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Sample records for elastic network modeling

  1. Adaptive elastic networks as models of supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Le; Wyart, Matthieu

    2015-08-01

    The thermodynamics and dynamics of supercooled liquids correlate with their elasticity. In particular for covalent networks, the jump of specific heat is small and the liquid is strong near the threshold valence where the network acquires rigidity. By contrast, the jump of specific heat and the fragility are large away from this threshold valence. In a previous work [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 6307 (2013), 10.1073/pnas.1300534110], we could explain these behaviors by introducing a model of supercooled liquids in which local rearrangements interact via elasticity. However, in that model the disorder characterizing elasticity was frozen, whereas it is itself a dynamic variable in supercooled liquids. Here we study numerically and theoretically adaptive elastic network models where polydisperse springs can move on a lattice, thus allowing for the geometry of the elastic network to fluctuate and evolve with temperature. We show numerically that our previous results on the relationship between structure and thermodynamics hold in these models. We introduce an approximation where redundant constraints (highly coordinated regions where the frustration is large) are treated as an ideal gas, leading to analytical predictions that are accurate in the range of parameters relevant for real materials. Overall, these results lead to a description of supercooled liquids, in which the distance to the rigidity transition controls the number of directions in phase space that cost energy and the specific heat.

  2. Modeling ion binding to humic substances: elastic polyelectrolyte network model.

    PubMed

    Orsetti, Silvia; Andrade, Estela M; Molina, Fernando V

    2010-03-02

    A new model for the electrostatic contribution to ion binding to humic substances is proposed and applied to published data for proton binding to fulvic and humic acids. The elastic polyelectrolyte network model treats humic substance particles as composed by two parts, an external one directly in contact with the solution, and an internal part or gel fraction which is considered, from a statistical point of view, as a charged polymer network swelled by the electrolyte solution, in the framework of the Flory polymer network theory. The electrostatic effect is given by a Donnan-like potential, which can be regarded as an average value over the gel fraction of the humic particle. The gel fraction expands as the pH and humic charge are increased, determining the Donnan potential and consequently the ion activity inside the gel. The model was fitted to published experimental data with good agreement. The model predictions are discussed, and the behavior suggests, for some cases, the presence of a transition between closed and open structures attributed to the presence, at low pH, of intramolecular hydrogen bonds which are removed as the carboxylic sites become deprotonated.

  3. Towards synthetic molecular motors: a model elastic-network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amartya; Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-04-01

    Protein molecular motors play a fundamental role in biological cells and development of their synthetic counterparts is a major challenge. Here, we show how a model motor system with the operation mechanism resembling that of muscle myosin can be designed at the concept level, without addressing the implementation aspects. The model is constructed as an elastic network, similar to the coarse-grained descriptions used for real proteins. We show by numerical simulations that the designed synthetic motor can operate as a deterministic or Brownian ratchet and that there is a continuous transition between such two regimes. The motor operation under external load, approaching the stall condition, is also analysed.

  4. Solvated dissipative electro-elastic network model of hydrated proteins.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel R; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2012-10-28

    Elastic network models coarse grain proteins into a network of residue beads connected by springs. We add dissipative dynamics to this mechanical system by applying overdamped Langevin equations of motion to normal-mode vibrations of the network. In addition, the network is made heterogeneous and softened at the protein surface by accounting for hydration of the ionized residues. Solvation changes the network Hessian in two ways. Diagonal solvation terms soften the spring constants and off-diagonal dipole-dipole terms correlate displacements of the ionized residues. The model is used to formulate the response functions of the electrostatic potential and electric field appearing in theories of redox reactions and spectroscopy. We also formulate the dielectric response of the protein and find that solvation of the surface ionized residues leads to a slow relaxation peak in the dielectric loss spectrum, about two orders of magnitude slower than the main peak of protein relaxation. Finally, the solvated network is used to formulate the allosteric response of the protein to ion binding. The global thermodynamics of ion binding is not strongly affected by the network solvation, but it dramatically enhances conformational changes in response to placing a charge at the active site of the protein.

  5. Comparative Study of Elastic Network Model and Protein Contact Network for Protein Complexes: The Hemoglobin Case.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guang; Di Paola, Luisa; Liang, Zhongjie; Giuliani, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The overall topology and interfacial interactions play key roles in understanding structural and functional principles of protein complexes. Elastic Network Model (ENM) and Protein Contact Network (PCN) are two widely used methods for high throughput investigation of structures and interactions within protein complexes. In this work, the comparative analysis of ENM and PCN relative to hemoglobin (Hb) was taken as case study. We examine four types of structural and dynamical paradigms, namely, conformational change between different states of Hbs, modular analysis, allosteric mechanisms studies, and interface characterization of an Hb. The comparative study shows that ENM has an advantage in studying dynamical properties and protein-protein interfaces, while PCN is better for describing protein structures quantitatively both from local and from global levels. We suggest that the integration of ENM and PCN would give a potential but powerful tool in structural systems biology.

  6. Comparative Study of Elastic Network Model and Protein Contact Network for Protein Complexes: The Hemoglobin Case

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Luisa; Liang, Zhongjie; Giuliani, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The overall topology and interfacial interactions play key roles in understanding structural and functional principles of protein complexes. Elastic Network Model (ENM) and Protein Contact Network (PCN) are two widely used methods for high throughput investigation of structures and interactions within protein complexes. In this work, the comparative analysis of ENM and PCN relative to hemoglobin (Hb) was taken as case study. We examine four types of structural and dynamical paradigms, namely, conformational change between different states of Hbs, modular analysis, allosteric mechanisms studies, and interface characterization of an Hb. The comparative study shows that ENM has an advantage in studying dynamical properties and protein-protein interfaces, while PCN is better for describing protein structures quantitatively both from local and from global levels. We suggest that the integration of ENM and PCN would give a potential but powerful tool in structural systems biology. PMID:28243596

  7. Temperature-induced unfolding behavior of proteins studied by tensorial elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Amit; Granek, Rony

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by single molecule experiments and recent molecular dynamics (MD) studies, we propose a simple and computationally efficient method based on a tensorial elastic network model to investigate the unfolding pathways of proteins under temperature variation. The tensorial elastic network model, which relies on the native state topology of a protein, combines the anisotropic network model, the bond bending elasticity, and the backbone twist elasticity to successfully predicts both the isotropic and anisotropic fluctuations in a manner similar to the Gaussian network model and anisotropic network model. The unfolding process is modeled by breaking the native contacts between residues one by one, and by assuming a threshold value for strain fluctuation. Using this method, we simulated the unfolding processes of four well-characterized proteins: chymotrypsin inhibitor, barnase, ubiquitein, and adenalyate kinase. We found that this step-wise process leads to two or more cooperative, first-order-like transitions between partial denaturation states. The sequence of unfolding events obtained using this method is consistent with experimental and MD studies. The results also imply that the native topology of proteins "encrypts" information regarding their unfolding process. Proteins 2016; 84:1767-1775. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Elasticity of Poissonian fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Mäkinen, J. P.; Alava, M. J.; Timonen, J.

    2000-05-01

    An effective-medium model is introduced for the elasticity of two-dimensional random fiber networks. These networks are commonly used as basic models of heterogeneous fibrous structures such as paper. Using the exact Poissonian statistics to describe the microscopic geometry of the network, the tensile modulus can be expressed by a single-parameter function. This parameter depends on the network density and fiber dimensions, which relate the macroscopic modulus to the relative importance of axial and bending deformations of the fibers. The model agrees well with simulation results and experimental findings. We also discuss the possible generalizations of the model.

  9. Efficient perturbation analysis of elastic network models - Application to acetylcholinesterase of T. californica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, K.

    2010-09-01

    Elastic network models in their different flavors have become useful models for the dynamics and functions of biomolecular systems such as proteins and their complexes. Perturbation to the interactions occur due to randomized and fixated changes (in molecular evolution) or designed modifications of the protein structures (in bioengineering). These perturbations are modifications in the topology and the strength of the interactions modeled by the elastic network models. We discuss how a naive approach to compute properties for a large number of perturbed structures and interactions by repeated diagonalization can be replaced with an identity found in linear algebra. We argue about the computational complexity and discuss the advantages of the protocol. We apply the proposed algorithm to the acetylcholinesterase, a well-known enzyme in neurobiology, and show how one can gain insight into the "breathing dynamics" of a structural funnel necessary for the function of the protein. The computational speed-up was a 60-fold increase in this example.

  10. An improved scheduled traffic model utilizing bandwidth splitting in elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Upama; Prakash, Shashi

    2016-07-01

    The surge of traffic in today's networks gave birth to elastic optical networking paradigm. In this paper, first we propose to use the scheduled traffic model (STM) in elastic optical networks (EONs) to ensure guaranteed availability of resources to demands which enter into the network with a predetermined start and end times. In optical networks, such demands are referred to as scheduled lightpath demands (SLDs). To increase the amount of bandwidth accepted in network, next we introduce a time aware routing and spectrum assignment (TA-RSA) approach. We observed that provisioning of bulky SLDs has become more challenging in EONs due to enforcement of RSA constraints. To address this challenge, we improve the proposed STM and designed three heuristics for its implementation in EONs. In this work, we collectively refer to these heuristics as bandwidth segmented RSA (BSRSA). The improved STM (iSTM) allows splitting of SLDs in bandwidth dimension by utilizing the knowledge of attributes viz. demand holding time, overlapping in time and bandwidth requested by SLDs. Our numerical results show that BSRSA consistently outperformed over TA-RSA under all distinctive experimental cases that we considered and achieved fairness in serving heterogeneous bandwidth SLDs. The impact of splitting on the number and capacity of transponders at nodes is also gauged. It is observed that ingenious splitting of demands increases the number of resources (on links and nodes) used, and their utilization, leading to an increase in bandwidth accepted in the network.

  11. Applying forces to elastic network models of large biomolecules using a haptic feedback device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocks, M. B.; Laycock, S. D.; Hayward, S.

    2011-03-01

    Elastic network models of biomolecules have proved to be relatively good at predicting global conformational changes particularly in large systems. Software that facilitates rapid and intuitive exploration of conformational change in elastic network models of large biomolecules in response to externally applied forces would therefore be of considerable use, particularly if the forces mimic those that arise in the interaction with a functional ligand. We have developed software that enables a user to apply forces to individual atoms of an elastic network model of a biomolecule through a haptic feedback device or a mouse. With a haptic feedback device the user feels the response to the applied force whilst seeing the biomolecule deform on the screen. Prior to the interactive session normal mode analysis is performed, or pre-calculated normal mode eigenvalues and eigenvectors are loaded. For large molecules this allows the memory and number of calculations to be reduced by employing the idea of the important subspace, a relatively small space of the first M lowest frequency normal mode eigenvectors within which a large proportion of the total fluctuation occurs. Using this approach it was possible to study GroEL on a standard PC as even though only 2.3% of the total number of eigenvectors could be used, they accounted for 50% of the total fluctuation. User testing has shown that the haptic version allows for much more rapid and intuitive exploration of the molecule than the mouse version.

  12. Applying forces to elastic network models of large biomolecules using a haptic feedback device.

    PubMed

    Stocks, M B; Laycock, S D; Hayward, S

    2011-03-01

    Elastic network models of biomolecules have proved to be relatively good at predicting global conformational changes particularly in large systems. Software that facilitates rapid and intuitive exploration of conformational change in elastic network models of large biomolecules in response to externally applied forces would therefore be of considerable use, particularly if the forces mimic those that arise in the interaction with a functional ligand. We have developed software that enables a user to apply forces to individual atoms of an elastic network model of a biomolecule through a haptic feedback device or a mouse. With a haptic feedback device the user feels the response to the applied force whilst seeing the biomolecule deform on the screen. Prior to the interactive session normal mode analysis is performed, or pre-calculated normal mode eigenvalues and eigenvectors are loaded. For large molecules this allows the memory and number of calculations to be reduced by employing the idea of the important subspace, a relatively small space of the first M lowest frequency normal mode eigenvectors within which a large proportion of the total fluctuation occurs. Using this approach it was possible to study GroEL on a standard PC as even though only 2.3% of the total number of eigenvectors could be used, they accounted for 50% of the total fluctuation. User testing has shown that the haptic version allows for much more rapid and intuitive exploration of the molecule than the mouse version.

  13. UMMS: constrained harmonic and anharmonic analyses of macromolecules based on elastic network models.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yunho; Jeong, Jay I; Kim, Moon K

    2006-07-01

    UMass Morph Server (UMMS) has been developed for the broad impact on the study of molecular dynamics (MD). The elastic network model (ENM) of a given macromolecule has been proven as a useful tool for analyzing thermal behaviors locally and predicting folding pathways globally. UMMS utilizes coarse-grained ENMs at various levels. These simplifications remarkably save computation time compared with all-atom MD simulations so that one can bring down massive computational problems from a supercomputer to a PC. To improve computational efficiency and physical reality of ENMs, the symmetry-constrained, rigid-cluster, hybrid and chemical-bond ENMs have been developed and implemented at UMMS. One can request both harmonic normal mode analysis of a single macromolecule and anharmonic pathway generation between two conformations of a same molecule using elastic network interpolation at http://biomechanics.ecs.umass.edu/umms.html.

  14. Optimization of an Elastic Network Augmented Coarse Grained Model to Study CCMV Capsid Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Globisch, Christoph; Krishnamani, Venkatramanan; Deserno, Markus; Peter, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The major protective coat of most viruses is a highly symmetric protein capsid that forms spontaneously from many copies of identical proteins. Structural and mechanical properties of such capsids, as well as their self-assembly process, have been studied experimentally and theoretically, including modeling efforts by computer simulations on various scales. Atomistic models include specific details of local protein binding but are limited in system size and accessible time, while coarse grained (CG) models do get access to longer time and length scales but often lack the specific local interactions. Multi-scale models aim at bridging this gap by systematically connecting different levels of resolution. Here, a CG model for CCMV (Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus), a virus with an icosahedral shell of 180 identical protein monomers, is developed, where parameters are derived from atomistic simulations of capsid protein dimers in aqueous solution. In particular, a new method is introduced to combine the MARTINI CG model with a supportive elastic network based on structural fluctuations of individual monomers. In the parametrization process, both network connectivity and strength are optimized. This elastic-network optimized CG model, which solely relies on atomistic data of small units (dimers), is able to correctly predict inter-protein conformational flexibility and properties of larger capsid fragments of 20 and more subunits. Furthermore, it is shown that this CG model reproduces experimental (Atomic Force Microscopy) indentation measurements of the entire viral capsid. Thus it is shown that one obvious goal for hierarchical modeling, namely predicting mechanical properties of larger protein complexes from models that are carefully parametrized on elastic properties of smaller units, is achievable. PMID:23613730

  15. A multiscale modelling of bone ultrastructure elastic proprieties using finite elements simulation and neural network method.

    PubMed

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Tlili, Brahim; Vercher-Martínez, Ana; Hambli, Ridha

    2016-10-01

    Bone is a living material with a complex hierarchical structure which entails exceptional mechanical properties, including high fracture toughness, specific stiffness and strength. Bone tissue is essentially composed by two phases distributed in approximately 30-70%: an organic phase (mainly type I collagen and cells) and an inorganic phase (hydroxyapatite-HA-and water). The nanostructure of bone can be represented throughout three scale levels where different repetitive structural units or building blocks are found: at the first level, collagen molecules are arranged in a pentameric structure where mineral crystals grow in specific sites. This primary bone structure constitutes the mineralized collagen microfibril. A structural organization of inter-digitating microfibrils forms the mineralized collagen fibril which represents the second scale level. The third scale level corresponds to the mineralized collagen fibre which is composed by the binding of fibrils. The hierarchical nature of the bone tissue is largely responsible of their significant mechanical properties; consequently, this is a current outstanding research topic. Scarce works in literature correlates the elastic properties in the three scale levels at the bone nanoscale. The main goal of this work is to estimate the elastic properties of the bone tissue in a multiscale approach including a sensitivity analysis of the elastic behaviour at each length scale. This proposal is achieved by means of a novel hybrid multiscale modelling that involves neural network (NN) computations and finite elements method (FEM) analysis. The elastic properties are estimated using a neural network simulation that previously has been trained with the database results of the finite element models. In the results of this work, parametric analysis and averaged elastic constants for each length scale are provided. Likewise, the influence of the elastic constants of the tissue constituents is also depicted. Results highlight

  16. Normal stresses in elastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioroianu, Adrian R.; Storm, Cornelis

    2013-11-01

    When loaded in simple shear deformation, polymeric materials may develop so-called normal stresses: stresses perpendicular to the direction of the applied shear. These normal stresses are intrinsically nonlinear: basic symmetry considerations dictate they may only enter at O(γ2), with γ the dimensionless shear strain. There is no fundamental restriction on their sign, and normal stresses may be positive (pushing outward) or negative (pulling inward). Most materials tend to dilate in the normal direction, but a wide variety of biopolymer networks including fibrin and actin gels have been reported to present anomalously large, negative normal stresses—a feature which has been ascribed to the intrinsic elastic nonlinearity of semiflexible fibers. In this work, we present analytical results on a model nonlinear network, which we expand to the required nonlinear order to show that due to geometric, rather than elastic, nonlinearities (negative) normal stresses generically arise in filamentous networks—even in networks composed of linear, Hookean springs. We investigate analytically and numerically how the subsequent addition of elastic nonlinearities, nonaffine deformations, and filament persistence through cross-linkers augment this basic behavior.

  17. A mass weighted chemical elastic network model elucidates closed form domain motions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Seo, Sangjae; Jeong, Jay Il; Kim, Bum Joon; Liu, Wing Kam; Lim, Byeong Soo; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Moon Ki

    2013-01-01

    An elastic network model (ENM), usually Cα coarse-grained one, has been widely used to study protein dynamics as an alternative to classical molecular dynamics simulation. This simple approach dramatically saves the computational cost, but sometimes fails to describe a feasible conformational change due to unrealistically excessive spring connections. To overcome this limitation, we propose a mass-weighted chemical elastic network model (MWCENM) in which the total mass of each residue is assumed to be concentrated on the representative alpha carbon atom and various stiffness values are precisely assigned according to the types of chemical interactions. We test MWCENM on several well-known proteins of which both closed and open conformations are available as well as three α-helix rich proteins. Their normal mode analysis reveals that MWCENM not only generates more plausible conformational changes, especially for closed forms of proteins, but also preserves protein secondary structures thus distinguishing MWCENM from traditional ENMs. In addition, MWCENM also reduces computational burden by using a more sparse stiffness matrix. PMID:23456820

  18. Elastic network model of learned maintained contacts to predict protein motion

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Ines

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel elastic network model, lmcENM, to determine protein motion even for localized functional motions that involve substantial changes in the protein’s contact topology. Existing elastic network models assume that the contact topology remains unchanged throughout the motion and are thus most appropriate to simulate highly collective function-related movements. lmcENM uses machine learning to differentiate breaking from maintained contacts. We show that lmcENM accurately captures functional transitions unexplained by the classical ENM and three reference ENM variants, while preserving the simplicity of classical ENM. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on a large set of proteins covering different motion types. Our results suggest that accurately predicting a “deformation-invariant” contact topology offers a promising route to increase the general applicability of ENMs. We also find that to correctly predict this contact topology a combination of several features seems to be relevant which may vary slightly depending on the protein. Additionally, we present case studies of two biologically interesting systems, Ferric Citrate membrane transporter FecA and Arachidonate 15-Lipoxygenase. PMID:28854238

  19. Development of minimal models of the elastic properties of flexible and stiff polymer networks with permanent and thermoreversible cross-links

    PubMed Central

    Lin, David C.

    2010-01-01

    We review the elasticity of flexible and stiff polymer networks with permanent cross-links and synthesize these results into a unifying polymer chain network model. This framework is then used to address how the network elasticity becomes modified when the network cross-linking is thermoreversible in nature, changes in the stability of the network with deformation, and the effect of a variable rate of network deformation on the non-linear elastic response. Comparisons are made between this class of simplified network models with elasticity measurements performed on flexible chain and stiff fiber networks, both with permanent and associative cross-links. Although these network models are highly idealized, they are apparently able to capture many aspects of the elastic properties of diverse real networks. PMID:21113355

  20. Bend-twist-stretch model for coarse elastic network simulation of biomolecular motion.

    PubMed

    Stember, Joseph N; Wriggers, Willy

    2009-08-21

    The empirical harmonic potential function of elastic network models (ENMs) is augmented by three- and four-body interactions as well as by a parameter-free connection rule. In the new bend-twist-stretch (BTS) model the complexity of the parametrization is shifted from the spatial level of detail to the potential function, enabling an arbitrary coarse graining of the network. Compared to distance cutoff-based Hookean springs, the approach yields a more stable parametrization of coarse-grained ENMs for biomolecular dynamics. Traditional ENMs give rise to unbounded zero-frequency vibrations when (pseudo)atoms are connected to fewer than three neighbors. A large cutoff is therefore chosen in an ENM (about twice the average nearest-neighbor distance), resulting in many false-positive connections that reduce the spatial detail that can be resolved. More importantly, the required three-neighbor connectedness also limits the coarse graining, i.e., the network must be dense, even in the case of low-resolution structures that exhibit few spatial features. The new BTS model achieves such coarse graining by extending the ENM potential to include three-and four-atom interactions (bending and twisting, respectively) in addition to the traditional two-atom stretching. Thus, the BTS model enables reliable modeling of any three-dimensional graph irrespective of the atom connectedness. The additional potential terms were parametrized using continuum elastic theory of elastic rods, and the distance cutoff was replaced by a competitive Hebb connection rule, setting all free parameters in the model. We validate the approach on a carbon-alpha representation of adenylate kinase and illustrate its use with electron microscopy maps of E. coli RNA polymerase, E. coli ribosome, and eukaryotic chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide 1, which were difficult to model with traditional ENMs. For adenylate kinase, we find excellent reproduction (>90% overlap) of the ENM modes and B factors

  1. Elastic network models capture the motions apparent within ensembles of RNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Michael T.; Jernigan, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The role of structure and dynamics in mechanisms for RNA becomes increasingly important. Computational approaches using simple dynamics models have been successful at predicting the motions of proteins and are often applied to ribonucleo-protein complexes but have not been thoroughly tested for well-packed nucleic acid structures. In order to characterize a true set of motions, we investigate the apparent motions from 16 ensembles of experimentally determined RNA structures. These indicate a relatively limited set of motions that are captured by a small set of principal components (PCs). These limited motions closely resemble the motions computed from low frequency normal modes from elastic network models (ENMs), either at atomic or coarse-grained resolution. Various ENM model types, parameters, and structure representations are tested here against the experimental RNA structural ensembles, exposing differences between models for proteins and for folded RNAs. Differences in performance are seen, depending on the structure alignment algorithm used to generate PCs, modulating the apparent utility of ENMs but not significantly impacting their ability to generate functional motions. The loss of dynamical information upon coarse-graining is somewhat larger for RNAs than for globular proteins, indicating, perhaps, the lower cooperativity of the less densely packed RNA. However, the RNA structures show less sensitivity to the elastic network model parameters than do proteins. These findings further demonstrate the utility of ENMs and the appropriateness of their application to well-packed RNA-only structures, justifying their use for studying the dynamics of ribonucleo-proteins, such as the ribosome and regulatory RNAs. PMID:24759093

  2. Elastic network models capture the motions apparent within ensembles of RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael T; Jernigan, Robert L

    2014-06-01

    The role of structure and dynamics in mechanisms for RNA becomes increasingly important. Computational approaches using simple dynamics models have been successful at predicting the motions of proteins and are often applied to ribonucleo-protein complexes but have not been thoroughly tested for well-packed nucleic acid structures. In order to characterize a true set of motions, we investigate the apparent motions from 16 ensembles of experimentally determined RNA structures. These indicate a relatively limited set of motions that are captured by a small set of principal components (PCs). These limited motions closely resemble the motions computed from low frequency normal modes from elastic network models (ENMs), either at atomic or coarse-grained resolution. Various ENM model types, parameters, and structure representations are tested here against the experimental RNA structural ensembles, exposing differences between models for proteins and for folded RNAs. Differences in performance are seen, depending on the structure alignment algorithm used to generate PCs, modulating the apparent utility of ENMs but not significantly impacting their ability to generate functional motions. The loss of dynamical information upon coarse-graining is somewhat larger for RNAs than for globular proteins, indicating, perhaps, the lower cooperativity of the less densely packed RNA. However, the RNA structures show less sensitivity to the elastic network model parameters than do proteins. These findings further demonstrate the utility of ENMs and the appropriateness of their application to well-packed RNA-only structures, justifying their use for studying the dynamics of ribonucleo-proteins, such as the ribosome and regulatory RNAs. © 2014 Zimmermann and Jernigan; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. Artificial neural network for modeling the elastic modulus of electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Vatankhah, Elham; Semnani, Dariush; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Tadayon, Mahdi; Razavi, Shahnaz; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-02-01

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE) require the consideration of multiple aspects, including polymeric composition and the structure and mechanical properties of the scaffolds, in order to mimic the native extracellular matrix of the tissue. Electrospun fibers are frequently utilized in TE due to their tunable physical, chemical, and mechanical properties and porosity. The mechanical properties of electrospun scaffolds made from specific polymers are highly dependent on the processing parameters, which can therefore be tuned for particular applications. Fiber diameter and orientation along with polymeric composition are the major factors that determine the elastic modulus of electrospun nano- and microfibers. Here we have developed a neural network model to investigate the simultaneous effects of composition, fiber diameter and fiber orientation of electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin mats on the elastic modulus of the scaffolds under ambient and simulated physiological conditions. The model generated might assist bioengineers to fabricate electrospun scaffolds with defined fiber diameters, orientations and constituents, thereby replicating the mechanical properties of the native target tissue.

  4. Robustness Elasticity in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Matisziw, Timothy C.; Grubesic, Tony H.; Guo, Junyu

    2012-01-01

    Network robustness refers to a network’s resilience to stress or damage. Given that most networks are inherently dynamic, with changing topology, loads, and operational states, their robustness is also likely subject to change. However, in most analyses of network structure, it is assumed that interaction among nodes has no effect on robustness. To investigate the hypothesis that network robustness is not sensitive or elastic to the level of interaction (or flow) among network nodes, this paper explores the impacts of network disruption, namely arc deletion, over a temporal sequence of observed nodal interactions for a large Internet backbone system. In particular, a mathematical programming approach is used to identify exact bounds on robustness to arc deletion for each epoch of nodal interaction. Elasticity of the identified bounds relative to the magnitude of arc deletion is assessed. Results indicate that system robustness can be highly elastic to spatial and temporal variations in nodal interactions within complex systems. Further, the presence of this elasticity provides evidence that a failure to account for nodal interaction can confound characterizations of complex networked systems. PMID:22808060

  5. Identification of Motions in Membrane Proteins by Elastic Network Models and Their Experimental Validation

    PubMed Central

    Isin, Basak; Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Oltvai, Zoltán N.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Bahar, Ivet

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the functional motions of membrane proteins is difficult because they range from large-scale collective dynamics to local small atomic fluctuations at different timescales that are difficult to measure experimentally due to the hydrophobic nature of these proteins. Elastic Network Models, and in particular their most widely used implementation, the Anisotropic Network Model (ANM), have proven to be useful computational methods in many recent applications to predict membrane protein dynamics. These models are based on the premise that biomolecules possess intrinsic mechanical characteristics uniquely defined by their particular architectures. In the ANM, interactions between residues in close proximity are represented by harmonic potentials with a uniform spring constant. The slow mode shapes generated by the ANM provide valuable information on the global dynamics of biomolecules that are relevant to their function. In its recent extension in the form of ANM-guided molecular dynamics (MD), this coarse-grained approach is augmented with atomic detail. The results from ANM and its extensions can be used to guide experiments and thus speedup the process of quantifying motions in membrane proteins. Testing the predictions can be accomplished through (a) direct observation of motions through studies of structure and biophysical probes, (b) perturbation of the motions by, e.g., cross-linking or site-directed mutagenesis, and (c) by studying the effects of such perturbations on protein function, typically through ligand binding and activity assays. To illustrate the applicability of the combined computational ANM—experimental testing framework to membrane proteins, we describe—alongside the general protocols—here the application of ANM to rhodopsin, a prototypical member of the pharmacologically relevant G-protein coupled receptor family. PMID:22976035

  6. Prediction of allosteric sites on protein surfaces with an elastic-network-model-based thermodynamic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ji Guo; Qi, Li Sheng; Li, Chun Hua; Zhu, Yan Ying; Du, Hui Jing; Hou, Yan Xue; Hao, Rui; Wang, Ji Hua

    2014-08-01

    Allostery is a rapid and efficient way in many biological processes to regulate protein functions, where binding of an effector at the allosteric site alters the activity and function at a distant active site. Allosteric regulation of protein biological functions provides a promising strategy for novel drug design. However, how to effectively identify the allosteric sites remains one of the major challenges for allosteric drug design. In the present work, a thermodynamic method based on the elastic network model was proposed to predict the allosteric sites on the protein surface. In our method, the thermodynamic coupling between the allosteric and active sites was considered, and then the allosteric sites were identified as those where the binding of an effector molecule induces a large change in the binding free energy of the protein with its ligand. Using the proposed method, two proteins, i.e., the 70 kD heat shock protein (Hsp70) and GluA2 alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor, were studied and the allosteric sites on the protein surface were successfully identified. The predicted results are consistent with the available experimental data, which indicates that our method is a simple yet effective approach for the identification of allosteric sites on proteins.

  7. Evaluating Elastic Network Models of Crystalline Biological Molecules with Temperature Factors, Correlated Motions, and Diffuse X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Riccardi, Demian; Cui, Qiang; Phillips, George N.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the variance-covariance matrix of protein motions is used to compare several elastic network models within the theoretical framework of x-ray scattering from crystals. A set of 33 ultra-high resolution structures is used to characterize the average scaling behavior of the vibrational density of states and make comparisons between experimental and theoretical temperature factors. Detailed investigations of the vibrational density of states, correlations, and predicted diffuse x-ray scatter are carried out for crystalline Staphylococcal nuclease; correlations and diffuse x-ray scatter are also compared to predictions from the translation, libration, screw model and a liquid-like dynamics model. We show that elastic network models developed to best predict temperature factors without regard for the crystal environment have relatively strong long-range interactions that yield very short-ranged atom-atom correlations. Further, we find that the low-frequency modes dominate the variance-covariance matrix only for those models with a physically reasonable vibrational density of states, and the fraction of modes required to converge the correlations is higher than that typically used for elastic network model studies. The practical implications are explored using computed diffuse x-ray scatter, which can be measured experimentally. PMID:20959103

  8. On the Applicability of Elastic Network Models for the Study of RNA CUG Trinucleotide Repeat Overexpansion

    PubMed Central

    González, Àlex L.; Teixidó, Jordi; Borrell, José I.; Estrada-Tejedor, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs play a pivotal role in a number of diseases promoting an aberrant sequestration of nuclear RNA-binding proteins. In the particular case of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a multisystemic autosomal dominant disease, the formation of large non-coding CUG repeats set up long-tract hairpins able to bind muscleblind-like proteins (MBNL), which trigger the deregulation of several splicing events such as cardiac troponin T (cTNT) and insulin receptor’s, among others. Evidence suggests that conformational changes in RNA are determinant for the recognition and binding of splicing proteins, molecular modeling simulations can attempt to shed light on the structural diversity of CUG repeats and to understand their pathogenic mechanisms. Molecular dynamics (MD) are widely used to obtain accurate results at atomistic level, despite being very time consuming, and they contrast with fast but simplified coarse-grained methods such as Elastic Network Model (ENM). In this paper, we assess the application of ENM (traditionally applied on proteins) for studying the conformational space of CUG repeats and compare it to conventional and accelerated MD conformational sampling. Overall, the results provided here reveal that ANM can provide useful insights into dynamic rCUG structures at a global level, and that their dynamics depend on both backbone and nucleobase fluctuations. On the other hand, ANM fail to describe local U-U dynamics of the rCUG system, which require more computationally expensive methods such as MD. Given that several limitations are inherent to both methods, we discuss here the usefulness of the current theoretical approaches for studying highly dynamic RNA systems such as CUG trinucleotide repeat overexpansions. PMID:27010216

  9. On the Applicability of Elastic Network Models for the Study of RNA CUG Trinucleotide Repeat Overexpansion.

    PubMed

    González, Àlex L; Teixidó, Jordi; Borrell, José I; Estrada-Tejedor, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs play a pivotal role in a number of diseases promoting an aberrant sequestration of nuclear RNA-binding proteins. In the particular case of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a multisystemic autosomal dominant disease, the formation of large non-coding CUG repeats set up long-tract hairpins able to bind muscleblind-like proteins (MBNL), which trigger the deregulation of several splicing events such as cardiac troponin T (cTNT) and insulin receptor's, among others. Evidence suggests that conformational changes in RNA are determinant for the recognition and binding of splicing proteins, molecular modeling simulations can attempt to shed light on the structural diversity of CUG repeats and to understand their pathogenic mechanisms. Molecular dynamics (MD) are widely used to obtain accurate results at atomistic level, despite being very time consuming, and they contrast with fast but simplified coarse-grained methods such as Elastic Network Model (ENM). In this paper, we assess the application of ENM (traditionally applied on proteins) for studying the conformational space of CUG repeats and compare it to conventional and accelerated MD conformational sampling. Overall, the results provided here reveal that ANM can provide useful insights into dynamic rCUG structures at a global level, and that their dynamics depend on both backbone and nucleobase fluctuations. On the other hand, ANM fail to describe local U-U dynamics of the rCUG system, which require more computationally expensive methods such as MD. Given that several limitations are inherent to both methods, we discuss here the usefulness of the current theoretical approaches for studying highly dynamic RNA systems such as CUG trinucleotide repeat overexpansions.

  10. Flexibility of the exportins Cse1p and Xpot depicted by elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingwen; Kim, Byung

    2011-07-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotic cells involves many interactions between macromolecules, and has been an active area for many researchers. However, the precise mechanism still evades us and more efforts are needed to better understand it. In this study, the authors investigated exportins (Cse1p and Xpot) by elastic network interpolation (ENI) and elastic network based normal mode analysis (EN-NMA). Results of the study on Cse1p were in good agreement with the results obtained by molecular dynamics simulation in another study but with the benefit of time-efficiency. First, a formation of ring closure obtained by ENI was observed. Second, HEAT 1 to 3 and HEAT 14 to 17 had the largest values of root mean square deviation (RMSD) which indicated the flexibility of Cse1p during the transition. In the case of Xpot, a possible pathway from nuclear state to cytoplasmic state was shown, and the predicted pathway was also quantitatively analyzed in terms of RMSD. The results suggested two flexible regions of Xpot that might be important to the transporting mechanism. Moreover, the dominant mode of Xpot in the nuclear state obtained by EN-NMA not only showed the tendency to match the predicted pathway to the cytoplasmic state of Xpot, but also displayed the flexible regions of Xpot. A time-efficient computational approach was presented in this paper and the results indicated that the flexibility of tested exportins might be required to perform the biological function of transporting cargos.

  11. Elastic collapse in disordered isostatic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukarzel, C. F.

    2012-02-01

    Isostatic networks are minimally rigid and therefore have, generically, nonzero elastic moduli. Regular isostatic networks have finite moduli in the limit of large sizes. However, numerical simulations show that all elastic moduli of geometrically disordered isostatic networks go to zero with system size. This holds true for positional as well as for topological disorder. In most cases, elastic moduli decrease as inverse power laws of system size. On directed isostatic networks, however, of which the square and cubic lattices are particular cases, the decrease of the moduli is exponential with size. For these, the observed elastic weakening can be quantitatively described in terms of the multiplicative growth of stresses with system size, giving rise to bulk and shear moduli of order e-bL. The case of sphere packings, which only accept compressive contact forces, is considered separately. It is argued that these have a finite bulk modulus because of specific correlations in contact disorder, introduced by the constraint of compressivity. We discuss why their shear modulus, nevertheless, is again zero for large sizes. A quantitative model is proposed that describes the numerically measured shear modulus, both as a function of the loading angle and system size. In all cases, if a density p>0 of overconstraints is present, as when a packing is deformed by compression or when a glass is outside its isostatic composition window, all asymptotic moduli become finite. For square networks with periodic boundary conditions, these are of order \\sqrt{p} . For directed networks, elastic moduli are of order e-c/p, indicating the existence of an "isostatic length scale" of order 1/p.

  12. Nonaffine rubber elasticity for stiff polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Heussinger, Claus; Schaefer, Boris; Frey, Erwin

    2007-09-01

    We present a theory for the elasticity of cross-linked stiff polymer networks. Stiff polymers, unlike their flexible counterparts, are highly anisotropic elastic objects. Similar to mechanical beams, stiff polymers easily deform in bending, while they are much stiffer with respect to tensile forces ("stretching"). Unlike in previous approaches, where network elasticity is derived from the stretching mode, our theory properly accounts for the soft bending response. A self-consistent effective medium approach is used to calculate the macroscopic elastic moduli starting from a microscopic characterization of the deformation field in terms of "floppy modes"-low-energy bending excitations that retain a high degree of nonaffinity. The length scale characterizing the emergent nonaffinity is given by the "fiber length" lf, defined as the scale over which the polymers remain straight. The calculated scaling properties for the shear modulus are in excellent agreement with the results of recent simulations obtained in two-dimensional model networks. Furthermore, our theory can be applied to rationalize bulk rheological data in reconstituted actin networks.

  13. Fluctuating Elasticity Mode in Transient Molecular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Giovanni; Rossi, Marina; Biffi, Silvia; Sciortino, Francesco; Bellini, Tommaso

    2017-08-01

    Transient molecular networks, a class of adaptive soft materials with remarkable application potential, display complex, and intriguing dynamic behavior. By performing dynamic light scattering on a wide angular range, we study the relaxation dynamics of a reversible network formed by DNA tetravalent nanoparticles, finding a slow relaxation mode that is wave vector independent at large q and crosses over to a standard q-2 viscoelastic relaxation at low q . Exploiting the controlled properties of our DNA network, we attribute this mode to fluctuations in local elasticity induced by connectivity rearrangement. We propose a simple beads and springs model that captures the basic features of this q0 behavior.

  14. Combining Efficient Conformational Sampling with a Deformable Elastic Network Model Facilitates Structure Refinement at Low Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Gunnar F.; Brunger, Axel T.; Levitt, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Summary Structural studies of large proteins and protein assemblies are a difficult and pressing challenge in molecular biology. Experiments often yield only low-resolution or sparse data which are not sufficient to fully determine atomistic structures. We have developed a general geometry-based algorithm that efficiently samples conformational space under constraints imposed by low-resolution density maps obtained from electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography experiments. A deformable elastic network (DEN) is used to restrain the sampling to prior knowledge of an approximate structure. The DEN restraints dramatically reduce over-fitting, especially at low resolution. Cross-validation is used to optimally weight the structural information and experimental data. Our algorithm is robust even for noise-added density maps and has a large radius of convergence for our test case. The DEN restraints can also be used to enhance reciprocal space simulated annealing refinement. PMID:18073112

  15. Free energies for coarse-grained proteins by integrating multibody statistical contact potentials with entropies from elastic network models

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Michael T.; Leelananda, Sumudu P.; Gniewek, Pawel; Feng, Yaping; Jernigan, Robert L.; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel method of calculation of free energy for coarse grained models of proteins by combining our newly developed multibody potentials with entropies computed from elastic network models of proteins. Multi-body potentials have been of much interest recently because they take into account three dimensional interactions related to residue packing and capture the cooperativity of these interactions in protein structures. Combining four-body non-sequential, four-body sequential and pairwise short range potentials with optimized weights for each term, our coarse-grained potential improved recognition of native structure among misfolded decoys, outperforming all other contact potentials for CASP8 decoy sets and performance comparable to the fully atomic empirical DFIRE potentials. By combing statistical contact potentials with entropies from elastic network models of the same structures we can compute free energy changes and improve coarse-grained modeling of protein structure and dynamics. The consideration of protein flexibility and dynamics should improve protein structure prediction and refinement of computational models. This work is the first to combine coarse-grained multibody potentials with an entropic model that takes into account contributions of the entire structure, investigating native-like decoy selection. PMID:21674234

  16. Filament-length-controlled elasticity in 3D fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Broedersz, C P; Sheinman, M; Mackintosh, F C

    2012-02-17

    We present a model for disordered 3D fiber networks to study their linear and nonlinear elasticity. In contrast to previous 2D models, these 3D networks with binary crosslinks are underconstrained with respect to fiber stretching elasticity, suggesting that bending may dominate their response. We find that such networks exhibit a bending-dominated elastic regime controlled by fiber length, as well as a crossover to a stretch-dominated regime for long fibers. Finally, by extending the model to the nonlinear regime, we show that these networks become intrinsically nonlinear with a vanishing linear response regime in the limit of flexible or long filaments.

  17. Nonequilibrium Relaxation of Conformational Dynamics Facilitates Catalytic Reaction in an Elastic Network Model of T7 DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziqing W; Xie, X Sunney; Ge, Hao

    2016-03-24

    Nucleotide-induced conformational closing of the finger domain of DNA polymerase is crucial for its catalytic action during DNA replication. Such large-amplitude molecular motion is often not fully accessible to either direct experimental monitoring or molecular dynamics simulations. However, a coarse-grained model can offer an informative alternative, especially for probing the relationship between conformational dynamics and catalysis. Here we investigate the dynamics of T7 DNA polymerase catalysis using a Langevin-type elastic network model incorporating detailed structural information on the open conformation without the substrate bound. Such a single-parameter model remarkably captures the induced conformational dynamics of DNA polymerase upon dNTP binding, and reveals its close coupling to the advancement toward transition state along the coordinate of the target reaction, which contributes to significant lowering of the activation energy barrier. Furthermore, analysis of stochastic catalytic rates suggests that when the activation energy barrier has already been significantly lowered and nonequilibrium relaxation toward the closed form dominates the catalytic rate, one must appeal to a picture of two-dimensional free energy surface in order to account for the full spectrum of catalytic modes. Our semiquantitative study illustrates the general role of conformational dynamics in achieving transition-state stabilization, and suggests that such an elastic network model, albeit simplified, possesses the potential to furnish significant mechanistic insights into the functioning of a variety of enzymatic systems.

  18. Elastic model of supercoiling.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, C J

    1977-01-01

    An elastic model for the supercoiling of duplex DNA is developed. The simplest assumptions regarding the elastic properties of double-helical DNA (homogeneous, isotropic, of circular cross section, and remaining straight when unstressed) will generate two orders of superhelicity when stressed. Recent experimental results [Brady, G.W., Fein, D.B. & Brumberger, H. (1976) Nature 264, 231-234] suggest that in supercoiled DNA molecules there are regions where two distinct orders of supercoiling arise, as predicted by this model. PMID:267934

  19. Protein folding pathways and state transitions described by classical equations of motion of an elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gareth; Toon, Andrew J

    2010-12-01

    Protein topology defined by the matrix of residue contacts has proved to be a fruitful basis for the study of protein dynamics. The widely implemented coarse-grained elastic network model of backbone fluctuations has been used to describe crystallographic temperature factors, allosteric couplings, and some aspects of the folding pathway. In the present study, we develop a model of protein dynamics based on the classical equations of motion of a damped network model (DNM) that describes the folding path from a completely unfolded state to the native conformation through a single-well potential derived purely from the native conformation. The kinetic energy gained through the collapse of the protein chain is dissipated through a friction term in the equations of motion that models the water bath. This approach is completely general and sufficiently fast that it can be applied to large proteins. Folding pathways for various proteins of different classes are described and shown to correlate with experimental observations and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Allosteric transitions between alternative protein structures are also modeled within the DNM through an asymmetric double-well potential.

