with manufacturing defects, such as in-plane fiber waviness (marcelling). This paper describes details of validation comparisons performed to enable simulation of guided wave propagation in composites containing fiber waviness. Simulation results for guided wave interaction with in-plane fiber waviness are also discussed. The results show that the wavefield is affected by the presence of waviness on both the surface containing fiber waviness, as well as the opposite surface to the location of waviness.

  9. Simulation of Guided Wave Interaction with In-Plane Fiber Waviness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the timeline for certification of composite materials and enabling the expanded use of advanced composite materials for aerospace applications are two primary goals of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP). A key a technical challenge area for accomplishing these goals is the development of rapid composite inspection methods with improved defect characterization capabilities. Ongoing work at NASA Langley is focused on expanding ultrasonic simulation capabilities for composite materials. Simulation tools can be used to guide the development of optimal inspection methods. Custom code based on elastodynamic finite integration technique is currently being developed and implemented to study ultrasonic wave interaction with manufacturing defects, such as in-plane fiber waviness (marcelling). This paper describes details of validation comparisons performed to enable simulation of guided wave propagation in composites containing fiber waviness. Simulation results for guided wave interaction with in-plane fiber waviness are also discussed. The results show that the wavefield is affected by the presence of waviness on both the surface containing fiber waviness, as well as the opposite surface to the location of waviness.

  10. Dynamics and elastic interactions of the discrete multi-dark soliton solutions for the Kaup-Newell lattice equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Wen, Xiao-Yong

    2018-03-01

    Under consideration in this paper is the Kaup-Newell (KN) lattice equation which is an integrable discretization of the KN equation. Infinitely, many conservation laws and discrete N-fold Darboux transformation (DT) for this system are constructed and established based on its Lax representation. Via the resulting N-fold DT, the discrete multi-dark soliton solutions in terms of determinants are derived from non-vanishing background. Propagation and elastic interaction structures of such solitons are shown graphically. Overtaking interaction phenomena between/among the two, three and four solitons are discussed. Numerical simulations are used to explore their dynamical behaviors of such multi-dark solitons. Numerical results show that their evolutions are stable against a small noise. Results in this paper might be helpful for understanding the propagation of nonlinear Alfvén waves in plasmas.

  11. Carbon nanotube mode lockers with enhanced nonlinearity via evanescent field interaction in D-shaped fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji; Goh, Chee S.; Set, Sze Y.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel passive mode-locking scheme for pulsed lasers enhanced by the interaction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with the evanescent field of propagating light in a D-shaped optical fiber. The scheme features all-fiber operation as well as a long lateral interaction length, which guarantees a strong nonlinear effect from the nanotubes. Mode locking is achieved with less than 30% of the CNTs compared with the amount of nanotubes used for conventional schemes. Our method also ensures the preservation of the original morphology of the individual CNTs. The demonstrated pulsed laser with our CNT mode locker has a repetition rate of 5.88 MHz and a temporal pulse width of 470 fs.

  12. Carbon nanotube mode lockers with enhanced nonlinearity via evanescent field interaction in D-shaped fibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji; Goh, Chee S; Set, Sze Y

    2007-01-15

    We demonstrate a novel passive mode-locking scheme for pulsed lasers enhanced by the interaction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with the evanescent field of propagating light in a D-shaped optical fiber. The scheme features all-fiber operation as well as a long lateral interaction length, which guarantees a strong nonlinear effect from the nanotubes. Mode locking is achieved with less than 30% of the CNTs compared with the amount of nanotubes used for conventional schemes. Our method also ensures the preservation of the original morphology of the individual CNTs. The demonstrated pulsed laser with our CNT mode locker has a repetition rate of 5.88 MHz and a temporal pulse width of 470 fs.

  13. Dynamic virtual optical network embedding in spectral and spatial domains over elastic optical networks with multicore fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Zhao, Yongli; Yang, Hui; Tan, Yuanlong; Chen, Haoran; Zhang, Jie; Jue, Jason P.

    2016-08-01

    Network virtualization can eradicate the ossification of the infrastructure and stimulate innovation of new network architectures and applications. Elastic optical networks (EONs) are ideal substrate networks for provisioning flexible virtual optical network (VON) services. However, as network traffic continues to increase exponentially, the capacity of EONs will reach the physical limitation soon. To further increase network flexibility and capacity, the concept of EONs is extended into the spatial domain. How to map the VON onto substrate networks by thoroughly using the spectral and spatial resources is extremely important. This process is called VON embedding (VONE).Considering the two kinds of resources at the same time during the embedding process, we propose two VONE algorithms, the adjacent link embedding algorithm (ALEA) and the remote link embedding algorithm (RLEA). First, we introduce a model to solve the VONE problem. Then we design the embedding ability measurement of network elements. Based on the network elements' embedding ability, two VONE algorithms were proposed. Simulation results show that the proposed VONE algorithms could achieve better performance than the baseline algorithm in terms of blocking probability and revenue-to-cost ratio.

  14. Energy-momentum conserving higher-order time integration of nonlinear dynamics of finite elastic fiber-reinforced continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, Norbert; Groß, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Since many years the relevance of fibre-reinforced polymers is steadily increasing in fields of engineering, especially in aircraft and automotive industry. Due to the high strength in fibre direction, but the possibility of lightweight construction, these composites replace more and more traditional materials as metals. Fibre-reinforced polymers are often manufactured from glass or carbon fibres as attachment parts or from steel or nylon cord as force transmission parts. Attachment parts are mostly subjected to small strains, but force transmission parts usually suffer large deformations in at least one direction. Here, a geometrically nonlinear formulation is necessary. Typical examples are helicopter rotor blades, where the fibres have the function to stabilize the structure in order to counteract large centrifugal forces. For long-run analyses of rotor blade deformations, we have to apply numerically stable time integrators for anisotropic materials. This paper presents higher-order accurate and numerically stable time stepping schemes for nonlinear elastic fibre-reinforced continua with anisotropic stress behaviour.

  15. Interface stresses in fiber-reinforced materials with regular fiber arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. H.; Schmauder, S.

    The theory of linear elasticity is used here to analyze the stresses inside and at the surface of fiber-reinforced composites. Plane strain, plane stress, and generalized plane strain are analyzed using the shell model and the BHE model and are numerically studied using finite element analysis. Interface stresses are shown to depend weakly on Poisson's ratio. For equal values of the ratio, generalized plane strain and plane strain results are identical. For small volume fractions up to 40 vol pct of fibers, the shell and the BHE models predict the interface stresses very well over a wide range of elastic mismatches and for different fiber arrangements. At higher volume fractions the stresses are influenced by interactions with neighboring fibers. Introducing an external pressure into the shell model allows the prediction of interface stresses in real composite with isolated or regularly arranged fibers.

  16. Spectral wings of the fiber supercontinuum and the dark-bright soliton interaction.

    PubMed

    Milián, C; Marest, T; Kudlinski, A; Skryabin, D V

    2017-05-01

    We present experimental and numerical data on the supercontinuum generation in an optical fiber pumped in the normal dispersion range where the seeded dark and the spontaneously generated bright solitons contribute to the spectral broadening. We report the dispersive radiation arising from the interaction of the bright and dark solitons. This radiation consists of the two weak dispersing pulses that continuously shift their frequencies and shape the short and long wavelength wings of the supercontinuum spectrum.

  17. QTL analysis of genotype x environment interactions affecting cotton fiber quality.

    PubMed

    Paterson, A H; Saranga, Y; Menz, M; Jiang, C-X; Wright, R J

    2003-02-01

    Cotton is unusual among major crops in that large acreages are grown under both irrigated and rainfed conditions, making genotype x environment interactions of even greater importance than usual in designing crop-improvement strategies. We describe the impact of well-watered versus water-limited growth conditions on the genetic control of fiber quality, a complex suite of traits that collectively determine the utility of cotton. Fiber length, length uniformity, elongation, strength, fineness, and color (yellowness) were influenced by 6, 7, 9, 21, 25 and 11 QTLs (respectively) that could be detected in one or more treatments. The genetic control of cotton fiber quality was markedly affected both by general differences between growing seasons ("years") and by specific differences in water management regimes. Seventeen QTLs were detected only in the water-limited treatment while only two were specific to the well-watered treatment, suggesting that improvement of fiber quality under water stress may be even more complicated than improvement of this already complex trait under well-watered conditions. In crops such as cotton with widespread use of both irrigated and rainfed production systems, the need to manipulate larger numbers of genes to confer adequate quality under both sets of conditions will reduce the expected rate of genetic gain. These difficulties may be partly ameliorated by efficiencies gained through identification and use of diagnostic DNA markers, including those identified herein.

  18. Interaction of gelatin with polyenes modulates antifungal activity and biocompatibility of electrospun fiber mats

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Loh, Xian Jun; Nandhakumar, Muruganantham; Barathi, Veluchamy Amutha; Kalaipriya, Madhaiyan; Kwan, Jia Lin; Liu, Shou Ping; Beuerman, Roger Wilmer; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-01-01

    Topical application of antifungals does not have predictable or well-controlled release characteristics and requires reapplication to achieve therapeutic local concentration in a reasonable time period. In this article, the efficacy of five different US Food and Drug Administration-approved antifungal-loaded (amphotericin B, natamycin, terbinafine, fluconazole, and itraconazole) electrospun gelatin fiber mats were compared. Morphological studies show that incorporation of polyenes resulted in a two-fold increase in fiber diameter and the mats inhibit the growth of yeasts and filamentous fungal pathogens. Terbinafine-loaded mats were effective against three filamentous fungal species. Among the two azole antifungals compared, the itraconazole-loaded mat was potent against Aspergillus strains. However, activity loss was observed for fluconazole-loaded mats against all of the test organisms. The polyene-loaded mats displayed rapid candidacidal activities as well. Biophysical and rheological measurements indicate strong interactions between polyene antifungals and gelatin matrix. As a result, the polyenes stabilized the triple helical conformation of gelatin and the presence of gelatin decreased the hemolytic activity of polyenes. The polyene-loaded fiber mats were noncytotoxic to primary human corneal and sclera fibroblasts. The reduction of toxicity with complete retention of activity of the polyene antifungal-loaded gelatin fiber mats can provide new opportunities in the management of superficial skin infections. PMID:24920895

  19. Electric-acoustic interactions in the hearing cochlea: single fiber recordings.

    PubMed

    Tillein, J; Hartmann, R; Kral, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigates interactions of simultaneous electric and acoustic stimulation in single auditory nerve fibers in normal hearing cats. First, the auditory nerve was accessed with a microelectrode and response areas of single nerve fibers were determined for acoustic stimulation. Second, response thresholds to extracochlear sinusoidal electric stimulation using ball electrodes positioned at the round window were measured. Third, interactions that occurred with combined electric-acoustic stimulation were investigated in two areas: (1) the spectral domain (frequency response areas) and (2) the temporal domain (phase-locking to each stimulus) at moderate stimulus intensities (electric: 6 dB re threshold, acoustic: 20-40 dB re threshold at the characteristic frequency, CF). For fibers responding to both modalities responses to both electric and acoustic stimulation could be clearly identified. CFs, thresholds, and bandwidth (Q10dB) of acoustic responses were not significantly affected by simultaneous electric stimulation. Phase-locking of electric responses decreased in the presence of acoustic stimulation. Indication for electric stimulation of inner hair cells with 125 and 250 Hz were observed. However, these did not disturb the acoustic receptive fields of auditory nerve fibers. There was a trade-off between these responses when the intensities of the stimulation were varied: Relatively more intense stimulation dominated less intense stimulation. The scarcity of interaction between the different stimulus modalities demonstrates the ability of electric-acoustic stimulation to transfer useful information through both stimulation channels at the same time despite cochlear electrophonic effects. Application of 30 Hz electric stimulation resulted in a strong suppression of acoustic activity in the anodic phase of the stimulus. An electric stimulation like this might thus be used to control acoustic responses. This article is part of a Special Issue

  20. Geometric phase due to orbit-orbit interaction: rotating LP11 modes in a two-mode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep Chakravarthy, T.; Naik, Dinesh N.; Viswanathan, Nirmal K.

    2017-10-01

    Accumulation of geometric phase due to non-coplanar propagation of higher-order modes in an optical fiber is experimentally demonstrated. Vertically-polarized LP11 fiber mode, excited in a horizontally-held, torsion-free, step-index, two-mode optical fiber, rotates due to asymmetry in the propagating k-vectors, arising due to off-centered beam location at the fiber input. Perceiving the process as due to rotation of the fiber about the off-axis launch position, the orbital Berry phase accumulation upon scanning the launch position in a closed-loop around the fiber axis manifests as rotational Doppler effect, a consequence of orbit-orbit interaction. The anticipated phase accumulation as a function of the input launch position, observed through interferometry is connected to the mode rotation angle, quantified using the autocorrelation method.

  1. Elastic interactions of a fatigue crack with a micro-defect by the mixed boundary integral equation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lua, Yuan J.; Liu, Wing K.; Belytschko, Ted

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the mixed boundary integral equation method is developed to study the elastic interactions of a fatigue crack and a micro-defect such as a void, a rigid inclusion or a transformation inclusion. The method of pseudo-tractions is employed to study the effect of a transformation inclusion. An enriched element which incorporates the mixed-mode stress intensity factors is applied to characterize the singularity at a moving crack tip. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the numerical procedure, the analysis of a crack emanating from a circular hole in a finite plate is performed and the results are compared with the available numerical solution. The effects of various micro-defects on the crack path and fatigue life are investigated. The results agree with the experimental observations.

  2. On Interactions of Oscillation Modes for a Weakly Non-Linear Undamped Elastic Beam with AN External Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BOERTJENS, G. J.; VAN HORSSEN, W. T.

    2000-08-01

    In this paper an initial-boundary value problem for the vertical displacement of a weakly non-linear elastic beam with an harmonic excitation in the horizontal direction at the ends of the beam is studied. The initial-boundary value problem can be regarded as a simple model describing oscillations of flexible structures like suspension bridges or iced overhead transmission lines. Using a two-time-scales perturbation method an approximation of the solution of the initial-boundary value problem is constructed. Interactions between different oscillation modes of the beam are studied. It is shown that for certain external excitations, depending on the phase of an oscillation mode, the amplitude of specific oscillation modes changes.

  3. Interaction between shock wave and single inertial bubbles near an elastic boundary.

    PubMed

    Sankin, G N; Zhong, P

    2006-10-01

    The interaction of laser-generated single inertial bubbles (collapse time = 121 mus) near a silicon rubber membrane with a shock wave (55 MPa in peak pressure and 1.7 mus in compressive pulse duration) is investigated. The interaction leads to directional, forced asymmetric collapse of the bubble with microjet formation toward the surface. Maximum jet penetration into the membrane is produced during the bubble collapse phase with optimal shock wave arrival time and stand-off distance. Such interaction may provide a unique acoustic means for in vivo microinjection, applicable to targeted delivery of macromolecules and gene vectors to biological tissues.

  4. Validation of a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction model simulating flow through an elastic aperture.

    PubMed

    Quaini, A; Canic, S; Glowinski, R; Igo, S; Hartley, C J; Zoghbi, W; Little, S

    2012-01-10

    This work presents a validation of a fluid-structure interaction computational model simulating the flow conditions in an in vitro mock heart chamber modeling mitral valve regurgitation during the ejection phase during which the trans-valvular pressure drop and valve displacement are not as large. The mock heart chamber was developed to study the use of 2D and 3D color Doppler techniques in imaging the clinically relevant complex intra-cardiac flow events associated with mitral regurgitation. Computational models are expected to play an important role in supporting, refining, and reinforcing the emerging 3D echocardiographic applications. We have developed a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction algorithm based on a semi-implicit, monolithic method, combined with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach to capture the fluid domain motion. The mock regurgitant mitral valve corresponding to an elastic plate with a geometric orifice, was modeled using 3D elasticity, while the blood flow was modeled using the 3D Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible, viscous fluid. The two are coupled via the kinematic and dynamic conditions describing the two-way coupling. The pressure, the flow rate, and orifice plate displacement were measured and compared with numerical simulation results. In-line flow meter was used to measure the flow, pressure transducers were used to measure the pressure, and a Doppler method developed by one of the authors was used to measure the axial displacement of the orifice plate. The maximum recorded difference between experiment and numerical simulation for the flow rate was 4%, the pressure 3.6%, and for the orifice displacement 15%, showing excellent agreement between the two. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of a Hypersonic Vehicle with Significant Aero-Thermo-Elastic-Propulsion Interactions: Elastic, Thermal and Mass Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Jaidev

    This thesis examines themodeling, analysis, and control system design issues for scramjet powered hypersonic vehicles. A nonlinear three degrees of freedom longitudinal model which includes aero-propulsion-elasticity effects was used for all analyses. This model is based upon classical compressible flow and Euler-Bernouli structural concepts. Higher fidelity computational fluid dynamics and finite element methods are needed for more precise intermediate and final evaluations. The methods presented within this thesis were shown to be useful for guiding initial control relevant design. The model was used to examine the vehicle's static and dynamic characteristics over the vehicle's trimmable region. The vehicle has significant longitudinal coupling between the fuel equivalency ratio (FER) and the flight path angle (FPA). For control system design, a two-input two-output plant (FER - elevator to speed-FPA) with 11 states (including 3 flexible modes) was used. Velocity, FPA, and pitch were assumed to be available for feedback. Aerodynamic heat modeling and design for the assumed TPS was incorporated to original Bolender's model to study the change in static and dynamic properties. De-centralized control stability, feasibility and limitations issues were dealt with the change in TPS elasticity, mass and physical dimension. The impact of elasticity due to TPS mass, TPS physical dimension as well as prolonged heating was also analyzed to understand performance limitations of de-centralized control designed for nominal model.

  6. The Interaction between Dietary Fiber and Fat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Sandi L; Neuhouser, Marian L; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Tinker, Lesley F; Shikany, James M; Snetselaar, Linda; Martinez, Jessica A; Kato, Ikuko; Beresford, Shirley A A; Chapkin, Robert S; Lampe, Johanna W

    2016-11-30

    Combined intakes of specific dietary fiber and fat subtypes protect against colon cancer in animal models. We evaluated associations between self-reported individual and combinations of fiber (insoluble, soluble, and pectins, specifically) and fat (omega-6, omega-3, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), specifically) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in the Women's Health Initiative prospective cohort ( n = 134,017). During a mean 11.7 years (1993-2010), 1952 incident CRC cases were identified. Cox regression models computed multivariate adjusted hazard ratios to estimate the association between dietary factors and CRC risk. Assessing fiber and fat individually, there was a modest trend for lower CRC risk with increasing intakes of total and insoluble fiber ( p-trend 0.09 and 0.08). An interaction ( p = 0.01) was observed between soluble fiber and DHA + EPA, with protective effects of DHA + EPA with lower intakes of soluble fiber and an attenuation at higher intakes, however this association was no longer significant after correction for multiple testing. These results suggest a modest protective effect of higher fiber intake on CRC risk, but not in combination with dietary fat subtypes. Given the robust results in preclinical models and mixed results in observational studies, controlled dietary interventions with standardized intakes are needed to better understand the interaction of specific fat and fiber subtypes on colon biology and ultimately CRC susceptibility in humans.

  7. The Interaction between Dietary Fiber and Fat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Sandi L.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Tinker, Lesley F.; Shikany, James M.; Snetselaar, Linda; Martinez, Jessica A.; Kato, Ikuko; Beresford, Shirley A. A.; Chapkin, Robert S.; Lampe, Johanna W.

    2016-01-01

    Combined intakes of specific dietary fiber and fat subtypes protect against colon cancer in animal models. We evaluated associations between self-reported individual and combinations of fiber (insoluble, soluble, and pectins, specifically) and fat (omega-6, omega-3, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), specifically) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in the Women’s Health Initiative prospective cohort (n = 134,017). During a mean 11.7 years (1993–2010), 1952 incident CRC cases were identified. Cox regression models computed multivariate adjusted hazard ratios to estimate the association between dietary factors and CRC risk. Assessing fiber and fat individually, there was a modest trend for lower CRC risk with increasing intakes of total and insoluble fiber (p-trend 0.09 and 0.08). An interaction (p = 0.01) was observed between soluble fiber and DHA + EPA, with protective effects of DHA + EPA with lower intakes of soluble fiber and an attenuation at higher intakes, however this association was no longer significant after correction for multiple testing. These results suggest a modest protective effect of higher fiber intake on CRC risk, but not in combination with dietary fat subtypes. Given the robust results in preclinical models and mixed results in observational studies, controlled dietary interventions with standardized intakes are needed to better understand the interaction of specific fat and fiber subtypes on colon biology and ultimately CRC susceptibility in humans. PMID:27916893

  8. Membrane Elasticity and Mediated Interactions in Continuum Theory: A Differential Geometric Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deserno, Markus

    Biomembranes are fantastically complex systems [1-4]: hundreds of different lipid and protein species self-assemble into a large two-dimensional aggregate of locally complex and laterally inhomogeneous structure, and a globally potentially daunting topology. Thermal motion of this elastically soft system contributes prominently to its properties, and active processes constantly drive it away from equilibrium. How can we ever hope to learn something quantitative about such a complicated thing? The route to success lies — as so often in physics — in the observation that we can frefectly well described by an effective Hamiltonian, whose small number of phenomenological parameters depend on — and can in principle be determined from — the underlying microscopic physics. Yet, establishing this micro-macro relation is not prerequisite to a successful ing steps can be performed, thus constructing a hierarchy of scales with much beautiful physics in the different tiers. For instance, the laws of quantum mechanics explain everything about water that we need to know — e.g., how water structure and hydrogen bonds give rise to many of water's anomalies — but we can often just describe it effectively as a substance with some measurable material parameters, such as density, heat of vaporization, melting point, and compressibility. And even of these parameters many become irrelevant if we're only interested in large-scale fluid motion, for which density and viscosity are often the only relevant properties. Having gotten so used to this separability, we sometimes even forget that the success of physics as a science rests entirely on it. If phenomena on different scales could not be disentangled, we would for instance not be able to describe the motion of the liquid in a stirred cup of coffee without a thorough appreciation of its atomic structure. Or, maybe we'd even need to understand quarks? Or strings? The fact that for all intents and purposes we can master our

  9. Transverse compression of PPTA fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singletary, James

    2000-07-01

    Results of single transverse compression testing of PPTA and PIPD fibers, using a novel test device, are presented and discussed. In the tests, short lengths of single fibers are compressed between two parallel, stiff platens. The fiber elastic deformation is analyzed as a Hertzian contact problem. The inelastic deformation is analyzed by elastic-plastic FE simulation and by laser-scanning confocal microscopy of the compressed fibers ex post facto. The results obtained are compared to those in the literature and to the theoretical predictions of PPTA fiber transverse elasticity based on PPTA crystal elasticity.

  10. Modification of the Interfacial Interaction between Carbon Fiber and Epoxy with Carbon Hybrid Materials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kejing; Wang, Menglei; Wu, Junqing; Qian, Kun; Sun, Jie; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the hybrid materials and epoxy and carbon fiber (CF) composites were improved significantly as compared to the CF composites made from unmodified epoxy. The reasons could be attributed to the strong interfacial interaction between the CF and the epoxy composites for the existence of carbon nanomaterials. The microstructure and dispersion of carbon nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The results showed that the dispersion of the hybrid materials in the polymer was superior to other carbon nanomaterials. The high viscosity and shear stress characterized by a rheometer and the high interfacial friction and damping behavior characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that the strong interfacial interaction was greatly improved between fibers and epoxy composites. Remarkably, the tensile tests presented that the CF composites with hybrid materials and epoxy composites have a better reinforcing and toughening effect on CF, which further verified the strong interfacial interaction between epoxy and CF for special structural hybrid materials. PMID:28335217

  11. Fibulin-4 E57K Knock-in Mice Recapitulate Cutaneous, Vascular and Skeletal Defects of Recessive Cutis Laxa 1B with both Elastic Fiber and Collagen Fibril Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Igoucheva, Olga; Alexeev, Vitali; Halabi, Carmen M; Adams, Sheila M; Stoilov, Ivan; Sasaki, Takako; Arita, Machiko; Donahue, Adele; Mecham, Robert P; Birk, David E; Chu, Mon-Li

    2015-08-28

    Fibulin-4 is an extracellular matrix protein essential for elastic fiber formation. Frameshift and missense mutations in the fibulin-4 gene (EFEMP2/FBLN4) cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) 1B, characterized by loose skin, aortic aneurysm, arterial tortuosity, lung emphysema, and skeletal abnormalities. Homozygous missense mutations in FBLN4 are a prevalent cause of ARCL 1B. Here we generated a knock-in mouse strain bearing a recurrent fibulin-4 E57K homozygous missense mutation. The mutant mice survived into adulthood and displayed abnormalities in multiple organ systems, including loose skin, bent forelimb, aortic aneurysm, tortuous artery, and pulmonary emphysema. Biochemical studies of dermal fibroblasts showed that fibulin-4 E57K mutant protein was produced but was prone to dimer formation and inefficiently secreted, thereby triggering an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Immunohistochemistry detected a low level of fibulin-4 E57K protein in the knock-in skin along with altered expression of selected elastic fiber components. Processing of a precursor to mature lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in cross-linking of elastin and collagen, was compromised. The knock-in skin had a reduced level of desmosine, an elastin-specific cross-link compound, and ultrastructurally abnormal elastic fibers. Surprisingly, structurally aberrant collagen fibrils and altered organization into fibers were characteristics of the knock-in dermis and forelimb tendons. Type I collagen extracted from the knock-in skin had decreased amounts of covalent intermolecular cross-links, which could contribute to the collagen fibril abnormalities. Our studies provide the first evidence that fibulin-4 plays a role in regulating collagen fibril assembly and offer a preclinical platform for developing treatments for ARCL 1B. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Macroscopic elastic properties of textured ZrN-AlN polycrystalline aggregates: From ab initio calculations to grain-scale interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holec, D.; Tasnádi, F.; Wagner, P.; Friák, M.; Neugebauer, J.; Mayrhofer, P. H.; Keckes, J.

    2014-11-01

    Despite the fast development of computational material modeling, the theoretical description of macroscopic elastic properties of textured polycrystalline aggregates starting from basic principles remains a challenging task. In this study we use a supercell-based approach to obtain the elastic properties of a random solid solution cubic Zr1 -xAlxN system as a function of the metallic sublattice composition and texture descriptors. The employed special quasirandom structures are optimized not only with respect to short-range-order parameters, but also to make the three cubic directions [1 0 0 ] , [0 1 0 ] , and [0 0 1 ] as similar as possible. In this way, only a small spread of elastic constant tensor components is achieved and an optimum trade-off between modeling of chemical disorder and computational limits regarding the supercell size and calculational time is proposed. The single-crystal elastic constants are shown to vary smoothly with composition, yielding x ≈0.5 an alloy constitution with an almost isotropic response. Consequently, polycrystals with this composition are suggested to have Young's modulus independent of the actual microstructure. This is indeed confirmed by explicit calculations of polycrystal elastic properties, both within the isotropic aggregate limit and with fiber textures with various orientations and sharpness. It turns out that for low AlN mole fractions, the spread of the possible Young's modulus data caused by the texture variation can be larger than 100 GPa. Consequently, our discussion of Young's modulus data of cubic Zr1 -xAlxN contains also the evaluation of the texture typical for thin films.

  13. Improvement of Interaction in a Composite Structure by Using a Sol-Gel Functional Coating on Carbon Fibers.

    PubMed

    Szczurek, Anna; Barcikowski, Michał; Leluk, Karol; Babiarczuk, Bartosz; Kaleta, Jerzy; Krzak, Justyna

    2017-08-25

    The modification of carbon fibers for improving adhesion between fibers and an epoxy resin in composite materials has become the focus of attention. In this work the carbon fiber coating process has been devised in a way preventing the stiffening and clumping of fibers. To improve interactions between coated fibers and a resin in composites, four types of silica coatings with different organic functional groups (3-aminopropyl-coating 1, 3-mercaptopropyl-coating 2, 2-(3,4-epoxycyclohexyl) ethyl-coating 3, methyl-coating 4) were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to distinguish the changes of a carbon fibers surface after coating deposition. The thickness of the obtained coatings, including the diversity of thickness, was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The increase in surface free energy (SFE) of modified fibers, including the distinction between the polar and dispersive parts, was examined by wettability measurements using a tensometric test. The developed coating preparation process allowed to cover fibers separately with nanoscale silica layers, which changed their morphology. The introduction of organic functional groups resulted in surface free energy changes, especially an increase in specific polar surface energy components.

  14. Improvement of Interaction in a Composite Structure by Using a Sol-Gel Functional Coating on Carbon Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Barcikowski, Michał; Leluk, Karol; Babiarczuk, Bartosz; Kaleta, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    The modification of carbon fibers for improving adhesion between fibers and an epoxy resin in composite materials has become the focus of attention. In this work the carbon fiber coating process has been devised in a way preventing the stiffening and clumping of fibers. To improve interactions between coated fibers and a resin in composites, four types of silica coatings with different organic functional groups (3-aminopropyl–coating 1, 3-mercaptopropyl–coating 2, 2-(3,4-epoxycyclohexyl) ethyl–coating 3, methyl–coating 4) were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to distinguish the changes of a carbon fibers surface after coating deposition. The thickness of the obtained coatings, including the diversity of thickness, was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The increase in surface free energy (SFE) of modified fibers, including the distinction between the polar and dispersive parts, was examined by wettability measurements using a tensometric test. The developed coating preparation process allowed to cover fibers separately with nanoscale silica layers, which changed their morphology. The introduction of organic functional groups resulted in surface free energy changes, especially an increase in specific polar surface energy components. PMID:28841187

  15. Switching in Feedforward Control of Grip Force During Tool-Mediated Interaction With Elastic Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    White, Olivier; Karniel, Amir; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Barbiero, Marie; Nisky, Ilana

    2018-01-01

    Switched systems are common in artificial control systems. Here, we suggest that the brain adopts a switched feedforward control of grip forces during manipulation of objects. We measured how participants modulated grip force when interacting with soft and rigid virtual objects when stiffness varied continuously between trials. We identified a sudden phase transition between two forms of feedforward control that differed in the timing of the synchronization between the anticipated load force and the applied grip force. The switch occurred several trials after a threshold stiffness level in the range 100–200 N/m. These results suggest that in the control of grip force, the brain acts as a switching control system. This opens new research questions as to the nature of the discrete state variables that drive the switching. PMID:29930504

  16. Penny-shaped crack in a fiber-reinforced matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, T. V.; Erdogan, F.

    1975-01-01

    Using the slender inclusion model developed earlier the elastostatic interaction problem between a penny-shaped crack and elastic fibers in an elastic matrix is formulated. For a single set and for multiple sets of fibers oriented perpendicularly to the plane of the crack and distributed symmetrically on concentric circles the problem is reduced to a system of singular integral equations. Techniques for the regularization and for the numerical solution of the system are outlined. For various fiber geometries numerical examples are given and distribution of the stress intensity factor along the crack border is obtained. Sample results showing the distribution of the fiber stress and a measure of the fiber-matrix interface shear are also included.

  17. The Impact of Carnitine on Dietary Fiber and Gut Bacteria Metabolism and Their Mutual Interaction in Monogastrics

    PubMed Central

    Ghonimy, Abdallah; Zhang, Dong Ming; Farouk, Mohammed Hamdy; Wang, Qiuju

    2018-01-01

    Carnitine has vital roles in the endogenous metabolism of short chain fatty acids. It can protect and support gut microbial species, and some dietary fibers can reduce the available iron involved in the bioactivity of carnitine. There is also an antagonistic relationship between high microbial populations and carnitine bioavailability. This review shows the interactions between carnitine and gut microbial composition. It also elucidates the role of carnitine bacterial metabolism, mitochondrial function, fiber fermentability, and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). PMID:29597260

  18. Interactions between fibroin and sericin proteins from Antheraea pernyi and Bombyx mori silk fibers.

    PubMed

    Du, Shan; Zhang, Jin; Zhou, Wei T; Li, Quan X; Greene, George W; Zhu, Hai J; Li, Jing L; Wang, Xun G

    2016-09-15

    Silkworm silk fibers are core-shell composites of fibroin and sericin proteins. Studying the interactions between fibroin and sericin is essential for understanding the properties of these composites. It is observed that compared to the domestic silk cocoon Bombyx mori (B. mori), the adhesion between fibroin and sericin from the wild silk cocoon, Antheraea pernyi (A. pernyi), is significantly stronger with a higher degree of heterogeneity. The adsorption of A. pernyi sericin on its fibroin is almost twice the value for B. mori sericin on fibroin, both showing a monolayer Langmuir adsorption. (1)H NMR and FTIR studies demonstrate on a molecular level the stronger interactions and the more intensive complex formation between A. pernyi fibroin and sericin, facilitated by the hydrogen bonding between glycine and serine. The findings of this study may help the design of composites with superior interfacial adhesion between different components. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fast interactive elastic registration of 12-bit multi-spectral images with subvoxel accuracy using display hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, Herke Jan; de Roode, Rowland; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    Multi-spectral images of human tissue taken in-vivo often contain image alignment problems as patients have difficulty in retaining their posture during the acquisition time of 20 seconds. Previously, it has been attempted to correct motion errors with image registration software developed for MR or CT data but these algorithms have been proven to be too slow and erroneous for practical use with multi-spectral images. A new software package has been developed which allows the user to play a decisive role in the registration process as the user can monitor the progress of the registration continuously and force it in the right direction when it starts to fail. The software efficiently exploits videocard hardware to gain speed and to provide a perfect subvoxel correspondence between registration field and display. An 8 bit graphic card was used to efficiently register and resample 12 bit images using the hardware interpolation modes present on the graphic card. To show the feasibility of this new registration process, the software was applied in clinical practice evaluating the dosimetry for psoriasis and KTP laser treatment. The microscopic differences between images of normal skin and skin exposed to UV light proved that an affine registration step including zooming and slanting is critical for a subsequent elastic match to have success. The combination of user interactive registration software with optimal addressing the potentials of PC video card hardware greatly improves the speed of multi spectral image registration.

  20. Elastic scattering and particle production in two-prong. pi. /sup -/p interactions at 8 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagaki, T.; Tanaka, S.; Yuta, H.

    1982-10-01

    Results of a high-statistics study of elastic scattering and meson resonances produced by ..pi../sup -/p interactions at 8 GeV/c are presented. Large statistics and small systematic errors permit examination of the complete kinematic region. Total differential cross sections are given for rho/sup 0,-/, f/sup 0/, g/sup 0,-/, ..delta../sup + -/, ..delta../sup 0/, and N* resonances. Spin-density matrix elements and Legendre-polynomial moments are given for rho, f, and ..delta.. resonances. The results for rho/sup 0/ and f/sup 0/ resonances are compared with the predictions of a Regge-pole-exchange model. Properties of the above resonances are compared and discussed. In particular, we presentmore » evidence that the rho/sup 0/ and f/sup 0/ production mechanisms are similar. The similarity of the g/sup 0/ t distribution to that of the rho/sup 0/ and f/sup 0/ suggests a common production mechanism for all three resonances.« less

  1. Dynamic interaction of twin vertically overlapping lined tunnels in an elastic half space subjected to incident plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongxian; Wang, Yirui; Liang, Jianwen

    2016-06-01

    The scattering of plane harmonic P and SV waves by a pair of vertically overlapping lined tunnels buried in an elastic half space is solved using a semi-analytic indirect boundary integration equation method. Then the effect of the distance between the two tunnels, the stiffness and density of the lining material, and the incident frequency on the seismic response of the tunnels is investigated. Numerical results demonstrate that the dynamic interaction between the twin tunnels cannot be ignored and the lower tunnel has a significant shielding effect on the upper tunnel for high-frequency incident waves, resulting in great decrease of the dynamic hoop stress in the upper tunnel; for the low-frequency incident waves, in contrast, the lower tunnel can lead to amplification effect on the upper tunnel. It also reveals that the frequency-spectrum characteristics of dynamic stress of the lower tunnel are significantly different from those of the upper tunnel. In addition, for incident P waves in low-frequency region, the soft lining tunnels have significant amplification effect on the surface displacement amplitude, which is slightly larger than that of the corresponding single tunnel.

  2. Flame resistant elastic elastomeric fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Massucco, A. A.; Sidman, K. R.

    1974-01-01

    Compositions exhibit elastomeric properties and possess various degrees of flame resistance. First material polyurethane, incorporates halogen containing polyol and is flame resistant in air; second contains spandex elastomer with flame retardant additives; and third material is prepared from fluorelastomer composition of copolymer of vinylidene fluoride and hexafluoropropylene.

  3. Elastic nonwovens containing cotton fibers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nonwoven products continue to grow because of their unique structure and properties and one’s ability to engineer their properties for desired applications, which include filters, absorbent products and medical nonwovens. Meltblowing is a one-step process in which high-velocity hot air blows a molte...

  4. Quantitative analysis of lung elastic fibers in idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (IPPFE): comparison of clinical, radiological, and pathological findings with those of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Noriyuki; Kusagaya, Hideki; Oyama, Yoshiyuki; Kono, Masato; Kaida, Yusuke; Kuroishi, Shigeki; Hashimoto, Dai; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Yokomura, Koshi; Inui, Naoki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2014-05-28

    The pathological appearance of idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (IPPFE) with hematoxylin-eosin staining is similar to that of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The amount of elastic fibers (EF) and detailed differences between IPPFE and IPF have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to quantify the EF and identify the differences between IPPFE and IPF. We evaluated six patients with IPPFE and 28 patients with IPF who underwent surgical lung biopsy or autopsy. The patients' clinical history, physical findings, chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings, and pathological features of lung specimens were retrospectively evaluated. The amounts of EF in lung specimens were quantified with Weigert's staining using a camera with a charge-coupled device and analytic software in both groups. Fewer patients with IPPFE than IPF had fine crackles (50.0% vs. 96.4%, p = 0.012). Patients with IPPFE had a lower forced vital capacity (62.7 ± 10.9% vs. 88.6 ± 21.9% predicted, p = 0.009), higher consolidation scores on HRCT (1.7 ± 0.8 vs. 0.3 ± 0.5, p < 0.0001), lower body mass indices (17.9 ± 0.9 vs. 24.3 ± 2.8, p < 0.0001), and more pneumothoraces than did patients with IPF (66.7 vs. 3.6%, p = 0.002). Lung specimens from patients with IPPFE had more than twice the amount of EF than did those from patients with IPF (28.5 ± 3.3% vs. 12.1 ± 4.4%, p < 0.0001). The amount of EF in the lower lobes was significantly lower than that in the upper lobes, even in the same patient with IPPFE (23.6 ± 2.4% vs. 32.4 ± 5.5%, p = 0.048). However, the amount of EF in the lower lobes of patients with IPPFE was still higher than that of patients with IPF (23.6 ± 2.4% vs. 12.2 ± 4.4%, p < 0.0001). More than twice the amount of EF was found in patients with IPPFE than in those with IPF. Even in the lower lobes, the amount of EF was higher in patients with IPPFE than in those with IPF, although the

  5. Characterization of fluids and fluid-fluid interaction by fiber optic refractive index sensor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Hattenberger, C.; Weiner, M.; Liebscher, A.; Spangenberg, E.

    2009-04-01

    A fiber optic refractive index sensor is tested for continuous monitoring of fluid-fluid and fluid-gas interactions within the frame of laboratory investigations of CO2 storage, monitoring and safety technology research (COSMOS project, "Geotechnologien" program). The sensor bases on a Fabry-Perot white light interferometer technique, where the refractive index (RI) of the solution under investigation is measured by variation of the liquid-filled Fabry-Perot optical cavity length. Such sensor system is typically used for measuring and controlling oil composition and also fluid quality. The aim of this study is to test the application of the fiber optic refractive index sensor for monitoring the CO2 dissolution in formation fluids (brine, oil, gas) of CO2 storage sites. Monitoring and knowledge of quantity and especially rate of CO2 dissolution in the formation fluid is important for any assessment of long-term risks of CO2 storage sites. It is also a prerequisite for any precise reservoir modelling. As a first step we performed laboratory experiments in standard autoclaves on a variety of different fluids and fluid mixtures (technical alcohols, pure water, CO2, synthetic brines, natural formation brine from the Ketzin test site). The RI measurements are partly combined with default electrical conductivity and sonic velocity measurements. The fiber optic refractive index sensor system allows for RI measurements within the range 1.0000 to 1.7000 RI with a resolution of approximately 0.0001 RI. For simple binary fluid mixtures first results indicate linear relationships between refractive indices and fluid composition. Within the pressure range investigated (up to 60 bar) the data suggest only minor changes of RI with pressure. Further, planned experiments will focus on the determination of i) the temperature dependency of RI, ii) the combined effects of pressure and temperature on RI, and finally iii) the kinetics of CO2 dissolution in realistic formation fluids.

  6. Oxynitride glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Parimal J.; Messier, Donald R.; Rich, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Research at the Army Materials Technology Laboratory (AMTL) and elsewhere has shown that many glass properties including elastic modulus, hardness, and corrosion resistance are improved markedly by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in the glass structure. Oxynitride glasses, therefore, offer exciting opportunities for making high modulus, high strength fibers. Processes for making oxynitride glasses and fibers of glass compositions similar to commercial oxide glasses, but with considerable enhanced properties, are discussed. We have made glasses with elastic moduli as high as 140 GPa and fibers with moduli of 120 GPa and tensile strengths up to 2900 MPa. AMTL holds a U.S. patent on oxynitride glass fibers, and this presentation discusses a unique process for drawing small diameter oxynitride glass fibers at high drawing rates. Fibers are drawn through a nozzle from molten glass in a molybdenum crucible at 1550 C. The crucible is situated in a furnace chamber in flowing nitrogen, and the fiber is wound in air outside of the chamber, making the process straightforward and commercially feasible. Strengths were considerably improved by improving glass quality to minimize internal defects. Though the fiber strengths were comparable with oxide fibers, work is currently in progress to further improve the elastic modulus and strength of fibers. The high elastic modulus of oxynitride glasses indicate their potential for making fibers with tensile strengths surpassing any oxide glass fibers, and we hope to realize that potential in the near future.