  20. Elastic response of filamentous networks with compliant crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Sheinman, M; Heidemann, K M; MacKintosh, F C

    2013-11-01

    Experiments have shown that elasticity of disordered filamentous networks with compliant crosslinks is very different from networks with rigid crosslinks. Here, we model and analyze filamentous networks as a collection of randomly oriented rigid filaments connected to each other by flexible crosslinks that are modeled as wormlike chains. For relatively large extensions we allow for enthalpic stretching of crosslink backbones. We show that for sufficiently high crosslink density, the network linear elastic response is affine on the scale of the filaments' length. The nonlinear regime can become highly nonaffine and is characterized by a divergence of the elastic modulus at finite strain. In contrast to the prior predictions, we do not find an asymptotic regime in which the differential elastic modulus scales linearly with the stress, although an approximate linear dependence can be seen in a transition from entropic to enthalpic regimes. We discuss our results in light of recent experiments.

  1. Analysis of conformational motions and residue fluctuations for Escherichia coli ribose-binding protein revealed with elastic network models.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai Yan; Cao, Zan Xia; Zhao, Li Ling; Wang, Ji Hua

    2013-05-21

    The ribose-binding protein (RBP) is a sugar-binding bacterial periplasmic protein whose function is associated with a large allosteric conformational change from an open to a closed conformation upon binding to ribose. The open (ligand-free) and closed (ligand-bound) forms of RBP have been found. Here we investigate the conformational motions and residue fluctuations of the RBP by analyzing the modes of motion with two coarse-grained elastic network models, the Gaussian Network Model (GNM) and Anisotropic Network Model (ANM). The calculated B-factors in both the calculated models are in good agreement with the experimentally determined B-factors in X-ray crystal structures. The slowest mode analysis by GNM shows that both forms have the same motion hinge axes around residues Ser103, Gln235, Asp264 and the two domains of both structures have similar fluctuation range. The superposition of the first three dominant modes of ANM, consisting of the rotating, bending and twisting motions of the two forms, accounts for large rearrangement of domains from the ligand-free (open) to ligand-bound (closed) conformation and thus constitutes a critical component of the RBP's functions. By analyzing cross-correlations between residue fluctuation and the difference-distance plot, it is revealed that the conformational change can be described as a rigid rotation of the two domains with respect to each other, whereas the internal structure of the two domains remains largely intact. The results directly indicate that the dominant dynamic characteristics of protein structures can be captured from their static native state using coarse-grained models.

  2. Allosteric transitions of the maltose transporter studied by an elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun Hua; Yang, Yong Xiao; Su, Ji Guo; Liu, Bin; Tan, Jian Jun; Zhang, Xiao Yi; Wang, Cun Xin

    2014-07-01

    The maltose transporter from Escherichia coli is one of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that utilize the energy from ATP hydrolysis to translocate substrates across cellular membranes. Until 2011, three crystal structures have been determined for maltose transporter at different states in the process of transportation. Here, based on these crystal structures, the allosteric pathway from the resting state (inward-facing) to the catalytic intermediate state (outward-facing) is studied by applying an adaptive anisotropic network model. The results suggest that the allosteric transitions proceed in a coupled way. The closing of the nucleotide-binding domains occurs first, and subsequently this conformational change is propagated to the transmembrane domains (TMD) via the EAA and EAS loops, and then to the maltose-binding protein, which facilitates the translocation of the maltose. It is also found that there exist nonrigid-body and asymmetric movements in the TMD. The cytoplasmic gate may only play the role of allosteric propagation during the transition from the pretranslocation to outward-facing states. In addition, the results show that the movment of the helical subdomain towards the RecA-like subdomain mainly occurs in the earlier stages of the transition. These results can provide some insights into the understanding of the mechanism of ABC transporters.

  3. The peculiarities of shear crack network pre-rupture evolution: precursory signatures in seismicity distribution and scattered elastic wave properties in modeling and case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyashchenko, D.; Smirnova, N.; Troyan, V.; Vallianatos, F.

    2003-04-01

    One of the important tools for seismic hazard risk assessment is study of the dynamic of properties of spatio-temporal distribution of the seismicity. We have performed simulation of the crack network development in elastic body under external stresses. The results of simulation show that the variations of several multifractal characteristics (correlation dimension, information dimension, higher order generalized fractal dimensions, the abscissa of the top of multifractal spectrum) contain information about evolution of the system towards main rupture. The validity of the results of simulations has been supported by the results of case studies of the seismicity catalogs for Japan and Southern California. Also the considered model of crack network evolution has reproduced such precursory phenomena as the decrease of b-values and the increase of the level of spatio-temporal correlations in the seismicity. Appreciable information on the pre-rupture evolution of fault (crack) network in the lithosphere could be provided by study of the properties of coda waves scattered by the faults and inhomogeneities of the considered seismically active region. We have incorporated the results of simulation of the crack network evolution and solution of 2D problem of elastic waves propagation in elastic media containing a number of cracks. We present the preliminary results of study of acoustic waves scattered in the elastic media by the crack network on different stages of the destruction process. The work is supported by the grant RFBR 02-05-65081, grant INTAS 99-1102 and Russian Programme Intergeophysica.

  4. The elastic network model reveals a consistent picture on intrinsic functional dynamics of type II restriction endonucleases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyar, A.; Kurkcuoglu, O.; Nilsson, L.; Doruker, P.

    2011-10-01

    The vibrational dynamics of various type II restriction endonucleases, in complex with cognate/non-cognate DNA and in the apo form, are investigated with the elastic network model in order to reveal common functional mechanisms in this enzyme family. Scissor-like and tong-like motions observed in the slowest modes of all enzymes and their complexes point to common DNA recognition and cleavage mechanisms. Normal mode analysis further points out that the scissor-like motion has an important role in differentiating between cognate and non-cognate sequences at the recognition site, thus implying its catalytic relevance. Flexible regions observed around the DNA-binding site of the enzyme usually concentrate on the highly conserved β-strands, especially after DNA binding. These β-strands may have a structurally stabilizing role in functional dynamics for target site recognition and cleavage. In addition, hot spot residues based on high-frequency modes reveal possible communication pathways between the two distant cleavage sites in the enzyme family. Some of these hot spots also exist on the shortest path between the catalytic sites and are highly conserved.

  5. Elastic model of dry friction

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E.

    2013-09-15

    Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

  6. Computational Simulation of the Activation Cycle of Gα Subunit in the G Protein Cycle Using an Elastic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Ryung; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Choi, Jae Boong; Chung, Ka Young; Kim, Moon Ki

    2016-01-01

    Agonist-activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) interact with GDP-bound G protein heterotrimers (Gαβγ) promoting GDP/GTP exchange, which results in dissociation of Gα from the receptor and Gβγ. The GTPase activity of Gα hydrolyzes GTP to GDP, and the GDP-bound Gα interacts with Gβγ, forming a GDP-bound G protein heterotrimer. The G protein cycle is allosterically modulated by conformational changes of the Gα subunit. Although biochemical and biophysical methods have elucidated the structure and dynamics of Gα, the precise conformational mechanisms underlying the G protein cycle are not fully understood yet. Simulation methods could help to provide additional details to gain further insight into G protein signal transduction mechanisms. In this study, using the available X-ray crystal structures of Gα, we simulated the entire G protein cycle and described not only the steric features of the Gα structure, but also conformational changes at each step. Each reference structure in the G protein cycle was modeled as an elastic network model and subjected to normal mode analysis. Our simulation data suggests that activated receptors trigger conformational changes of the Gα subunit that are thermodynamically favorable for opening of the nucleotide-binding pocket and GDP release. Furthermore, the effects of GTP binding and hydrolysis on mobility changes of the C and N termini and switch regions are elucidated. In summary, our simulation results enabled us to provide detailed descriptions of the structural and dynamic features of the G protein cycle. PMID:27483005

  7. Analysis of conformational motions and related key residue interactions responsible for a specific function of proteins with elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji Guo; Han, Xiao Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Hou, Yan Xue; Zhu, Jian Zhuo; Wu, Yi Dong

    2016-01-01

    Protein collective motions play a critical role in many biochemical processes. How to predict the functional motions and the related key residue interactions in proteins is important for our understanding in the mechanism of the biochemical processes. Normal mode analysis (NMA) of the elastic network model (ENM) is one of the effective approaches to investigate the structure-encoded motions in proteins. However, the motion modes revealed by the conventional NMA approach do not necessarily correspond to a specific function of protein. In the present work, a new analysis method was proposed to identify the motion modes responsible for a specific function of proteins and then predict the key residue interactions involved in the functional motions by using a perturbation approach. In our method, an internal coordinate that accounts for the specific function was introduced, and the Cartesian coordinate space was transformed into the internal/Cartesian space by using linear approximation, where the introduced internal coordinate serves as one of the axes of the coordinate space. NMA of ENM in this internal/Cartesian space was performed and the function-relevant motion modes were identified according to their contributions to the specific function of proteins. Then the key residue interactions important for the functional motions of the protein were predicted as the interactions whose perturbation largely influences the fluctuation along the internal coordinate. Using our proposed methods, the maltose transporter (MalFGK2) from E. Coli was studied. The functional motions and the key residue interactions that are related to the channel-gating function of this protein were successfully identified.

  8. Rubber elasticity for incomplete polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kengo; Chijiishi, Masashi; Katsumoto, Yukiteru; Nakao, Toshio; Fujii, Kenta; Chung, Ung-il; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takamasa; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the relationship between the elastic modulus, G and the reaction probability, p for polymer networks. First, we pointed out that the elastic modulus is expressed by G = {(fp/2 - 1) + O((p - 1)2)} NkBT/V (percolated network law), which does not depend on the local topology of the network structure or the existence of the loops. Here, N is the number of lattice point, V is the system volume, f is the functionality of the cross-link, kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature. We also conducted simulations for polymer networks with triangular and diamond lattices, and mechanical testing experiments on tetra-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) gel with systematically tuning the reaction probability. Here, the tetra-PEG gel was confirmed to be a potential candidate for ideal polymer networks consisting of unimodal strands free from defects and entanglements. From the results of simulations and experiments, it was revealed, for the first time, that the elastic modulus obeys this law in the wide range of p (pc ≪ p ≤ 1), where pc is the reaction probability at gelation threshold.

  9. Properties of elastic percolating networks in isotropic media with arbitrary elastic constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla, O.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Guinea, F.; Louis, E.

    1990-06-01

    The properties of diluted elastic media in two dimensions are investigated in an isotropic system in which the ratio between the two Lamé coefficients can be varied. Changes in the ratio between the continuum elastic constants induce significant variations in the behavior of the system away from the threshold for percolation, but not in the properties near the percolation transition. We discuss the results in both cases and their relevance to the definition of the universal properties of diluted elastic networks. It is shown that many features of interest, like the bulk modulus at intermediate concentrations of voids and the backbone, are very dependent on the microscopic details of the model, and not only on its macroscopic behavior. Thus, elastic percolation does not seem to have the same degree of universality as scalar percolation.

  10. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D visco-elastic simulations against in vitro measurements

    PubMed Central

    Alastruey, Jordi; Khir, Ashraf W.; Matthys, Koen S.; Segers, Patrick; Sherwin, Spencer J.; Verdonck, Pascal R.; Parker, Kim H.; Peiró, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of the nonlinear one-dimensional (1-D) equations of pressure and flow wave propagation in Voigt-type visco-elastic arteries was tested against measurements in a well-defined experimental 1:1 replica of the 37 largest conduit arteries in the human systemic circulation. The parameters required by the numerical algorithm were directly measured in the in vitro setup and no data fitting was involved. The inclusion of wall visco-elasticity in the numerical model reduced the underdamped high-frequency oscillations obtained using a purely elastic tube law, especially in peripheral vessels, which was previously reported in this paper [Matthys et al., 2007. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D numerical simulations against in vitro measurements. J. Biomech. 40, 3476–3486]. In comparison to the purely elastic model, visco-elasticity significantly reduced the average relative root-mean-square errors between numerical and experimental waveforms over the 70 locations measured in the in vitro model: from 3.0% to 2.5% (p<0.012) for pressure and from 15.7% to 10.8% (p<0.002) for the flow rate. In the frequency domain, average relative errors between numerical and experimental amplitudes from the 5th to the 20th harmonic decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p<0.107) for pressure and from 7.0% to 3.3% (p<10−6) for the flow rate. These results provide additional support for the use of 1-D reduced modelling to accurately simulate clinically relevant problems at a reasonable computational cost. PMID:21724188

  11. Efficiency gain from elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, Annalisa; Rival, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    We compare the cost-efficiency of optical networks based on mixed datarates (10, 40, 100Gb/s) and datarateelastic technologies. A European backbone network is examined under various traffic assumptions (volume of transported data per demand and total number of demands) to better understand the impact of traffic characteristics on cost-efficiency. Network dimensioning is performed for static and restorable networks (resilient to one-link failure). In this paper we will investigate the trade-offs between price of interfaces, reach and reconfigurability, showing that elastic solutions can be more cost-efficient than mixed-rate solutions because of the better compatibility between different datarates, increased reach of channels and simplified wavelength allocation.

  12. Neural network model of rupture conditions for elastic material sample based on measurements at static loading under different strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolgov, I.; Kaverzneva, T.; Kolesova, S.; Lazovskaya, T.; Stolyarov, O.; Tarkhov, D.

    2016-11-01

    The article deals with the problem of predicting of the temporal elongation law of the sample under dynamic loading. The determination of tensile behavior of samples under uniaxial loading is performed by a standard tensile method. The neural network approach is applied to construct an approximate elongation-force dependence using measurement data and posterior model of the dependence of rupture conditions on the neural network parameters. The considered approach can be used in the building industry.

  13. Normal mode analysis based on an elastic network model for biomolecules in the Protein Data Bank, which uses dihedral angles as independent variables.

    PubMed

    Wako, Hiroshi; Endo, Shigeru

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a computer program, named PDBETA, that performs normal mode analysis (NMA) based on an elastic network model that uses dihedral angles as independent variables. Taking advantage of the relatively small number of degrees of freedom required to describe a molecular structure in dihedral angle space and a simple potential-energy function independent of atom types, we aimed to develop a program applicable to a full-atom system of any molecule in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The algorithm for NMA used in PDBETA is the same as the computer program FEDER/2, developed previously. Therefore, the main challenge in developing PDBETA was to find a method that can automatically convert PDB data into molecular structure information in dihedral angle space. Here, we illustrate the performance of PDBETA with a protein-DNA complex, a protein-tRNA complex, and some non-protein small molecules, and show that the atomic fluctuations calculated by PDBETA reproduce the temperature factor data of these molecules in the PDB. A comparison was also made with elastic-network-model based NMA in a Cartesian-coordinate system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Active elastic network: cytoskeleton of the red blood cell.

    PubMed

    Gov, Nir S

    2007-01-01

    In red blood cells there is a cortical cytoskeleton; a two-dimensional elastic network of membrane-attached proteins. We describe, using a simple model, how the metabolic activity of the cell, through the consumption of ATP, controls the stiffness of this elastic network. The unusual mechanical property of active strain softening is described and compared to experimental data. As a by-product of this activity there is also an active contribution to the amplitude of membrane fluctuations. We model this membrane as a field of independent "curvature motors," and calculate the spectrum of active fluctuations. We find that the active cytoskeleton contributes to the amplitude of the membrane height fluctuations at intermediate wavelengths, as observed experimentally.

  15. Topological rubber elasticity theory. II. SCL networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Kazuyoshi

    1982-06-01

    The theory presented in part I [Iwata, J. Chem. Phys. 76, 6363 (1982)] is applied to networks having a simple-cubic-lattice (SCL) regular connection pattern, for which the projection matrix Γ* is computed easily. Derivatives of elastic free energies in regard to parameter λ for macroscopic deformation ∂F˜e/∂λ are computed numerically for isotropic deformations (swelling or deswelling) and for simple deformations (extension or contraction under swelling by α times). The initial arrangement of junction points r0 is assumed to be exactly SCL, and δ = d0/√νb is chosen as one of parameters in the calculation, where d0 is an end-to-end distance of the strands at the time of network formation, ν is a degree of polymerization in regard to the strands, and b is a statistical length per monomer. A repeating cell is chosen as a cube composed of 3×3×3 ( = 27) junction points and 3×27 ( = 81) strands. The following are found in this work. (1) Among four terms ∂F0,ph/∂λ, ∂F˜0,top/∂λ, ∂F˜1/∂λ, and ∂F˜2/∂λ of the derivative of the elastic free energy, the principal term is ∂F˜0,top/∂λ, which comes from the topological interaction among the strands; the phantom network term ∂F0,ph/∂λ is only a small correction to the net stress. (2) In isotropic deformations, the elastic free energy takes a minimum at λ0, a little below λ = 1; for compression below λ0, a strong postitive inner pressure, which comes from the topological repulsive forces among the strands, arises. (3) In simple deformations, the Mooney-Rivlin term appears for unswollen systems and it disappears as swelling of the network proceeds. Experimental plans are proposed which will reveal the existence of the topological repulsive interactions in the networks.

  16. Advantages of IP over elastic optical networks using multi-flow transponders from cost and equipment count aspects.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takafumi; Hirano, Akira; Jinno, Masahiko

    2014-01-13

    To evaluate the cost efficiency of IP over elastic optical network architectures, we use a multi-layer network design scheme that covers network to node equipment level. An evaluation in a static traffic environment shows that the multi-flow optical transponder-based elastic optical network reduces total cost as well as equipment counts compared to other elastic network models based on fixed-rate, mixed-line-rate and bandwidth-variable transponders.

  17. Deformable elastic network refinement for low-resolution macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Schröder, Gunnar F.; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T.

    2014-09-01

    An overview of applications of the deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method is presented together with recommendations for its optimal usage. Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determinion of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed, recommendations for its optimal usage are provided and its limitations are discussed. Representative examples of the application of DEN refinement to challenging cases of refinement at low resolution are presented. These cases include soluble as well as membrane proteins determined at limiting resolutions ranging from 3 to 7 Å. Potential extensions of the DEN refinement technique and future perspectives for the interpretation of low-resolution crystal structures are also discussed.

  18. Bridging between NMA and Elastic Network Models: Preserving All-Atom Accuracy in Coarse-Grained Models.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyuntae; Jernigan, Robert L; Song, Guang

    2015-10-01

    Dynamics can provide deep insights into the functional mechanisms of proteins and protein complexes. For large protein complexes such as GroEL/GroES with more than 8,000 residues, obtaining a fine-grained all-atom description of its normal mode motions can be computationally prohibitive and is often unnecessary. For this reason, coarse-grained models have been used successfully. However, most existing coarse-grained models use extremely simple potentials to represent the interactions within the coarse-grained structures and as a result, the dynamics obtained for the coarse-grained structures may not always be fully realistic. There is a gap between the quality of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures given by all-atom models and that by coarse-grained models. In this work, we resolve an important question in protein dynamics computations--how can we efficiently construct coarse-grained models whose description of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures remains as accurate as that given by all-atom models? Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of the Hessian matrix and achieves a high efficiency with a novel iterative matrix projection approach. The result is highly significant since it can provide descriptions of normal mode motions at an all-atom level of accuracy even for the largest biomolecular complexes. The application of our method to GroEL/GroES offers new insights into the mechanism of this biologically important chaperonin, such as that the conformational transitions of this protein complex in its functional cycle are even more strongly connected to the first few lowest frequency modes than with other coarse-grained models.

  19. Drainage fracture networks in elastic solids with internal fluid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobchenko, Maya; Hafver, Andreas; Jettestuen, Espen; Galland, Olivier; Renard, François; Meakin, Paul; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Dysthe, Dag K.

    2013-06-01

    Experiments in which CO2 gas was generated by the yeast fermentation of sugar in an elastic layer of gelatine gel confined between two glass plates are described and analyzed theoretically. The CO2 gas pressure causes the gel layer to fracture. The gas produced is drained on short length scales by diffusion and on long length scales by flow in a fracture network, which has topological properties that are intermediate between river networks and hierarchical-fracture networks. A simple model for the experimental system with two parameters that characterize the disorder and the intermediate (river-fracture) topology of the network was developed and the results of the model were compared with the experimental results.

  20. Scale-Dependent Nonaffine Elasticity of Semiflexible Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakhorrami, M.; Koenderink, G. H.; Palierne, J. F.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Schmidt, C. F.

    2014-02-01

    The cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells provides mechanical support and governs intracellular transport. These functions rely on the complex mechanical properties of networks of semiflexible protein filaments. We study the impact of local network deformations on the scale-dependent mobility of probe particles in entangled networks of actin filaments using high-bandwidth microrheology. We find that micron-sized particles in these networks experience two opposing noncontinuum elastic effects: entropic depletion reduces the effective network rigidity, while local nonaffine deformations of the network substantially enhance the rigidity at low frequencies, eventually leading to a size-independent response and strong violation of the generalized Stokes formula. We show that a simple model of lateral bending of filaments embedded in a viscoelastic background leads to an intermediate scaling regime for the apparent elastic modulus G'(ω)˜ω9/16, closely matching the experiments. These results demonstrate that nonaffine bending deformations can be dominant for the mobility of objects of the size of vesicles and organelles in the cell.

  1. A coarse-grained elastic network atom contact model and its use in the simulation of protein dynamics and the prediction of the effect of mutations.

    PubMed

    Frappier, Vincent; Najmanovich, Rafael J

    2014-04-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) methods are widely used to study dynamic aspects of protein structures. Two critical components of NMA methods are coarse-graining in the level of simplification used to represent protein structures and the choice of potential energy functional form. There is a trade-off between speed and accuracy in different choices. In one extreme one finds accurate but slow molecular-dynamics based methods with all-atom representations and detailed atom potentials. On the other extreme, fast elastic network model (ENM) methods with Cα-only representations and simplified potentials that based on geometry alone, thus oblivious to protein sequence. Here we present ENCoM, an Elastic Network Contact Model that employs a potential energy function that includes a pairwise atom-type non-bonded interaction term and thus makes it possible to consider the effect of the specific nature of amino-acids on dynamics within the context of NMA. ENCoM is as fast as existing ENM methods and outperforms such methods in the generation of conformational ensembles. Here we introduce a new application for NMA methods with the use of ENCoM in the prediction of the effect of mutations on protein stability. While existing methods are based on machine learning or enthalpic considerations, the use of ENCoM, based on vibrational normal modes, is based on entropic considerations. This represents a novel area of application for NMA methods and a novel approach for the prediction of the effect of mutations. We compare ENCoM to a large number of methods in terms of accuracy and self-consistency. We show that the accuracy of ENCoM is comparable to that of the best existing methods. We show that existing methods are biased towards the prediction of destabilizing mutations and that ENCoM is less biased at predicting stabilizing mutations.

  2. A Coarse-Grained Elastic Network Atom Contact Model and Its Use in the Simulation of Protein Dynamics and the Prediction of the Effect of Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Frappier, Vincent; Najmanovich, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) methods are widely used to study dynamic aspects of protein structures. Two critical components of NMA methods are coarse-graining in the level of simplification used to represent protein structures and the choice of potential energy functional form. There is a trade-off between speed and accuracy in different choices. In one extreme one finds accurate but slow molecular-dynamics based methods with all-atom representations and detailed atom potentials. On the other extreme, fast elastic network model (ENM) methods with Cα−only representations and simplified potentials that based on geometry alone, thus oblivious to protein sequence. Here we present ENCoM, an Elastic Network Contact Model that employs a potential energy function that includes a pairwise atom-type non-bonded interaction term and thus makes it possible to consider the effect of the specific nature of amino-acids on dynamics within the context of NMA. ENCoM is as fast as existing ENM methods and outperforms such methods in the generation of conformational ensembles. Here we introduce a new application for NMA methods with the use of ENCoM in the prediction of the effect of mutations on protein stability. While existing methods are based on machine learning or enthalpic considerations, the use of ENCoM, based on vibrational normal modes, is based on entropic considerations. This represents a novel area of application for NMA methods and a novel approach for the prediction of the effect of mutations. We compare ENCoM to a large number of methods in terms of accuracy and self-consistency. We show that the accuracy of ENCoM is comparable to that of the best existing methods. We show that existing methods are biased towards the prediction of destabilizing mutations and that ENCoM is less biased at predicting stabilizing mutations. PMID:24762569

  3. Survivable virtual optical network embedding with probabilistic network-element failures in elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Cheng, Lei; Luo, Guangjun; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yongli; Ding, Huixia; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Yang

    2015-06-01

    The elastic optical networks can elastically allocate spectrum tailored for various bandwidth requirements. In addition, different virtual optical networks (VONs) formed by different applications or service providers need to be embedded on the common physical optical network, it brings virtual optical network embedding (VONE) problem. There is no precise standard to measure the survivability of VON from the failure probability view and take minimum VON failure probability as an objective in a VONE problem. In this paper, we investigate a survivable VONE problem from a new perspective. Considering probabilistic physical network-element failures, a novel metric, named virtual optical network failure probability (VON-FP), is introduced to evaluate the survivability of VONs in elastic optical networks. Moreover, a failure-probability-aware virtual optical network embedding (FPA-VONE) algorithm is proposed to deploy VONs on the physical network elements with small failure probability, and finally to decrease the VON-FP and enhance the spectrum utilization effectively.

  4. Chromosomal dynamics predicted by an elastic network model explains genome-wide accessibility and long-range couplings.

    PubMed

    Sauerwald, Natalie; Zhang, She; Kingsford, Carl; Bahar, Ivet

    2017-03-16

    Understanding the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of chromatin and its relation to gene expression and regulation is fundamental to understanding how the genome functions. Advances in Hi-C technology now permit us to study 3D genome organization, but we still lack an understanding of the structural dynamics of chromosomes. The dynamic couplings between regions separated by large genomic distances (>50 Mb) have yet to be characterized. We adapted a well-established protein-modeling framework, the Gaussian Network Model (GNM), to model chromatin dynamics using Hi-C data. We show that the GNM can identify spatial couplings at multiple scales: it can quantify the correlated fluctuations in the positions of gene loci, find large genomic compartments and smaller topologically-associating domains (TADs) that undergo en bloc movements, and identify dynamically coupled distal regions along the chromosomes. We show that the predictions of the GNM correlate well with genome-wide experimental measurements. We use the GNM to identify novel cross-correlated distal domains (CCDDs) representing pairs of regions distinguished by their long-range dynamic coupling and show that CCDDs are associated with increased gene co-expression. Together, these results show that GNM provides a mathematically well-founded unified framework for modeling chromatin dynamics and assessing the structural basis of genome-wide observations.

  5. The 1-Particle-per-k-Nucleotides (1PkN) Elastic Network Model of DNA Dynamics with Sequence-Dependent Geometry.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Takeru; Isami, Shuhei; Togashi, Yuichi; Nishimori, Hiraku; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Awazu, Akinori

    2017-01-01

    Coarse-grained models of DNA have made important contributions to the determination of the physical properties of genomic DNA, working as a molecular machine for gene regulation. In this study, to analyze the global dynamics of long DNA sequences with consideration of sequence-dependent geometry, we propose elastic network models of DNA where each particle represents k nucleotides (1-particle-per-k-nucleotides, 1PkN). The models were adjusted according to profiles of the anisotropic fluctuations obtained from our previous 1-particle-per-1-nucleotide (1P1N) model, which was proven to reproduce such profiles of all-atom models. We confirmed that the 1P3N and 1P4N models are suitable for the analysis of detailed dynamics such as local twisting motion. The models are intended for the analysis of large structures, e.g., 10-nm fibers in the nucleus, and nucleoids of mitochondrial or phage DNA at low computational costs. As an example, we surveyed the physical characteristics of the whole mitochondrial human and Plasmodium falciparum genomes.

  6. The 1-Particle-per-k-Nucleotides (1PkN) Elastic Network Model of DNA Dynamics with Sequence-Dependent Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Takeru; Isami, Shuhei; Togashi, Yuichi; Nishimori, Hiraku; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Awazu, Akinori

    2017-01-01

    Coarse-grained models of DNA have made important contributions to the determination of the physical properties of genomic DNA, working as a molecular machine for gene regulation. In this study, to analyze the global dynamics of long DNA sequences with consideration of sequence-dependent geometry, we propose elastic network models of DNA where each particle represents k nucleotides (1-particle-per-k-nucleotides, 1PkN). The models were adjusted according to profiles of the anisotropic fluctuations obtained from our previous 1-particle-per-1-nucleotide (1P1N) model, which was proven to reproduce such profiles of all-atom models. We confirmed that the 1P3N and 1P4N models are suitable for the analysis of detailed dynamics such as local twisting motion. The models are intended for the analysis of large structures, e.g., 10-nm fibers in the nucleus, and nucleoids of mitochondrial or phage DNA at low computational costs. As an example, we surveyed the physical characteristics of the whole mitochondrial human and Plasmodium falciparum genomes. PMID:28382002

  7. Inferring a weighted elastic network from partial unfolding with coarse-grained simulations.

    PubMed

    de Mendonça, Matheus R; Rizzi, Leandro G; Contessoto, Vinicius; Leite, Vitor B P; Alves, Nelson A

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that simple elastic network models can reproduce experimental B-factors, providing insights into the structure-function properties of proteins. Here, we report a study on how to improve an elastic network model and explore its performance by predicting the experimental B-factors. Elastic network models are built on the experimental Cα coordinates, and they only take the pairs of Cα atoms within a given cutoff distance rc into account. These models describe the interactions by elastic springs with the same force constant. We have developed a method based on numerical simulations with a simple coarse-grained force field, to attribute weights to these spring constants. This method considers the time that two Cα atoms remain connected in the network during partial unfolding, establishing a means of measuring the strength of each link. We examined two different coarse-grained force fields and explored the computation of these weights by unfolding the native structures.

  8. A strain-consistent elastic plate model with surface elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, C. Q.

    2016-03-01

    A strain-consistent elastic plate model is formulated in which both initial surface tension and the induced residual stress are treated as finite values, and the exactly same strain expressions are consistently employed for both the surface and the bulk plate. Different than most of previous related models which follow the original Gurtin-Murdoch model and include some non-strain displacement gradient terms (which cannot be expressed in terms of the surface infinitesimal strains or the von Karman-type strains) in the surface stress-strain relations, the present model does not include any non-strain displacement gradient terms in the surface stress-strain relations. For a free elastic plate with in-plane movable edges, the present model predicts that initial surface tension exactly cancels out the induced residual compressive stress. On the other hand, if all edges are in-plane immovable, residual stress cannot develop in the plate and the initial surface tension causes a tensile net membrane force. In addition, the present model predicts that initial surface tension reduces the effective bending rigidity of the plate, while this reduction does not depend on Poisson ratio. In particular, self-buckling of a free elastic plate under tensile surface tension cannot occur unless the effective bending rigidity of plate vanishes or becomes negative.

  9. Edge mode amplification in disordered elastic networks.

    PubMed

    Yan, Le; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Wyart, Matthieu

    2017-08-30

    Understanding how mechanical systems can be designed to efficiently transport elastic information is important in a variety of fields, including in materials science and biology. Recently, it has been discovered that certain crystalline lattices present "topologically-protected" edge modes that can amplify elastic signals. Several observations suggest that edge modes are important in disordered systems as well, an effect not well understood presently. Here we build a theory of edge modes in disordered isostatic materials and compute the distribution g(κ) of Lyapunov exponents κ characterizing how modes penetrate in the bulk, and find good agreement with numerical results. We show that disordered isostatic materials generically act as levers with amplification of an order L(L) where L is the system size, whereas more connected materials amplify signals only close to free surfaces. Our approach, which is based on recent results in "free" random matrix theory, makes an analogy with electronic transport in a disordered conductor.

  10. Deformable elastic network refinement for low-resolution macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Gunnar F; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T

    2014-09-01

    Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determinion of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed, recommendations for its optimal usage are provided and its limitations are discussed. Representative examples of the application of DEN refinement to challenging cases of refinement at low resolution are presented. These cases include soluble as well as membrane proteins determined at limiting resolutions ranging from 3 to 7 Å. Potential extensions of the DEN refinement technique and future perspectives for the interpretation of low-resolution crystal structures are also discussed.

  11. Deformable elastic network refinement for low-resolution macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Gunnar F.; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T.

    2014-01-01

    Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determinion of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed, recommendations for its optimal usage are provided and its limitations are discussed. Representative examples of the application of DEN refinement to challenging cases of refinement at low resolution are presented. These cases include soluble as well as membrane proteins determined at limiting resolutions ranging from 3 to 7 Å. Potential extensions of the DEN refinement technique and future perspectives for the interpretation of low-resolution crystal structures are also discussed. PMID:25195739

  12. Conformational Motions and Functionally Key Residues for Vitamin B12 Transporter BtuCD-BtuF Revealed by Elastic Network Model with a Function-Related Internal Coordinate.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhang, Xiao; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Li, Xing-Yuan; Hou, Yan-Xue; Wu, Yi-Dong; Zhu, Jian-Zhuo; An, Hai-Long

    2015-08-04

    BtuCD-BtuF from Escherichia coli is a binding protein-dependent adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter system that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transmit vitamin B12 across cellular membranes. Experimental studies have showed that during the transport cycle, the transporter undergoes conformational transitions between the "inward-facing" and "outward-facing" states, which results in the open-closed motions of the cytoplasmic gate of the transport channel. The opening-closing of the channel gate play critical roles for the function of the transporter, which enables the substrate vitamin B12 to be translocated into the cell. In the present work, the extent of opening of the cytoplasmic gate was chosen as a function-related internal coordinate. Then the mean-square fluctuation of the internal coordinate, as well as the cross-correlation between the displacement of the internal coordinate and the movement of each residue in the protein, were calculated based on the normal mode analysis of the elastic network model to analyze the function-related motions encoded in the structure of the system. In addition, the key residues important for the functional motions of the transporter were predicted by using a perturbation method. In order to facilitate the calculations, the internal coordinate was introduced as one of the axes of the coordinate space and the conventional Cartesian coordinate space was transformed into the internal/Cartesian space with linear approximation. All the calculations were carried out in this internal/Cartesian space. Our method can successfully identify the functional motions and key residues for the transporter BtuCD-BtuF, which are well consistent with the experimental observations.

  13. Ligand Docking to Intermediate and Close-To-Bound Conformers Generated by an Elastic Network Model Based Algorithm for Highly Flexible Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Doruker, Pemra

    2016-01-01

    Incorporating receptor flexibility in small ligand-protein docking still poses a challenge for proteins undergoing large conformational changes. In the absence of bound structures, sampling conformers that are accessible by apo state may facilitate docking and drug design studies. For this aim, we developed an unbiased conformational search algorithm, by integrating global modes from elastic network model, clustering and energy minimization with implicit solvation. Our dataset consists of five diverse proteins with apo to complex RMSDs 4.7–15 Å. Applying this iterative algorithm on apo structures, conformers close to the bound-state (RMSD 1.4–3.8 Å), as well as the intermediate states were generated. Dockings to a sequence of conformers consisting of a closed structure and its “parents” up to the apo were performed to compare binding poses on different states of the receptor. For two periplasmic binding proteins and biotin carboxylase that exhibit hinge-type closure of two dynamics domains, the best pose was obtained for the conformer closest to the bound structure (ligand RMSDs 1.5–2 Å). In contrast, the best pose for adenylate kinase corresponded to an intermediate state with partially closed LID domain and open NMP domain, in line with recent studies (ligand RMSD 2.9 Å). The docking of a helical peptide to calmodulin was the most challenging case due to the complexity of its 15 Å transition, for which a two-stage procedure was necessary. The technique was first applied on the extended calmodulin to generate intermediate conformers; then peptide docking and a second generation stage on the complex were performed, which in turn yielded a final peptide RMSD of 2.9 Å. Our algorithm is effective in producing conformational states based on the apo state. This study underlines the importance of such intermediate states for ligand docking to proteins undergoing large transitions. PMID:27348230

  14. ISSLS Prize Winner: A Detailed Examination of the Elastic Network Leads to a New Understanding of Annulus Fibrosus Organization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Schollum, Meredith L; Wade, Kelly R; Broom, Neil D; Urban, Jill P G

    2015-08-01

    Investigation of the elastic network in disc annulus and its function. To investigate the involvement of the elastic network in the structural interconnectivity of the annulus and to examine its possible mechanical role. The lamellae of the disc are now known to consist of bundles of collagen fibers organized into compartments. There is strong interconnectivity between adjacent compartments and between adjacent lamellae, possibly aided by a translamellar bridging network, containing blood vessels. An elastic network exists across the disc annulus and is particularly dense between the lamellae, and forms crossing bridges within the lamellae. Blocks of annulus taken from bovine caudal discs were studied in either their unloaded or radially stretched state then fixed and sectioned, and their structure analyzed optically using immunohistology. An elastic network enclosed the collagen compartments, connecting the compartments with each other and with the elastic network of adjacent lamellae, formed an integrated network across the annulus, linking it together. Stretching experiments demonstrated the mechanical interconnectivities of the elastic fibers and the collagen compartments. The annulus can be viewed as a modular structure organized into compartments of collagen bundles enclosed by an elastic sheath. The elastic network of these sheaths is interconnected mechanically across the entire annulus. This organization is also seen in the modular structure of tendon and muscle. The results provide a new understanding annulus structure and its interconnectivity, and contribute to fundamental structural information relevant to disc tissue engineering and mechanical modeling. N/A.

  15. Adaptive Quality of Transmission Control in Elastic Optical Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xinran

    Optical fiber communication is becoming increasingly important due to the burgeoning demand in the internet capacity. However, traditional wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technique fails to address such demand because of its inefficient spectral utilization. As a result, elastic optical networking (EON) has been under extensive investigation recently. Such network allows sub-wavelength and super-wavelength channel accommodation, and mitigates the stranded bandwidth problem in the WDM network. In addition, elastic optical network is also able to dynamically allocate the spectral resources of the network based on channel conditions and impairments, and adaptively control the quality of transmission of a channel. This application requires two aspects to be investigated: an efficient optical performance monitoring scheme and networking control and management algorithms to reconfigure the network in a dynamic fashion. This thesis focuses on the two aspects discussed above about adaptive QoT control. We demonstrated a supervisory channel method for optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) and chromatic dispersion (CD) monitoring. In addition, our proof-of-principle testbed experiments show successful impairment aware reconfiguration of the network with modulation format switching (MFS) only and MFS combined with lightpath rerouting (LR) for hundred-GHz QPSK superchannels undergoing time-varying OSNR impairment.

  16. A microchannel flow model for soft tissue elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K. J.

    2014-08-01

    A number of advances, including imaging of tissue displacements, have increased our ability to make measurements of tissue elastic properties of animal and human tissues. Accordingly, the question is increasingly asked, ‘should our data be fit to a viscoelastic model, and if so which one?’ In this paper we focus solely on soft tissues in a functional (non-pathological) state, and develop a model of elastic behavior that is based on the flow of viscous fluids through the extensive network of tissue microchannels in response to applied stress. This behavior can be captured in a 2-parameter model, and the model appears to predict the stress-relaxation behavior and the dispersive shear wave behavior of bovine liver specimens and other soft tissues and phantoms. The relationship of the microchannel flow model to more traditional models is also examined.

  17. Elastic instabilities in a model cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayett, David; Manyuhina, Oksana; Schwarz, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    Soft and biological systems exhibit elastic instabilities, such as buckling, folding and wrinkling, in the presence of external loads, growth, or both. The modeling of such systems calls for a continuum approach to account for the interplay between local elastic stresses and global growth profiles. It is this interplay that can lead to non-trivial geometries. We propose a model of the cerebral cortex, described as an anisotropic multi-layered material with two basic components (white matter and grey matter) undergoing differential growth. We explore the nature of buckling instabilities, assuming a compatibility between the growth and geometric deformation, by solving a nonlinear variational problem with a free interface. We expect that this simplified approach, based on a combination of geometry and elasticity, could give insight into the formation and splitting of folds observed during the development of the cerebral cortex.

  18. Dynamic Elasticity Model of Resilin Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Duki, Solomon

    2013-03-01

    Resilin proteins are `super elastic rubbers' in the flight and jumping systems of most insects, and can extend and retract millions of times. Natural resilin exhibits high resilience (> 95%) under high-frequency conditions, and could be stretched to over 300% of its original length with a low elastic modulus of 0.1-3 MPa. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. We report on the dynamic structure transitions and functions of full length resilin from fruit fly (D. melanogaster CG15920) and its different functional domains. A dynamic computational model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for resilins, as well as other elastomeric proteins. A strong beta-turn transition was experimentally identified in the full length resilin and its non-elastic domains (Exon III). Changes in periodic long-range order were demonstrated during this transition, induced either by thermal or mechanical inputs, to confirm the universality of proposed mechanism. Further, this model offers new options for designing protein-based biopolymers with tunable material applications.

  19. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Kengo E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Noguchi, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Sakai, Takamasa E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-11-14

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G{sub 0}, must be equal to G/G{sub 0} = (p − 2/f)/(1 − 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  20. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Kengo; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takamasa; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-14

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G0, must be equal to G/G0 = (p - 2/f)/(1 - 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  1. Rubber Elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kengo; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Sakai, Takamasa

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation for Hookian spring network (EMA) to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1 ,G0, must be equal to G /G0 = (p - 2 / f) / (1 - 2 / f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA, and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  2. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kengo; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takamasa; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-01

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G0, must be equal to G/G0 = (p - 2/f)/(1 - 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  3. Modeling Pseudo-elastic Behavior of Springback

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Z. Cedric

    2005-08-05

    One of the principal foundations of mathematical theory of conventional plasticity for rate-independent metals is that there exists a well-defined yield surface in stress space for any material point under deformation. A material point can undergo further plastic deformation if the applied stresses are beyond current yield surface which is generally referred as 'plastic loading'. On the other hand, if the applied stress state falls within or on the yield surface, the metal will deform elastically only and is said to be undergoing 'elastic unloading'. Although it has been always recognized throughout the history of development of plasticity theory that there is indeed inelastic deformation accompanying elastic unloading, which leads to metal's hysteresis behavior, its effects were thought to be negligible and were largely ignored in the mathematical treatment.Recently there have been renewed interests in the study of unloading behavior of sheet metals upon large plastic deformation and its implications on springback prediction. Springback is essentially an elastic recovery process of a formed sheet metal blank when it is released from the forming dies. Its magnitude depends on the stress states and compliances of the deformed sheet metal if no further plastic loading occurs during the relaxation process. Therefore the accurate determination of material compliances during springback and its effective incorporation into simulation software are important aspects for springback calculation. Some of the studies suggest that the unloading curve might deviate from linearity, and suggestions were made that a reduced elastic modulus be used for springback simulation.The aim of this study is NOT to take a position on the debate of whether elastic moduli are changed during sheet metal forming process. Instead we propose an approach of modeling observed psuedoelastic behavior within the context of mathematical theory of plasticity, where elastic moduli are treated to be

  4. Elastic model for dinucleosome structure and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Hashem; Khodabandeh, Fatemeh; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid

    2016-04-01

    The equilibrium structure of a dinucleosome is studied using an elastic model that takes into account the force and torque balance conditions. Using the proper boundary conditions, it is found that the conformational energy of the problem does not depend on the length of the linker DNA. In addition it is shown that the two histone octamers are almost perpendicular to each other, and the linker DNA in short lengths is almost straight. These findings could shed some light on the role of DNA elasticity in the chromatin structure.