  7. An innovative approach to achieve re-centering and ductility of cement mortar beams through randomly distributed pseudo-elastic shape memory alloy fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajil, N.; Srinivasan, S. M.; Santhanam, M.

    2012-04-01

    Fibers can play a major role in post cracking behavior of concrete members, because of their ability to bridge cracks and distribute the stress across the crack. Addition of steel fibers in mortar and concrete can improve toughness of the structural member and impart significant energy dissipation through slow pull out. However, steel fibers undergo plastic deformation at low strain levels, and cannot regain their shape upon unloading. This is a major disadvantage in strong cyclic loading conditions, such as those caused by earthquakes, where self-centering ability of the fibers is a desired characteristic in addition to ductility of the reinforced cement concrete. Fibers made from an alternative material such as shape memory alloy (SMA) could offer a scope for re-centering, thus improving performance especially after a severe loading has occurred. In this study, the load-deformation characteristics of SMA fiber reinforced cement mortar beams under cyclic loading conditions were investigated to assess the re-centering performance. This study involved experiments on prismatic members, and related analysis for the assessment and prediction of re-centering. The performances of NiTi fiber reinforced mortars are compared with mortars with same volume fraction of steel fibers. Since re-entrant corners and beam columns joints are prone to failure during a strong ground motion, a study was conducted to determine the behavior of these reinforced with NiTi fiber. Comparison is made with the results of steel fiber reinforced cases. NiTi fibers showed significantly improved re-centering and energy dissipation characteristics compared to the steel fibers.

  8. All-fiber mode-locked laser via short single-wall carbon nanotubes interacting with evanescent wave in photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujia; Gao, Lei; Huang, Wei; Gao, Cong; Liu, Min; Zhu, Tao

    2016-10-03

    We report an all-fiber passively mode-locked laser based on a saturable absorber fabricated by filling short single-wall carbon nanotubes into cladding holes of grapefruit-type photonic crystal fiber. The single-wall carbon nanotube is insensitive to polarization of light for its one-dimensional structure, which suppresses the polarization dependence loss. Carbon nanotubes interact with photonic crystal fiber with ultra-weak evanescent field, which enhances the damage threshold of the saturable absorber and improves the operating stability. In our experiment, conventional soliton with a pulse duration of 1.003 ps and center wavelength of 1566.36 nm under a pump power of 240 mW is generated in a compact erbium-doped fiber laser cavity with net anomalous dispersion of -0.4102 ps2. The signal to noise ratio of the fundamental frequency component is ~80 dB. The maximum average output power of the mode-locked laser reaches 9.56 mW under a pump power of 360 mW. The output power can be further improved by a higher pump power.

  9. Stretchable Fluorescent Polyfluorene/Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber Blend Electrospun Fibers through Physical Interaction and Geometrical Confinement.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hui-Ching; Chen, Jung-Yao; Lee, Wen-Ya; Bera, Debaditya; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2018-03-01

    Stretchable light-emitting polymers are important for wearable electronics; however, the development of intrinsic stretchable light-emitting materials with great performance under large applied strain is the most critical challenge. Herein, this study demonstrates the fabrication of stretchable fluorescent poly[(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene)]/acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (PFN/NBR) blend nanofibers using the uniaxial electrospinning technique. The physical interaction of PFN with NBR and the geometrical confinement of nanofibers are employed to reduce PFN aggregation, leading to the high photoluminescence quantum yield of 35.7%. Such fiber mat film shows stable blue emission at the 50% strain for 200 stretching/release cycles, which has potential applications in smart textiles. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Bright and dark solitons in the normal dispersion regime of inhomogeneous optical fibers: Soliton interaction and soliton control

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wenjun; Tian Bo, E-mail: tian.bupt@yahoo.com.c; State Key Laboratory of Software Development Environment, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191

    2010-08-15

    Symbolically investigated in this paper is a nonlinear Schroedinger equation with the varying dispersion and nonlinearity for the propagation of optical pulses in the normal dispersion regime of inhomogeneous optical fibers. With the aid of the Hirota method, analytic one- and two-soliton solutions are obtained. Relevant properties of physical and optical interest are illustrated. Different from the previous results, both the bright and dark solitons are hereby derived in the normal dispersion regime of the inhomogeneous optical fibers. Moreover, different dispersion profiles of the dispersion-decreasing fibers can be used to realize the soliton control. Finally, soliton interaction is discussed withmore » the soliton control confirmed to have no influence on the interaction. The results might be of certain value for the study of the signal generator and soliton control.« less

  11. Using carboxylated cellulose nanofibers to enhance mechanical and barrier properties of collagen fiber film by electrostatic interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhang; Zhang, Xiuling; Li, Cong; Du, Guanhua; Zhang, Hongjie; Ni, Yonghao

    2018-06-01

    Collagen-based films including casings with a promising application in meat industry are still needed to improve its inferior performance. In the present study, the reinforcement of carboxylated cellulose nanofibers (CNF) for collagen film, based on inter-/intra- molecular electrostatic interaction between cationic acid-swollen collagen fiber and anionic carboxylated CNF, was investigated. Adding CNF decreased the zeta-potential but increased particle size of collagen fiber suspension, with little effect on pH. Furthermore, CNF addition led to a higher tensile strength but a lower elongation, and the water vapor and oxygen barrier properties were improved remarkably. Because the CNF content was 50 g kg -1 or lower, the films had a homogeneous interwoven network, and CNF homogeneously embedded into collagen fiber matrix according to the scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis. Additionally, CNF addition increased film thickness and opacity, as well as swelling rate. The incorporation of CNF endows collagen fiber films good mechanical and barrier properties over a proper concentration range (≤ 50 g kg -1 collagen fiber), which is closely associated with electrostatic reaction of collagen fiber and CNF and, subsequently, the form of the homogenous, compatible spatial network, indicating a potential applications of CNF in collagenous protein films, such as edible casings. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Interaction of a parabolic-shaped pulse pair in a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Shuai; Wu, Ge; Gao, Bo; Tian, Xiao-Jian

    2013-01-01

    We numerically investigate the formation and interaction of a parabolic-shaped pulse pair in a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser. Based on a lumped model, the parabolic-shaped pulse pair is obtained by controlling the inter-cavity average dispersion and gain saturation energy, Moreover, pulse repulsive and attractive motion are also achieved with different pulse separations. Simulation results show that the phase shift plays an important role in pulse interaction, and the interaction is determined by the inter-cavity average dispersion and gain saturation energy, i.e., the strength of the interaction is proportional to the gain saturation energy, a stronger gain saturation energy will result in a higher interaction intensity. On the contrary, the increase of the inter-cavity dispersion will counterbalance some interaction force. The results also show that the interaction of a parabolic-shaped pulse pair has a larger interaction distance compared to conventional solitons.

  13. Interaction potential for indium phosphide: a molecular dynamics and first-principles study of the elastic constants, generalized stacking fault and surface energies.

    PubMed

    Branicio, Paulo Sergio; Rino, José Pedro; Gan, Chee Kwan; Tsuzuki, Hélio

    2009-03-04

    Indium phosphide is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density-functional theory calculations. MD simulations use a proposed effective interaction potential for InP fitted to a selected experimental dataset of properties. The potential consists of two- and three-body terms that represent atomic-size effects, charge-charge, charge-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions as well as covalent bond bending and stretching. Predictions are made for the elastic constants as a function of density and temperature, the generalized stacking fault energy and the low-index surface energies.

  14. Ultrastructure of cholinergic neurons in the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus of the rat: interaction with catecholamine fibers.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Y; Leung, E; Vincent, S R

    1992-01-01

    The ultrastructure of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunoreactive neurons in the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (TLD) of the rat was investigated by immunohistochemical techniques. The immunoreactive neurons were medium to large in size, with a few elongated dendrites, contained well-developed cytoplasm, and a nucleus with deep infoldings. They received many nonimmunoreactive, mostly asymmetric synaptic inputs on their soma and dendrites. ChAT-immunoreactive, usually myelinated, axons were occasionally seen in TLD. Only one immunoreactive axon terminal was observed within TLD, and it made synaptic contact with a nonimmunoreactive neuronal perikaryon. The synaptic interactions between ChAT-immunoreactive neurons and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive fibers in the TLD were investigated with a double immunohistochemical staining method. ChAT-immunoreactivity detected with a beta-galactosidase method was light blue-green in the light microscope and formed dot-like electron dense particles at the electron microscopic level. TH-immunoreactivity, visualized with a nickel-enhanced immunoperoxidase method, was dark blue-black in the light microscope and diffusely opaque in the electron microscope. Therefore, the difference between these two kinds of immunoreactivity could be quite easily distinguished at both light and electron microscopic levels. In the light microscope, TH-positive fibers were often closely apposed to ChAT-immunoreactive cell bodies and dendrites in TLD. In the electron microscope, the cell soma and proximal dendrites of ChAT-immunoreactive neurons received synaptic contacts from TH-immunoreactive axon terminals. These results provide a morphological basis for catecholaminergic regulation of the cholinergic reticular system.

  15. Folding model analyses of 12C-12C and 16O-16O elastic scattering using the density-dependent LOCV-averaged effective interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmat, M.; Modarres, M.

    2018-03-01

    The averaged effective two-body interaction (AEI), which can be generated through the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method for symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) with the input [Reid68, Ann. Phys. 50, 411 (1968), 10.1016/0003-4916(68)90126-7] nucleon-nucleon potential, is used as the effective nucleon-nucleon potential in the folding model to describe the heavy-ion (HI) elastic scattering cross sections. The elastic scattering cross sections of 12C-12C and 16O-16O systems are calculated in the above framework. The results are compared with the corresponding calculations coming from the fitting procedures with the input finite range D D M 3 Y 1 -Reid potential and the available experimental data at different incident energies. It is shown that a reasonable description of the elastic 12C-12C and 16O-16O scattering data at the low and medium energies can be obtained by using the above LOCV AEI, without any need to define a parametrized density-dependent function in the effective nucleon-nucleon potential, which is formally considered in the typical D D M 3 Y 1 -Reid interactions.

  16. Effects of sodium salt types on the intermolecular interaction of sodium alginate/antarctic krill protein composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Guo, Jing; Liu, Yuanfa; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Sen; Yu, Yue

    2018-06-01

    Sodium alginate (SA) and antarctic krill protein (AKP) were blended to fabricate the SA/AKP composite fibers by the conventional wet spinning method using 5% CaCl 2 as coagulation solution. The sodium salt was added to the SA/AKP solution to adjust the ionization degree and intermolecular interaction of composite system. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of sodium salt types (NaCl, CH 3 COONa, Na 2 SO 4 ) on the intermolecular interaction of SA/AKP composite fibers. The intermolecular interaction, morphology, crystallinity, thermal stability and mechanical properties of SA/AKP composite fibers were analyzed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results show that the types of sodium salt have obvious influences on the content of both β-sheet, intermolecular hydrogen bond, breaking strength and surface morphology in SA/AKP composite fibers, but have a negligible effect on the crystallinity and thermal stability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Physicochemical properties of surimi gels fortified with dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Debusca, Alicia; Tahergorabi, Reza; Beamer, Sarah K; Matak, Kristen E; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2014-04-01

    Although dietary fiber provides health benefits, most Western populations have insufficient intake. Surimi seafood is not currently fortified with dietary fiber, nor have the effects of fiber fortification on physicochemical properties of surimi been thoroughly studied. In the present study, Alaska pollock surimi was fortified with 0-8 g/100 g of long-chain powdered cellulose as a source of dietary fiber. The protein/water concentrations in surimi were kept constant by adding an inert filler, silicon dioxide in inverse concentrations to the fiber fortification. Fiber-fortified surimi gels were set at 90 °C. The objectives were to determine (1) textural and colour properties; (2) heat-induced gelation (dynamic rheology); and (3) protein endothermic transitions (differential scanning calorimetry) of surimi formulated with constant protein/water, but variable fiber content. Fiber fortification up to 6 g/100 g improved (P<0.05) texture and colour although some decline occurred with 8 g/100g of fiber. Dynamic rheology correlated with texture and showed large increase in gel elasticity, indicating enhanced thermal gelation of surimi. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that fiber fortification did not interfere with thermal transitions of surimi myosin and actin. Long-chain fiber probably traps water physically, which is stabilized by chemical bonding with protein within surimi gel matrix. Based on the present study, it is suggested that the fiber-protein interaction is mediated by water and is physicochemical in nature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anisotropy of the elastic properties of crystalline cellulose Iß from first principles density functional theory with Van der Waals interactions

    Treesearch

    Fernando L. Dri; Louis G. Jr. Hector; Robert J. Moon; Pablo D. Zavattieri

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the significant potential of cellulose nanocrystals as functional nanoparticles for numerous applications, a fundamental understanding of the mechanical properties of defect-free, crystalline cellulose is still lacking. In this paper, the elasticity matrix for cellulose Iß with hydrogen bonding network A was calculated using ab initio...

  19. Investigation of laser induced parametric interactions in optical waveguides and fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical aspects of the laser pump depletion characteristics in an optical fiber due to stimulated Raman scattering, and stimulated Brillouin scattering were studied. A review is presented of research in fiber transmission accompanied by stimulated scattering. Results of experimental work with tunable dye lasers and argon lasers are presented. The spectral profiles of the laser pump and its transmitted light through the fiber are given.

  20. High-power graphene mode-locked Tm/Ho co-doped fiber laser with evanescent field interaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohui; Yu, Xuechao; Sun, Zhipei; Yan, Zhiyu; Sun, Biao; Cheng, Yuanbing; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Qi Jie

    2015-01-01

    Mid-infrared ultrafast fiber lasers are valuable for various applications, including chemical and biomedical sensing, material processing and military applications. Here, we report all-fiber high-power graphene mode-locked Tm/Ho co-doped fiber laser at long wavelength with evanescent field interaction. Ultrafast pulses up to 7.8 MHz are generated at a center wavelength of 1879.4 nm, with a pulse width of 4.7 ps. A graphene absorber integrated with a side-polished fiber can increase the damage threshold significantly. Harmonics mode-locking can be obtained till to the 21th harmonics at a pump power of above 500 mW. By using one stage amplifier in the anomalous dispersion regime, the laser can be amplified up to 450 mW and the narrowest pulse duration of 1.4 ps can be obtained simultaneously. Our work paves the way to graphene Tm/Ho co-doped mode-locked all-fiber master oscillator power amplifiers as potentially efficient and economic laser sources for high-power laser applications, such as special material processing and nonlinear optical studies. PMID:26567536

  1. High-power graphene mode-locked Tm/Ho co-doped fiber laser with evanescent field interaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohui; Yu, Xuechao; Sun, Zhipei; Yan, Zhiyu; Sun, Biao; Cheng, Yuanbing; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Qi Jie

    2015-11-16

    Mid-infrared ultrafast fiber lasers are valuable for various applications, including chemical and biomedical sensing, material processing and military applications. Here, we report all-fiber high-power graphene mode-locked Tm/Ho co-doped fiber laser at long wavelength with evanescent field interaction. Ultrafast pulses up to 7.8 MHz are generated at a center wavelength of 1879.4 nm, with a pulse width of 4.7 ps. A graphene absorber integrated with a side-polished fiber can increase the damage threshold significantly. Harmonics mode-locking can be obtained till to the 21(th) harmonics at a pump power of above 500 mW. By using one stage amplifier in the anomalous dispersion regime, the laser can be amplified up to 450 mW and the narrowest pulse duration of 1.4 ps can be obtained simultaneously. Our work paves the way to graphene Tm/Ho co-doped mode-locked all-fiber master oscillator power amplifiers as potentially efficient and economic laser sources for high-power laser applications, such as special material processing and nonlinear optical studies.

  2. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  3. Quench dynamics of one-dimensional interacting bosons in a disordered potential: elastic dephasing and critical speeding-up of thermalization.

    PubMed

    Tavora, Marco; Rosch, Achim; Mitra, Aditi

    2014-07-04

    The dynamics of interacting bosons in one dimension following the sudden switching on of a weak disordered potential is investigated. On time scales before quasiparticles scatter (prethermalized regime), the dephasing from random elastic forward scattering causes all correlations to decay exponentially fast, but the system remains far from thermal equilibrium. For longer times, the combined effect of disorder and interactions gives rise to inelastic scattering and to thermalization. A novel quantum kinetic equation accounting for both disorder and interactions is employed to study the dynamics. Thermalization turns out to be most effective close to the superfluid-Bose-glass critical point where nonlinearities become more and more important. The numerically obtained thermalization times are found to agree well with analytic estimates.

  4. Penny-shaped crack in a fiber-reinforced matrix. [elastostatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, T. V.; Erdogan, F.

    1974-01-01

    Using a slender inclusion model developed earlier, the elastostatic interaction problem between a penny-shaped crack and elastic fibers in an elastic matrix is formulated. For a single set and for multiple sets of fibers oriented perpendicularly to the plane of the crack and distributed symmetrically on concentric circles, the problem was reduced to a system of singular integral equations. Techniques for the regularization and for the numerical solution of the system are outlined. For various fiber geometries numerical examples are given, and distribution of the stress intensity factor along the crack border was obtained. Sample results showing the distribution of the fiber stress and a measure of the fiber-matrix interface shear are also included.

  5. Physical properties of organic particulate UV-absorbers used in sunscreens. I. Determination of particle size with fiber-optic quasi-elastic light scattering (FOQELS), disc centrifugation, and laser diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Bernd; Katzenstein, Armin; Quass, Katja; Stehlin, Albert; Luther, Helmut

    2004-03-01

    In this study microparticles consisting of a benzotriazole derivative, which are used as absorbers for UV radiation in cosmetic sunscreens, were investigated. The particles were micronized in presence of a dispersing agent by means of a ball milling process. According to the energy input different particle sizes were produced in the range of 0.16 to 4 microm. The particle sizes obtained after different stages of the micronization process were measured using fiber-optic quasi-elastic light scattering (FOQELS), disc centrifugation, and laser diffractometry. All methods showed satisfactory agreement over the whole range of sizes. With the FOQELS technique the particle size distribution could be resolved to sizes well below 0.1 microm.

  6. An investigation of adhesive/adherend and fiber/matrix interactions. Part B: SEM/ESCA analysis of fracture surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B.; Widyani, E.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Adhesion was studied with emphasis on the characterization of surface oxide layers, the analysis of fracture surfaces, and the interaction of matrices and fibers. A number of surface features of the fractured lap shear samples were noted in the SEM photomicrographs including the beta phase alloy of the Ti 6-4 adherend, the imprint of the adherend on the adhesive failure surface, increased void density for high temperature samples, and the alumina filler particles. Interfacial failure of some of the fractured lap shear samples is invariably characterized by the appearance of an ESCA oxygen photopeak at 530.3 eV assigned to the surface oxide layer of Ti 6-4 adherend. The effect of grit blasting on carbon fiber composites is evident in the SEM analysis. A high surface fluorine concentration on the composite surface is reduced some ten fold by grit blasting.

  7. Does dietary calcium interact with dietary fiber against colorectal cancer? A case-control study in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Galas, Aleksander; Augustyniak, Malgorzata; Sochacka-Tatara, Elzbieta

    2013-10-04

    An unfavorable trend of increasing rates of colorectal cancer has been observed across modern societies. In general, dietary factors are understood to be responsible for up to 70% of the disease's incidence, though there are still many inconsistencies regarding the impact of specific dietary items. Among the dietary minerals, calcium intake may play a crucial role in the prevention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of intake of higher levels of dietary calcium on the risk of developing of colorectal cancer, and to evaluate dose dependent effect and to investigate possible effect modification. A hospital based case-control study of 1556 patients (703 histologically confirmed colon and rectal incident cases and 853 hospital-based controls) was performed between 2000-2012 in Krakow, Poland. The 148-item semi-quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire to assess dietary habits and level of nutrients intake was used. Data regarding possible covariates was also collected. After adjustment for age, gender, education, consumption of fruits, raw and cooked vegetables, fish, and alcohol, as well as for intake of fiber, vitamin C, dietary iron, lifetime recreational physical activity, BMI, smoking status, and taking mineral supplements, an increase in the consumption of calcium was associated with the decrease of colon cancer risk (OR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.89-0.98 for every 100 mg Ca/day increase). Subjects consumed >1000 mg/day showed 46% decrease of colon cancer risk (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.35-0.83). The effect of dietary calcium was modified by dietary fiber (p for interaction =0.015). Finally, consistent decrease of colon cancer risk was observed across increasing levels of dietary calcium and fiber intake. These relationships were not proved for rectal cancer. The study confirmed the effect of high doses of dietary calcium against the risk of colon cancer development. This relationship was observed across different levels of dietary fiber, and the

  8. Interactions of dietary fiber with nutritional components on gut microbial composition, function, and health in monogastrics.

    PubMed

    Seidu, A; Dongsheng, Che; Guixin, Qin; Hailong, Jiang; Han, Rui; Tlotliso Sello, Cornelius

    2018-05-07

    The relation between dietary fiber and wellbeing of human and other monogastrics has recently became a hot topic as showed in an increasing number of publication of the related research. The aim of this review is to describe through a logical approach the scientific suggestion linking possible benefits of dietary fiber on nutritional components and their effect on the gastrointestinal composition in relation to disease conditions in humans or animals. Dietary fiber plays a key role in influencing blood glucose or insulin concentrations, stool bulkiness, reduce the pH within the digestive tract, synthesize volatile fatty acids (VFA), reduce intestinal transit time, stimulate growth of intestinal microbes, and constructively enhance various blood parameters. The available literature suggests that fiber influences the bioavailability of nutrients, and maintains the host wellbeing by controlling disorders and disease prevalent with a Western way of life such as constipation and diarrhea, diabetes, obesity, gastrointestinal inflammation, atherosclerosis, and colon cancer. Although there are some studies demonstrating that dietary fiber may be effective in prevention and treatment of this disorders, however, the mechanisms involved are yet to be understood. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Rheological properties of molten flax- and Tencel{sup ®}-polypropylene composites: Influence of fiber morphology and concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Abdennadher, Ahmed; Vincent, Michel; Budtova, Tatiana, E-mail: Tatiana.Budtova@mines-paristech.fr

    The rheological properties of short fiber reinforced polypropylene were investigated. Flax and Tencel{sup ®} are two cellulose based fibers used in this study. Flax fibers are extracted from the bast of plants. They are composed of thin elementary fibers and rigid thick bundles made of elementary fibers “glued” together. Tencel{sup ®} is a man-made cellulosic fiber spun from cellulose solution, with a uniform diameter, thin, and flexible. First, fiber dimensions before and after compounding were analyzed. Both types of fibers were broken during compounding. Flax shows larger length and diameter than Tencel{sup ®}, but aspect ratio of flax is smaller.more » The reason is that after compounding flax remained in bundles. Dynamic viscosity, elastic and viscous moduli were studied as a function of fiber type, concentration (from 0 to 30 wt. %), and composite temperature (from 180 to 200 °C). All Tencel{sup ®}-based composites showed higher apparent yield stress, viscosity, and moduli compared to flax-based composites at the same fiber concentrations. The results are analyzed in terms of the influence of fiber type, aspect ratio, and flexibility. The importance of considering fiber morphology is demonstrated as far as it controls fiber flexibility and fiber-fiber interactions.« less

  10. Pilot study of diet and microbiota: interactive associations of fibers and polyphenols with human intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Adriana; Valdés, Lorena; Salazar, Nuria; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel; González, Sonia

    2014-06-11

    Several studies have addressed the use of dietary fibers in the modulation of intestinal microbiota; however, information about other highly correlated components in foods, such as polyphenols, is scarce. The aim of this work was to explore the association between the intake of fibers and polyphenols from a regular diet and fecal microbiota composition in 38 healthy adults. Food intake was recorded using an annual food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Quantification of microbial populations in feces was performed by quantitative PCR. A negative association was found between the intake of pectins and flavanones from oranges and the levels of Blautia coccoides and Clostridium leptum. By contrast, white bread, providing hemicellulose and resistant starch, was directly associated with Lactobacillus. Because some effects on intestinal microbiota attributed to isolated fibers or polyphenols might be modified by other components present in the same food, future research should be focused on diet rather than individual compounds.

  11. Study on Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dongqing; Wu, Min; Jie, Pengyu

    2017-12-01

    Several common high elastic modulus fibers (steel fibers, basalt fibers, polyvinyl alcohol fibers) and low elastic modulus fibers (polypropylene fiber) are incorporated into the concrete, and its cube compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength are studied. The test result and analysis demonstrate that single fiber and hybrid fiber will improve the integrity of the concrete at failure. The mechanical properties of hybrid steel fiber-polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete are excellent, and the cube compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength respectively increase than plain concrete by 6.4%, 3.7%, 11.4%. Doped single basalt fiber or polypropylene fiber and basalt fibers hybrid has little effect on the mechanical properties of concrete. Polyvinyl alcohol fiber and polypropylene fiber hybrid exhibit ‘negative confounding effect’ on concrete, its splitting tensile and flexural strength respectively are reduced by 17.8% and 12.9% than the single-doped polyvinyl alcohol fiber concrete.

  12. Interaction and dispersion of waveguide modes in an optical fiber with microirregularities of the core surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadorin, A. S.; Kruglov, R. S.; Surkova, G. A.

    2012-08-01

    A self-consistent linear model is proposed for the transformation of the average intensity of the mode spectrum I( z) of the waveguide field in a multimode optical fiber with a stepped refractive index profile and the core having a rough surface. The model is based on the concept of the intermodal dispersion matrix of an elementary segment of the fiber, ∆, whose elements characterize the mutual transfer of energy between the waveguide modes, as well as their conversion to radiation modes on the specified interval. On this basis, the features of the transformation of the mode spectrum I( z) in a multimode optical fiber with a stepped refractive index profile are considered that is due to the effects of multiple dispersion of the signal by the stochastic irregularities of the duct. The effect of self-filtering of I( z) is described that results in the formation of a stable (normalized) distribution I*. The features of the normalization of the radiative damping of a group of modes I i ( z) in an optical fiber are considered.

  13. Interactive educational technologies as a method of communicative competency development of optical and fiber optic communication systems specialists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveeva, Tatiana U.; Osadchiy, Igor S.; Husnutdinova, Marina N.

    2017-04-01

    The article examines the process of formation of communicative competencies of optic and fiber optic communication systems specialists; the role of communicative competencies is examined in the structure of professionally important skills, together with the contents of professional activity. The stages of empirical research into formation of communicative competencies have been presented, and the values of statistical reliability of data have been provided. The model of formation of communicative competency using interactive technology has been developed based on the research done, and main stages of model implementation and motives of formation of communicative competency have been highlighted. A scheme of "Communicative competence as a base of future success" training session has been suggested as one of the basic interactive technologies. Main components of education that are used during the stages of the training cycle have been examined. The statistical data on the effectiveness of use of interactive educational technologies has been presented; it allowed development of communicative competency of specialists in the field of optical and fiber optic communication system.

  14. Elastic stress interaction between faulting and volcanism in the Olacapato-San Antonio de Los Cobres area (NW Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonali, F. L.; Tibaldi, A.; Corazzato, C.; Lanza, F.; Cavallo, A.; Nardin, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the relationships between Plio-Quaternary tectonics, palaeoseismicity and volcanism along the NW-trending Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT) lineament that crosses the Andean chain and the Puna Plateau and continues within the eastern Cordillera at about 24° S. Field and satellite data have been collected from the Chile-Argentina border to a few km east of the San Antonio del Los Cobres village. These data revealed the presence of seven Quaternary NW-striking normal left-lateral fault segments in the southeastern part of the studied area and of a Plio-Quaternary N-S-striking graben structure in the northwestern part. The NW-striking Chorrillos fault (CF) segment shows the youngest motions, of late Pleistocene age, being marked by several fault scarps, sag-ponds and offset Quaternary deposits and landforms. Offset lavas of 0.78±0.1 Ma to 0.2±0.08 Ma indicate fault kinematics characterized by a pitch angle of 20° to 27° SE, a total net displacement that ranges from 31 to 63.8 m, and a slip-rate of 0.16 to 0.08 mm/yr. This fault segment is 32 km long and terminates to the northwest near a set of ESE-dipping thrust faults affecting Tertiary strata, while to the southeast it terminates 10 km further from San Antonio. In the westernmost part of the examined area, in Chile at altitudes of 4000 m, recent N-S-striking normal fault scarps depict the 5-km-wide and 10-km-long graben structure. Locally, fault pitches indicate left-lateral normal kinematics. These faults affect deposits up to ignimbrites of Plio-Quaternary age. Scarp heights are from a few metres to 24 m. Despite this area is located along the trace of the COT strike-slip fault system, which is reported as a continuous structure from Chile to Argentina in the literature, no evidence of NW-striking Plio-Quaternary strike-slip structures is present here. A series of numerical models were developed in an elastic half-space with uniform isotropic elastic properties using the

  15. Elastic stress interaction between faulting and volcanism in the Olacapato-San Antonio de Los Cobres area (Puna plateau, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonali, F. L.; Corazzato, C.; Tibaldi, A.

    2012-06-01

    We describe the relationships between Plio-Quaternary tectonics, palaeoseismicity and volcanism along the NW-trending Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT) lineament that crosses the Andean chain and the Puna Plateau and continues within the eastern Cordillera at about 24° S. We studied in detail the area from the Chile-Argentina border to a few km east of the San Antonio del Los Cobres village. Satellite and field data revealed the presence of seven Quaternary NW-striking normal left-lateral fault segments in the southeastern part of the studied area and of a Plio-Quaternary N-S-striking graben structure in the northwestern part. The NW-striking Chorrillos fault (CF) segment shows the youngest motions, of late Pleistocene age, being marked by several fault scarps, sag ponds and offset Quaternary deposits and landforms. Offset lavas of 0.78 ± 0.1 Ma to 0.2 ± 0.08 Ma indicate fault kinematics characterised by a pitch angle of 20° to 27° SE, a total net displacement of 31 to 63.8 m, and a slip-rate of 0.16 to 0.08 mm/yr. This fault segment is 32 km long and terminates to the northwest near a set of ESE-dipping thrust faults affecting Tertiary strata, while to the southeast it terminates 10 km further from San Antonio. In the westernmost part of the examined area, in Chile at altitudes > 4000 m, recent N-S-striking normal fault scarps depict the 5-km-wide and 10-km-long graben structure. Locally, fault pitches indicate left-lateral normal kinematics. These faults affect deposits up to ignimbrites of Plio-Quaternary age. Scarp heights are from a few metres to 24 m. Despite that this area is located along the trace of the COT strike-slip fault system, which is reported as a continuous structure from Chile to Argentina in the literature, no evidence of NW-striking Plio-Quaternary strike-slip structures is present here. A series of numerical models were also developed in an elastic half-space with uniform isotropic elastic properties using the Coulomb 3.1 code. We studied

  16. Tailoring light-sound interactions in a single mode fiber for the high-power transmission or sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulistan, Aamir; Rahman, M. M.; Ghosh, Souvik; Rahman, B. M. A.

    2018-03-01

    A full-vectorial numerically efficient Finite Element Method (FEM) based computer code is developed to study complex light-sound interactions in a single mode fiber (SMF). The SBS gain or SBS threshold in a fiber is highly related to the overlap between the optical and acoustic modes. For a typical SMF the acoustic-optic overlap strongly depends on the optical and acoustic mode profiles and it is observed that the acoustic mode is more confined in the core than the optical mode and reported overlap is around 94 % between these fundamental optical and acoustic modes. However, it is shown here that selective co-doping of Aluminum and Germanium in core reduces the acoustic index while keeping the optical index of the same value and thus results in increased acoustic- optic overlap of 99.7%. On the other hand, a design of acoustic anti-guide fiber for high-power transmission systems is also proposed, where the overlap between acoustic and optical modes is reduced. Here, we show that by keeping the optical properties same as a standard SMF and introducing a Boron doped 2nd layer in the cladding, a very low value of 2.7% overlap is achieved. Boron doping in cladding 2nd layer results in a high acoustic index and acoustic modes shifts in the cladding from the core, allowing much high power delivery through this SMF.

  17. Application of a flexible CO(2) laser fiber for neurosurgery: laser-tissue interactions.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert W; Wolf, Tamir; Spetzler, Robert F; Coons, Stephen W; Fink, Yoel; Preul, Mark C

    2010-02-01

    The CO(2) laser has an excellent profile for use in neurosurgery. Its high absorption in water results in low thermal spread, sparing adjacent tissue. Use of this laser has been limited to line-of-sight applications because no solid fiber optic cables could transmit its wavelength. Flexible photonic bandgap fiber technology enables delivery of CO(2) laser energy through a flexible fiber easily manipulated in a handheld device. The authors examined and compared the first use of this CO(2) laser fiber to conventional methods for incising neural tissue. Carbon dioxide laser energy was delivered in pulsed or continuous wave settings for different power settings, exposure times, and distances to cortical tissue of 6 anesthetized swine. Effects of CO(2) energy on the tissue were compared with bipolar cautery using a standard pial incision technique, and with scalpel incisions without cautery. Tissue was processed for histological analysis (using H & E, silver staining, and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunohistochemistry) and scanning electron microscopy, and lesion measurements were made. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed laser incisions of consistent shape, with central craters surrounded by limited zones of desiccated and edematous tissue. Increased laser power resulted in deeper but not significantly wider incisions. Bipolar cautery lesions showed desiccated and edematous zones but did not incise the pia, and width increased more than depth with higher power. Incisions made without using cautery produced hemorrhage but minimal adjacent tissue damage. The photonic bandgap fiber CO(2) laser produced reliable cortical incisions, adjustable over a range of settings, with minimal adjacent thermal tissue damage. Ease of application under the microscope suggests this laser system has reached true practicality for neurosurgery.

  18. Rotational elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  19. Highly sensitive detection of molecular interactions with plasmonic optical fiber grating sensors.

    PubMed

    Voisin, Valérie; Pilate, Julie; Damman, Pascal; Mégret, Patrice; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2014-01-15

    Surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) optical fiber biosensors constitute a miniaturized counterpart to the bulky prism configuration and offer remote operation in very small volumes of analyte. They are a cost-effective and relatively straightforward technique to yield in situ (or even possibly in vivo) molecular detection. The biosensor configuration reported in this work uses nanometric-scale gold-coated tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBGs) interrogated by light polarized radially to the optical fiber outer surface, so as to maximize the optical coupling with the SPR. These gratings were recently associated to aptamers to assess their label-free biorecognition capability in buffer and serum solutions. In this work, using the well-acknowledged biotin-streptavidin pair as a benchmark, we go forward in the demonstration of their unique sensitivity. In addition to the monitoring of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in real time, we report an unprecedented limit of detection (LOD) as low as 2 pM. Finally, an immunosensing experiment is realized with human transferrin (dissociation constant Kd~10(-8) M(-1)). It allows to assess both the reversibility and the robustness of the SPR-TFBG biosensors and to confirm their high sensitivity. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Optical sensor for fluoride determination in tea sample based on evanescent-wave interaction and fiber-optic integration.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Wu, Jiayi; Wang, Qing; Xu, Jing; Fang, Shenwen; Chen, Jie; Duan, Ming

    2017-11-01

    In this work, a miniaturized optical sensor was developed for fluoride determination in tea samples to evaluate their specific risks of fluorosis for public health based on evanescent-wave interaction. The sensor design was integrated on the optical fiber by utilizing the evanescent wave produced on the fiber surface to react with sensing reagents. According to the absorption change at 575nm, fluoride could be determined by colorimetric method and evaluated by Beer's law. With improved performances of small detection volume (1.2μL), fast analysis (0.41min), wide linear range (0.01-1.4mgL -1 ), low detection limit (3.5μgL -1 , 3σ) and excellent repeatability (2.34%), the sensor has been applied to fluoride determination in six different tea samples. Conventional spectrophotometry and ion chromatography were employed to validate the sensor's accuracy and potential application. Furthermore, this sensor fabrication provided a miniaturized colorimetric detection platform for other hazardous species monitoring based on evanescent wave interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of gene-environment interactions in the presence of linkage disequilibrium and noise by using genetic risk scores with internal weights from elastic net regression.

    PubMed

    Hüls, Anke; Ickstadt, Katja; Schikowski, Tamara; Krämer, Ursula

    2017-06-12

    For the analysis of gene-environment (GxE) interactions commonly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are used to characterize genetic susceptibility, an approach that mostly lacks power and has poor reproducibility. One promising approach to overcome this problem might be the use of weighted genetic risk scores (GRS), which are defined as weighted sums of risk alleles of gene variants. The gold-standard is to use external weights from published meta-analyses. In this study, we used internal weights from the marginal genetic effects of the SNPs estimated by a multivariate elastic net regression and thereby provided a method that can be used if there are no external weights available. We conducted a simulation study for the detection of GxE interactions and compared power and type I error of single SNPs analyses with Bonferroni correction and corresponding analysis with unweighted and our weighted GRS approach in scenarios with six risk SNPs and an increasing number of highly correlated (up to 210) and noise SNPs (up to 840). Applying weighted GRS increased the power enormously in comparison to the common single SNPs approach (e.g. 94.2% vs. 35.4%, respectively, to detect a weak interaction with an OR ≈ 1.04 for six uncorrelated risk SNPs and n = 700 with a well-controlled type I error). Furthermore, weighted GRS outperformed the unweighted GRS, in particular in the presence of SNPs without any effect on the phenotype (e.g. 90.1% vs. 43.9%, respectively, when 20 noise SNPs were added to the six risk SNPs). This outperforming of the weighted GRS was confirmed in a real data application on lung inflammation in the SALIA cohort (n = 402). However, in scenarios with a high number of noise SNPs (>200 vs. 6 risk SNPs), larger sample sizes are needed to avoid an increased type I error, whereas a high number of correlated SNPs can be handled even in small samples (e.g. n = 400). In conclusion, weighted GRS with weights from the marginal genetic effects of the

  2. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Linear Elastic Properties of Myocardium and Other Anisotropic Soft Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, Brentley Keith

    1995-01-01

    This thesis seeks to contribute to a better understanding of the physics of interaction of ultrasonic waves with inhomogeneous and anisotropic media, one example of which is the human heart. The clinical success of echocardiography has generated a considerable interest in the development of ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic properties of heart tissue. It is hypothesized that the elastic properties of myocardium are influenced by the interstitial content and organization of collagen. Collagen, which is the main component of tendon, interconnects the muscle cells of the heart to form locally unidirectional myofibers. This thesis therefore employs ultrasonic techniques to characterize the linear elastic properties of both heart and tendon. The linear elastic properties of tissues possessing a unidirectional arrangement of fibers may be described in terms of five independent elastic stiffness coefficients. Three of these coefficients were determined for formalin fixed specimens of bovine Achilles tendon and human myocardium by measuring the velocity of longitudinal mode ultrasonic pulses as a function of angle of propagation relative to the fiber axis of the tissue. The remaining two coefficients were determined by measuring the velocity of transverse mode ultrasonic waves through these tissues. To overcome technical difficulties associated with the extremely high attenuation of transverse mode waves at low megahertz frequencies, a novel measurement system was developed based on the sampled continuous wave technique. Results of these measurements were used to assess the influence of interstitial collagen, and to model the mechanical properties of heart wall.

  3. Interface-Controlled Conductive Fibers for Wearable Strain Sensors and Stretchable Conducting Wires.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zherui; Wang, Ranran; He, Tengyu; Xu, Fangfang; Sun, Jing

    2018-04-25

    As an important subfield of flexible electronics, conductive fibers have been an active area of research. The interfacial interaction between nanostructured conductive materials with elastic substrates plays a vital role in the electromechanical performance of conductive fibers. However, the underlying mechanism has seldom been investigated. Here, we propose a fabricating strategy for a silver nanowire (Ag NW)/polyurethane composite fiber with a sheath-core architecture. The interfacial bonding layer is regulated, and its influence on the performance of conductive fibers is investigated, based on which an interfacial interaction model is proposed. The model underlines the significance of the embedding depth of the Ag NW network. Both supersensitive (gauge factor up to 9557) and ultrastable (negligible conductance degradation below the strain of 150%) conductive fibers are obtained via interface regulating, exhibiting great potential in the applications of wearable sensors and stretchable conducting connections.

  4. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields

    PubMed Central

    Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-01-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain. PMID:25717155

  5. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields.

    PubMed

    Leib, Raz; Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-05-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Testing charged current quasi-elastic and multinucleon interaction models in the NEUT neutrino interaction generator with published datasets from the MiniBooNE and MINERνA experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, C.; Terri, R.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bercellie, A.; Bronner, C.; Cartwright, S.; de Perio, P.; Dobson, J.; Duffy, K.; Furmanski, A. P.; Haegel, L.; Hayato, Y.; Kaboth, A.; Mahn, K.; McFarland, K. S.; Nowak, J.; Redij, A.; Rodrigues, P.; Sánchez, F.; Schwehr, J. D.; Sinclair, P.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Stamoulis, P.; Stowell, P.; Tacik, R.; Thompson, L.; Tobayama, S.; Wascko, M. O.; Żmuda, J.

    2016-04-01

    There has been a great deal of theoretical work on sophisticated charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino interaction models in recent years, prompted by a number of experimental results that measured unexpectedly large CCQE cross sections on nuclear targets. As the dominant interaction mode at T2K energies, and the signal process in oscillation analyses, it is important for the T2K experiment to include realistic CCQE cross section uncertainties in T2K analyses. To this end, T2K's Neutrino Interaction Working Group has implemented a number of recent models in NEUT, T2K's primary neutrino interaction event generator. In this paper, we give an overview of the models implemented and present fits to published νμ and ν¯ μ CCQE cross section measurements from the MiniBooNE and MINER ν A experiments. The results of the fits are used to select a default cross section model for future T2K analyses and to constrain the cross section uncertainties of the model. We find strong tension between datasets for all models investigated. Among the evaluated models, the combination of a modified relativistic Fermi gas with multinucleon CCQE-like interactions gives the most consistent description of the available data.