  5. Modeling elastic anisotropy in strained heteroepitaxy.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Gopal Krishna; Ranganathan, Madhav

    2017-09-20

    Using a continuum evolution equation, we model the growth and evolution of quantum dots in the heteroepitaxial Ge on Si(0 0 1) system in a molecular beam epitaxy unit. We formulate our model in terms of evolution due to deposition, and due to surface diffusion which is governed by a free energy. This free energy has contributions from surface energy, curvature, wetting effects and elastic energy due to lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate. In addition to anisotropy due to surface energy which favors facet formation, we also incorporate elastic anisotropy due to an underlying crystal lattice. The complicated elastic problem of the film-substrate system subjected to boundary conditions at the free surface, interface and the bulk substrate is solved by perturbation analysis using a small slope approximation. This permits an analysis of effects at different orders in the slope and sheds new light on the observed behavior. Linear stability analysis shows the early evolution of the instability towards dot formation. The elastic anisotropy causes a change in the alignment of dots in the linear regime, whereas the surface energy anisotropy changes the dot shapes at the nonlinear regime. Numerical simulation of the full nonlinear equations shows the evolution of the surface morphology. In particular, we show, for parameters of the [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] on Si(0 0 1), the surface energy anisotropy dominates the shapes of the quantum dots, whereas their alignment is influenced by the elastic energy anisotropy. The anisotropy in elasticity causes a further elongation of the islands whose coarsening is interrupted due to [Formula: see text] facets on the surface.

  6. Modeling elastic anisotropy in strained heteroepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Dixit, Gopal; Ranganathan, Madhav

    2017-09-01

    Using a continuum evolution equation, we model the growth and evolution of quantum dots in the heteroepitaxial Ge on Si(0 0 1) system in a molecular beam epitaxy unit. We formulate our model in terms of evolution due to deposition, and due to surface diffusion which is governed by a free energy. This free energy has contributions from surface energy, curvature, wetting effects and elastic energy due to lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate. In addition to anisotropy due to surface energy which favors facet formation, we also incorporate elastic anisotropy due to an underlying crystal lattice. The complicated elastic problem of the film-substrate system subjected to boundary conditions at the free surface, interface and the bulk substrate is solved by perturbation analysis using a small slope approximation. This permits an analysis of effects at different orders in the slope and sheds new light on the observed behavior. Linear stability analysis shows the early evolution of the instability towards dot formation. The elastic anisotropy causes a change in the alignment of dots in the linear regime, whereas the surface energy anisotropy changes the dot shapes at the nonlinear regime. Numerical simulation of the full nonlinear equations shows the evolution of the surface morphology. In particular, we show, for parameters of the Ge0.25 Si0.75 on Si(0 0 1), the surface energy anisotropy dominates the shapes of the quantum dots, whereas their alignment is influenced by the elastic energy anisotropy. The anisotropy in elasticity causes a further elongation of the islands whose coarsening is interrupted due to < 1 0 5 > facets on the surface.

  7. A collagen and elastic network in the wing of the bat.

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, K A; Odland, G F

    1978-01-01

    Bundles of collagen fibrils, elastic fibres and fibroblasts are organized into a network that lies in the plane of a large portion of the bat wing. By ultrastructural (TEM and SEM) and biochemical analyses it was found that individual bundles of the net are similar to elastic ligaments. Although elastic fibres predominate, they are integrated and aligned in parallel with small bundles of collagen. A reticulum of fibroblasts, joined by focal junctions, forms a cellular framework throughout each bundle. Because of the unique features of the fibre bundles of the bat's wing, in particular their accessibility, and the parallel alignment of the collagen fibrils and elastic fibres in each easily isolatable fibre bundle, they should prove a most valuable model for connective tissue studies, particularly for the study of collagen-elastin interactions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:649500

  8. Hypo-Elastic Model for Lung Parenchyma

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    A simple elastic isotropic constitutive model for the spongy tissue in lung is derived from the theory of hypoelasticity. The model is shown to exhibit a pressure dependent behavior that has been interpreted by some as indicating extensional anisotropy. In contrast, we show that this behavior arises natural from an analysis of isotropic hypoelastic invariants, and is a likely result of non-linearity, not anisotropy. The response of the model is determined analytically for several boundary value problems used for material characterization. These responses give insight into both the material behavior as well as admissible bounds on parameters. The model is characterized against published experimental data for dog lung. Future work includes non-elastic model behavior.

  9. Fluctuation-stabilized marginal networks and anomalous entropic elasticity.

    PubMed

    Dennison, M; Sheinman, M; Storm, C; MacKintosh, F C

    2013-08-30

    We study the elastic properties of thermal networks of Hookean springs. In the purely mechanical limit, such systems are known to have a vanishing rigidity when their connectivity falls below a critical, isostatic value. In this work, we show that thermal networks exhibit a nonzero shear modulus G well below the isostatic point and that this modulus exhibits an anomalous, sublinear dependence on temperature T. At the isostatic point, G increases as the square root of T, while we find G∝Tα below the isostatic point, where α≃0.8. We show that this anomalous T dependence is entropic in origin.

  10. Stepwise Elastic Behavior in a Model Elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawe, Dhananjay M.; Cohen, Claude; Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2004-12-01

    MonteCarlo simulations of an entanglement-free cross-linked polymer network of semiflexible chains reveal a peculiar stepwise elastic response. For increasing stress, step jumps in strain are observed that do not correlate with changes in the number of aligned chains. We show that this unusual behavior stems from the ability of the system to form multiple ordered chain domains that exclude the cross-linking species. This novel elastomer shows a toughening behavior similar to that observed in biological structural materials, such as muscle proteins and abalone shell adhesive.

  11. A mathematical model of elastic fin micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Pin; Lee, Kwok Hong; Piang Lim, Siak; Dong, Shuxiang; Zhong Lin, Wu

    2000-08-01

    In the present work, a simplified mathematical model of ultrasonic elastic fin micromotors has been developed. According to the operating principle of this type of motor, the motions of a rotor in each cycle of the stator vibration are divided into several stages based on whether the fin tip and the stator are in contact with slip, contact without slip or separation. The equations of motion of the rotor in each stage are derived. The valid range of the model has been discussed through numerical examples. This work provides an initial effort to construct a model for the elastic fin motor by considering the dynamical deformation of the rotor as well as the intermittent contacts.

  12. Modeling orthotropic elasticity, localized plasticity and fracture in trabecular bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, D. T.; Elkhodary, K. I.; Fouad, Y.; Greene, M. S.; Sabet, F. A.; Qian, J.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, W. K.; Jasiuk, I.

    2016-09-01

    This work develops a model for the mechanical response of trabecular bone including plasticity, damage and fracture. It features a resultant lamellar orientation that captures trabecular strut anisotropic elasticity, and introduces asymmetric J2 plasticity with isotropic hardening to capture evolving strut tensile and compressive dissipative properties. A continuum compatibility based damage and fracture criterion is also proposed to model fracture surface generation. We investigated fracture of a trabecular bone network under a compressive load, for which failure modes of both tension and compression were identified at the strut level. The predicted trabecular network response was found to fall within the range of experimental results reported in literature. We also investigated the response of idealized struts under compression, tension and bending using our model. Individual struts were found to exhibit micro-buckling under compression and micro-necking under tension. These instabilities are however masked by the multiplicity and complexity of strut orientations at the trabecular network level.

  13. Shape memory polymer network with thermally distinct elasticity and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Zou, Weike; Luo, Yingwu; Xie, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive materials with sophisticated yet controllable shape-changing behaviors are highly desirable for real-world device applications. Among various shape-changing materials, the elastic nature of shape memory polymers allows fixation of temporary shapes that can recover on demand, whereas polymers with exchangeable bonds can undergo permanent shape change via plasticity. We integrate the elasticity and plasticity into a single polymer network. Rational molecular design allows these two opposite behaviors to be realized at different temperature ranges without any overlap. By exploring the cumulative nature of the plasticity, we demonstrate easy manipulation of highly complex shapes that is otherwise extremely challenging. The dynamic shape-changing behavior paves a new way for fabricating geometrically complex multifunctional devices. PMID:26824077

  14. Elastic modulus and equilibrium swelling of networks crosslinked by end-linking oligodimethylsiloxane at solution state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urayama, Kenji; Kawamura, Takanobu; Kohjiya, Shinzo

    1996-09-01

    We have investigated the degree of equilibrium swelling and the elastic modulus of networks prepared by end-linking oligo(dimethylsiloxane)s (ODMS) in solution as a function of polymer concentration at crosslinking. The molecular weight of ODMS is so low that entanglement couplings are not formed in uncrosslinked state. It has been found from the preparation concentration dependence of elastic modulus in preparation state that trapped entanglements are formed by the introduction of crosslinks, and those considerably contribute to elastic modulus, even if the prepolymers are not entangled in uncrosslinked state. The experimental results for preparation concentration dependence of the degree of equilibrium swelling and the elastic modulus of equilibrium swollen networks are compared with the theoretical predictions by the two theories, i.e., the affine model and the c* theorem. It has been clearly shown that the affine model describes well the experimental results, while the discrepancies between the experimental results and the predictions by the c* theorem are considerable. These results strongly suggest that preparation concentration should be regarded as a reference state, and the displacement of crosslinks moves affinely on swelling, while the complete disinterpenetration of network chains in equilibrium swollen state, which is a postulate of the c* theorem, does not occur.

  15. SAHBNET, an Accessible Surface-Based Elastic Network: An Application to Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dony, Nicolas; Crowet, Jean Marc; Joris, Bernard; Brasseur, Robert; Lins, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics is a method of choice for membrane simulations and the rising of coarse-grained forcefields has opened the way to longer simulations with reduced calculations times. Here, we present an elastic network, SAHBNET (Surface Accessibility Hydrogen-Bonds elastic NETwork), that will maintain the structure of soluble or membrane proteins based on the hydrogen bonds present in the atomistic structure and the proximity between buried residues. This network is applied on the coarse-grained beads defined by the MARTINI model, and was designed to be more physics-based than a simple elastic network. The SAHBNET model is evaluated against atomistic simulations, and compared with ELNEDYN models. The SAHBNET is then used to simulate two membrane proteins inserted in complex lipid bilayers. These bilayers are formed by self-assembly and the use of a modified version of the GROMACS tool genbox (which is accessible through the gcgs.gembloux.ulg.ac.be website). The results show that SAHBNET keeps the structure close to the atomistic one and is successfully used for the simulation of membrane proteins. PMID:23722660

  16. Elastic model for crimped collagen fibrils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the nonlinear elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils in a fascicle have a three-dimensional structure at the micron scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this wave form allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form: all integrals become analytic. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendinece.

  17. Elastic model for crimped collagen fibrils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the nonlinear elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils in a fascicle have a three-dimensional structure at the micron scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this wave form allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form: all integrals become analytic. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendinece.

  18. A novel approach for large-scale polypeptide folding based on elastic networks using continuous optimization.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Sourav; Ananthasuresh, G K

    2010-02-07

    We present a new computationally efficient method for large-scale polypeptide folding using coarse-grained elastic networks and gradient-based continuous optimization techniques. The folding is governed by minimization of energy based on Miyazawa-Jernigan contact potentials. Using this method we are able to substantially reduce the computation time on ordinary desktop computers for simulation of polypeptide folding starting from a fully unfolded state. We compare our results with available native state structures from Protein Data Bank (PDB) for a few de-novo proteins and two natural proteins, Ubiquitin and Lysozyme. Based on our simulations we are able to draw the energy landscape for a small de-novo protein, Chignolin. We also use two well known protein structure prediction software, MODELLER and GROMACS to compare our results. In the end, we show how a modification of normal elastic network model can lead to higher accuracy and lower time required for simulation.

  19. A Mechanical Model for Elastic Fiber Microbuckling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waas, M. A.; Babcock, C. D., Jr.; Knauss, W. G.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional mechanical model is presented to predict the compressive strength of unidirectional fiber composites using technical beam theory and classical elasticity. First, a single fiber resting on a matrix half-plane is considered. Next, a more elaborate analysis of a uniformly laminated, unidirectional fiber composite half-plane is presented. The model configuration incorporates a free edge which introduces a buckling mode that originates at the free edge and decays into the inferior of the half-plane. It is demonstrated that for composites of low volume fraction (less than 0.3), this decay mode furnishes values of buckling strain that are below the values predicted by the Rosen (1965) model. At a higher volume fraction the buckling mode corresponds to a half wavelength that is in violation of the usual assumptions of beam theory. Causes for deviations of the model prediction froi?i existing experimental results are discussed.

  20. A mechanical model for elastic fiber microbuckling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waas, A. M.; Babcock, C. D., Jr.; Knauss, W. G.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional mechanical model is presented to predict the compressive strength of unidirectional fiber composites using technical beam theory and classical elasticity. First, a single fiber resting on a matrix half-plane is considered. Next, a more elaborate analysis of a uniformly laminated, unidirectional fiber composite half-plane is presented. The model configuration incorporates a free edge which introduces a buckling mode that originates at the free edge and decays into the interior of the half-plane. It is demonstrated that for composites of low volume fraction (less than 0.3), this decay mode furnishes values of buckling strain that are below the values predicted by the Rosen (1965) model. At a higher volume fraction the buckling mode corresponds to a half-wavelength that is in violation of the usual assumptions of beam theory. Causes for deviations of the model prediction from existing experimental results are discussed.

  1. Approach to the unfolding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch upon adenine dissociation using a coarse-grained elastic network model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhua; Lv, Dashuai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Feng; Wang, Cunxin; Su, Jiguo; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding mRNA segments that can regulate the gene expression via altering their structures in response to specific metabolite binding. We proposed a coarse-grained Gaussian network model (GNM) to examine the unfolding and folding dynamics of adenosine deaminase (add) A-riboswitch upon the adenine dissociation, in which the RNA is modeled by a nucleotide chain with interaction networks formed by connecting adjoining atomic contacts. It was shown that the adenine binding is critical to the folding of the add A-riboswitch while the removal of the ligand can result in drastic increase of the thermodynamic fluctuations especially in the junction regions between helix domains. Under the assumption that the native contacts with the highest thermodynamic fluctuations break first, the iterative GNM simulations showed that the unfolding process of the adenine-free add A-riboswitch starts with the denature of the terminal helix stem, followed by the loops and junctions involving ligand binding pocket, and then the central helix domains. Despite the simplified coarse-grained modeling, the unfolding dynamics and pathways are shown in close agreement with the results from atomic-level MD simulations and the NMR and single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Overall, the study demonstrates a new avenue to investigate the binding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch molecule which can be readily extended for other RNA molecules. PMID:27394096

  2. Approach to the unfolding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch upon adenine dissociation using a coarse-grained elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhua; Lv, Dashuai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Feng; Wang, Cunxin; Su, Jiguo; Zhang, Yang

    2016-07-07

    Riboswitches are noncoding mRNA segments that can regulate the gene expression via altering their structures in response to specific metabolite binding. We proposed a coarse-grained Gaussian network model (GNM) to examine the unfolding and folding dynamics of adenosine deaminase (add) A-riboswitch upon the adenine dissociation, in which the RNA is modeled by a nucleotide chain with interaction networks formed by connecting adjoining atomic contacts. It was shown that the adenine binding is critical to the folding of the add A-riboswitch while the removal of the ligand can result in drastic increase of the thermodynamic fluctuations especially in the junction regions between helix domains. Under the assumption that the native contacts with the highest thermodynamic fluctuations break first, the iterative GNM simulations showed that the unfolding process of the adenine-free add A-riboswitch starts with the denature of the terminal helix stem, followed by the loops and junctions involving ligand binding pocket, and then the central helix domains. Despite the simplified coarse-grained modeling, the unfolding dynamics and pathways are shown in close agreement with the results from atomic-level MD simulations and the NMR and single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Overall, the study demonstrates a new avenue to investigate the binding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch molecule which can be readily extended for other RNA molecules.

  3. Approach to the unfolding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch upon adenine dissociation using a coarse-grained elastic network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhua; Lv, Dashuai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Feng; Wang, Cunxin; Su, Jiguo; Zhang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding mRNA segments that can regulate the gene expression via altering their structures in response to specific metabolite binding. We proposed a coarse-grained Gaussian network model (GNM) to examine the unfolding and folding dynamics of adenosine deaminase (add) A-riboswitch upon the adenine dissociation, in which the RNA is modeled by a nucleotide chain with interaction networks formed by connecting adjoining atomic contacts. It was shown that the adenine binding is critical to the folding of the add A-riboswitch while the removal of the ligand can result in drastic increase of the thermodynamic fluctuations especially in the junction regions between helix domains. Under the assumption that the native contacts with the highest thermodynamic fluctuations break first, the iterative GNM simulations showed that the unfolding process of the adenine-free add A-riboswitch starts with the denature of the terminal helix stem, followed by the loops and junctions involving ligand binding pocket, and then the central helix domains. Despite the simplified coarse-grained modeling, the unfolding dynamics and pathways are shown in close agreement with the results from atomic-level MD simulations and the NMR and single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Overall, the study demonstrates a new avenue to investigate the binding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch molecule which can be readily extended for other RNA molecules.

  4. Elastic network normal modes provide a basis for protein structure refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gniewek, Pawel; Kolinski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L.; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2012-05-01

    It is well recognized that thermal motions of atoms in the protein native state, the fluctuations about the minimum of the global free energy, are well reproduced by the simple elastic network models (ENMs) such as the anisotropic network model (ANM). Elastic network models represent protein dynamics as vibrations of a network of nodes (usually represented by positions of the heavy atoms or by the Cα atoms only for coarse-grained representations) in which the spatially close nodes are connected by harmonic springs. These models provide a reliable representation of the fluctuational dynamics of proteins and RNA, and explain various conformational changes in protein structures including those important for ligand binding. In the present paper, we study the problem of protein structure refinement by analyzing thermal motions of proteins in non-native states. We represent the conformational space close to the native state by a set of decoys generated by the I-TASSER protein structure prediction server utilizing template-free modeling. The protein substates are selected by hierarchical structure clustering. The main finding is that thermal motions for some substates, overlap significantly with the deformations necessary to reach the native state. Additionally, more mobile residues yield higher overlaps with the required deformations than do the less mobile ones. These findings suggest that structural refinement of poorly resolved protein models can be significantly enhanced by reduction of the conformational space to the motions imposed by the dominant normal modes.

  5. Continuity Aware Spectrum Allocation Schemes for Virtual Optical Network Embedding in Elastic Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Yongli; He, Ruiying; Yu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Haomian; Lin, Yi; Han, Jianrui

    2016-05-01

    Optical network virtualization has been studied as a promising technique for optical network resources provisioning. In the virtualization context of Elastic Optical Network (EON), Virtual Optical Network Embedding (VONE) is investigated as a key issue for allocating spectrum resources to VON requests. This paper discusses the continuity constraint for the VONE problem in EONs, and presents three continuity-aware spectrum allocation schemes according to strict and relaxed continuity constraints. We have demonstrated the proposed schemes on emulated testbed to verify the feasibility of composing VON with discontiguous spectrum resources. Additionally, the performances of the proposed schemes are compared via simulation in terms of blocking probability, spectrum resource utilization and discontinuity degree.

  6. Continuum models for epitaxial growth with elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yang

    In heteroepitaxial growth, the mismatch between the lattice constants in the film and the substrate causes misfit strain in the film, making a flat surface unstable to small perturbations. This morphological instability is called Asaro-Tiller-Grinfeld (ATG) instability, which can drive the film to self-organize into nanostructures such as quantum wires or quantum dots. At low temperature, the surface consists of steps and facets, when the misfit strain causes step bunching, traditional continuum models for ATG instability does not apply directly. In the first part of this thesis, we derive a PDE model for step bunching by taking the continuum limit of the discrete models proposed by Tersoff et al and Duport et al. We study the linear instability of a uniform step train with small perturbations and compare our results with those of discrete models and continuum models for traditional ATG instability. We numerically study the nonlinear evolution of this instability and compare our results with those of discrete models. We also study the equilibrium shapes of step bunches and explain their coalescence. In the second part of this thesis, we derive a nonlinear approximate PDE for the ATG instability. In the ATG instability, the misfit strain is coupled with surface morphology and an elasticity problem must be solved numerically. Linear approximation is made in some cases such as when computing the equilibrium island shapes. Using the exact solution for a cycloid surface obtained by Chiu and Gao, we find that our nonlinear approximation has a wider range of applicability than linear approximation. Numerical simulation using our nonlinear PDE model predicts formation of a cusp-like surface morphology from initially small perturbations of flat surfaces, which agrees well with the result obtained by Spencer and Meiron by solving the elasticity problem numerically.

  7. An elastic rod model for anguilliform swimming.

    PubMed

    McMillen, T; Holmes, P

    2006-11-01

    We develop a model for anguilliform (eel-like) swimming as an elastic rod actuated via time-dependent intrinsic curvature and subject to hydrodynamic drag forces, the latter as proposed by Taylor (in Proc Roy Proc Lond A 214:158-183, 1952). We employ a eometrically exact theory and discretize the resulting nonlinear partial differential evolution both to perform numerical simulations, and to compare with previous models consisting of chains of rigid links or masses connected by springs, dampers, and prescribed force generators representing muscles. We show that muscle activations driven by motoneuronal spike trains via calcium dynamics produce intrinsic curvatures corresponding to near-sinusoidal body shapes in longitudinally-uniform rods, but that passive elasticity causes Taylor's assumption of prescribed shape to fail, leading to time-periodic motions and lower speeds than those predicted Taylor (in Proc Roy Proc Lond A 214:158-183, 1952). We investigate the effects of bending stiffness, body geometry, and activation patterns on swimming speed, turning behavior, and acceleration to steady swimming. We show that laterally-uniform activation yields stable straight swimming and laterally differential activation levels lead to stable turns, and we argue that tapered bodies with reduced caudal (tail-end) activation (to produce uniform intrinsic curvature) swim faster than ones with uniform activation.

  8. Dynamic virtual optical network embedding in spectral and spatial domains over elastic optical networks with multicore fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Zhao, Yongli; Yang, Hui; Tan, Yuanlong; Chen, Haoran; Zhang, Jie; Jue, Jason P.

    2016-08-01

    Network virtualization can eradicate the ossification of the infrastructure and stimulate innovation of new network architectures and applications. Elastic optical networks (EONs) are ideal substrate networks for provisioning flexible virtual optical network (VON) services. However, as network traffic continues to increase exponentially, the capacity of EONs will reach the physical limitation soon. To further increase network flexibility and capacity, the concept of EONs is extended into the spatial domain. How to map the VON onto substrate networks by thoroughly using the spectral and spatial resources is extremely important. This process is called VON embedding (VONE).Considering the two kinds of resources at the same time during the embedding process, we propose two VONE algorithms, the adjacent link embedding algorithm (ALEA) and the remote link embedding algorithm (RLEA). First, we introduce a model to solve the VONE problem. Then we design the embedding ability measurement of network elements. Based on the network elements' embedding ability, two VONE algorithms were proposed. Simulation results show that the proposed VONE algorithms could achieve better performance than the baseline algorithm in terms of blocking probability and revenue-to-cost ratio.

  9. Multicasting based optical inverse multiplexing in elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bingli; Xu, Yingying; Zhu, Paikun; Zhong, Yucheng; Chen, Yuanxiang; Li, Juhao; Chen, Zhangyuan; He, Yongqi

    2014-06-16

    Optical multicasting based inverse multiplexing (IM) is introduced in spectrum allocation of elastic optical network to resolve the spectrum fragmentation problem, where superchannels could be split and fit into several discrete spectrum blocks in the intermediate node. We experimentally demonstrate it with a 1-to-7 optical superchannel multicasting module and selecting/coupling components. Also, simulation results show that, comparing with several emerging spectrum defragmentation solutions (e.g., spectrum conversion, split spectrum), IM could reduce blocking performance significantly but without adding too much system complexity as split spectrum. On the other hand, service fairness for traffic with different granularity of these schemes is investigated for the first time and it shows that IM performs better than spectrum conversion and almost as well as split spectrum, especially for smaller size traffic under light traffic intensity.

  10. A neural network for controlling the configuration of frame structure with elastic members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsutsumi, Kazuyoshi

    1989-01-01

    A neural network for controlling the configuration of frame structure with elastic members is proposed. In the present network, the structure is modeled not by using the relative angles of the members but by using the distances between the joint locations alone. The relationship between the environment and the joints is also defined by their mutual distances. The analog neural network attains the reaching motion of the manipulator as a minimization problem of the energy constructed by the distances between the joints, the target, and the obstacles. The network can generate not only the final but also the transient configurations and the trajectory. This framework with flexibility and parallelism is very suitable for controlling the Space Telerobotic systems with many degrees of freedom.

  11. The flow of power law fluids in elastic networks and porous media.

    PubMed

    Sochi, Taha

    2016-02-01

    The flow of power law fluids, which include shear thinning and shear thickening as well as Newtonian as a special case, in networks of interconnected elastic tubes is investigated using a residual-based pore scale network modeling method with the employment of newly derived formulae. Two relations describing the mechanical interaction between the local pressure and local cross-sectional area in distensible tubes of elastic nature are considered in the derivation of these formulae. The model can be used to describe shear dependent flows of mainly viscous nature. The behavior of the proposed model is vindicated by several tests in a number of special and limiting cases where the results can be verified quantitatively or qualitatively. The model, which is the first of its kind, incorporates more than one major nonlinearity corresponding to the fluid rheology and conduit mechanical properties, that is non-Newtonian effects and tube distensibility. The formulation, implementation, and performance indicate that the model enjoys certain advantages over the existing models such as being exact within the restricting assumptions on which the model is based, easy implementation, low computational costs, reliability, and smooth convergence. The proposed model can, therefore, be used as an alternative to the existing Newtonian distensible models; moreover, it stretches the capabilities of the existing modeling approaches to reach non-Newtonian rheologies.

  12. Benefit of adaptive FEC in shared backup path protected elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Dai, Hua; Wang, Chao; Li, Yongcheng; Bose, Sanjay K; Shen, Gangxiang

    2015-07-27

    We apply an adaptive forward error correction (FEC) allocation strategy to an Elastic Optical Network (EON) operated with shared backup path protection (SBPP). To maximize the protected network capacity that can be carried, an Integer Linear Programing (ILP) model and a spectrum window plane (SWP)-based heuristic algorithm are developed. Simulation results show that the FEC coding overhead required by the adaptive FEC scheme is significantly lower than that needed by a fixed FEC allocation strategy resulting in higher network capacity for the adaptive strategy. The adaptive FEC allocation strategy can also significantly outperform the fixed FEC allocation strategy both in terms of the spare capacity redundancy and the average FEC coding overhead needed per optical channel. The proposed heuristic algorithm is efficient and not only performs closer to the ILP model but also does much better than the shortest-path algorithm.

  13. Elastic models of defects in two-dimensional crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikova, A. L.; Orlova, T. S.; Hussainova, I.; Romanov, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Elastic models of defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystals are presented in terms of continuum mechanics. The models are based on the classification of defects, which is founded on the dimensionality of the specification region of their self-distortions, i.e., lattice distortions associated with the formation of defects. The elastic field of an infinitesimal dislocation loop in a film is calculated for the first time. The fields of the center of dilatation, dislocation, disclination, and circular inclusion in planar 2D elastic media, namely, nanofilms and graphenes, are considered. Elastic fields of defects in 2D and 3D crystals are compared.

  14. A model for compression-weakening materials and the elastic fields due to contractile cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosakis, Phoebus; Notbohm, Jacob; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-12-01

    We construct a homogeneous, nonlinear elastic constitutive law that models aspects of the mechanical behavior of inhomogeneous fibrin networks. Fibers in such networks buckle when in compression. We model this as a loss of stiffness in compression in the stress-strain relations of the homogeneous constitutive model. Problems that model a contracting biological cell in a finite matrix are solved. It is found that matrix displacements and stresses induced by cell contraction decay slower (with distance from the cell) in a compression weakening material than linear elasticity would predict. This points toward a mechanism for long-range cell mechanosensing. In contrast, an expanding cell would induce displacements that decay faster than in a linear elastic matrix.

  15. Temporal and spatial characteristics of drainage fracture networks in elastic media with internal fluid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Kobchenko, Maya; Hafver, Andreas; Panahi, Hamed; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Renard, Francois

    2014-05-01

    Escape of internally generated fluids from low permeability elastic solids plays an important role in several natural environments. In geological systems, primary migration of hydrocarbons, dehydration of sediments and hydrated mantle rocks in subduction zones are examples where the existing permeability cannot accommodate transport of generated fluids in low permeability rocks and fluid pressure build-up may alter the permeability by fracturing. Fractures form and propagate in the rock due to internal pressure build-up. We have performed experiments on shales and model materials using X-ray microtomography, 2D imaging and pressure burst recordings to study the spatiotemporal evolution of drainage fracture networks and released fluids. The local growth of fractures due to internal pressure build up has been characterized and modeled. The spatial organization of the fracture networks have been characterized in a novel manner as intermediate between tree networks and hierarchical fracture networks. The dynamics of intermittent fluid release on the network show both periodic, 1/f and 1/f2 dependence of fluid release spectrum. Discrete element, algorithmic and finite element models have been used to reproduce different aspects of the drainage fracture network behavior.

  16. Dynamics of enzymatic digestion of elastic fibers and networks under tension.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ascânio D; Majumdar, Arnab; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Yi, Eunice; Spencer, Jean L; Nugent, Matthew A; Suki, Béla

    2011-06-07

    We study the enzymatic degradation of an elastic fiber under tension using an anisotropic random-walk model coupled with binding-unbinding reactions that weaken the fiber. The fiber is represented by a chain of elastic springs in series along which enzyme molecules can diffuse. Numerical simulations show that the fiber stiffness decreases exponentially with two distinct regimes. The time constant of the first regime decreases with increasing tension. Using a mean field calculation, we partition the time constant into geometrical, chemical and externally controllable factors, which is corroborated by the simulations. We incorporate the fiber model into a multiscale network model of the extracellular matrix and find that network effects do not mask the exponential decay of stiffness at the fiber level. To test these predictions, we measure the force relaxation of elastin sheets stretched to 20% uniaxial strain in the presence of elastase. The decay of force is exponential and the time constant is proportional to the inverse of enzyme concentration in agreement with model predictions. Furthermore, the fragment mass released into the bath during digestion is linearly related to enzyme concentration that is also borne out in the model. We conclude that in the complex extracellular matrix, feedback between the local rate of fiber digestion and the force the fiber carries acts to attenuate any spatial heterogeneity of digestion such that molecular processes manifest directly at the macroscale. Our findings can help better understand remodeling processes during development or in disease in which enzyme concentrations and/or mechanical forces become abnormal.

  17. Flexible multi-dimensional modulation method for elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zilong; Liu, Wentao; Shi, Sheping; Shen, Bailin; Chen, Xue; Gao, Xiqing; Zhang, Qi; Shang, Dongdong; Ji, Yongning; Liu, Yingfeng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a flexible multi-dimensional modulation method for elastic optical networks. We compare the flexible multi-dimensional modulation formats PM-kSC-mQAM with traditional modulation formats PM-mQAM using numerical simulations in back-to-back and wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) transmission (50 GHz-spaced) scenarios at the same symbol rate of 32 Gbaud. The simulation results show that PM-kSC-QPSK and PM-kSC-16QAM can achieve obvious back-to-back sensitivity gain with respect to PM-QPSK and PM-16QAM at the expense of spectral efficiency reduction. And the WDM transmission simulation results show that PM-2SC-QPSK can achieve 57.5% increase in transmission reach compared to PM-QPSK, and 48.5% increase for PM-2SC-16QAM over PM-16QAM. Furthermore, we also experimentally investigate the back to back performance of PM-2SC-QPSK, PM-4SC-QPSK, PM-2SC-16QAM and PM-3SC-16QAM, and the experimental results agree well with the numerical simulations.

  18. Spectrum-space-divided spectrum allocation approaches in software-defined elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bowen; Yu, Xiaosong; Zhao, Yongli

    2017-08-01

    Recently, the architecture of elastic optical network (EON) has been proposed as a candidate solution to accommodate both huge bandwidth requirements and flexible connections in next generation optical networks. In order to improve the spectrum efficiency, we propose different spectrum-space-divided approaches and develop two integer linear programming (ILP) models and several spectrum-space-divided spectrum allocation approaches with and without dedicated-path protection in software-defined elastic optical networks (SD-EONs). Simulation results show that the ILP models achieve better performance in terms of the number of frequency slots and hop counts than the proposed spectrum-space-divided spectrum allocation approaches with and without dedicated-path protection under the static scenario of connection requests. Furthermore, we apply the spectrum-space-divided spectrum allocation approaches with and without dedicated-path protection to reduce the blocking probability and to improve spectrum efficiency under the dynamic connection requests compared to the traditional first-fit spectrum allocation approach in SD-EONs.

  19. Modeling shock waves in orthotropic elastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignjevic, Rade; Campbell, James C.; Bourne, Neil K.; Djordjevic, Nenad

    2008-08-01

    A constitutive relationship for modeling of shock wave propagation in orthotropic materials is proposed for nonlinear explicit transient large deformation computer codes (hydrocodes). A procedure for separation of material volumetric compression (compressibility effects equation of state) from deviatoric strain effects is formulated, which allows for the consistent calculation of stresses in the elastic regime as well as in the presence of shock waves. According to this procedure the pressure is defined as the state of stress that results in only volumetric deformation, and consequently is a diagonal second order tensor. As reported by Anderson et al. [Comput. Mech. 15, 201 (1994)], the shock response of an orthotropic material cannot be accurately predicted using the conventional decomposition of the stress tensor into isotropic and deviatoric parts. This paper presents two different stress decompositions based on the assumption that the stress tensor is split into two components: one component is due to volumetric strain and the other is due to deviatoric strain. Both decompositions are rigorously derived. In order to test their ability to describe shock propagation in orthotropic materials, both algorithms were implemented in a hydrocode and their predictions were compared to experimental plate impact data. The material considered was a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy material, which was tested in both the through-thickness and longitudinal directions. The ψ decomposition showed good agreement with the physical behavior of the considered material, while the ζ decomposition significantly overestimated the longitudinal stresses.

  20. Multipath protection for data center services in OpenFlow-based software defined elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Cheng, Lei; Yuan, Jian; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yongli; Lee, Young

    2015-06-01

    With the rapid growth of data center services, the elastic optical network is a very promising networking architecture to interconnect data centers because it can elastically allocate spectrum tailored for various bandwidth requirements. In case of a link failure, to ensure a high-level quality of service (QoS) for user request after the failure becomes a research focus. In light of it, in this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate multipath protection for data center services in OpenFlow-based software defined elastic optical network testbed aiming at improving network reliability. We first propose an OpenFlow-based software defined elastic optical network architecture for data center service protection. Then, based on the proposed architecture, multipath protection scheme is figured based on the importance level of the service. To implement the proposed scheme in the architecture, OpenFlow protocol is extended to support multipath protection in elastic optical network. The performance of our proposed multipath protection scheme is evaluated by means of experiment on our OpenFlow-based testbed. The feasibility of our proposed scheme is also demonstrated in software defined elastic optical networks.

  1. Multiscale design of coarse-grained elastic network-based potentials for the μ opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Fossépré, Mathieu; Leherte, Laurence; Laaksonen, Aatto; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2016-09-01

    Despite progress in computer modeling, most biological processes are still out of reach when using all-atom (AA) models. Coarse-grained (CG) models allow classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to be accelerated. Although simplification of spatial resolution at different levels is often investigated, simplification of the CG potential in itself has been less common. CG potentials are often similar to AA potentials. In this work, we consider the design and reliability of purely mechanical CG models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In this sense, CG force fields (FF) consist of a set of holonomic constraints guided by an elastic network model (ENM). Even though ENMs are used widely to perform normal mode analysis (NMA), they are not often implemented as a single FF in the context of MD simulations. In this work, various ENM-like potentials were investigated by varying their force constant schemes and connectivity patterns. A method was established to systematically parameterize ENM-like potentials at different spatial resolutions by using AA data. To do so, new descriptors were introduced. The choice of conformation descriptors that also include flexibility information is important for a reliable parameterization of ENMs with different degrees of sensitivity. Hence, ENM-like potentials, with specific parameters, can be sufficient to accurately reproduce AA MD simulations of μOR at highly coarse-grained resolutions. Therefore, the essence of the flexibility properties of μOR can be captured with simple models at different CG spatial resolutions, opening the way to mechanical approaches to understanding GPCR functions. Graphical Abstract All atom structure, residue interaction network and coarse-grained elastic network models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR).

  2. Position-space renormalization for elastic percolation networks with bond-bending forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shechao; Sahimi, Muhammad

    1985-02-01

    We develop a three-parameter position-space renormalization-group method and study the percolation properties of a two-dimensional elastic network in which both central and rotationally invariant bond-bending forces are present. The critical exponent f, which describes the power-law behavior of the elastic moduli near the percolation threshold, is estimated for a square network and is found to be consistent with recent estimates obtained by other methods.

  3. Studies in cutaneous aging: I. The elastic fiber network

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, I.M.; Fonferko, E.

    1982-05-01

    We studied by light and electron microscopy the elastic fibers in he sun exposed and sun protected skin of normal and psoriatic individuals of different ages in order to separate the changes of actinic damage from those of chronological aging. The sun exposed skin showed 2 types of elastic fiber abnormalities-one related to actinic damage and the other to chronological aging. The sun protected buttock skin showed only the latter. From ages 30 to 70, a minority of the elastic fibers exhibited abnormalities that appeared to represent a process of fiber disintegration. After age 70, the majority of elastic fibers showed these abnormalities. These abnormalities were present without accompanying inflammatory cells. Also, there was morphological evidence of continuing synthesis of elastic fibers during the lifetime of these subjects, except that from ages 50-93, the fibers appeared to be loosely, rather than compactly, assembled. Incubation of dermal slices from buttock skin of young adults with porcine pancreatic elastase and bovine chymotrypsin produced elastic fiber degradation that closely simulated the changes that were observed in aged sun protected skin. Researcher propose that one of the features of cutaneous aging is a slow, spontaneous, progressive degradative process inherent in the elastic fiber that can be enzymatically accelerated from decades to hours by elastase and chymotrypsin.

  4. A novel elastic optical path network that utilizes bitrate-specific anchored frequency slot arrangement.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhi-shu; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Ken-ichi; Tanaka, Takafumi; Hirano, Akira

    2014-02-10

    We propose a novel elastic optical path network where each specific bitrate signal uses its own dedicated fixed grid and one edge of its frequency grid is anchored at a specific frequency. Numerical evaluations using various bitrate signal patterns and network topologies show that the network proposal can almost match the performance of conventional flexible grid networks, while greatly mitigating the hardware requirements: it allows the use of the tunable filters for the fixed grid systems.

  5. Energy-efficient routing, modulation and spectrum allocation in elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yanxia; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng

    2017-07-01

    With tremendous growth in bandwidth demand, energy consumption problem in elastic optical networks (EONs) becomes a hot topic with wide concern. The sliceable bandwidth-variable transponder in EON, which can transmit/receive multiple optical flows, was recently proposed to improve a transponder's flexibility and save energy. In this paper, energy-efficient routing, modulation and spectrum allocation (EE-RMSA) in EONs with sliceable bandwidth-variable transponder is studied. To decrease the energy consumption, we develop a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) model with corresponding EE-RMSA algorithm for EONs. The MILP model jointly considers the modulation format and optical grooming in the process of routing and spectrum allocation with the objective of minimizing the energy consumption. With the help of genetic operators, the EE-RMSA algorithm iteratively optimizes the feasible routing path, modulation format and spectrum resources solutions by explore the whole search space. In order to save energy, the optical-layer grooming strategy is designed to transmit the lightpath requests. Finally, simulation results verify that the proposed scheme is able to reduce the energy consumption of the network while maintaining the blocking probability (BP) performance compare with the existing First-Fit-KSP algorithm, Iterative Flipping algorithm and EAMGSP algorithm especially in large network topology. Our results also demonstrate that the proposed EE-RMSA algorithm achieves almost the same performance as MILP on an 8-node network.

  6. Mechanical sublayer model for elastic-plastic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1987-03-01

    Strain-hardening behavior for plane stress problems is modeled by a panel with n layers, the first ( n - 1) layers are elastic-perfectly-plastic under Mises-Hencky condition, each with different yield stress, and the n-th layer is elastic. Equivalent incremental stress-strain relations for the panel can be obtained. The resulting uniaxial stress-strain curve contains n segments. Those segments in the plastic range are not straight lines.

  7. Porous grain model and equivalent elastic medium approach for predicting effective elastic properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Franklin J.

    This dissertation presents the results of using different inclusion and granular effective medium models and poroelasticity to predict the elastic properties of rocks with complex microstructures. Effective medium models account for the microstructure and texture of rocks, and can be used to predict the type of rock and microstructure from seismic velocities and densities. We introduce the elastic equivalency approach, using the differential effective medium model, to predict the effective elastic moduli of rocks and attenuation. We introduce the porous grain concept and develop rock physics models for rocks with microporosity. We exploit the porous grain concept to describe a variety of arrangements of uncemented and cemented grains with different degrees of hydraulic connectivity in the pore space. We first investigate the accuracy of the differential effective medium and self-consistent estimations of elastic properties of complex rock matrix using composites as analogs. We test whether the differential effective-medium (DEM) and self-consistent (SC) models can accurately estimate the elastic moduli of a complex rock matrix and compare the results with the average of upper and lower Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. We find that when the material microstructure is consistent with DEM, this model is more accurate than both SC and the bound-average method for a variety of inclusion aspect ratios, concentrations, and modulus contrasts. Based on these results, we next pose a question: can a theoretical inclusion model, specifically, the differential effective-medium model (DEM), be used to match experimental velocity data in rocks that are not necessarily made of inclusions (such as elastics)? We first approach this question by using empirical velocity-porosity equations as proxies for data. By finding a DEM inclusion aspect ratio (AR) to match these equations, we find that the required range of AR is remarkably narrow. Moreover, a constant AR of about 0.13 can be used to

  8. Free energy of contact formation in proteins: Efficient computation in the elastic network approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Kay

    2011-07-01

    Biomolecular simulations have become a major tool in understanding biomolecules and their complexes. However, one can typically only investigate a few mutants or scenarios due to the severe computational demands of such simulations, leading to a great interest in method development to overcome this restriction. One way to achieve this is to reduce the complexity of the systems by an approximation of the forces acting upon the constituents of the molecule. The harmonic approximation used in elastic network models simplifies the physical complexity to the most reduced dynamics of these molecular systems. The reduced polymer modeled this way is typically comprised of mass points representing coarse-grained versions of, e.g., amino acids. In this work, we show how the computation of free energy contributions of contacts between two residues within the molecule can be reduced to a simple lookup operation in a precomputable matrix. Being able to compute such contributions is of great importance: protein design or molecular evolution changes introduce perturbations to these pair interactions, so we need to understand their impact. Perturbation to the interactions occurs due to randomized and fixated changes (in molecular evolution) or designed modifications of the protein structures (in bioengineering). These perturbations are modifications in the topology and the strength of the interactions modeled by the elastic network models. We apply the new algorithm to (1) the bovine trypsin inhibitor, a well-known enzyme in biomedicine, and show the connection to folding properties and the hydrophobic collapse hypothesis and (2) the serine proteinase inhibitor CI-2 and show the correlation to Φ values to characterize folding importance. Furthermore, we discuss the computational complexity and show empirical results for the average case, sampled over a library of 77 structurally diverse proteins. We found a relative speedup of up to 10 000-fold for large proteins with respect to

  9. All-optical OXC transition strategy from WDM optical network to elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Li, Juhao; Guo, Bingli; Zhu, Paikun; Tang, Ruizhi; Chen, Zhangyuan; He, Yongqi

    2016-02-22

    Elastic optical network (EON) has been proposed recently as a spectrum-efficient optical layer to adapt to rapidly-increasing traffic demands instead of current deployed wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical network. In contrast with conventional WDM optical cross-connect (OXCs) based on wavelength selective switches (WSSs), the EON OXCs are based on spectrum selective switches (SSSs) which are much more expensive than WSSs, especially for large-scale switching architectures. So the transition cost from WDM OXCs to EON OXCs is a major obstacle to realizing EON. In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a transition OXC (TOXC) structure based on 2-stage cascading switching architectures, which make full use of available WSSs in current deployed WDM OXCs to reduce number and port count of required SSSs. Moreover, we propose a contention-aware spectrum allocation (CASA) scheme for EON built with the proposed TOXCs. We show by simulation that the TOXCs reduce the network capital expenditure transiting from WDM optical network to EON about 50%, with a minor traffic blocking performance degradation and about 10% accommodated traffic number detriment compared with all-SSS EON OXC architectures.