  7. Fracton-Elasticity Duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretko, Michael; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by recent studies of fractons, we demonstrate that elasticity theory of a two-dimensional quantum crystal is dual to a fracton tensor gauge theory, providing a concrete manifestation of the fracton phenomenon in an ordinary solid. The topological defects of elasticity theory map onto charges of the tensor gauge theory, with disclinations and dislocations corresponding to fractons and dipoles, respectively. The transverse and longitudinal phonons of crystals map onto the two gapless gauge modes of the gauge theory. The restricted dynamics of fractons matches with constraints on the mobility of lattice defects. The duality leads to numerous predictions for phases and phase transitions of the fracton system, such as the existence of gauge theory counterparts to the (commensurate) crystal, supersolid, hexatic, and isotropic fluid phases of elasticity theory. Extensions of this duality to generalized elasticity theories provide a route to the discovery of new fracton models. As a further consequence, the duality implies that fracton phases are relevant to the study of interacting topological crystalline insulators.

  8. Molecular Pathways: Gene-environment interactions regulating dietary fiber induction of proliferation and apoptosis via butyrate for cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bultman, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions are so numerous and biologically complicated that it can be challenging to understand their role in cancer. However, dietary fiber and colorectal cancer prevention may represent a tractable model system. Fiber is fermented by colonic bacteria into short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. One molecular pathway that has emerged involves butyrate having differential effects depending on its concentration and the metabolic state of the cell. Low-moderate concentrations, which are present near the base of colonic crypts, are readily metabolized in the mitochondria to stimulate cell proliferation via energetics. Higher concentrations, which are present near the lumen, exceed the metabolic capacity of the colonocyte. Unmetabolized butyrate enters the nucleus and functions as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that epigenetically regulates gene expression to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis as the colonocytes exfoliate into the lumen. Butyrate may therefore play a role in normal homeostasis by promoting turnover of the colonic epithelium. Because cancerous colonocytes undergo the Warburg effect, their preferred energy source is glucose instead of butyrate. Consequently, even moderate concentrations of butyrate accumulate in cancerous colonocytes and function as HDAC inhibitors to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. These findings implicate a bacterial metabolite with metaboloepigenetic properties in tumor suppression. PMID:24270685

  9. Probing the nanoscale interaction forces and elastic properties of organic and inorganic materials using force-distance (F-D) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Abhilash

    studying the interaction forces as well as the mechanical properties of nanobiomaterials. The research protocol employed in the earlier part of the dissertation is specifically aimed to understand the operation of F-D spectroscopy technique. The elastic properties of thin films of silicon dioxide NPs were investigated using F-D spectroscopy in the high force regime of few 100 nN to 1 microN. Here, sol-gel derived porous nanosilica thin films of varying surface morphology, particle size and porosity were prepared through acid and base catalyzed process. AFM nanoindentation experiments were conducted on these films using the F-D spectroscopy mode and the nanoscale elastic properties of these films were evaluated. The major contribution of this dissertation is a study exploring the interaction forces acting between CNPs and transferrin proteins in picoNewton scale regime using the force-distance spectroscopy technique. This study projects the importance of obtaining appropriate surface charges and surface chemistry so that the NP can exhibit enhanced protein adsorption and NP cellular uptake.

  10. Interaction between an elastic structure and free-surface flows: experimental versus numerical comparisons using the PFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idelsohn, S. R.; Marti, J.; Souto-Iglesias, A.; Oñate, E.

    2008-12-01

    The paper aims to introduce new fluid structure interaction (FSI) tests to compare experimental results with numerical ones. The examples have been chosen for a particular case for which experimental results are not much reported. This is the case of FSI including free surface flows. The possibilities of the Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM) [1] for the simulation of free surface flows is also tested. The simulations are run using the same scale as the experiment in order to minimize errors due to scale effects. Different scenarios are simulated by changing the boundary conditions for reproducing flows with the desired characteristics. Details of the input data for all the examples studied are given. The aim is to identifying benchmark problems for FSI including free surface flows for future comparisons between different numerical approaches.

  11. Investigation of aquifer-estuary interaction using wavelet analysis of fiber-optic temperature data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, R.D.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Harvey, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FODTS) provides sub-minute temporal and meter-scale spatial resolution over kilometer-long cables. Compared to conventional thermistor or thermocouple-based technologies, which measure temperature at discrete (and commonly sparse) locations, FODTS offers nearly continuous spatial coverage, thus providing hydrologic information at spatiotemporal scales previously impossible. Large and information-rich FODTS datasets, however, pose challenges for data exploration and analysis. To date, FODTS analyses have focused on time-series variance as the means to discriminate between hydrologic phenomena. Here, we demonstrate the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and cross-wavelet transform (XWT) to analyze FODTS in the context of related hydrologic time series. We apply the CWT and XWT to data from Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts to identify the location and timing of tidal pumping of submarine groundwater.

  12. Lipid-protein interactions in plasma membranes of fiber cells isolated from the human eye lens.

    PubMed

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2014-03-01

    The protein content in human lens membranes is extremely high, increases with age, and is higher in the nucleus as compared with the cortex, which should strongly affect the organization and properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact membranes. To assess these effects, the intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from human lenses from 41- to 60-year-old donors were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling methods. Results were compared with those obtained for lens lipid membranes prepared from total lipid extracts from human eyes of the same age group [Mainali, L., Raguz, M., O'Brien, W. J., and Subczynski, W. K. (2013) Biochim. Biophys. Acta]. Differences were considered to be mainly due to the effect of membrane proteins. The lipid-bilayer portions of intact membranes were significantly less fluid than lipid bilayers of lens lipid membranes, prepared without proteins. The intact membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain. However, the cholesterol bilayer domain, which was detected in cortical and nuclear lens lipid membranes, was not detected in intact membranes. The relative amounts of bulk and trapped lipids were evaluated. The amount of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins was greater in nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. Thus, it is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes is greater than that of cortical membranes. Also the permeability coefficients for oxygen measured in domains of nuclear membranes were significantly lower than appropriate coefficients measured in cortical membranes. Relationships between the organization of lipids into lipid domains in fiber cells plasma membranes and the organization of membrane proteins are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lipid-Protein Interactions in Plasma Membranes of Fiber Cells Isolated from the Human Eye Lens

    PubMed Central

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O’Brien, William J.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2014-01-01

    The protein content in human lens membranes is extremely high, increases with age, and is higher in the nucleus as compared with the cortex, which should strongly affect the organization and properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact membranes. To assess these effects, the intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from human lenses from 41- to 60-year-old donors were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling methods. Results were compared with those obtained for lens lipid membranes prepared from total lipid extracts from human eyes of the same age group [Mainali,L., Raguz, M., O’Brien, W. J., and Subczynski, W. K. (2013) Biochim. Biophys. Acta]. Differences were considered to be mainly due to the effect of membrane proteins. The lipid-bilayer portions of intact membranes were significantly less fluid than lipid bilayers of lens lipid membranes, prepared without proteins. The intact membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain. However, the cholesterol bilayer domain, which was detected in cortical and nuclear lens lipid membranes, was not detected in intact membranes. The relative amounts of bulk and trapped lipids were evaluated. The amount of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins was greater in nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. Thus, it is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes is greater than that of cortical membranes. Also the permeability coefficients for oxygen measured in domains of nuclear membranes were significantly lower than appropriate coefficients measured in cortical membranes. Relationships between the organization of lipids into lipid domains in fiber cells plasma membranes and the organization of membrane proteins are discussed. PMID:24486794

  14. Glycosaminoglycans contribute to extracellular matrix fiber recruitment and arterial wall mechanics.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Jeffrey M; Turcotte, Raphaël; Zhang, Yanhang

    2017-02-01

    Elastic and collagen fibers are well known to be the major load-bearing extracellular matrix (ECM) components of the arterial wall. Studies of the structural components and mechanics of arterial ECM generally focus on elastin and collagen fibers, and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are often neglected. Although GAGs represent only a small component of the vessel wall ECM, they are considerably important because of their diverse functionality and their role in pathological processes. The goal of this study was to study the mechanical and structural contributions of GAGs to the arterial wall. Biaxial tensile testing was paired with multiphoton microscopic imaging of elastic and collagen fibers in order to establish the structure-function relationships of porcine thoracic aorta before and after enzymatic GAG removal. Removal of GAGs results in an earlier transition point of the nonlinear stress-strain curves [Formula: see text]. However, stiffness was not significantly different after GAG removal treatment, indicating earlier but not absolute stiffening. Multiphoton microscopy showed that when GAGs are removed, the adventitial collagen fibers are straighter, and both elastin and collagen fibers are recruited at lower levels of strain, in agreement with the mechanical change. The amount of stress relaxation also decreased in GAG-depleted arteries [Formula: see text]. These findings suggest that the interaction between GAGs and other ECM constituents plays an important role in the mechanics of the arterial wall, and GAGs should be considered in addition to elastic and collagen fibers when studying arterial function.

  15. Dynamics of elastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankovich, Vladimir

    1998-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to build a consistent physical theory of the dynamics of the bat-ball interaction. This requires creating realistic models for both the softball bat and the softball. Some of the features of these models are known phenomenologically, from experiments conducted in our laboratory, others will be introduced and computed from first principles here for the first time. Both interacting objects are treated from the viewpoint of the theory of elasticity, and it is shown how a computer can be used to accurately calculate all the relevant characteristics of batball collisions. It is shown also how the major elastic parameters of the material constituting the interior of a softball can be determined using the existing experimental data. These parameters, such as the Young's modulus, the Poisson ratio and the damping coefficient are vital for the accurate description of the ball's dynamics. We are demonstrating how the existing theories of the elastic behavior of solid bars and hollow shells can be augmented to simplify the resulting equations and make the subsequent computer analysis feasible. The standard system of fourth-order PDE's is reduced to a system of the second order, because of the inclusion of the usually ignored effects of the shear forces in the bat.

  16. The interaction with gold suppresses fiber-like conformations of the amyloid β (16-22) peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Luca; Ardèvol, Albert; Parrinello, Michele; Lutz, Helmut; Lu, Hao; Weidner, Tobias; Corni, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic surfaces and nanoparticles can accelerate or inhibit the fibrillation process of proteins and peptides, including the biomedically relevant amyloid β peptide. However, the microscopic mechanisms that determine such an effect are still poorly understood. By means of large-scale, state-of-the-art enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations, here we identify an interaction mechanism between the segments 16-22 of the amyloid β peptide, known to be fibrillogenic by itself, and the Au(111) surface in water that leads to the suppression of fiber-like conformations from the peptide conformational ensemble. Moreover, thanks to advanced simulation analysis techniques, we characterize the conformational selection vs. induced fit nature of the gold effect. Our results disclose an inhibition mechanism that is rooted in the details of the microscopic peptide-surface interaction rather than in general phenomena such as peptide sequestration from the solution.Inorganic surfaces and nanoparticles can accelerate or inhibit the fibrillation process of proteins and peptides, including the biomedically relevant amyloid β peptide. However, the microscopic mechanisms that determine such an effect are still poorly understood. By means of large-scale, state-of-the-art enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations, here we identify an interaction mechanism between the segments 16-22 of the amyloid β peptide, known to be fibrillogenic by itself, and the Au(111) surface in water that leads to the suppression of fiber-like conformations from the peptide conformational ensemble. Moreover, thanks to advanced simulation analysis techniques, we characterize the conformational selection vs. induced fit nature of the gold effect. Our results disclose an inhibition mechanism that is rooted in the details of the microscopic peptide-surface interaction rather than in general phenomena such as peptide sequestration from the solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  17. Elastic waves in periodic and non-periodic sets of hollow cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitov, S. A.; Gulyaev, Yu. V.; Lisenkov, I. V.; Popov, R. S.; Grigorievkii, A. V.; Grigorievkii, V. I.

    2008-06-01

    Two ways of modeling of elastic wave propagation in microstructured acoustic fiber are considered. First one is the calculation of band gap parameters by FEM for phononic crystal forming cross section of fiber. Second one is immediate calculation of dispersion characteristics of elastic fiber containing hole cylindric chanels. For fiber made of fused β quarz numerical results are proposed. For the first type full forbidden gap obtained and for second two different types of modes was found.

  18. Nonlinear Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y. B.; Ogden, R. W.

    2001-05-01

    This collection of papers by leading researchers in the field of finite, nonlinear elasticity concerns itself with the behavior of objects that deform when external forces or temperature gradients are applied. This process is extremely important in many industrial settings, such as aerospace and rubber industries. This book covers the various aspects of the subject comprehensively with careful explanations of the basic theories and individual chapters each covering a different research direction. The authors discuss the use of symbolic manipulation software as well as computer algorithm issues. The emphasis is placed firmly on covering modern, recent developments, rather than the very theoretical approach often found. The book will be an excellent reference for both beginners and specialists in engineering, applied mathematics and physics.

  19. Highly Stretchable, Strain Sensing Hydrogel Optical Fibers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Liu, Xinyue; Jiang, Nan; Yetisen, Ali K; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Yang, Changxi; Khademhosseini, Ali; Zhao, Xuanhe; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2016-12-01

    A core-clad fiber made of elastic, tough hydrogels is highly stretchable while guiding light. Fluorescent dyes are easily doped into the hydrogel fiber by diffusion. When stretched, the transmission spectrum of the fiber is altered, enabling the strain to be measured and also its location. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Electrochromic fiber-shaped supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuli; Lin, Huijuan; Deng, Jue; Zhang, Ye; Sun, Xuemei; Chen, Peining; Fang, Xin; Zhang, Zhitao; Guan, Guozhen; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-12-23

    An electrochromic fiber-shaped super-capacitor is developed by winding aligned carbon nanotube/polyaniline composite sheets on an elastic fiber. The fiber-shaped supercapacitors demonstrate rapid and reversible chromatic transitions under different working states, which can be directly observed by the naked eye. They are also stretchable and flexible, and are woven into textiles to display designed signals in addition to storing energy. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths ( τ ( app)) and slip coefficient ( β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle ( ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  2. Elasticity and dislocation anelasticity of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikanorov, S. P.; Kardashev, B. K.

    The book is concerned with the application of the results of physical acoustic studies of elasticity and dislocation anelasticity to the investigation of interatomic interactions and interactions between lattice defects. The analysis of the potential functions determining the energy of interatomic interactions is based on a study of the elastic properties of crystals over a wide temperature range; data on the dislocation structure and on the interaction between dislocations and point defects are based mainly on a study of inelastic effects. Particular attention is given to the relationship between microplastic effects and the initial stage of plastic deformation under conditions of elastic oscillations, when the multiplication of dislocations is negligible.

  3. Robustness Elasticity in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Matisziw, Timothy C.; Grubesic, Tony H.; Guo, Junyu

    2012-01-01

    Network robustness refers to a network’s resilience to stress or damage. Given that most networks are inherently dynamic, with changing topology, loads, and operational states, their robustness is also likely subject to change. However, in most analyses of network structure, it is assumed that interaction among nodes has no effect on robustness. To investigate the hypothesis that network robustness is not sensitive or elastic to the level of interaction (or flow) among network nodes, this paper explores the impacts of network disruption, namely arc deletion, over a temporal sequence of observed nodal interactions for a large Internet backbone system. In particular, a mathematical programming approach is used to identify exact bounds on robustness to arc deletion for each epoch of nodal interaction. Elasticity of the identified bounds relative to the magnitude of arc deletion is assessed. Results indicate that system robustness can be highly elastic to spatial and temporal variations in nodal interactions within complex systems. Further, the presence of this elasticity provides evidence that a failure to account for nodal interaction can confound characterizations of complex networked systems. PMID:22808060

  4. The optimal fiber volume fraction and fiber-matrix property compatibility in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Ning

    1992-01-01

    Although the question of minimum or critical fiber volume fraction beyond which a composite can then be strengthened due to addition of fibers has been dealt with by several investigators for both continuous and short fiber composites, a study of maximum or optimal fiber volume fraction at which the composite reaches its highest strength has not been reported yet. The present analysis has investigated this issue for short fiber case based on the well-known shear lag (the elastic stress transfer) theory as the first step. Using the relationships obtained, the minimum spacing between fibers is determined upon which the maximum fiber volume fraction can be calculated, depending on the fiber packing forms within the composites. The effects on the value of this maximum fiber volume fraction due to such factors as fiber and matrix properties, fiber aspect ratio and fiber packing forms are discussed. Furthermore, combined with the previous analysis on the minimum fiber volume fraction, this maximum fiber volume fraction can be used to examine the property compatibility of fiber and matrix in forming a composite. This is deemed to be useful for composite design. Finally some examples are provided to illustrate the results.

  5. Plasmon-organic fiber interactions in diamond-like carbon coated nanostructured gold films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cielecki, Paweł Piotr; Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Kostiuočenko, Oksana; Leißner, Till; Tamulevičius, Tomas; Tamulevičius, Sigitas; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Adam, Jost; Fiutowski, Jacek

    2017-11-01

    Gold is the most commonly used plasmonic material, however soft and prone to mechanical deformations. It has been shown that the durability of gold plasmonic substrates can be improved by applying a protective diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating. In this work, we investigate the influence of such protective layers on plasmonic interactions in organic-plasmonic hybrid systems. We consider systems, consisting of 1-Cyano-quaterphenylene nanofibers on top of gold nano-square plasmonic arrays, coated with protective layers of varying thickness. We numerically investigate the spectral position of surface plasmon polariton resonances and electric field intensity, as a function of protective layer thickness, using the finite-difference time-domain method. To confirm the numerically indicated field enhancement preservation on top of protective layers, we experimentally map the second harmonic response of organic nanofibers. Subsequently, we characterize the plasmonic coupling between organic nanofibers and underlying substrates, considered as one of the main loss channels for photoluminescence from nanofibers, by time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Our findings reveal that, for the investigated system, plasmonic interactions are preserved for DLC coatings up to 55 nm. This is relevant for the fabrication of new passive and active plasmonic components with increased durability and hence prolonged lifetime.

  6. Development of a flameproof elastic elastomeric fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Nilgrom, J.; Massucco, A.; Sheth, S. G.; Dawn, F. S.

    1971-01-01

    Various flexible polyurethane structures containing halogen were synthesized from polyesters derived from aliphatic or aromatic polyols and dibasic acids. Aliphatic halide structures could not be used because they are unstable at the required reaction temperatures, giving of hydrogen halide which hydrolyzes the ester linkages. In contract, halogen-containing aromatic polyols were stable and satisfactory products were made. The most promising composition, a brominated neopentyl glycol capped with toluene disocyanate, was used as a conventional diisocyanate, in conjunction with hydroxy-terminated polyethers or polyesters to form elastomeric urethanes containing about 10% bromine with weight. Products made in this manner will not burn in air, have an oxygen index value of about 25, and have tensile strength values of about 5,000 psi at 450% elongation. The most efficient additives for imparting flame retardancy to Spandex urethanes are aromatic halides and the most effective of these are the bromide compounds. Various levels of flame retardancy have been achieved depending on the levels of additives used.

  7. A high pressure study of calmodulin-ligand interactions using small-angle X-ray and elastic incoherent neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Süleyman; Al-Ayoubi, Samy; Sternemann, Christian; Peters, Judith; Winter, Roland; Czeslik, Claus

    2018-01-31

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca 2+ sensor and mediates Ca 2+ signaling through binding of numerous target ligands. The binding of ligands by Ca 2+ -saturated CaM (holo-CaM) is governed by attractive hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that are weakened under high pressure in aqueous solutions. Moreover, the potential formation of void volumes upon ligand binding creates a further source of pressure sensitivity. Hence, high pressure is a suitable thermodynamic variable to probe protein-ligand interactions. In this study, we compare the binding of two different ligands to holo-CaM as a function of pressure by using X-ray and neutron scattering techniques. The two ligands are the farnesylated hypervariable region (HVR) of the K-Ras4B protein, which is a natural binding partner of holo-CaM, and the antagonist trifluoperazine (TFP), which is known to inhibit holo-CaM activity. From small-angle X-ray scattering experiments performed up to 3000 bar, we observe a pressure-induced partial unfolding of the free holo-CaM in the absence of ligands, where the two lobes of the dumbbell-shaped protein are slightly swelled. In contrast, upon binding TFP, holo-CaM forms a closed globular conformation, which is pressure stable at least up to 3000 bar. The HVR of K-Ras4B shows a different binding behavior, and the data suggest the dissociation of the holo-CaM/HVR complex under high pressure, probably due to a less dense protein contact of the HVR as compared to TFP. The elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments corroborate these findings. Below 2000 bar, pressure induces enhanced atomic fluctuations in both holo-CaM/ligand complexes, but those of the holo-CaM/HVR complex seem to be larger. Thus, the inhibition of holo-CaM by TFP is supported by a low-volume ligand binding, albeit this is not associated with a rigidification of the complex structure on the sub-ns Å-scale.

  8. An investigation of adhesive/adherend and fiber matrix interactions. [Ti 6-4 surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B.; Siriwardane, R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Research during the report period focused on continued scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of lap shear samples and flatwise tensile specimens and on the surface characterization of TiO2, Ti 6-4, and Ti powders with particular emphasis on their interaction with primer solutions of both polyphenylquinoxaline and LaRC-13 polyimide. The use of SEM and XPS in the analysis of Ti 6-4 adherend surfaces is described as well as differences in Ti 6-4 surface composition after different chemical pretreatments. Analysis of fractured surfaces is used to established the failure mode. The surface acidity of Ti 6-4 coupons can be established by reflectance visible spectroscopy using indicator dyes.

  9. Adhesion of cellulose fibers in paper.

    PubMed

    Persson, Bo N J; Ganser, Christian; Schmied, Franz; Teichert, Christian; Schennach, Robert; Gilli, Eduard; Hirn, Ulrich

    2013-01-30

    The surface topography of paper fibers is studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and thus the surface roughness power spectrum is obtained. Using AFM we have performed indentation experiments and measured the effective elastic modulus and the penetration hardness as a function of humidity. The influence of water capillary adhesion on the fiber-fiber binding strength is studied. Cellulose fibers can absorb a significant amount of water, resulting in swelling and a strong reduction in the elastic modulus and the penetration hardness. This will lead to closer contact between the fibers during the drying process (the capillary bridges pull the fibers into closer contact without storing up a lot of elastic energy at the contacting interface). In order for the contact to remain good in the dry state, plastic flow must occur (in the wet state) so that the dry surface profiles conform to each other (forming a key-and-lock type of contact).

  10. Elasticity and dislocation inelasticity of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikanorov, S. P.; Kardashev, B. K.

    The use of methods of physical acoustics for studying the elasticity and dislocation inelasticity of crystals is discussed, as is the application of the results of such studies to the analysis of interatomic and lattice defect interactions. The analysis of the potential functions determining the energy of interatomic interactions is based on an analysis of the elastic properties of crystals over a wide temperature range. The data on the dislocation structure and the interaction between dislocations and point defects are obtained from a study of inelastic effects. Particular attention is given to the relationship between microplastic effects under conditions of elastic oscillations and the initial stage of plastic deformation.

  11. Binding Interactions of Keratin-Based Hair Fiber Extract to Gold, Keratin, and BMP-2

    PubMed Central

    de Guzman, Roche C.; Tsuda, Shanel M.; Ton, Minh-Thi N.; Zhang, Xiao; Esker, Alan R.; Van Dyke, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Hair-derived keratin biomaterials composed mostly of reduced keratin proteins (kerateines) have demonstrated their utility as carriers of biologics and drugs for tissue engineering. Electrostatic forces between negatively-charged keratins and biologic macromolecules allow for effective drug retention; attraction to positively-charged growth factors like bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) has been used as a strategy for osteoinduction. In this study, the intermolecular surface and bulk interaction properties of kerateines were investigated. Thiol-rich kerateines were chemisorbed onto gold substrates to form an irreversible 2-nm rigid layer for surface plasmon resonance analysis. Kerateine-to-kerateine cohesion was observed in pH-neutral water with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 1.8 × 10−4 M, indicating that non-coulombic attractive forces (i.e. hydrophobic and van der Waals) were at work. The association of BMP-2 to kerateine was found to be greater (KD = 1.1 × 10−7 M), within the range of specific binding. Addition of salts (phosphate-buffered saline; PBS) shortened the Debye length or the electrostatic field influence which weakened the kerateine-BMP-2 binding (KD = 3.2 × 10−5 M). BMP-2 in bulk kerateine gels provided a limited release in PBS (~ 10% dissociation in 4 weeks), suggesting that electrostatic intermolecular attraction was significant to retain BMP-2 within the keratin matrix. Complete dissociation between kerateine and BMP-2 occurred when the PBS pH was lowered (to 4.5), below the keratin isoelectric point of 5.3. This phenomenon can be attributed to the protonation of keratin at a lower pH, leading to positive-positive repulsion. Therefore, the dynamics of kerateine-BMP-2 binding is highly dependent on pH and salt concentration, as well as on BMP-2 solubility at different pH and molarity. The study findings may contribute to our understanding of the release kinetics of drugs from keratin biomaterials and allow for the

  12. Poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid interaction with the transgenic flax fibers: FT-IR and Raman spectra of the composite extracted from a GM flax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Żuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan; Dymińska, Lucyna; Mączka, Mirosław; Hanuza, Jerzy

    2009-07-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman studies have been performed on commercial 3-hydroxy-butyric acid, commercial poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid as well as poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid (PHB) produced by bacteria. The data were compared to those obtained for poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid extracted from natural and genetically modified flax. Genetically modified flax was generated by expression of three bacterial genes coding for synthesis of poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid. Thus transgenic flaxes were enhanced with different amount of the PHB. The discussion of polymer structure and vibrational properties has been done in order to get insight into differences among these materials. The interaction between the cellulose of flax fibers and embedded poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid has been also discussed. The spectroscopic data provide evidences for structural changes in cellulose and in PHB when synthesized in fibers. Based on this data it is suggesting that cellulose and PHB interact by hydrogen and ester bonds.

  13. Mutual interaction between high and low stereo-regularity components for crystallization and melting behaviors of polypropylene blend fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Kouya; Takarada, Wataru; Kikutani, Takeshi, E-mail: kikutani.t.aa@m.titech.ac.jp

    Crystallization and melting behaviors of blend fibers of two types of polypropylene (PP), i.e. high stereo-regularity/high molecular weight PP (HPP) and low stereo-regularity/low molecular weight PP (LPP), was investigated. Blend fibers consisting of various HPP/LPP compositions were prepared through the melt spinning process. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature modulated DSC (TMDSC) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) analysis were applied for clarifying the crystallization and melting behaviors of individual components. In the DSC measurement of blend fibers with high LPP composition, continuous endothermic heat was detected between the melting peaks of LPP at around 40 °C and that of HPP atmore » around 160 °C. Such endothermic heat was more distinct for the blend fibers with higher LPP composition indicating that the melting of LPP in the heating process was hindered because of the presence of HPP crystals. On the other hand, heat of crystallization was detected at around 90 °C in the case of blend fibers with LPP content of 30 to 70 wt%, indicating that the crystallization of HPP component was taking place during the heating of as-spun blend fibers in the DSC measurement. Through the TMDSC analysis, re-organization of the crystalline structure through the simultaneous melting and re-crystallization was detected in the cases of HPP and blend fibers, whereas re-crystallization was not detected during the melting of LPP fibers. In the WAXD analysis during the heating of fibers, amount of a-form crystal was almost constant up to the melting in the case of single component HPP fibers, whereas there was a distinct increase of the intensity of crystalline reflections from around 100 °C, right after the melting of LPP in the case of blend fibers. These results suggested that the crystallization of HPP in the spinning process as well as during the conditioning process after spinning was hindered by the presence of LPP.« less

  14. Modeling the Elastic Modulus of 2D Woven CVI SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2006-01-01

    The use of fiber, interphase, CVI SiC minicomposites as structural elements for 2D-woven SiC fiber reinforced chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC matrix composites is demonstrated to be a viable approach to model the elastic modulus of these composite systems when tensile loaded in an orthogonal direction. The 0deg (loading direction) and 90deg (perpendicular to loading direction) oriented minicomposites as well as the open porosity and excess SiC associated with CVI SiC composites were all modeled as parallel elements using simple Rule of Mixtures techniques. Excellent agreement for a variety of 2D woven Hi-Nicalon(TradeMark) fiber-reinforced and Sylramic-iBN reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites that differed in numbers of plies, constituent content, thickness, density, and number of woven tows in either direction (i.e, balanced weaves versus unbalanced weaves) was achieved. It was found that elastic modulus was not only dependent on constituent content, but also the degree to which 90deg minicomposites carried load. This depended on the degree of interaction between 90deg and 0deg minicomposites which was quantified to some extent by composite density. The relationships developed here for elastic modulus only necessitated the knowledge of the fractional contents of fiber, interphase and CVI SiC as well as the tow size and shape. It was concluded that such relationships are fairly robust for orthogonally loaded 2D woven CVI SiC composite system and can be implemented by ceramic matrix composite component modelers and designers for modeling the local stiffness in simple or complex parts fabricated with variable constituent contents.

  15. Polysoaps: Configurations and Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, A.

    1997-03-01

    Simple polymers are very long, flexible, linear molecules. Amphiphiles, soaps, are small molecules comprising of a part that prefers water over oil and a part that prefers oil over water. By combining the two we arrive at an interesting, little explored, class of materials: Polysoaps. These comprise of a water soluble backbone incorporating, at intervals, covalently bound amphiphilic monomers. In water, the polymerised amphiphiles aggregate into self assembled units known as micelles. This induces a dramatic modification of the spatial configurations of the polymers. What were featureless random coils now exhibit intramolecular, hierachial self organisation. Due to this self organisation it is necessary to modify the paradigms describing the large scale behaviour of these polymers: Their configurations, dimensions and elasticity. Understanding the behaviour of these polymers is of practical interest because of their wide range of industrial applications, ranging from cosmetics to paper coating. It is of fundamental interest because polysoaps are characterised by a rugged free energy landscape that is reminiscent of complex systems such as proteins and glasses. The talk concerns theoretical arguments regarding the following issues: (i) The design parameters that govern the spatial configurations of the polysoaps, (ii) The interaction between polysoaps and free amphiphiles, (iii) The effect of the intramolecular self organisation on the elasticity of the chains.

  16. Fiber webs

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell; James S. Han; Von L. Byrd

    2005-01-01

    Wood fibers can be used to produce a wide variety of low-density three-dimensional webs, mats, and fiber-molded products. Short wood fibers blended with long fibers can be formed into flexible fiber mats, which can be made by physical entanglement, nonwoven needling, or thermoplastic fiber melt matrix technologies. The most common types of flexible mats are carded, air...

  17. Theory of fiber reinforced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashin, Z.

    1972-01-01

    A unified and rational treatment of the theory of fiber reinforced composite materials is presented. Fundamental geometric and elasticity considerations are throughly covered, and detailed derivations of the effective elastic moduli for these materials are presented. Biaxially reinforced materials which take the form of laminates are then discussed. Based on the fundamentals presented in the first portion of this volume, the theory of fiber-reinforced composite materials is extended to include viscoelastic and thermoelastic properties. Thermal and electrical conduction, electrostatics and magnetostatics behavior of these materials are discussed. Finally, a brief statement of the very difficult subject of physical strength is included.

  18. Ytterbium-doped fiber laser passively mode locked by few-layer Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) saturable absorber functioned with evanescent field interaction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Wang, Qingkai; Jiang, Guobao; Xu, Changwen; Zhao, Chujun; Xiang, Yuanjiang; Chen, Yu; Wen, Shuangchun; Zhang, Han

    2014-01-01

    By coupling few-layer Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) with fiber-taper evanescent light field, a new type of MoS2 based nonlinear optical modulating element had been successfully fabricated as a two-dimensional layered saturable absorber with strong light-matter interaction. This MoS2-taper-fiber device is not only capable of passively mode-locking an all-normal-dispersion ytterbium-doped fiber laser and enduring high power laser excitation (up to 1 W), but also functions as a polarization sensitive optical modulating component (that is, different polarized light can induce different nonlinear optical response). Thanks to the combined advantages from the strong nonlinear optical response in MoS2 together with the sufficiently-long-range interaction between light and MoS2, this device allows for the generation of high power stable dissipative solitons at 1042.6 nm with pulse duration of 656 ps and a repetition rate of 6.74 MHz at a pump power of 210 mW. Our work may also constitute the first example of MoS2-enabled wave-guiding photonic device, and potentially give some new insights into two-dimensional layered materials related photonics. PMID:25213108

  19. Investigating the relationship between changes in collagen fiber orientation during skin aging and collagen/water interactions by polarized-FTIR microimaging.

    PubMed

    Eklouh-Molinier, Christophe; Happillon, Teddy; Bouland, Nicole; Fichel, Caroline; Diébold, Marie-Danièle; Angiboust, Jean-François; Manfait, Michel; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; Piot, Olivier

    2015-09-21

    Upon chronological aging, human skin undergoes structural and molecular modifications, especially at the level of type I collagen. This macromolecule is one of the main dermal structural proteins and presents several age-related alterations. It exhibits a triple helical structure and assembles itself to form fibrils and fibers. In addition, water plays an important role in stabilizing the collagen triple helix by forming hydrogen-bonds between collagen residues. However, the influence of water on changes of dermal collagen fiber orientation with age has not been yet understood. Polarized-Fourier Transform Infrared (P-FTIR) imaging is an interesting biophotonic approach to determine in situ the orientation of type I collagen fibers, as we have recently shown by comparing skin samples of different ages. In this work, P-FTIR spectral imaging was performed on skin samples from two age groups (35- and 38-year-old on the one hand, 60- and 66-year-old on the other hand), and our analyses were focused on the effect of H2O/D2O substitution. Spectral data were processed with fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering in order to distinguish different orientations of collagen fibers. We demonstrated that the orientation was altered with aging, and that D2O treatment, affecting primarily highly bound water molecules, is more marked for the youngest skin samples. Collagen-bound water-related spectral markers were also highlighted. Our results suggest a weakening of water/collagen interactions with age. This non-destructive and label-free methodology allows us to understand better the importance of bound water in collagen fiber orientation alterations occurring with skin aging. Obtaining such structural information could find benefits in dermatology as well as in cosmetics.

  20. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Ana C., E-mail: anac@food.dtu.dk, E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Chronakis, Ioannis S., E-mail: anac@food.dtu.dk, E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulusmore » of elasticity up to 24 h.« less

  1. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: Excitation and Suppression of the Brain Waves by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS-team Team

    2017-10-01

    The novel study of the laser excitation-suppression of the brain waves is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated multi-photon fiber-laser interaction with the brain parvalbumin (PV) neurons. The repetition frequency matches the low frequency brain waves (5-100 Hz); enabling the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the PV neurons (the generators of the brain wave activity). The tunable fiber laser frequencies are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling the monitoring of the PV neuron-DNA, within the 10s of milliseconds. In medicine, the method can be used as an ``instantaneous-on-off anesthetic.'' Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  2. Interaction of DNA with Simple and Mixed Ligand Copper(II) Complexes of 1,10-Phenanthrolines as Studied by DNA-Fiber EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chikira, Makoto; Ng, Chew Hee; Palaniandavar, Mallayan

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of simple and ternary Cu(II) complexes of 1,10-phenanthrolines with DNA has been studied extensively because of their various interesting and important functions such as DNA cleavage activity, cytotoxicity towards cancer cells, and DNA based asymmetric catalysis. Such functions are closely related to the DNA binding modes of the complexes such as intercalation, groove binding, and electrostatic surface binding. A variety of spectroscopic methods have been used to study the DNA binding mode of the Cu(II) complexes. Of all these methods, DNA-fiber electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy affords unique information on the DNA binding structures of the complexes. In this review we summarize the results of our DNA-fiber EPR studies on the DNA binding structure of the complexes and discuss them together with the data accumulated by using other measurements. PMID:26402668

  3. Interaction of dietary sucrose and fiber on serum lipids in healthy young men fed high carbohydrate diets.

    PubMed

    Albrink, M J; Ullrich, I H

    1986-03-01

    High sucrose diets may cause increased serum triglycerides and decreased high density lipoprotein concentration. To determine whether dietary fiber protects against these effects, four groups of six healthy young men were assigned to one of four very high carbohydrate diets providing 0, 18, 36, or 52% of calories as sucrose. Each diet was fed in both low (less than 14 g) and high (greater than 34 g) levels of dietary fiber for 10 days each. Triglycerides increased during the 36 and 52% sucrose diets compared to 0 and 18% sucrose diets, and fiber protected partially against this rise. Serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol were lower during the 0 and 18% sucrose diets than the 36 or 52% sucrose diets but fiber had no effect. HDL cholesterol decreased during all low fat diets, with a trend toward a greater decrease during the high sucrose diets. The results suggest that fiber protects against carbohydrate-induced lipemia but has no effect on cholesterol during very high carbohydrate diets.

  4. A numerical study of a long flexible fiber in shear flow: dynamics and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuk, Pawel; Perazzo, Antonio; Nunes, Janine; Stone, Howard

    2017-11-01

    Long slender particles can span the whole spectrum of stiffness: from very flexible particles such as globular proteins to extremely rigid particles, e.g. carbon nanotubes or β-amyloid fibers. The behavior of rigid particles is well understood, however there are only few recent experimental reports about long fibers of moderate flexibility. We present a numerical study of a single long flexible fiber in a shear flow. The fiber is simulated as a bead-spring model including hydrodynamic interactions in the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa approximation. We analyze fiber shape, motion and stress induced in the fluid under the shear flow. We find that all of these properties appear to be related to the characteristic length scale of the kinks formed in the fibers. We present a scaling law for the kink size as a function of shear rate and the fiber parameters and justify it using elastic theory. The study suggests that local properties of a single fiber may condition the behavior of concentrated suspensions.

  5. Experimental atherosclerosis in rabbits fed cholesterol-free diets. Part 7. Interaction of animal or vegetable protein with fiber.

    PubMed

    Kritchevsky, D; Tepper, S A; Williams, D E; Story, J A

    1977-04-01

    Rabbits were maintained for 10 months on a semipurified, cholesterol-free atherogenic regimen. All diets contained sucrose (40%) and hydrogenated coconut oil (14%). The protein (25%) was either casein or soya protein and the fiber (15%) was either wheat straw, alfalfa, or cellulose. Within either protein group the order for induction of cholesteremia was cellulose=wheat straw greater than alfalfa. For atherogenesis, the effect was cellulose greater than wheat straw greater than alfalfa Soya-wheat straw or soya-cellulose diets were less cholesteremic and atherogenic than their casein counterparts. When alfalfa was the fiber, the two types of protein were almost equivalent. Our results show that casein may be more cholesteremic and atherogenic than soya protein under certain conditions (cellulose or wheat straw as fiber) but the addition of alfalfa to the diet renders the two proteins equivalent.

  6. Natural fibers

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caulfield

    2005-01-01

    The term “natural fibers” covers a broad range of vegetable, animal, and mineral fibers. However, in the composites industry, it usually refers to wood fiber and agrobased bast, leaf, seed, and stem fibers. These fibers often contribute greatly to the structural performance of the plant and, when used in plastic composites, can provide significant reinforcement. Below...

  7. Interaction of angiogenically stimulated intermediate CD163+ monocytes/macrophages with soft hydrophobic poly(n-butyl acrylate) networks with elastic moduli matched to that of human arteries.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Anke; Kratz, Karl; Hiebl, Bernhard; Lendlein, Andreas; Jung, Friedrich

    2012-03-01

    The cell population of peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages (MO) is heterogeneous: The majority of the MO are CD14++ CD16- and named "classical" (= MO1). Furthermore, two other subpopulations were described: CD14++ CD16+ ("intermediate" = MO2) and CD14+ CD16++ ("non-classical" = MO3). It is reported that MO2 possess anti-inflammatory properties and express the MO lineage marker CD163. On a hydrophilic neutrally charged acrylamide-based hydrogel human intermediate (CD14++ CD16+ ), angiogenically stimulated CD163++ monocytes/macrophages (aMO2) maintained a proangiogenic and noninflammatory status for at least 14 days. Here, we explored whether this aMO2 subset adhered to hydrophobic poly(n-butyl acrylate) networks (cPnBA) and also remained in its proangiogenic and noninflammatory status. Because substrate elasticity can impact adherence, morphology, and function of cells, cPnBAs with different Young's modulus (250 and 1100 kPa) were investigated, whereby their elasticity was tailored by variation of the cross-linker content and matched to the elasticity of human arteries. The cPnBAs exhibited similar surface properties (e.g., surface roughness), which were maintained after ethylene oxide sterilization and exposure in serum-free cell culture medium for 18 h at 37°C. aMO2 were seeded on cPnBA samples (1.7 × 10(5) cells/1.33 cm(2) ) in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM high glucose) supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF-A(165) , 10 ng/mL) and fetal calf serum (10 vol%) for 3 and 72 h. On both polymeric samples (n = 3 each), the numbers of adherent cells per unit area were significantly higher (P < 0.01; cPnBA0250: 3 h 13 ± 5 cells/mm(2) , 72 h 234 ± 106 cells/mm(2) ; cPnBA1100: 3 h 14 ± 3 cells/mm(2) , 72 h 198 ± 113 cells/mm(2) ) compared to control cultures (glass, 3 h: 6 ± 3 cells/mm(2) , 72 h: 130 ± 83 cells/mm(2) ) and showed a typically spread morphology. The

  8. Probabilistic Fiber Composite Micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using Monte Carlo simulation. The variables in which uncertainties are accounted for include constituent and void volume ratios, constituent elastic properties and strengths, and fiber misalignment. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to demonstrate fiber composite material property variations induced by random changes expected at the material micro level. Regression results are presented to show the relative correlation between predictor and response variables in the study. These computational procedures make possible a formal description of anticipated random processes at the intra-ply level, and the related effects of these on composite properties.

  9. Stress-intensity factors of r-cracks in fiber-reinforced composites under thermal and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. H.; Schmauder, S.

    1993-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of the calculation of stress-intensity factors at the tips of radial matrix cracks (r-cracks) in fiber-reinforced composites under thermal and/or transverse uniaxial or biaxial mechanical loading. The crack is either located in the immediate vicinity of a single fiber or it terminates at the interface between the fiber and the matrix. The problem is stated and solved numerically within the framework of linear elasticity using Erdogan's integral equation technique. It is shown that the solutions for purely thermal and purely mechanical loading can simply be superimposed in order to obtain the results of the combined loading case. Stress-intensity factors (SIFs) are calculated for various lengths and distances of the crack from the interface for each of these loading conditions. The behavior of the SIFs for cracks growing towards or away from the interface is examined. The role of the elastic mismatch between the fibers and the matrix is emphasized and studied extensively using the so-called Dundurs' parameters. It is shown that an r-crack, which is remotely located from the fiber, can either be stabilized or destabilized depending on both the elastic as well as the thermal mismatch of the fibrous composite. Furthermore, Dundurs' parameters are used to predict the exponent of the singularity of the crack tip elastic field and the behavior of the corresponding SIFs for cracks which terminate at the interface. An analytical solution for the SIFs is derived for all three loading conditions under the assumption that the elastic constants of the matrix and the fiber are equal. It is shown that the analytical solution is in good agreement with the corresponding numerical results. Moreover, another analytical solution from the literature, which is based upon Paris' equation for the calculation of stress-intensity factors, is compared with the numerical results and it is shown to be valid only for extremely short r-cracks touching the

  10. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-03

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range.

  11. Mean Green operators of deformable fiber networks embedded in a compliant matrix and property estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franciosi, Patrick; Spagnuolo, Mario; Salman, Oguz Umut

    2018-04-01

    Composites comprising included phases in a continuous matrix constitute a huge class of meta-materials, whose effective properties, whether they be mechanical, physical or coupled, can be selectively optimized by using appropriate phase arrangements and architectures. An important subclass is represented by "network-reinforced matrices," say those materials in which one or more of the embedded phases are co-continuous with the matrix in one or more directions. In this article, we present a method to study effective properties of simple such structures from which more complex ones can be accessible. Effective properties are shown, in the framework of linear elasticity, estimable by using the global mean Green operator for the entire embedded fiber network which is by definition through sample spanning. This network operator is obtained from one of infinite planar alignments of infinite fibers, which the network can be seen as an interpenetrated set of, with the fiber interactions being fully accounted for in the alignments. The mean operator of such alignments is given in exact closed form for isotropic elastic-like or dielectric-like matrices. We first exemplify how these operators relevantly provide, from classic homogenization frameworks, effective properties in the case of 1D fiber bundles embedded in an isotropic elastic-like medium. It is also shown that using infinite patterns with fully interacting elements over their whole influence range at any element concentration suppresses the dilute approximation limit of these frameworks. We finally present a construction method for a global operator of fiber networks described as interpenetrated such bundles.

  12. Dietary and Lifestyle Factors Associated with Colorectal Cancer Risk and Interactions with Microbiota: Fiber, Red or Processed Meat and Alcoholic Drinks

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Juan; Chen, Ying-Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Diets and lifestyles have been strongly associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). In the past several decades, emerging evidence has suggested that the gut microbiota may have a role in the development of CRC. Its interaction with diets and lifestyles could affect the carcinogenesis of CRC. Summary This review presents the most recent epidemiologic and experimental evidence of three factors that may convincingly have a role in CRC, including fiber, red or processed meat, and alcohol, focusing on potential mechanisms and their interactions with the gut microbiota. Key Message High consumption of fiber, low consumption of red or processed red meat as well as minimizing alcohol intake have been associated with a lower risk of CRC. Many microbial metabolites formed from those three substances may mediate the microbial diversity and the composition and abundance of the gut microbiota, which eventually affects the balance between health and disease, including CRC. Practical Implications Based on our synthetic review, clinicians may probably offer some recommendations and explanations to their patients who may want to modulate their diet and lifestyle to prevent CRC. As an easily modifiable environmental factor, it may be possible that applying dietary or lifestyle intervention could effectively protect against the development of CRC in the future. PMID:27722153

  13. Dietary and Lifestyle Factors Associated with Colorectal Cancer Risk and Interactions with Microbiota: Fiber, Red or Processed Meat and Alcoholic Drinks.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Juan; Chen, Ying-Xuan

    2016-09-01

    Diets and lifestyles have been strongly associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). In the past several decades, emerging evidence has suggested that the gut microbiota may have a role in the development of CRC. Its interaction with diets and lifestyles could affect the carcinogenesis of CRC. This review presents the most recent epidemiologic and experimental evidence of three factors that may convincingly have a role in CRC, including fiber, red or processed meat, and alcohol, focusing on potential mechanisms and their interactions with the gut microbiota. High consumption of fiber, low consumption of red or processed red meat as well as minimizing alcohol intake have been associated with a lower risk of CRC. Many microbial metabolites formed from those three substances may mediate the microbial diversity and the composition and abundance of the gut microbiota, which eventually affects the balance between health and disease, including CRC. Based on our synthetic review, clinicians may probably offer some recommendations and explanations to their patients who may want to modulate their diet and lifestyle to prevent CRC. As an easily modifiable environmental factor, it may be possible that applying dietary or lifestyle intervention could effectively protect against the development of CRC in the future.

  14. Effects of Crystal Orientation on Cellulose Nanocrystals−Cellulose Acetate Nanocomposite Fibers Prepared by Dry Spinning

    Treesearch

    Si Chen; Greg Schueneman; R. Byron Pipes; Jeffrey Youngblood; Robert J. Moon

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the development of dry spun cellulose acetate (CA) fibers using cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as reinforcements. Increasing amounts of CNCs were dispersed into CA fibers in efforts to improve the tensile strength and elastic modulus of the fiber. A systematic characterization of dispersion of CNCs in the polymer fiber and their effect on the...

  15. Topological diversity of chromatin fibers: Interplay between nucleosome repeat length, DNA linking number and the level of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Davood; Katebi, Ataur; Cui, Feng; Zhurkin, Victor B.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial organization of nucleosomes in 30-nm fibers remains unknown in detail. To tackle this problem, we analyzed all stereochemically possible configurations of two-start chromatin fibers with DNA linkers L = 10–70 bp (nucleosome repeat length NRL = 157–217 bp). In our model, the energy of a fiber is a sum of the elastic energy of the linker DNA, steric repulsion, electrostatics, and the H4 tail-acidic patch interaction between two stacked nucleosomes. We found two families of energetically feasible conformations of the fibers—one observed earlier, and the other novel. The fibers from the two families are characterized by different DNA linking numbers—that is, they are topologically different. Remarkably, the optimal geometry of a fiber and its topology depend on the linker length: the fibers with linkers L = 10n and 10n + 5 bp have DNA linking numbers per nucleosome ΔLk ≈ −1.5 and −1.0, respectively. In other words, the level of DNA supercoiling is directly related to the length of the inter-nucleosome linker in the chromatin fiber (and therefore, to NRL). We hypothesize that this topological polymorphism of chromatin fibers may play a role in the process of transcription, which is known to generate different levels of DNA supercoiling upstream and downstream from RNA polymerase. A genome-wide analysis of the NRL distribution in active and silent yeast genes yielded results consistent with this assumption. PMID:28133628

  16. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    SciTech Connect

    Tatarenko, V.A.; Tsysman, C.L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Y.T.

    1994-12-31

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC{sub 60}) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distoration relaxation of the host fullerene (C{sub 60}) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distoration field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. This paper seeks to find a functional relationmore » between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of statistic concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method. In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the statistic inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the average-lattice sites as well as on the lattice parameter a of the elastically-anysotropic cubic C{sub 60} crystal are taken into account.« less

  17. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatarenko, Valentine A.; Tsysman, Constantin L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Yelena T.

    1995-01-01

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC-60) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distortion relaxation of the host fullerene (C-60) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distortion field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. The given paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of static concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method(*). In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the static inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the 'average-lattice' sites' as well as on the lattice parameter a of a elastically-anysotropic 'cubic' C-60 crystal are taken into account.

  18. Mathematical model of the two-point bending test for strength measurement of optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srubshchik, Leonid S.

    1999-12-01

    The mathematical and numerical analysis of two nonlinear problems of solid mechanics related to the breaking strength of coated optical glass fibers are presented. Both of these problems are concerned with the two-point bending technique which measures the strength of optical fibers by straining them in a bending mode between two parallel plates. The plates are squeezed together until the fiber fractures. The process gives a measurement of fiber strength. The present theory of this test is based on the elastica theory of an unshearable and inextensible rod. However, within the limits of the elastics theory the tensile and shear stresses cannot be determined. In this paper we study the behavior of optical glass fiber on the base of a geometrically exact nonlinear Cosserat theory in which a rod can suffer flexure, extension, and shear. We adopt the specific nonlinear stress-strain relations in silica and titania-doped silica glass fibers and show that it does not yield essential changes in the results as compared with the results for the linear stress-strain relations. We obtain the governing equations of the motion of the fiber in the two-point bending test taking into account the friction between the test fiber and the rigid plates. We develop the computational methods to solve the initial and equilibrium free-boundary nonlinear planar problems. We derive formulas for tensile and shear stresses which allow us to calculate tension in the fiber. The numerical results show that frictional forces play an important role. The interaction of optical fiber and rigid plates is treated by means of the classical contact theory.

  19. Polymer optical fiber strain gauge for human-robot interaction forces assessment on an active knee orthosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Junior, Arnaldo G.; Frizera, Anselmo; Marques, Carlos; Sánchez, Manuel R. A.; Botelho, Thomaz R.; Segatto, Marcelo V.; Pontes, Maria José

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the development of a polymer optical fiber (POF) strain gauge based on the light coupling principle, which the power attenuation is created by the misalignment between two POFs. The misalignment, in this case, is proportional to the strain on the structure that the fibers are attached. This principle has the advantages of low cost, ease of implementation, temperature insensitiveness, electromagnetic fields immunity and simplicity on the sensor interrogation and signal processing. Such advantages make the proposed solution an interesting alternative to the electronic strain gauges. For this reason, an analytical model for the POF strain gauge is proposed and validated. Furthermore, the proposed POF sensor is applied on an active orthosis for knee rehabilitation exercises through flexion/extension cycles. The controller of the orthosis provides 10 different levels of robotic assistance on the flexion/extension movement. The POF strain gauge is tested at each one of these levels. Results show good correlation between the optical and electronic strain gauges with root mean squared deviation (RMSD) of 1.87 Nm when all cycles are analyzed, which represents a deviation of less than 8%. For the application, the proposed sensor presented higher stability than the electronic one, which can provide advantages on the rehabilitation exercises and on the inner controller of the device.

  20. Natural fibers

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons

    2010-01-01

    The term “natural fibers” covers a broad range of vegetable, animal, and mineral fibers. However, in the composites industry, it usually refers to wood fiber and plant-based bast, leaf, seed, and stem fibers. These fibers often contribute greatly to the structural performance of the plant and, when used in plastic composites, can provide significant reinforcement....

  1. Elastic spheres can walk on water.

    PubMed

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C; Jandron, Michael A; Bower, Allan F; Truscott, Tadd T

    2016-02-04

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys.

  2. Elastic spheres can walk on water

    PubMed Central

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C.; Jandron, Michael A.; Bower, Allan F.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2016-01-01

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys. PMID:26842860

  3. On the mechanical coupling of a fiber optic cable used for distributed acoustic/vibration sensing applications—a theoretical consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinsch, Thomas; Thurley, Tom; Jousset, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, fiber optic cables are increasingly used for the acquisition of dynamic strain changes for seismic surveys. When considering seismic amplitudes, one of the first questions arising is the mechanical coupling between optical fiber and the surrounding medium. Here we analyse the interaction of ground movement with a typical telecom-grade fiber optic cable from an existing telecommunication network deployed in a sand filled trench at the surface. Within the cable, the optical fiber is embedded in a gel-filled plastic tube. We apply Hooke’s law to calculate the stress needed to strain the optical fiber throughout the cable structure. In case the stress magnitude at the cable-sand interface as well as the gel-optical fiber interface is below the yield strength of the respective material, sand and gel, it can be regarded as an elastic medium. Hence, a multilayer radial symmetric model can be used to calculate the coupling of the optical fiber with the surrounding medium. We show that the transfer function has a -3 dB lower cut-off wavelength of about 22 m. The magnitude response of this telecom-grade fiber optic cable is therefore almost perfect at typical low frequency seismic waves. The approach presented here can be applied to various cable designs to estimate the strain transfer between ground movement and an optical fiber.

  4. Relative validity of micronutrient and fiber intake assessed with two new interactive meal- and Web-based food frequency questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Sara E; Möller, Elisabeth; Bonn, Stephanie E; Ploner, Alexander; Bälter, Olle; Lissner, Lauren; Bälter, Katarina

    2014-02-21

    The meal- and Web-based food frequency questionnaires, Meal-Q and MiniMeal-Q, were developed for cost-efficient assessment of dietary intake in epidemiological studies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative validity of micronutrient and fiber intake assessed with Meal-Q and MiniMeal-Q. The reproducibility of Meal-Q was also evaluated. A total of 163 volunteer men and women aged between 20 and 63 years were recruited from Stockholm County, Sweden. Assessment of micronutrient and fiber intake with the 174-item Meal-Q was compared to a Web-based 7-day weighed food record (WFR). Two administered Meal-Q questionnaires were compared for reproducibility. The 126-item MiniMeal-Q, developed after the validation study, was evaluated in a simulated validation by using truncated Meal-Q data. The study population consisted of approximately 80% women (129/163) with a mean age of 33 years (SD 12) who were highly educated (130/163, 80% with >12 years of education) on average. Cross-classification of quartiles with the WFR placed 69% to 90% in the same/adjacent quartile for Meal-Q and 67% to 89% for MiniMeal-Q. Bland-Altman plots with the WFR and the questionnaires showed large variances and a trend of increasing underestimation with increasing intakes. Deattenuated and energy-adjusted Spearman rank correlations between the questionnaires and the WFR were in the range ρ=.25-.69, excluding sodium that was not statistically significant. Cross-classifications of quartiles of the 2 Meal-Q administrations placed 86% to 97% in the same/adjacent quartile. Intraclass correlation coefficients for energy-adjusted intakes were in the range of .50-.76. With the exception of sodium, this validation study demonstrates Meal-Q and MiniMeal-Q to be useful methods for ranking micronutrient and fiber intake in epidemiological studies with Web-based data collection.

  5. Elastic and thermal expansion asymmetry in dense molecular materials.

    PubMed

    Burg, Joseph A; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2016-09-01

    The elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion are fundamental properties of elastically stiff molecular materials and are assumed to be the same (symmetric) under both tension and compression loading. We show that molecular materials can have a marked asymmetric elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion that are inherently related to terminal chemical groups that limit molecular network connectivity. In compression, terminal groups sterically interact to stiffen the network, whereas in tension they interact less and disconnect the network. The existence of asymmetric elastic and thermal expansion behaviour has fundamental implications for computational approaches to molecular materials modelling and practical implications on the thermomechanical strains and associated elastic stresses. We develop a design space to control the degree of elastic asymmetry in molecular materials, a vital step towards understanding their integration into device technologies.

  6. Viscous-elastic dynamics of power-law fluids within an elastic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Bercovici, Moran; Gat, Amir D.

    2017-07-01

    In a wide range of applications, microfluidic channels are implemented in soft substrates. In such configurations, where fluidic inertia and compressibility are negligible, the propagation of fluids in channels is governed by a balance between fluid viscosity and elasticity of the surrounding solid. The viscous-elastic interactions between elastic substrates and non-Newtonian fluids are particularly of interest due to the dependence of viscosity on the state of the system. In this work, we study the fluid-structure interaction dynamics between an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid and a slender linearly elastic cylinder under the creeping flow regime. Considering power-law fluids and applying the thin shell approximation for the elastic cylinder, we obtain a nonhomogeneous p-Laplacian equation governing the viscous-elastic dynamics. We present exact solutions for the pressure and deformation fields for various initial and boundary conditions for both shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. We show that in contrast to Stokes' problem where a compactly supported front is obtained for shear-thickening fluids, here the role of viscosity is inversed and such fronts are obtained for shear-thinning fluids. Furthermore, we demonstrate that for the case of a step in inlet pressure, the propagation rate of the front has a tn/n +1 dependence on time (t ), suggesting the ability to indirectly measure the power-law index (n ) of shear-thinning liquids through measurements of elastic deformation.

  7. Advances in biomimetic regeneration of elastic matrix structures

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraman, Balakrishnan; Bashur, Chris A.

    2012-01-01

    Elastin is a vital component of the extracellular matrix, providing soft connective tissues with the property of elastic recoil following deformation and regulating the cellular response via biomechanical transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. The limited ability of most adult cells to synthesize elastin precursors and assemble them into mature crosslinked structures has hindered the development of functional tissue-engineered constructs that exhibit the structure and biomechanics of normal native elastic tissues in the body. In diseased tissues, the chronic overexpression of proteolytic enzymes can cause significant matrix degradation, to further limit the accumulation and quality (e.g., fiber formation) of newly deposited elastic matrix. This review provides an overview of the role and importance of elastin and elastic matrix in soft tissues, the challenges to elastic matrix generation in vitro and to regenerative elastic matrix repair in vivo, current biomolecular strategies to enhance elastin deposition and matrix assembly, and the need to concurrently inhibit proteolytic matrix disruption for improving the quantity and quality of elastogenesis. The review further presents biomaterial-based options using scaffolds and nanocarriers for spatio-temporal control over the presentation and release of these biomolecules, to enable biomimetic assembly of clinically relevant native elastic matrix-like superstructures. Finally, this review provides an overview of recent advances and prospects for the application of these strategies to regenerating tissue-type specific elastic matrix structures and superstructures. PMID:23355960

  8. Mechanism of Resilin Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guokui; Hu, Xiao; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Resilin is critical in the flight and jumping systems of insects as a polymeric rubber-like protein with outstanding elasticity. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. Here we report the structure and function of resilin from Drosophila CG15920. A reversible beta-turn transition was identified in the peptide encoded by exon III and for full length resilin during energy input and release, features that correlate to the rapid deformation of resilin during functions in vivo. Micellar structures and nano-porous patterns formed after beta-turn structures were present via changes in either the thermal or mechanical inputs. A model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for this protein. Further, this model offers a view of elastomeric proteins in general where beta-turn related structures serve as fundamental units of the structure and elasticity. PMID:22893127

  9. Poisson's ratio of fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansson, Henrik; Helsing, Johan

    1996-05-01

    Poisson's ratio flow diagrams, that is, the Poisson's ratio versus the fiber fraction, are obtained numerically for hexagonal arrays of elastic circular fibers in an elastic matrix. High numerical accuracy is achieved through the use of an interface integral equation method. Questions concerning fixed point theorems and the validity of existing asymptotic relations are investigated and partially resolved. Our findings for the transverse effective Poisson's ratio, together with earlier results for random systems by other authors, make it possible to formulate a general statement for Poisson's ratio flow diagrams: For composites with circular fibers and where the phase Poisson's ratios are equal to 1/3, the system with the lowest stiffness ratio has the highest Poisson's ratio. For other choices of the elastic moduli for the phases, no simple statement can be made.

  10. Topological, total, and elastic cross sections for K/sup +/p,. pi. /sup +/p, and pp interactions at 147 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Brick, D.; Rudnicka, H.; Shapiro, A.M.

    1982-06-01

    The Fermilab hybrid 30-in. bubble-chamber spectrometer was exposed to a tagged 147-GeV/c positive beam containing ..pi../sup +/, K/sup +/, and p. A sample of 3003 K/sup +/p, 19 410 pp, and 20 745 ..pi../sup +/p interactions is used to derive sigma/sub n/, , f/sub 2//sup tsc/c, and /D for each beam particle. These values are compared to values obtained at other, mostly lower, beam momenta. The overall dependence of on E/sub a/, the available center-of-mass energy, for these three reactions as well as ..pi../sup -/p and pp interactions has been determined.

  11. Micromechanical analysis of composites with fibers distributed randomly over the transverse cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Jingmeng; Wen, Weidong; Cui, Haitao; Chen, Bo

    2018-06-01

    A new method to generate the random distribution of fibers in the transverse cross-section of fiber reinforced composites with high fiber volume fraction is presented in this paper. Based on the microscopy observation of the transverse cross-sections of unidirectional composite laminates, hexagon arrangement is set as the initial arrangement status, and the initial velocity of each fiber is arbitrary at an arbitrary direction, the micro-scale representative volume element (RVE) is established by simulating perfectly elastic collision. Combined with the proposed periodic boundary conditions which are suitable for multi-axial loading, the effective elastic properties of composite materials can be predicted. The predicted properties show reasonable agreement with experimental results. By comparing the stress field of RVE with fibers distributed randomly and RVE with fibers distributed periodically, the predicted elastic modulus of RVE with fibers distributed randomly is greater than RVE with fibers distributed periodically.

  12. Axisymmetric micromechanics of elastic-perfectly plastic fibrous composites under uniaxial tension loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Allen, David H.

    1993-01-01

    The uniaxial response of a continuous fiber elastic-perfectly plastic composite is modeled herein as a two-element composite cylinder. An axisymmetric analytical micromechanics solution is obtained for the rate-independent elastic-plastic response of the two-element composite cylinder subjected to tensile loading in the fiber direction for the case wherein the core fiber is assumed to be a transversely isotropic elastic-plastic material obeying the Tsai-Hill yield criterion, with yielding simulating fiber failure. The matrix is assumed to be an isotropic elastic-plastic material obeying the Tresca yield criterion. It is found that there are three different circumstances that depend on the fiber and matrix properties: fiber yield, followed by matrix yielding; complete matrix yield, followed by fiber yielding; and partial matrix yield, followed by fiber yielding, followed by complete matrix yield. The order in which these phenomena occur is shown to have a pronounced effect on the predicted uniaxial effective composite response.

  13. Ultrasonic characterization of the nonlinear elastic properties of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1987-01-01

    The theoretical treatment of linear and nonlinear elasticity in a unidirectionally fiber reinforced composite as well as measurements for a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite (T300/5208) are presented. Linear elastic properties were measured by both ultrasonic and strain gage measurements. The nonlinear properties were determined by measuring changes in ultrasonic natural phase velocity with a pulsed phase locked loop interferometer as a function of stress and temperature. These measurements provide the basis for further investigations into the relationship between nonlinear elastic properties and other important properties such as strength and fiber-matrix interfacial stength in graphite/epoxy composites.

  14. Arterial extracellular matrix: a mechanobiological study of the contributions and interactions of elastin and collagen.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ming-Jay; Turcotte, Raphaël; Lin, Charles P; Zhang, Yanhang

    2014-06-17

    The complex network structure of elastin and collagen extracellular matrix (ECM) forms the primary load bearing components in the arterial wall. The structural and mechanobiological interactions between elastin and collagen are important for properly functioning arteries. Here, we examined the elastin and collagen organization, realignment, and recruitment by coupling mechanical loading and multiphoton imaging. Two-photon excitation fluorescence and second harmonic generation methods were performed with a multiphoton video-rate microscope to capture real time changes to the elastin and collagen structure during biaxial deformation. Enzymatic removal of elastin was performed to assess the structural changes of the remaining collagen structure. Quantitative analysis of the structural changes to elastin and collagen was made using a combination of two-dimensional fast Fourier transform and fractal analysis, which allows for a more complete understanding of structural changes. Our study provides new quantitative evidence, to our knowledge on the sequential engagement of different arterial ECM components in response to mechanical loading. The adventitial collagen exists as large wavy bundles of fibers that exhibit fiber engagement after 20% strain. The medial collagen is engaged throughout the stretching process, and prominent elastic fiber engagement is observed up to 20% strain after which the engagement plateaus. The fiber orientation distribution functions show remarkably different changes in the ECM structure in response to mechanical loading. The medial collagen shows an evident preferred circumferential distribution, however the fiber families of adventitial collagen are obscured by their waviness at no or low mechanical strains. Collagen fibers in both layers exhibit significant realignment in response to unequal biaxial loading. The elastic fibers are much more uniformly distributed and remained relatively unchanged due to loading. Removal of elastin produces

  15. Elasticity of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Angel, Ross J.; Ross, Nancy L.

    2016-02-01

    Elastic properties are reported for eight plagioclase feldspars that span compositions from albite (NaSi3AlO8) to anorthite (CaSi2Al2O8). Surface acoustic wave velocities measured using Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering and compliance sums from high-pressure X-ray compression studies accurately determine all 21 components of the elasticity tensor for these triclinic minerals. The overall pattern of elasticity and the changes in individual elastic components with composition can be rationalized on the basis of the evolution of crystal structures and chemistry across this solid-solution join. All plagioclase feldspars have high elastic anisotropy; a* (the direction perpendicular to the b and c axes) is the softest direction by a factor of 3 in albite. From albite to anorthite the stiffness of this direction undergoes the greatest change, increasing twofold. Small discontinuities in the elastic components, inferred to occur between the three plagioclase phases with distinct symmetry (C1>¯, I1>¯, and P1>¯), appear consistent with the nature of the underlying conformation of the framework-linked tetrahedra and the associated structural changes. Measured body wave velocities of plagioclase-rich rocks, reported over the last five decades, are consistent with calculated Hill-averaged velocities using the current moduli. This confirms long-standing speculation that previously reported elastic moduli for plagioclase feldspars are systematically in error. The current results provide greater assurance that the seismic structure of the middle and lower crusts can be accurately estimated on the basis of specified mineral modes, chemistry, and fabric.

  16. 3D elastic control for mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Hachet, Martin; Pouderoux, Joachim; Guitton, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    To increase the input space of mobile devices, the authors developed a proof-of-concept 3D elastic controller that easily adapts to mobile devices. This embedded device improves the completion of high-level interaction tasks such as visualization of large documents and navigation in 3D environments. It also opens new directions for tomorrow's mobile applications.

  17. Effect of interactions between Co(2+) and surface goethite layer on the performance of α-FeOOH coated hollow fiber ceramic ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwen; Zhu, Li; Li, Jianrong; Tang, Jianfeng; Li, Gang; Hsieh, Yi-Kong; Wang, TsingHai; Wang, Chu-Fang

    2016-03-15

    The consideration of water energy nexus inspires the environmental engineering community to pursue a more sustainable strategy in the wastewater treatment. One potential response would be to enhance the performance of the low-pressure driven filtration system. To reach this objective, it is essential to have a better understanding regarding the surface interaction between the target substance and the surface of membrane. In this study, the hollow fiber ceramic membranes were coated with a goethite layer in order to enhance the Co(2+) rejection. Experimental results indicate that higher Co(2+) rejections are always accompanied with the significant reduction in the permeability. Based on the consideration of electroviscous effect, the surface interactions including the induced changes in viscosity, pore radius and Donnan effect in the goethite layer are likely responsible for the pH dependent behaviors in the rejection and permeability. These results could be valuable references to develop the filtration system with high rejection along with acceptable degree of permeability in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chiral fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Victor I.; Churikov, Victor M.; Singer, Jonathan; Neugroschl, Daniel; Genack, Azriel Z.

    2010-04-01

    We have fabricated a variety of chiral fiber sensors by twisting one or more standard or custom optical fibers with noncircular or nonconcentric core as they pass though a miniature oven. The resulting structures are as stable as the glass material and can be produced with helical pitch ranging from microns to hundreds of microns. The polarization selectivity of the chiral gratings is determined by the geometry of the fiber cross section. Single helix structures are polarization insensitive, while double helix gratings interact only with a single optical polarization component. Both single and double helix gratings may function as a fiber long period grating, coupling core and cladding modes or as a diffraction grating scattering light from the fiber core out of the fiber. The resulting dips in the transmission spectrum are sensitive to fiber elongation, twist and temperature, and (in the case of the long period gratings) to the refractive index of the surrounding medium. The suitability of chiral gratings for sensing temperature, elongation, twist and liquid levels will be discussed. Gratings made of radiation sensitive glass can be used to measure the cumulative radiation dose, while gratings made of radiation-hardened glass are suitable for stable sensing of the environment in nuclear power plants. Excellent temperature stability up to 900°C is found in pure silica chiral diffraction grating sensors.

  19. Elastic membranes in confinement.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J B; Miksis, M J; Davis, S H

    2016-07-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and coiled DNA, have fine internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically 'confined' by another object. Here, the two-dimensional shape of an elastic membrane in a 'confining' box is studied by introducing a repulsive confinement pressure that prevents the membrane from intersecting the wall. The stage is set by contrasting confined and unconfined solutions. Continuation methods are then used to compute response diagrams, from which we identify the particular membrane mechanics that generate mitochondria-like shapes. Large confinement pressures yield complex response diagrams with secondary bifurcations and multiple turning points where modal identities may change. Regions in parameter space where such behaviour occurs are then mapped. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  1. Valorization of residual Empty Palm Fruit Bunch Fibers (EPFBF) by microfluidization: production of nanofibrillated cellulose and EPFBF nanopaper.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Ana; Filpponen, Ilari; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Laine, Janne; Rojas, Orlando J

    2012-12-01

    Different cellulose pulps were produced from sulfur-free chemical treatments of Empty Palm Fruit Bunch Fibers (EPFBF), a by-product from palm oil processing. The pulps were microfluidized for deconstruction into nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and nanopaper was manufactured by using an overpressure device. The morphological and structural features of the obtained NFCs were characterized via atomic force and scanning electron microscopies. The physical properties as well as the interactions with water of sheets from three different pulps were compared with those of nanopaper obtained from the corresponding NFC. Distinctive chemical and morphological characteristics and ensuing nanopaper properties were generated by the EPFBF fibers. The NFC grades obtained compared favorably with associated materials typically produced from bleached wood fibers. Lower water absorption, higher tensile strengths (107-137 MPa) and elastic modulus (12-18 GPa) were measured, which opens the possibility for valorization of such widely available bioresource. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Elastic properties and fracture strength of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    A research program is described which was devised to determine experimentally the elastic properties in tension and bending of quasi-isotropic laminates made from high-modulus graphite fiber and epoxy. Four laminate configurations were investigated, and determinations were made of the tensile modulus, Poisson's ratio, bending stiffness, fracture strength, and fracture strain. The measured properties are compared with those predicted by laminate theory, reasons for scatter in the experimental data are discussed, and the effect of fiber misalignment on predicted elastic tensile properties is examined. The results strongly suggest that fiber misalignment in combination with variation in fiber volume content is responsible for the scatter in both elastic constants and fracture strength.

  3. The ultra-structural organization of the elastic network in the intra- and inter-lamellar matrix of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, J; Elliott, D M; Costi, J J

    2017-08-01

    The inter-lamellar matrix (ILM)-located between adjacent lamellae of the annulus fibrosus-consists of a complex structure of elastic fibers, while elastic fibers of the intra-lamellar region are aligned predominantly parallel to the collagen fibers. The organization of elastic fibers under low magnification, in both inter- and intra-lamellar regions, was studied by light microscopic analysis of histologically prepared samples; however, little is known about their ultrastructure. An ultrastructural visualization of elastic fibers in the inter-lamellar matrix is crucial for describing their contribution to structural integrity, as well as mechanical properties of the annulus fibrosus. The aims of this study were twofold: first, to present an ultrastructural analysis of the elastic fiber network in the ILM and intra-lamellar region, including cross section (CS) and in-plane (IP) lamellae, of the AF using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and second, to -compare the elastic fiber orientation between the ILM and intra-lamellar region. Four samples (lumbar sheep discs) from adjacent sections (30μm thickness) of anterior annulus were partially digested by a developed NaOH-sonication method for visualization of elastic fibers by SEM. Elastic fiber orientation and distribution were quantified relative to the tangential to circumferential reference axis. Visualization of the ILM under high magnification revealed a dense network of elastic fibers that has not been previously described. Within the ILM, elastic fibers form a complex network, consisting of different size and shape fibers, which differed to those located in the intra-lamellar region. For both regions, the majority of fibers were oriented near 0° with respect to tangential to circumferential (TCD) direction and two minor symmetrical orientations of approximately±45°. Statistically, the orientation of elastic fibers between the ILM and intra-lamellar region was not different (p=0.171). The present study used

  4. NONLINEAR AND FIBER OPTICS: Thermal self-interaction of laser beams in water within the anomalous density range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribova, E. Z.; Sorokin, Yu M.

    1990-04-01

    A theoretical model is proposed in order to account for the temperature dependence of the refractive index of water in the range of parameters not far from the crystallization point. It is shown that the thermal self-interaction results in defocusing in supercooled water and in the temperature range of the anomalous density. Penetrating self-convection is predicted and confirmed experimentally for this case: this is manifested by a local change of the sign of the buoyancy forces in the region occupied by a laser beam. The possibility of suppression of such self-convection and enhancement of symmetric nonlinear refraction effects near an extremum of the density of water is also predicted and demonstrated experimentally.

  5. Numerical approach of the injection molding process of fiber-reinforced composite with considering fiber orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Thi, T. B.; Yokoyama, A.; Ota, K.; Kodama, K.; Yamashita, K.; Isogai, Y.; Furuichi, K.; Nonomura, C.

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important challenges in the injection molding process of the short-glass fiber/thermoplastic composite parts is being able to predict the fiber orientation, since it controls the mechanical and the physical properties of the final parts. Folgar and Tucker included into the Jeffery equation a diffusive type of term, which introduces a phenomenological coefficient for modeling the randomizing effect of the mechanical interactions between the fibers, to predict the fiber orientation in concentrated suspensions. Their experiments indicated that this coefficient depends on the fiber volume fraction and aspect ratio. However, a definition of the fiber interaction coefficient, which is very necessary in the fiber orientation simulations, hasn't still been proven yet. Consequently, this study proposed a developed fiber interaction model that has been introduced a fiber dynamics simulation in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient. This supposed that the coefficient is a sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The proposed model was incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. Short-glass fiber/polyamide-6 composites were produced in the injection molding with the fiber weight concentration of 30 wt.%, 50 wt.%, and 70 wt.%. The physical properties of these composites were examined, and their fiber orientation distributions were measured by micro-computed-tomography equipment μ-CT. The simulation results showed a good agreement with experiment results.

  6. Numerical approach of the injection molding process of fiber-reinforced composite with considering fiber orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Thi, T. B., E-mail: thanhbinh.skku@gmail.com, E-mail: yokoyama@kit.ac.jp; Yokoyama, A., E-mail: thanhbinh.skku@gmail.com, E-mail: yokoyama@kit.ac.jp; Ota, K., E-mail: kei-ota@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhisa-yamashita@toyobo.jp, E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp, E-mail: kenji-furuichi@toyobo.jp, E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp

    2014-05-15

    One of the most important challenges in the injection molding process of the short-glass fiber/thermoplastic composite parts is being able to predict the fiber orientation, since it controls the mechanical and the physical properties of the final parts. Folgar and Tucker included into the Jeffery equation a diffusive type of term, which introduces a phenomenological coefficient for modeling the randomizing effect of the mechanical interactions between the fibers, to predict the fiber orientation in concentrated suspensions. Their experiments indicated that this coefficient depends on the fiber volume fraction and aspect ratio. However, a definition of the fiber interaction coefficient, whichmore » is very necessary in the fiber orientation simulations, hasn't still been proven yet. Consequently, this study proposed a developed fiber interaction model that has been introduced a fiber dynamics simulation in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient. This supposed that the coefficient is a sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The proposed model was incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. Short-glass fiber/polyamide-6 composites were produced in the injection molding with the fiber weight concentration of 30 wt.%, 50 wt.%, and 70 wt.%. The physical properties of these composites were examined, and their fiber orientation distributions were measured by micro-computed-tomography equipment μ-CT. The simulation results showed a good agreement with experiment results.« less

  7. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Cheol; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Yeol

    2015-03-27

    In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter). In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress-strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures.

  8. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Cheol; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter). In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress–strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures. PMID:28788011

  9. Neutrino Nucleon Elastic Scattering in MiniBooNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. Christopher

    2007-12-01

    Neutrino nucleon elastic scattering νN→νN is a fundamental process of the weak interaction, and can be used to study the structure of the nucleon. This is the third largest scattering process in MiniBooNE comprising ˜15% of all neutrino interactions. Analysis of this sample has yielded a neutral current elastic differential cross section as a function of Q2 that agrees within errors to model predictions.

  10. The Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocco, Alberto; Masin, Sergio Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight--a cognitive law analogous to Hooke's law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined…

  11. The Calculus of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Warren B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the elasticity of demand, and shows that geometrically, it may be interpreted as the ratio of two simple distances along the tangent line: the distance from the point on the curve to the x-intercept to the distance from the point on the curve to the y-intercept. It also shows that total revenue is maximized at the transition…

  12. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  13. Pneumatic Variable Series Elastic Actuator.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Wu, Molei; Shen, Xiangrong

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by human motor control theory, stiffness control is highly effective in manipulation and human-interactive tasks. The implementation of stiffness control in robotic systems, however, has largely been limited to closed-loop control, and suffers from multiple issues such as limited frequency range, potential instability, and lack of contribution to energy efficiency. Variable-stiffness actuator represents a better solution, but the current designs are complex, heavy, and bulky. The approach in this paper seeks to address these issues by using pneumatic actuator as a variable series elastic actuator (VSEA), leveraging the compressibility of the working fluid. In this work, a pneumatic actuator is modeled as an elastic element with controllable stiffness and equilibrium point, both of which are functions of air masses in the two chambers. As such, for the implementation of stiffness control in a robotic system, the desired stiffness/equilibrium point can be converted to the desired chamber air masses, and a predictive pressure control approach is developed to control the timing of valve switching to obtain the desired air mass while minimizing control action. Experimental results showed that the new approach in this paper requires less expensive hardware (on-off valve instead of proportional valve), causes less control action in implementation, and provides good control performance by leveraging the inherent dynamics of the actuator.

  14. Pneumatic Variable Series Elastic Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hao; Wu, Molei; Shen, Xiangrong

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by human motor control theory, stiffness control is highly effective in manipulation and human-interactive tasks. The implementation of stiffness control in robotic systems, however, has largely been limited to closed-loop control, and suffers from multiple issues such as limited frequency range, potential instability, and lack of contribution to energy efficiency. Variable-stiffness actuator represents a better solution, but the current designs are complex, heavy, and bulky. The approach in this paper seeks to address these issues by using pneumatic actuator as a variable series elastic actuator (VSEA), leveraging the compressibility of the working fluid. In this work, a pneumatic actuator is modeled as an elastic element with controllable stiffness and equilibrium point, both of which are functions of air masses in the two chambers. As such, for the implementation of stiffness control in a robotic system, the desired stiffness/equilibrium point can be converted to the desired chamber air masses, and a predictive pressure control approach is developed to control the timing of valve switching to obtain the desired air mass while minimizing control action. Experimental results showed that the new approach in this paper requires less expensive hardware (on–off valve instead of proportional valve), causes less control action in implementation, and provides good control performance by leveraging the inherent dynamics of the actuator. PMID:27354755

  15. Development of a continuous spinning process for producing silicon carbide - silicon nitride precursor fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus was designed for the continuous production of silicon carbide - silicon nitride precursor fibers. The precursor polymer can be fiberized, crosslined and pyrolyzed. The product is a metallic black fiber with the composition of the type C sub x Si sub y n sub z. Little, other than the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity, is known of the physical properties.

  16. Micromechanics of composites with shape memory alloy fibers in uniform thermal fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Victor; Saravanos, Dimitris A.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical procedures are developed for a composite system consisting of shape memory alloy fibers within an elastic matrix subject to uniform temperature fluctuations. Micromechanics for the calculation of the equivalent properties of the composite are presented by extending the multi-cell model to incorporate shape memory alloy fibers. A three phase concentric cylinder model is developed for the analysis of local stresses which includes the fiber, the matrix, and the surrounding homogenized composite. The solution addresses the complexities induced by the nonlinear dependence of the in-situ martensite fraction of the fibers to the local stresses and temperature, and the local stresses developed from interactions between the fibers and matrix during the martensitic and reverse phase transformations. Results are presented for a nitinol/epoxy composite. The applications illustrate the response of the composite in isothermal longitudinal loading and unloading, and in temperature induced actuation. The local stresses developed in the composite under various stages of the martensitic and reverse phase transformation are also shown.

  17. Modeling creep behavior of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. L.; Sun, C. T.

    1988-01-01

    A micromechanical model for the creep behavior of fiber composites is developed based on a typical cell consisting of a fiber and the surrounding matrix. The fiber is assumed to be linearly elastic and the matrix nonlinearly viscous. The creep strain rate in the matrix is assumed to be a function of stress. The nominal stress-strain relations are derived in the form of differential equations which are solved numerically for off-axis specimens under uniaxial loading. A potential function and the associated effective stress and effective creep strain rates are introduced to simplify the orthotropic relations.