  10. Models for elastic shells with incompatible strains

    PubMed Central

    Lewicka, Marta; Mahadevan, L.; Pakzad, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional shapes of thin lamina, such as leaves, flowers, feathers, wings, etc., are driven by the differential strain induced by the relative growth. The growth takes place through variations in the Riemannian metric given on the thin sheet as a function of location in the central plane and also across its thickness. The shape is then a consequence of elastic energy minimization on the frustrated geometrical object. Here, we provide a rigorous derivation of the asymptotic theories for shapes of residually strained thin lamina with non-trivial curvatures, i.e. growing elastic shells in both the weakly and strongly curved regimes, generalizing earlier results for the growth of nominally flat plates. The different theories are distinguished by the scaling of the mid-surface curvature relative to the inverse thickness and growth strain, and also allow us to generalize the classical Föppl–von Kármán energy to theories of prestrained shallow shells. PMID:24808750

  11. Experimental demonstration of elastic optical networks based on enhanced software defined networking (eSDN) for data center application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Hui; Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Li, Hui; Lin, Yi; Li, Gang; Han, Jianrui; Lee, Young; Ma, Teng

    2013-11-04

    Due to the high burstiness and high-bandwidth characteristics of the applications, data center interconnection by elastic optical networks have attracted much attention of network operators and service providers. Many data center applications require lower delay and higher availability with the end-to-end guaranteed quality of service. In this paper, we propose and implement a novel elastic optical network based on enhanced software defined networking (eSDN) architecture for data center application, by introducing a transport-aware cross stratum optimization (TA-CSO) strategy. eSDN can enable cross stratum optimization of application and elastic optical network stratum resources and provide the elastic physical layer parameter adjustment, e.g., modulation format and bandwidth. We have designed and verified experimentally software defined path provisioning on our testbed with four real OpenFlow-enabled elastic optical nodes for data center application. The overall feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture is also experimentally demonstrated and compared with individual CSO and physical layer adjustment strategies in terms of path setup/release/adjustment latency, blocking probability and resource occupation rate.

  12. Exploring elasticity and energy dissipation in mussel-inspired hydrogel transient networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindy, Scott; Learsch, Robert; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    Dynamic, reversible crosslinks have been shown to specifically control the mechanical properties of a wide variety of mechanically tough and resilient biomaterials. We have shown that reversible histidine-metal ion interactions, known to contribute to the strong mechanical properties and self-healing nature of mussel byssal threads, can be used to control and engineer the temporally-hierarchical mechanical properties of model hydrogels orthogonally from the spatial structure of the material. Here, we explore the scaling relationships in our model networks to further inform our abilities to control the relative elasticity and energy dissipation on hierarchical timescales. Scaling arguments suggest that the elasticity is dominated by long-range entanglements, while the dissipation is controlled by the exchange kinetics of the transient crosslinks. Further, we show that by using UV light, we can further control the viscoelastic properties of our mussel-inspired hydrogels in situ. This process opens the door for creating biocompatible hydrogel materials with arbitrary spatial control over their viscoelastic mechanical properties. Overall, we show that by understanding the interplay between bio-inspired dynamic crosslinks and soft matter physics allows us to rationally design high-strength hydrogels for specific states of dynamic loading.

  13. The Modified Semidirect Onlay Technique With Articulated Elastic Model.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Efstratios; Diamantopoulou, Sofia

    2015-12-01

    The modified semidirect onlay technique with articulated elastic model involves the fabrication of a stone model that is quickly mounted on an articulator and it includes an elastic part that enables the fabrication of a restoration with proper occlusal anatomy. The technique overcomes the disadvantages of the direct technique such as polymerization shrinkage stress and difficulty in achieving proper contours and, compared to the indirect technique, treatment is completed in a single appointment, without laboratory cost. The novelty of the technique is that, since the restoration is fabricated on an articulated model it eliminates time for occlusal adjustments.

  14. Body forces and pressures in elastic models of the myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, W H

    1981-01-01

    Tension strands are introduced to represent active myocardial fibers. They create one body force proportional to the divergence of the tension-direction vector, and a second equal to the tension divided by the radius of curvature. Explicit solutions to isotropic linearly elastic tensor equations with these body forces are found for the radially-symmetric, linearly-isotropic, elastic spherical heart with arbitrary radial body force. They confirm experiments showing supraluminal intramural pressures. Such pressures may affect coronary perfusion. A tension strand model which is a reasonable compromise between actual myofibrillar geometry and analytical simplicity is the iso-oblique, terminating, nonintersecting model. The body force from that or any other axially symmetric body force can be the forcing term for equations in which the heart is modeled as a thin, ellipsoidal, elastic membrane. PMID:7213931

  15. ADCIGs extraction and reflection tomography modeling for elastic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruihe; Qin, Ning; Yin, Xingyao

    2017-08-01

    Based on the theory of elastic wave, we derive the migration angle formula of P- and S-wave in the Gaussian beam migration and implement the ADCIGs (angle domain common imaging gathers) extraction for Gaussian beam of PP- and PS-wave firstly. Then, we derive the reflection tomography equations for elastic wave velocity analysis. They are used for the tomography velocity modeling base on the Gaussian beam ADCIGs. Making reflection tomography and depth migration into the same velocity modeling process, this method can not only use ADCIGs of elastic wave to update the velocities, but also can apply the migration results of tomography in each iteration as quality control, until the end of whole process in velocity modeling and finally we can get the prestack depth migration results after tomography. Synthetic and field examples validate the correctness and practicability of this method.

  16. A mesoscopic network model for permanent set in crosslinked elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Weisgraber, T H; Gee, R H; Maiti, A; Clague, D S; Chinn, S; Maxwell, R S

    2009-01-29

    A mesoscopic computational model for polymer networks and composites is developed as a coarse-grained representation of the composite microstructure. Unlike more complex molecular dynamics simulations, the model only considers the effects of crosslinks on mechanical behavior. The elastic modulus, which depends only on the crosslink density and parameters in the bond potential, is consistent with rubber elasticity theory, and the network response satisfies the independent network hypothesis of Tobolsky. The model, when applied to a commercial filled silicone elastomer, quantitatively reproduces the experimental permanent set and stress-strain response due to changes in the crosslinked network from irradiation.

  17. Elastic-plastic models for multi-site damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Actis, Ricardo L.; Szabo, Barna A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments in advanced analysis methods for the computation of stress site damage. The method of solution is based on the p-version of the finite element method. Its implementation was designed to permit extraction of linear stress intensity factors using a superconvergent extraction method (known as the contour integral method) and evaluation of the J-integral following an elastic-plastic analysis. Coarse meshes are adequate for obtaining accurate results supported by p-convergence data. The elastic-plastic analysis is based on the deformation theory of plasticity and the von Mises yield criterion. The model problem consists of an aluminum plate with six equally spaced holes and a crack emanating from each hole. The cracks are of different sizes. The panel is subjected to a remote tensile load. Experimental results are available for the panel. The plasticity analysis provided the same limit load as the experimentally determined load. The results of elastic-plastic analysis were compared with the results of linear elastic analysis in an effort to evaluate how plastic zone sizes influence the crack growth rates. The onset of net-section yielding was determined also. The results show that crack growth rate is accelerated by the presence of adjacent damage, and the critical crack size is shorter when the effects of plasticity are taken into consideration. This work also addresses the effects of alternative stress-strain laws: The elastic-ideally-plastic material model is compared against the Ramberg-Osgood model.

  18. Entanglement effects in model polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everaers, R.; Kremer, K.

    The influence of topological constraints on the local dynamics in cross-linked polymer melts and their contribution to the elastic properties of rubber elastic systems are a long standing problem in statistical mechanics. Polymer networks with diamond lattice connectivity (Everaers and Kremer 1995, Everaers and Kremer 1996a) are idealized model systems which isolate the effect of topology conservation from other sources of quenched disorder. We study their behavior in molecular dynamics simulations under elongational strain. In our analysis we compare the measured, purely entropic shear moduli G to the predictions of statistical mechanical models of rubber elasticity, making extensive use of the microscopic structural and topological information available in computer simulations. We find (Everaers and Kremer 1995) that the classical models of rubber elasticity underestimate the true change in entropy in a deformed network significantly, because they neglect the tension along the contour of the strands which cannot relax due to entanglements (Everaers and Kremer (in preparation)). This contribution and the fluctuations in strained systems seem to be well described by the constrained mode model (Everaers 1998) which allows to treat the crossover from classical rubber elasticity to the tube model for polymer networks with increasing strand length within one transparant formalism. While this is important for the description of the effects we try to do a first quantitative step towards their explanation by topological considerations. We show (Everaers and Kremer 1996a) that for the comparatively short strand lengths of our diamond networks the topology contribution to the shear modulus is proportional to the density of entangled mesh pairs with non-zero Gauss linking number. Moreover, the prefactor can be estimated consistently within a rather simple model developed by Vologodskii et al. and by Graessley and Pearson, which is based on the definition of an entropic

  19. Analytical formulation of a discrete chiral elastic metamaterial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. N.; Huang, G. L.; Hu, G. K.

    2012-04-01

    By embedding appropriately designed chiral local resonators in a host elastic media, a chiral metamaterial with simultaneously negative effective density and bulk modulus can be achieved. In this work, an two dimentional (2D) ideal discrete model for the chiral elastic metamaterial is proposed. The discrete dynamic equation is derived and then homogenized to give the continuous description of the metamaterial. The homogenization procedure is validated by the agreement of the dispersion curve of the discrete and homogenized formulations. The form of homogenized governing equations of the metamaterial cannot be classified as a traditional Cauchy elastic theory. This result conforms the conscience that the Cauchy elasticity cannot reflect the chirality, which is usually captured by higher order theory such as the non-centrosymmetric micropolar elasticity. However when reduced to a (2D) problem, the existing chiral micropolar theory becomes non-chiral. Based on reinterpretation of isotropic tensors in a 2D case, we propose a continuum theory to model the chiral effect for 2D isotropic chiral solids. This 2D chiral micropolar theory constitutes a hopeful macroscopic framework for the theory development of chiral metamaterials.

  20. Random networks of fibres display maximal heterogeneity in the distribution of elastic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.; Myllys, M.; Fellman, J.; Lebell, J.

    2007-01-01

    Above a small length scale, the distribution of local elastic energies in a material under an external load is typically Gaussian, and the dependence of the average elastic energy on strain defines the stiffness of the material. Some particular materials, such as granular packings, suspensions at the jamming transition, crumpled sheets and dense cellular aggregates, display under compression an exponential distribution of elastic energies, but also in this case the elastic properties are well defined. We demonstrate here that networks of fibres, which form uncorrelated non-fractal structures, have under external load a scale invariant distribution of elastic energy (ɛ) at the fibre-fibre contacts proportional to 1/ɛ. This distribution is much broader than any other distribution observed before for elastic energies in a material. We show that for small compressions it holds over 10 orders of magnitude in ɛ. In such a material a few 'hot spots' carry most of the elastic load. Consequently, these materials are highly susceptible to local irreversible deformations, and are thereby extremely efficient for damping vibrations.

  1. Random networks of fibres display maximal heterogeneity in the distribution of elastic energy.

    PubMed

    Aström, J A; Timonen, J; Myllys, M; Fellman, J; LeBell, J

    2007-01-01

    Above a small length scale, the distribution of local elastic energies in a material under an external load is typically Gaussian, and the dependence of the average elastic energy on strain defines the stiffness of the material. Some particular materials, such as granular packings, suspensions at the jamming transition, crumpled sheets and dense cellular aggregates, display under compression an exponential distribution of elastic energies, but also in this case the elastic properties are well defined. We demonstrate here that networks of fibres, which form uncorrelated non-fractal structures, have under external load a scale invariant distribution of elastic energy (epsilon) at the fibre-fibre contacts proportional to 1/epsilon. This distribution is much broader than any other distribution observed before for elastic energies in a material. We show that for small compressions it holds over 10 orders of magnitude in epsilon. In such a material a few 'hot spots' carry most of the elastic load. Consequently, these materials are highly susceptible to local irreversible deformations, and are thereby extremely efficient for damping vibrations.

  2. An elastic compound tube model for a single osteon.

    PubMed

    Braidotti, P; Branca, F P; Sciubba, E; Stagni, L

    1995-04-01

    A model is developed whereby the secondary osteon--the dominant microstructural component of the cortical bone tissue--is considered as an n-layered cylinder with internal stresses in linear isotropic elasticity. An exact solution is obtained for a loading condition represented by a tensile-compressive force. The lengthening, the side deformation, and the strain energy of the system are explicitly calculated. The behavior of the main elastic quantities is illustrated by graphs. In particular, the important role played by the parity of the number of lamellae is revealed.

  3. Elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model for fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, T. S.; Sun, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    A constitutive model to describe the elastic/viscoplastic behavior of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites under plane stress conditions is presented. Formulations are given for quasi-static plasticity and time-dependent viscoplasticity. Experimental procedures required to generate the necessary material constants are explained, and the experimental data is compared to the predicted behavior.

  4. The role of mode of delivery on elastic fiber architecture and vaginal vault elasticity: a rodent model study.

    PubMed

    Downing, Keith T; Billah, Mubashir; Raparia, Eva; Shah, Anup; Silverstein, Moshe C; Ahmad, Amanda; Boutis, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    We report on an experimental study of the role of mode of delivery and pregnancy on the architecture of vaginal elastic fibers and vaginal vault elasticity in female Sprague-Dawley rats. In primiparous rats submitted to spontaneous or Cesarean delivery and virgin rats submitted to simulated delivery, the tortuosity of elastic fibers (defined as the ratio of length to end-to-end distance) was observed to decrease when measured from two days to two weeks postpartum. In addition, the measured tortuosity of elastic fibers in multiparous rats was greater than that of virgin rats. The tortuosity of elastic fibers of all rats measured at two days postpartum was found to be similar to that of multiparous rats. At two weeks postpartum the measured tortuosity of vaginal elastic fibers was indistinguishable from virgin rats, regardless of the delivery method. Borrowing from the field of polymer physics, a model is suggested that connects elastic fiber tortuosity to the resulting tension under an applied stress; fibers having high tortuosity are expected to provide less structural support than more linear, low tortuosity fibers. To probe the macroscopic effects in elasticity due to architectural changes observed in elastic fibers, we have measured the stiffness of the vaginal vault in each cohort using a pressure-infusion system. The vaginal vault stiffness of all primiparous rats measured two weeks postpartum was greater than that measured two days postpartum. In addition, the vaginal vault of virgin rats was stiffer than that of multiparous rats. These observations confirmed that vaginal vault elastic fibers undergo significant remodeling due to pregnancy and parturition, and that the complex remodeling may be a significant contributor to tissue elasticity. Remarkably, regardless of the mode of delivery or simulated tissue trauma, elastic fiber tortuosity is observed to decrease from two days to two weeks postpartum indicating the onset of repair and recovery of tissue

  5. The role of mode of delivery on elastic fiber architecture and vaginal vault elasticity: a rodent model study

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Keith; Billah, Mubashir; Raparia, Eva; Shah, Anup; Silverstein, Moshe; Ahmad, Amanda; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    We report on an experimental study of the role of mode of delivery and pregnancy on the architecture of vaginal elastic fibers and vaginal vault elasticity in female Sprague-Dawley rats. In primiparous rats submitted to spontaneous or Cesarean delivery and virgin rats submitted to simulated delivery, the tortuosity of elastic fibers (defined as the ratio of length to end-to-end distance) was observed to decrease when measured two days to two weeks postpartum. In addition, the measured tortuosity of elastic fibers in multiparous rats was greater than that of virgin rats. The tortuosity of elastic fibers of all rats measured at two days postpartum were found to be similar to that of multiparous rats. At two weeks postpartum the measured tortuosity of vaginal elastic fibers was indistinguishable from virgin rats, regardless of the delivery method. Borrowing from the field of polymer physics, a model is suggested that connects elastic fiber tortuosity to the resulting tension under an applied stress; fibers having high tortuosity are expected to provide less structural support than more linear, low tortuosity fibers. To probe the macroscopic effects in elasticity due to architectural changes observed in elastic fibers, we have measured the stiffness of the vaginal vault in each cohort using a pressure-infusion system. The vaginal vault stiffness of all primiparous rats measured two weeks postpartum was greater than that measured two days postpartum. In addition, the vaginal vault of virgin rats was stiffer than that of multiparous rats. These observations confirmed that vaginal vault elastic fibers undergo significant remodeling due to pregnancy and parturition, and that the complex remodeling may be a significant contributor to tissue elasticity. Remarkably, regardless of the mode of delivery or simulated tissue trauma, elastic fiber tortuosity is observed to decrease from two days to two weeks postpartum indicating the onset of repair and recovery of tissue stiffness

  6. Hyper-elastic modelling of intervertebral disc polyurethane implant.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Marek; Skalski, Konstanty; Sowiński, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Artificial materials including various kinds of polymers like polyurethanes are more and more widely used in different branches of science and also in biomedical engineering. The paper presents the process of creating a constitutive equation for a polyurethane nanocomposite which is considered to be hyper-elastic. The constitutive modelling was conducted within the range of application of the material as one of the components of lumbar intervertebral disc prosthesis. In the paper, the biomechanics of the lumbar spine and the most frequently applied intervertebral disc prostheses are described. Also a polyurethane nanocomposite as a new material to be applied in prostheses is presented. The way of formulating a constitutive equation by means of mathematical formulae is described. Four various hyper-elastic potential functions are considered, i.e., Ogden, Neo-Hookean, Yeoh and Mooney-Rivlin. On the basis of monotonic compression tests the best hyper-elastic model for the material considered was chosen and hyper-elastic constants were calibrated. Finally, the constitutive model was validated on the basis of FE analysis. The paper ends with a conclusion and presentation of further plans of research directed towards the development of a constitutive equation and its application in computer simulations by means of the finite element method.

  7. Articulated registration: elastic registration based on a wire-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Fernandez, Miguel A.; Munyoz-Moreno, Emma; Martin-Fernandez, Marcos; Alberola-Lopez, Carlos

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we propose a new method of elastic registration of anatomical structures that bears an inner skeleton, such as the knee, hand or spine. Such a method has to deal with great degrees of variability, specially for the case of inter-subject registration; but even for the intra-subject case the degree of variability of images will be large since the structures we bear in mind are articulated. Rigid registration methods are clearly inappropriate for this problem, and well-known elastic methods do not usually incorporate the restriction of maintaining long skeletal structures straight. A new method is therefore needed to deal with such a situation; we call this new method "articulated registration". The inner bone skeleton is modeled with a wire model, where wires are drawn by connecting landmarks located in the main joints of the skeletal structure to be registered (long bones). The main feature of our registration method is that within the bone axis (specifically, where the wires are) an exact registration is guaranteed, while for the remaining image points an elastic registration is carried out based on a distance transform (with respect to the model wires); this causes the registration on long bones to be affine to all practical purposes, while the registration of soft tissue -- far from the bones -- is elastic. As a proof-of-concept of this method we describe the registration of hands on radiographs.

  8. Modeling the citation network by network cosmology.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zheng; Ouyang, Zhenzheng; Zhang, Pengyuan; Yi, Dongyun; Kong, Dexing

    2015-01-01

    Citation between papers can be treated as a causal relationship. In addition, some citation networks have a number of similarities to the causal networks in network cosmology, e.g., the similar in-and out-degree distributions. Hence, it is possible to model the citation network using network cosmology. The casual network models built on homogenous spacetimes have some restrictions when describing some phenomena in citation networks, e.g., the hot papers receive more citations than other simultaneously published papers. We propose an inhomogenous causal network model to model the citation network, the connection mechanism of which well expresses some features of citation. The node growth trend and degree distributions of the generated networks also fit those of some citation networks well.

  9. Modeling the Citation Network by Network Cosmology

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zheng; Ouyang, Zhenzheng; Zhang, Pengyuan; Yi, Dongyun; Kong, Dexing

    2015-01-01

    Citation between papers can be treated as a causal relationship. In addition, some citation networks have a number of similarities to the causal networks in network cosmology, e.g., the similar in-and out-degree distributions. Hence, it is possible to model the citation network using network cosmology. The casual network models built on homogenous spacetimes have some restrictions when describing some phenomena in citation networks, e.g., the hot papers receive more citations than other simultaneously published papers. We propose an inhomogenous causal network model to model the citation network, the connection mechanism of which well expresses some features of citation. The node growth trend and degree distributions of the generated networks also fit those of some citation networks well. PMID:25807397

  10. Elastic model of a dislocation center for martensite nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Vereshchagin, V.P.; Kashchenko, M.P.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of spontaneous nucleation of a crystal of new phase when the original structure is metastable is usually connected with the catalyzing effect of defects playing the role of nucleation centers. In the case of the {gamma}{r_arrow}{alpha} martensite transformation in iron alloys, even individual dislocations can act as such defects, based on analysis of long-range elastic fields of isolated linear dislocations in a linearly elastic anisotropic continuum, the authors established the existence of a correlation between the geometric characteristics of the elastically deformed state in the vicinity of 60-degree and 30-degree dislocations and the structure and morphological characteristics of {alpha}-martensite observed in massive iron alloy samples. These results suggest that the dislocation affects the pathway of the martensite reaction and allows the authors to say that the specific characteristics of heterogeneous nucleation of new phase for the martensite mechanism of the {gamma}{r_arrow}{alpha} transformation involves singling out a single structural rearrangement variant which is suitable from the standpoint of adapation of the transforming lattice to the characteristic features of the elastically deformed state created by the dislocation. The possibilities for such adaption are limited by the crystallography of the transformation and the reactions of the surrounding austenite occurring when regular connections exist with the morphological characteristics of the martensite crystal, and are not necessarily compatible with the individual features of the elastic field of each dislocation. Considering this, the authors can introduce the concept of a dislocation center for nucleation of a martensite crystal about the region of the dislocation where conditions are realized which are favorable for the formation of a nucleus of martensite crystal of a certain shape and orientation, and they can develop an elastic model corresponding to this concept.

  11. An elastic-viscous-plastic model for sea ice dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hunke, E.C.; Dukowicz, J.K.

    1996-10-01

    The standard model for sea ice dynamics treats the ice pack as a viscous-plastic material that flows plastically under typical stress conditions but behaves as a linear viscous fluid where strain rates are small and the ice becomes nearly rigid. Because of large viscosities in these regions, implicit numerical methods are necessary for timesteps larger than a few seconds. Current solution methods for these equations use iterative relaxation methods, which are time consuming, scale poorly with mesh resolution, and are not well adapted to parallel computation. To remedy this, we have developed and tested two separate methods. First, by demonstrating that the viscous-plastic rheology can be represented by a symmetric, negative definite matrix operator, we have implemented the faster and better behaved preconditioned conjugate gradient method. Second, realizing that only the response of the ice on time scales associated with wind forcing need be accurately resolved, we have modified the model to reduce to the viscous-plastic model at these time scales; at shorter time scales the adjustment process takes place by a numerically efficient elastic wave mechanism. This modification leads to a fully explicit numerical scheme which further improves the computational efficiency and is an advantage for implementations on parallel machines. Furthermore, we observe that the standard viscous-plastic model has poor dynamic response to forcing on a daily time scale, given the standard time step (1 day) used by the ice modeling community. In contrast, the explicit discretization of the elastic wave mechanism allows the elastic-viscous-plastic model to capture the ice response to variations in the imposed stress more accurately. Thus, the elastic-viscous-plastic model provides more accurate results for shorter time scales associated with physical forcing, reproduces viscous-plastic model behavior on longer time scales, and is computationally more efficient. 49 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Manycast routing, modulation level and spectrum assignment over elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Xue; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; Wang, Huitao; Wang, Taili

    2017-07-01

    Manycast is a point to multi-point transmission framework that requires a subset of destination nodes successfully reached. It is particularly applicable for dealing with large amounts of data simultaneously in bandwidth-hungry, dynamic and cloud-based applications. As rapid increasing of traffics in these applications, the elastic optical networks (EONs) may be relied on to achieve high throughput manycast. In terms of finer spectrum granularity, the EONs could reach flexible accessing to network spectrum and efficient providing exact spectrum resource to demands. In this paper, we focus on the manycast routing, modulation level and spectrum assignment (MA-RMLSA) problem in EONs. Both EONs planning with static manycast traffic and EONs provisioning with dynamic manycast traffic are investigated. An integer linear programming (ILP) model is formulated to derive MA-RMLSA problem in static manycast scenario. Then corresponding heuristic algorithm called manycast routing, modulation level and spectrum assignment genetic algorithm (MA-RMLSA-GA) is proposed to adapt for both static and dynamic manycast scenarios. The MA-RMLSA-GA optimizes MA-RMLSA problem in destination nodes selection, routing light-tree constitution, modulation level allocation and spectrum resource assignment jointly, to achieve an effective improvement in network performance. Simulation results reveal that MA-RMLSA strategies offered by MA-RMLSA-GA have slightly disparity from the optimal solutions provided by ILP model in static scenario. Moreover, the results demonstrate that MA-RMLSA-GA realizes a highly efficient MA-RMLSA strategy with the lowest blocking probability in dynamic scenario compared with benchmark algorithms.

  13. Deconstruction and elastic ππ scattering in Higgsless models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2007-02-01

    We study elastic pion-pion scattering in global linear moose models and apply the results to a variety of Higgsless models in flat and anti-de Sitter (AdS) space using the equivalence theorem. In order to connect the global moose to Higgsless models, we first introduce a block-spin transformation which corresponds, in the continuum, to the freedom to perform coordinate transformations in the Higgsless model. We show that it is possible to make an “f-flat” deconstruction in which all of the f-constants fj of the linear moose model are identical; the phenomenologically relevant f-flat models are those in which the coupling constants of the groups at either end of the moose are small—corresponding to the global linear moose. In studying pion-pion scattering, we derive various sum rules, including one analogous to the Kawarabayashi-Suzuki-Riazuddin-Fayyazuddin (KSRF) relation, and use them in evaluating the low-energy and high-energy forms of the leading elastic partial-wave scattering amplitudes. We obtain elastic unitarity bounds as a function of the mass of the lightest KK mode and discuss their physical significance.

  14. Deconstruction and elastic {pi}{pi} scattering in Higgsless models

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2007-02-01

    We study elastic pion-pion scattering in global linear moose models and apply the results to a variety of Higgsless models in flat and anti-de Sitter (AdS) space using the equivalence theorem. In order to connect the global moose to Higgsless models, we first introduce a block-spin transformation which corresponds, in the continuum, to the freedom to perform coordinate transformations in the Higgsless model. We show that it is possible to make an 'f-flat' deconstruction in which all of the f-constants f{sub j} of the linear moose model are identical; the phenomenologically relevant f-flat models are those in which the coupling constants of the groups at either end of the moose are small--corresponding to the global linear moose. In studying pion-pion scattering, we derive various sum rules, including one analogous to the Kawarabayashi-Suzuki-Riazuddin-Fayyazuddin (KSRF) relation, and use them in evaluating the low-energy and high-energy forms of the leading elastic partial-wave scattering amplitudes. We obtain elastic unitarity bounds as a function of the mass of the lightest KK mode and discuss their physical significance.

  15. NEXT-GENERATION NUMERICAL MODELING: INCORPORATING ELASTICITY, ANISOTROPY AND ATTENUATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. LARSEN; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    A new effort has been initiated between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) to investigate what features the next generation of numerical seismic models should contain that will best address current technical problems encountered during exploration in increasingly complex geologies. This collaborative work is focused on designing and building these new models, generating synthetic seismic data through simulated surveys of various geometries, and using these data to test and validate new and improved seismic imaging algorithms. The new models will be both 2- and 3-dimensional and will include complex velocity structures as well as anisotropy and attenuation. Considerable attention is being focused on multi-component acoustic and elastic effects because it is now widely recognized that converted phases could play a vital role in improving the quality of seismic images. An existing, validated 3-D elastic modeling code is being used to generate the synthetic data. Preliminary elastic modeling results using this code are presented here along with a description of the proposed new models that will be built and tested.

  16. Split spectrum: a multi-channel approach to elastic optical networking.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ming; Proietti, R; Dahlfort, Stefan; Yoo, S J B

    2012-12-31

    This paper introduces Split Spectrum, which enhances elastic optical networking by splitting a bulk traffic demand into multiple channels, when a single-channel transmission is prohibited by distance or spectrum availability. We performed transmission simulations to determine the maximum reach as a function of modulation format (dual polarization BPSK, QPSK, 16QAM), baud-rate (from 5 to 28 GBd), and number of ROADMs, for a Nyquist WDM super-channel with subcarrier spacing equal to 1.2 × baud-rate. Performance evaluation on two representative topologies shows that, compared to the previously proposed elastic optical networking, Split Spectrum doubles the zero-blocking load and achieves 100% higher network spectral efficiency at zero-blocking loads as a result of extended transmission distance and efficient utilization of spectrum fragments.

  17. Orthotropic elastic shell model for buckling of microtubules.

    PubMed

    Wang, C Y; Ru, C Q; Mioduchowski, A

    2006-11-01

    In view of the fact that microtubules exhibit strong anisotropic elastic properties, an orthotropic elastic shell model for microtubules is developed to study buckling behavior of microtubules. The predicted critical pressure is found to agree well with recent unexplained experimental data on pressure-induced buckling of microtubules [Needleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 198104 (2004); Biophys. J. 89, 3410 (2005)] which are lower than that predicted by the isotropic shell model by four orders of magnitude. General buckling behavior of microtubules under axial compression or radial pressure is studied. The results show that the isotropic shell model greatly overestimates the bucking loads of microtubules, except columnlike axially compressed buckling of long microtubules (of length-to-diameter ratio larger than, say, 150). In particular, the present results also offer a plausible explanation for the length dependency of flexibility of microtubules reported in the literature.

  18. Mechanistic Constitutive Models for Rubber Elasticity and Viscoelasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M

    2003-01-21

    Physically based models which describe the finite strain behavior of vulcanized rubber are developed. Constitutive laws for elasticity and viscoelasticity are derived by integrating over orientation space the forces due to each individual polymer chain. A novel scheme is presented which effectively approximates these integrals in terms of strain and strain invariants. In addition, the details involving the implementation of such models into a quasi-static large strain finite element formulation are provided. In order to account for the finite extensibility of a molecular chain, Langevin statistics is used to model the chain response. The classical statistical model of rubber assumes that polymer chains interact only at the chemical crosslinks. It is shown that such model when fitted for uniaxial tension data cannot fit compression or equibiaxial data. A model which incorporates the entanglement interactions of surrounding chains, in addition to the finite extensibility of the chains, is shown to give better predictions than the classical model. The technique used for approximating the orientation space integral was applied to both the classical and entanglement models. A viscoelasticity model based on the force equilibration process as described by Doi and Edwards is developed. An assumed form for the transient force in the chain is postulated. The resulting stress tensor is composed of an elastic and a viscoelastic portion with the elastic stress given by the proposed entanglement model. In order to improve the simulation of experimental data, it was found necessary to include the effect of unattached or dangling polymer chains in the viscoelasticity model. The viscoelastic effect of such chains is the manifestation of a disengagement process. This disengagement model for unattached polymer chains motivated an empirical model which was very successful in simulating the experimental results considered.

  19. The influence of elastic modulus and thickness on the release of the soft-fouling green alga Ulva linza (syn. Enteromorpha linza) from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) model networks.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Manoj K; Finlay, John A; Chung, Jun Young; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A

    2005-01-01

    The effect of modulus and film thickness on the release of adhered spores and sporelings (young plants) of the green fouling alga Ulva (syn. Enteromorpha) was investigated. PDMS elastomers of constant thickness (100 microm) but different elastic moduli were prepared by varying cross-link density with functional silicone oligomers with degrees of polymerization ranging from 18-830. This provided a 50-fold range of modulus values between 0.2 and 9.4 MPa. Three PDMS coatings of different thicknesses were tested at constant elastic modulus (0.8 MPa). The data revealed no significant increase in percentage spore removal except at the lowest modulus of 0.2 MPa although sporelings released more readily at all but the highest modulus. The influence of coating thickness was also greater for the release of sporelings compared to spores. The release data are discussed in the light of fracture mechanics models that have been applied to hard fouling. New concepts appertaining to the release of soft fouling organisms are proposed, which take into account the deformation in the adhesive base of the adherand and deformation of the PDMS film.

  20. Phenomenological models of elastic nucleon scattering and predictions for LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kašpar, Jan; Kundrát, Vojtěch; Lokajíček, Miloš; Procházka, Jiří

    2011-02-01

    The hitherto analyses of elastic collisions of charged nucleons involving common influence of Coulomb and hadronic scattering have been based practically on West and Yennie formula. However, this approach has been shown recently to be inadequate from experimental as well as theoretical points of view. The eikonal model enabling to determine physical characteristics in impact parameter space seems to be more pertinent. The contemporary phenomenological models admit, of course, different distributions of collision processes in the impact parameter space and cannot give any definite answer. Nevertheless, some predictions for the planned LHC energy that have been given on their basis may be useful, as well as the possibility of determining the luminosity from elastic scattering.

  1. Self-consistent Modeling of Elastic Anisotropy in Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Wenk, H.; Matthies, S.; Vasin, R.

    2012-12-01

    Elastic anisotropy in clay-rich sedimentary rocks has increasingly received attention because of significance for prospecting of petroleum deposits, as well as seals in the context of nuclear waste and CO2 sequestration. The orientation of component minerals and pores/fractures is a critical factor that influences elastic anisotropy. In this study, we investigate lattice and shape preferred orientation (LPO and SPO) of three shales from the North Sea in UK, the Qusaiba Formation in Saudi Arabia, and the Officer Basin in Australia (referred to as N1, Qu3, and L1905, respectively) to calculate elastic properties and compare them with experimental results. Synchrotron hard X-ray diffraction and microtomography experiments were performed to quantify LPO, weight proportions, and three-dimensional SPO of constituent minerals and pores. Our preliminary results show that the degree of LPO and total amount of clays are highest in Qu3 (3.3-6.5 m.r.d and 74vol%), moderately high in N1 (2.4-5.6 m.r.d. and 70vol%), and lowest in L1905 (2.3-2.5 m.r.d. and 42vol%). In addition, porosity in Qu3 is as low as 2% while it is up to 6% in L1605 and 8% in N1, respectively. Based on this information and single crystal elastic properties of mineral components, we apply a self-consistent averaging method to calculate macroscopic elastic properties and corresponding seismic velocities for different shales. The elastic model is then compared with measured acoustic velocities on the same samples. The P-wave velocities measured from Qu3 (4.1-5.3 km/s, 26.3%Ani.) are faster than those obtained from L1905 (3.9-4.7 km/s, 18.6%Ani.) and N1 (3.6-4.3 km/s, 17.7%Ani.). By making adjustments for pore structure (aspect ratio) and single crystal elastic properties of clay minerals, a good agreement between our calculation and the ultrasonic measurement is obtained.

  2. Performance evaluation of time-aware enhanced software defined networking (TeSDN) for elastic data center optical interconnection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Li, Hui; Lin, Yi; Li, Gang; Han, Jianrui; Lee, Young; Ma, Teng

    2014-07-28

    Data center interconnection with elastic optical networks is a promising scenario to meet the high burstiness and high-bandwidth requirements of data center services. We previously implemented enhanced software defined networking over elastic optical network for data center application [Opt. Express 21, 26990 (2013)]. On the basis of it, this study extends to consider the time-aware data center service scheduling with elastic service time and service bandwidth according to the various time sensitivity requirements. A novel time-aware enhanced software defined networking (TeSDN) architecture for elastic data center optical interconnection has been proposed in this paper, by introducing a time-aware resources scheduling (TaRS) scheme. The TeSDN can accommodate the data center services with required QoS considering the time dimensionality, and enhance cross stratum optimization of application and elastic optical network stratums resources based on spectrum elasticity, application elasticity and time elasticity. The overall feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture is experimentally verified on our OpenFlow-based testbed. The performance of TaRS scheme under heavy traffic load scenario is also quantitatively evaluated based on TeSDN architecture in terms of blocking probability and resource occupation rate.

  3. Elastic scattering of light nuclei through a simple potential model

    SciTech Connect

    Bhoi, J. Laha, U.

    2016-05-15

    The phase function method is adapted to deal with the scattering on our proposed interactions for α–α and α–{sup 3}He systems. The effect of the electromagnetic interaction is included in terms of a screened Coulomb potential. Based on our proposed potential models we present results for α–α and α–{sup 3}He elastic scattering phase shifts which compare well with more detailed calculations.

  4. Efficient routing and spectrum assignment in elastic optical networks with time scheduled traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yang; Fan, Zheyu; Chan, Chun-Kit

    2016-07-01

    Elastic optical networks (EONs) employ dynamic routing and spectrum assignment (RSA) algorithms to support diverse services and heterogeneous requests. However, these RSA algorithms may possibly induce spectrum fragments when allocating spectrum to accommodate different service requests. Therefore, such induced spectrum fragments should also be regarded as spectrum consumption besides the allocated spectrum by RSA algorithms. In this paper, by additionally considering the holding times of lightpaths and service connections, we first introduce a comprehensive spectrum consumption model to simultaneously investigate both the allocated and the fragmented spectrum consumptions. Then we solve this model in both static and dynamic traffic scenarios, by either formulating the RSA problem with time-scheduled traffic or introducing a time-aware spectrum-efficient heuristics algorithm. Since no defragmentation is executed in spectrum allocation, the proposed RSA algorithm requires no traffic disruption and can be realized more easily in reality. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm reduces the comprehensive spectrum consumption and has lower bandwidth blocking probability than the typical first-fit RSA algorithm.

  5. Dynamic on-demand defragmentation in flexible bandwidth elastic optical networks.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yawei; Wen, Ke; Geisler, David J; Liu, Ruiting; Yoo, S J B

    2012-01-16

    While flexible bandwidth elastic optical networking is a promising direction for future networks, the spectral fragmentation problem in such a network inevitably raises the blocking probability and significantly degrades network performance. This paper addresses the spectral defragmentation problem using an auxiliary graph based approach, which transforms the problem into a matter of finding the maximum independent set (MIS) in the constructed auxiliary graph. The enabling technologies and defragmentation-capable node architectures, together with heuristic defragmentation algorithms are proposed and evaluated. Simulation results show that the proposed min-cost defragmentation algorithms can significantly reduce the blocking probability of incoming requests in a spectrally fragmented flexible bandwidth optical network, while substantially minimizing the number of disrupted connections.

  6. The role of elastic compressibility in dynamic subduction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austmann, W.; Govers, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in geodynamic numerical models show a trend towards more realistic rheologies. The Earth is no longer modeled as a purely viscous fluid, but the effects of, for example, elasticity and plasticity are also included. However, by making such improvements, it is essential to include these more complex rheologies in a consistent way. Specifically, compressibility needs also to be included, an effect that is commonly neglected in numerical models. Recently, we showed that the effect of elastic compressibility is significant. This was done for a gravity driven cylinder in a homogeneous Maxwell fluid bounded by closed boundaries. For a fluid with a realistic compressibility (Poisson ratio equals 0.3), the settling velocity showed a discrepancy with the semi-analytical steady state incompressible solution of approximately 40%. The motion of the fluid was no longer restricted by a small region around the cylinder, but the motion of the cylinder compressed also the fluid near the bottom boundary. This compression decreased the resistance on the cylinder and resulted in a larger settling velocity. Here, we examine the influence of elastic compressibility in an oceanic subduction setting. The slab is driven by slab pull and a far field prescribed plate motion. Preliminary results indicate that elastic compressibility has a significant effect on the fluid motion. Differences with respect to nearly incompressible solution are most significant near material boundaries. In line with our earlier findings, the flow is increased in regions of confined flow, such as the mantle wedge or the subduction channel. As a consequence, an increasing compressibility results in a larger slab velocity. We seek to identify surface observables, such as topography and plate motion, that allow us to distinguish the compressible and incompressible behavior.

  7. The role of elastic compressibility in dynamic subduction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austmann, Walter; Govers, Rob; Burov, Evgenii

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in geodynamic numerical models show a trend towards more realistic rheologies. The Earth is no longer modeled as a purely viscous fluid, but the effects of, for example, elasticity and plasticity are also included. However, by making such improvements, it is essential to include these more complex rheologies in a consistent way. Specifically, compressibility needs also to be included, an effect that is commonly neglected in numerical models. Recently, we showed that the effect of elastic compressibility is significant. This was done for a gravity driven cylinder in a homogeneous Maxwell fluid bounded by closed boundaries. For a fluid with a realistic compressibility (Poisson ratio equals 0.3), the settling velocity showed a discrepancy with the semi-analytical steady state incompressible solution of approximately 40%. The motion of the fluid was no longer restricted by a small region around the cylinder, but the motion of the cylinder compressed also the fluid near the bottom boundary. This compression decreased the resistance on the cylinder and resulted in a larger settling velocity. Here, we examine the influence of elastic compressibility in an oceanic subduction setting. The slab is driven by slab pull and a far field prescribed plate motion. Preliminary results indicate that elastic compressibility has a significant effect on the fluid motion. Differences with respect to nearly incompressible solution are most significant near material boundaries. In line with our earlier findings, the flow is increased in regions of confined flow, such as the mantle wedge or the subduction channel. As a consequence, an increasing compressibility results in a larger slab velocity. We seek to identify surface observables, such as topography and plate motion, that allow us to distinguish the compressible and incompressible behavior.

  8. Experimental demonstration of spectrum-sliced elastic optical path network (SLICE).

    PubMed

    Kozicki, Bartłomiej; Takara, Hidehiko; Tsukishima, Yukio; Yoshimatsu, Toshihide; Yonenaga, Kazushige; Jinno, Masahiko

    2010-10-11

    We describe experimental demonstration of spectrum-sliced elastic optical path network (SLICE) architecture. We employ optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) modulation format and bandwidth-variable optical cross-connects (OXC) to generate, transmit and receive optical paths with bandwidths of up to 1 Tb/s. We experimentally demonstrate elastic optical path setup and spectrally-efficient transmission of multiple channels with bit rates ranging from 40 to 140 Gb/s between six nodes of a mesh network. We show dynamic bandwidth scalability for optical paths with bit rates of 40 to 440 Gb/s. Moreover, we demonstrate multihop transmission of a 1 Tb/s optical path over 400 km of standard single-mode fiber (SMF). Finally, we investigate the filtering properties and the required guard band width for spectrally-efficient allocation of optical paths in SLICE.

  9. Experimental flow studies in an elastic Y-model.

    PubMed

    Mijovic, Budimir; Liepsch, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    To determine the causes and history of atherosclerosis it is necessary to understand the hemodynamic parameters of blood circulation. Hemodynamic parameters play an important role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques, especially near bends and bifurcations where the flow separates from the wall. Here the flow is laminar and non-axial with eddies, secondary flow, flow separation and stagnation points. Stenoses are found predominantly in flow separation areas. Therefore, it is important to separately study the following flow parameters: steady and pulsatile flow, wall elasticity and non-Newtonian flow behavior of blood. A simplified silicon elastic y-model simulating the human carotid artery was used for the analysis of these parameters. This model can be used for numerical studies as well. Flow was visualized at steady flow using dyes and at pulsatile flow with a photoelastic apparatus and a birefringent solution. The local axial velocity at steady and pulsatile flow was determined with a one-component Laser-Doppler-Anemometer (LDA). Pulsatile flow was generated by a piston membrane pump. A glycerin-water solution was used to simulate the Newtonian flow behavior of blood. A DMSO-Separan water solution was used to simulate the non-Newtonian flow behavior. Pulsatile flow creates higher and lower shear rates so called oscillating shear rate compare to steady flow depending on the velocity amplitude. The non-Newtonian fluid showed a markedly different flow behavior than the Newtonian fluid especially in areas of flow separation. Shear gradients were calculated from these velocity measurements using a bicubic spline interpolation. Shear stresses were calculated from these velocity shear gradients and the viscosity of the non-Newtonian fluid at these shear gradients. At special areas, high shear stresses > 10 Pa were found. The elasticity of the model wall also influences the flow behavior. The measurements showed that the characteristics of pulsatile flow and the

  10. Elastic modeling and steep dips: unraveling the reflected wavefield

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelting, C. J.; Gherasim, M.; House, L. S.; Marfurt, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a larger elastic numerical modeling project, we have been investigating how energy reflected from steeply dipping interfaces is recorded using typical multicomponent acquisition geometries. Specifically, we have been interpreting how rcflection events from the flanks of salt dome structures are distributed on 3C and 4C phones for vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) and ocean bottom seismic (OBS) or land surface surveys. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to improve the structural imaging of steeply dipping interfaces and eventually to evaluate the usc of the recorded elastic wavefield for fluid description near these interfaces. In the current work, we focus on a common assumption used when processing converted wave reflection seismic data that most PP energy is recorded on the vertical geophone and/or the hydrophone and that most PS energy is recorded on the horizontal geophones. This is a useful assumption when it is valid, because it eliminates the need for separation of the recorded wavefield into P and S wavetypes. Using two elastic models and different acquisition geometries, we examine the validity of this assumption in the presence of steeply dipping interfaces and discuss the implications for converted-wave and vector imaging of salt flanks.

  11. Surface tension and the dodecahedron model for lung elasticity.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, E; Budiansky, B

    1990-05-01

    Macroscopic elastic moduli governing the incremental deformations of lung parenchyma are calculated on the basis of a model for an individual lung element in the shape of a regular dodecahedron. Elastic stiffness within the element is provided by pin-jointed tension members along the edges of the dodecahedron, surface tension is incorporated into its pentagonal faces, and the influence of transpulmonary pressure is simulated by an externally applied hydrostatic tension. The analysis is based on a variational statement of nonlinear structural mechanics, and the results show how the moduli depend on the effective inflation pressure, the constitutive behavior of the idealized truss members, and the surface-area dependent surface tension. The theory is discussed in the light of available experimental information. A more general analysis is needed to account for the effects of structural as well as surface-tension hysteresis.

  12. Modeling and Processing of Continuous 3D Elastic Wavefield Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milkereit, B.; Bohlen, T.

    2001-12-01

    Continuous seismic wavefields are excited by earthquake clustering, induced seismicity in reservoirs, and mining. In hydrocarbon reservoirs, for example, pore pressure changes and fluid flow (mass transfer) will cause incremental deviatoric stresses sufficient to trigger and sustain seismic activity. Here we address three aspects of seismic wavefields in three-dimensional heterogeneous media triggered by distributed sources in space and time: forward modeling, multichannel data processing, and source location imaging. A power law distribution of seismic sources (such as the Gutenberg-Richter law) is used for the modeling of viscoelastic/elastic wave propagation through a realistic earth model. 3D modeling provides new insight in the interaction of multi-source wavefields and the role of scale-dependend elastic model parameters on transmitted and reflected/back-scattered wavefields. There exists a strong correlation between the spatial properties of the compressional, shear wave and density perturbations and the lateral correlation length of the resulting reflected or transmitted seismic wavefields. Modeling is based on the implementation of 3D elastic/viscoelastic FD codes on massive parallel and/or distributed computing resources using MPI (message passing interface). For parallelization, large grid 3D earth models are decomposed into subvolume processing elements whereby each processing element is updating the wavefield within its portion of the grid. Processing of continuous seismic wavefields excited by multiple distributed sources is based on a combination of crosscorrelated or slowness-transformed array data and Kirchhoff or reverse time migration for source location or source volume imaging. The appearance of slowness in both migration and array data processing suggests the possibility of combining them into a single process. In order to place further constraints on the migration, the directivity properties of 3-component receiver arrays can be included in

  13. Surface corrections for peridynamic models in elasticity and fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Q. V.; Bobaru, F.

    2017-08-01

    Peridynamic models are derived by assuming that a material point is located in the bulk. Near a surface or boundary, material points do not have a full non-local neighborhood. This leads to effective material properties near the surface of a peridynamic model to be slightly different from those in the bulk. A number of methods/algorithms have been proposed recently for correcting this peridynamic surface effect. In this study, we investigate the efficacy and computational cost of peridynamic surface correction methods for elasticity and fracture. We provide practical suggestions for reducing the peridynamic surface effect.

  14. Elastic lattice modelling of seismic waves including a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O`Brien, Gareth S.

    2014-06-01

    Elastic lattice methods (ELMs) have been shown to accurately model seismic wave propagation in a heterogeneous medium. These methods represent an elastic solid as a series of interconnected springs arranged on a lattice and recover a continuum wave equation in the long wavelength limit. However, in the case of a regular lattice, the recovery of the continuum equation depends on the symmetry of the lattice. By removing particles above a free surface this symmetry is broken. Therefore, this free surface implementation leads to errors when compared with a traction free boundary condition. The error between a traction free boundary condition and the ELMs grows as the Poisson's ratio deviates from 0.25. By modifying the interaction constants with a scalar, the error can be reduced while keeping the flexibility of the nearest neighbour interaction rule. We present results of simulations where modified spring constants reduce the misfit with a traction free boundary solution and hence increase the accuracy of the elastic lattice method solution on the free surface.

  15. Phase-field elasticity model based on mechanical jump conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Daniel; Tschukin, Oleg; Choudhury, Abhik; Selzer, Michael; Böhlke, Thomas; Nestler, Britta

    2015-05-01

    Computational models based on the phase-field method typically operate on a mesoscopic length scale and resolve structural changes of the material and furthermore provide valuable information about microstructure and mechanical property relations. An accurate calculation of the stresses and mechanical energy at the transition region is therefore indispensable. We derive a quantitative phase-field elasticity model based on force balance and Hadamard jump conditions at the interface. Comparing the simulated stress profiles calculated with Voigt/Taylor (Annalen der Physik 274(12):573, 1889), Reuss/Sachs (Z Angew Math Mech 9:49, 1929) and the proposed model with the theoretically predicted stress fields in a plate with a round inclusion under hydrostatic tension, we show the quantitative characteristics of the model. In order to validate the elastic contribution to the driving force for phase transition, we demonstrate the absence of excess energy, calculated by Durga et al. (Model Simul Mater Sci Eng 21(5):055018, 2013), in a one-dimensional equilibrium condition of serial and parallel material chains. To validate the driving force for systems with curved transition regions, we relate simulations to the Gibbs-Thompson equilibrium condition (Johnson and Alexander, J Appl Phys 59(8):2735, 1986).

  16. Hybrid Simulation Modeling to Estimate U.S. Energy Elasticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylin-Stern, Adam C.

    This paper demonstrates how an U.S. application of CIMS, a technologically explicit and behaviourally realistic energy-economy simulation model which includes macro-economic feedbacks, can be used to derive estimates of elasticity of substitution (ESUB) and autonomous energy efficiency index (AEEI) parameters. The ability of economies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions depends on the potential for households and industry to decrease overall energy usage, and move from higher to lower emissions fuels. Energy economists commonly refer to ESUB estimates to understand the degree of responsiveness of various sectors of an economy, and use estimates to inform computable general equilibrium models used to study climate policies. Using CIMS, I have generated a set of future, 'pseudo-data' based on a series of simulations in which I vary energy and capital input prices over a wide range. I then used this data set to estimate the parameters for transcendental logarithmic production functions using regression techniques. From the production function parameter estimates, I calculated an array of elasticity of substitution values between input pairs. Additionally, this paper demonstrates how CIMS can be used to calculate price-independent changes in energy-efficiency in the form of the AEEI, by comparing energy consumption between technologically frozen and 'business as usual' simulations. The paper concludes with some ideas for model and methodological improvement, and how these might figure into future work in the estimation of ESUBs from CIMS. Keywords: Elasticity of substitution; hybrid energy-economy model; translog; autonomous energy efficiency index; rebound effect; fuel switching.

  17. Acoustic characterization and prediction of the cut-off dimensionless frequency of an elastic tube by neural networks.

    PubMed

    Dariouchy, Abdelilah; Aassif, El Houcein; Décultot, Dominique; Maze, Gérard

    2007-05-01

    A neural network is developed to predict cut-off dimensionless frequencies of the antisymmetric circumferential waves (Ai) propagating around an elastic circular cylindrical shell of different radius ratio b/a (a, outer radius; b, inner radius). The useful data to train and test the performances of the model are determinated from calculated trajectories of natural modes of resonances or extracted from time-frequency representations of Wigner-Ville of the acoustic backscattered time signal obtained from a computation. In this work, the studied tubes are made of aluminum or stainless steel. The material density, the radius ratio b/a, the index i of the antisymmetric waves, and the propagation velocities in the tube, are selected like relevant entries of the model of neural network. During the development of the network, several configurations are evaluated. The optimal model selected is a network with two hidden layers. This model is able to predict the cut-off dimensionless frequencies with a mean relative error (MRE) of about 1%, a mean absolute error (MAE) of 3.10(-3) k1a, and a standard error (SE) of 10(-3) k1a (k1a is the dimensionless frequency, k is the wave number in water).

  18. Modeling Network Interdiction Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    they may attack the flaw to cause widespread chaos. Attacks such as these are considered a form of network interdiction. Assessing the networks over...and forms a foundation for the techniques of the measures and models approaches of the research framework, which is depicted in Figure 2. The...ensures the distance of the shortest (i, j) path is computed. This insight is attributed to Warshall [62]. The algorithm’s present form is attributed

  19. Elastic Model Transitions Using Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2012-01-01

    A technique is presented for initializing multiple discrete finite element model (FEM) mode sets for certain types of flight dynamics formulations that rely on superposition of orthogonal modes for modeling the elastic response. Such approaches are commonly used for modeling launch vehicle dynamics, and challenges arise due to the rapidly time-varying nature of the rigid-body and elastic characteristics. By way of an energy argument, a quadratic inequality constrained least squares (LSQI) algorithm is employed to e ect a smooth transition from one set of FEM eigenvectors to another with no requirement that the models be of similar dimension or that the eigenvectors be correlated in any particular way. The physically unrealistic and controversial method of eigenvector interpolation is completely avoided, and the discrete solution approximates that of the continuously varying system. The real-time computational burden is shown to be negligible due to convenient features of the solution method. Simulation results are presented, and applications to staging and other discontinuous mass changes are discussed

  20. Elastic laboratory measurements and modeling of saturated basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Ludmila; Otheim, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the elastic behavior of basalt is important to seismically monitor volcanoes, subsea basalts, and carbon sequestration in basalt. We estimate the elastic properties of basalt samples from the Snake River Plain, Idaho, at ultrasonic (0.8 MHz) and seismic (2-300 Hz) frequencies. To test the sensitivity of seismic waves to the fluid content in the pore structure, measurements are performed at three saturation conditions: saturated with liquid CO2, water, and dry. When CO2 replaces water, the P-wave velocity drops, on average, by 10%. Vesicles and cracks, observed in the rock microstructure, control the relaxation of pore-fluid pressures in the rock as a wave propagates. The bulk and shear moduli of basalts saturated with liquid CO2 are not frequency dependent, suggesting that fluid pore pressures are in equilibrium between 2 Hz and 0.8 MHz. However, when samples are water saturated, the bulk modulus of the rock is frequency dependent. Modeling with Gassmann's equations predicts the measured saturated rock bulk modulus for all fluids for frequencies below 20 Hz but underpredicts the water-saturated basalt bulk modulus for frequencies greater than 20 Hz. The most likely reason is that the pore-fluid pressures are unrelaxed. Instead, the ultrasonic frequency rock moduli are modeled with high-frequency elastic theories of squirt flow and Kuster-Toksöz (KT). Although KT's model is based on idealized pore shapes, a combination of spheres (vesicles) and penny-shaped cracks (fractures) interpreted and quantified from petrographical data predicts the ultrasonic dry and saturated rock moduli for the measured basalts.

  1. Multi-scale modelling of elastic moduli of trabecular bone

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Elham; Jasiuk, Iwona; Yoo, Andrew; Lee, YikHan; Liszka, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    We model trabecular bone as a nanocomposite material with hierarchical structure and predict its elastic properties at different structural scales. The analysis involves a bottom-up multi-scale approach, starting with nanoscale (mineralized collagen fibril) and moving up the scales to sub-microscale (single lamella), microscale (single trabecula) and mesoscale (trabecular bone) levels. Continuum micromechanics methods, composite materials laminate theory and finite-element methods are used in the analysis. Good agreement is found between theoretical and experimental results. PMID:22279160

  2. A 3D Orthotropic Elastic Continuum Damage Material Model

    SciTech Connect

    English, Shawn Allen; Brown, Arthur A.

    2013-08-01

    A three dimensional orthotropic elastic constitutive model with continuum damage is implemented for polymer matrix composite lamina. Damage evolves based on a quadratic homogeneous function of thermodynamic forces in the orthotropic planes. A small strain formulation is used to assess damage. In order to account for large deformations, a Kirchhoff material formulation is implemented and coded for numerical simulation in Sandia’s Sierra Finite Element code suite. The theoretical formulation is described in detail. An example of material parameter determination is given and an example is presented.

  3. A fast method for a generalized nonlocal elastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ning; Wang, Hong; Wang, Che

    2015-09-01

    We develop a numerical method for a generalized nonlocal elastic model, which is expressed as a composition of a Riesz potential operator with a fractional differential operator, by composing a collocation method with a finite difference discretization. By carefully exploring the structure of the coefficient matrix of the numerical method, we develop a preconditioned fast Krylov subspace method, which reduces the computations to (Nlog ⁡ N) per iteration and the memory to O (N). The use of the preconditioner significantly reduces the number of iterations, and the preconditioner can be inverted in O (Nlog ⁡ N) computations. Numerical results show the utility of the method.

  4. Accurate numerical solutions for elastic-plastic models. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Schreyer, H. L.; Kulak, R. F.; Kramer, J. M.

    1980-03-01

    The accuracy of two integration algorithms is studied for the common engineering condition of a von Mises, isotropic hardening model under plane stress. Errors in stress predictions for given total strain increments are expressed with contour plots of two parameters: an angle in the pi plane and the difference between the exact and computed yield-surface radii. The two methods are the tangent-predictor/radial-return approach and the elastic-predictor/radial-corrector algorithm originally developed by Mendelson. The accuracy of a combined tangent-predictor/radial-corrector algorithm is also investigated.

  5. A nonlocal elastic anisotropic shell model for microtubule buckling behaviors in cytoplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuanwen; An, Le

    2010-07-01

    The buckling behaviors of microtubules (MTs) in a living cell have been studied based on the nonlocal anisotropic shell theory and Stokes flow theory. The analytical expressions for the buckling load and the growth rate of the buckling are obtained and discussed. In addition, the pressure on MTs, resulting from cytosol motion, is derived on the basis of the Stokes flow theory. The influences of filament network elasticity and the shear modulus of MTs, especially the cytosol viscosity and MT small scale effects on MT buckling behaviors, are investigated. The analytical results show that the MT buckling growth rate increases with the MT small scale parameter, while decreases as the filament network elastic modulus, the MT shear modulus and cytoplasm viscosity increase. Although the cytosol viscosity has a significant influence on the value of the growth rate, it shows little effects on the range of the axial wave number of buckling as well as the critical axial wave number that corresponds to the maximal growth rate. Finally, the MT buckling growth rates have been calculated using the beam model, the isotropic shell model, and the anisotropic shell model. The results indicate that using the anisotropy shell theory to model the buckling behavior of MTs is necessary.

  6. An Elastic Model of Blebbing in Nuclear Lamin Meshworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funkhouser, Chloe; Sknepnek, Rastko; Shimi, Takeshi; Goldman, Anne; Goldman, Robert; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2013-03-01

    A two-component continuum elastic model is introduced to analyze a nuclear lamin meshwork, a structural element of the lamina of the nuclear envelope. The main component of the lamina is a meshwork of lamin protein filaments providing mechanical support to the nucleus and also playing a role in gene expression. Abnormalities in nuclear shape are associated with a variety of pathologies, including some forms of cancer and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, and are often characterized by protruding structures termed nuclear blebs. Nuclear blebs are rich in A-type lamins and may be related to pathological gene expression. We apply the two-dimensional elastic shell model to determine which characteristics of the meshwork could be responsible for blebbing, including heterogeneities in the meshwork thickness and mesh size. We find that if one component of the lamin meshwork, rich in A-type lamins, has a tendency to form a larger mesh size than that rich in B-type lamins, this is sufficient to cause segregation of the lamin components and also to form blebs rich in A-type lamins. The model produces structures with comparable morphologies and mesh size distributions as the lamin meshworks of real, pathological nuclei. Funded by US DoE Award DEFG02-08ER46539 and by the DDR&E and AFOSR under Award FA9550-10-1-0167; simulations performed on NU Quest cluster

  7. Measuring in vivo elasticities of Calvin cycle enzymes: network structure and patterns of modulations.

    PubMed

    Kreim, Michael; Giersch, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    To measure the kinetics of enzymes, the proteins are usually assayed in vitro after isolation from their parent organisms. We make an attempt to show how one might determine enzyme elasticities in an intact system by a multiple modulation approach. Certain target enzymes are modulated in their activities and the changes in metabolite concentrations and flux rates upon the modulations are used to calculate the enzyme elasticities. Central to this approach is that the modulations must be independent of each other, and an algorithm is developed for finding all independent modulations that allow determining the elasticities of a given enzyme. This approach is applied to a mass-action model of the Calvin cycle. The goal is to determine the elasticities of as many enzymes as possible by modulating the activities of as few of them as possible. It is shown that the elasticities of 20 (out of 22) Calvin cycle enzymes can be determined by modulating just five reactions. Moreover, visualization of independence of modulations may be used to decompose the Calvin cycle into several sections that are independent of each other regarding flow of matter and information.

  8. Effective-medium theory of elastic waves in random networks of rods.

    PubMed

    Katz, J I; Hoffman, J J; Conradi, M S; Miller, J G

    2012-06-01

    We formulate an effective medium (mean field) theory of a material consisting of randomly distributed nodes connected by straight slender rods, hinged at the nodes. Defining wavelength-dependent effective elastic moduli, we calculate both the static moduli and the dispersion relations of ultrasonic longitudinal and transverse elastic waves. At finite wave vector k the waves are dispersive, with phase and group velocities decreasing with increasing wave vector. These results are directly applicable to networks with empty pore space. They also describe the solid matrix in two-component (Biot) theories of fluid-filled porous media. We suggest the possibility of low density materials with higher ratios of stiffness and strength to density than those of foams, aerogels, or trabecular bone.

  9. Elastic tracking versus neural network tracking for very high multiplicity problems

    SciTech Connect

    Harlander, M.; Gyulassy, M.

    1991-04-01

    A new Elastic Tracking (ET) algorithm is proposed for finding tracks in very high multiplicity and noisy environments. It is based on a dynamical reinterpretation and generalization of the Radon transform and is related to elastic net algorithms for geometrical optimization. ET performs an adaptive nonlinear fit to noisy data with a variable number of tracks. Its numerics is more efficient than that of the traditional Radon or Hough transform method because it avoids binning of phase space and the costly search for valid minima. Spurious local minima are avoided in ET by introducing a time-dependent effective potential. The method is shown to be very robust to noise and measurement error and extends tracking capabilities to much higher track densities than possible via local road finding or even the novel Denby-Peterson neural network tracking algorithms. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Elastic response of DNA molecules under the action of interfacial traction and stretching: An elastic thin rod model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing; Qiang, Lei; Gao, Jun

    2015-11-01

    In a multivalent salt solution, a segment of DNA is modeled as an elastic rod subjected to the interfacial traction. The shooting method is used to calculate the equilibrium configurations of condensed DNA under the action of the longitudinal end-force and interfacial traction simultaneously. The results show that the shapes of DNA are mainly determined by the competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of stretching. The change of end-to-end distance with the longitudinal end-force is consistent with the worm-like chain (WLC) model. The higher the concentration is, the stronger the condensation of DNA.

  11. Dynamics of Elastic Beams with Embedded Fluid-Filled Parallel-Channel Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gat, Amir D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A pressurized fluid-filled parallel-channel network embedded in an elastic beam, asymmetrically to the neutral plane, will create a deformation field within the beam. Deformation due to embedded fluidic networks is currently studied in the context of soft actuators and soft-robotic applications. Expanding on this concept, configurations can be designed so that the pressure in the channel network is created directly from external forces acting on the beam, and thus can be viewed as passive solid–fluid composite structures. We approximate the deformation of such structures and relate the fluid pressure and geometry of the network to a continuous deformation-field function. This enables the design of networks creating steady arbitrary deformation fields as well as to eliminate deformation created by external time-varying forces, thus increasing the effective rigidity of the beam. In addition, by including the effects of the deformation created by the channel network on the beam inertia, we can modify the response of the beam to external time-varying forces. We present a scheme to design channel networks that create predefined oscillating deformation patterns in response to external oscillating forces. The ability to include inertial effects is relevant to the design of dynamic soft robots and soft actuators. Our results are illustrated and validated by numerical computations. PMID:27625914

  12. The effects of substrate elasticity on endothelial cell network formation and traction force generation.

    PubMed

    Califano, Joseph P; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2009-01-01

    While the growth factors and cytokines known to influence angiogenesis and vasculogenesis have garnered widespread attention, less is known about how the mechanical environment affects blood vessel formation and cell assembly. In this study, we investigate the relationship between substrate elasticity, endothelial cell-cell connectivity and traction force generation. We find that on more compliant substrates, endothelial cells self-assemble into network-like structures independently of additional exogenous growth factors or cytokines. These networks form from the assembly of sub-confluent endothelial cells on compliant (E = 200-1000Pa) substrates, and results from both the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. Interestingly, stabilization of these cell-cell connections and networks requires fibronectin polymerization. Traction Force Microscopy measurements indicate that individual endothelial cells on compliant substrates exert forces which create substrate stains that propagate from the cell edge. We speculate that these strains draw the cells together and initiate self-assembly. Notably, endothelial cell network formation on compliant substrates is dynamic and transient; as cell number and substrate strains increase, the networks fill in through collective cell movements from the network edges. Our results indicate that network formation is mediated in part by substrate mechanics and that cellular traction force may promote cell-cell assembly by directing cell migration.

  13. Crosslinked actin networks show liquid crystal elastomer behaviour, including soft-mode elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalhaimer, Paul; Discher, Dennis E.; Lubensky, Tom C.

    2007-05-01

    Actin filament networks with protein crosslinks of distinct length and flexibility resemble liquid crystal elastomers. We simulate actin filament systems with flexible crosslinkers of varying length and connectivity to understand general phase behaviour and elasticity. Simulated networks with very short filaments and long crosslinkers resemble the cytoskeleton of the red blood cell and remain isotropic in compression and shear, seeming well-suited to blood flow. In contrast, networks with longer filaments as found in many cell types show three regimes of nematic phase behaviour dependent on crosslinker length: (1) `loose' networks are isotropic at zero stress but align under compression or shear; (2) `semi-loose' networks are nematic at low stress but become isotropic under dilation and (3) `tight' networks possess a locked-in nematic order as represented by the cytoskeleton of the outer hair cell in the ear, for which anisotropic compliance directs sound propagation. Furthermore, for a subset of loose networks with `periodic' connections among filaments, extremely soft stress-strain behaviour is found, as predicted for liquid crystal elastomers.

  14. Elastic-wave velocity in marine sediments with gas hydrates: Effective medium modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.; Sakai, A.; Collett, T.

    1999-01-01

    We offer a first-principle-based effective medium model for elastic-wave velocity in unconsolidated, high porosity, ocean bottom sediments containing gas hydrate. The dry sediment frame elastic constants depend on porosity, elastic moduli of the solid phase, and effective pressure. Elastic moduli of saturated sediment are calculated from those of the dry frame using Gassmann's equation. To model the effect of gas hydrate on sediment elastic moduli we use two separate assumptions: (a) hydrate modifies the pore fluid elastic properties without affecting the frame; (b) hydrate becomes a component of the solid phase, modifying the elasticity of the frame. The goal of the modeling is to predict the amount of hydrate in sediments from sonic or seismic velocity data. We apply the model to sonic and VSP data from ODP Hole 995 and obtain hydrate concentration estimates from assumption (b) consistent with estimates obtained from resistivity, chlorinity and evolved gas data. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Modeling, design, and optimization of Mindwalker series elastic joint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiqian; Meijneke, Cor; van der Kooij, Herman

    2013-06-01

    Weight and power autonomy are limiting the daily use of wearable exoskeleton. Lightweight, efficient and powerful actuation system are not easy to achieve. Choosing the right combinations of existing technologies, such as battery, gear and motor is not a trivial task. In this paper, we propose an optimization framework by setting up a power-based quasi-static model of the exoskeleton joint drivetrain. The goal is to find the most efficient and lightweight combinations. This framework can be generalized for other similar applications by extending or accommodating the model to their own needs. We also present the Mindwalker exoskeleton joint, for which a novel series elastic actuator, consisting of a ballscrew-driven linear actuator and a double spiral spring, was developed and tested. This linear actuator is capable of outputting 960 W power and the exoskeleton joint can output 100 Nm peak torque continuously. The double spiral spring can sense torque between 0.08Nm and 100 Nm and it exhibits linearity of 99.99%, with no backlash or hysteresis. The series elastic joint can track a chirp torque profile with amplitude of 100 Nm over 6 Hz (large torque bandwidth) and for small torque (2 Nm peak-to-peak), it has a bandwidth over 38 Hz. The integrated exoskeleton joint, including the ballscrew-driven linear actuator, the series spring, electronics and the metal housing which hosts these components, weighs 2.9 kg.

  16. The molecular kink paradigm for rubber elasticity: numerical simulations of explicit polyisoprene networks at low to moderate tensile strains.

    PubMed

    Hanson, David E

    2011-08-07

    Based on recent molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations of small isoprene molecules, we propose a new ansatz for rubber elasticity. We envision a network chain as a series of independent molecular kinks, each comprised of a small number of backbone units, and the strain as being imposed along the contour of the chain. We treat chain extension in three distinct force regimes: (Ia) near zero strain, where we assume that the chain is extended within a well defined tube, with all of the kinks participating simultaneously as entropic elastic springs, (II) when the chain becomes sensibly straight, giving rise to a purely enthalpic stretching force (until bond rupture occurs) and, (Ib) a linear entropic regime, between regimes Ia and II, in which a force limit is imposed by tube deformation. In this intermediate regime, the molecular kinks are assumed to be gradually straightened until the chain becomes a series of straight segments between entanglements. We assume that there exists a tube deformation tension limit that is inversely proportional to the chain path tortuosity. Here we report the results of numerical simulations of explicit three-dimensional, periodic, polyisoprene networks, using these extension-only force models. At low strain, crosslink nodes are moved affinely, up to an arbitrary node force limit. Above this limit, non-affine motion of the nodes is allowed to relax unbalanced chain forces. Our simulation results are in good agreement with tensile stress vs. strain experiments.

  17. A viscoelastic biomechanical model of the cornea describing the effect of viscosity and elasticity on hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Glass, Dianne H; Roberts, Cynthia J; Litsky, Alan S; Weber, Paul A

    2008-09-01

    To develop a method for evaluating viscosity and elasticity of the cornea and to examine the effect that both properties have on hysteresis. A three-component spring and dashpot model was created in Simulink in Matlab to represent the purely elastic and viscoelastic behavior of the cornea during a measurement using device called an ocular response analyzer (ORA). Values for elasticity and viscosity were varied while sinusoidal stress was applied to the model. The simulated stresses were used to determine how hysteresis is affected by the individual components of elasticity, viscosity, and maximum stress. To validate the model, high-speed photography was used to measure induced strain in a corneal phantom during ORA measurement. This measured strain was compared with the strains simulated by the model. When the spring in the viscoelastic portion of the model was stiffened, hysteresis decreased. When the spring in the purely elastic element was stiffened, hysteresis increased. If both springs were stiffened together, hysteresis peaked strongly as a function of the viscosity of the viscoelastic element. Below the peak value, lower elasticity was associated with higher hysteresis. Above the peak value, higher elasticity was associated with higher hysteresis. In addition, hysteresis increased as the air maximum pressure was increased. Measurements from phantom corresponded to predictions from the model. A viscoelastic model is presented to illustrate how changing viscosity and elasticity may affect hysteresis. Low hysteresis can be associated with either high elasticity or low elasticity, depending on the viscosity, a finding consistent with clinical reports.

  18. A study of self-propelled elastic cylindrical micro-swimmers using modeling and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingling; Čanić, Sunčica; Quaini, Annalisa; Pan, Tsorng-Whay

    2016-06-01

    We study propulsion of micro-swimmers in 3D creeping flow. The swimmers are assumed to be made of elastic cylindrical hollow tubes. The swimming is generated by the contractions of the tube's elastic membrane walls producing a traveling wave in the form of a ;step-function; traversing the swimmer from right to left, propelling the swimmer from left to right. The problem is motivated by medical applications such as drug delivery. The influence of several non-dimensional design parameters on the velocity of the swimmer is investigated, including the swimmer aspect ratio, and the amplitude of the traveling wave relative to the swimmer radius. An immersed boundary method based on a finite element method approach is successfully combined with an elastic spring network model to simulate the two-way fluid-structure interaction coupling between the elastic cylindrical tube and the flow of a 3D viscous, incompressible fluid. To gain a deeper insight into the influence of various parameters on the swimmer speed, a reduced 1D fluid-structure interaction model was derived and validated. It was found that fast swimmers are those with large tube aspect ratios, and with the amplitude of the traveling wave which is roughly 50% of the reference swimmer radius. It was shown that the speed of our ;optimal swimmer; is around 1.5 swimmer lengths per second, which is at the top of the class of all currently manufactured micro-swimmers swimming in low Reynolds number flows (Re =10-6), reported in [11].

  19. Relating Cohesive Zone Model to Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The conditions required for a cohesive zone model (CZM) to predict a failure load of a cracked structure similar to that obtained by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis are investigated in this paper. This study clarifies why many different phenomenological cohesive laws can produce similar fracture predictions. Analytical results for five cohesive zone models are obtained, using five different cohesive laws that have the same cohesive work rate (CWR-area under the traction-separation curve) but different maximum tractions. The effect of the maximum traction on the predicted cohesive zone length and the remote applied load at fracture is presented. Similar to the small scale yielding condition for an LEFM analysis to be valid. the cohesive zone length also needs to be much smaller than the crack length. This is a necessary condition for a CZM to obtain a fracture prediction equivalent to an LEFM result.

  20. A Double Scattering Analytical Model For Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barradas, N. P.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.; Darakchieva, V.

    2011-06-01

    We present an analytical model for calculation of double scattering in elastic recoil detection measurements. Only events involving the beam particle and the recoil are considered, i.e. 1) an ion scatters off a target element and then produces a recoil, and 2) an ion produces a recoil which then scatters off a target element. Events involving intermediate recoils are not considered, i.e. when the primary ion produces a recoil which then produces a second recoil. If the recoil element is also present in the stopping foil, recoil events in the stopping foil are also calculated. We included the model in the standard code for IBA data analysis NDF, and applied it to the measurement of hydrogen in Si.

  1. Folding model calculations for 6He+12C elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, A. Ibraheem

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of the double folding model, we used the α+2n and di-triton configurations for the nuclear matter density of the 6He nucleus to generate the real part of the optical potential for the system 6He+12C. As an alternative, we also use the high energy approximation to generate the optical potential for the same system. The derived potentials are employed to analyze the elastic scattering differential cross section at energies of 38.3, 41.6 and 82.3 MeV/u. For the imaginary part of the potential we adopt the squared Woods-Saxon form. The obtained results are compared with the corresponding measured data as well as with available results in the literature. The calculated total reaction cross sections are investigated and compared with the optical limit Glauber model description.

  2. A two-dimensional pseudospectral model for time reversal and nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goursolle, Thomas; Callé, Samuel; Dos Santos, Serge; Bou Matar, Olivier

    2007-12-01

    One way to characterize metallic materials in the presence of defects like dislocation networks is to measure their large dynamic nonlinear elastic response. In this numerical study, a new method combining the nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) method with a time reversal (TR) process is proposed. This method, called NEWS-TR, uses nonlinear analysis as a pretreatment of time reversal and then consists of retrofocusing only nonlinear components on the defect position. A two-dimensional pseudospectral time domain algorithm is developed here to validate the NEWS-TR method as a potential technique for damage location. Hysteretic nonlinear behavior of the materials being studied is introduced using the Preisach-Mayergoyz model. Moreover, in order to extend this solver in two dimensions, the Kelvin notation is used to modify the elastic coefficient tensor. Simulations performed on a metallic sample show the feasibility and value of the NEWS-TR methodology for microdamage imaging. Retrofocusing quality depends on different parameters such as the filtering method used to keep only nonlinear components and the nonlinear effect measured. In harmonic generation, pulse inversion filtering seems to be a more appropriate filtering method than classical harmonic filtering for most defect positions, mainly because of its ability to filter all fundamental components.

  3. Modelling and simulation of substrate elasticity sensing in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaowei; Li, Shaofan

    2011-05-01

    Recently, we have developed a multiscale soft matter cell model aiming at improving the understanding of mechanotransduction mechanism of stem cells, which is responsible for information exchange between cells and their extracellular environment. In this paper, we report the preliminary results of our research on multiscale modelling and simulation of soft contact and adhesion of stem cells. The proposed multiscale soft matter cell model may be used to model soft contact and adhesion between cells and their extracellular substrates. To the authors' best knowledge, this may be the first time that a soft matter model has been developed for cell contact and adhesion. Moreover, we have developed and implemented a Lagrange-type meshfree Galerkin formulation and related computational algorithms for the proposed cell model. Comparison study with experimental data has been conducted to validate the parameters of the cell model. By using the soft matter cell model, we have simulated the soft adhesive contact process between cells and extracellular substrates. The simulation shows that the cell can sense substrate elasticity by responding it in different manners from cell spreading to cell contact configuration and molecular conformation changes.

  4. Distinct Tensile Response of Model Semi-flexible Elastomer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera-Mercado, Bernardo M.; Cohen, Claude; Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2011-03-01

    Through coarse-grained molecular modeling, we study how the elastic response strongly depends upon nanostructural heterogeneities in model networks made of semi-flexible chains exhibiting both regular and realistic connectivity. Idealized regular polymer networks have been shown to display a peculiar elastic response similar to that of super-tough natural materials (e.g., organic adhesives inside abalone shells). We investigate the impact of chain stiffness, and the effect of including tri-block copolymer chains, on the network's topology and elastic response. We find in some systems a dual tensile response: a liquid-like behavior at small deformations, and a distinct saw-tooth shaped stress-strain curve at moderate to large deformations. Additionally, stiffer regular networks exhibit a marked hysteresis over loading-unloading cycles that can be deleted by heating-cooling cycles or by performing deformations along different axes. Furthermore, small variations of chain stiffness may entirely change the nature of the network's tensile response from an entropic to an enthalpic elastic regime, and micro-phase separation of different blocks within elastomer networks may significantly enhance their mechanical strength. This work was supported by the American Chemical Society.

  5. A Morpho-Elastic Model of Hyphal Tip Growth in Filamentous Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, A.; Tabor, M.; Tongen, A.

    The growth of filamentous cells is modeled through the use of exact, nonlinear, elasticity theory for shells and membranes. The biomechanical model is able to capture the generic features of growth of a broad array of cells including actinomycetes, fungi, and root hairs. It also provides the means of studying the effects of external surface stresses. The growth mechanism is modeled by a process of incremental elastic growth in which the cell wall responds elastically to the continuous addition of new material.

  6. Statistical model selection between elastic and Newtonian viscous matrix models for the microboudin palaeopiezometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Tarojiro; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Masuda, Toshiaki

    2017-06-01

    We carried out statistical evaluations of two probability density functions for the microboudin palaeopiezometer using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and the cross-validation (CV) technique. In terms of the relevant stress-transfer model, these functions are defined as the elastic matrix model and the Newtonian viscous matrix model, respectively. The AIC and CV techniques enable us to evaluate the relative quality of both models when applied to nine data sets collected from metachert samples containing tourmaline grains in a quartz matrix, collected from the East Pilbara Terrane, Western Australia. The results show that the elastic matrix model is the more appropriate probability density function for analysis of fracturing of tourmaline grains in a quartz matrix. This statistical evaluation shows the validity of the elastic matrix model for the microboudin palaeopiezometer when analysing such data sets.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Survivable VON mapping with ambiguity similitude for differentiable maximum shared capacity in elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Zhu, Xiaoxu; Bai, Wei; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Zhu; Zhou, Ziguan; Ou, Qinghai

    2016-09-01

    Virtualization is considered to be a promising solution to support various emerging applications. This paper illustrates the problem of virtual mapping from a new perspective, and mainly focuses on survivable mapping of virtual networks and the potential trade-off between spectral resource usage effectiveness and failure resilience level. We design an optimum shared protection mapping (OSPM) scheme in elastic optical networks. A differentiable maximum shared capacity of each frequency slot is defined to more efficiently shared protection resource. In order to satisfy various assessment standards, a metric called ambiguity similitude is defined for the first time to give insight on the optimizing difficulty. Simulation results are presented to compare the outcome of the novel OSPM algorithm with traditional dedicated link protection and maximum shared protection mapping. By synthetic analysis, OSPM outperforms the other two schemes in terms of striking a perfect balance among blocking probability, resources utilization, protective success rate, and spectrum redundancy.

  8. Modeling elastic tensile fractures in snow using nonlocal damage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borstad, C. P.; McClung, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The initiation and propagation of tensile fractures in snow and ice are fundamental to numerous important physical processes in the cryosphere, from iceberg calving to ice shelf rift propagation to slab avalanche release. The heterogeneous nature of snow and ice, their proximity to the melting temperature, and the varied governing timescales typically lead to nonlinear fracture behavior which does not follow the predictions of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Furthermore, traditional fracture mechanics is formally inapplicable for predicting crack initiation in the absence of a pre-existing flaw or stress concentration. An alternative to fracture mechanics is continuum damage mechanics, which accounts for the material degradation associated with cracking in a numerically efficient framework. However, damage models which are formulated locally (e.g. stress and strain are defined as point properties) suffer from mesh-sensitive crack trajectories, spurious localization of damage and improper fracture energy dissipation with mesh refinement. Nonlocal formulations of damage, which smear the effects of the material heterogeneity over an intrinsic length scale related to the material microstructure, overcome these difficulties and lead to numerically efficient and mesh-objective simulations of the tensile failure of heterogeneous materials. We present the results of numerical simulations of tensile fracture initiation and propagation in cohesive snow using a nonlocal damage model. Seventeen beam bending experiments, both notched and unnotched, were conducted using blocks of cohesive dry snow extracted from an alpine snowpack. Material properties and fracture parameters were calculated from the experimental data using beam theory and quasi-brittle fracture mechanics. Using these parameters, a nonlocal isotropic damage model was applied to two-dimensional finite element meshes of the same scale as the experiments. The model was capable of simulating the propagation

  9. Computational Model of Three Dimensional Elastic Wing Driven by Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. Jane; Cowen, Nathaniel; Peskin, Charles S.; Childress, Stephen W.

    2003-11-01

    The flapping wing motion observed in nature results from couplings of muscles, flexible wing structures, and unsteady flows. Previously we have studied the unsteady flows and forces of a rigid two dimensional wing undergoing prescribed motion similar to kinematics observed in insects, as a means of understanding basic unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms. In this talk, we describe our recent progress in constructing a more realistic model insect, which consists of a pair of elastic wings immersed in fluids, and is driven by periodically contracting 'muscles'. A natural computational framework for such a system is the immersed boundary method, which is used here. We present simulations of flapping flight at Reynolds number 10^2, in the same range as that of fruitflies and butterflies.

  10. Numerical approach to unbiased and driven generalized elastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhadhaghighi, M. Ghasemi; Chechkin, A.; Metzler, R.

    2014-01-01

    From scaling arguments and numerical simulations, we investigate the properties of the generalized elastic model (GEM) that is used to describe various physical systems such as polymers, membranes, single-file systems, or rough interfaces. We compare analytical and numerical results for the subdiffusion exponent β characterizing the growth of the mean squared displacement ⟨(δh)2⟩ of the field h described by the GEM dynamic equation. We study the scaling properties of the qth order moments ⟨|δh|q⟩ with time, finding that the interface fluctuations show no intermittent behavior. We also investigate the ergodic properties of the process h in terms of the ergodicity breaking parameter and the distribution of the time averaged mean squared displacement. Finally, we study numerically the driven GEM with a constant, localized perturbation and extract the characteristics of the average drift for a tagged probe.

  11. Correlations in a generalized elastic model: Fractional Langevin equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taloni, Alessandro; Chechkin, Aleksei; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    The generalized elastic model (GEM) provides the evolution equation which governs the stochastic motion of several many-body systems in nature, such as polymers, membranes, and growing interfaces. On the other hand a probe (tracer) particle in these systems performs a fractional Brownian motion due to the spatial interactions with the other system’s components. The tracer’s anomalous dynamics can be described by a fractional Langevin equation (FLE) with a space-time correlated noise. We demonstrate that the description given in terms of GEM coincides with that furnished by the relative FLE, by showing that the correlation functions of the stochastic field obtained within the FLE framework agree with the corresponding quantities calculated from the GEM. Furthermore we show that the Fox H -function formalism appears to be very convenient to describe the correlation properties within the FLE approach.