  18. Albumin fiber scaffolds for engineering functional cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shapira, Assaf; Regev, Omri; Nseir, Nora; Zussman, Eyal; Dvir, Tal

    2014-06-01

    In recent years attempts to engineer contracting cardiac patches were focused on recapitulation of the myocardium extracellular microenvironment. We report here on our work, where for the first time, a three-dimensional cardiac patch was fabricated from albumin fibers. We hypothesized that since albumin fibers' mechanical properties resemble those of cardiac tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) and their biochemical character enables their use as protein carriers, they can support the assembly of cardiac tissues capable of generating strong contraction forces. Here, we have fabricated aligned and randomly oriented electrospun albumin fibers and investigated their structure, mechanical properties, and chemical nature. Our measurements showed that the scaffolds have improved elasticity as compared to synthetic electrospun PCL fibers, and that they are capable of adsorbing serum proteins, such as laminin leading to strong cell-matrix interactions. Moreover, due to the functional groups on their backbone, the fibers can be chemically modified with essential biomolecules. When seeded with rat neonatal cardiac cells the engineered scaffolds induced the assembly of aligned cardiac tissues with high aspect ratio cardiomyocytes and massive actinin striation. Compared to synthetic fibrous scaffolds, cardiac cells cultured within aligned or randomly oriented scaffolds formed functional tissues, exhibiting significantly improved function already on Day 3, including higher beating rate (P = 0.0002 and P < 0.0001, respectively), and higher contraction amplitude (P = 0.009 and P = 0.003, respectively). Collectively, our results suggest that albumin electrospun scaffolds can play a key role in contributing to the ex vivo formation of a contracting cardiac muscle tissue. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Stiffness, working stroke, and force of single-myosin molecules in skeletal muscle: elucidation of these mechanical properties via nonlinear elasticity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Motoshi; Higuchi, Hideo

    2013-11-01

    In muscles, the arrays of skeletal myosin molecules interact with actin filaments and continuously generate force at various contraction speeds. Therefore, it is crucial for myosin molecules to generate force collectively and minimize the interference between individual myosin molecules. Knowledge of the elasticity of myosin molecules is crucial for understanding the molecular mechanisms of muscle contractions because elasticity directly affects the working and drag (resistance) force generation when myosin molecules are positively or negatively strained. The working stroke distance is also an important mechanical property necessary for elucidation of the thermodynamic efficiency of muscle contractions at the molecular level. In this review, we focus on these mechanical properties obtained from single-fiber and single-molecule studies and discuss recent findings associated with these mechanical properties. We also discuss the potential molecular mechanisms associated with reduction of the drag effect caused by negatively strained myosin molecules.

  20. Measuring shear modulus of individual fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behlow, Herbert; Saini, Deepika; Oliviera, Luciana; Skove, Malcolm; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Fiber technology has advanced to new heights enabling tailored mechanical properties. For reliable fiber applications their mechanical properties must be well characterized at the individual fiber level. Unlike the tensile modulus, which can be well studied in a single fiber, the present indirect and dynamic methods of measuring the shear properties of fibers suffer from various disadvantages such as the interaction between fibers and the influence of damping. In this talk, we introduce a quasi-static method to directly measure the shear modulus of a single micron-sized fiber. Our simple and inexpensive setup yields a shear modulus of 16 and 2 GPa for a single IM7 carbon fiber and a Kevlar fiber, respectively. Furthermore, our setup is also capable of measuring the creep, hysteresis and the torsion coefficient, and examples of these will be presented.

  1. Construction of Reference Data for Tissue Characterization of Arterial Wall Based on Elasticity Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Jun; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi; Ichiki, Masataka; Tezuka, Fumiaki

    2005-06-01

    Previously, we developed the phased tracking method [H. Kanai et al.: IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 43 (1996) 791] for measuring the minute change in thickness during one heartbeat and the elasticity of the arterial wall. By comparing pathological images with elasticity images measured with ultrasound, elasticity distributions for respective tissues in the arterial wall were determined. We have already measured the elasticity distributions for lipids and fibrous tissues (mixtures of smooth-muscle and collagen fiber) [H. Kanai et al.: Circulation 107 (2003) 3018]. In this study, elasticity distributions were measured for blood clots and calcified tissues. We discuss whether these elasticity distributions, which were measuerd in vitro, can be used as reference data for classifying cross-sectional elasticity images measured in vivo into respective tissues. In addition to the measurement of elasticity distributions, correlations between collagen content and elasticity were investigated with respect to fibrous tissue to estimate the collagen and smooth-muscle content based on elasticity. Collagen and smooth-muscle content may be important factors in determining the stability of the fibrous cap of atherosclerotic plaque. Therefore, correlations between elasticity and elements of the tissue in the arterial wall may provide useful information for the noninvasive diagnosis of plaque vulnerability.

  2. Autoclave processing for composite material fabrication. 1: An analysis of resin flows and fiber compactions for thin laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    High quality long fiber reinforced composites, such as those used in aerospace and industrial applications, are commonly processed in autoclaves. An adequate resin flow model for the entire system (laminate/bleeder/breather), which provides a description of the time-dependent laminate consolidation process, is useful in predicting the loss of resin, heat transfer characteristics, fiber volume fraction and part dimension, etc., under a specified set of processing conditions. This could be accomplished by properly analyzing the flow patterns and pressure profiles inside the laminate during processing. A newly formulated resin flow model for composite prepreg lamination process is reported. This model considers viscous resin flows in both directions perpendicular and parallel to the composite plane. In the horizontal direction, a squeezing flow between two nonporous parallel plates is analyzed, while in the vertical direction, a poiseuille type pressure flow through porous media is assumed. Proper force and mass balances have been made and solved for the whole system. The effects of fiber-fiber interactions during lamination are included as well. The unique features of this analysis are: (1) the pressure gradient inside the laminate is assumed to be generated from squeezing action between two adjacent approaching fiber layers, and (2) the behavior of fiber bundles is simulated by a Finitely Extendable Nonlinear Elastic (FENE) spring.

  3. Interaction of Elastic Waves with Corrosion Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Joachim Schneider -Gloetzl, Gloetzl GmbH, Rheinstetten, Germany Rainer Gloetzl, RG Research, Ettlingen, Germany...Katerina Krebber, Sascha Liehr, Mario Wendt, Aleksander Wosniok, BAM, Federal Institute for Materials, Research and Testing, Berlin, Germany

  4. Uncertainty quantification of fiber orientation distribution measurements for long-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bhisham N.; Naragani, Diwakar; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    Here, we present a detailed methodology for experimental measurement of fiber orientation distribution in injection-molded discontinuous fiber composites using the method of ellipses on two-dimensional cross sections. Best practices to avoid biases occurring during surface preparation and optical imaging of carbon-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics are discussed. We developed a marker-based watershed transform routine for efficient image segmentation and the separation of touching fiber ellipses. The sensitivity of the averaged orientation tensor to the image sample size is studied for the case of long-fiber thermoplastics. A Mori–Tanaka implementation of the Eshelby model is then employed to quantify the sensitivity of elastic stiffness predictionsmore » to biases in the fiber orientation distribution measurements.« less

  5. Uncertainty quantification of fiber orientation distribution measurements for long-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, Bhisham N.; Naragani, Diwakar; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; ...

    2017-09-28

    Here, we present a detailed methodology for experimental measurement of fiber orientation distribution in injection-molded discontinuous fiber composites using the method of ellipses on two-dimensional cross sections. Best practices to avoid biases occurring during surface preparation and optical imaging of carbon-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics are discussed. We developed a marker-based watershed transform routine for efficient image segmentation and the separation of touching fiber ellipses. The sensitivity of the averaged orientation tensor to the image sample size is studied for the case of long-fiber thermoplastics. A Mori–Tanaka implementation of the Eshelby model is then employed to quantify the sensitivity of elastic stiffness predictionsmore » to biases in the fiber orientation distribution measurements.« less

  6. The Elasticity of Preferences.

    PubMed

    Simon, Dan; Spiller, Stephen A

    2016-12-01

    We explore how preferences for attributes are constructed when people choose between multiattribute options. As found in prior research, we observed that while people make decisions, their preferences for the attributes in question shift to support the emerging choice, thus enabling confident decisions. The novelty of the studies reported here is that participants repeated the same task 6 to 8 weeks later. We found that between tasks, preferences returned to near their original levels, only to shift again to support the second choice, regardless of which choice participants made. Similar patterns were observed in a free-choice task (Study 1) and when the favorableness of options was manipulated (Study 2). It follows that preferences behave in an elastic manner: In the absence of situational pressures, they rest at baseline levels, but during the process of reaching a decision, they morph to support the chosen options. This elasticity appears to facilitate confident decision making in the face of decisional conflict.

  7. Elastic plate spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oline, L.; Medaglia, J.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic finite element method was used to investigate elastic stress waves in a plate. Strain displacement and stress strain relations are discussed along with the stiffness and mass matrix. The results of studying point load, and distributed load over small, intermediate, and large radii are reported. The derivation of finite element matrices, and the derivation of lumped and consistent matrices for one dimensional problems with Laplace transfer solutions are included. The computer program JMMSPALL is also included.

  8. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Morioka, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato

    2015-05-01

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffrey's equation a diffusive type of term by introducing a phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29th International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160α, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated.

  9. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Morioka, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffrey’s equation a diffusive type of term by introducing amore » phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29{sup th} International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160α, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated.« less

  10. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  11. Anomalous elasticity, fluctuations and disorder in elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by freely suspended graphene and polymerized membranes in soft and biological matter we present a detailed study of a tensionless elastic sheet in the presence of thermal fluctuations and quenched disorder. The manuscript is based on an extensive draft dating back to 1993, that was circulated privately. It presents the general theoretical framework and calculational details of numerous results, partial forms of which have been published in brief Letters (Le Doussal and Radzihovsky, 1992; 1993). The experimental realization atom-thin graphene sheets (Novoselov et al., 2004) have driven a resurgence in this fascinating subject, making our dated predictions and their detailed derivations timely. To this end we analyze the statistical mechanics of a generalized D-dimensional elastic "membrane" embedded in d dimensions using a self-consistent screening approximation (SCSA), that has proved to be unprecedentedly accurate in this system, exact in three complementary limits: (i) d → ∞, (ii) D → 4, and (iii) D = d. Focusing on the critical "flat" phase, for a homogeneous two-dimensional (D = 2) membrane embedded in three dimensions (d = 3), we predict its universal roughness exponent ζ = 0 . 590, length-scale dependent elastic moduli exponents η = 0 . 821 and ηu = 0 . 358, and an anomalous Poisson ratio, σ = - 1 / 3. In the presence of random uncorrelated heterogeneity the membrane exhibits a glassy wrinkled ground state, characterized by ζ‧ = 0 . 775 ,η‧ = 0 . 449, ηu‧ = 1 . 101 and a Poisson ratio σ‧ = - 1 / 3. Motivated by a number of physical realizations (charged impurities, disclinations and dislocations) we also study power-law correlated quenched disorder that leads to a variety of distinct glassy wrinkled phases. Finally, neglecting self-avoiding interaction we demonstrate that at high temperature a "phantom" sheet undergoes a continuous crumpling transition, characterized by a radius of gyration exponent, ν = 0 . 732 and η = 0

  12. Asymptotic quantum elastic generalized Lorenz Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, G.

    2006-10-01

    The (electromagnetic) generalized Lorenz-Mie theory describes the interaction between an electromagnetic arbitrary shaped beam and a homogeneous sphere. It is a generalization of the Lorenz-Mie theory which deals with the simpler case of a plane-wave illumination. In a recent paper, we established that, if we restrict ourselves to the study of cross-sections, both for elastic and inelastic scatterings, a macroscopic sphere in Lorenz-Mie theory is formally equivalent to a quantum-like radial potential. To generalize this result, a prerequisite is to possess an asymptotic quantum generalized Lorenz-Mie theory expressing cross-sections in the case of a quantum radial potential interacting with a sub-class of quantum arbitrary wave-packets. Such a theory, restricted however to elastic scattering, is presented in this paper.

  13. Richtmyer-Meshkov flow in elastic solids.

    PubMed

    Piriz, A R; López Cela, J J; Tahir, N A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2006-09-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov flow is studied by means of an analytical model which describes the asymptotic oscillations of a corrugated interface between two perfectly elastic solids after the interaction with a shock wave. The model shows that the flow stability is due to the restoring effect of the elastic force. It provides a simple approximate but still very accurate formula for the oscillation period. It also shows that as it is observed in numerical simulations, the amplitude oscillates around a mean value equal to the post-shock amplitude, and that this is a consequence of the stress free conditions of the material immediately after the shock interaction. Extensive numerical simulations are presented to validate the model results.

  14. Relative sliding durability of candidate high temperature fiber seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    The relative sliding durability behavior of six candidate ceramic fibers for high temperature sliding seal applications is reviewed and compared. Pin on disk tests were used to evaluate potential seal materials by sliding a tow or bundle of the candidate ceramic fiber against a superalloy test disk. Tests were conducted in air under a 2.65 N load, at a sliding velocity of 0.025 m/sec and at temperatures from 25 to 900 C. Friction was measured during the tests and fiber wear, indicated by the extent of fibers broken in the tow or bundle, was measured at the end of each test. For most of the fibers, friction and wear increase with test temperature. The relative fiber durability ranking correlates with tensile strength, indicating that tensile data, which is more readily available than sliding durability data, may be useful in predicting fiber wear behavior under various conditions. A dimensional analysis of the wear data shows that the fiber durability is related to a dimensionless durability ratio which represents the ratio of the fiber strength to the fiber stresses imposed by sliding. The analysis is applicable to fibers with similar diameters and elastic moduli. Based upon the results of the research program, three fiber candidates are recommended for further study as potential seal materials. They are a silicon based complex carbide-oxide fiber, an alumina-boria-silica and an aluminosilicate fiber.

  15. Mechanical Characterization of Electrospun Nanocomposite Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsmairat, Ohood

    Electrospinning is considered one of the most efficient techniques used for producing fibers in the nanometer to micrometer ranges. The mechanical properties of the electrospun fibers depend on the solution used to produce them. The present study focuses on dissolving the PolyMethalylmethacrylate (PMMA) in acetone solvent. A concentration of 23% PMMA was found to be the best concentration for producing smooth fibers with almost no beads. We studied the effect of mixing the PMMA with two types of nanotubes on the mechanical properties of the fibers. A Carbon-Nano-Tubes (CNT) and Boron-Nitride-Nano-Tubes were mixed with PMMA solution at different ratios to produce a CNT/PMMA and BNNT/PMMA solutions with different concentrations of 0.1%, 0.25%, and 0.6%. Electrospinning technique was used to produce fibers from the PMMA, CNT/PMMA, and BNNT/PMMA solutions. All fibers were tested experimentally with a micro-tensile-tester to produce stress-strain curves that were used to extract the average modulus of elasticity, maximum strength, and fracture point for each fiber. Enhancements in the Youngs modulus and maximum tensile strength of the fibers were observed with the addition of CNTs. Further enhancements were observed with the addition of BNNTs. A random sample of 0.6% CNT/PMMA fibers was tested with Raman spectrometer and the results show a linear change in the frequency-strain curve.

  16. Buckling Modes of Structural Elements of Off-Axis Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Polyakova, N. V.; Kholmogorov, S. A.; Shishov, M. A.

    2018-05-01

    The structures of two types of unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites — with an ELUR-P carbon fiber tape, an XT-118 cold-cure binder with an HSE 180 REM prepreg, and a hot-cure binder — were investigated. The diameters of fibers and fiber bundles (threads) of both the types of composites were measured, and their mutual arrangement was examined both in the semifinished products (in the uncured state) and in the finished composites. The defects characteristic of both the types of binder and manufacturing technique were detected in the cured composites. Based on an analysis of the results obtained, linearized problems on the internal multiscale buckling modes of an individual fiber (with and without account of its interaction with the surrounding matrix) or of a fiber bundle are formulated. In the initial atate, these structural elements of the fibrous composites are in a subcritical (unperturbed) state under the action of shear stresses and tension (compression) in the transverse direction. Such an initial stress state is formed in them in tension and compression tests on flat specimens made of off-axis-reinforced composites with straight fibers. To formulate the problems, the equations derived earlier from a consistent variant of geometrically nonlinear equations of elasticity theory by reducing them to the one-dimensional equations of the theory of straight rods on the basis of a refined Timoshenko shear model with account of tensile-compressive strains in the transverse direction are used. It is shown that, in loading test specimens, a continuous rearrangement of composite structure can occur due to the realization and continuous change of internal buckling modes as the wave-formation parameter varies continuously, which apparently explain the decrease revealed in the tangential shear modulus of the fibrous composites with increasing shear strains.

  17. Dark-dark solitons for a coupled variable-coefficient higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger system in an inhomogeneous optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Zhen; Tian, Bo; Qu, Qi-Xing; Chai, Han-Peng; Liu, Lei; Du, Zhong

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, under investigation is a coupled variable-coefficient higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger system, which describes the simultaneous propagation of optical pulses in an inhomogeneous optical fiber. Based on the Lax pair and binary Darboux transformation, we present the nondegenerate N-dark-dark soliton solutions. With the graphical simulation, soliton propagation and interaction are discussed with the group velocity dispersion and fourth-order dispersion effects, which affect the velocity but have no effect on the amplitude. Linear, parabolic and periodic one dark-dark solitons are displayed. Interactions between the two solitons are presented as well, which are all elastic.

  18. Numerical Analysis of the Elastic Properties of 3D Needled Carbon/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y.; Yan, Y.; Li, X.; Guo, F.

    2017-09-01

    Based on the observation of microstructures of 3D needled carbon/carbon (C/C) composites, a model of their representative volume element (RVE) considering the true distribution of fibers is established. Using the theories of mesoscopic mechanics and introducing periodic boundary conditions for displacements, their elastic properties, with account of porosity, are determined by finite-element methods. Quasi-static tensile tests were carried out, and the numerical predictions were found to be in good agreement with test results. This means that the RVE model of 3D needled C/C composites can predict their elastic properties efficiently. The effects of needling density, radius of needled fibers, and thickness ratio of a short-cut fiber web and a weftless ply on the elastic constants of the composites are analyzed.

  19. Optimization of mechanical strength of titania fibers fabricated by direct drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanschmidt, Kelli; Tätte, Tanel; Hussainova, Irina; Part, Marko; Mändar, Hugo; Roosalu, Kaspar; Chasiotis, Ioannis

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructured polycrystalline titania (TiO2) microfibers were produced by direct drawing from visco-elastic alkoxide precursors. The fiber crystallinity and grain size were shown to depend on post-treatment calcination temperature. Tensile tests with individual fibers showed strong sensitivity of the elastic modulus and the tensile strength to microstructural details of the fibers. The elastic modulus of as-fabricated fibers increased about 10 times after calcination at 700 ∘C, while the strain at failure remained almost the same at ˜1.4 %. The highest tensile strength of more than 800 MPa was exhibited by nanoscale grained fibers with a bimodal grain size distribution consisting of rutile grains embedded into an anatase matrix. This structure is believed to have reduced the critical defect size, and thus increased the tensile strength. The resultant fibers showed properties that were appropriate for reinforcement of different matrixes.

  20. Form finding in elastic gridshells.

    PubMed

    Baek, Changyeob; Sageman-Furnas, Andrew O; Jawed, Mohammad K; Reis, Pedro M

    2018-01-02

    Elastic gridshells comprise an initially planar network of elastic rods that are actuated into a shell-like structure by loading their extremities. The resulting actuated form derives from the elastic buckling of the rods subjected to inextensibility. We study elastic gridshells with a focus on the rational design of the final shapes. Our precision desktop experiments exhibit complex geometries, even from seemingly simple initial configurations and actuation processes. The numerical simulations capture this nonintuitive behavior with excellent quantitative agreement, allowing for an exploration of parameter space that reveals multistable states. We then turn to the theory of smooth Chebyshev nets to address the inverse design of hemispherical elastic gridshells. The results suggest that rod inextensibility, not elastic response, dictates the zeroth-order shape of an actuated elastic gridshell. As it turns out, this is the shape of a common household strainer. Therefore, the geometry of Chebyshev nets can be further used to understand elastic gridshells. In particular, we introduce a way to quantify the intrinsic shape of the empty, but enclosed regions, which we then use to rationalize the nonlocal deformation of elastic gridshells to point loading. This justifies the observed difficulty in form finding. Nevertheless, we close with an exploration of concatenating multiple elastic gridshell building blocks.

  1. Form finding in elastic gridshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Changyeob; Sageman-Furnas, Andrew O.; Jawed, Mohammad K.; Reis, Pedro M.

    2018-01-01

    Elastic gridshells comprise an initially planar network of elastic rods that are actuated into a shell-like structure by loading their extremities. The resulting actuated form derives from the elastic buckling of the rods subjected to inextensibility. We study elastic gridshells with a focus on the rational design of the final shapes. Our precision desktop experiments exhibit complex geometries, even from seemingly simple initial configurations and actuation processes. The numerical simulations capture this nonintuitive behavior with excellent quantitative agreement, allowing for an exploration of parameter space that reveals multistable states. We then turn to the theory of smooth Chebyshev nets to address the inverse design of hemispherical elastic gridshells. The results suggest that rod inextensibility, not elastic response, dictates the zeroth-order shape of an actuated elastic gridshell. As it turns out, this is the shape of a common household strainer. Therefore, the geometry of Chebyshev nets can be further used to understand elastic gridshells. In particular, we introduce a way to quantify the intrinsic shape of the empty, but enclosed regions, which we then use to rationalize the nonlocal deformation of elastic gridshells to point loading. This justifies the observed difficulty in form finding. Nevertheless, we close with an exploration of concatenating multiple elastic gridshell building blocks.

  2. Mutation of the myosin converter domain alters cross-bridge elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Jan; Winkler, Gerhard; Schulte, Imke; Scholz, Tim; McKenna, William; Brenner, Bernhard; Kraft, Theresia

    2002-01-01

    Elastic distortion of a structural element of the actomyosin complex is fundamental to the ability of myosin to generate motile forces. An elastic element allows strain to develop within the actomyosin complex (cross-bridge) before movement. Relief of this strain then drives filament sliding, or more generally, movement of a cargo. Even with the known crystal structure of the myosin head, however, the structural element of the actomyosin complex in which elastic distortion occurs remained unclear. To assign functional relevance to various structural elements of the myosin head, e.g., to identify the elastic element within the cross-bridge, we studied mechanical properties of muscle fibers from patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with point mutations in the head domain of the β-myosin heavy chain. We found that the Arg-719 → Trp (Arg719Trp) mutation, which is located in the converter domain of the myosin head fragment, causes an increase in force generation and fiber stiffness under isometric conditions by 48–59%. Under rigor and relaxing conditions, fiber stiffness was 45–47% higher than in control fibers. Yet, kinetics of active cross-bridge cycling were unchanged. These findings, especially the increase in fiber stiffness under rigor conditions, indicate that cross-bridges with the Arg719Trp mutation are more resistant to elastic distortion. The data presented here strongly suggest that the converter domain that forms the junction between the catalytic and the light-chain-binding domain of the myosin head is not only essential for elastic distortion of the cross-bridge, but that the main elastic distortion may even occur within the converter domain itself. PMID:11904418

  3. The multiple V-shaped double peeling of elastic thin films from elastic soft substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menga, N.; Afferrante, L.; Pugno, N. M.; Carbone, G.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a periodic configuration of V-shaped double peeling process is investigated. Specifically, an elastic thin film is detached from a soft elastic material by applying multiple concentrated loads periodically distributed with spatial periodicity λ. The original Kendall's idea is extended to take into account the change in elastic energy occurring in the substrate when the detachment fronts propagate. The symmetric configuration typical of a V-peeling process causes the energy release rate to be sensitive to variations of the elastic energy stored in the soft substrate. This results in an enhancement of the adhesion strength because part of the external work required to trigger the peeling mechanism is converted in substrate elastic energy. A key role is played by both spatial periodicity λ and elasticity ratio E/Eh, between tape and substrate elastic moduli, in determining the conditions of stable adhesion. Indeed, the presence of multiple peeling fronts determines a modification of the mechanism of interaction, because deformations close to each peeling front are also affected by the stresses related to the other fronts. Results show that the energy release rate depends on the detached length of the tape so that conditions can be established which lead to an increase of the supported load compared to the classical peeling on rigid substrates. Finally, we also find that for any given value of the load per unit length, an optimum value of the wavelength λ exists that maximizes the tolerance of the system, before unstable propagation of the peeling front can occur.

  4. An analytical solution for the elastoplastic response of a continuous fiber composite under uniaxial loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Allen, David H.

    1990-01-01

    A continuous fiber composite is modelled by a two-element composite cylinder in order to predict the elastoplastic response of the composite under a monotonically increasing tensile loading parallel to fibers. The fibers and matrix are assumed to be elastic-perfectly plastic materials obeying Hill's and Tresca's yield criteria, respectively. Here, the composite behavior when the fibers yield prior to the matrix is investigated.

  5. Fireblocking Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    PBI was originally developed for space suits. In 1980, the need for an alternative to asbestos and stricter government anti-pollution standards led to commercialization of the fire blocking fiber. PBI is used for auto racing driver suits and aircraft seat covers. The fiber does not burn in air, is durable and easily maintained. It has been specified by a number of airliners and is manufactured by Hoechst-Celanese Corporation.

  6. Fiber Optics,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-04

    effectiveness of new ships and ship systems. The basis of this new technology is the optical fiber, a thin, flex- ible glass or plastic waveguide through...His photophone used unguiled modulated sunlight to transmit speech about 700 feet (213 m). In 1910, researchers performed theoretical investigations...somewhat more con- troversial use of optical fibers in terms of cost effectiveness is in LANs, or as we sometimes call them in the Navy, "data transfer

  7. Measurement of the elastic modulus of a multi-wall boron nitride nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Nasreen G.; Zettl, A.

    1998-02-01

    We have experimentally determined the elastic properties of an individual multi-wall boron nitride (BN) nanotube. From the thermal vibration amplitude of a cantilevered BN nanotube observed in a transmission electron microscope, we find the axial Young's modulus to be 1.22 ± 0.24 TPa, a value consistent with theoretical estimates. The observed Young's modulus exceeds that of all other known insulating fibers. Our elasticity results confirm that BN nanotubes are highly crystalline with very few defects.

  8. The interactive effects of high-fat, high-fiber diets and ractopamine HCl on finishing pig growth performance, carcass characteristics, and carcass fat quality.

    PubMed

    Graham, A B; Goodband, R D; Tokach, M D; Dritz, S S; DeRouchey, J M; Nitikanchana, S

    2014-10-01

    A total of 576 mixed-sex pigs (PIC 327 × 1,050; initial BW = 55.8 ± 5.5 kg) were used to determine the effects of corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) and wheat middlings (midds) withdrawal 24 d before harvest in diets without or with ractopamine HCl (RAC) on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and carcass fat quality. From d 0 to 49, pigs were fed a corn-soybean meal-based diet (CS) or a diet high in unsaturated fat and crude fiber provided by 30% DDGS and 19% wheat midds (HFF) and not balanced for energy. On d 49, pens of pigs previously fed CS diets remained on the CS diet. Half of the HFF-fed pigs were switched to the CS-based diets, which served as the withdrawal regimen. Finally, half of the HFF-fed pigs remained on the same HFF diet. All 3 regimens were fed without or with 10 mg/kg RAC. There were 12 pens per treatment with 8 pigs per pen. No significant diet regimen × RAC interactions were observed. From d 0 to 49, pigs fed the CS diet had increased (P < 0.001) ADG and G:F compared with pigs fed the HFF diet. Overall (d 0 to 73), pigs fed the CS diets throughout had greater (P < 0.001) ADG and G:F than those fed the HFF diets throughout. Pigs fed the withdrawal diets had greater (P = 0.014) ADG, but similar G:F to those fed the HFF diets throughout. Pigs fed the CS diets throughout had greater (P = 0.025) carcass yield compared with pigs fed the HFF diets throughout, with those fed the withdrawal diets intermediate. Pigs fed RAC had greater (P < 0.001) ADG, G:F, and carcass yield (P = 0.061 than pigs not fed RAC. Jowl, backfat, belly, and leaf fat iodine value (IV) were lowest (P < 0.001) for pigs fed the CS diets, highest (P < 0.015) for those fed HFF diets throughout, and intermediate for pigs fed the withdrawal diet. There were no differences in either full or rinsed intestine or organ weights between pigs that were fed CS diets throughout and pigs fed the withdrawal diet; however, pigs fed the HFF diets throughout the study had

  9. Transverse mode instability of fiber oscillators in comparison with fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejaz, Kamran; Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Azizi, Saeed; Abedinajafi, Ali; Roohforouz, Ali; Rezaei-Nasirabad, Reza; Vatani, Vahid

    2018-05-01

    Transverse mode instability (TMI) is experimentally investigated in a fiber oscillator and a fiber amplifier. For a reasonable comparison of TMI in these two configurations, the same optical components and design parameters are applied to both. Our experimental results show that the TMI power threshold in a fiber oscillator is lower than in a corresponding fiber amplifier. By using simulation software, a fiber oscillator and an amplifier are designed with similar characteristics, to provide identical conditions for all effective parameters on TMI in both of them. Since the signal propagation in fiber oscillators is different from that of single-pass fiber amplifiers, and also since both forward and backward propagating signals in fiber oscillators can generate thermo-optic index gratings, the observed lower TMI threshold in the fiber oscillator is due to its different interaction of light with index gratings.

  10. Saturated fat supplementation interacts with dietary forage neutral detergent fiber content during the immediate postpartum and carryover periods in Holstein cows: Production responses and digestibility of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Piantoni, P; Lock, A L; Allen, M S

    2015-05-01

    Forty-eight multiparous cows were used in a randomized complete block design experiment with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments to determine the interaction between a highly saturated free FA supplement (SFFA) and dietary forage neutral detergent fiber (fNDF) content on production responses and nutrient digestibility of dairy cows in the postpartum period. Treatment diets were offered from 1 to 29d postpartum (postpartum period; PP) and contained 20 or 26% fNDF (50:50 corn silage:alfalfa silage and hay, dry matter basis) and 0 or 2% SFFA [Energy Booster 100 (Milk Specialties Global, Eden Prairie, MN); 96.1% FA: 46.2% C18:0 and 37.0% C16:0]. From 30 to 71d postpartum (carryover period), a common diet (~23% fNDF, 0% SFFA) was offered to all cows to evaluate carryover effects of the treatment diets early in lactation. During the PP, higher fNDF decreased dry matter intake (DMI) by 2.0 kg/d, whereas SFFA supplementation increased it by 1.4kg/d. In addition, high fNDF with 0% SFFA decreased DMI compared with the other diets and this difference increased throughout the PP. Treatments did not affect 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield during the PP but did during the carryover period when SFFA supplementation decreased 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield for the low-fNDF diet (51.1 vs. 58.7kg/d), but not for the high-fNDF diet (58.5 vs. 58.0kg/d). During the PP, lower fNDF and SFFA supplementation decreased body condition score loss. A tendency for an interaction between fNDF and SFFA indicated that low fNDF with 2% SFFA decreased body condition score loss compared with the other diets (-0.49 vs. -0.89). During the PP, lower fNDF and 2% SFFA supplementation decreased feed efficiency (3.5% fat-corrected milk/DMI) by 0.30 and 0.23 units, respectively. The low-fNDF diet with 2% SFFA decreased feed efficiency compared with other diets early in the PP, but this difference decreased over time. Supplementation of SFFA in the PP favored energy partitioning to body reserves and

  11. Transverse thermal expansion of carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmer, J. F.; Diefendorf, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal expansion coefficients and moduli of elasticity have been determined experimentally for a series of epoxy-matrix composites reinforced with carbon and Kevlar fibers. It is found that in the transverse direction the difference between the properties of the fiber and the matrix is not as pronounced as in the longitudinal direction, where the composite properties are fiber-dominated. Therefore, the pattern of fiber packing tends to affect transverse composite properties. The transverse properties of the composites tested are examined from the standpoint of the concept of homogeneity defined as the variation of packing (or lack thereof) throughout a sample.

  12. Gene-carbohydrate and gene-fiber interactions and type 2 diabetes in diverse populations from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) as part of the Epidemiologic Architecture for Genes Linked to Environment (EAGLE) study.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Raquel; Goodloe, Robert J; McClellan, Bob E; Boston, Jonathan; Crawford, Dana C

    2014-06-14

    Both environmental and genetic factors impact type 2 diabetes (T2D). To identify such modifiers, we genotyped 15 T2D-associated variants from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 6,414 non-Hispanic whites, 3,073 non-Hispanic blacks, and 3,633 Mexican American participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) and evaluated interactions between these variants and carbohydrate intake and fiber intake. We calculated a genetic risk score (GRS) with the 15 SNPs. The odds ratio for T2D with each GRS point was 1.10 (95% CI: 1.05-1.14) for non-Hispanic whites, 1.07 (95% CI: 1.02-1.13) for non-Hispanic blacks, and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.06-1.17) for Mexican Americans. We identified two gene-carbohydrate interactions (P < 0.05) in non-Hispanic whites (with CDKAL1 rs471253 and FTO rs8050136), two in non-Hispanic blacks (with IGFBP2 rs4402960 and THADA rs7578597), and two in Mexican Americans (with NOTCH2 rs1092398 and TSPAN8-LGRS rs7961581). We found three gene-fiber interactions in non-Hispanic whites (with ADAMT59 rs4607103, CDKN2A/2B rs1801282, and FTO rs8050136), two in non-Hispanic blacks (with ADAMT59 rs4607103 and THADA rs7578597), and two in Mexican Americans (with THADA rs7578597 and TSPAN8-LGRS rs796158) at the P < 0.05 level. Interactions between the GRS and nutrients failed to reach significance in all the racial/ethnic groups. Our results suggest that dietary carbohydrates and fiber may modify T2D-associated variants, highlighting the importance of dietary nutrients in predicting T2D risk.

  13. Unravel the key genes potentially related to high strength of cotton fiber by comparative phenotypic and genomic analyses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The demand of high strength of cotton fibers has been increased dramatically with the advent of modern high speed spinning technology for producing yarn. Bundle fiber strength is affected by fiber-to-fiber interactions in addition to the individual fiber strength. The bundle fiber strength is not al...

  14. Uncertainty quantification of fiber orientation distribution measurements for long-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bhisham N.; Naragani, Diwakar; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    We present a detailed methodology for experimental measurement of fiber orientation distribution (FOD) in injection-molded discontinuous fiber composites using the method of ellipses on 2D cross sections. Best practices to avoid biases occurring during surface preparation and optical imaging of carbon-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics are discussed. A marker-based watershed transform routine for efficient image segmentation and the separation of touching fiber ellipses is developed. The sensitivity of the averaged orientation tensor to the image sample size is studied for the case of long-fiber thermoplastics. A Mori-Tanaka implementation of the Eshelby model is then employed to quantify the sensitivity of elastic stiffness predictionsmore » to biases in the FOD measurements.« less

  15. Aging Enhances Indirect Flight Muscle Fiber Performance yet Decreases Flight Ability in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mark S.; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Braddock, Joan M.

    2008-10-02

    We investigated the effects of aging on Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle from the whole organism to the actomyosin cross-bridge. Median-aged (49-day-old) flies were flight impaired, had normal myofilament number and packing, barely longer sarcomeres, and slight mitochondrial deterioration compared with young (3-day-old) flies. Old (56-day-old) flies were unable to beat their wings, had deteriorated ultrastructure with severe mitochondrial damage, and their skinned fibers failed to activate with calcium. Small-amplitude sinusoidal length perturbation analysis showed median-aged indirect flight muscle fibers developed greater than twice the isometric force and power output of young fibers, yet cross-bridge kinetics were similar. Large increasesmore » in elastic and viscous moduli amplitude under active, passive, and rigor conditions suggest that median-aged fibers become stiffer longitudinally. Small-angle x-ray diffraction indicates that myosin heads move increasingly toward the thin filament with age, accounting for the increased transverse stiffness via cross-bridge formation. We propose that the observed protein composition changes in the connecting filaments, which anchor the thick filaments to the Z-disk, produce compensatory increases in longitudinal stiffness, isometric tension, power and actomyosin interaction in aging indirect flight muscle. We also speculate that a lack of MgATP due to damaged mitochondria accounts for the decreased flight performance.« less

  16. Mechanical critical phenomena and the elastic response of fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackintosh, Fred

    The mechanics of cells and tissues are largely governed by scaffolds of filamentous proteins that make up the cytoskeleton, as well as extracellular matrices. Evidence is emerging that such networks can exhibit rich mechanical phase behavior. A classic example of a mechanical phase transition was identified by Maxwell for macroscopic engineering structures: networks of struts or springs exhibit a continuous, second-order phase transition at the isostatic point, where the number of constraints imposed by connectivity just equals the number of mechanical degrees of freedom. We present recent theoretical predictions and experimental evidence for mechanical phase transitions in in both synthetic and biopolymer networks. We show, in particular, excellent quantitative agreement between the mechanics of collagen matrices and the predictions of a strain-controlled phase transition in sub-isostatic networks.

  17. Scaling, elasticity, and CLPT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunelle, Eugene J.

    1994-01-01

    The first few viewgraphs describe the general solution properties of linear elasticity theory which are given by the following two statements: (1) for stress B.C. on S(sub sigma) and zero displacement B.C. on S(sub u) the altered displacements u(sub i)(*) and the actual stresses tau(sub ij) are elastically dependent on Poisson's ratio nu alone: thus the actual displacements are given by u(sub i) = mu(exp -1)u(sub i)(*); and (2) for zero stress B.C. on S(sub sigma) and displacement B.C. on S(sub u) the actual displacements u(sub i) and the altered stresses tau(sub ij)(*) are elastically dependent on Poisson's ratio nu alone: thus the actual stresses are given by tau(sub ij) = E tau(sub ij)(*). The remaining viewgraphs describe the minimum parameter formulation of the general classical laminate theory plate problem as follows: The general CLT plate problem is expressed as a 3 x 3 system of differential equations in the displacements u, v, and w. The eighteen (six each) A(sub ij), B(sub ij), and D(sub ij) system coefficients are ply-weighted sums of the transformed reduced stiffnesses (bar-Q(sub ij))(sub k); the (bar-Q(sub ij))(sub k) in turn depend on six reduced stiffnesses (Q(sub ij))(sub k) and the material and geometry properties of the k(sup th) layer. This paper develops a method for redefining the system coefficients, the displacement components (u,v,w), and the position components (x,y) such that a minimum parameter formulation is possible. The pivotal steps in this method are (1) the reduction of (bar-Q(sub ij))(sub k) dependencies to just two constants Q(*) = (Q(12) + 2Q(66))/(Q(11)Q(22))(exp 1/2) and F(*) - (Q(22)/Q(11))(exp 1/2) in terms of ply-independent reference values Q(sub ij); (2) the reduction of the remaining portions of the A, B, and D coefficients to nondimensional ply-weighted sums (with 0 to 1 ranges) that are independent of Q(*) and F(*); and (3) the introduction of simple coordinate stretchings for u, v, w and x,y such that the process is

  18. Gaseous Viscous Peeling of Linearly Elastic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaz, Shai; Jacob, Hila; Gat, Amir

    2017-11-01

    We study pressure-driven propagation of gas into a micron-scale gap between two linearly elastic substrates. Applying the lubrication approximation, the governing nonlinear evolution equation describes the interaction between elasticity and viscosity, as well as weak rarefaction and low-Mach-number compressibility, characteristic to gaseous microflows. Several physical limits allow simplification of the evolution equation and enable solution by self-similarity. During the peeling process the flow-field transitions between the different limits and the respective approximate solutions. The sequence of limits occurring during the propagation dynamics can be related to the thickness of the prewetting layer of the configuration at rest, yielding an approximate description of the entire peeling dynamics. The results are validated by numerical solutions of the evolution equation. Israel Science Foundation 818/13.

  19. Fiber reinforced hybrid phenolic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Amit

    Hybrid composites in recent times have been developed by using more than one type of fiber reinforcement to bestow synergistic properties of the chosen filler and matrix and also facilitating the design of materials with specific properties matched to end use. However, the studies for hybrid foams have been very limited because of problems related to fiber dispersion in matrix, non uniform mixing due to presence of more than one filler and partially cured foams. An effective approach to synthesize hybrid phenolic foam has been proposed and investigated here. Hybrid composite phenolic foams were reinforced with chopped glass and aramid fibers in varied proportions. On assessing mechanical properties in compression and shear several interesting facts surfaced but overall hybrid phenolic foams exhibited a more graceful failure, greater resistance to cracking and were significantly stiffer and stronger than foams with only glass and aramid fibers. The optimum fiber ratio for the reinforced hybrid phenolic foam system was found to be 1:1 ratio of glass to aramid fibers. Also, the properties of hybrid foam were found to deviate from rule of mixture (ROM) and thus the existing theories of fiber reinforcement fell short in explaining their complex behavior. In an attempt to describe and predict mechanical behavior of hybrid foams a statistical design tool using analysis of variance technique was employed. The utilization of a statistical model for predicting foam properties was found to be an appropriate tool that affords a global perspective of the influence of process variables such as fiber weight fraction, fiber length etc. on foam properties (elastic modulus and strength). Similar approach could be extended to study other fiber composite foam systems such as polyurethane, epoxy etc. and doing so will reduce the number of experimental iterations needed to optimize foam properties and identify critical process variables. Diffusivity, accelerated aging and flammability

  20. Fiber inhalability and head deposition in rats and humans.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to their dimensions and long durability, inhaled asbestos fibers clear slowly from lung airways. Retained fibers may injure the epithelium, interact with macrophages, or translocate to the interstitium to result in various respiratory diseases. Therefore, calculations of fibe...

  1. Elastic instabilities in rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gent, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Materials that undergo large elastic deformations can exhibit novel instabilities. Several examples are described: development of an aneurysm on inflating a rubber tube; non-uniform stretching on inflating a spherical balloon; formation of internal cracks in rubber blocks at a critical level of triaxial tension or when supersaturated with a dissolved gas; surface wrinkling of a block at a critical amount of compression; debonding or fracture of constrained films on swelling, and formation of ``knots'' on twisting stretched cylindrical rods. These various deformations are analyzed in terms of a simple strain energy function, using Rivlin's theory of large elastic deformations, and the results are compared with experimental measurements of the onset of unstable states. Such comparisons provide new tests of Rivlin's theory and, at least in principle, critical tests of proposed strain energy functions for rubber. Moreover the onset of highly non-uniform deformations has serious implications for the fatigue life and fracture resistance of rubber components. [4pt] References: [0pt] R. S. Rivlin, Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond. Ser. A241 (1948) 379--397. [0pt] A. Mallock, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. 49 (1890--1891) 458--463. [0pt] M. A. Biot, ``Mechanics of Incremental Deformations'', Wiley, New York, 1965. [0pt] A. N. Gent and P. B. Lindley, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 249 (1958) 195--205. [0pt] A. N. Gent, W. J. Hung and M. F. Tse, Rubb. Chem. Technol. 74 (2001) 89--99. [0pt] A. N. Gent, Internatl. J. Non-Linear Mech. 40 (2005) 165--175.