  12. Elastic properties of compressed cryocrystals in a deformed atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Zhikharev, I. V.; Troitskaya, E. P.; Chabanenko, Val. V.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2013-06-01

    A model with deformed atom shells was built to investigate the elastic properties of rare-gas Ne and Kr crystals under high pressure. It is shown that the observed deviation from the Cauchy relation δ cannot be adequately reproduced when taking into account only the many-body interaction. The individual pressure dependence of δ is the result of competition of the many-body interaction and the quadrupole interaction associated with the quadrupole-type deformation of electron shells of the atoms during the displacement of the nuclei. Each kind of interaction makes a strongly pressure dependent contribution to δ. In the case of Ne and Kr, contributions of these interactions are compensated to a good precision, providing δ being almost constant against pressure.

  13. Muon Neutrino on Electron Elastic Scattering in the NOvA Near Detector and its Applications Beyond the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Biao; Bian, Jianming; Coan, Thomas E.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Duyang, Hongyue; Hatzikoutelis, Athanasios; NOvA Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Using the NuMI beam at Fermilab and the NOvA near detector, we study the process by which a muon neutrino elastically scatters off an electron in the detector to produce a very forward going electromagnetic shower. By comparing dE/dx for various particle hypotheses for both longitudinal and transverse directions in a multilayer perceptron neural network, we trained a Particle ID algorithm to identify the scattered electron in an inclusive dataset. Muon-neutrino-on-e elastic scattering provides a clean, purely leptonic process free from nuclear effects for understanding neutral current scattering and constraining the NuMI beam flux. Also, this technique can be applied in two broad areas of beyond the standard model physics: a large neutrino transition magnetic moment and light dark matter particles produced in the NuMI target, both of which would create an energy dependent enhancement in the elastic scattering cross section.

  14. Directed network discovery with dynamic network modelling.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Stefano; Kliemann, Dorit; Jacoby, Nir; Saxe, Rebecca

    2017-05-01

    Cognitive tasks recruit multiple brain regions. Understanding how these regions influence each other (the network structure) is an important step to characterize the neural basis of cognitive processes. Often, limited evidence is available to restrict the range of hypotheses a priori, and techniques that sift efficiently through a large number of possible network structures are needed (network discovery). This article introduces a novel modelling technique for network discovery (Dynamic Network Modelling or DNM) that builds on ideas from Granger Causality and Dynamic Causal Modelling introducing three key changes: (1) efficient network discovery is implemented with statistical tests on the consistency of model parameters across participants, (2) the tests take into account the magnitude and sign of each influence, and (3) variance explained in independent data is used as an absolute (rather than relative) measure of the quality of the network model. In this article, we outline the functioning of DNM, we validate DNM in simulated data for which the ground truth is known, and we report an example of its application to the investigation of influences between regions during emotion recognition, revealing top-down influences from brain regions encoding abstract representations of emotions (medial prefrontal cortex and superior temporal sulcus) onto regions engaged in the perceptual analysis of facial expressions (occipital face area and fusiform face area) when participants are asked to switch between reporting the emotional valence and the age of a face. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evolution of a fracture network in an elastic medium with internal fluid generation and expulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobchenko, Maya; Hafver, Andreas; Jettestuen, Espen; Renard, François; Galland, Olivier; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Meakin, Paul; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2014-11-01

    A simple and reproducible analog experiment was used to simulate fracture formation in a low-permeability elastic solid during internal fluid/gas production, with the objective of developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that control the dynamics of fracturing, fracture opening and closing, and fluid transport. In the experiment, nucleation, propagation, and coalescence of fractures within an elastic gelatin matrix, confined in a Hele-Shaw cell, occurred due to CO2 production via fermentation of sugar, and it was monitored by optical means. We first quantified how a fracture network develops, and then how intermittent fluid transport is controlled by the dynamics of opening and closing of fractures. The gas escape dynamics exhibited three characteristic behaviors: (1) Quasiperiodic release of gas with a characteristic frequency that depends on the gas production rate but not on the system size. (2) A 1 /f power spectrum for the fluctuations in the total open fracture area over an intermediate range of frequencies (f ), which we attribute to collective effects caused by interaction between fractures in the drainage network. (3) A 1 /f2 power spectrum was observed at high frequencies, which can be explained by the characteristic behavior of single fractures.

  16. Evolution of a fracture network in an elastic medium with internal fluid generation and expulsion.

    PubMed

    Kobchenko, Maya; Hafver, Andreas; Jettestuen, Espen; Renard, François; Galland, Olivier; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Meakin, Paul; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2014-11-01

    A simple and reproducible analog experiment was used to simulate fracture formation in a low-permeability elastic solid during internal fluid/gas production, with the objective of developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that control the dynamics of fracturing, fracture opening and closing, and fluid transport. In the experiment, nucleation, propagation, and coalescence of fractures within an elastic gelatin matrix, confined in a Hele-Shaw cell, occurred due to CO_{2} production via fermentation of sugar, and it was monitored by optical means. We first quantified how a fracture network develops, and then how intermittent fluid transport is controlled by the dynamics of opening and closing of fractures. The gas escape dynamics exhibited three characteristic behaviors: (1) Quasiperiodic release of gas with a characteristic frequency that depends on the gas production rate but not on the system size. (2) A 1/f power spectrum for the fluctuations in the total open fracture area over an intermediate range of frequencies (f), which we attribute to collective effects caused by interaction between fractures in the drainage network. (3) A 1/f^{2} power spectrum was observed at high frequencies, which can be explained by the characteristic behavior of single fractures.

  17. Nonlinear dispersion effects in elastic plates: numerical modelling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijanka, Piotr; Radecki, Rafal; Packo, Pawel; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Leamy, Michael J.

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear features of elastic wave propagation have attracted significant attention recently. The particular interest herein relates to complex wave-structure interactions, which provide potential new opportunities for feature discovery and identification in a variety of applications. Due to significant complexity associated with wave propagation in nonlinear media, numerical modeling and simulations are employed to facilitate design and development of new measurement, monitoring and characterization systems. However, since very high spatio- temporal accuracy of numerical models is required, it is critical to evaluate their spectral properties and tune discretization parameters for compromise between accuracy and calculation time. Moreover, nonlinearities in structures give rise to various effects that are not present in linear systems, e.g. wave-wave interactions, higher harmonics generation, synchronism and | recently reported | shifts to dispersion characteristics. This paper discusses local computational model based on a new HYBRID approach for wave propagation in nonlinear media. The proposed approach combines advantages of the Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA) and Cellular Automata for Elastodynamics (CAFE). The methods are investigated in the context of their accuracy for predicting nonlinear wavefields, in particular shifts to dispersion characteristics for finite amplitude waves and secondary wavefields. The results are validated against Finite Element (FE) calculations for guided waves in copper plate. Critical modes i.e., modes determining accuracy of a model at given excitation frequency - are identified and guidelines for numerical model parameters are proposed.

  18. Dynamic Visco-elastic Buckling Analysis for Airway Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Kiyoshi; Ohba, Kenkichi; Yamanoi, Yuta

    In order to clarify the mechanism by which the lung airway narrows during an asthma attack, dynamic buckling analysis of the wall was conducted. The wall was modeled using a visco-elastic thin-walled circular cylinder of the Voigt model for the planestress state. A governing equation for dynamic buckling was derived, and in the equation, the contraction of smooth muscle was replaced by uniform inward transmural pressure. The non-dimensional parameters for the buckling wave number n were nondimensional retardation time τ, non-dimensional increasing velocity of inward transmural pressure β, thickness radius ratio α2, radius length ratio η, density ratio ζ, and Poisson's ratio ν. The validity of the theoretical model was confirmed by comparing the calculated wave number with that obtained from the experiment, in which a silicone rubber tube blended with silicone potting gel was used as the in vitro airway model. In addition, the wave number n increased with β. It was necessary to consider the damping effect of the tube model or the airway wall, and n increased by 1.5 to 2 due to the additional mass effect of surrounding tissues of the basement membrane in the airway wall.

  19. An Elastic Plastic Contact Model with Strain Hardening for the LAMMPS Granular Package

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhr, Bryan; Brake, Matthew Robert; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2015-03-01

    The following details the implementation of an analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening for normal im pacts into the LAMMPS granular package. The model assumes that, upon impact, the co llision has a period of elastic loading followed by a period of mixed elastic plas tic loading, with contributions to each mechanism estimated by a hyperbolic seca nt weight function. This function is implemented in the LAMMPS source code as the pair style gran/ep/history. Preliminary tests, simulating the pouring of pure nickel spheres, showed the elastic/plastic model took 1.66x as long as similar runs using gran/hertz/history.

  20. Constitutive modelling of composite biopolymer networks.

    PubMed

    Fallqvist, B; Kroon, M

    2016-04-21

    The mechanical behaviour of biopolymer networks is to a large extent determined at a microstructural level where the characteristics of individual filaments and the interactions between them determine the response at a macroscopic level. Phenomena such as viscoelasticity and strain-hardening followed by strain-softening are observed experimentally in these networks, often due to microstructural changes (such as filament sliding, rupture and cross-link debonding). Further, composite structures can also be formed with vastly different mechanical properties as compared to the individual networks. In this present paper, we present a constitutive model presented in a continuum framework aimed at capturing these effects. Special care is taken to formulate thermodynamically consistent evolution laws for dissipative effects. This model, incorporating possible anisotropic network properties, is based on a strain energy function, split into an isochoric and a volumetric part. Generalisation to three dimensions is performed by numerical integration over the unit sphere. Model predictions indicate that the constitutive model is well able to predict the elastic and viscoelastic response of biological networks, and to an extent also composite structures.

  1. Asymptotic analysis of mathematical models for elastic composite media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, S. K.

    The main subject of the thesis is the asymptotic analysis of models in mechanics of composite materials. It is based on the extension of the theory of the Polya-Szego tensors to the problems of homogenization and fracture. Such a technique allows one to obtain an asymptotic solution to a problem where most of numerical algorithms fail due to the presence of a singular perturbation. As a result of this work, a number of interesting effects have been found in optimization of composites and inverse problems of crack-inclusion interaction. Chapter 1 is an introductory chapter that contains the main definitions and bibliographical remarks. In Chapter 2 the Polya-Szego dipole tensors are employed for analysis of plane elasticity problems in non-homogeneous media. Classes of equivalence for defects (cavities and rigid inclusions) are specified for the Laplace and Navier operators: composite materials with defects of the same class have the same effective elastic moduli. Explicit asymptotic formulae for the effective compliance matrices of dilute composites are obtained. The problem of the optimal cavity shape is analyzed in Chapter 3. The analysis uses the Polya-Szego tensors calculated in Chapter 2. A new type of structure which is optimal for shear loading has been found. Properties of the optimal cavity are described. The crack-inclusion interaction problem considered in Chapter 4 has been solved by the asymptotic methods. An analysis of crack trajectories is performed in Chapter 5 for different types of defects and interface conditions. The algorithm employs the Polya-Szego tensors as integral characteristics describing the defect. Comparison with experimental data (Ceramic Centre, Bologna) is presented. In Chapter 6 we use the method of compound asymptotic expansions to treat the homogenization problem for thin-walled composites. The technique of boundary layer fields is employed to derive the junction condition in the region connecting thin walls. The asymptotic

  2. Continuum elasticity modeling of nanostructure evolution in strained film epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, Champika G.

    The formation of surface nanostructures such as islands or quantum dots during strained film epitaxy has attracted great interest in recent years. The underlying mechanisms have been attributed to the occurrence of morphological instabilities of the strained films, for which the coupling between film-substrate material properties and growth conditions play a major role. Morphological properties of an epitaxially grown film and the self-organization process of coherent strained islands are analyzed via the development of a continuum elasticity model based on the 2nd order perturbation method. Effects of wetting stress due to film-substrate interactions have been incorporated in the resulting nonlinear dynamic equation governing the film morphological profile. We study the formation and evolution of surface strained islands or quantum dots for different film/substrate misfit strains, via analyzing the time-dependent behavior of the structure factor for surface heights, its various moments, and the surface roughness. Three regimes of island array evolution have been identified, including a film instability regime at early stage, a slow power-law-type coarsening at intermediate time, and the crossover to a saturated state, with detailed behavior dependent on misfit strains but not qualitatively on finite system sizes. It is found to be controlled by the strength of film-substrate wetting interaction which would constrain the valley-to-peak mass transport and hence the growth of island height, and also determined by the effect of elastic interaction between surface islands and the high-order strain energy of individual islands at late evolution stage. The results are compared to previous experimental and theoretical efforts on quantum dots coarsening and saturation. We also study the formation of these nanostructures on a nonplanar patterned substrate. The properties of islands formed are highly affected and controlled by the periodicity and amplitude of the pre

  3. SLA-aware differentiated QoS in elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Anuj; Vyas, Upama; Bhatia, Vimal; Prakash, Shashi

    2017-07-01

    The quality of service (QoS) offered by optical networks can be improved by accurate provisioning of service level specifications (SLSs) included in the service level agreement (SLA). A large number of users coexisting in the network require different services. Thus, a pragmatic network needs to offer a differentiated QoS to a variety of users according to the SLA contracted for different services at varying costs. In conventional wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) optical networks, service differentiation is feasible only for a limited number of users because of its fixed-grid structure. Newly introduced flex-grid based elastic optical networks (EONs) are more adaptive to traffic requirements as compared to the WDM networks because of the flexibility in their grid structure. Thus, we propose an efficient SLA provisioning algorithm with improved QoS for these flex-grid EONs empowered by optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (O-OFDM). The proposed algorithm, called SLA-aware differentiated QoS (SADQ), employs differentiation at the level of routing, spectrum allocation, and connection survivability. The proposed SADQ aims to accurately provision the SLA using such multilevel differentiation with an objective to improve the spectrum utilization from the network operator's perspective. SADQ is evaluated for three different CoSs under various traffic demand patterns and for different ratios of the number of requests belonging to the three considered CoSs. We propose two new SLA metrics for the improvement of functional QoS requirements, namely, security, confidentiality and survivability of high class of service (CoS) traffic. Since, to the best of our knowledge, the proposed SADQ is the first scheme in optical networks to employ exhaustive differentiation at the levels of routing, spectrum allocation, and survivability in a single algorithm, we first compare the performance of SADQ in EON and currently deployed WDM networks to assess the

  4. Dynamic time and spectrum fragmentation-aware service provisioning in elastic optical networks with multi-path routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Zhao, Yongli; Yang, Hui; Yu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Jie; Yousefpour, Ashkan; Wang, Nannan; Jue, Jason P.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-path fragmentation-aware routing, modulation and spectrum assignment algorithm (RMSA) for advance reservation (AR) and immediate reservation (IR) requests in elastic optical networks. Immediate reservation requests should be provided with service immediately, while advance reservation requests have specific starting times and holding times. As lightpaths are set up and torn down, fragmentation may occur in both spectrum and time domains. To decrease the two-dimensional fragmentation and to solve the problem of resource scarcity, we propose splitting requests into different parts and transferring these parts along one or more paths utilizing sliceable bandwidth variable transponders. We first introduce a model to solve the problem and propose a two-dimensional fragmentation occurrence measurement in spectrum and time domains. Then we propose a multi-path fragmentation-aware RMSA algorithm (MPFA). Simulation results show that MPFA can achieve better performance than existing algorithms in terms of blocking probability and spectrum utilization.

  5. Dynamic optical resource allocation for mobile core networks with software defined elastic optical networking.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongli; Chen, Zhendong; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xinbo

    2016-07-25

    Driven by the forthcoming of 5G mobile communications, the all-IP architecture of mobile core networks, i.e. evolved packet core (EPC) proposed by 3GPP, has been greatly challenged by the users' demands for higher data rate and more reliable end-to-end connection, as well as operators' demands for low operational cost. These challenges can be potentially met by software defined optical networking (SDON), which enables dynamic resource allocation according to the users' requirement. In this article, a novel network architecture for mobile core network is proposed based on SDON. A software defined network (SDN) controller is designed to realize the coordinated control over different entities in EPC networks. We analyze the requirement of EPC-lightpath (EPCL) in data plane and propose an optical switch load balancing (OSLB) algorithm for resource allocation in optical layer. The procedure of establishment and adjustment of EPCLs is demonstrated on a SDON-based EPC testbed with extended OpenFlow protocol. We also evaluate the OSLB algorithm through simulation in terms of bandwidth blocking ratio, traffic load distribution, and resource utilization ratio compared with link-based load balancing (LLB) and MinHops algorithms.

  6. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Cloetingh, Sierd A. P. L.

    2013-08-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young modulus (E) within the lithosphere. In view of the large uncertainties affecting strength estimates, we evaluate global strength and Te distributions for possible end-member 'hard' (HRM) and a 'soft' (SRM) rheology models of the continental crust. Temperature within the lithosphere has been estimated using a recent tomography model of Ritsema et al. (2011), which has much higher horizontal resolution than previous global models. Most of the strength is localized in the crust for the HRM and in the mantle for the SRM. These results contribute to the long debates on applicability of the "crème brulée" or "jelly-sandwich" model for the lithosphere structure. Changing from the SRM to HRM turns most of the continental areas from the totally decoupled mode to the fully coupled mode of the lithospheric layers. However, in the areas characterized by a high thermal regime and thick crust, the layers remain decoupled even for the HRM. At the same time, for the inner part of the cratons the lithospheric layers are coupled in both models. Therefore, rheological variations lead to large changes in the integrated strength and Te distribution in the regions characterized by intermediate thermal conditions. In these areas temperature uncertainties have a greater effect, since this parameter principally determines rheological behavior. Comparison of the Te estimates for both models with those determined from the flexural loading and spectral analysis shows that the 'hard' rheology is likely applicable for cratonic areas, whereas the 'soft' rheology is more representative for young orogens.

  7. Modeling the elastic energy of alloys: Potential pitfalls of continuum treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, Arvind; Ratsch, Christian; Smereka, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Some issues that arise when modeling elastic energy for binary alloys are discussed within the context of a Keating model and density-functional calculations. The Keating model is a simplified atomistic formulation based on modeling elastic interactions of a binary alloy with harmonic springs whose equilibrium length is species dependent. It is demonstrated that the continuum limit for the strain field are the usual equations of linear elasticity for alloys and that they correctly capture the coarse-grained behavior of the displacement field. In addition, it is established that Euler-Lagrange equation of the continuum limit of the elastic energy will yield the same strain field equation. This is the same energy functional that is often used to model elastic effects in binary alloys. However, a direct calculation of the elastic energy atomistic model reveals that the continuum expression for the elastic energy is both qualitatively and quantitatively incorrect. This is because it does not take atomistic scale compositional nonuniformity into account. Importantly, this result also shows that finely mixed alloys tend to have more elastic energy than segregated systems, which is the exact opposite of predictions made by some continuum theories. It is also shown that for strained thin films the traditionally used effective misfit for alloys systematically underestimate the strain energy. In some models, this drawback is handled by including an elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing, which is characterized in terms of the continuum concentration. The direct calculation of the atomistic model reveals that this approach suffers serious difficulties. It is demonstrated that elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing is nonisotropic and scale dependent. It is also shown that such effects are present in density-functional theory calculations for the Si-Ge system. This work demonstrates that it is critical to include the microscopic arrangements in any elastic

  8. Modeling the elastic energy of alloys: Potential pitfalls of continuum treatments.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Arvind; Ratsch, Christian; Smereka, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Some issues that arise when modeling elastic energy for binary alloys are discussed within the context of a Keating model and density-functional calculations. The Keating model is a simplified atomistic formulation based on modeling elastic interactions of a binary alloy with harmonic springs whose equilibrium length is species dependent. It is demonstrated that the continuum limit for the strain field are the usual equations of linear elasticity for alloys and that they correctly capture the coarse-grained behavior of the displacement field. In addition, it is established that Euler-Lagrange equation of the continuum limit of the elastic energy will yield the same strain field equation. This is the same energy functional that is often used to model elastic effects in binary alloys. However, a direct calculation of the elastic energy atomistic model reveals that the continuum expression for the elastic energy is both qualitatively and quantitatively incorrect. This is because it does not take atomistic scale compositional nonuniformity into account. Importantly, this result also shows that finely mixed alloys tend to have more elastic energy than segregated systems, which is the exact opposite of predictions made by some continuum theories. It is also shown that for strained thin films the traditionally used effective misfit for alloys systematically underestimate the strain energy. In some models, this drawback is handled by including an elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing, which is characterized in terms of the continuum concentration. The direct calculation of the atomistic model reveals that this approach suffers serious difficulties. It is demonstrated that elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing is nonisotropic and scale dependent. It is also shown that such effects are present in density-functional theory calculations for the Si-Ge system. This work demonstrates that it is critical to include the microscopic arrangements in any elastic

  9. Size effects and internal length scales in the elasticity of random fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picu, Catalin; Berkache, Kamel; Shahsavari, Ali; Ganghoffer, Jean-Francois

    Random fiber networks are the structural element of many biological and man-made materials, including connective tissue, various consumer products and packaging materials. In all cases of practical interest the scale at which the material is used and the scale of the fiber diameter or the mean segment length of the network are separated by several orders of magnitude. This precludes solving boundary value problems defined on the scale of the application while resolving every fiber in the system, and mandates the development of continuum equivalent models. To this end, we study the intrinsic geometric and mechanical length scales of the network and the size effect associated with them. We consider both Cauchy and micropolar continuum models and calibrate them based on the discrete network behavior. We develop a method to predict the characteristic length scales of the problem and the minimum size of a representative element of the network based on network structural parameters and on fiber properties.

  10. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel.

    PubMed

    Ben-Isaac, E; Fodor, É; Visco, P; van Wijland, F; Gov, Nir S

    2015-07-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels both in artificial (in vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells has been extensively studied with experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct nonthermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures," and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies.

  11. Assessment of distributed arterial network models.

    PubMed

    Segers, P; Stergiopulos, N; Verdonck, P; Verhoeven, R

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the relative importance of elastic non-linearities, viscoelasticity and resistance vessel modelling on arterial pressure and flow wave contours computed with distributed arterial network models. The computational results of a non-linear (time-domain) and a linear (frequency-domain) mode were compared using the same geometrical configuration and identical upstream and downstream boundary conditions and mechanical properties. pressures were computed at the ascending aorta, brachial and femoral artery. In spite of the identical problem definition, computational differences were found in input impedance modulus (max. 15-20%), systolic pressure (max. 5%) and pulse pressure (max. 10%). For the brachial artery, the ratio of pulse pressure to aortic pulse pressure was practically identical for both models (3%), whereas for the femoral artery higher values are found for the linear model (+10%). The aortic/brachial pressure transfer function indicates that pressure harmonic amplification is somewhat higher in the linear model for frequencies lower than 6 Hz while the opposite is true for higher frequencies. These computational disparities were attributed to conceptual model differences, such as the treatment of geometric tapering, rather than to elastic or convective non-linearities. Compared to the effect of viscoelasticity, the discrepancy between the linear and non-linear model is of the same importance. At peripheral locations, the correct representation of terminal impedance outweight the computational differences between the linear and non-linear models.

  12. Network model with structured nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisco, Pierluigi

    2011-08-01

    We present a network model in which words over a specific alphabet, called structures, are associated to each node and undirected edges are added depending on some distance measure between different structures. This model shifts the underlying principle of network generation from a purely mathematical one to an information-based one. It is shown how this model differs from the Barábasi-Albert and duplication models and how it can generate networks with topological features similar to biological networks: power law degree distribution, low average path length, clustering coefficient independent from the network size, etc. Two biological networks: S. cerevisiae gene network and E. coli protein-protein interaction network, are replicated using this model.

  13. The Elastic Body Model: A Pedagogical Approach Integrating Real Time Measurements and Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, C.; Guastella, I.; Tarantino, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a pedagogical approach to elastic body movement based on measurements of the contact times between a metallic rod and small bodies colliding with it and on modelling of the experimental results by using a microcomputer-based laboratory and simulation tools. The experiments and modelling activities have been built in the…

  14. The Elastic Body Model: A Pedagogical Approach Integrating Real Time Measurements and Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, C.; Guastella, I.; Tarantino, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a pedagogical approach to elastic body movement based on measurements of the contact times between a metallic rod and small bodies colliding with it and on modelling of the experimental results by using a microcomputer-based laboratory and simulation tools. The experiments and modelling activities have been built in the…

  15. Model Diagnostics for Bayesian Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip

    2006-01-01

    Bayesian networks are frequently used in educational assessments primarily for learning about students' knowledge and skills. There is a lack of works on assessing fit of Bayesian networks. This article employs the posterior predictive model checking method, a popular Bayesian model checking tool, to assess fit of simple Bayesian networks. A…

  16. Comparing interfacial dynamics in protein-protein complexes: an elastic network approach.

    PubMed

    Zen, Andrea; Micheletti, Cristian; Keskin, Ozlem; Nussinov, Ruth

    2010-08-08

    The transient, or permanent, association of proteins to form organized complexes is one of the most common mechanisms of regulation of biological processes. Systematic physico-chemical studies of the binding interfaces have previously shown that a key mechanism for the formation/stabilization of dimers is the steric and chemical complementarity of the two semi-interfaces. The role of the fluctuation dynamics at the interface of the interacting subunits, although expectedly important, proved more elusive to characterize. The aim of the present computational study is to gain insight into salient dynamics-based aspects of protein-protein interfaces. The interface dynamics was characterized by means of an elastic network model for 22 representative dimers covering three main interface types. The three groups gather dimers sharing the same interface but with good (type I) or poor (type II) similarity of the overall fold, or dimers sharing only one of the semi-interfaces (type III). The set comprises obligate dimers, which are complexes for which no structural representative of the free form(s) is available. Considerations were accordingly limited to bound and unbound forms of the monomeric subunits of the dimers. We proceeded by first computing the mobility of amino acids at the interface of the bound forms and compare it with the mobility of (i) other surface amino acids (ii) interface amino acids in the unbound forms. In both cases different dynamic patterns were observed across interface types and depending on whether the interface belongs to an obligate or non-obligate complex. The comparative investigation indicated that the mobility of amino acids at the dimeric interface is generally lower than for other amino acids at the protein surface. The change in interfacial mobility upon removing "in silico" the partner monomer (unbound form) was next found to be correlated with the interface type, size and obligate nature of the complex. In particular, going from the

  17. Double porosity modeling in elastic wave propagation for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J. G., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Phenomenological equations for the poroelastic behavior of a double porosity medium have been formulated and the coefficients in these linear equations identified. The generalization from a single porosity model increases the number of independent coefficients from three to six for an isotropic applied stress. In a quasistatic analysis, the physical interpretations are based upon considerations of extremes in both spatial and temporal scales. The limit of very short times is the one most relevant for wave propagation, and in this case both matrix porosity and fractures behave in an undrained fashion. For the very long times more relevant for reservoir drawdown,the double porosity medium behaves as an equivalent single porosity medium At the macroscopic spatial level, the pertinent parameters (such as the total compressibility) may be determined by appropriate field tests. At the mesoscopic scale pertinent parameters of the rock matrix can be determined directly through laboratory measurements on core, and the compressibility can be measured for a single fracture. We show explicitly how to generalize the quasistatic results to incorporate wave propagation effects and how effects that are usually attributed to squirt flow under partially saturated conditions can be explained alternatively in terms of the double-porosity model. The result is therefore a theory that generalizes, but is completely consistent with, Biot`s theory of poroelasticity and is valid for analysis of elastic wave data from highly fractured reservoirs.

  18. An elastic model of partial budding of retroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2008-03-01

    Retroviruses are characterized by their unique infection strategy of reverse transcription, in which the genetic information flows from RNA back to DNA. The most well known representative is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Unlike budding of traditional enveloped viruses, retrovirus budding happens together with the formation of spherical virus capsids at the cell membrane. Led by this unique budding mechanism, we proposed an elastic model of retrovirus budding in this work. We found that if the lipid molecules of the membrane are supplied fast enough from the cell interior, the budding always proceeds to completion. In the opposite limit, there is an optimal size of partially budded virions. The zenith angle of these partially spherical capsids, α, is given by α˜(2̂/κσ)^1/4, where κ is the bending modulus of the membrane, σ is the surface tension of the membrane, and τ characterizes the strength of capsid protein interaction. If τ is large enough such that α˜π, the budding is complete. Our model explained many features of retrovirus partial budding observed in experiments.

  19. Piezoresistive Sensor with High Elasticity Based on 3D Hybrid Network of Sponge@CNTs@Ag NPs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Nishuang; Shi, Yuling; Liu, Weijie; Yue, Yang; Wang, Siliang; Ma, Yanan; Wen, Li; Li, Luying; Long, Fei; Zou, Zhengguang; Gao, Yihua

    2016-08-31

    Pressure sensors with high elasticity are in great demand for the realization of intelligent sensing, but there is a need to develope a simple, inexpensive, and scalable method for the manufacture of the sensors. Here, we reported an efficient, simple, facile, and repeatable "dipping and coating" process to manufacture a piezoresistive sensor with high elasticity, based on homogeneous 3D hybrid network of carbon nanotubes@silver nanoparticles (CNTs@Ag NPs) anchored on a skeleton sponge. Highly elastic, sensitive, and wearable sensors are obtained using the porous structure of sponge and the synergy effect of CNTs/Ag NPs. Our sensor was also tested for over 2000 compression-release cycles, exhibiting excellent elasticity and cycling stability. Sensors with high performance and a simple fabrication process are promising devices for commercial production in various electronic devices, for example, sport performance monitoring and man-machine interfaces.

  20. Multicast contention resolution based on time-frequency joint scheduling in elastic optical switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huanlin; Li, Yuan; Peng, Han; Huang, Jun; Kong, Deqian

    2017-01-01

    Resolving the optical multicast contention in optical switch node is an effective approach to improve the performance of elastic optical multicast switch. An optical node architecture integrating with output shared all-optical Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) network coding technology and shared feedback fiber delay lines (FDLs) buffer is designed. And a time-frequency joint scheduling strategy (TFJSS) is proposed. In TFJSS, the maximal weighted independent set algorithm is used to select the output packets with no overlapping spectrum among the contending multicast packets. The remaining contention packets are compressed by OFDM network coding with all-optical XOR operation. Hence, the contention is avoided in spectrum domain by encoding the contending unicast/multicast packets and changing the carrier frequency of encoded packets. If the network coding cannot successfully resolve the contending packets, the shared feedback FDLs are called to address the contention in time domain. Compared with the existing node architecture and scheduling algorithm, the simulation results show that the proposed architecture and the TFJSS can reduce the packet loss probability with low delay largely.

  1. Visualizing tropoelastin in a long-term human elastic fibre cell culture model

    PubMed Central

    Halm, M.; Schenke-Layland, K.; Jaspers, S.; Wenck, H.; Fischer, F.

    2016-01-01

    Elastin is an essential protein found in a variety of tissues where resilience and flexibility are needed, such as the skin and the heart. When aiming to engineer suitable implants, elastic fibres are needed to allow adequate tissue renewal. However, the visualization of human elastogenesis remains in the dark. To date, the visualization of human tropoelastin (TE) production in a human cell context and its fibre assembly under live cell conditions has not been achieved. Here, we present a long-term cell culture model of human dermal fibroblasts expressing fluorescence-labelled human TE. We employed a lentiviral system to stably overexpress Citrine-labelled TE to build a fluorescent fibre network. Using immunofluorescence, we confirmed the functionality of the Citrine-tagged TE. Furthermore, we visualized the fibre assembly over the course of several days using confocal microscopy. Applying super resolution microscopy, we were able to investigate the inner structure of the elastin–fibrillin-1 fibre network. Future investigations will allow the tracking of TE produced under various conditions. In tissue engineering applications the fluorescent fibre network can be visualized under various conditions or it serves as a tool for investigating fibre degradation processes in disease-in-a-dish-models. PMID:26842906

  2. Elastic-Net Copula Granger Causality for Inference of Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Siyal, Mohammad Yakoob

    2016-01-01

    Aim In bioinformatics, the inference of biological networks is one of the most active research areas. It involves decoding various complex biological networks that are responsible for performing diverse functions in human body. Among these networks analysis, most of the research focus is towards understanding effective brain connectivity and gene networks in order to cure and prevent related diseases like Alzheimer and cancer respectively. However, with recent advances in data procurement technology, such as DNA microarray analysis and fMRI that can simultaneously process a large amount of data, it yields high-dimensional data sets. These high dimensional dataset analyses possess challenges for the analyst. Background Traditional methods of Granger causality inference use ordinary least-squares methods for structure estimation, which confront dimensionality issues when applied to high-dimensional data. Apart from dimensionality issues, most existing methods were designed to capture only the linear inferences from time series data. Method and Conclusion In this paper, we address the issues involved in assessing Granger causality for both linear and nonlinear high-dimensional data by proposing an elegant form of the existing LASSO-based method that we call “Elastic-Net Copula Granger causality”. This method provides a more stable way to infer biological networks which has been verified using rigorous experimentation. We have compared the proposed method with the existing method and demonstrated that this new strategy outperforms the existing method on all measures: precision, false detection rate, recall, and F1 score. We have also applied both methods to real HeLa cell data and StarPlus fMRI datasets and presented a comparison of the effectiveness of both methods. PMID:27792750

  3. A Dynamic Space-Time Network Flow Model for City Traffic Congestion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    both the constant demand and elastic demand models a static set of origin destination demands is assumed to exist. This may be a valid long run...determined for each situation. II. A TWO ATTRIBUTE DINAMIC NETWORK FLOW MODEL In this section a two attribute network flow model which is dynamic, i.e

  4. Universality in Nonlinear Elasticity of Biological and Polymeric Networks and Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Dobrynin, Andrey

    2011-03-01

    Networks and gels are part of our everyday experience starting from automotive tires and rubber bands to biological tissues and cells. Biological and polymeric networks show remarkably high deformability at relatively small stresses and can sustain reversible deformations up to ten times of their initial size. A distinctive feature of these materials is highly nonlinear stress-strain curves leading to material hardening with increasing deformation. This differentiates networks and gels from conventional materials, such as metals and glasses, showing linear stress-strain relationship in the reversible deformation regime. Using theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulations we propose and test a model that describes nonlinear mechanical properties of a broad variety of biological and polymeric networks and gels by relating their macroscopic strain hardening behavior with molecular parameters of the network strands. This model provides a universal relationship between the strain-dependent network modulus and the network deformation and explains strain-hardening of natural rubber, synthetic polymeric networks, and biopolymer networks of actin, collagen, fibrin, vimentin and neurofilaments. NSF: DMR-1004576.

  5. Introduction to physical properties and elasticity models: Chapter 20

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorkin, Jack; Helgerud, Michael B.; Waite, William F.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Nur, Amos

    2003-01-01

    Estimating the in situ methane hydrate volume from seismic surveys requires knowledge of the rock physics relations between wave speeds and elastic moduli in hydrate/sediment mixtures. The elastic moduli of hydrate/sediment mixtures depend on the elastic properties of the individual sedimentary particles and the manner in which they are arranged. In this chapter, we present some rock physics data currently available from literature. The unreferenced values in Table I were not measured directly, but were derived from other values in Tables I and II using standard relationships between elastic properties for homogeneous, isotropic material. These derivations allow us to extend the list of physical property estimates, but at the expense of introducing uncertainties due to combining property values measured under different physical conditions. This is most apparent in the case of structure II (sII) hydrate for which very few physical properties have been measured under identical conditions.

  6. A Nonlinear Elasticity Model of Macromolecular Conformational Change Induced by Electrostatic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y. C.; Holst, Michael; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose a nonlinear elasticity model of macromolecular conformational change (deformation) induced by electrostatic forces generated by an implicit solvation model. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the electrostatic potential is analyzed in a domain varying with the elastic deformation of molecules, and a new continuous model of the electrostatic forces is developed to ensure solvability of the nonlinear elasticity equations. We derive the estimates of electrostatic forces corresponding to four types of perturbations to an electrostatic potential field, and establish the existance of an equilibrium configuration using a fixed-point argument, under the assumption that the change in the ionic strength and charges due to the additional molecules causing the deformation are sufficiently small. The results are valid for elastic models with arbitrarily complex dielectric interfaces and cavities, and can be generalized to large elastic deformation caused by high ionic strength, large charges, and strong external fields by using continuation methods. PMID:19461946

  7. A Nonlinear Elasticity Model of Macromolecular Conformational Change Induced by Electrostatic Forces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y C; Holst, Michael; McCammon, J Andrew

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we propose a nonlinear elasticity model of macromolecular conformational change (deformation) induced by electrostatic forces generated by an implicit solvation model. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the electrostatic potential is analyzed in a domain varying with the elastic deformation of molecules, and a new continuous model of the electrostatic forces is developed to ensure solvability of the nonlinear elasticity equations. We derive the estimates of electrostatic forces corresponding to four types of perturbations to an electrostatic potential field, and establish the existance of an equilibrium configuration using a fixed-point argument, under the assumption that the change in the ionic strength and charges due to the additional molecules causing the deformation are sufficiently small. The results are valid for elastic models with arbitrarily complex dielectric interfaces and cavities, and can be generalized to large elastic deformation caused by high ionic strength, large charges, and strong external fields by using continuation methods.

  8. Rubber elasticity: Solution of the James-Guth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, B. E.

    2015-05-01

    The solution of the many-body statistical mechanical theory of elasticity formulated by James and Guth in the 1940s [H. M. James, J. Chem. Phys. 15, 651 (1947)], 10.1063/1.1746624 is presented. The remarkable aspect of the solution is that it gives an elastic free energy that is essentially equivalent to that developed by Flory over a period of several decades.

  9. Freeze fracturing of elastic porous media: a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Vlahou, I.; Worster, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a mathematical model of the fracturing of water-saturated rocks and other porous materials in cold climates. Ice growing inside porous rocks causes large pressures to develop that can significantly damage the rock. We study the growth of ice inside a penny-shaped cavity in a water-saturated porous rock and the consequent fracturing of the medium. Premelting of the ice against the rock, which results in thin films of unfrozen water forming between the ice and the rock, is one of the dominant processes of rock fracturing. We find that the fracture toughness of the rock, the size of pre-existing faults and the undercooling of the environment are the main parameters determining the susceptibility of a medium to fracturing. We also explore the dependence of the growth rates on the permeability and elasticity of the medium. Thin and fast-fracturing cracks are found for many types of rocks. We consider how the growth rate can be limited by the existence of pore ice, which decreases the permeability of a medium, and propose an expression for the effective ‘frozen’ permeability. PMID:25792954

  10. New, higher-order, elasticity-based micromechanics model

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T. O.

    2003-01-01

    The formulation for a new homogenization theory is presented. The theory utilizes a higher-order, elasticity-based cell analysis of a periodic array of unit cells. The unit cell is discretized into subregions or subcells. The displacement field within each subcell is approximated by an (truncated) eigenfunction function expansion of up to fifth order. The governing equations are developed by satisfying the pointwise governing equations of geometrically linear continuum mechanics exactly up through the given order of the subcell displacement fields. The specified governing equations are valid for any type of constitutive model used to describe the behavior of the material in a subcell. The fifth order theory is subsequently reduced to a third order theory. The appropriate reduction of the fifth and third order theories to the first order theory (which corresponds to a variant of the original method of cells (MOC) (Aboudi, 1991) theory) is outlined. The 3D ECM theory correctly reduces to the 2D ECM theory microstructures and the exact 1D theory for bilaminated structures. Comparison of the predicted bulk and local responses with published results indicates that the theory accurately predicts both types of responses. Furthermore, it is shown that the higher order fields introduced coupling effects between the local fields that can result in substantial changes in the predicted bulk inelastic response of a composite.

  11. Generative model for feedback networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Douglas R.; Kejžar, Nataša; Tsallis, Constantino; Farmer, Doyne; White, Scott

    2006-01-01

    We propose a model for network formation and study some of its statistical properties. The motivation for the model comes from the growth of several kinds of real networks (i.e., kinship and trading networks, networks of corporate alliances, networks of autocatalytic chemical reactions). These networks grow either by establishing closer connections by adding links in the existing network or by adding new nodes. A node in these networks lacks the information of the entire network. In order to establish a closer connection to other nodes it starts a search in the neighboring part of the network and waits for a possible feedback from a distant node that received the “searching signal.” Our model imitates this behavior by growing the network via the addition of a link that creates a cycle in the network or via the addition of a new node with a link to the network. The forming of a cycle creates feedback between the two ending nodes. After choosing a starting node, a search is made for another node at a suitable distance; if such a node is found, a link is established between this and the starting node, otherwise (such a node cannot be found) a new node is added and is linked to the starting node. We simulate this algorithm and find that we cannot reject the hypothesis that the empirical degree distribution is a q -exponential function, which has been used to model long-range processes in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.

  12. On a molecular statistical basis for Ogden's model of rubber elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, Alexander E.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a link is established between the statistical theory of long chain molecules and Ogden's phenomenological model of rubber elasticity. It has been shown by several authors in the past that many invariant-based phenomenological models for rubber-like materials are related to the classical statistical theories. The essential means to reach this reconciliation were methods to account for a non-affine deformation of polymer chains in the network, appropriate techniques to calculate their averaged response, and an approximation of the inverse Langevin function appearing in the non-Gaussian statistical theory. It is shown in this paper that the very same approach, if appropriately implemented, allows to express the strain-energy function of Ogden's material in terms of physical constants characterising the polymer chain and network, together with few additional parameters that account for the non-affine deformation of the polymer chains. Particularly, it is shown that Ogden's model can be represented as a non-affine non-Gaussian 3-chain model with topological constraints.

  13. Large computer simulations on elastic networks: Small eigenvalues and eigenvalue spectra of the Kirchhoff matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Shy, L.Y.; Eichinger, B.E.

    1989-05-01

    Computer simulations of the formation of trifunctional and tetrafunctional polydimethyl-siloxane networks that are crosslinked by condensation of telechelic chains with multifunctional crosslinking agents have been carried out on systems containing up to 1.05 x 10/sup 6/ chains. Eigenvalue spectra of Kirchhoff matrices for these networks have been evaluated at two levels of approximation: (1) inclusion of all midchain modes, and (2) suppression of midchain modes. By use of the recursion method of Haydock and Nex, we have been able to effectively diagonalize matrices with 730 498 rows and columns without actually constructing matrices of this size. The small eigenvalues have been computed by use of the Lanczos algorithm. We demonstrate the following results: (1) The smallest eigenvalues (with chain modes suppressed) vary as ..mu../sup -2//sup ///sup 3/ for sufficiently large ..mu.., where ..mu.. is the number of junctions in the network; (2) the eigenvalue spectra of the Kirchhoff matrices are well described by McKay's theory for random regular graphs in the range of the larger eigenvalues, but there are significant departures in the region of small eigenvalues where computed spectra have many more small eigenvalues than random regular graphs; (3) the smallest eigenvalues vary as n/sup -1.78/ where n is the number of Rouse beads in the chains that comprise the network. Computations are done for both monodisperse and polydisperse chain length distributions. Large eigenvalues associated with localized motion of the junctions are found as predicted by theory. The relationship between the small eigenvalues and the equilibrium modulus of elasticity is discussed, as is the relationship between viscoelasticity and the band edge of the spectrum.