  2. Nonlinear elastic effects on the energy flux deviation of ultrasonic waves in gr/ep composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of nonlinear elasticity on energy flux deviation in undirectional gr/ep composites are examined. The shift in the flux deviation is modeled using acoustoelasticity theory and the second- and third-order elastic stiffness coefficients for T300/5208 gr/ep. Two conditions of applied uniaxial stress are considered. In the first case, the direction of applied uniaxial stress was along the fiber axis (x3), while in the second case it was perpendicular to the fiber axis along the laminate stacking direction (x1). For both conditions, the change in the energy flux deviation angle from the condition of zero applied stress is computed over the range of propagation directions of 0 to 60 deg from the fiber axis at two-degree intervals. A positive flux deviation angle implies the energy deviates away from the fiber direction toward the x1 axis, while a negative deviation means that the energy deviates toward the fibers. Over this range of fiber orientation angles, the energy of the quasi-longitudinal and pure mode transverse waves deviates toward the fibers, while that of the quasi-transverse mode deviates away from the fibers.

  3. The First Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girill, T. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Boyle-Mariotte gas law was formulated in terms of pneumatic springs," subsumed by Hooke under his own stress-strain relation, and generally regarded as a law of elasticity. The subsequent development of Boyle's principle and elasticity provide thought-provoking test cases for Kuhn's notations of paradigm and puzzle solving in physics.…

  4. Nonlocal elasticity tensors in dislocation and disclination cores

    DOE PAGES

    Taupin, V.; Gbemou, K.; Fressengeas, C.; ...

    2017-01-07

    We introduced nonlocal elastic constitutive laws for crystals containing defects such as dislocations and disclinations. Additionally, the pointwise elastic moduli tensors adequately reflect the elastic response of defect-free regions by relating stresses to strains and couple-stresses to curvatures, elastic cross-moduli tensors relating strains to couple-stresses and curvatures to stresses within convolution integrals are derived from a nonlocal analysis of strains and curvatures in the defects cores. Sufficient conditions are derived for positive-definiteness of the resulting free energy, and stability of elastic solutions is ensured. The elastic stress/couple stress fields associated with prescribed dislocation/disclination density distributions and solving the momentum andmore » moment of momentum balance equations in periodic media are determined by using a Fast Fourier Transform spectral method. Here, the convoluted cross-moduli bring the following results: (i) Nonlocal stresses and couple stresses oppose their local counterparts in the defects core regions, playing the role of restoring forces and possibly ensuring spatio-temporal stability of the simulated defects, (ii) The couple stress fields are strongly affected by nonlocality. Such effects favor the stability of the simulated grain boundaries and allow investigating their elastic interactions with extrinsic defects, (iii) Driving forces inducing grain growth or refinement derive from the self-stress and couple stress fields of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline configurations.« less

  5. Photovoltaic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  6. Cell Elasticity Determines Macrophage Function

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Naimish R.; Bole, Medhavi; Chen, Cheng; Hardin, Charles C.; Kho, Alvin T.; Mih, Justin; Deng, Linhong; Butler, James; Tschumperlin, Daniel; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Koziel, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function. PMID:23028423

  7. Fiber Optic Laser Accelerometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-06

    embodiment of a fiber laser accelerometer 10. The fiber laser accelerometer 10 includes a fiber laser 12. Fiber laser 12 can be either a Fabry - Perot type...cavity fiber laser or a distributed feedback fiber laser. In a 4 Attorney Docket No. 97966 Fabry - Perot type fiber laser, the laser cavity is a length...type of signal. A receiver 26 receives the phase shifted signal. Receiver 26 is capable of demodulating and detecting the signal from the fiber laser by

  8. Blocky inversion of multichannel elastic impedance for elastic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozayan, Davoud Karami; Gholami, Ali; Siahkoohi, Hamid Reza

    2018-04-01

    Petrophysical description of reservoirs requires proper knowledge of elastic parameters like P- and S-wave velocities (Vp and Vs) and density (ρ), which can be retrieved from pre-stack seismic data using the concept of elastic impedance (EI). We propose an inversion algorithm which recovers elastic parameters from pre-stack seismic data in two sequential steps. In the first step, using the multichannel blind seismic inversion method (exploited recently for recovering acoustic impedance from post-stack seismic data), high-resolution blocky EI models are obtained directly from partial angle-stacks. Using an efficient total-variation (TV) regularization, each angle-stack is inverted independently in a multichannel form without prior knowledge of the corresponding wavelet. The second step involves inversion of the resulting EI models for elastic parameters. Mathematically, under some assumptions, the EI's are linearly described by the elastic parameters in the logarithm domain. Thus a linear weighted least squares inversion is employed to perform this step. Accuracy of the concept of elastic impedance in predicting reflection coefficients at low and high angles of incidence is compared with that of exact Zoeppritz elastic impedance and the role of low frequency content in the problem is discussed. The performance of the proposed inversion method is tested using synthetic 2D data sets obtained from the Marmousi model and also 2D field data sets. The results confirm the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method for inversion of pre-stack seismic data.

  9. Numerical simulation of deformation and fracture of space protective shell structures from concrete and fiber concrete under pulse loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between aircraft Boeing 747-400 and protective shell of nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as complex multilayered cellular structure comprising layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was held three-dimensionally using the author's algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. The dynamics of stress-strain state and fracture of structure were studied. Destruction is described using two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of shell cellular structure—cells start to destruct in unloading wave, originating after output of compression wave to the free surfaces of cells.

  10. Fibrous nonlinear elasticity enables positive mechanical feedback between cells and ECMs

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew S.; Alisafaei, Farid; Ban, Ehsan; Feng, Xinzeng; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    In native states, animal cells of many types are supported by a fibrous network that forms the main structural component of the ECM. Mechanical interactions between cells and the 3D ECM critically regulate cell function, including growth and migration. However, the physical mechanism that governs the cell interaction with fibrous 3D ECM is still not known. In this article, we present single-cell traction force measurements using breast tumor cells embedded within 3D collagen matrices. We recreate the breast tumor mechanical environment by controlling the microstructure and density of type I collagen matrices. Our results reveal a positive mechanical feedback loop: cells pulling on collagen locally align and stiffen the matrix, and stiffer matrices, in return, promote greater cell force generation and a stiffer cell body. Furthermore, cell force transmission distance increases with the degree of strain-induced fiber alignment and stiffening of the collagen matrices. These findings highlight the importance of the nonlinear elasticity of fibrous matrices in regulating cell–ECM interactions within a 3D context, and the cell force regulation principle that we uncover may contribute to the rapid mechanical tissue stiffening occurring in many diseases, including cancer and fibrosis. PMID:27872289

  11. Slip Morphology of Elastic Strips on Frictional Rigid Substrates.

    PubMed

    Sano, Tomohiko G; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Wada, Hirofumi

    2017-04-28

    The morphology of an elastic strip subject to vertical compressive stress on a frictional rigid substrate is investigated by a combination of theory and experiment. We find a rich variety of morphologies, which-when the bending elasticity dominates over the effect of gravity-are classified into three distinct types of states: pinned, partially slipped, and completely slipped, depending on the magnitude of the vertical strain and the coefficient of static friction. We develop a theory of elastica under mixed clamped-hinged boundary conditions combined with the Coulomb-Amontons friction law and find excellent quantitative agreement with simulations and controlled physical experiments. We also discuss the effect of gravity in order to bridge the difference in the qualitative behaviors of stiff strips and flexible strings or ropes. Our study thus complements recent work on elastic rope coiling and takes a significant step towards establishing a unified understanding of how a thin elastic object interacts vertically with a solid surface.

  12. Wave propagation modeling in composites reinforced by randomly oriented fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudela, Pawel; Radzienski, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2018-02-01

    A new method for prediction of elastic constants in randomly oriented fiber composites is proposed. It is based on mechanics of composites, the rule of mixtures and total mass balance tailored to the spectral element mesh composed of 3D brick elements. Selected elastic properties predicted by the proposed method are compared with values obtained by another theoretical method. The proposed method is applied for simulation of Lamb waves in glass-epoxy composite plate reinforced by randomly oriented fibers. Full wavefield measurements conducted by the scanning laser Doppler vibrometer are in good agreement with simulations performed by using the time domain spectral element method.

  13. Elastic fibres are broadly distributed in tendon and highly localized around tenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Tyler M; Thompson, Mark S; Urban, Jill; Yu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Elastic fibres have the unique ability to withstand large deformations and are found in numerous tissues, but their organization and structure have not been well defined in tendon. The objective of this study was to characterize the organization of elastic fibres in tendon to understand their function. Immunohistochemistry was used to visualize elastic fibres in bovine flexor tendon with fibrillin-1, fibrillin-2 and elastin antibodies. Elastic fibres were broadly distributed throughout tendon, and highly localized longitudinally around groups of cells and transversely between collagen fascicles. The close interaction of elastic fibres and cells suggests that elastic fibres are part of the pericellular matrix and therefore affect the mechanical environment of tenocytes. Fibres present between fascicles are likely part of the endotenon sheath, which enhances sliding between adjacent collagen bundles. These results demonstrate that elastic fibres are highly localized in tendon and may play an important role in cellular function and contribute to the tissue mechanics of the endotenon sheath. PMID:23587025

  14. Fiber resources

    Treesearch

    P. J. Ince

    2004-01-01

    In economics, primary inputs or factors of production define the term ‘resources.’ Resources include land resources (plants, animals, and minerals), labor, capital, and entrepreneurship. Almost all pulp and paper fiber resources are plant materials obtained from trees or agricultural crops. These resources encompass plant materials harvested directly from the land (...

  15. Metal-coated optical fiber damage sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Sirkis, James S.

    1993-07-01

    A process which uses electroplating methods has been developed to fabricate metal coated optical fiber sensors. The elastic-plastic characteristics of the metal coatings have been exploited to develop a sensor capable of `remembering' low velocity impact damage. These sensors have been investigated under uniaxial tension testing of unembedded sensors and under low velocity impact of graphite/epoxy specimens with embedded sensors using both Michelson and polarimetric optical arrangements. The tests show that coating properties alter the optical fiber sensor performance and that the permanent deformation in the coating can be used to monitor composite delamination/impact damage.

  16. Elastic Anisotropy of Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K.; Shapiro, S.; Stanchits, S.; Dresen, G.; Kaselow, A.; Vinciguerra, S.

    2005-12-01

    Elastic properties of rocks are sensitive to changes of the in-situ stress and damage state. In particular, seismic velocities are strongly affected by stress-induced formation and deformation of cracks or shear-enhanced pore collapse. The effect of stress on seismic velocities as a result of pore space deformation in isotropic rock at isostatic compression may be expressed by the equation: A+K*P-B*exp (-D*P) (1), where P=Pc-Pp is the effective pressure, the pure difference between confining pressure and pore pressure. The parameter A, K, B and D describe material constants determined using experimental data. The physical meaning of the parameters is given by Shapiro (2003, in Geophysics Vol.68(Nr.2)). Parameter D is related to the stress sensitivity of the rock. A similar relation was derived by Shapiro and Kaselow (2005, in Geophysics in press) for weak anisotropic rocks under arbitrary load. They describe the stress dependent anisotropy in terms of Thomson's (1986, in Geophysics, Vol. 51(Nr.10)) anisotropy parameters ɛ and γ as a function of stress in the case of an initially isotropic rock: ɛ ∝ E2-E3, γ ∝ E3-E2 (2) with Ei=exp (D*Pi). The exponential terms Ei are controlled by the effective stress components Pi. To test this relation, we have conducted a series of triaxial compression tests on dry samples of initially isotropic Etnean Basalt in a servo-controlled MTS loading frame equipped with a pressure cell. Confining pressure was 60, 40 and 20 MPa. Samples were 5 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length. Elastic anisotropy was induced by axial compression of the samples through opening and growth of microcracks predominantly oriented parallel to the sample axis. Ultrasonic P- and S- wave velocities were monitored parallel and normal to the sample axis by an array of 20 piezoceramic transducers glued to the surface. Preamplified full waveform signals were stored in two 12 channel transient recorders. According to equation 2 the anisotropy parameters are

  17. Evidence for ACTN3 as a Speed Gene in Isolated Human Muscle Fibers.

    PubMed

    Broos, Siacia; Malisoux, Laurent; Theisen, Daniel; van Thienen, Ruud; Ramaekers, Monique; Jamart, Cécile; Deldicque, Louise; Thomis, Martine A; Francaux, Marc

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effect of α-actinin-3 deficiency due to homozygosity for the ACTN3 577X-allele on contractile and morphological properties of fast muscle fibers in non-athletic young men. A biopsy was taken from the vastus lateralis of 4 RR and 4 XX individuals to test for differences in morphologic and contractile properties of single muscle fibers. The cross-sectional area of the fiber and muscle fiber composition was determined using standard immunohistochemistry analyses. Skinned single muscle fibers were subjected to active tests to determine peak normalized force (P0), maximal unloading velocity (V0) and peak power. A passive stretch test was performed to calculate Young's Modulus and hysteresis to assess fiber visco-elasticity. No differences were found in muscle fiber composition. The cross-sectional area of type IIa and IIx fibers was larger in RR compared to XX individuals (P<0.001). P0 was similar in both groups over all fiber types. A higher V0 was observed in type IIa fibers of RR genotypes (P<0.001) but not in type I fibers. The visco-elasticity as determined by Young's Modulus and hysteresis was unaffected by fiber type or genotype. The greater V0 and the larger fast fiber CSA in RR compared to XX genotypes likely contribute to enhanced whole muscle performance during high velocity contractions.

  18. Dynamics of an elastic sphere containing a thin creeping region and immersed in an acoustic region for similar viscous-elastic and acoustic time- and length-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Amir; Friedman, Yonathan

    2017-11-01

    The characteristic time of low-Reynolds number fluid-structure interaction scales linearly with the ratio of fluid viscosity to solid Young's modulus. For sufficiently large values of Young's modulus, both time- and length-scales of the viscous-elastic dynamics may be similar to acoustic time- and length-scales. However, the requirement of dominant viscous effects limits the validity of such regimes to micro-configurations. We here study the dynamics of an acoustic plane wave impinging on the surface of a layered sphere, immersed within an inviscid fluid, and composed of an inner elastic sphere, a creeping fluid layer and an external elastic shell. We focus on configurations with similar viscous-elastic and acoustic time- and length-scales, where the viscous-elastic speed of interaction between the creeping layer and the elastic regions is similar to the speed of sound. By expanding the linearized spherical Reynolds equation into the relevant spectral series solution for the hyperbolic elastic regions, a global stiffness matrix of the layered elastic sphere was obtained. This work relates viscous-elastic dynamics to acoustic scattering and may pave the way to the design of novel meta-materials with unique acoustic properties. ISF 818/13.

  19. Over-damped elastic `snap-through'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Michael; Moulton, Derek E.; Vella, Dominic

    Elastic `snap-through' occurs when a system is in an equilibrium state that either disappears or becomes unstable as a control parameter varies. The switch from one state to another is generally rapid and hence is used to generate fast motions in biology and engineering. While the conditions under which simple elastic objects undergo snap-through have been reasonably well studied, how fast snapping happens is much less well understood. Recently, it has been shown that snap-through can be subject to critical slowing down near the snapping transition, so that the dynamics may be slow even in the absence of viscous damping. Here, we study the interaction of snap-through with the flow of a viscous fluid. We begin by showing how snap-through may be used to create a channel whose hydraulic conductivity changes discontinuously in response to fluid flow. We then study the dynamics of snap-through for an elastic element embedded in a viscous fluid, which is typical of pull-in instabilities in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).

  20. Rac1 GTPase -deficient mouse lens exhibits defects in shape, suture formation, fiber cell migration and survival

    PubMed Central

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Chauhan, Bharesh K.; Walker, Christopher; Zheng, Yi; Robinson, Michael L.; Lang, Richard A.; Rao, Ponugoti V.

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis and shape of the ocular lens depend on epithelial cell elongation and differentiation into fiber cells, followed by the symmetric and compact organization of fiber cells within an enclosed extracellular matrix-enriched elastic capsule. The cellular mechanisms orchestrating these different events however, remain obscure. We investigated the role of the Rac1 GTPase in these processes by targeted deletion of expression using the conditional gene knockout (cKO) approach. Rac1 cKO mice were derived from two different Cre (Le-Cre and MLR-10) transgenic mice in which lens-specific Cre expression starts at embryonic day 8.75 and 10.5, respectively, in both the lens epithelium and fiber cells. The Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO mice exhibited an early-onset (E12.5) and severe lens phenotype compared to the MLR-10/Rac1 cKO (E15.5) mice. While the Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO lenses displayed delayed primary fiber cell elongation, lenses from both Rac1 cKO strains were characterized by abnormal shape, impaired secondary fiber cell migration, sutural defects and thinning of the posterior capsule which often led to rupture. Lens fiber cell N-cadherin/β-catenin/Rap1/Nectin-based cell-cell junction formation and WAVE-2/Abi-2/Nap1-regulated actin polymerization were impaired in the Rac1 deficient mice. Additionally, the Rac1 cKO lenses were characterized by a shortened epithelial sheet, reduced levels of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and increased apoptosis. Taken together, these data uncover the essential role of Rac1 GTPase activity in establishment and maintenance of lens shape, suture formation and capsule integrity, and in fiber cell migration, adhesion and survival, via regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics, cell adhesive interactions and ECM turnover. PMID:21945075

  1. Computational predictions of the tensile properties of electrospun fiber meshes: effect of fiber diameter and fiber orientation

    PubMed Central

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Bashur, Chris A.; Goldstein, Aaron S.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical properties of biomaterial scaffolds are crucial for their efficacy in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. At the microscopic scale, the scaffold must be sufficiently rigid to support cell adhesion, spreading, and normal extracellular matrix deposition. Concurrently, at the macroscopic scale the scaffold must have mechanical properties that closely match those of the target tissue. The achievement of both goals may be possible by careful control of the scaffold architecture. Recently, electrospinning has emerged as an attractive means to form fused fiber scaffolds for tissue engineering. The diameter and relative orientation of fibers affect cell behavior, but their impact on the tensile properties of the scaffolds has not been rigorously characterized. To examine the structure-property relationship, electrospun meshes were made from a polyurethane elastomer with different fiber diameters and orientations and mechanically tested to determine the dependence of the elastic modulus on the mesh architecture. Concurrently, a multiscale modeling strategy developed for type I collagen networks was employed to predict the mechanical behavior of the polyurethane meshes. Experimentally, the measured elastic modulus of the meshes varied from 0.56 to 3.0 MPa depending on fiber diameter and the degree of fiber alignment. Model predictions for tensile loading parallel to fiber orientation agreed well with experimental measurements for a wide range of conditions when a fitted fiber modulus of 18 MPa was used. Although the model predictions were less accurate in transverse loading of anisotropic samples, these results indicate that computational modeling can assist in design of electrospun artificial tissue scaffolds. PMID:19627797

  2. Stretching single fibrin fibers hampers their lysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Lucioni, Tomas; Li, Rongzhong; Bonin, Keith; Cho, Samuel S; Guthold, Martin

    2017-09-15

    Blood clots, whose main structural component is a mesh of microscopic fibrin fibers, experience mechanical strain from blood flow, clot retraction and interactions with platelets and other cells. We developed a transparent, striated and highly stretchable substrate made from fugitive glue (a styrenic block copolymer) to investigate how mechanical strain affects lysis of single, suspended fibrin fibers. In this suspended fiber assay, lysis manifested itself by fiber elongation, thickening (disassembly), fraying and collapse. Stretching single fibrin fibers significantly hampered their lysis. This effect was seen in uncrosslinked and crosslinked fibers. Crosslinking (without stretching) also hampered single fiber lysis. Our data suggest that strain is a novel mechanosensitive factor that regulates blood clot dissolution (fibrinolysis) at the single fiber level. At the molecular level of single fibrin molecules, strain may distort, or hinder access to, plasmin cleavage sites and thereby hamper lysis. Fibrin fibers are the major structural component of a blood clot. We developed a highly stretchable substrate made from fugitive glue and a suspended fibrin fiber lysis assay to investigate the effect of stretching on single fibrin fibers lysis. The key findings from our experiments are: 1) Fibers thicken and elongate upon lysis; 2) stretching strongly reduces lysis; 3) this effect is more pronounced for uncrosslinked fibers; and 4) stretching fibers has a similar effect on reducing lysis as crosslinking fibers. At the molecular level, strain may distort plasmin cleavage sites, or restrict access to those sites. Our results suggest that strain may be a novel mechanobiological factor that regulates fibrinolysis. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mass Transfer and Rheology of Fiber Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianghui

    Rheological and mass transfer properties of non-Brownian fiber suspensions are affected by fiber characteristics, fiber interactions, and processing conditions. In this thesis we develop several simulation methods to study the dynamics of single fibers in simple shear flow, as well as the rheology and mass transfer of fiber suspensions. Isolated, rigid, neutrally-buoyant, non-Brownian, slightly curved, nonchiral fibers in simple shear flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid at low Reynolds number can drift steadily in the gradient direction without external forces or torques. The average drift velocity and direction depend on the fiber aspect ratio, curvature and initial orientation. The drift results from the coupling of rotational and translational dynamics, and the combined effects of flipping, scooping, and spinning motions of the fiber. Irreversible fiber collisions in the suspensions cause shear-induced diffusion. The shear-induced self-diffusivity of dilute suspensions of fibers increases with increasing concentration and increasing static friction between contacts. The diffusivities in both the gradient and vorticity directions are larger for suspensions of curved fibers than for suspensions of straight fibers. For suspensions of curved fibers, significant enhancements in the diffusivity in the gradient direction are attributed to fiber drift in the gradient direction. The shear-induced self-diffusivity of concentrated suspensions of fibers increases with increasing concentration before fiber networks or flocs are formed, after which the diffusivity decreases with increasing concentration. The diffusivity increases with increasing fiber equilibrium bending angle, effective stiffness, coefficient of static friction, and rate of collisions. The specific viscosity of fiber suspensions increases with increasing fiber curvature, friction coefficient between mechanical contacts, and solids concentration. The specific viscosity increases linearly with

  4. Reflection of shear elastic waves from the interface of a ferromagnetic half–space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoyan, L. H.; Terzyan, S. H.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the problems of reflection and refraction of a pure elastic wave incident from a nonmagnetic medium on the surface of contact between two semi-infinite media of an infinite nonmagnetic/magnetic structure are considered. The resonance character of the interaction between elastic and magnetic waves is shown, and the dependence of the magnetoelastic wave amplitudes on the the incident elastic wave amplitude is also established.

  5. Dynamic Modulus and Damping of Boron, Silicon Carbide, and Alumina Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Williams, W.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic modulus and damping capacity for boron, silicon carbide, and silicon carbide coated boron fibers were measured from-190 to 800 C. The single fiber vibration test also allowed measurement of transverse thermal conductivity for the silicon carbide fibers. Temperature dependent damping capacity data for alumina fibers were calculated from axial damping results for alumina-aluminum composites. The dynamics fiber data indicate essentially elastic behavior for both the silicon carbide and alumina fibers. In contrast, the boron based fibers are strongly anelastic, displaying frequency dependent moduli and very high microstructural damping. Ths single fiber damping results were compared with composite damping data in order to investigate the practical and basic effects of employing the four fiber types as reinforcement for aluminum and titanium matrices.

  6. Constant-Elasticity-of-Substitution Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, G.

    1986-01-01

    Program simulates constant elasticity-of-substitution (CES) production function. CES function used by economic analysts to examine production costs as well as uncertainties in production. User provides such input parameters as price of labor, price of capital, and dispersion levels. CES minimizes expected cost to produce capital-uncertainty pair. By varying capital-value input, one obtains series of capital-uncertainty pairs. Capital-uncertainty pairs then used to generate several cost curves. CES program menu driven and features specific print menu for examining selected output curves. Program written in BASIC for interactive execution and implemented on IBM PC-series computer.

  7. The preparation and investigation into properties of ionomer fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejigiri, Everest Emmanuel

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the preparation and characterization of ionomer fiber. Two outstanding features of oriented-fiber composites are their high strength-to- weight ratio and controlled anisotropy which is because fibers are formed when polymer chains (in case of polymeric materials) are all lined up in the same direction. And the chains can pack together tightly. Materials can be made into fiber for the purpose of getting better properties and to make the application flexible. In this study, ionomer fiber was prepared. The physical and mechanical properties were examined through a variety of tests- including tensile test, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), free shape recovery test, and constrained stress recovery test. The ionomer fibers were made into muscles fiber, and the tensile actuation behavior of the muscle was studied. From the DMA, Storage modulus, loss modulus, tan delta and glass transition temperature were obtained. DSC was also used to obtain the glass transition temperature which also closely aligned with glass transition obtained from DMA. Also according to the test results, ionomer fiber (filament) demonstrated considerable stress recovery, high ductility and however, the filament did not produce high recovery ratio. The fiber was made into artificial muscle and actuation test was also carried out, which indicated that because the fiber being too much elastic - the fiber was not able to expand and contract when heat was applied to it. Instead it showed continuous expansion.

  8. Fabrication of Composite Material Using Gettou Fiber by Injection Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuda, Roy; Fukumoto, Isao; Kanda, Yasuyuki

    This study investigated the mechanical properties of composite using gettou (shell ginger) fiber as reinforcement fabricated from injection molding. Gettou fiber is a natural fiber made from gettou, a subtropical plant that is largely abundant in Okinawa, Japan. We used the stem part of gettou plant and made the gettou fiber by crushing the stem. The composite using gettou fiber contributed to low shrinkage ratio, high bending strength and high flexural modulus. The mechanical strength of composite using long gettou fiber showed higher value than composite using short gettou fiber. Next, because gettou is particularly known for its anti-mold characteristic, we investigated the characteristic in gettou plastic composite. The composite was tested against two molds: aspergillius niger and penicillium funiculosum. The 60% gettou fiber plastic composite was found to satisfy the JISZ2801 criterion. Finally, in order to predict the flexural modulus of composite using gettou fiber by Halpin-Tsai equation, the tensile elastic modulus of single gettou fiber was measured. The tendency of the experimental results of composite using gettou fiber was in good agreement with Halpin-Tsai equation.

  9. Effect of carbon fiber addition on the electromagnetic shielding properties of carbon fiber/polyacrylamide/wood based fiberboards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Baokang; Chen, Yipeng; Yang, Ning; Chen, Bo; Sun, Qingfeng

    2018-05-01

    Carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite boards are fabricated by mechanical grind-assisted hot-pressing, and are used for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. CF with an average diameter of 150 nm is distributed on wood fiber, which is then encased by polyacrylamide. The CF/polyacrylamide/wood fiber (CPW) composite exhibits an optimal EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of 41.03 dB compared to that of polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite (0.41 dB), which meets the requirements of commercial merchandise. Meanwhile, the CPW composite also shows high mechanical strength. The maximum modulus of rupture (MOR) and modulus of elasticity (MOE) of CPW composites are 39.52 MPa and 5823.15 MPa, respectively. The MOR and MOE of CPW composites increased by 38% and 96%, respectively, compared to that of polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite (28.64 and 2967.35 MPa).

  10. Effect of carbon fiber addition on the electromagnetic shielding properties of carbon fiber/polyacrylamide/wood based fiberboards.

    PubMed

    Dang, Baokang; Chen, Yipeng; Yang, Ning; Chen, Bo; Sun, Qingfeng

    2018-05-11

    Carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite boards are fabricated by mechanical grind-assisted hot-pressing, and are used for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. CF with an average diameter of 150 nm is distributed on wood fiber, which is then encased by polyacrylamide. The CF/polyacrylamide/wood fiber (CPW) composite exhibits an optimal EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of 41.03 dB compared to that of polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite (0.41 dB), which meets the requirements of commercial merchandise. Meanwhile, the CPW composite also shows high mechanical strength. The maximum modulus of rupture (MOR) and modulus of elasticity (MOE) of CPW composites are 39.52 MPa and 5823.15 MPa, respectively. The MOR and MOE of CPW composites increased by 38% and 96%, respectively, compared to that of polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite (28.64 and 2967.35 MPa).

  11. Do xylem fibers affect vessel cavitation resistance?

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Anna L; Ewers, Frank W; Pratt, R Brandon; Paddock, William A; Davis, Stephen D

    2005-09-01

    Possible mechanical and hydraulic costs to increased cavitation resistance were examined among six co-occurring species of chaparral shrubs in southern California. We measured cavitation resistance (xylem pressure at 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity), seasonal low pressure potential (P(min)), xylem conductive efficiency (specific conductivity), mechanical strength of stems (modulus of elasticity and modulus of rupture), and xylem density. At the cellular level, we measured vessel and fiber wall thickness and lumen diameter, transverse fiber wall and total lumen area, and estimated vessel implosion resistance using (t/b)(h)(2), where t is the thickness of adjoining vessel walls and b is the vessel lumen diameter. Increased cavitation resistance was correlated with increased mechanical strength (r(2) = 0.74 and 0.76 for modulus of elasticity and modulus of rupture, respectively), xylem density (r(2) = 0.88), and P(min) (r(2) = 0.96). In contrast, cavitation resistance and P(min) were not correlated with decreased specific conductivity, suggesting no tradeoff between these traits. At the cellular level, increased cavitation resistance was correlated with increased (t/b)(h)(2) (r(2) = 0.95), increased transverse fiber wall area (r(2) = 0.89), and decreased fiber lumen area (r(2) = 0.76). To our knowledge, the correlation between cavitation resistance and fiber wall area has not been shown previously and suggests a mechanical role for fibers in cavitation resistance. Fiber efficacy in prevention of vessel implosion, defined as inward bending or collapse of vessels, is discussed.

  12. Mechanical properties of individual southern pine fibers. Part III. Global relationships between fiber properties and fiber location within an individual tree.

    Treesearch

    Leslie H. Groom; Stephen Shaler; Laurence Mott

    2002-01-01

    This is the third and final paper in a three-part series investigating the effect of location within a tree on the mechanical properties of individual wood tracheids. This paper focuses on the definition of juvenile, transition, and mature zones as classified by fiber stiffness, strength, microfibril angle, and cross-sectional area. The average modulus of elasticity...

  13. Mechanical Properties of Individual Southern Pine Fibers. Part III: Global Relationships Between Fiber Properties and Fiber Location Within An Individual Tree

    Treesearch

    Les Groom; Stephen Shaler; Laurence Mott

    2002-01-01

    This is the third and final paper in a three-part series investigating the effect of location within a tree on the mechanical properties of individual wood tracheids. This paper focuses on the definition of juvenile, transition, and mature zones as classified by fiber stiffness, strength, microfibril angle, and cross-sectional area. The average modulus of elasticity...

  14. Hilbert complexes of nonlinear elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angoshtari, Arzhang; Yavari, Arash

    2016-12-01

    We introduce some Hilbert complexes involving second-order tensors on flat compact manifolds with boundary that describe the kinematics and the kinetics of motion in nonlinear elasticity. We then use the general framework of Hilbert complexes to write Hodge-type and Helmholtz-type orthogonal decompositions for second-order tensors. As some applications of these decompositions in nonlinear elasticity, we study the strain compatibility equations of linear and nonlinear elasticity in the presence of Dirichlet boundary conditions and the existence of stress functions on non-contractible bodies. As an application of these Hilbert complexes in computational mechanics, we briefly discuss the derivation of a new class of mixed finite element methods for nonlinear elasticity.

  15. Tendon elasticity and muscle function.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R McNeill

    2002-12-01

    Vertebrate animals exploit the elastic properties of their tendons in several different ways. Firstly, metabolic energy can be saved in locomotion if tendons stretch and then recoil, storing and returning elastic strain energy, as the animal loses and regains kinetic energy. Leg tendons save energy in this way when birds and mammals run, and an aponeurosis in the back is also important in galloping mammals. Tendons may have similar energy-saving roles in other modes of locomotion, for example in cetacean swimming. Secondly, tendons can recoil elastically much faster than muscles can shorten, enabling animals to jump further than they otherwise could. Thirdly, tendon elasticity affects the control of muscles, enhancing force control at the expense of position control.

  16. Elasticity of crystalline molecular explosives

    DOE PAGES

    Hooks, Daniel E.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Bolme, C. A.; ...

    2015-04-14

    Crystalline molecular explosives are key components of engineered explosive formulations. In precision applications a high degree of consistency and predictability is desired under a range of conditions to a variety of stimuli. Prediction of behaviors from mechanical response and failure to detonation initiation and detonation performance of the material is linked to accurate knowledge of the material structure and first stage of deformation: elasticity. The elastic response of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), including aspects of material and measurement variability, and computational methods are described in detail. Experimental determinations of elastic tensors are compared, andmore » an evaluation of sources of error is presented. Furthermore, computed elastic constants are also compared for these materials and for triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), for which there are no measurements.« less

  17. Influence of the addition of soy product and wheat fiber on rheological, textural, and other quality characteristics of pizza.

    PubMed

    Glicerina, Virginia; Balestra, Federica; Capozzi, Francesco; Dalla Rosa, Marco; Romani, Santina

    2017-11-17

    The effect of partial replacement of wheat flour with soy paste and wheat fiber on rheological, textural, physicochemical, and organoleptic characteristics of an enriched pizza base (E) was investigated in comparison with those of a control pizza base (C). New ingredients (e.g., enriched cooked ham, whey cheese, and tomato sauce realized using food industry by-products) were also used in E pizza topping to further increase its nutritional properties. Enriched dough was developed first at a laboratory level. Large and small deformation, moisture, leavening activity, and metabolic heat were tested. On the final product, produced at the industrial level, textural, color, sensory, and nutritional analyses were performed. Preliminary rheological analysis was essential to evaluate the suitability of the new pizza to be processed at industrial level. Both pizza dough samples showed a solid elastic-like behavior; however, the addition of soy and fiber increased moisture content of E pizza, due to the water binding ability of soy protein and to the effect of fibers that also decreased E dough elasticity. No differences in extensibility between the two samples were observed, whereas significantly lower values of resistance to extension and dough force were shown in sample E. These differences were likely due to the presence of soy that interfere with gluten formation and to the dietary fibers that interact with water. Ingredients used in E pizza improved its nutritional quality increasing dietary fibers and protein, and decreasing saturated fatty acids and cholesterol content, which contributed to decrease energy value, in terms of kilocalorie reduction. In this work, the effects of using new ingredients (e.g., soy paste, wheat fiber) on the rheological, textural, physicochemical, nutritional, and organoleptic characteristics of an enriched pizza type were investigated both at laboratory and industrial levels. The new pizza provides a product that combines solid

  18. Tapered fibers embedded in silica aerogel.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Limin; Grogan, Michael D W; Leon-Saval, Sergio G; Williams, Rhys; England, Richard; Wadsworth, Willam J; Birks, Tim A

    2009-09-15

    We have embedded thin tapered fibers (with diameters down to 1 microm) in silica aerogel with low loss. The aerogel is rigid but behaves refractively like air, protecting the taper without disturbing light propagation along it. This enables a new class of fiber devices exploiting volume evanescent interactions with the aerogel itself or with dopants or gases in the pores.

  19. Conservation laws, bilinear forms and solitons for a fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the attosecond pulses in an optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Jun; Tian, Bo, E-mail: tian_bupt@163.com; Zhen, Hui-Ling

    Under investigation in this paper is a fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which describes the propagation of attosecond pulses in an optical fiber. Based on the Lax pair, infinitely-many conservation laws are derived. With the aid of auxiliary functions, bilinear forms, one-, two- and three-soliton solutions in analytic forms are generated via the Hirota method and symbolic computation. Soliton velocity varies linearly with the coefficients of the high-order terms. Head-on interaction between the bidirectional two solitons and overtaking interaction between the unidirectional two solitons as well as the bound state are depicted. For the interactions among the three solitons, two head-onmore » and one overtaking interactions, three overtaking interactions, an interaction between a bound state and a single soliton and the bound state are displayed. Graphical analysis shows that the interactions between the two solitons are elastic, and interactions among the three solitons are pairwise elastic. Stability analysis yields the modulation instability condition for the soliton solutions.« less

  20. Fiber reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics for high performance applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Brennan, J. J.; Layden, G. K.

    1986-01-01

    The development of fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites is described. The general concepts involved in composite fabrication and resultant composite properties are given for a broad range of fiber and matrix combinations. It is shown that composite materials can be tailored to achieve high levels of toughness, strength, and elastic stiffness, as well as wear resistance and dimensional stability.

  1. ELASTIC SCATTERING ANGULAR DISTRIBUTIONS AND TOTAL REACTION CROSS SECTIONS FOR THE INTERACTION OF 12.8 Mev DEUTERONS WITH Ni$sup 58$ AND Ni$sup 60$ NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Budzanowski, A.; Grotowski, K.

    1962-10-15

    Recentiy optical model analysis has been applied to fit the experimental angular distribution data of the elastic scattering of deuterons by nuclei. In view of a considerable dependence of sigma /sub R/ on the shape of the real and imaginary part of the potential at the nuclear surface, it was thought worthwhile to measure both sigma /sub el/ ( theta ) and sigma /sub R/ for 12.8 Mev deuterons on targets of separated Ni/sup 58/ and Ni/sup 60/ isotopes. (W.D.M.)

  2. Instability of fiber-reinforced viscoelastic composite plates to in-plane compressive loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandiramani, N. K.; Librescu, L.

    1990-01-01

    This study analyzes the stability behavior of unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite plates with viscoelastic material behavior subject to in-plane biaxial compressive edge loads. To predict the effective time-dependent material properties, elastic fibers embedded in a linearly viscoelastic matrix are examined. The micromechanical relations developed for a transversely isotropic medium are discussed along with the correspondence principle of linear viscoelasticity. It is concluded that the stability boundary obtained for a viscoelastic plate is lower (more critical) than its elastic counterpart, and the transverse shear deformation effects are more pronounced in viscoelastic plates than in their elastic counterparts.

  3. Propagating elastic vibrations dominate thermal conduction in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jaeyun; Latour, Benoit; Minnich, Austin J.

    2018-01-01

    The thermal atomic vibrations of amorphous solids can be distinguished by whether they propagate as elastic waves or do not propagate due to lack of atomic periodicity. In a -Si, prior works concluded that nonpropagating waves are the dominant contributors to heat transport, with propagating waves being restricted to frequencies less than a few THz and scattered by anharmonicity. Here, we present a lattice and molecular dynamics analysis of vibrations in a -Si that supports a qualitatively different picture in which propagating elastic waves dominate the thermal conduction and are scattered by local fluctuations of elastic modulus rather than anharmonicity. We explicitly demonstrate the propagating nature of waves up to around 10 THz, and further show that pseudoperiodic structures with homogeneous elastic properties exhibit a marked temperature dependence characteristic of anharmonic interactions. Our work suggests that most heat is carried by propagating elastic waves in a -Si and demonstrates that manipulating local elastic modulus variations is a promising route to realize amorphous materials with extreme thermal properties.