  14. A staggered-grid convolutional differentiator for elastic wave modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Zhou, Binzhong; Fu, Li-Yun

    2015-11-01

    The computation of derivatives in governing partial differential equations is one of the most investigated subjects in the numerical simulation of physical wave propagation. An analytical staggered-grid convolutional differentiator (CD) for first-order velocity-stress elastic wave equations is derived in this paper by inverse Fourier transformation of the band-limited spectrum of a first derivative operator. A taper window function is used to truncate the infinite staggered-grid CD stencil. The truncated CD operator is almost as accurate as the analytical solution, and as efficient as the finite-difference (FD) method. The selection of window functions will influence the accuracy of the CD operator in wave simulation. We search for the optimal Gaussian windows for different order CDs by minimizing the spectral error of the derivative and comparing the windows with the normal Hanning window function for tapering the CD operators. It is found that the optimal Gaussian window appears to be similar to the Hanning window function for tapering the same CD operator. We investigate the accuracy of the windowed CD operator and the staggered-grid FD method with different orders. Compared to the conventional staggered-grid FD method, a short staggered-grid CD operator achieves an accuracy equivalent to that of a long FD operator, with lower computational costs. For example, an 8th order staggered-grid CD operator can achieve the same accuracy of a 16th order staggered-grid FD algorithm but with half of the computational resources and time required. Numerical examples from a homogeneous model and a crustal waveguide model are used to illustrate the superiority of the CD operators over the conventional staggered-grid FD operators for the simulation of wave propagations.

  15. Secondary and tertiary structure elasticity of titin Z1Z2 and a titin chain model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric H; Hsin, Jen; Mayans, Olga; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-09-01

    The giant protein titin, which is responsible for passive elasticity in muscle fibers, is built from approximately 300 regular immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domains and FN-III repeats. While the soft elasticity derived from its entropic regions, as well as the stiff mechanical resistance derived from the unfolding of the secondary structure elements of Ig- and FN-III domains have been studied extensively, less is known about the mechanical elasticity stemming from the orientation of neighboring domains relative to each other. Here we address the dynamics and energetics of interdomain arrangement of two adjacent Ig-domains of titin, Z1, and Z2, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The simulations reveal conformational flexibility, due to the domain-domain geometry, that lends an intermediate force elasticity to titin. We employ adaptive biasing force MD simulations to calculate the energy required to bend the Z1Z2 tandem open to identify energetically feasible interdomain arrangements of the Z1 and Z2 domains. The finding is cast into a stochastic model for Z1Z2 interdomain elasticity that is generalized to a multiple domain chain replicating many Z1Z2-like units and representing a long titin segment. The elastic properties of this chain suggest that titin derives so-called tertiary structure elasticity from bending and twisting of its domains. Finally, we employ steered molecular dynamics simulations to stretch individual Z1 and Z2 domains and characterize the so-called secondary structure elasticity of the two domains. Our study suggests that titin's overall elastic response at weak force stems from a soft entropic spring behavior (not described here), from tertiary structure elasticity with an elastic spring constant of approximately 0.001-1 pN/A and, at strong forces, from secondary structure elasticity.

  16. Elastic Coupling of Nascent apCAM Adhesions to Flowing Actin Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mejean, Cecile O.; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Buck, Kenneth B.; Kress, Holger; Shundrovsky, Alla; Merrill, Jason W.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Forscher, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Adhesions are multi-molecular complexes that transmit forces generated by a cell’s acto-myosin networks to external substrates. While the physical properties of some of the individual components of adhesions have been carefully characterized, the mechanics of the coupling between the cytoskeleton and the adhesion site as a whole are just beginning to be revealed. We characterized the mechanics of nascent adhesions mediated by the immunoglobulin-family cell adhesion molecule apCAM, which is known to interact with actin filaments. Using simultaneous visualization of actin flow and quantification of forces transmitted to apCAM-coated beads restrained with an optical trap, we found that adhesions are dynamic structures capable of transmitting a wide range of forces. For forces in the picoNewton scale, the nascent adhesions’ mechanical properties are dominated by an elastic structure which can be reversibly deformed by up to 1 µm. Large reversible deformations rule out an interface between substrate and cytoskeleton that is dominated by a number of stiff molecular springs in parallel, and favor a compliant cross-linked network. Such a compliant structure may increase the lifetime of a nascent adhesion, facilitating signaling and reinforcement. PMID:24039928

  17. Elastic coupling of nascent apCAM adhesions to flowing actin networks.

    PubMed

    Mejean, Cecile O; Schaefer, Andrew W; Buck, Kenneth B; Kress, Holger; Shundrovsky, Alla; Merrill, Jason W; Dufresne, Eric R; Forscher, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Adhesions are multi-molecular complexes that transmit forces generated by a cell's acto-myosin networks to external substrates. While the physical properties of some of the individual components of adhesions have been carefully characterized, the mechanics of the coupling between the cytoskeleton and the adhesion site as a whole are just beginning to be revealed. We characterized the mechanics of nascent adhesions mediated by the immunoglobulin-family cell adhesion molecule apCAM, which is known to interact with actin filaments. Using simultaneous visualization of actin flow and quantification of forces transmitted to apCAM-coated beads restrained with an optical trap, we found that adhesions are dynamic structures capable of transmitting a wide range of forces. For forces in the picoNewton scale, the nascent adhesions' mechanical properties are dominated by an elastic structure which can be reversibly deformed by up to 1 µm. Large reversible deformations rule out an interface between substrate and cytoskeleton that is dominated by a number of stiff molecular springs in parallel, and favor a compliant cross-linked network. Such a compliant structure may increase the lifetime of a nascent adhesion, facilitating signaling and reinforcement.

  18. Temporal evolution of a drainage fracture network into an elastic medium with internal fluid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobchenko, Maya; Hafver, Andreas; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Renard, Francois

    2013-04-01

    Escape of internally generated fluids from low permeability rocks plays an important role in several geological systems. Primary migration of hydrocarbons, dehydration of sediments and hydrated mantellic rocks in subduction zones in the Earth's crust are geological examples where the existing permeability cannot accommodate transport of generated fluids in low permeability rocks and fluid pressure build-up may alter the permeability by fracturing. Fractures form and propagate in the rock due to internal pressure build-up. We develop an easy and reproducible analog experiment to simulate fracture formation in low permeability rock during internal fluid/gas production. This work aims to describe the physical mechanism of fracture network growth and temporal evolution of created fractures. A tight elastic gelatin matrix is used as a rock analog. The nucleation, propagation and coalescence of fractures within the solid matrix occurs due to CO2 production by yeast consuming sugar and is followed using optical means. We quantify first how an equilibrium fracture network self-develop, and then how the intermittent fluid transport is controlled by the dynamics of opening and closing of fractures, with a well-defined time frequency.

  19. Optimized Equivalent Staggered-grid FD Method for Elastic Wave Modeling Based on Plane Wave Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Peng; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Liao, Wenyuan; Qu, Luping; Li, Qingyang; Liu, Peijun

    2016-12-01

    In finite difference (FD) method, numerical dispersion is the dominant factor influencing the accuracy of seismic modeling. Various optimized FD schemes for scalar wave modeling have been proposed to reduce grid dispersion, while the optimized time-space domain FD schemes for elastic wave modeling have not been fully investigated yet. In this paper, an optimized FD scheme with Equivalent Staggered Grid (ESG) for elastic modelling has been developed. We start from the constant P- and S-wave speed elastic wave equations and then deduce analytical plane wave solutions in the wavenumber domain with eigenvalue decomposition method. Based on the elastic plane wave solutions, three new time-space domain dispersion relations of ESG elastic modeling are obtained, which are represented by three equations corresponding to P-, S- and converted wave terms in the elastic equations, respectively. By using these new relations, we can study the dispersion errors of different spatial FD terms independently. The dispersion analysis showed that different spatial FD terms have different errors. It is therefore suggested that different FD coefficients to be used to approximate the three spatial derivative terms. In addition, the relative dispersion error in L2-norm is minimized through optimizing FD coefficients using Newton's method. Synthetic examples have demonstrated that this new optimal FD schemes have superior accuracy for elastic wave modeling compared to Taylor-series expansion and optimized space domain FD schemes.

  20. Optimized equivalent staggered-grid FD method for elastic wave modelling based on plane wave solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Peng; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Liao, Wenyuan; Qu, Luping; Li, Qingyang; Liu, Peijun

    2017-02-01

    In finite-difference (FD) method, numerical dispersion is the dominant factor influencing the accuracy of seismic modelling. Various optimized FD schemes for scalar wave modelling have been proposed to reduce grid dispersion, while the optimized time-space domain FD schemes for elastic wave modelling have not been fully investigated yet. In this paper, an optimized FD scheme with Equivalent Staggered Grid (ESG) for elastic modelling has been developed. We start from the constant P- and S-wave speed elastic wave equations and then deduce analytical plane wave solutions in the wavenumber domain with eigenvalue decomposition method. Based on the elastic plane wave solutions, three new time-space domain dispersion relations of ESG elastic modelling are obtained, which are represented by three equations corresponding to P-, S- and converted-wave terms in the elastic equations, respectively. By using these new relations, we can study the dispersion errors of different spatial FD terms independently. The dispersion analysis showed that different spatial FD terms have different errors. It is therefore suggested that different FD coefficients to be used to approximate the three spatial derivative terms. In addition, the relative dispersion error in L2-norm is minimized through optimizing FD coefficients using Newton's method. Synthetic examples have demonstrated that this new optimal FD schemes have superior accuracy for elastic wave modelling compared to Taylor-series expansion and optimized space domain FD schemes.

  1. Shared end-to-content backup path protection in k-node (edge) content connected elastic optical datacenter networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Huang, Shanguo; Yin, Shan; Guo, Bingli; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Min; Gu, Wanyi

    2016-05-02

    To quantitatively measure content connectivity and provide protection for different kinds of content, the concept of k-node (edge) content connectivity is proposed recently. Based on k-node (edge) content connectivity, k-node (edge) content connected elastic optical datacenter network (KC-EODN) is proposed to design disaster-resilient and spectrum-efficient optical datacenter networks. In KC-EODN, k independent end-to-content paths are established for each request. However, it will consume too much resource to assign dedicated spectrum for each end-to-content path. Spectrum sharing among multiple end-to-content paths of different requests can greatly improve resource efficiency. In this paper, a novel perfect matching based sharing principle among multiple end-to-content paths of different requests is proposed. Based on the new proposed sharing principle, we present the shared end-to-content backup path protection (SEBPP) scheme for KC-EODN. Integer linear program (ILP) model and heuristic algorithms are designed for SEBPP scheme with the objective of minimizing the total of working and backup spectrum resources. Numerical results show that the proposed SEBPP scheme can greatly reduce spectrum consumption while ensuring the survivability against natural disaster and multi-failures.

  2. Rigid-plug elastic-water model for transient pipe flow with entrapped air pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; OU, CHANGQI

    2011-01-01

    Pressure transients in a rapidly filling pipe with an entrapped air pocket are investigated analytically. A rigid-plug elastic water model is developed by applying elastic water hammer to the majority of the water column while applying rigid water analysis to a small portion near the air-water interface, which avoids effectively the interpolation error of previous approaches. Moreover, another two simplified models are introduced respectively based on constant water length and by neglecting water elasticity. Verification of the three models is confirmed by experimental results. Calculations show that the simplification of constant water length is feasible for small air pockets. The complete rigid water model is appropriate for cases with large initial air volume. The rigid-plug elastic model can predict all the essential features for the entire range of initial air fraction considered in this study, and it is the effective model for analysis of pressure transients of entrapped air.

  3. Analysis of Nonlinear Poro-Elastic and Poro-Visco-Elastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bociu, Lorena; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Sacco, Riccardo; Webster, Justin T.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the initial and boundary value problem for a system of partial differential equations describing the motion of a fluid-solid mixture under the assumption of full saturation. The ability of the fluid phase to flow within the solid skeleton is described by the permeability tensor, which is assumed here to be a multiple of the identity and to depend nonlinearly on the volumetric solid strain. In particular, we study the problem of the existence of weak solutions in bounded domains, accounting for non-zero volumetric and boundary forcing terms. We investigate the influence of viscoelasticity on the solution functional setting and on the regularity requirements for the forcing terms. The theoretical analysis shows that different time regularity requirements are needed for the volumetric source of linear momentum and the boundary source of traction depending on whether or not viscoelasticity is present. The theoretical results are further investigated via numerical simulations based on a novel dual mixed hybridized finite element discretization. When the data are sufficiently regular, the simulations show that the solutions satisfy the energy estimates predicted by the theoretical analysis. Interestingly, the simulations also show that, in the purely elastic case, the Darcy velocity and the related fluid energy might become unbounded if indeed the data do not enjoy the time regularity required by the theory.

  4. Elastic body spline technique for feature point generation and face modeling.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung J; Hung, Jui-Hsin; Tsai, Meng-Han; Shih, Po-Liang

    2005-12-01

    Due to the advent of MPEG-4 standard, facial animation has been receiving significant attention lately. A common approach for facial animation is to use the mesh model. The physics-based transformation, elastic body spline (EBS), has been proposed to deform the facial mesh model and generate realistic expression by assuming the whole facial image has the same elastic property. In this paper, we partition facial images into different regions and propose an iterative algorithm to find the elastic property of each facial region. By doing so, we can obtain the EBS for mesh vertices in the facial mesh model such that facial animation can be more realistically achieved.

  5. Evaluation of massless-spring modeling of suspension-line elasticity during the parachute unfurling process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Huckins, E. K., III

    1972-01-01

    A general theory on mathematical modeling of elastic parachute suspension lines during the unfurling process was developed. Massless-spring modeling of suspension-line elasticity was evaluated in detail. For this simple model, equations which govern the motion were developed and numerically integrated. The results were compared with flight test data. In most regions, agreement was satisfactory. However, poor agreement was obtained during periods of rapid fluctuations in line tension.

  6. Spectrum-efficient multipath provisioning with content connectivity for the survivability of elastic optical datacenter networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tao; Li, Xin; Guo, Bingli; Yin, Shan; Li, Wenzhe; Huang, Shanguo

    2017-07-01

    Multipath provisioning is a survivable and resource efficient solution against increasing link failures caused by natural or man-made disasters in elastic optical datacenter networks (EODNs). Nevertheless, the conventional multipath provisioning scheme is designed only for connecting a specific node pair. Also, it is obvious that the number of node-disjoint paths between any two nodes is restricted to network connectivity, which has a fixed value for a given topology. Recently, the concept of content connectivity in EODNs has been proposed, which guarantees that a user can be served by any datacenter hosting the required content regardless of where it is located. From this new perspective, we propose a survivable multipath provisioning with content connectivity (MPCC) scheme, which is expected to improve the spectrum efficiency and the whole system survivability. We formulate the MPCC scheme with Integer Linear Program (ILP) in static traffic scenario and a heuristic approach is proposed for dynamic traffic scenario. Furthermore, to adapt MPCC to the variation of network state in dynamic traffic scenario, we propose a dynamic content placement (DCP) strategy in the MPCC scheme for detecting the variation of the distribution of user requests and adjusting the content location dynamically. Simulation results indicate that the MPCC scheme can reduce over 20% spectrum consumption than conventional multipath provisioning scheme in static traffic scenario. And in dynamic traffic scenario, the MPCC scheme can reduce over 20% spectrum consumption and over 50% blocking probability than conventional multipath provisioning scheme. Meanwhile, benefiting from the DCP strategy, the MPCC scheme has a good adaption to the variation of the distribution of user requests.

  7. On the origin of Gaussian network theory in the thermo/chemo-responsive shape memory effect of amorphous polymers undergoing photo-elastic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Huang, Wei Min; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-06-01

    Amorphous polymers are normally isotropic in their physical properties, however, upon stress their structural randomness is disturbed and they become anisotropic. There is a close connection between the optical anisotropy and the elastic (or mechanical) anisotropy, since both are related to the type of symmetry exhibited by the molecular structure. On the origin of Gaussian network theory, a phenomenological constitutive framework was proposed to study the photo-elastic transition and working mechanism of the thermo-/chemo-responsive shape-memory effect (SME) in amorphous shape memory polymers (SMPs). Optically refractive index was initially employed to couple the stress, strain and the anisotropy of the random link in macromolecule chain. Based on the Arrhenius law, a constitutive framework was then applied for the temperature dependence of optical (or elastic or mechanical) anisotropy according to the fictive temperature parameter. Finally, the phenomenological photo-elastic model was proposed to quantitatively identify the influential factors behind the thermo-/chemo-responsive SME in SMPs, of which the shape recovery behavior is predicted and verified by the available experimental data reported in the literature.

  8. A micromechanical damage and fracture model for polymers based on fractional strain-gradient elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyden, S.; Li, B.; Weinberg, K.; Conti, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2015-01-01

    We formulate a simple one-parameter macroscopic model of distributed damage and fracture of polymers that is amenable to a straightforward and efficient numerical implementation. We show that the macroscopic model can be rigorously derived, in the sense of optimal scaling, from a micromechanical model of chain elasticity and failure regularized by means of fractional strain-gradient elasticity. In particular, we derive optimal scaling laws that supply a link between the single parameter of the macroscopic model, namely, the critical energy-release rate of the material, and micromechanical parameters pertaining to the elasticity and strength of the polymer chains and to the strain-gradient elasticity regularization. We show how the critical energy-release rate of specific materials can be determined from test data. Finally, we demonstrate the scope and fidelity of the model by means of an example of application, namely, Taylor-impact experiments of polyurea 1000 rods.

  9. Magneto-elastic oscillator: Modeling and analysis with nonlinear magnetic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K. Aravind; Ali, Shaikh Faruque; Arockiarajan, A.

    2017-04-01

    The magneto-elastically buckled beam is a classic example of a nonlinear oscillator that exhibits chaotic motions. This system serves as a model to analyze the motion of elastic structures in magnetic fields. The system follows a sixth order magneto-elastic potential and may have up to five static equilibrium positions. However, often the non-dimensional Duffing equation is used to approximate the system, with the coefficients being derived from experiments. In few other instances, numerical methods are used to evaluate the magnetic field values. These field values are then used to approximate the nonlinear magnetic restoring force. In this manuscript, we derive analytical closed form expressions for the magneto-elastic potential and the nonlinear restoring forces in the system. Such an analytical formulation would facilitate tracing the effect of change in a parameter, such as the magnet dimension, on the dynamics of the system. The model is derived assuming a single mode approximation, taking into account the effect of linear elastic and nonlinear magnetic forces. The developed model is then numerically simulated to show that it is accurate in capturing the system dynamics and bifurcation of equilibrium positions. The model is validated through experiments based on forced vibrations of the magneto-elastic oscillator. To gather further insights about the magneto-elastic oscillator, a parametric study has been conducted based on the field strength of the magnets and the distance between the magnets and the results are reported.

  10. Effect of matrix elasticity on the continuous foaming of food models.

    PubMed

    Narchi, I; Vial, Ch; Djelveh, G

    2008-12-01

    The aim is to understand the effect of matrix elasticity on continuous foaming using food models based on glucose syrup. This was modified by adding polyacrylamide (PAA) with 2% whey protein isolate (WPI) or Tween 80 as foaming agents. Foaming was conducted in a stirred column. Rotation speed N and gas-to-liquid flow ratio (G/L) were varied. Overrun, average bubble size d (32), texture and stability were measured using densimetry, image analysis, and rheometry, respectively. Experimental results showed that 0.01% PAA did not modify the viscosity of 2% WPI models, but conferred low elastic behavior. PAA (0.05%) doubled matrix viscosity and drastically increased elasticity. The increase of elasticity became slower for further PAA addition. Foaming experiments demonstrated that theoretical overrun could not be achieved for inelastic WPI models in two cases: for high viscosity and low N, as dispersion effectiveness was reduced; for high G/L and N because of enhanced coalescence. Matrix elasticity was shown to increase overrun at constant viscosity for high G/L by enhancing interface stabilization. However, in elastic models, gas dispersion was more difficult and d (32) was higher than in inelastic fluids of similar viscosity. Finally, when the limiting step was dispersion, foaming was shown to be negatively affected by matrix elasticity.

  11. On boundary-element models of elastic fault interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Schott, B.

    2002-12-01

    We present the freely available, modular, and UNIX command-line based boundary-element program interact. It is yet another implementation of Crouch and Starfield's (1983) 2-D and Okada's (1992) half-space solutions for constant slip on planar fault segments in an elastic medium. Using unconstrained or non-negative, standard-package matrix routines, the code can solve for slip distributions on faults given stress boundary conditions, or vice versa, both in a local or global reference frame. Based on examples of complex fault geometries from structural geology, we discuss the effects of different stress boundary conditions on the predicted slip distributions of interacting fault systems. Such one-step calculations can be useful to estimate the moment-release efficiency of alternative fault geometries, and so to evaluate the likelihood which system may be realized in nature. A further application of the program is the simulation of cyclic fault rupture based on simple static-kinetic friction laws. We comment on two issues: First, that of the appropriate rupture algorithm. Cellular models of seismicity often employ an exhaustive rupture scheme: fault cells fail if some critical stress is reached, then cells slip once-only by a given amount, and subsequently the redistributed stress is used to check for triggered activations on other cells. We show that this procedure can lead to artificial complexity in seismicity if time-to-failure is not calculated carefully because of numerical noise. Second, we address the question if foreshocks can be viewed as direct expressions of a simple statistical distribution of frictional strength on individual faults. Repetitive failure models based on a random distribution of frictional coefficients initially show irregular seismicity. By repeatedly selecting weaker patches, the fault then evolves into a quasi-periodic cycle. Each time, the pre-mainshock events build up the cumulative moment release in a non-linear fashion. These

  12. Mechanical Model Analysis for Quantitative Evaluation of Liver Fibrosis Based on Ultrasound Tissue Elasticity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Maki, Tomonori; Yamakawa, Makoto; Mitake, Tsuyoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Kenji

    2012-07-01

    Precise evaluation of the stage of chronic hepatitis C with respect to fibrosis has become an important issue to prevent the occurrence of cirrhosis and to initiate appropriate therapeutic intervention such as viral eradication using interferon. Ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging, i.e., elastography can visualize tissue hardness/softness, and its clinical usefulness has been studied to detect and evaluate tumors. We have recently reported that the texture of elasticity image changes as fibrosis progresses. To evaluate fibrosis progression quantitatively on the basis of ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging, we introduced a mechanical model of fibrosis progression and simulated the process by which hepatic fibrosis affects elasticity images and compared the results with those clinical data analysis. As a result, it was confirmed that even in diffuse diseases like chronic hepatitis, the patterns of elasticity images are related to fibrous structural changes caused by hepatic disease and can be used to derive features for quantitative evaluation of fibrosis stage.

  13. Transient Networks and Dense Colloidal Suspensions: From Viscous Flow to Elastic Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2013-03-01

    In order to analyze the mechanical response of viscoelastic materials in highly non-linear regimes, we have designed a new kind of Hele-Shaw cell where both viscous liquids and soft elastic solids can be tested at a controlled loading rate. We first consider model Maxwell liquids - characterized by a single relaxation time - with the project of benchmarking the response of complex, glassy systems. We use several solutions of microemulsions connected by telechelic polymers. We show that these materials undergo instability in a broad range of loading rates. At low rates, this instability is shown to be of the viscous Saffman-Taylor type. At high rates, we observe a purely elastic bulk instability discovered recently in the context of soft elastomers. A microfluidic version of our cell makes it possible to study the response of colloidal suspensions. We use more or less concentrated PNIPA aqueous solutions for which temperature controls the volume fraction. Observations are interpreted in the light of our understanding of their viscoelastic properties. This work was done in collaboration with Maxime Lefranc, Baudouin Saintyves, Olivier Dauchot and Serge Mora. It was funded by ANR, France.

  14. Elastic properties of alpha quartz and the alkali halides based on an interatomic force model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, D. J.; Simmons, G.

    1972-01-01

    A two-body central-force atomic model can be used to describe accurately the elastic properties of alpha quartz if the nontetrahedral O:O forces are included. The strength of the Si:O interaction has little effect on the bulk modulus. The technique is sufficiently general to allow calculations of the elastic properties of a specified structure under arbitrary pressure from a complete description of the interatomic forces. The elastic constants for the NaCl structure and the CsCl structure are examined. Our model includes two-body, central, anion-anion, anion-cation, and electrostatic interactions.

  15. Elastic properties of alpha quartz and the alkali halides based on an interatomic force model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, D. J.; Simmons, G.

    1972-01-01

    A two-body central-force atomic model can be used to describe accurately the elastic properties of alpha quartz if the nontetrahedral O:O forces are included. The strength of the Si:O interaction has little effect on the bulk modulus. The technique is sufficiently general to allow calculations of the elastic properties of a specified structure under arbitrary pressure from a complete description of the interatomic forces. The elastic constants for the NaCl structure and the CsCl structure are examined. Our model includes two-body, central, anion-anion, anion-cation, and electrostatic interactions.

  16. Accurate modelling of the elastic behavior of a continuum with the Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celigueta, M. A.; Latorre, S.; Arrufat, F.; Oñate, E.

    2017-08-01

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) has been used for modelling continua, like concrete or rocks. However, it requires a big calibration effort, even to capture just the linear elastic behavior of a continuum modelled via the classical force-displacement relationships at the contact interfaces between particles. In this work we propose a new way for computing the contact forces between discrete particles. The newly proposed forces take into account the surroundings of the contact, not just the contact itself. This brings in the missing terms that provide an accurate approximation to an elastic continuum, and avoids calibration of the DEM parameters for the purely linear elastic range.

  17. Complex Networks in Psychological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemann, R. S.; Carvalho, L. S. A. V. D.; Donangelo, R.

    We develop schematic, self-organizing, neural-network models to describe mechanisms associated with mental processes, by a neurocomputational substrate. These models are examples of real world complex networks with interesting general topological structures. Considering dopaminergic signal-to-noise neuronal modulation in the central nervous system, we propose neural network models to explain development of cortical map structure and dynamics of memory access, and unify different mental processes into a single neurocomputational substrate. Based on our neural network models, neurotic behavior may be understood as an associative memory process in the brain, and the linguistic, symbolic associative process involved in psychoanalytic working-through can be mapped onto a corresponding process of reconfiguration of the neural network. The models are illustrated through computer simulations, where we varied dopaminergic modulation and observed the self-organizing emergent patterns at the resulting semantic map, interpreting them as different manifestations of mental functioning, from psychotic through to normal and neurotic behavior, and creativity.

  18. 14O+p elastic scattering in a microscopic cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D.; Leo, F.

    2006-04-26

    The 14O+p elastic scattering is analyzed in a fully microscopic cluster model. With the Resonating Group Method associated with the microscopic R-matrix theory, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated. Data on 16O+p are used to test the precision of the model. For the 14O+p elastic scattering, an excellent agreement is found with recent experimental data. Resonances properties in 15F are discussed.

  19. POLICY VARIATION, LABOR SUPPLY ELASTICITIES, AND A STRUCTURAL MODEL OF RETIREMENT

    PubMed Central

    MANOLI, DAY; MULLEN, KATHLEEN J.; WAGNER, MATHIS

    2015-01-01

    This paper exploits a combination of policy variation from multiple pension reforms in Austria and administrative data from the Austrian Social Security Database. Using the policy changes for identification, we estimate social security wealth and accrual elasticities in individuals’ retirement decisions. Next, we use these elasticities to estimate a dynamic programming model of retirement decisions. Finally, we use the estimated model to examine the labor supply and welfare consequences of potential social security reforms. PMID:26472916

  20. A model reduction technique based on the PGD for elastic-viscoplastic computational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relun, N.; Néron, D.; Boucard, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a model reduction approach for elastic-viscoplastic evolution problems is considered. Enhancement of the PGD reduced model by a new iterative technique involving only elastic problems is investigated and allows to reduce CPU cost. The accuracy of the solution and convergence properties are tested on an academic example and a calculation time comparison with the commercial finite element code Abaqus is presented in the case of an industrial structure.

  1. Assortative model for social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Michele; Caldarelli, Guido; Pietronero, Luciano

    2004-09-01

    In this Brief Report we present a version of a network growth model, generalized in order to describe the behavior of social networks. The case of study considered is the preprint archive at cul.arxiv.org. Each node corresponds to a scientist, and a link is present whenever two authors wrote a paper together. This graph is a nice example of degree-assortative network, that is, to say a network where sites with similar degree are connected to each other. The model presented is one of the few able to reproduce such behavior, giving some insight on the microscopic dynamics at the basis of the graph structure.

  2. Assortative model for social networks.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Michele; Caldarelli, Guido; Pietronero, Luciano

    2004-09-01

    In this Brief Report we present a version of a network growth model, generalized in order to describe the behavior of social networks. The case of study considered is the preprint archive at cul.arxiv.org. Each node corresponds to a scientist, and a link is present whenever two authors wrote a paper together. This graph is a nice example of degree-assortative network, that is, to say a network where sites with similar degree are connected to each other. The model presented is one of the few able to reproduce such behavior, giving some insight on the microscopic dynamics at the basis of the graph structure.

  3. New theoretical considerations in polymer rheology: Elastic breakdown of chain entanglement network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Ravindranath, Sham; Wang, Yangyang; Boukany, Pouyan

    2007-08-01

    Recent experimental evidence has motivated us to present a set of new theoretical considerations and to provide a rationale for interpreting the intriguing flow phenomena observed in entangled polymer solutions and melts [P. Tapadia and S. Q. Wang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 016001 (2006); 96, 196001 (2006); S. Q. Wang et al., ibid. 97, 187801 (2006)]. Three forces have been recognized to play important roles in controlling the response of a strained entanglement network. During flow, an intermolecular locking force fiml arises and causes conformational deformation in each load-bearing strand between entanglements. The chain deformation builds up a retractive force fretract within each strand. Chain entanglement prevails in quiescence because a given chain prefers to stay interpenetrating into other chains within its pervaded volume so as to enjoy maximum conformational entropy. Since each strand of length lent has entropy equal to kBT, the disentanglement criterion is given by fretract>fent~kBT/lent in the case of interrupted deformation. This condition identifies fent as a cohesive force. Imbalance among these forces causes elastic breakdown of the entanglement network. For example, an entangled polymer yields during continuous deformation when the declining fiml cannot sustain the elevated fretract. This opposite trend of the two forces is at the core of the physics governing a ``cohesive'' breakdown at the yield point (i.e., the stress overshoot) in startup flow. Identifying the yield point as the point of force imbalance, we can also rationalize the recently observed striking scaling behavior associated with the yield point in continuous deformation of both shear and extension.

  4. Identification of thin elastic isotropic plate parameters applying Guided Wave Measurement and Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabisek, Ewa; Waszczyszyn, Zenon

    2015-12-01

    A new hybrid computational system for material identification (HCSMI) is presented, developed for the identification of homogeneous, elastic, isotropic plate parameters. Attention is focused on the construction of dispersion curves, related to Lamb waves. The main idea of the system HCSMI lies in separation of two essential basic computational stages, corresponding to direct or inverse analyses. In the frame of the first stage an experimental dispersion curve DCexp is constructed, applying Guided Wave Measurement (GWM) technique. Then, in the other stage, corresponding to the inverse analysis, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is trained 'off line'. The substitution of results of the first stage, treated as inputs of the ANN, gives the values of identified plate parameters. In such a way no iteration is needed, unlike to the classical approach. In such an approach, the "distance" between the approximate experimental curves DCexp and dispersion curves DCnum obtained in the direct analysis, is iteratively minimized. Two case studies are presented, corresponding either to measurements in laboratory tests or those related to pseudo-experimental noisy data of computer simulations. The obtained results prove high numerical efficiency of HCSMI, applied to the identification of aluminum plate parameters.

  5. Shared path protection through reconstructing sharable bandwidth based on spectrum segmentation for elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huanlin; Zhang, Mingjia; Yi, Pengfei; Chen, Yong

    2016-12-01

    In order to address the problems of spectrum fragmentation and low sharing degree of spectrum resources in survivable elastic optical networks, an improved algorithm, called shared path protection by reconstructing sharable bandwidth based on spectrum segmentation (SPP-RSB-SS), is proposed in the paper. In the SPP-RSB-SS algorithm, for reducing the number of spectrum fragmentations and improving the success rate of spectrum allocation, the whole spectrum resource is partitioned into several spectrum segments. And each spectrum segment is allocated to the requests with the same bandwidth requirement in priority. Meanwhile, the protection path with higher spectrum sharing degree is selected through optimizing the link cost function and reconstructing sharable bandwidth. Hence, the protection path can maximize the sharable spectrum usage among multiple protection paths. The simulation results indicate that the SPP-RSB-SS algorithm can increase the sharing degree of protection spectrum effectively. Furthermore, the SPP-RSB-SS algorithm can enhance the spectrum utilization, and reduce the bandwidth blocking probability significantly.

  6. A modified elastic foundation contact model for application in 3D models of the prosthetic knee.

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, Antonio; Fenollosa-Esteve, Carlos; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín L; Sánchez-Marín, Francisco T; Vergara, Margarita; Rodríguez-Cervantes, Pablo J

    2008-04-01

    Different models have been used in the literature for the simulation of surface contact in biomechanical knee models. However, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of these models applied to the simulation of a common case, which will provide relevant information about their accuracy and suitability for application in models of the implanted knee. In this work a comparison of the Hertz model (HM), the elastic foundation model (EFM) and the finite element model (FEM) for the simulation of the elastic contact in a 3D model of the prosthetic knee is presented. From the results of this comparison it is found that although the nature of the EFM offers advantages when compared with that of the HM for its application to realistic prosthetic surfaces, and when compared with the FEM in CPU time, its predictions can differ from FEM in some circumstances. These differences are considerable if the comparison is performed for prescribed displacements, although they are less important for prescribed loads. To solve these problems a new modified elastic foundation model (mEFM) is proposed that maintains basically the simplicity of the original model while producing much more accurate results. In this paper it is shown that this new mEFM calculates pressure distribution and contact area with accuracy and short computation times for toroidal contacting surfaces. Although further work is needed to confirm its validity for more complex geometries the mEFM is envisaged as a good option for application in 3D knee models to predict prosthetic knee performance.

  7. Fractional-order elastic models of cartilage: A multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Royston, Thomas J.

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this research is to develop new quantitative methods to describe the elastic properties (e.g., shear modulus, viscosity) of biological tissues such as cartilage. Cartilage is a connective tissue that provides the lining for most of the joints in the body. Tissue histology of cartilage reveals a multi-scale architecture that spans a wide range from individual collagen and proteoglycan molecules to families of twisted macromolecular fibers and fibrils, and finally to a network of cells and extracellular matrix that form layers in the connective tissue. The principal cells in cartilage are chondrocytes that function at the microscopic scale by creating nano-scale networks of proteins whose biomechanical properties are ultimately expressed at the macroscopic scale in the tissue's viscoelasticity. The challenge for the bioengineer is to develop multi-scale modeling tools that predict the three-dimensional macro-scale mechanical performance of cartilage from micro-scale models. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR elastography (MRE) provide a basis for developing such models based on the nondestructive biomechanical assessment of cartilage in vitro and in vivo. This approach, for example, uses MRI to visualize developing proto-cartilage structure, MRE to characterize the shear modulus of such structures, and fractional calculus to describe the dynamic behavior. Such models can be extended using hysteresis modeling to account for the non-linear nature of the tissue. These techniques extend the existing computational methods to predict stiffness and strength, to assess short versus long term load response, and to measure static versus dynamic response to mechanical loads over a wide range of frequencies (50-1500 Hz). In the future, such methods can perhaps be used to help identify early changes in regenerative connective tissue at the microscopic scale and to enable more effective diagnostic monitoring of the onset of disease.

  8. The Elastic Behaviour of Sintered Metallic Fibre Networks: A Finite Element Study by Beam Theory

    PubMed Central

    Bosbach, Wolfram A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The finite element method has complimented research in the field of network mechanics in the past years in numerous studies about various materials. Numerical predictions and the planning efficiency of experimental procedures are two of the motivational aspects for these numerical studies. The widespread availability of high performance computing facilities has been the enabler for the simulation of sufficiently large systems. Objectives and Motivation In the present study, finite element models were built for sintered, metallic fibre networks and validated by previously published experimental stiffness measurements. The validated models were the basis for predictions about so far unknown properties. Materials and Methods The finite element models were built by transferring previously published skeletons of fibre networks into finite element models. Beam theory was applied as simplification method. Results and Conclusions The obtained material stiffness isn’t a constant but rather a function of variables such as sample size and boundary conditions. Beam theory offers an efficient finite element method for the simulated fibre networks. The experimental results can be approximated by the simulated systems. Two worthwhile aspects for future work will be the influence of size and shape and the mechanical interaction with matrix materials. PMID:26569603

  9. Low Activation Joining of SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion Applications: Modeling Miniature Torsion Tests with Elastic and Elastic-Plastic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kurtz, Richard J.; Ferraris, Monica; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-06-30

    The international fusion community designed miniature torsion specimens for joint testing and irradiation in test reactors with limited irradiation volumes since SiC and SiC-composites used in fission or fusion environments require joining methods for assembling systems. Torsion specimens fail out-of-plane when joints are strong and when elastic moduli are comparable to SiC, which causes difficulties in determining shear strengths for many joints or for comparing unirradiated and irradiated joints. A finite element damage model was developed to treat elastic joints such as SiC/Ti3SiC2+SiC and elastic-plastic joints such as SiC/epoxy and steel/epoxy. The model uses constitutive shear data and is validated using epoxy joint data. The elastic model indicates fracture is likely to occur within the joined pieces to cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. Lower modulus epoxy joints always fail in plane and provide good model validation.

  10. Numerical solution of an elastic and viscoelastic gravitational models by the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjona Almodóvar, A.; Chacón Rebollo, T.; Gómez Marmol, M.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic areas present a lower effective viscosity than usually in the Earth's crust. Both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models allow the computation of gravity, deformation, and gravitational potential changes in order to investigate crustal deformations of Earth (see for instance Battaglia & Segall, 2004; Fernández et al. 1999, 2001; Rundle 1980 and 1983). These models can be represented by a coupled system of linear parabolic (for the elastic deformations), hyperbolic (for the viscoelastic deformations) and elliptic partial differential equations (for gravitational potential changes) (see for instance Arjona et al. 2008 and 2010). The existence and uniqueness of weak solutions for both the elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational problem was demonstrated in Arjona et al. (2008 and 2014). The stabilization to solutions of the associated stationary system was proved in Arjona and Díaz (2007). Here we consider the internal source as response to the effect of a pressurized magma reservoir into a multilayered, elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational earth model. We introduce the numerical analysis of a simplified steady elastic-gravitational model, solved by means of the finite element method. We also present some numerical tests in realistic situations that confirm the predictions of theoretical order of convergence. Finally, we describe the methodology for both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models using 2D and 3D test examples performed with FreeFEM++.

  11. Including surface ligand effects in continuum elastic models of nanocrystal vibrations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Elizabeth M Y; Mork, A Jolene; Willard, Adam P; Tisdale, William A

    2017-07-28

    The measured low frequency vibrational energies of some quantum dots (QDs) deviate from the predictions of traditional elastic continuum models. Recent experiments have revealed that these deviations can be tuned by changing the ligands that passivate the QD surface. This observation has led to speculation that these deviations are due to a mass-loading effect of the surface ligands. In this article, we address this speculation by formulating a continuum elastic theory that includes the dynamical loading by elastic surface ligands. We demonstrate that this model is capable of accurately reproducing the l = 0 phonon energy across a variety of different QD samples, including cores with different ligand identities and epitaxially grown CdSe/CdS core/shell heterostructures. We highlight that our model performs well even in the small QD regime, where traditional elastic continuum models are especially prone to failure. Furthermore, we show that our model combined with Raman measurements can be used to infer the elastic properties of surface bound ligands, such as sound velocities and elastic moduli, that are otherwise challenging to measure.

  12. Including surface ligand effects in continuum elastic models of nanocrystal vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Elizabeth M. Y.; Mork, A. Jolene; Willard, Adam P.; Tisdale, William A.

    2017-07-01

    The measured low frequency vibrational energies of some quantum dots (QDs) deviate from the predictions of traditional elastic continuum models. Recent experiments have revealed that these deviations can be tuned by changing the ligands that passivate the QD surface. This observation has led to speculation that these deviations are due to a mass-loading effect of the surface ligands. In this article, we address this speculation by formulating a continuum elastic theory that includes the dynamical loading by elastic surface ligands. We demonstrate that this model is capable of accurately reproducing the l = 0 phonon energy across a variety of different QD samples, including cores with different ligand identities and epitaxially grown CdSe/CdS core/shell heterostructures. We highlight that our model performs well even in the small QD regime, where traditional elastic continuum models are especially prone to failure. Furthermore, we show that our model combined with Raman measurements can be used to infer the elastic properties of surface bound ligands, such as sound velocities and elastic moduli, that are otherwise challenging to measure.

  13. Elastic properties of compressed rare-gas crystals in a model of deformable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Troitskaya, E. P.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The elastic properties of compressed Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe rare-gas crystals were studied in a model of deformable and polarizable atoms. The second-order Fuchs elasticity moduli, their pressure derivatives, and the Zener elastic anisotropy ratio were calculated with allowance for three-body interaction and quadrupole deformation in electron shells within a wide pressure range. Comparison with the experiment and results of other authors was performed. In xenon at a compression of 0.6, the shear modulus B 44 was observed to become zero, thus corresponding to the FCC-HCP transition at 75 GPa.

  14. Campus network security model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-ku; Song, Li-ren

    2011-12-01

    Campus network security is growing importance, Design a very effective defense hacker attacks, viruses, data theft, and internal defense system, is the focus of the study in this paper. This paper compared the firewall; IDS based on the integrated, then design of a campus network security model, and detail the specific implementation principle.

  15. Substitution and price elasticity estimates using inter-countrypooled data in a translog cost model

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Joyashree; Sanstad, Alan H.; Sathaye, Jayant A.; Khaddaria,Raman

    2006-06-01

    Pooled data across several developing countries and the U.S. were used to estimate long-run substitution and price elasticities ina translog framework for the paper, iron and steel, and aggregatemanufacturing industries. While the quality of the estimates variesacross the several industry-specific models, the results suggest highervalues for these elasticities than appear commonly used in integratedassessment models. Estimates of own-price elasticities of energy rangefrom - 0.80 to - 1.76 and are comparable to estimates from previouseconometric studies in the context of developed countries (- 0.77 to -0.87). Substitution elasticities show wider variation across countriesand industries. For energy and capital they range from -1.96 to 9.80, forlabor and energy from 2.61 to 7.11, and for energy and material from -0.26 to 2.07.

  16. Estimation of elasticity by modeling blood flow using clinical ultrasound data.

    PubMed

    Maerefat, Mehdi; Rahgozar, Saeed; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe

    2007-08-01

    In the present study, the estimation of elastic modulus of large arteries is used as an index for arterial stiffness. At first, a dynamic model is introduced for pulsatile blood flow in arteries with elastic walls. The model is based on Navier-Stokes equations in fluid mechanics and the theory of elasticity. The system of equations is completed by clinical ultrasound data obtained from Doppler ultrasound images of carotid artery of 40 healthy male volunteers. For this purpose, Doppler ultrasound images are recorded and saved in computer and then center-line blood velocity, arterial wall thickness, and arterial radius measured by offline processing. The results from analytic solution of completed equations show that the mean elastic modulus for the group of healthy volunteers is about 213 kPa. By applying this method, non-invasive clinical evaluation of common carotid artery stiffness by Doppler ultrasound measurement will be possible, without the measurement of local blood pressure.

  17. The modified Black-Scholes model via constant elasticity of variance for stock options valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edeki, S. O.; Owoloko, E. A.; Ugbebor, O. O.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the classical Black-Scholes option pricing model is visited. We present a modified version of the Black-Scholes model via the application of the constant elasticity of variance model (CEVM); in this case, the volatility of the stock price is shown to be a non-constant function unlike the assumption of the classical Black-Scholes model.