  4. Meat and fiber intake and interaction with pattern recognition receptors (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, and TLR10) in relation to colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective, case-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Tine Iskov; Vogel, Ulla; Tjonneland, Anne; Andersen, Vibeke

    2018-03-01

    Meat and dietary fiber are associated with increased and decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), respectively. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) regulate the intestinal immune response in a complex interplay between the mucosal epithelium and the microbiota and may therefore be important modulators of diet-induced CRC together with other inflammatory mediators. Our aim was to investigate the association between functional TLR polymorphisms and risk of CRC and the interaction with dietary factors. Additionally, interactions with previously studied polymorphisms in IL10, IL1B, PTGS2, and NFKB1 were assessed in order to examine possible biological pathways in meat-induced CRC. A nested case-cohort study of 897 CRC cases and 1689 randomly selected participants from the Danish prospective "Diet, Cancer and Health" study encompassing 57,053 persons was performed using Cox proportional hazard models and the likelihood ratio test. We found associations between polymorphisms in TLR2 (P = 0.018) and TLR4 (P = 0.044) and risk of CRC per se, interactions between intake of red and processed meat (10 g/d) and polymorphisms in TLR1 (P-interaction = 0.032) and TLR10 (P-interaction = 0.026 and 0.036), and intake of cereals (50 g/d) and TLR4 (P-interaction = 0.044) in relation to risk of CRC. Intake of red and processed meat also interacted with combinations of polymorphisms in TLR1 and TLR10 and polymorphisms in NFKB1, IL10, IL1B, and PTGS2 (P-interaction; TLR1/rs4833095 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.021, TLR10/rs11096955 × IL10/rs3024505 = 0.047, TLR10/rs11096955 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.017, TLR10/rs4129009 × NFKB1/rs28362491 = 0.027, TLR10/rs4129009 × IL1B/rs4848306 = 0.020, TLR10/rs4129009 × IL1B/rs1143623 = 0.021, TLR10/rs4129009 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.027), whereas intake of dietary fiber (10 g/d) interacted with combinations of polymorphisms in TLR4, IL10, and PTGS2 (P-interaction; TLR4/rs1554973 × IL10/rs3024505 = 0.0012, TLR4/rs1554973 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.0041, TLR4/rs1554973 × PTGS

  5. Nonlinear Elastic Effects on the Energy Flux Deviation of Ultrasonic Waves in GR/EP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1992-01-01

    In isotropic materials, the direction of the energy flux (energy per unit time per unit area) of an ultrasonic plane wave is always along the same direction as the normal to the wave front. In anisotropic materials, however, this is true only along symmetry directions. Along other directions, the energy flux of the wave deviates from the intended direction of propagation. This phenomenon is known as energy flux deviation and is illustrated. The direction of the energy flux is dependent on the elastic coefficients of the material. This effect has been demonstrated in many anisotropic crystalline materials. In transparent quartz crystals, Schlieren photographs have been obtained which allow visualization of the ultrasonic waves and the energy flux deviation. The energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy (gr/ep) composite materials can be quite large because of their high anisotropy. The flux deviation angle has been calculated for unidirectional gr/ep composites as a function of both fiber orientation and fiber volume content. Experimental measurements have also been made in unidirectional composites. It has been further demonstrated that changes in composite materials which alter the elastic properties such as moisture absorption by the matrix or fiber degradation, can be detected nondestructively by measurements of the energy flux shift. In this research, the effects of nonlinear elasticity on energy flux deviation in unidirectional gr/ep composites were studied. Because of elastic nonlinearity, the angle of the energy flux deviation was shown to be a function of applied stress. This shift in flux deviation was modeled using acoustoelastic theory and the previously measured second and third order elastic stiffness coefficients for T300/5208 gr/ep. Two conditions of applied uniaxial stress were considered. In the first case, the direction of applied uniaxial stress was along the fiber axis (x3) while in the second case it was perpendicular to the fiber axis along the

  6. A three-dimensional collagen-fiber network model of the extracellular matrix for the simulation of the mechanical behaviors and micro structures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shoubin; Huang, Zetao; Tang, Liqun; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Yongrou; Jiang, Yi

    2017-07-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural and biochemical support to cells and tissues, which is a critical factor for modulating cell dynamic behavior and intercellular communication. In order to further understand the mechanisms of the interactive relationship between cell and the ECM, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) collagen-fiber network model to simulate the micro structure and mechanical behaviors of the ECM and studied the stress-strain relationship as well as the deformation of the ECM under tension. In the model, the collagen-fiber network consists of abundant random distributed collagen fibers and some crosslinks, in which each fiber is modeled as an elastic beam and a crosslink is modeled as a linear spring with tensile limit, it means crosslinks will fail while the tensile forces exceed the limit of spring. With the given parameters of the beam and the spring, the simulated tensile stress-strain relation of the ECM highly matches the experimental results including damaged and failed behaviors. Moreover, by applying the maximal inscribed sphere method, we measured the size distribution of pores in the fiber network and learned the variation of the distribution with deformation. We also defined the alignment of the collagen-fibers to depict the orientation of fibers in the ECM quantitatively. By the study of changes of the alignment and the damaged crosslinks against the tensile strain, this paper reveals the comprehensive mechanisms of four stages of 'toe', 'linear', 'damage' and 'failure' in the tensile stress-strain relation of the ECM which can provide further insight in the study of cell-ECM interaction.

  7. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using tapered fibers.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Richard L; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2010-01-01

    The Thulium fiber laser has recently been tested as a potential alternative to the Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. This study explores use of a short taper for expanding the Thulium fiber laser beam at the distal tip of a small-core fiber. Thulium fiber laser radiation with a wavelength of 1,908 nm, 10 Hz pulse rate, 70 mJ pulse energy, and 1-millisecond pulse duration was delivered through a 2-m-length fiber with 150-microm-core-input-end, 300-microm-core-output-end, and 5-mm-length taper, in contact with human uric acid (UA) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones, ex vivo (n = 10 each). Stone mass loss, stone crater depths, fiber transmission losses, fiber burn-back, irrigation rates, and deflection through a flexible ureteroscope were measured for the tapered fiber and compared with conventional fibers. After delivery of 1,800 pulses through the tapered fiber, mass loss measured 12.7+/-2.6 mg for UA and 7.2+/-0.8 mg COM stones, comparable to conventional 100-microm-core fibers (12.6+/-2.5 mg for UA and 6.8+/-1.7 mg for COM stones). No transmission losses or burn-back occurred for the tapered fiber after 36,000 pulses, while a conventional 150-microm fiber experienced significant tip degradation after only 1,800 pulses. High irrigation rates were measured with the tapered fiber inserted through the working port of a flexible ureteroscope without hindering its deflection, mimicking that of a conventional 150 microm fiber. The short tapered distal fiber tip allows expansion of the laser beam, resulting in decreased fiber tip damage compared to conventional small-core fibers, without compromising fiber bending, stone vaporization efficiency, or irrigation rates.

  8. Enrichment of extruded snack products with coproducts from chestnut mushroom (Agrocybe aegerita) production: interactions between dietary fiber, physicochemical characteristics, and glycemic load.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Margaret A; Derbyshire, Emma; Tiwari, Brijesh K; Brennan, Charles S

    2012-05-02

    Mushrooms are a common vegetable product that have also been linked to pharmaceutical and medicinal uses. However, the production of the fruiting bodies of mushrooms results in a large quantity of food waste in the form of spent compost. Hyphae and the base of fruit bodies from Agrocybe aegerita were retrieved from spent mushroom compost and refined as a freeze-dried powder. This fiber-rich ingredient was used in the manufacture of ready-to-eat extruded cereal snack products. Inclusions rates were 0, 5, 10, and 15% w/w replacement levels for wheat flour from a control recipe. Inclusion of mushroom coproduct material (MCM) was significantly correlated to increased product expansion (r = 0.848) and density (r = 0.949) but negatively correlated to water absorption index (WAI; r = -0.928) and water solubility index (WSI; r = -0.729). Fiber content could not be correlated to differences in pasting properties of extruded snacks even though snack products with MCM showed significantly lower final viscosity values compared to the control. The potential glycemic response of foods was significantly lowered by including MCM (p < 0.05) with a negative correlation between fiber content and overall AUC following a standardized in vitro digestion method (r = -0.910). Starch content, WAI, and WSI were positively correlated to AUC of extruded snacks (r = 0.916, 0.851, and 0.878. respectively). The results illustrate a reduction in the potential glycemic response from including 5% (w/w) of MCM in extruded snacks exceeds 20%. Thus, the incorporation of MCM in ready-to-eat snack foods may be of considerable interest to the food industry in trying to regulate the glycemic response of foods.

  9. LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    We have successfully fabricate optical fiber with a thin layer of LiNbO3 at the boundary of the glass core and dear glass cladding. The construction of this fiber is based on our successful Semiconductor Cylinder Fibers (SCF). A schematic representation of a LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber is shown. These fibers can be used as light modulators, sonar detectors and in other applications. The core diameter of the fiber is sufficiently small compared to the light wavelength and the indices of refraction of the core and cladding glasses are sufficiently close in value so that there is sufficient light at the core cladding boundary to interact with the LiNbO3 layer. This fiber functions best when just a single light mode propagates through the fiber. The idea for a LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber came from Dr. Tracee Jamison of NASA. The optical properties of LiNbO3 can be changed with strain or the application of an electric field. Thus these fibers can be used as acoustic sensors as for example in a sonar. They can also be used as electric field operated light modulators. However, for this application the fibers would be made with a cross section in the form of a 'D'. The core with its surrounding LiNbO, layer would be close to the flat portion of the 'D' shaped fiber. Two metal contacts would be deposited on the flat portion of the fiber on either side of the core. A voltage applied across these contacts will result in an electric field in the core region that can be used for modulating the optical properties of the LiNbO, layer. To our knowledge this is the first ever LiNbO, Cylinder Fiber made.

  10. LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornreich, Philip

    2004-01-01

    We have successfully fabricate optical fiber with a thin layer of LiNbO3 at the boundary of the glass core and clear glass cladding. The construction of this fiber is based on our successful Semiconductor Cylinder Fibers (SCF). A schematic representation of a LiN bo, Cylinder Fiber. These fibers can be used as light modulators, sonar detectors and in other applications. The core diameter of the fiber is sufficiently small compared to the light wavelength and the indices of refraction of the core and cladding glasses are sufficiently close in value so that there is sufficient light at the core cladding boundary to interact with the LiNbO3 layer. This fiber functions best when just a single light mode propagates through the fiber. The idea for a LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber came from Dr. Tracee Jamison of NASA. The optical properties of LiNbO3 can be changed with strain or the application of an electric field. Thus these fibers can be used as acoustic sensors as for example in a sonar. They can also be used as electric field operated light modulators. However, for this application the fibers would be made with a cross section in the form of a "D". The core with its surrounding LiNbO, layer would be close to the flat portion of the "D" shaped fiber. Two metal contacts would be deposited on the flat portion of the fiber on either side of the core. A voltage applied across these contacts will result in an electric field in the core region that can be used for modulating the optical properties of the LiNbO3 layer. To our knowledge this is the first ever LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber made.

  11. Singularity-free dislocation dynamics with strain gradient elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po, Giacomo; Lazar, Markus; Seif, Dariush; Ghoniem, Nasr

    2014-08-01

    The singular nature of the elastic fields produced by dislocations presents conceptual challenges and computational difficulties in the implementation of discrete dislocation-based models of plasticity. In the context of classical elasticity, attempts to regularize the elastic fields of discrete dislocations encounter intrinsic difficulties. On the other hand, in gradient elasticity, the issue of singularity can be removed at the outset and smooth elastic fields of dislocations are available. In this work we consider theoretical and numerical aspects of the non-singular theory of discrete dislocation loops in gradient elasticity of Helmholtz type, with interest in its applications to three dimensional dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations. The gradient solution is developed and compared to its singular and non-singular counterparts in classical elasticity using the unified framework of eigenstrain theory. The fundamental equations of curved dislocation theory are given as non-singular line integrals suitable for numerical implementation using fast one-dimensional quadrature. These include expressions for the interaction energy between two dislocation loops and the line integral form of the generalized solid angle associated with dislocations having a spread core. The single characteristic length scale of Helmholtz elasticity is determined from independent molecular statics (MS) calculations. The gradient solution is implemented numerically within our variational formulation of DD, with several examples illustrating the viability of the non-singular solution. The displacement field around a dislocation loop is shown to be smooth, and the loop self-energy non-divergent, as expected from atomic configurations of crystalline materials. The loop nucleation energy barrier and its dependence on the applied shear stress are computed and shown to be in good agreement with atomistic calculations. DD simulations of Lome-Cottrell junctions in Al show that the strength of the

  12. Effect of fiber diameter on flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Atai, Mohammad; Hamze, Faeze

    2013-01-01

    Flexural strength (FS) is one of the most important properties of restorative dental materials which could be improved in fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) by several methods including the incorporation of stronger reinforcing fibers. This study evaluates the influence of the glass fiber diameter on the FS and elastic modulus of FRCs at the same weight percentage. A mixture of 2,2-bis-[4-(methacryloxypropoxy)-phenyl]-propaneand triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (60/40 by weight) was prepared as the matrix phase in which 0.5 wt. % camphorquinone and 0.5 wt. % N-N'-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate were dissolved as photoinitiator system. Glass fibers with three different diameters (14, 19, and 26 μm) were impregnated with the matrix resin using a soft brush. The FRCs were inserted into a 2 × 2 × 25 mm3 mold and cured using a light curing unit with an intensity of ca. 600 mW/cm2 . The FS of the FRCs was measured in a three-point bending method. The elastic modulus was determined from the slope of the initial linear part of stress-strain curve. The fracture surface of the composites was observed using scanning electron microscopy to study the fiber-matrix interface. The results were analyzed and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. Although the FS increased as the diameter of fibers increased up to 19 μm (P < 0.05), no significant difference was observed between the composites containing fibers with diameters of 19 and 26 μm. The diameter of the fibers influences the mechanical properties of the FRCs.

  13. Handsheet formation and mechanical testing via fiber-level simulations

    Treesearch

    Leonard H. Switzer; Daniel J. Klingenberg; C. Tim Scott

    2004-01-01

    A fiber model and simulation method are employed to investigate the mechanical response of planar fiber networks subjected to elongational deformation. The simulated responses agree qualitatively with numerous experimental observations. suggesting that such simulation methods may be useful for probing the relationships between fiber properties and interactions and the...

  14. Mechanics of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Buckling Modes and Failure Under Compression Along Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Kholmogorov, S. A.; Gazizullin, R. K.

    2018-01-01

    One-dimensional linearized problems on the possible buckling modes of an internal or peripheral layer of unidirectional multilayer composites with rectilinear fibers under compression in the fiber direction are considered. The investigations are carried out using the known Kirchhoff-Love and Timoshenko models for the layers. The binder, modeled as an elastic foundation, is described by the equations of elasticity theory, which are simplified in accordance to the model of a transversely soft layer and are integrated along the transverse coordinate considering the kinematic coupling relations for a layer and foundation layers. Exact analytical solutions of the problems formulated are found, which are used to calculate a composite made of an HSE 180 REM prepreg based on a unidirectional carbon fiber tape. The possible buckling modes of its internal and peripheral layers are identified. Calculation results are compared with experimental data obtained earlier. It is concluded that, for the composite studied, the flexural buckling of layers in the uniform axial compression of specimens along fibers is impossible — the failure mechanism is delamination with buckling of a fiber bundle according to the pure shear mode. It is realized (due to the low average transverse shear modulus) at the value of the ultimate compression stress equal to the average shear modulus. It is shown that such a shear buckling mode can be identified only on the basis of equations constructed using the Timoshenko shear model to describe the deformation process of layers.

  15. Enhanced stiffness of silk-like fibers by loop formation in the corona leads to stronger gels.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Wolf H; Domeradzka, Natalia E; Werten, Marc W T; Leermakers, Frans A M; de Vries, Renko J; de Wolf, Frits A; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2016-11-01

    We study the self-assembly of protein polymers consisting of a silk-like block flanked by two hydrophilic blocks, with a cysteine residue attached to the C-terminal end. The silk blocks self-assemble to form fibers while the hydrophilic blocks form a stabilizing corona. Entanglement of the fibers leads to the formation of hydrogels. Under oxidizing conditions the cysteine residues form disulfide bridges, effectively connecting two corona chains at their ends to form a loop. We find that this leads to a significant increase in the elastic modulus of the gels. Using atomic force microscopy, we show that this stiffening is due to an increase of the persistence length of the fibers. Self-consistent-field calculations indicate a slight decrease of the lateral pressure in the corona upon loop formation. We argue that this small decrease in the repulsive interactions affects the stacking of the silk-like blocks in the core, resulting in a more rigid fiber. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Fiber Optics: Deregulate and Deploy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwinski, Jan H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes fiber optic technology, explains its use in education and commercial settings, and recommends regulations and legislation that will speed its use to create broadband information networks. Topics discussed include distance learning; interactive video; costs; and the roles of policy makers, lawmakers, public advocacy groups, and consumers.…

  17. Specialty fibers for fiber optic sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, K.; Koh, J.; Coon, J.; Chien, C. K.; Artuso, A.; Chen, X.; Nolan, D.; Li, M.-J.

    2007-09-01

    Over the last several years, Fiber Optic Sensor (FOS) applications have seen an increased acceptance in many areas including oil & gas production monitoring, gyroscopes, current sensors, structural sensing and monitoring, and aerospace applications. High level optical and mechanical reliability of optical fiber is necessary to guarantee reliable performance of FOS. In this paper, we review recent research and development activities on new specialty fibers. We discuss fiber design concepts and present both modeling and experimental results. The main approaches to enhancing fiber attributes include new index profile design and fiber coating modification.

  18. A biopulping mechanism : creation of acid groups on fiber

    Treesearch

    Chris Hunt; William Kenealy; Eric Horn; Carl Houtman

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how biopulping modifies chemical and physical properties of wood and how these changes affect the properties of the resulting fiber. Mechanical and chemical testing revealed wood cell changes during 2 weeks of colonization by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Typical mechanical properties, such as modulus of elasticity and maximum load, tracked reductions in...

  19. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  20. Elastic and inelastic collisions of swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Dieter; Martin, Stephan; Thatcher, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Scattering interactions of swarms in potentials that are generated by an attraction-repulsion model are studied. In free space, swarms in this model form a well-defined steady state describing the translation of a stable formation of the particles whose shape depends on the interaction potential. Thus, the collision between a swarm and a boundary or between two swarms can be treated as (quasi)-particle scattering. Such scattering experiments result in internal excitations of the swarm or in bound states, respectively. In addition, varying a parameter linked to the relative importance of damping and potential forces drives transitions between elastic and inelastic scattering of the particles. By tracking the swarm's center of mass, a refraction rule is derived via simulations relating the incoming and outgoing directions of a swarm hitting the wall. Iterating the map derived from the refraction law allows us to predict and understand the dynamics and bifurcations of swarms in square boxes and in channels.

  1. Solitary waves in a peridynamic elastic solid

    DOE PAGES

    Silling, Stewart A.

    2016-06-23

    The propagation of large amplitude nonlinear waves in a peridynamic solid is ana- lyzed. With an elastic material model that hardens in compression, sufficiently large wave pulses propagate as solitary waves whose velocity can far exceed the linear wave speed. In spite of their large velocity and amplitude, these waves leave the material they pass through with no net change in velocity and stress. They are nondissipative and nondispersive, and they travel unchanged over large distances. An approximate solution for solitary waves is derived that reproduces the main features of these waves observed in computational simulations. We demonstrate, by numericalmore » studies, that waves interact only weakly with each other when they collide. Finally, we found that wavetrains composed of many non-interacting solitary waves form and propagate under certain boundary and initial conditions.« less

  2. Nanofiber alignment of a small diameter elastic electrospun scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Jignesh

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in western countries with coronary heart disease making up 50% of these deaths. As a treatment option, tissue engineered grafts have great potential. Elastic scaffolds that mimic arterial extracellular matrix (ECM) may hold the key to creating viable vascular grafts. Electrospinning is a widely used scaffold fabrication technique to engineer tubular scaffolds. In this study, we investigated how the collector rotation speed altered the nanofiber alignment which may improve mechanical characteristics making the scaffold more suitable for arterial grafts. The scaffold was fabricated from a blend of PCL/Elastin. 2D Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) image processing tool and MatLab were used to quantitatively analyze nanofiber orientation at different collector speeds (13500 to 15500 rpm). Both Image J and MatLab showed graphical peaks indicating predominant fiber orientation angles. A collector speed of 15000 rpm was found to produce the best nanofiber alignment with narrow peaks at 90 and 270 degrees, and a relative amplitude of 200. This indicates a narrow distribution of circumferentially aligned nanofibers. Collector speeds below and above 15000 rpm caused a decrease in fiber alignment with a broader orientation distribution. Uniformity of fiber diameter was also measured. Of 600 measures from the 15000 rpm scaffolds, the fiber diameter range from 500 nm to 899 nm was most prevalent. This diameter range was slightly larger than native ECM which ranges from 50 nm to 500 nm. The second most prevalent diameter range had an average of 404 nm which is within the diameter range of collagen. This study concluded that with proper electrospinning technique and collector speed, it is possible to fabricate highly aligned small diameter elastic scaffolds. Image J 2D FFT results confirmed MatLab findings for the analyses of circumferentially aligned nanofibers. In addition, MatLab analyses simplified the FFT orientation data

  3. Mechanical evaluation of the resistance and elastance of post-burn scars after topical treatment with tretinoin

    PubMed Central

    Dematte, Maria Fernanda; Gemperli, Rolf; Salles, Alessandra Grassi; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Lanças, Tatiana; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: After burn injuries, scarred skin lacks elasticity, especially in hypertrophic scars. Topical treatment with tretinoin can improve the appearance and quality of the skin (i.e., texture, distensibility, color, and hydration). The objective of this prospective study was to examine the effects of treatment with 0.05% tretinoin for one year on the biomechanical behavior and histological changes undergone by facial skin with post-burn scarring. Setting: Tertiary, Institutional. METHOD: Fifteen female patients who had suffered partial thickness burns with more than two years of evolution were selected. Skin biopsies were obtained initially and after one year of treatment. The resistance and elastance of these skin biopsies were measured using a mechanical oscillation analysis system. The density of collagen fibers, elastic fibers, and versican were determined using immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: Tretinoin treatment significantly lowered skin resistance and elastance, which is a result that indicates higher distensibility of the skin. However, tretinoin treatment did not significantly affect the density of collagen fibers, elastic fibers, or versican. CONCLUSION: Topical tretinoin treatment alters the mechanical behavior of post-burn scarred skin by improving its distensibility and thus leads to improved quality of life for patients. PMID:22086527

  4. Mechanical evaluation of the resistance and elastance of post-burn scars after topical treatment with tretinoin.

    PubMed

    Dematte, Maria Fernanda; Gemperli, Rolf; Salles, Alessandra Grassi; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Lanças, Tatiana; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2011-01-01

    After burn injuries, scarred skin lacks elasticity, especially in hypertrophic scars. Topical treatment with tretinoin can improve the appearance and quality of the skin (i.e., texture, distensibility, color, and hydration). The objective of this prospective study was to examine the effects of treatment with 0.05% tretinoin for one year on the biomechanical behavior and histological changes undergone by facial skin with post-burn scarring. Tertiary, Institutional. Fifteen female patients who had suffered partial thickness burns with more than two years of evolution were selected. Skin biopsies were obtained initially and after one year of treatment. The resistance and elastance of these skin biopsies were measured using a mechanical oscillation analysis system. The density of collagen fibers, elastic fibers, and versican were determined using immunohistochemical analysis. Tretinoin treatment significantly lowered skin resistance and elastance, which is a result that indicates higher distensibility of the skin. However, tretinoin treatment did not significantly affect the density of collagen fibers, elastic fibers, or versican. Topical tretinoin treatment alters the mechanical behavior of post-burn scarred skin by improving its distensibility and thus leads to improved quality of life for patients.

  5. Finite element analysis of stress transfer mechanism from matrix to the fiber in SWCN reinforced nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, E.

    2017-02-01

    This study defined as micromechanical finite element (FE) approach examining the stress transfer mechanism in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCN) reinforced composites. In the modeling, 3D unit-cell method was evaluated. Carbon nanotube reinforced composites were modeled as three layers which comprises CNT, interface and matrix material. Firstly; matrix, fiber and interfacial materials all together considered as three layered cylindrical nanocomposite. Secondly, the cylindrical matrix material was assumed to be isotropic and also considered as a continuous medium. Then, fiber material was represented with zigzag type SWCNs. Finally, SWCN was combined with the elastic medium by using springs with different constants. In the FE modeling of SWCN reinforced composite model springs were modeled by using ANSYS spring damper element COMBIN14. The developed interfacial van der Waals interaction effects between the continuous matrix layer and the carbon nanotube fiber layer were simulated by applying these various spring stiffness values. In this study, the layered composite cylindrical FE model was presented as the equivalent mechanical properties of SWCN structures in terms of Young's modulus. The obtained results and literature values were presented and discussed. Figures, 16, 17, and 18 of the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, were affected by a PDF-processing error. Consequently, a solid diamond symbol appeared instead of a Greek tau on the y axis labels for these three figures. This article was updated on 17 March 2017 to correct the PDF-processing error, with the scientific content remaining unchanged.

  6. Fiber distributed feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G. A.; Yeh, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing round optical fibers as communication channels in optical communication networks presents the problem of obtaining a high efficiency coupling between the optical fiber and the laser. A laser is made an integral part of the optical fiber channel by either diffusing active material into the optical fiber or surrounding the optical fiber with the active material. Oscillation within the active medium to produce lasing action is established by grating the optical fiber so that distributed feedback occurs.

  7. Optimization of Elastically Tailored Tow-Placed Plates with Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

    2003-01-01

    Elastic stiffness tailoring of laminated composite panels by allowing the fibers to curve within the plane of the laminate is a design concept that has been demonstrated to be both beneficial and practical. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of stiffness tailoring through the use of curvilinear fibers to reduce stress concentrations around the hole and improve the load carrying capability of panels. Preliminary panel designs that are to be manufactured and tested were determined through design studies for flat plates without holes under axial compression using an optimization program. These candidate designs were then analyzed with finite element models that accurately reflect the test conditions and geometries in order to decide upon the final designs for manufacture and testing. An advanced tow-placement machine is used to manufacture the test panels with varying fiber orientation angles. A total of six large panels measuring three feet by six feet, each of which is used to produce four specimens with or without holes, are fabricated. The panels were machined into specimens with holes and tested at NASA Langley Research Center. Buckling response and failure of panels without holes and with two different hole dimensions are presented. Buckling and failure loads of tow-steered specimens are significantly greater than the buckling and failure loads of traditional straight-fiber specimens.

  8. Elasticity and critical bending moment of model colloidal aggregates.

    PubMed

    Pantina, John P; Furst, Eric M

    2005-04-08

    The bending mechanics of singly bonded colloidal aggregates are measured using laser tweezers. We find that the colloidal bonds are capable of supporting significant torques, providing a direct measurement of the tangential interactions between particles. A critical bending moment marks the limit of linear bending elasticity, past which small-scale rearrangements occur. These mechanical properties underlie the rheology and dynamics of colloidal gels formed by diffusion-limited cluster aggregation, and give critical insight into the contact interactions between Brownian particles.

  9. Does Topology Drive Fiber Polymerization?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have developed new procedures to examine the early steps in fibrin polymerization. First, we isolated fibrinogen monomers from plasma fibrinogen by gel filtration. Polymerization of fibrinogen monomers differed from that of plasma fibrinogen. The formation of protofibrils was slower and the transformation of protofibrils to fibers faster for the fibrinogen monomers. Second, we used formaldehyde to terminate the polymerization reactions. The formaldehyde-fixed products obtained at each time point were examined by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The data showed the formaldehyde-fixed products were stable and representative of the reaction intermediates. TEM images showed monomers, short oligomers, protofibrils, and thin fibers. The amount and length of these species varied with time. Short oligomers were less than 5% of the molecules at all times. Third, we developed models that recapitulate the TEM images. Fibrin monomer models were assembled into protofibrils, and protofibrils were assembled into two-strand fibers using Chimera software. Monomers were based on fibrinogen crystal structures, and the end-to-end interactions between monomers were based on D-dimer crystal structures. Protofibrils assembled from S-shaped monomers through asymmetric D:D interactions were ordered helical structures. Fibers were modeled by duplicating a protofibril and rotating the duplicate 120° around its long axis. No specific interactions were presumed. The two protofibrils simply twisted around one another to form a fiber. This model suggests that the conformation of the protofibril per se promotes the assembly into fibers. These findings introduce a novel mechanism for fibrin assembly that may be relevant to other biopolymers. PMID:25419972

  10. Dietary fat and fiber interact to uniquely modify global histone post-translational epigenetic programming in a rat colon cancer progression model.

    PubMed

    Triff, Karen; McLean, Mathew W; Callaway, Evelyn; Goldsby, Jennifer; Ivanov, Ivan; Chapkin, Robert S

    2018-04-16

    Dietary fermentable fiber generates short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), e.g., butyrate, in the colonic lumen which serves as a chemoprotective histone deacetylase inhibitor and/or as an acetylation substrate for histone acetylases. In addition, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) in fish oil can affect the chromatin landscape by acting as ligands for tumor suppressive nuclear receptors. In an effort to gain insight into the global dimension of post-translational modification of histones (including H3K4me3 and H3K9ac) and clarify the chemoprotective impact of dietary bioactive compounds on transcriptional control in a preclinical model of colon cancer, we generated high-resolution genome-wide RNA (RNA-Seq) and "chromatin-state" (H3K4me3-seq and H3K9ac-seq) maps for intestinal (epithelial colonocytes) crypts in rats treated with a colon carcinogen and fed diets containing bioactive (i) fish oil, (ii) fermentable fiber (a rich source of SCFA), (iii) a combination of fish oil plus pectin or (iv) control, devoid of fish oil or pectin. In general, poor correlation was observed between differentially transcribed (DE) and enriched genes (DERs) at multiple epigenetic levels. The combinatorial diet (fish oil + pectin) uniquely affected transcriptional profiles in the intestinal epithelium, e.g., upregulating lipid catabolism and beta-oxidation associated genes. These genes were linked to activated ligand-dependent nuclear receptors associated with n-3 PUFA and were also correlated with the mitochondrial L-carnitine shuttle and the inhibition of lipogenesis. These findings demonstrate that the chemoprotective fish oil + pectin combination diet uniquely induces global histone state modifications linked to the expression of chemoprotective genes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 UICC.

  11. Physical Principles Pertaining to Ultrasonic and Mechanical Properties of Anisotropic Media and Their Application to Nondestructive Evaluation of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Scott Michael

    The central theme of this thesis is to contribute to the physics underlying the mechanical properties of highly anisotropic materials. Our hypothesis is that a fundamental understanding of the physics involved in the interaction of interrogating ultrasonic waves with anisotropic media will provide useful information applicable to quantitative ultrasonic measurement techniques employed for the determination of material properties. Fiber-reinforced plastics represent a class of advanced composite materials that exhibit substantial anisotropy. The desired characteristics of practical fiber -reinforced composites depend on average mechanical properties achieved by placing fibers at specific angles relative to the external surfaces of the finished part. We examine the physics underlying the use of ultrasound as an interrogation probe for determination of ultrasonic and mechanical properties of anisotropic materials such as fiber-reinforced composites. Fundamental constituent parameters, such as elastic stiffness coefficients (c_{rm IJ}), are experimentally determined from ultrasonic time-of-flight measurements. Mechanical moduli (Poisson's ratio, Young's and shear modulus) descriptive of the anisotropic mechanical properties of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites are obtained from the ultrasonically determined stiffness coefficients. Three-dimensional visualizations of the anisotropic ultrasonic and mechanical properties of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites are generated. A related goal of the research is to strengthen the connection-between practical ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods and the physics underlying quantitative ultrasonic measurements for the assessment of manufactured fiber-reinforced composites. Production defects such as porosity have proven to be of substantial concern in the manufacturing of composites. We investigate the applicability of ultrasonic interrogation techniques for the detection and characterization of porosity in

  12. Respiratory monitoring system based on fiber optic macro bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnamaningsih, Retno Wigajatri; Widyakinanti, Astari; Dhia, Arika; Gumelar, Muhammad Raditya; Widianto, Arif; Randy, Muhammad; Soedibyo, Harry

    2018-02-01

    We proposed a respiratory monitoring system for living activities in human body based on fiber optic macro-bending for laboratory scale. The respiration sensor consists of a single-mode optical fiber and operating on a wavelength at around 1550 nm. The fiber optic was integrated into an elastic fabric placed on the chest and stomach of the monitored human subject. Deformations of the flexible textile involving deformations of the fiber optic bending curvature, which was proportional to the chest and stomach expansion. The deformation of the fiber was detected using photodetector and processed using microcontroller PIC18F14K50. The results showed that this system able to display various respiration pattern and rate for sleeping, and after walking and running activities in real time.

  13. Experimental study of optical fibers influence on composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong-Mei; Liang, Da-Kai

    2010-03-01

    Bending strength and elasticity modulus of composite, with and without embedded optical fibers, were experimentally studied. Two kinds of laminates, which were denoted as group 1 and group 2, were fabricated from an orthogonal woven glass/epoxy prepreg. Since the normal stress value becomes the biggest at the surface of a beam, the optical fibers were embedded at the outmost layer and were all along the loading direction. Four types of materials, using each kind of laminated prepreg respectively, were manufactured. The embedded optical fibers for the 4 material types were 0, 10, 30 and 50 respectively. Three-point bending tests were carried out on the produced specimens to study the influence of embedded optical fiber on host composite. The experimental results indicated that the materials in group 2 were more sensitive to the embedded optical fibers.

  14. Creep of chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The creep, thermal expansion, and elastic modulus properties for chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers were measured between 1000 and 1500 C. Creep strain was observed to increase logarithmically with time, monotonically with temperature, and linearly with tensile stress up to 600 MPa. The controlling activation energy was 480 + or - 20 kJ/mole. Thermal pretreatments near 1200 and 1450 C were found to significantly reduce fiber creep. These results coupled with creep recovery observations indicate that below 1400 C fiber creep is anelastic with neglible plastic component. This allowed a simple predictive method to be developed for describing fiber total deformation as a function of time, temperature, and stress. Mechanistic analysis of the property data suggests that fiber creep is the result of beta-SiC grain boundary sliding controlled by a small percent of free silicon in the grain boundaries.

  15. Optimal development of matrix elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Majkut, Stephanie; Idema, Timon; Swift, Joe; Krieger, Christine; Liu, Andrea; Discher, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In development and differentiation, morphological changes often accompany mechanical changes [1], but it is unclear if or when cells in embryos sense tissue elasticity. The earliest embryo is uniformly pliable while adult tissues vary widely in mechanics from soft brain and stiff heart to rigid bone [2], but the sensitivity of cells to microenvironment elasticity is debated [3]. Regenerative cardiology provides strong motivation because rigid post-infarct regions limit pumping by the adult heart [4]. Here we focus on embryonic heart and isolated cardiomyocytes, which both beat spontaneously. Tissue elasticity, Et, increases daily for heart to 1-2 kiloPascal by embryonic day-4 (E4), and although this is ∼10-fold softer than adult heart, the beating contractions of E4-cardiomyocytes prove optimal at ∼Et,E4 both in vivo and in vitro. Proteomics reveals daily increases in a small subset of proteins, namely collagen plus cardiac-specific excitation-contraction proteins. Rapid softening of the heart's matrix with collagenase or stiffening it with enzymatic crosslinking suppresses beating. Sparsely cultured E4-cardiomyocytes on collagen-coated gels likewise show maximal contraction on matrices with native E4 stiffness, highlighting cell-intrinsic mechanosensitivity. While an optimal elasticity for striation proves consistent with the mathematics of force-driven sarcomere registration, contraction wave-speed is linear in Et as theorized for Excitation-Contraction Coupled to Matrix Elasticity. Mechanosensitive stem cell cardiogenesis helps generalize tissue results, which demonstrate how myosin-II organization and contractile function is optimally matched to the load presented by matrix elasticity. PMID:24268417

  16. Soliton interactions and complexes for coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Tian, Bo; Liu, Wen-Jun; Sun, Kun; Li, Min; Wang, Pan

    2012-03-01

    Under investigation in this paper are the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (CNLS) equations, which can be used to govern the optical-soliton propagation and interaction in such optical media as the multimode fibers, fiber arrays, and birefringent fibers. By taking the 3-CNLS equations as an example for the N-CNLS ones (N≥3), we derive the analytic mixed-type two- and three-soliton solutions in more general forms than those obtained in the previous studies with the Hirota method and symbolic computation. With the choice of parameters for those soliton solutions, soliton interactions and complexes are investigated through the asymptotic and graphic analysis. Soliton interactions and complexes with the bound dark solitons in a mode or two modes are observed, including that (i) the two bright solitons display the breatherlike structures while the two dark ones stay parallel, (ii) the two bright and dark solitons all stay parallel, and (iii) the states of the bound solitons change from the breatherlike structures to the parallel one even with the distance between those solitons smaller than that before the interaction with the regular one soliton. Asymptotic analysis is also used to investigate the elastic and inelastic interactions between the bound solitons and the regular one soliton. Furthermore, some discussions are extended to the N-CNLS equations (N>3). Our results might be helpful in such applications as the soliton switch, optical computing, and soliton amplification in the nonlinear optics.

  17. Lamb Wave Assessment of Fiber Volume Fraction in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.; Prosser, W. H.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    1998-01-01

    Among the various techniques available, ultrasonic Lamb waves offer a convenient method of examining composite materials. Since the Lamb wave velocity depends on the elastic properties of a material, an effective tool exists to evaluate composites by measuring the velocity of these waves. Lamb waves can propagate over long distances and are sensitive to the desired in-plane elastic properties of the material. This paper discusses a study in which Lamb waves were used to examine fiber volume fraction variations of approximately 0.40-0.70 in composites. The Lamb wave measurements were compared to fiber volume fractions obtained from acid digestion tests. Additionally, a model to predict the fiber volume fraction from Lamb wave velocity values was evaluated.

  18. Optimal matrix rigidity for stress fiber polarization in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The shape and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells is especially sensitive to the rigidity of their environment; the physical mechanisms involved are unknown. A theoretical model and experiments demonstrate here that the polarization/alignment of stress-fibers within stem cells is a non-monotonic function of matrix rigidity. We treat the cell as an active elastic inclusion in a surrounding matrix whose polarizability, unlike dead matter, depends on the feedback of cellular forces that develop in response to matrix stresses. The theory correctly predicts the monotonic increase of the cellular forces with the matrix rigidity and the alignment of stress-fibers parallel to the long axis of cells. We show that the anisotropy of this alignment depends non-monotonically on matrix rigidity and demonstrate it experimentally by quantifying the orientational distribution of stress-fibers in stem cells. These findings offer a first physical insight for the dependence of stem cell differentiation on tissue elasticity. PMID:20563235

  19. Strong tissue glue with tunable elasticity.

    PubMed

    Kelmansky, Regina; McAlvin, Brian J; Nyska, Abraham; Dohlman, Jenny C; Chiang, Homer H; Hashimoto, Michinao; Kohane, Daniel S; Mizrahi, Boaz

    2017-04-15

    Many bio-adhesive materials adhere weakly to tissue due to their high water content and weak structural integrity. Others provide desirable adhesive strength but suffer from rigid structure and lack of elasticity after administration. We have developed two water-free, liquid four-armed PEG pre-polymers modified with NHS or with NH 2 end groups which upon mixing changed from liquids to an elastic solid. The sealant and adhesive properties increased with the amount of the %v/v PEG 4 -NHS pre-polymer, and achieved adhesive properties comparable to those of cyanoacrylate glues. All mixtures showed minimal cytotoxicity in vitro. Mixtures of 90%v/v PEG 4 -NHS were retained in the subcutaneous space in vivo for up to 14days with minimal inflammation. This material's combination of desirable mechanical properties and biocompatibility has potential in numerous biomedical applications. Many bio-adhesive materials adhere weakly to tissue (e.g. hydrogels) due to their high water content and weak structural integrity. Others provide desirable mechanical properties but suffer from poor biocompatibility (e.g. cyanoacrylates). This study proposes a new concept for the formation of super strong and tunable tissue glues. Our bio-materials' enhanced performance is the product of new neat (without water or other solvents) liquid polymers that solidify after administration while allowing interactions with the tissue. Moreover, the elastic modulus of these materials could easily be tuned without compromising biocompatibility. This system could be an attractive alternative to sutures and staples since it can be applied more quickly, causes less pain and may require less equipment while maintaining the desired adhesion strength. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Elegent—An elastic event generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kašpar, J.

    2014-03-01

    Although elastic scattering of nucleons may look like a simple process, it presents a long-lasting challenge for theory. Due to missing hard energy scale, the perturbative QCD cannot be applied. Instead, many phenomenological/theoretical models have emerged. In this paper we present a unified implementation of some of the most prominent models in a C++ library, moreover extended to account for effects of the electromagnetic interaction. The library is complemented with a number of utilities. For instance, programs to sample many distributions of interest in four-momentum transfer squared, t, impact parameter, b, and collision energy √{s}. These distributions at ISR, Spp¯S, RHIC, Tevatron and LHC energies are available for download from the project web site. Both in the form of ROOT files and PDF figures providing comparisons among the models. The package includes also a tool for Monte-Carlo generation of elastic scattering events, which can easily be embedded in any other program framework. Catalogue identifier: AERT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 10551 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 126316 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any in principle, tested on x86-64 architecture. Operating system: Any in principle, tested on GNU/Linux. RAM: Strongly depends on the task, but typically below 20MB Classification: 11.6. External routines: ROOT, HepMC Nature of problem: Monte-Carlo simulation of elastic nucleon-nucleon collisions Solution method: Implementation of some of the most prominent phenomenological/theoretical models providing cumulative distribution function that is used for random event generation. Running time: Strongly depends on the task, but

  1. FIBER OPTICS. ACOUSTOOPTICS: High-frequency magnetooptics of fiber waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, S. N.; Bulyuk, A. N.; Vetoshko, P. M.; Shkerdin, G. N.

    1990-07-01

    An investigation is made of the hf distributed magnetooptic interaction in fiber waveguides associated with the Faraday effect observed under the conditions of both spatial and temporal phase matching between the normal modes of the waveguide and an external magentic field. Analytic expressions are obtained for the main relationships governing modulation of the state of polarization of light in a long fiber waveguide at high and ultrahigh frequencies. An analysis is made of several variants of hf magnetooptic modulators. It is shown that in the specific case when a 10-m long quartz fiber waveguide wound to form a cylindrical coil is placed inside the cavity of a coaxial microwave resonator and the microwave control power is 10 W, the efficiency of modulation of light should be 50%. The main theoretical predictions were supported by the reported experiments. These experiments showed that at a frequency of 80 MHz the modulation efficiency was 1% when the control power was 0.5 W.

  2. Optical fiber pressure sensor based on fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dongcao

    In oil field, it is important to measure the high pressure and temperature for down-hole oil exploration and well-logging, the available traditional electronic sensor is challenged due to the harsh, flammable environment. Recently, applications based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor in the oil industry have become a popular research because of its distinguishing advantages such as electrically passive operation, immunity to electromagnetic interference, high resolution, insensitivity to optical power fluctuation etc. This thesis is divided into two main sections. In the first section, the design of high pressure sensor based on FBG is described. Several sensing elements based on FBG for high pressure measurements have been proposed, for example bulk-modulus or free elastic modulus. But the structure of bulk-modulus and free elastic modulus is relatively complex and not easy to fabricate. In addition, the pressure sensitivity is not high and the repeatability of the structure has not been investigated. In this thesis, a novel host material of carbon fiber laminated composite (CFLC) for high pressure sensing is proposed. The mechanical characteristics including principal moduli in three directions and the shape repeatability are investigated. Because of it's Young's modulus in one direction and anisotropic characteristics, the pressure sensor made by CFLC has excellent sensitivity. This said structure can be used in very high pressure measurement due to carbon fiber composite's excellent shape repetition even under high pressure. The experimental results show high pressure sensitivity of 0.101nm/MPa and high pressure measurement up to 70MPa. A pressure sensor based on CFLC and FBG with temperature compensation has been designed. In the second section, the design of low pressure sensor based on FBG is demonstrated. Due to the trade off between measurement range and sensitivity, a sensor for lower pressure range needs more sensitivity. A novel material of carbon

  3. Dynamics of Mechanical Signal Transmission through Prestressed Stress Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yongyun; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2012-01-01

    Transmission of mechanical stimuli through the actin cytoskeleton has been proposed as a mechanism for rapid long-distance mechanotransduction in cells; however, a quantitative understanding of the dynamics of this transmission and the physical factors governing it remains lacking. Two key features of the actin cytoskeleton are its viscoelastic nature and the presence of prestress due to actomyosin motor activity. We develop a model of mechanical signal transmission through prestressed viscoelastic actin stress fibers that directly connect the cell surface to the nucleus. The analysis considers both temporally stationary and oscillatory mechanical signals and accounts for cytosolic drag on the stress fibers. To elucidate the physical parameters that govern mechanical signal transmission, we initially focus on the highly simplified case of a single stress fiber. The results demonstrate that the dynamics of mechanical signal transmission depend on whether the applied force leads to transverse or axial motion of the stress fiber. For transverse motion, mechanical signal transmission is dominated by prestress while fiber elasticity has a negligible effect. Conversely, signal transmission for axial motion is mediated uniquely by elasticity due to the absence of a prestress restoring force. Mechanical signal transmission is significantly delayed by stress fiber material viscosity, while cytosolic damping becomes important only for longer stress fibers. Only transverse motion yields the rapid and long-distance mechanical signal transmission dynamics observed experimentally. For simple networks of stress fibers, mechanical signals are transmitted rapidly to the nucleus when the fibers are oriented largely orthogonal to the applied force, whereas the presence of fibers parallel to the applied force slows down mechanical signal transmission significantly. The present results suggest that cytoskeletal prestress mediates rapid mechanical signal transmission and allows

  4. Substrate-dependent cell elasticity measured by optical tweezers indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Ndoye, Fatou; Coceano, Giovanna; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, cell elasticity has been widely investigated as a potential label free indicator for cellular alteration in different diseases, cancer included. Cell elasticity can be locally measured by pulling membrane tethers, stretching or indenting the cell using optical tweezers. In this paper, we propose a simple approach to perform cell indentation at pN forces by axially moving the cell against a trapped microbead. The elastic modulus is calculated using the Hertz-model. Besides the axial component, the setup also allows us to examine the lateral cell-bead interaction. This technique has been applied to measure the local elasticity of HBL-100 cells, an immortalized human cell line, originally derived from the milk of a woman with no evidence of breast cancer lesions. In addition, we have studied the influence of substrate stiffness on cell elasticity by performing experiments on cells cultured on two substrates, bare and collagen-coated, having different stiffness. The mean value of the cell elastic modulus measured during indentation was 26±9 Pa for the bare substrate, while for the collagen-coated substrate it diminished to 19±7 Pa. The same trend was obtained for the elastic modulus measured during the retraction of the cell: 23±10 Pa and 13±7 Pa, respectively. These results show the cells adapt their stiffness to that of the substrate and demonstrate the potential of this setup for low-force probing of modifications to cell mechanics induced by the surrounding environment (e.g. extracellular matrix or other cells).

  5. CHNS: A case study of turbulence in elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, P. H.; Chacón, L.

    2018-05-01

    Recent progress in the study of Cahn-Hilliard Navier-Stokes (CHNS) turbulence is summarized. This is an example of elastic turbulence, which can occur in elastic (i.e., self-restoring) media. Such media exhibit memory due to freezing-in laws, as does MHD, which in turn constrains the dynamics. We report new results in the theory of CHNS turbulence in 2D, with special emphasis on the role of structure (i.e., "blob") formation and its interaction with the dual cascade. The evolution of a concentration gradient in response to a single eddy—analogous to flux expulsion in MHD—is analyzed. Lessons learned are discussed in the context of MHD and other elastic media.

  6. Elastic gauge fields and Hall viscosity of Dirac magnons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreiros, Yago; Vozmediano, María A. H.

    2018-02-01

    We analyze the coupling of elastic lattice deformations to the magnon degrees of freedom of magnon Dirac materials. For a honeycomb ferromagnet we find that, as happens in the case of graphene, elastic gauge fields appear coupled to the magnon pseudospinors. For deformations that induce constant pseudomagnetic fields, the spectrum around the Dirac nodes splits into pseudo-Landau levels. We show that when a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction is considered, a topological gap opens in the system and a Chern-Simons effective action for the elastic degrees of freedom is generated. Such a term encodes a phonon Hall viscosity response, entirely generated by quantum fluctuations of magnons living in the vicinity of the Dirac points. The magnon Hall viscosity vanishes at zero temperature, and grows as temperature is raised and the states around the Dirac points are increasingly populated.

  7. The elasticity of soap bubbles containing wormlike micelles.

    PubMed

    Sabadini, Edvaldo; Ungarato, Rafael F S; Miranda, Paulo B

    2014-01-28

    Slow-motion imaging of the rupture of soap bubbles generally shows the edges of liquid films retracting at a constant speed (known as the Taylor-Culick velocity). Here we investigate soap bubbles formed from simple solutions of a cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide - CTAB) and sodium salicylate. The interaction of salicylate ions with CTAB leads to the formation of wormlike micelles (WLM), which yield a viscoelastic behavior to the liquid film of the bubble. We demonstrate that these elastic bubbles collapse at a velocity up to 30 times higher than the Taylor-Culick limit, which has never been surpassed. This is because during the bubble inflation, the entangled WLM chains stretch, storing elastic energy. This extra energy is then released during the rupture of the bubble, yielding an additional driving force for film retraction (besides surface tension). This new mechanism for the bursting of elastic bubbles may have important implications to the breakup of viscoelastic sprays in industrial applications.

  8. Vector breather-to-soliton transitions and nonlinear wave interactions induced by higher-order effects in an erbium-doped fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Wang, Lei; Xie, Xi-Yang

    2018-06-01

    Vector breather-to-soliton transitions for the higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger-Maxwell-Bloch (NLS-MB) system with sextic terms are investigated. The Lax pair and Darboux transformation (DT) of such system are constructed. With the DT, analytic vector breather solutions up to the second order are obtained. With appropriate choices of the spectra parameters, vector breather-to-soliton transitions happen. Interaction mechanisms of vector nonlinear waves (breather-soliton or soliton-soliton interactions) are displayed.

  9. Influence of stress interaction on the behavior of off-axis unidirectional composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, M. J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    The yield function for plane stress of a transversely isotropic composite lamina consisting of stiff, linearly elastic fibers and a von Mises matrix material is formulated in terms of Hill's elastic stress concentration factors and a single plastic constraint parameter. The above are subsequently evaluated on the basis of observed average lamina and constituent response for the Avco 5505 boron epoxy system. It is shown that inclusion of residual stresses in the yield function together with the incorporation of Dubey and Hillier's concept of generalized yield stress for anisotropic media in the constitutive equation correctly predicts the trends observed in experiments. The incorporation of the strong axial stress interaction necessary to predict the correct trends in the shear response is directly traced to the high residual axial stresses in the matrix induced during fabrication of the composite.

  10. Elasticity improves handgrip performance and user experience during visuomotor control

    PubMed Central

    Rinne, Paul; Liardon, Jean-Luc; Uhomoibhi, Catherine; Bentley, Paul; Burdet, Etienne

    2017-01-01

    Passive rehabilitation devices, providing motivation and feedback, potentially offer an automated and low-cost therapy method, and can be used as simple human–machine interfaces. Here, we ask whether there is any advantage for a hand-training device to be elastic, as opposed to rigid, in terms of performance and preference. To address this question, we have developed a highly sensitive and portable digital handgrip, promoting independent and repetitive rehabilitation of grasp function based around a novel elastic force and position sensing structure. A usability study was performed on 66 healthy subjects to assess the effect of elastic versus rigid handgrip control during various visuomotor tracking tasks. The results indicate that, for tasks relying either on feedforward or on feedback control, novice users perform significantly better with the elastic handgrip, compared with the rigid equivalent (11% relative improvement, 9–14% mean range; p < 0.01). Furthermore, there was a threefold increase in the number of subjects who preferred elastic compared with rigid handgrip interaction. Our results suggest that device compliance is an important design consideration for grip training devices. PMID:28386448

  11. Elasticity improves handgrip performance and user experience during visuomotor control.

    PubMed

    Mace, Michael; Rinne, Paul; Liardon, Jean-Luc; Uhomoibhi, Catherine; Bentley, Paul; Burdet, Etienne

    2017-02-01

    Passive rehabilitation devices, providing motivation and feedback, potentially offer an automated and low-cost therapy method, and can be used as simple human-machine interfaces. Here, we ask whether there is any advantage for a hand-training device to be elastic, as opposed to rigid, in terms of performance and preference. To address this question, we have developed a highly sensitive and portable digital handgrip, promoting independent and repetitive rehabilitation of grasp function based around a novel elastic force and position sensing structure. A usability study was performed on 66 healthy subjects to assess the effect of elastic versus rigid handgrip control during various visuomotor tracking tasks. The results indicate that, for tasks relying either on feedforward or on feedback control, novice users perform significantly better with the elastic handgrip, compared with the rigid equivalent (11% relative improvement, 9-14% mean range; p  < 0.01). Furthermore, there was a threefold increase in the number of subjects who preferred elastic compared with rigid handgrip interaction. Our results suggest that device compliance is an important design consideration for grip training devices.

  12. Kinematic support using elastic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geirsson, Arni; Debra, Daniel B.

    1988-01-01

    The design of kinematic supports using elastic elements is reviewed. The two standard methods (cone, Vee and flat and three Vees) are presented and a design example involving a machine tool metrology bench is given. Design goals included thousandfold strain attenuation in the bench relative to the base when the base strains due to temperature variations and shifting loads. Space applications are also considered.

  13. Pilot Study of Debt Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiner, Keith; Girardi, Tony

    2006-01-01

    This report examines the relationship between student loan debt and the manner in which that debt is described. It focuses on three forms of description: (1) monthly payments, (2) total debt, and (3) income after graduation. The authors used the term elasticity to describe the relationship between consumers' college choices and the retention…

  14. The interaction of intracellular Mg2+ and pH on Cl- fluxes associated with intracellular pH regulation in barnacle muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The intracellular dialysis technique was used to measure unidirectional Cl- fluxes and net acid extrusion by single muscle fibers from the giant barnacle. Decreasing pHi below normal levels of 7.35 stimulated both Cl- efflux and influx. These increases of Cl- fluxes were blocked by disulfonic acid stilbene derivatives such as SITS and DIDS. The SITS- sensitive Cl- efflux was sharply dependent upon pHi, increasing approximately 20-fold as pHi was decreased from 7.35 to 6.7. Under conditions of normal intracellular Mg2+ concentration, the apparent pKa for the activation of Cl- efflux was 7.0. We found that raising [Mg2+]i, but not [Mg2+]o, had a pronounced inhibitory effect on both SITS-sensitive unidirectional Cl- fluxes as well as on SITS-sensitive net acid extrusion. Increasing [Mg2+]i shifted the apparent pKa of Cl- efflux to a more acid value without affecting the maximal flux that could be attained. This relation between pHi and [Mg2+]i on SITS- sensitive Cl- efflux is consistent with a competition between H ions and Mg ions. We conclude that the SITS-inhibitable Cl- fluxes are mediated by the pHi-regulatory transport mechanism and that changes of intracellular Mg2+ levels can modify the activity of the pHi regulator/anion transporter. PMID:3392519

  15. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  16. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor); Mattes, Brenton L. (Inventor); Charnetski, Clark J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  17. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Muhs, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  18. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Muhs, J.D.

    1996-10-22

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded are disclosed. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled. 3 figs.

  19. Nonlinear characterization of elasticity using quantitative optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi; Zaki, Farzana R; Chandra, Namas; Chester, Shawn A; Liu, Xuan

    2016-11-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) has been used to perform mechanical characterization on biological tissue at the microscopic scale. In this work, we used quantitative optical coherence elastography (qOCE), a novel technology we recently developed, to study the nonlinear elastic behavior of biological tissue. The qOCE system had a fiber-optic probe to exert a compressive force to deform tissue under the tip of the probe. Using the space-division multiplexed optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detected by a spectral domain OCT engine, we were able to simultaneously quantify the probe deformation that was proportional to the force applied, and to quantify the tissue deformation. In other words, our qOCE system allowed us to establish the relationship between mechanical stimulus and tissue response to characterize the stiffness of biological tissue. Most biological tissues have nonlinear elastic behavior, and the apparent stress-strain relationship characterized by our qOCE system was nonlinear an extended range of strain, for a tissue-mimicking phantom as well as biological tissues. Our experimental results suggested that the quantification of force in OCE was critical for accurate characterization of tissue mechanical properties and the qOCE technique was capable of differentiating biological tissues based on the elasticity of tissue that is generally nonlinear.

  20. Effects of interfacial debonding and fiber breakage on static and dynamic buckling of fibers embedded in matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serttunc, Metin

    1992-09-01

    Analyses were performed for static and dynamic buckling of a continuous fiber embedded in a matrix in order to determine the effects of interfacial debonding and fiber breakage on the critical buckling load and the domain of instability. A beam on elastic foundation model was used. The study showed that a local interfacial debonding between a fiber and a surrounding matrix resulted in an increase of the wavelength of the buckling mode. An increase of the wave length yielded a decrease of the static buckling load and lowered the dynamic instability domain. In general, the effect of a partial or complete interfacial debonding was more significant on the domain of dynamic instability than on the effects of static buckling load. For dynamic buckling of a fiber, a local debonding of size 10 to 20 percent of the fiber length had the most important influence on the domains of dynamic instability regardless of the location of debonding and the boundary conditions of the fiber. For static buckling, the location of a local debonding was critical to a free-simply supported fiber but not to a fiber with both ends simply supported. Fiber breakage also lowered the critical buckling load significantly.

  1. Coatings for graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite fibers released from composites during burning or an explosion caused shorting of electrical and electronic equipment. Silicon carbide, silica, silicon nitride and boron nitride were coated on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistances. Resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than uncoated fiber were attained without any significant degradation of the substrate fiber. An organo-silicone approach to produce coated fibers with high electrical resistance was also used. Celion 6000 graphite fibers were coated with an organo-silicone compound, followed by hydrolysis and pyrolysis of the coating to a silica-like material. The shear and flexural strengths of composites made from high electrically resistant fibers were considerably lower than the shear and flexural strengths of composites made from the lower electrically resistant fibers. The lower shear strengths of the composites indicated that the coatings on these fibers were weaker than the coating on the fibers which were pyrolyzed at higher temperature.

  2. Elastic And Plastic Deformations In Butt Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents study of mathematical modeling of stresses and strains, reaching beyond limits of elasticity, in bars and plates. Study oriented toward development of capability to predict stresses and resulting elastic and plastic strains in butt welds.

  3. Study of Natural Fiber Breakage during Composite Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano-Solis, Carlos Jafet

    Biofiber-thermoplastic composites have gained considerable importance in the last century. To provide mechanical reinforcement to the polymer, fibers must be larger than a critical aspect ratio (length-to-width ratio). However, biofibers undergo breakage in length or width during processing, affecting their final aspect ratio in the composites. In this study, influence on biofiber breakage by factors related to processing conditions, fiber morphology and the flow type was investigated through: a) experiments using an internal mixer, a twin-screw extruder (TSE) or a capillary rheometer; and b) a Monte Carlo computer simulation. Composites of thermomechanical fibers of aspen or wheat straw mixed with polypropylene were studied. Internal mixer experiments analyzed wheat straw and two batches of aspen fibers, named AL and AS. AL fibers had longer average length. Processing variables included the temperature, rotors speed and fiber concentration. TSE experiments studied AL and AS fiber composites under various screws speeds, temperatures and feeding rates of the polymer and fibers. Capillary rheometers experiments determined AL fiber breakage in shear and elongational flows for composites processed at different concentrations, temperatures, and strain rates. Finally, the internal mixer experimental results where compared to Monte Carlo simulation predictions. The simulation focused on fiber length breakage due to fiber-polymer interactions. Internal mixer results showed that final fiber average length depended almost solely on processing conditions while final fiber average width depended on both processing conditions and initial fiber morphology. In the TSE, processing conditions as well as initial fiber length influenced final average length. TSE results showed that the fiber concentration regime seems to influence the effect of processing variables on fiber breakage. Capillary rheometer experiments demonstrated that biofiber breakage happens in both elongational and

  4. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  5. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    passive and active versions of each fiber designed under this task. Crystal Fibre shall provide characteristics of the fiber fabricated to include core...passive version of multicore fiber iteration 2. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Laser physics, Fibre Lasers, Photonic Crystal, Multicore, Fiber Laser 16...9 00* 0 " CRYSTAL FIBRE INT ODUCTION This report describes the photonic crystal fibers developed under agreement No FA8655-o5-a- 3046. All

  6. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  7. On the anisotropic elastic properties of hydroxyapatite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.; Ukraincik, K.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the isotropic elastic moduli on polycrystalline specimens of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite are compared with elastic constants measured directly from single crystals of fluorapatite in order to derive a set of pseudo single crystal elastic constants for hydroxyapatite. The stiffness coefficients thus derived are given. The anisotropic and isotropic elastic properties are then computed and compared with similar properties derived from experimental observations of the anisotropic behavior of bone.

  8. Effect of cold drawing on mechanical properties of biodegradable fibers.

    PubMed

    La Mantia, Francesco Paolo; Ceraulo, Manuela; Mistretta, Maria Chiara; Morreale, Marco

    2017-01-26

    Biodegradable polymers are currently gaining importance in several fields, because they allow mitigation of the impact on the environment related to disposal of traditional, nonbiodegradable polymers, as well as reducing the utilization of oil-based sources (when they also come from renewable resources). Fibers made of biodegradable polymers are of particular interest, though, it is not easy to obtain polymer fibers with suitable mechanical properties and to tailor these to the specific application. The main ways to tailor the mechanical properties of a given biodegradable polymer fiber are based on crystallinity and orientation control. However, crystallinity can only marginally be modified during processing, while orientation can be controlled, either during hot drawing or cold stretching. In this paper, a systematic investigation of the influence of cold stretching on the mechanical and thermomechanical properties of fibers prepared from different biodegradable polymer systems was carried out. Rheological and thermal characterization helped in interpreting the orientation mechanisms, also on the basis of the molecular structure of the polymer systems. It was found that cold drawing strongly improved the elastic modulus, tensile strength and thermomechanical resistance of the fibers, in comparison with hot-spun fibers. The elastic modulus showed higher increment rates in the biodegradable systems upon increasing the draw ratio.

  9. An irregular lattice method for elastic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Gareth S.; Bean, Christopher J.

    2011-12-01

    Lattice methods are a class of numerical scheme which represent a medium as a connection of interacting nodes or particles. In the case of modelling seismic wave propagation, the interaction term is determined from Hooke's Law including a bond-bending term. This approach has been shown to model isotropic seismic wave propagation in an elastic or viscoelastic medium by selecting the appropriate underlying lattice structure. To predetermine the material constants, this methodology has been restricted to regular grids, hexagonal or square in 2-D or cubic in 3-D. Here, we present a method for isotropic elastic wave propagation where we can remove this lattice restriction. The methodology is outlined and a relationship between the elastic material properties and an irregular lattice geometry are derived. The numerical method is compared with an analytical solution for wave propagation in an infinite homogeneous body along with comparing the method with a numerical solution for a layered elastic medium. The dispersion properties of this method are derived from a plane wave analysis showing the scheme is more dispersive than a regular lattice method. Therefore, the computational costs of using an irregular lattice are higher. However, by removing the regular lattice structure the anisotropic nature of fracture propagation in such methods can be removed.

  10. Methods And Apparatus For Acoustic Fiber Fractionation

    DOEpatents

    Brodeur, Pierre

    1999-11-09

    Methods and apparatus for acoustic fiber fractionation using a plane ultrasonic wave field interacting with water suspended fibers circulating in a channel flow using acoustic radiation forces to separate fibers into two or more fractions based on fiber radius, with applications of the separation concept in the pulp and paper industry. The continuous process relies on the use of a wall-mounted, rectangular cross-section piezoelectric ceramic transducer to selectively deflect flowing fibers as they penetrate the ultrasonic field. The described embodiment uses a transducer frequency of approximately 150 kHz. Depending upon the amount of dissolved gas in water, separation is obtained using a standing or a traveling wave field.

  11. Measurement of elastic Υ photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Breitweg, J.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Yoshida, R.; Zhang, H.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Anselmo, F.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Amelung, C.; Bornheim, A.; Brock, I.; Coböken, K.; Crittenden, J.; Deffner, R.; Eckert, M.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, K.; Heinz, L.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Paul, E.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schnurbusch, H.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; McFall, J. D.; Piccioni, D.; Roff, D. G.; Tapper, R. J.; Capua, M.; Iannotti, L.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Jing, Z.; Liu, W.; Mellado, B.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sampson, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Przybycień , M. B.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Bukowy, M.; Czermak, A. M.; Jeleń , K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycień , M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩ Bska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zaja C, J.; Duliń Ski, Z.; Kotań Ski, A.; Abbiendi, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fricke, U.; Gialas, I.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hasell, D.; Hebbel, K.; Johnson, K. F.; Kasemann, M.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lindemann, L.; Löhr, B.; Martínez, M.; Milewski, J.; Milite, M.; Monteiro, T.; Notz, D.; Pellegrino, A.; Pelucchi, F.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Ryan, J. J.; Saull, P. R. B.; Savin, A. A.; Schneekloth, U.; Schwarzer, O.; Selonke, F.; Stonjek, S.; Surrow, B.; Tassi, E.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Burow, B. D.; Coldewey, C.; Grabosch, H. J.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P.; Maccarrone, G.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Trefzger, T.; Wölfle, S.; Bromley, J. T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Lee, S. W.; MacDonald, N.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Sinclair, L. E.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Strickland, E.; Waugh, R.; Bohnet, I.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Meyer-Larsen, A.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Garfagnini, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Kçira, D.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Poelz, G.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Cole, J. E.; Howell, G.; Lamberti, L.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Pavel, N.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Sideris, D.; Walker, R.; Mallik, U.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Fleck, J. I.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Hong, S. J.; Lee, S. B.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Park, I. H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; Fernández, J. P.; García, G.; Glasman, C.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terrón, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Murray, W. N.; Ochs, A.; Riveline, M.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Botje, M.; Brümmer, N.; Engelen, J.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; van Sighem, A.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Verkerke, W.; Vossebeld, J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Nylander, P.; Romanowski, T. A.; Blaikley, H. E.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Edmonds, J. K.; Große-Knetter, J.; Harnew, N.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Ruske, O.; Tickner, J. R.; Walczak, R.; Waters, D. S.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Oh, B. Y.; Okrasiń Ski, J. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Raso, M.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Wichmann, R.; Williams, D. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Nagano, K.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Matsushita, T.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Petrucci, M. C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Polenz, S.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Simmons, D.; Butterworth, J. M.; Catterall, C. D.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Sutton, M. R.; Wing, M.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlak, R.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Zsolararnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Deppe, O.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Badgett, W. F.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Dasu, S.; Foudas, C.; Loveless, R. J.; Mattingly, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Bhadra, S.; Frisken, W. R.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1998-10-01

    The photoproduction reaction γp--> μ+μ-p has been studied in ep interactions using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 43.2 pb-1. The Υ meson has been observed in photoproduction for the first time. The sum of the products of the elastic Υ(1S),Υ(2S),Υ(3S) photoproduction cross sections with their respective branching ratios is determined to be 13.3+/-6.0(stat.)+2.7-2.3(syst.) pb at a mean photon-proton centre of mass energy of 120 GeV. The cross section is above the prediction of a perturbative QCD model.

  12. Intermediate energy proton-deuteron elastic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A fully symmetrized multiple scattering series is considered for the description of proton-deuteron elastic scattering. An off-shell continuation of the experimentally known twobody amplitudes that retains the exchange symmeteries required for the calculation is presented. The one boson exchange terms of the two body amplitudes are evaluated exactly in this off-shell prescription. The first two terms of the multiple scattering series are calculated explicitly whereas multiple scattering effects are obtained as minimum variance estimates from the 146-MeV data of Postma and Wilson. The multiple scattering corrections indeed consist of low order partial waves as suggested by Sloan based on model studies with separable interactions. The Hamada-Johnston wave function is shown consistent with the data for internucleon distances greater than about 0.84 fm.

  13. Frustration in protein elastic network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezon, Timothy; Bahar, Ivet

    2010-03-01

    Elastic network models (ENMs) are widely used for studying the equilibrium dynamics of proteins. The most common approach in ENM analysis is to adopt a uniform force constant or a non-specific distance dependent function to represent the force constant strength. Here we discuss the influence of sequence and structure in determining the effective force constants between residues in ENMs. Using a novel method based on entropy maximization, we optimize the force constants such that they exactly reporduce a subset of experimentally determined pair covariances for a set of proteins. We analyze the optimized force constants in terms of amino acid types, distances, contact order and secondary structure, and we demonstrate that including frustrated interactions in the ENM is essential for accurately reproducing the global modes in the middle of the frequency spectrum.

  14. The elastic and inelastic behavior of woven graphite fabric reinforced polyimide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searles, Kevin H.

    In many aerospace and conventional engineering applications, load-bearing composite structures are designed with the intent of being subjected to uniaxial stresses that are predominantly tensile or compressive. However, it is likely that biaxial and possibly triaxial states of stress will exist throughout the in-service life of the structure or component. The existing paradigm suggests that unidirectional tape materials are superior under uniaxial conditions since the vast majority of fibers lie in-plane and can be aligned to the loading axis. This may be true, but not without detriment to impact performance, interlaminar strength, strain to failure and complexity of part geometry. In circumstances where a sufficient balance of these properties is required, composites based on woven fabric reinforcements become attractive choices. In this thesis, the micro- and mesoscale elastic behavior of composites based on 8HS woven graphite fabric architectures and polyimide matrices is studied analytically and numerically. An analytical model is proposed to predict the composite elastic constants and is verified using numerical strain energy methods of equivalence. The model shows good agreement with the experiments and numerical strain energy equivalence. Lamina stresses generated numerically from in-plane shear loading show substantial shear and transverse normal stress concentrations in the transverse undulated tow which potentially leads to intralaminar damage. The macroscale inelastic behavior of the same composites is also studied experimentally and numerically. On an experimental basis, the biaxial and modified biaxial Iosipescu test methods are employed to study the weaker-mode shear and biaxial failure properties at room and elevated temperatures. On a numerical basis, the macroscale inelastic shear behavior of the composites is studied. Structural nonlinearities and material nonlinearities are identified and resolved. In terms of specimen-to-fixture interactions

  15. Linkage of interactions in sickle hemoglobin fiber assembly: inhibitory effect emanating from mutations in the AB region of the alpha-chain is annulled by a mutation at its EF corner.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Rajamani; Anantharaman, Lavanya; Sivaram, Mylavarapu V S; Mirsamadi, Neda; Choudhury, Devapriya; Lohiya, Nirmal K; Gupta, Rasik B; Roy, Rajendra P

    2004-05-07

    The AB and GH regions of the alpha-chain are located in spatial proximity and contain a cluster of intermolecular contact residues of the sickle hemoglobin (HbS) fiber. We have examined the role of dynamics of AB/GH region on HbS polymerization through simultaneous replacement of non-contact Ala(19) and Ala(21) of the AB corner with more flexible Gly or rigid alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues. The polymerization behavior of HbS with Aib substitutions was similar to the native HbS. In contrast, Gly substitutions inhibited HbS polymerization. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of alpha-chains indicated that coordinated motion of AB and GH region residues present in native (Ala) as well as in Aib mutant was disrupted in the Gly mutant. The inhibitory effect due to Gly substitutions was further explored in triple mutants that included mutation of an inter-doublestrand contact (alphaAsn(78) --> His or Gln) at the EF corner. Although the inhibitory effect of Gly substitutions in the triple mutant was unaffected in the presence of alphaGln(78), His at this site almost abrogated its inhibitory potential. The polymerization studies of point mutants (alphaGln(78) --> His) indicated that the inhibitory effect due to Gly substitutions in the triple mutant was synergistically compensated for by the polymerization-enhancing activity of His(78). Similar synergistic coupling, between alphaHis(78) and an intra-double-strand contact point (alpha16) mutation located in the AB region, was also observed. Thus, two conclusions are made: (i) Gly mutations at the AB corner inhibit HbS polymerization by perturbing the dynamics of the AB/GH region, and (ii) perturbations of AB region (through changes in dynamics of the AB/GH region or abolition of a specific fiber contact site) that influence HbS polymerization do so in concert with alpha78 site at the EF corner. The overall results provide insights about the interaction-linkage between distant regions of the HbS tetramer in

  16. Role of Fiber Length on Phagocytosis & Inflammatory Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkevich, Leonid; Stark, Carahline; Champion, Julie

    2014-03-01

    Asbestos fibers have long been associated with lung cancer death. The inability of immune cells (e.g. macrophages) to effectively remove asbestos leads to chronic inflammation and disease. This study examines the role of fiber length on toxicity at the cellular level using model glass fibers. A major challenge is obtaining single diameter fibers but differing in length. Samples of 1 micron diameter fibers with different length distributions were prepared: short fibers (less than 15 microns) by aggressive crushing, and long fibers (longer than 15 microns) by successive sedimentation. Time-lapse video microscopy monitored the interaction of MH-S murine alveolar macrophages with the fibers: short fibers were easily internalized by the macrophages, but long fibers resisted internalization over many hours. Production of TNF- α (tumor necrosis factor alpha), a general inflammatory secreted cytokine, and Cox-2 (cyclo-oxygenase-2), an enzyme that produces radicals, each exhibited a dose-dependence that was greater for long than for short fibers. These results corroborate the importance of fiber length in both physical and biochemical cell response and support epidemiological observations of higher toxicity for longer fibers.

  17. Fiber inhalability and head deposition in rats and humans. ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Due to their dimensions and long durability, inhaled asbestos fibers clear slowly from lung airways. Retained fibers may injure the epithelium, interact with macrophages, or translocate to the interstitium to result in various respiratory diseases. Therefore, calculations of fiber inhalability, deposition, and retention in respiratory tract regions of both rats and humans are crucial, both to assess the health risk of fiber exposures and to facilitate inferences from rat inhalation studies. Rat inhalation experiments are underway at the EPA and NIEHS. A model of fiber inhalability and initial deposition in the human and rat nasal cavity was developed. Existing models for particles were extended to fibers by replacing particle diameter with an equivalent fiber diameter. Since fiber inhalability into the respiratory tract and deposition in the extra thoracic airways depended mainly on its inertia, equivalent impaction diameters were derived and substituted in expressions for spherical particle diameter to determine fiber inhalability and nasal losses. Fiber impaction diameter depended strongly on its orientation in the air. Highest inhalability was obtained when fibers were aligned perpendicular to the flow streamlines in the inhaled air. However, detailed calculations of fiber transport in slow moving air such as that in the atmosphere and in lung airways showed that fibers stayed primarily aligned (parallel) to the flow. Therefore, for inhalability calculations,

  18. Investigation and modeling of the elastic-plastic fracture behavior of continuous woven fabric-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, W.K.

    1997-03-01

    The paper describes a study which attempted to extrapolate meaningful elastic-plastic fracture toughness data from flexure tests of a chemical vapor-infiltrated SiC/Nicalon fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite. Fibers in the fabricated composites were pre-coated with pyrolytic carbon to varying thicknesses. In the tests, crack length was not measured and the study employed an estimate procedure, previously used successfully for ductile metals, to derive J-R curve information. Results are presented in normalized load vs. normalized displacements and comparative J{sub Ic} behavior as a function of fiber precoating thickness.

  19. Decreasing diameter fluctuation of polymer optical fiber with optimized drawing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinkaya, Onur; Wojcik, Grzegorz; Mergo, Pawel

    2018-05-01

    The diameter fluctuations of poly(methyl methacrylate) based polymer optical fibers, during drawing processes, have been comprehensively studied. In this study, several drawing parameters were selected for investigation; such as drawing tensions, preform diameters, preform feeding speeds, and argon flows. Varied drawing tensions were used to draw fibers, while other parameters were maintained at constant. At a later stage in the process, micro-structured polymer optical fibers were drawn under optimized drawing conditions. Fiber diameter deviations were reduced to 2.2%, when a 0.2 N drawing tension was employed during the drawing process. Higher drawing tensions led to higher diameter fluctuations. The Young’s modulus of fibers drawn with different tensions was also measured. Our results showed that fiber elasticity increased as drawing tensions decreased. The inhomogeneity of fibers was also determined by comparing the deviation of Young’s modulus.

  20. Multiphoton microscopy observations of 3D elastin and collagen fiber microstructure changes during pressurization in aortic media.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Shukei; Matsumoto, Takeo

    2017-06-01

    Elastin and collagen fibers play important roles in the mechanical properties of aortic media. Because knowledge of local fiber structures is required for detailed analysis of blood vessel wall mechanics, we investigated 3D microstructures of elastin and collagen fibers in thoracic aortas and monitored changes during pressurization. Using multiphoton microscopy, autofluorescence images from elastin and second harmonic generation signals from collagen were acquired in media from rabbit thoracic aortas that were stretched biaxially to restore physiological dimensions. Both elastin and collagen fibers were observed in all longitudinal-circumferential plane images, whereas alternate bright and dark layers were observed along the radial direction and were recognized as elastic laminas (ELs) and smooth muscle-rich layers (SMLs), respectively. Elastin and collagen fibers are mainly oriented in the circumferential direction, and waviness of collagen fibers was significantly higher than that of elastin fibers. Collagen fibers were more undulated in longitudinal than in radial direction, whereas undulation of elastin fibers was equibiaxial. Changes in waviness of collagen fibers during pressurization were then evaluated using 2-dimensional fast Fourier transform in mouse aortas, and indices of waviness of collagen fibers decreased with increases in intraluminal pressure. These indices also showed that collagen fibers in SMLs became straight at lower intraluminal pressures than those in EL, indicating that SMLs stretched more than ELs. These results indicate that deformation of the aorta due to pressurization is complicated because of the heterogeneity of tissue layers and differences in elastic properties of ELs, SMLs, and surrounding collagen and elastin.

  1. Linear elastic fracture mechanics primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1992-01-01

    This primer is intended to remove the blackbox perception of fracture mechanics computer software by structural engineers. The fundamental concepts of linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented with emphasis on the practical application of fracture mechanics to real problems. Numerous rules of thumb are provided. Recommended texts for additional reading, and a discussion of the significance of fracture mechanics in structural design are given. Griffith's criterion for crack extension, Irwin's elastic stress field near the crack tip, and the influence of small-scale plasticity are discussed. Common stress intensities factor solutions and methods for determining them are included. Fracture toughness and subcritical crack growth are discussed. The application of fracture mechanics to damage tolerance and fracture control is discussed. Several example problems and a practice set of problems are given.

  2. Elasticity of Relativistic Rigid Bodies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2013-10-01

    In the classical Twin Paradox, according to the Special Theory of Relativity, when the traveling twin blasts off from the Earth to a relative velocity v =√{/3 } 2 c with respect to the Earth, his measuring stick and other physical objects in the direction of relative motion shrink to half their lengths. How is that possible in the real physical world to have let's say a rigid rocket shrinking to half and then later elongated back to normal as an elastic material when it stops? What is the explanation for the traveler's measuring stick and other physical objects, in effect, return to the same length to their original length in the Stay-At-Home, but there is no record of their having shrunk? If it's a rigid (not elastic) object, how can it shrink and then elongate back to normal? It might get broken in such situation.

  3. Elastic Heterogeneity in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowski, W.; Iwashita, T.; Chuang, C.-P.; Almer, J.; Egami, T.

    2010-11-01

    When a stress is applied on a metallic glass it deforms following Hook’s law. Therefore it may appear obvious that a metallic glass deforms elastically. Using x-ray diffraction and anisotropic pair-density function analysis we show that only about (3)/(4) in volume fraction of metallic glasses deforms elastically, whereas the rest of the volume is anelastic and in the experimental time scale deform without resistance. We suggest that this anelastic portion represents residual liquidity in the glassy state. Many theories, such as the free-volume theory, assume the density of defects in the glassy state to be of the order of 1%, but this result shows that it is as much as a quarter.

  4. Rotational relaxation time as unifying time scale for polymer and fiber drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boelens, A. M. P.; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-05-01

    Using hybrid direct numerical simulation plus Langevin dynamics, a comparison is performed between polymer and fiber stress tensors in turbulent flow. The stress tensors are found to be similar, suggesting a common drag reducing mechanism in the onset regime for both flexible polymers and rigid fibers. Since fibers do not have an elastic backbone, this must be a viscous effect. Analysis of the viscosity tensor reveals that all terms are negligible, except the off-diagonal shear viscosity associated with rotation. Based on this analysis, we identify the rotational orientation time as the unifying time scale setting a new time criterion for drag reduction by both flexible polymers and rigid fibers.

  5. Rotational relaxation time as unifying time scale for polymer and fiber drag reduction.

    PubMed

    Boelens, A M P; Muthukumar, M

    2016-05-01

    Using hybrid direct numerical simulation plus Langevin dynamics, a comparison is performed between polymer and fiber stress tensors in turbulent flow. The stress tensors are found to be similar, suggesting a common drag reducing mechanism in the onset regime for both flexible polymers and rigid fibers. Since fibers do not have an elastic backbone, this must be a viscous effect. Analysis of the viscosity tensor reveals that all terms are negligible, except the off-diagonal shear viscosity associated with rotation. Based on this analysis, we identify the rotational orientation time as the unifying time scale setting a new time criterion for drag reduction by both flexible polymers and rigid fibers.

  6. The effect of high fiber fraction on some mechanical properties of unidirectional glass fiber-reinforced composite.

    PubMed

    Abdulmajeed, Aous A; Närhi, Timo O; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V

    2011-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of an increase of fiber-density on some mechanical properties of higher volume fiber-reinforced composite (FRC). Five groups of FRC with increased fiber-density were fabricated and two additional groups were prepared by adding silanated barium-silicate glass fillers (0.7 μm) to the FRC. The unidirectional E-glass fiber rovings were impregnated with light-polymerizable bisGMA-TEGDMA (50-50%) resin. The fibers were pulled through a cylindrical mold with an opening diameter of 4.2mm, light cured for 40s and post-cured at elevated temperature. The cylindrical specimens (n=12) were conditioned at room temperature for 2 days before testing with the three-point bending test (Lloyd Instruments Ltd.) adapted to ISO 10477. Fiber-density was analyzed by combustion and gravimetric analyzes. ANOVA analysis revealed that by increasing the vol.% fraction of E-glass fibers from 51.7% to 61.7% there was a change of 27% (p<0.05) in the modulus of elasticity, 34% (p<0.05) in the toughness, and 15% (p<0.05) in the load bearing capacity, while there was only 8% (p<0.05) increase in the flexural strength although it was statistically insignificant. The addition of particulate fillers did not improve the mechanical properties. This study showed that the properties of FRC could be improved by increasing fibervolume fraction. Modulus of elasticity, toughness, and load bearing capacity seem to follow the law of ratio of quantity of fibers and volume of the polymer matrix more precisely than flexural strength when high fiber-density is used. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling elasticity in crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Elder, K R; Katakowski, Mark; Haataja, Mikko; Grant, Martin

    2002-06-17

    A new model of crystal growth is presented that describes the phenomena on atomic length and diffusive time scales. The former incorporates elastic and plastic deformation in a natural manner, and the latter enables access to time scales much larger than conventional atomic methods. The model is shown to be consistent with the predictions of Read and Shockley for grain boundary energy, and Matthews and Blakeslee for misfit dislocations in epitaxial growth.

  8. Design and Manufacture of Elastically Tailored Tow Placed Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatting, Brain F.; Guerdal, Zafer; Jegley, Dawn (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Elastic stiffness tailoring of laminated composite panels by allowing the fibers to curve within the plane of the laminate is a relatively novel design concept that has been demonstrated to be both beneficial and practical. In particular, for structures with highly non-uniform stress states, such as the case of a flat panel with a central hole subjected to in-plane loading, the concept is likely to provide substantial improvements in load carrying capability. The objective of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of stiffness tailoring through the use of curvilinear fibers to reduce stress concentrations around the hole and improve the load carrying capability of panels with holes. In this study software was created that translates standard finite element models with traditional laminate definitions into ones that possess stacking sequences with curvilinear fiber paths that are directly manufacturable using an advanced tow placement machine. Preliminary designs for the manufacturing and testing phase were determined through rudimentary design studies for flat plates without holes under axial compression. These candidate designs were then analyzed using finite element models that accurately reflect the test conditions and geometries in order to select final designs for testing. A total of six large panels, measuring three feet by six feet, each of which are used to produce four specimens with or without holes, were fabricated and delivered to NASA for machining and testing.

  9. THE PASSIVE PROPERTIES OF MUSCLE FIBERS ARE VELOCITY DEPENDENT

    PubMed Central

    Rehorn, Michael R.; Schroer, Alison K.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2014-01-01

    The passive properties of skeletal muscle play an important role in muscle function. While the passive quasi-static elastic properties of muscle fibers have been well characterized, the dynamic visco-elastic passive behavior of fibers has garnered less attention. In particular, it is unclear how the visco-elastic properties are influenced by lengthening velocity, in particular for the range of physiologically relevant velocities. The goals of this work were to: (i) measure the effects of lengthening velocity on the peak stresses within single muscle fibers to determine how passive behavior changes over a range of physiologically relevant lengthening rates (0.1–10 Lo/s), and (ii) develop a mathematical model of fiber viscoelasticity based on these measurements. We found that passive properties depend on strain rate, in particular at the low loading rates (0.1–3 Lo/s), and that the measured behavior can be predicted across a range of loading rates and time histories with a quasi-linear viscoelastic model. In the future, these results can be used to determine the impact of viscoelastic behavior on intramuscular st