  18. Histological and Electron Microscope Staining for the Identification of Elastic Fiber Networks.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elaine C; Li, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Elastic fibers are a major component of the extracellular matrix and are present in many tissues. Routine histology and standard electron microscopy procedures often do not allow for clear identification of elastic fibers making their organization and ultrastructure difficult to study. In this paper, we describe staining methods and procedures to enhance the contrast of elastin at both the light and electron microscope levels.

  19. Super-channel oriented routing, spectrum and core assignment under crosstalk limit in spatial division multiplexing elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Chunhui; Yu, Xiaosong; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Binglin; Zhang, Jie

    2017-07-01

    With the capacity increasing in optical networks enabled by spatial division multiplexing (SDM) technology, spatial division multiplexing elastic optical networks (SDM-EONs) attract much attention from both academic and industry. Super-channel is an important type of service provisioning in SDM-EONs. This paper focuses on the issue of super-channel construction in SDM-EONs. Mixed super-channel oriented routing, spectrum and core assignment (MS-RSCA) algorithm is proposed in SDM-EONs considering inter-core crosstalk. Simulation results show that MS-RSCA can improve spectrum resource utilization and reduce blocking probability significantly compared with the baseline RSCA algorithms.

  20. Discrete elastic model for two-dimensional melting.

    PubMed

    Lansac, Yves; Glaser, Matthew A; Clark, Noel A

    2006-04-01

    We present a network model for the study of melting and liquid structure in two dimensions, the first in which the presence and energy of topological defects (dislocations and disclinations) and of geometrical defects (elemental voids) can be independently controlled. Interparticle interaction is via harmonic springs and control is achieved by Monte Carlo moves which springs can either be orientationally "flipped" between particles to generate topological defects, or can be "popped" in force-free shape, to generate geometrical defects. With the geometrical defects suppressed the transition to the liquid phase occurs via disclination unbinding, as described by the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young model and found in soft potential two-dimensional (2D) systems, such as the dipole-dipole potential [H. H. von Grünberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 255703 (2004)]. By contrast, with topological defects suppressed, a disordering transition, the Glaser-Clark condensation of geometrical defects [M. A. Glaser and N. A. Clark, Adv. Chem. Phys. 83, 543 (1993); M. A. Glaser, (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1990), Vol. 52, p. 141], produces a state that accurately characterizes the local liquid structure and first-order melting observed in hard-potential 2D systems, such as hard disk and the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) potentials (M. A. Glaser and co-workers, see above). Thus both the geometrical and topological defect systems play a role in melting. The present work introduces a system in which the relative roles of topological and geometrical defects and their interactions can be explored. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of this model in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble, and present the phase diagram as well as various thermodynamic, statistical, and structural quantities as a function of the relative populations of geometrical and topological defects. The model exhibits a rich phase behavior including hexagonal and square crystals, expanded crystal, dodecagonal quasicrystal

  1. Neural network modeling of emotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Daniel S.

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews the history and development of computational neural network modeling of cognitive and behavioral processes that involve emotion. The exposition starts with models of classical conditioning dating from the early 1970s. Then it proceeds toward models of interactions between emotion and attention. Then models of emotional influences on decision making are reviewed, including some speculative (not and not yet simulated) models of the evolution of decision rules. Through the late 1980s, the neural networks developed to model emotional processes were mainly embodiments of significant functional principles motivated by psychological data. In the last two decades, network models of these processes have become much more detailed in their incorporation of known physiological properties of specific brain regions, while preserving many of the psychological principles from the earlier models. Most network models of emotional processes so far have dealt with positive and negative emotion in general, rather than specific emotions such as fear, joy, sadness, and anger. But a later section of this article reviews a few models relevant to specific emotions: one family of models of auditory fear conditioning in rats, and one model of induced pleasure enhancing creativity in humans. Then models of emotional disorders are reviewed. The article concludes with philosophical statements about the essential contributions of emotion to intelligent behavior and the importance of quantitative theories and models to the interdisciplinary enterprise of understanding the interactions of emotion, cognition, and behavior.

  2. Nonequilibrium model on Apollonian networks.

    PubMed

    Lima, F W S; Moreira, André A; Araújo, Ascânio D

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the majority-vote model with two states (-1,+1) and a noise parameter q on Apollonian networks. The main result found here is the presence of the phase transition as a function of the noise parameter q. Previous results on the Ising model in Apollonian networks have reported no presence of a phase transition. We also studied the effect of redirecting a fraction p of the links of the network. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, we obtained the exponent ratio γ/ν, β/ν, and 1/ν for several values of rewiring probability p. The critical noise q{c} and U were also calculated. Therefore, the results presented here demonstrate that the majority-vote model belongs to a different universality class than equilibrium Ising model on Apollonian network.

  3. Ultrasound-based Relative Elastic Modulus Imaging for Visualizing Thermal Ablation Zones in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingfeng; Brace, Chris; Andreano, Anita; DeWall, Ryan J.; Rubert, Nick; Fisher, Ted G.; Varghese, Tomy; Lee, Fred; Hall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasound-based elastic modulus imaging to visualize thermal ablation zones in an in vivo porcine model is reported in this article. Elastic modulus images of soft tissues are estimated as an inverse optimization problem. Ultrasonically-measured displacement data are utilized as inputs to determine an elastic modulus distribution that provides the best match to this displacement field. A total of 14 in vivo thermal ablation zones were investigated in this study. To determine the accuracy of delineation of each thermal ablation zone using elastic modulus imaging, the dimensions (lengths of long and short axes) and the are of each thermal ablation zone obtained from an elastic modulus image was compared to the corresponding gross pathology photograph of the same ablation zone. Comparison of elastic modulus imaging measurements and gross pathology measurements showed high correlation with respect to the area of thermal ablation zones (Pearson coefficient = 0.950 and p<0.0001). The radiological-pathological correlation was slightly lower (correlation = 0.853, p<0.0001) for strain imaging among these 14 in vivo ablation zones. We also found that, on average, elastic modulus imaging can more accurately depict thermal ablation zones, when compared to strain imaging (14.7% versus 22.3% absolute percent error in area measurements, respectively). Furthermore, elastic modulus imaging also provide higher (more than a factor of two) contrast-to-noise ratios for evaluating these thermal ablation zones than those on corresponding strain images, thereby reducing inter-observer variability. Our preliminary results suggest that elastic modulus imaging might potentially enhance the ability to visualize thermal ablation zones, thereby improving assessment of ablative therapies. PMID:20354279

  4. Automated Measurement and Statistical Modeling of Elastic Laminae in Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai; Hu, Jin-Jia; Humphrey, Jay D.; Liu, Jyh-Charn

    2010-01-01

    Structural features of elastic laminae within arteries can provide vital information for both the mechanobiology and the biomechanics of the wall. In this paper, we propose, test, and illustrate a new computer-based scheme for automated analysis of regional distributions of elastic laminae thickness, inter-lamellar distances, and fragmentation (furcation points) from standard histological images. Our scheme eliminates potential artifacts produced by tissue cutting, automatically aligns tissue according to physiologic orientations, and performs cross-sectional measurements along radial directions. A statistical randomized complete block design (RCBD) and F-test were used to assess potential (non)-uniformity of lamellar thicknesses and separations along both radial and circumferential directions. Illustrative results for both normotensive and hypertensive thoracic porcine aorta revealed marked heterogeneity along the radial direction in nearly stress-free samples. Clearly, regional measurements can provide more detailed information about morphologic changes that cannot be gained by globally averaged evaluations alone. We also found that quantifying Furcation Point densities offers new information about potential elastin fragmentation, particularly in response to increased loading due to hypertension. PMID:20221934

  5. Surface accuracy analysis and mathematical modeling of deployable large aperture elastic antenna reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Michael J.

    One class of deployable large aperture antenna consists of thin light-weight parabolic reflectors. A reflector of this type is a deployable structure that consists of an inflatable elastic membrane that is supported about its perimeter by a set of elastic tendons and is subjected to a constant hydrostatic pressure. A design may not hold the parabolic shape to within a desired tolerance due to an elastic deformation of the surface, particularly near the rim. We can compute the equilibrium configuration of the reflector system using an optimization-based solution procedure that calculates the total system energy and determines a configuration of minimum energy. Analysis of the equilibrium configuration reveals the behavior of the reflector shape under various loading conditions. The pressure, film strain energy, tendon strain energy, and gravitational energy are all considered in this analysis. The surface accuracy of the antenna reflector is measured by an RMS calculation while the reflector phase error component of the efficiency is determined by computing the power density at boresight. Our error computation methods are tailored for the faceted surface of our model and they are more accurate for this particular problem than the commonly applied Ruze Equation. Previous analytical work on parabolic antennas focused on axisymmetric geometries and loads. Symmetric equilibria are not assumed in our analysis. In addition, this dissertation contains two principle original findings: (1) the typical supporting tendon system tends to flatten a parabolic reflector near its edge. We find that surface accuracy can be significantly improved by fixing the edge of the inflated reflector to a rigid structure; (2) for large membranes assembled from flat sheets of thin material, we demonstrate that the surface accuracy of the resulting inflated membrane reflector can be improved by altering the cutting pattern of the flat components. Our findings demonstrate that the proper choice

  6. A three-dimensional computational model of collagen network mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Zhou, Xin; Riching, Kristin; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Keely, Patricia J; Guelcher, Scott A; Weaver, Alissa M; Jiang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) strongly influences cellular behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, and particularly migration. In cancer, the rigidity of the stromal collagen environment is thought to control tumor aggressiveness, and collagen alignment has been linked to tumor cell invasion. While the mechanical properties of collagen at both the single fiber scale and the bulk gel scale are quite well studied, how the fiber network responds to local stress or deformation, both structurally and mechanically, is poorly understood. This intermediate scale knowledge is important to understanding cell-ECM interactions and is the focus of this study. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic collagen fiber network model (bead-and-spring model) and studied fiber network behaviors for various biophysical conditions: collagen density, crosslinker strength, crosslinker density, and fiber orientation (random vs. prealigned). We found the best-fit crosslinker parameter values using shear simulation tests in a small strain region. Using this calibrated collagen model, we simulated both shear and tensile tests in a large linear strain region for different network geometry conditions. The results suggest that network geometry is a key determinant of the mechanical properties of the fiber network. We further demonstrated how the fiber network structure and mechanics evolves with a local formation, mimicking the effect of pulling by a pseudopod during cell migration. Our computational fiber network model is a step toward a full biomechanical model of cellular behaviors in various ECM conditions.

  7. A Three-Dimensional Computational Model of Collagen Network Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Zhou, Xin; Riching, Kristin; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Keely, Patricia J.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Weaver, Alissa M.; Jiang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) strongly influences cellular behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, and particularly migration. In cancer, the rigidity of the stromal collagen environment is thought to control tumor aggressiveness, and collagen alignment has been linked to tumor cell invasion. While the mechanical properties of collagen at both the single fiber scale and the bulk gel scale are quite well studied, how the fiber network responds to local stress or deformation, both structurally and mechanically, is poorly understood. This intermediate scale knowledge is important to understanding cell-ECM interactions and is the focus of this study. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic collagen fiber network model (bead-and-spring model) and studied fiber network behaviors for various biophysical conditions: collagen density, crosslinker strength, crosslinker density, and fiber orientation (random vs. prealigned). We found the best-fit crosslinker parameter values using shear simulation tests in a small strain region. Using this calibrated collagen model, we simulated both shear and tensile tests in a large linear strain region for different network geometry conditions. The results suggest that network geometry is a key determinant of the mechanical properties of the fiber network. We further demonstrated how the fiber network structure and mechanics evolves with a local formation, mimicking the effect of pulling by a pseudopod during cell migration. Our computational fiber network model is a step toward a full biomechanical model of cellular behaviors in various ECM conditions. PMID:25386649

  8. Calculations of isothermal elastic constants in the phase-field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisutha-Arnond, N.; Chan, V. W. L.; Elder, K. R.; Thornton, K.

    2013-01-01

    The phase-field crystal (PFC) method is an emerging coarse-grained atomistic model that can be used to predict material properties. In this work, we describe procedures for calculating isothermal elastic constants using the PFC method. We find that the conventional procedures used in the PFC method for calculating the elastic constants are inconsistent with those defined from a theory of thermoelasticity of stressed materials. Therefore we present an alternative procedure for calculating the elastic constants that are consistent with the definitions from the thermoelasticity theory, and show that the two procedures result in different predictions. Furthermore, we employ a thermodynamic formulation of stressed solids to quantify the differences between the elastic constants obtained from the two procedures in terms of thermodynamic quantities such as the pressure evaluated at the undeformed state.

  9. A Constitutive Model for Soft Clays Incorporating Elastic and Plastic Cross-Anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Jorge; Sivasithamparam, Nallathamby

    2017-01-01

    Natural clays exhibit a significant degree of anisotropy in their fabric, which initially is derived from the shape of the clay platelets, deposition process and one-dimensional consolidation. Various authors have proposed anisotropic elastoplastic models involving an inclined yield surface to reproduce anisotropic behavior of plastic nature. This paper presents a novel constitutive model for soft structured clays that includes anisotropic behavior both of elastic and plastic nature. The new model incorporates stress-dependent cross-anisotropic elastic behavior within the yield surface using three independent elastic parameters because natural clays exhibit cross-anisotropic (or transversely isotropic) behavior after deposition and consolidation. Thus, the model only incorporates an additional variable with a clear physical meaning, namely the ratio between horizontal and vertical stiffnesses, which can be analytically obtained from conventional laboratory tests. The model does not consider evolution of elastic anisotropy, but laboratory results show that large strains are necessary to cause noticeable changes in elastic anisotropic behavior. The model is able to capture initial non-vertical effective stress paths for undrained triaxial tests and to predict deviatoric strains during isotropic loading or unloading. PMID:28772938

  10. Sufficient minimal model for DNA denaturation: Integration of harmonic scalar elasticity and bond energies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Raj; Granek, Rony

    2016-10-14

    We study DNA denaturation by integrating elasticity - as described by the Gaussian network model - with bond binding energies, distinguishing between different base pairs and stacking energies. We use exact calculation, within the model, of the Helmholtz free-energy of any partial denaturation state, which implies that the entropy of all formed "bubbles" ("loops") is accounted for. Considering base pair bond removal single events, the bond designated for opening is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all remaining base pair bonds. Despite of its great simplicity, for several known DNA sequences our results are in accord with available theoretical and experimental studies. Moreover, we report free-energy profiles along the denaturation pathway, which allow to detect stable or meta-stable partial denaturation states, composed of bubble, as local free-energy minima separated by barriers. Our approach allows to study very long DNA strands with commonly available computational power, as we demonstrate for a few random sequences in the range 200-800 base-pairs. For the latter, we also elucidate the self-averaging property of the system. Implications for the well known breathing dynamics of DNA are elucidated.

  11. Sufficient minimal model for DNA denaturation: Integration of harmonic scalar elasticity and bond energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amit Raj; Granek, Rony

    2016-10-01

    We study DNA denaturation by integrating elasticity — as described by the Gaussian network model — with bond binding energies, distinguishing between different base pairs and stacking energies. We use exact calculation, within the model, of the Helmholtz free-energy of any partial denaturation state, which implies that the entropy of all formed "bubbles" ("loops") is accounted for. Considering base pair bond removal single events, the bond designated for opening is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all remaining base pair bonds. Despite of its great simplicity, for several known DNA sequences our results are in accord with available theoretical and experimental studies. Moreover, we report free-energy profiles along the denaturation pathway, which allow to detect stable or meta-stable partial denaturation states, composed of bubble, as local free-energy minima separated by barriers. Our approach allows to study very long DNA strands with commonly available computational power, as we demonstrate for a few random sequences in the range 200-800 base-pairs. For the latter, we also elucidate the self-averaging property of the system. Implications for the well known breathing dynamics of DNA are elucidated.

  12. In vivo measurements of human neck skin elasticity using MRI and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    An, Yunqiang; Ji, Changjin; Li, Yong; Wang, Jianxia; Zhang, Xinyue; Huang, Yaqi

    2017-04-01

    The assessment of mechanical properties of the human skin is very important in investigating the mechanism of obstructive sleep apnea, a common disorder characterized by repetitive collapse and obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. In this study, a unique method, combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and finite element modeling (FEM), was developed to obtain the value of the in vivo elastic modulus of the neck skin. A total of 22 subjects, 16 males and six females, were recruited to participate in the MRI studies. The changes in the airway and the neck size resulting from fluid shift from the lower body to the neck were measured based on the MR images. A two-dimensional plane strain FE model was built to simulate such changes in the neck cross-section for each subject. Solving an inverse problem using FEM by matching the measured data, we obtained the in vivo elastic modulus of the neck skin to be 1.78 ± 1.73 MPa. Results showed that the elastic modulus tended to increase with age and body mass index for these subjects. A sensitivity analysis of the muscle and fat mechanical parameters was also performed to test their effects on the predicted skin elasticity. The unique method developed in this study for measuring the in vivo elastic modulus of the neck skin is quite effective, and the skin elasticity value obtained using this method is credible. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. An Elastic-Plastic Damage Model for Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil

    2009-08-11

    This article proposes an elastic-plastic damage model that combines micromechanical modeling with continuum damage mechanics to predict the stress-strain response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics. The model accounts for distributions of orientation and length of elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic matrix whose behavior is elastic-plastic and damageable. The elastic-plastic damage behavior of the matrix is described by the modified Ramberg-Osgood relation and the three-dimensional damage model in deformation assuming isotropic hardening. Fiber/matrix debonding is accounted for using a parameter that governs the fiber/matrix interface compliance. A linear relationship between this parameter and the matrix damage variable is assumed. First, the elastic-plastic damage behavior of the reference aligned-fiber composite containing the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite is computed using an incremental Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka mean field approach. The incremental response of the latter is then obtained from the solution for the aligned-fiber composite by averaging over all fiber orientations. The model is validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  14. Effects of Host-rock Fracturing on Elastic-deformation Source Models of Volcano Deflation.

    PubMed

    Holohan, Eoghan P; Sudhaus, Henriette; Walter, Thomas R; Schöpfer, Martin P J; Walsh, John J

    2017-09-08

    Volcanoes commonly inflate or deflate during episodes of unrest or eruption. Continuum mechanics models that assume linear elastic deformation of the Earth's crust are routinely used to invert the observed ground motions. The source(s) of deformation in such models are generally interpreted in terms of magma bodies or pathways, and thus form a basis for hazard assessment and mitigation. Using discontinuum mechanics models, we show how host-rock fracturing (i.e. non-elastic deformation) during drainage of a magma body can progressively change the shape and depth of an elastic-deformation source. We argue that this effect explains the marked spatio-temporal changes in source model attributes inferred for the March-April 2007 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Reunion. We find that pronounced deflation-related host-rock fracturing can: (1) yield inclined source model geometries for a horizontal magma body; (2) cause significant upward migration of an elastic-deformation source, leading to underestimation of the true magma body depth and potentially to a misinterpretation of ascending magma; and (3) at least partly explain underestimation by elastic-deformation sources of changes in sub-surface magma volume.

  15. An elastic failure model of indentation damage. [of brittle structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, B. M.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.

    1984-01-01

    A mechanistically consistent model for indentation damage based on elastic failure at tensile or shear overloads, is proposed. The model accommodates arbitrary crack orientation, stress relaxation, reduction and recovery of stiffness due to crack opening and closure, and interfacial friction due to backward sliding of closed cracks. This elastic failure model was implemented by an axisymmetric finite element program which was used to simulate progressive damage in a silicon nitride plate indented by a tungsten carbide sphere. The predicted damage patterns and the permanent impression matched those observed experimentally. The validation of this elastic failure model shows that the plastic deformation postulated by others is not necessary to replicate the indentation damage of brittle structural ceramics.

  16. Geophysical models of heat and fluid flow in damageable poro-elastic continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubíček, Tomáš

    2017-03-01

    A rather general model for fluid and heat transport in poro-elastic continua undergoing possibly also plastic-like deformation and damage is developed with the goal to cover various specific models of rock rheology used in geophysics of Earth's crust. Nonconvex free energy at small elastic strains, gradient theories (in particular the concept of second-grade nonsimple continua), and Biot poro-elastic model are employed, together with possible large displacement due to large plastic-like strains evolving during long time periods. Also the additive splitting is justified in stratified situations which are of interest in modelling of lithospheric crust faults. Thermodynamically based formulation includes entropy balance (in particular the Clausius-Duhem inequality) and an explicit global energy balance. It is further outlined that the energy balance can be used to ensure, under suitable data qualification, existence of a weak solution and stability and convergence of suitable approximation schemes at least in some particular situations.

  17. An elastic failure model of indentation damage. [of brittle structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, B. M.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.

    1984-01-01

    A mechanistically consistent model for indentation damage based on elastic failure at tensile or shear overloads, is proposed. The model accommodates arbitrary crack orientation, stress relaxation, reduction and recovery of stiffness due to crack opening and closure, and interfacial friction due to backward sliding of closed cracks. This elastic failure model was implemented by an axisymmetric finite element program which was used to simulate progressive damage in a silicon nitride plate indented by a tungsten carbide sphere. The predicted damage patterns and the permanent impression matched those observed experimentally. The validation of this elastic failure model shows that the plastic deformation postulated by others is not necessary to replicate the indentation damage of brittle structural ceramics.

  18. Ice-shelf tidal deflections modelled with a full 3D elastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Ice-shelf flexure modelling was performed using a full 3D finite-difference elastic model, which takes into account sub-ice-shelf seawater flow. The numerical experiments were carried out for the thin plate of ice with changing ice thickness (with trapezoidal profile along the center line). The sub-ice seawater flow was described by the wave channel equation (Holdsworth and Glynn, 1978). In the model ice shelf flexures result from variations in the incoming (outgoing) sea water flux, which flows into (out of) the sub-ice-shelf channel. The numerical experiments were carried out for harmonic incoming seawater fluxes and the ice-shelf flexures were obtained for tidal ocean impacts and for different ice-shelf spatial extents. References Bassis J.N., Fricker H.A., Coleman R., Minster J.-B.: An investigation into the forces that drive ice-shelf rift propagation on the Amery Ice Shelf, East Antarcyica. J. of Glaciol. 54 (184): 17-27, 2008. Holdsworth G and Glynn J.: Iceberg calving from floating glaciers by a vibrating mechanism. Nature. 274, 464-466, 1978. Konovalov Y. V.: Ice-shelf resonance deflections modelled with a 2D elastic centre-line model. Physical Review & Research International, 4(1), 9-29, 2014. Vaughan D.G.: Tidal flexure at ice shelf margins. J. Geophys. Res. 100(B4), 6213-6224, 2002.

  19. Mobility Model for Tactical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollo, Milan; Komenda, Antonín

    In this paper a synthetic mobility model which represents behavior and movement pattern of heterogeneous units in disaster relief and battlefield scenarios is proposed. These operations usually take place in environment without preexisting communication infrastructure and units thus have to be connected by wireless communication network. Units cooperate to fulfill common tasks and communication network has to serve high amount of communication requests, especially data, voice and video stream transmissions. To verify features of topology control, routing and interaction protocols software simulations are usually used, because of their scalability, repeatability and speed. Behavior of all these protocols relies on the mobility model of the network nodes, which has to resemble real-life movement pattern. Proposed mobility model is goal-driven and provides support for various types of units, group mobility and realistic environment model with obstacles. Basic characteristics of the mobility model like node spatial distribution and average node degree were analyzed.

  20. The impact of ice I rheology on interior models of Ganymede: The elastic vs. the visco-elastic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrügge, Gregor; Hussmann, Hauke; Sohl, Frank; Oberst, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Many investigations on key processes of icy satellites are driven by the rheological behavior of planetary ices. Future missions to Jupiter's icy moons (e.g. JUICE / Europa clipper) aimed at constraining the thickness of the outer ice shell using radio science and/or laser altimetry will have to address this problem. We investigate for the case of Ganymede under which conditions the ice I viscosity could be constrained by measuring the phase-lag of the tidal response using laser altimetry. In the absence of seismic data, interior structure models are constrained by the satellite's mean density and mean moment-of-inertia factor. One key observable to reduce the ambiguity of the corresponding structural models is the measurement of the dynamic response of the satellite's outer ice shells to tidal forces exerted by Jupiter and characterized by the body tide surface Love numbers h2 and k2. The Love number k2 measures the variation of the gravitational potential due to tidally induced internal redistribution of mass and can be inferred from radio science experiments. The Love number h2 is a measure for the tide-induced radial displacement of the satellite's surface. It is an advantage that Ganymede's surface displacement Love number h2 can be expected to be measured with a high accuracy using laser altimetry (Steinbrügge et al., 2014). However, the determination of the resulting ice thickness further depends on the possible existence of a liquid subsurface water ocean and on the tidally effective rheology of the outer ice shell (Moore and Schubert, 2003). Here, we distinguish between an elastic, visco-elastic or even fluid behavior in the sense of the Maxwell model and alternative rheological models. In the case of Ganymede the fluid case would imply high ice temperatures which are at odds with thermal equilibrium models calculated by Spohn and Schubert (2003). However the visco-elastic case is still possible. Laboratory measurements of ice I (e.g. Sotin et al., 1998

  1. Performance evaluation of data center service localization based on virtual resource migration in software defined elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; Tan, Yuanlong; Lin, Yi; Han, Jianrui; Lee, Young

    2015-09-07

    Data center interconnection with elastic optical network is a promising scenario to meet the high burstiness and high-bandwidth requirements of data center services. In our previous work, we implemented cross stratum optimization of optical network and application stratums resources that allows to accommodate data center services. In view of this, this study extends the data center resources to user side to enhance the end-to-end quality of service. We propose a novel data center service localization (DCSL) architecture based on virtual resource migration in software defined elastic data center optical network. A migration evaluation scheme (MES) is introduced for DCSL based on the proposed architecture. The DCSL can enhance the responsiveness to the dynamic end-to-end data center demands, and effectively reduce the blocking probability to globally optimize optical network and application resources. The overall feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture are experimentally verified on the control plane of our OpenFlow-based enhanced SDN testbed. The performance of MES scheme under heavy traffic load scenario is also quantitatively evaluated based on DCSL architecture in terms of path blocking probability, provisioning latency and resource utilization, compared with other provisioning scheme.

  2. Low Activation Joining of SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion Applications: Modeling Miniature Torsion Tests with Elastic and Elastic-Plastic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Ferraris, Monica; Ventrella, Andrea; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-03-01

    The use of SiC and SiC-composites in fission or fusion environments requires joining methods for assembling systems. The international fusion community designed miniature torsion specimens for joint testing and irradiation in test reactors with limited irradiation volumes. These torsion specimens fail out-of-plane when joints are strong and when elastic moduli are within a certain range compared to SiC, which causes difficulties in determining shear strengths for joints or for comparing unirradiated and irradiated joints. A finite element damage model was developed that indicates fracture is likely to occur within the joined pieces to cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model was extended to treat elastic-plastic joints such as SiC/epoxy and steel/epoxy joints tested as validation of the specimen design.

  3. A Model of Network Porosity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-09

    standpoint remains more of an art than a science. Even when well executed, the ongoing evolution of the network may violate initial, security-critical design...attack graphs [1] which address worst-case attack reachability of a network for a single point in time. Our model addresses the stochastic evolution of...Laboratory, Technical rep. (2014). [7] P. Hudak, “Conception, evolution , and application of functional programming languages,” ACM Computing Surveys 21(3), 383

  4. Network growth models and genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D. V.; Kauffman, S. A.; Socolar, J. E. S.

    2006-03-01

    We study a class of growth algorithms for directed graphs that are candidate models for the evolution of genetic regulatory networks. The algorithms involve partial duplication of nodes and their links, together with the innovation of new links, allowing for the possibility that input and output links from a newly created node may have different probabilities of survival. We find some counterintuitive trends as the parameters are varied, including the broadening of the in-degree distribution when the probability for retaining input links is decreased. We also find that both the scaling of transcription factors with genome size and the measured degree distributions for genes in yeast can be reproduced by the growth algorithm if and only if a special seed is used to initiate the process.

  5. Network growth models and genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolar, Joshua; Foster, David; Kauffman, Stuart

    2006-03-01

    We study a class of growth algorithms for directed graphs that are candidate models for the evolution of genetic regulatory networks. The algorithms involve partial duplication of nodes and their links, together with innovation of new links, allowing for the possibility that input and output links from a newly created node may have different probabilities of survival. We find some counterintuitive trends as parameters are varied, including the broadening of indegree distribution when the probability for retaining input links is decreased. We also find that both the scaling of transcription factors with genome size and the measured degree distributions for genes in yeast can be reproduced by the growth algorithm if and only if a special seed is used to initiate the process.

  6. New features of vault architecture and dynamics revealed by novel refinement using the deformable elastic network approach.

    PubMed

    Casañas, Arnau; Querol-Audí, Jordi; Guerra, Pablo; Pous, Joan; Tanaka, Hideaki; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Verdaguer, Nuria; Fita, Ignasi

    2013-06-01

    The vault particle, with a molecular weight of about 10 MDa, is the largest ribonucleoprotein that has been described. The X-ray structure of intact rat vault has been solved at a resolution of 3.5 Å [Tanaka et al. (2009), Science, 323, 384-388], showing an overall barrel-shaped architecture organized into two identical moieties, each consisting of 39 copies of the major vault protein (MVP). The model deposited in the PDB includes 39 MVP copies (half a vault) in the crystal asymmetric unit. A 2.1 Å resolution structure of the seven N-terminal repeats (R1-7) of MVP has also been determined [Querol-Audí et al. (2009), EMBO J. 28, 3450-3457], revealing important discrepancies with respect to the MVP models for repeats R1 and R2. Here, the re-refinement of the vault structure by incorporating the high-resolution information available for the R1-7 domains, using the deformable elastic network (DEN) approach and maintaining strict 39-fold noncrystallographic symmetry is reported. The new refinement indicates that at the resolution presently available the MVP shell can be described well as only one independent subunit organized with perfect D39 molecular symmetry. This refinement reveals that significant rearrangements occur in the N-terminus of MVP during the closing of the two vault halves and that the 39-fold symmetry breaks in the cap region. These results reflect the highly dynamic nature of the vault structure and represent a necessary step towards a better understanding of the biology and regulation of this particle.

  7. On the influence of model parametrization in elastic full waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, D.; De Nil, D.; Kurzmann, A.; Przebindowska, A.; Bohlen, T.

    2012-10-01

    Elastic Full Waveform Tomography (FWT) aims to reduce the misfit between recorded and modelled data, to deduce a very detailed model of elastic material parameters in the underground. The choice of the elastic model parameters to be inverted affects the convergence and quality of the reconstructed subsurface model. Using the Cross-Triangle-Squares (CTS) model three elastic parametrizations, Lamé parameters m1 = [λ, μ, ρ], seismic velocities m2 = [Vp, Vs, ρ] and seismic impedances m3 = [Ip, Is, ρ] for far-offset reflection seismic acquisition geometries with explosive point sources and free-surface condition are studied. In each CTS model the three elastic parameters are assigned to three different geometrical objects that are spatially separated. The results of the CTS model study reveal a strong requirement of a sequential frequency inversion from low to high frequencies to reconstruct the density model. Using only high-frequency data, cross-talk artefacts have an influence on the quantitative reconstruction of the material parameters, while for a sequential frequency inversion only structural artefacts, representing the boundaries of different model parameters, are present. During the inversion, the Lamé parameters, seismic velocities and impedances could be reconstructed well. However, using the Lamé parametrization ?-artefacts are present in the λ model, while similar artefacts are suppressed when using seismic velocities or impedances. The density inversion shows the largest ambiguity for all parametrizations. However, the artefacts are again more dominant, when using the Lamé parameters and suppressed for seismic velocity and impedance parametrization. The afore mentioned results are confirmed for a geologically more realistic modified Marmousi-II model. Using a conventional streamer acquisition geometry the P-velocity, S-velocity and density models of the subsurface were reconstructed successfully and are compared with the results of the Lam

  8. Tuition Elasticity of the Demand for Higher Education among Current Students: A Pricing Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Glenn A.; Whipple, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A pricing model is offered, based on retention of current students, that colleges can use to determine appropriate tuition. A computer-based model that quantifies the relationship between tuition elasticity and projected net return to the college was developed and applied to determine an appropriate tuition rate for a small, private liberal arts…

  9. A Highly Anisotropic Nonlinear Elasticity Model for Vesicles II: Derivation of the Thin Bilayer Bending Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlet, Benoît

    2015-08-01

    We study the thin-shell limit of the nonlinear elasticity model for vesicles introduced in part I. We consider vesicles of width with elastic energy of order . In this regime, we show that the limit model is a bending theory for generalized hypersurfaces—namely, co-dimension one oriented varifolds without boundary. Up to a positive factor, the limit functional is the Willmore energy. In the language of -convergence, we establish a compactness result, a lower bound result and the matching upper bound in the smooth case.

  10. Generalized Chou-Yang Model and Meson-Proton Elastic Scattering at High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Mohammad; Aleem, Fazal-E.; Rashid, Haris

    The various characteristics of meson-proton elastic scattering at high energies are explained by using the generalized Chou-Yang model which takes into consideration the anisotropic scattering of objects constituting pions(kaons) and protons. A new parametrization of the proton form factor consistent with the recent experimental data is proposed. It is then shown that all the data for meson-proton elastic scattering at 200 and 250 GeV/c are in agreement with theoretical computations. The physical picture of generalized Chou-Yang model which is based on multiple scattering theory is given in detail.

  11. Dynamic elastic properties from micro-CT images: modeling and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, M.; Pervukhina, M.; de Paula, O.; Clennell, B.; Gurevich, B.

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the elastic properties of rocks is a key factor in seismic interpretation. Elastic properties of rock are determined by its microstructure and their prediction relies on the availability of accurate microstructural models. X-ray computer tomography (CT) as a unique non-destructive technique is becoming a powerful tool in geophysics research which reveals detailed 3D microstructure of rock with special resolution of 1 micron. Recent breakthrough in computational capabilities allows simulation of elastic properties directly using the micro-CT images. In this study we simulate acoustic velocities of sandstones, based on high resolution 3D images and compare simulation results with ultrasonic measurements. Synchrotron images of two sandstones are segmented to separate grain from pore space. The porosity obtained as a result of the segmentation process is compared with the measured porosity for the segmentation quality control. Parallel 3D finite difference (FD) code is used to simulate elastic wave propagation through the digitized two phase media where the total solid phase is supposed to have elastic properties of intact quartz and the pore space is either dry or saturated with water. Attenuation and dispersion of acoustic velocities are obtained at a range of frequencies. The numerical results noticeably overestimate velocities obtained at laboratory experiments at ultrasonic frequencies. The discrepancy can be explained with the fact that grain contacts have strong effect on elastic moduli and are the most speculative part of the simulations. To validate our FD code and calibrate the properties of grain contacts, we simulated elastic wave propagation in aluminum foam with porosity of 40%. All grain contacts in the foam are "solid" and its microstructure is similar to that of moldic carbonates. Preliminary results of FD modeling and comparison with experiment of carbonates are presented as well.

  12. Shear-stress fluctuations in self-assembled transient elastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Kriuchevskyi, I.; Cavallo, A.; Xu, H.; Baschnagel, J.

    2016-06-01

    Focusing on shear-stress fluctuations, we investigate numerically a simple generic model for self-assembled transient networks formed by repulsive beads reversibly bridged by ideal springs. With Δ t being the sampling time and t(f ) ˜1 /f the Maxwell relaxation time (set by the spring recombination frequency f ), the dimensionless parameter Δ x =Δ t /t(f ) is systematically scanned from the liquid limit (Δ x ≫1 ) to the solid limit (Δ x ≪1 ) where the network topology is quenched and an ensemble average over m -independent configurations is required. Generalizing previous work on permanent networks, it is shown that the shear-stress relaxation modulus G (t ) may be efficiently determined for all Δ x using the simple-average expression G (t ) =μA-h (t ) with μA=G (0 ) characterizing the canonical-affine shear transformation of the system at t =0 and h (t ) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress as a function of time t . This relation is compared to the standard expression G (t ) =c ˜(t ) using the (rescaled) shear-stress autocorrelation function c ˜(t ) . Lower bounds for the m configurations required by both relations are given.

  13. Shear-stress fluctuations in self-assembled transient elastic networks.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, J P; Kriuchevskyi, I; Cavallo, A; Xu, H; Baschnagel, J

    2016-06-01

    Focusing on shear-stress fluctuations, we investigate numerically a simple generic model for self-assembled transient networks formed by repulsive beads reversibly bridged by ideal springs. With Δt being the sampling time and t_{☆}(f)∼1/f the Maxwell relaxation time (set by the spring recombination frequency f), the dimensionless parameter Δx=Δt/t_{☆}(f) is systematically scanned from the liquid limit (Δx≫1) to the solid limit (Δx≪1) where the network topology is quenched and an ensemble average over m-independent configurations is required. Generalizing previous work on permanent networks, it is shown that the shear-stress relaxation modulus G(t) may be efficiently determined for all Δx using the simple-average expression G(t)=μ_{A}-h(t) with μ_{A}=G(0) characterizing the canonical-affine shear transformation of the system at t=0 and h(t) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress as a function of time t. This relation is compared to the standard expression G(t)=c[over ̃](t) using the (rescaled) shear-stress autocorrelation function c[over ̃](t). Lower bounds for the m configurations required by both relations are given.

  14. An approach for modeling vulnerability of the network of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Song, Bo; Zhang, Zhaojun; Liu, Haikuan

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a framework is given to model the network of networks and to investigate the vulnerability of the network of networks subjected to failures. Because there are several redundant systems in infrastructure systems, the dependent intensity between two networks is introduced and adopted to discuss the vulnerability of the interdependent infrastructure networks subjected to failures. Shanghai electrified rail transit network is used to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed framework. Because the rail network is dependent on the power grid and communication network, the corresponding power grid and communication network are also included in this system. Meanwhile the failures to the power grid and communication network are utilized to investigate the vulnerability of the rail network. The results show that the rail network strongly depends on the power grid and weakly depends on the communication network, and the transport functionality loss of the rail network increases with the increase of dependent intensity. Meanwhile the highest betweenness node-based attack to the power grid and the largest degree node-based attack to the communication network can result in the most functionality losses to the rail network. Moreover, the functionality loss of the rail network has the smallest value when the tolerance parameter of the power grid equals 0.75 and the critical nodes of the power grid and communication network can be obtained by simulations.

  15. Validation of an analytical compressed elastic tube model for acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hirtum, A.; Blandin, R.; Pelorson, X.

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic wave propagation through a compressed elastic tube is a recurrent problem in engineering. Compression of the tube is achieved by pinching it between two parallel bars so that the pinching effort as well as the longitudinal position of pinching can be controlled. A stadium-based geometrical tube model is combined with a plane wave acoustic model in order to estimate acoustic wave propagation through the elastic tube as a function of pinching effort, pinching position, and outlet termination (flanged or unflanged). The model outcome is validated against experimental data obtained in a frequency range from 3.5 kHz up to 10 kHz by displacing an acoustic probe along the tube's centerline. Due to plane wave model assumptions and the decrease of the lowest higher order mode cut-on frequency with increasing pinching effort, the difference between modeled and measured data is analysed in three frequency bands, up to 5 kHz, 8 kHz, and 9.5 kHz, respectively. It is seen that the mean and standard error within each frequency band do not significantly vary with pinching effort, pinching position, or outlet termination. Therefore, it is concluded that the analytical tube model is suitable to approximate the elastic tube geometry when modeling acoustic wave propagation through the pinched elastic tube with either flanged or unflanged termination.

  16. Modeling the Cell Muscle Membrane from Normal and Desmin- or Dystrophin-null Mice as an Elastic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Santamaría-Holek, Ivan; Bloch, Robert J.; Ortega, Alicia; González-Serratos, Hugo

    2010-12-01

    Two of the most important proteins linking the contractile apparatus and costameres at the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers are dystrophin and desmin. We have developed an elastic model of the proteins that link the sarcolemma to the myofibrils. This is a distributed model, with an elastic constant, k, that includes the main protein components of the costameres. The distributed spring model is composed of parallel units attached in series. To test the model, we performed experiments in which we applied negative pressure, generated by an elastimeter, to a small area of the sarcolemma from single myofiber. The negative pressure formed a bleb of variable height, dependent on the pressure applied. We normalized our measurements of k in dystrophin-null (mdx) and desmin-null (des-/-) mice to the value we obtained for wild type (WT) mice, which was set at 1.0. The relative experimental value for the stiffness of myofibers from mice lacking dystrophin or desmin was 0.5 and 0.7, respectively. The theoretical k values of the individual elements were obtained using neural networks (NN), in which the input was the k value for each parallel spring component and the output was the solution of each resulting parallel system. We compare the experimental values of k in control and mutant muscles to the theoretical values obtained by NN for each protein. Computed theoretical values were 0.4 and 0.8 for dystrophin- and desmin-null muscles, respectively, and 0.9 for WT, in reasonable agreement with our experimental results. This suggests that, although it is a simplified spring model solved by NN, it provides a good approximation of the distribution of spring elements and the elastic constants of the proteins that form the costameres. Our results show that dystrophin is the protein that contributes more than any other to the strength of the connections between the sarcolemma and the contractile apparatus, the costameres.

  17. The permeability and elastic moduli of tuff from Campi Flegrei, Italy: implications for ground deformation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Meredith, P. G.; Vinciguerra, S.; Reuschlé, T.

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of ground deformation modelling at active volcanoes is a principal requirement in volcanic hazard mitigation. However, the reliability of such models relies on the accuracy of the rock physical property (permeability and elastic moduli) input parameters. Unfortunately, laboratory-derived values on representative rocks are usually rare. To this end we have performed a systematic laboratory study on the influence of pressure and temperature on the permeability and elastic moduli of samples from the two most widespread lithified pyroclastic deposits at the Campi Flegrei volcanic district, Italy. Our data show that the water permeability of Neapolitan Yellow Tuff and a tuff from the Campanian Ignimbrite differ by about 1.5 orders of magnitude. As pressure (depth) increases beyond the critical point for inelastic pore collapse (at an effective pressure of 10-15 MPa, or a depth of about 750 m), permeability and porosity decrease significantly, and ultrasonic wave velocities and dynamic elastic moduli increase significantly. Increasing the thermal stressing temperature increases the permeability and decreases the ultrasonic wave velocities and dynamic elastic moduli of the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff; whereas the tuff from the Campanian Ignimbrite remains unaffected. This difference is due to the presence of thermally unstable zeolites within the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. For both rocks we also find, under the same pressure conditions, that the dynamic (calculated from ultrasonic wave velocities) and static (calculated from triaxial stress-strain data) elastic moduli differ significantly. The choice of elastic moduli in ground deformation modelling is therefore an important consideration. While we urge that these new laboratory data should be considered in routine ground deformation modelling, we highlight the challenges for ground deformation modelling based on the heterogeneous nature (vertically and laterally) of the rocks that comprise the caldera at Campi

  18. Quantitative Modeling of Coupled Piezo-Elastodynamic Behavior of Piezoelectric Actuators Bonded to an Elastic Medium for Structural Health Monitoring: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guoliang; Song, Fei; Wang, Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Elastic waves, especially guided waves, generated by a piezoelectric actuator/sensor network, have shown great potential for on-line health monitoring of advanced aerospace, nuclear, and automotive structures in recent decades. Piezoelectric materials can function as both actuators and sensors in these applications due to wide bandwidth, quick response and low costs. One of the most fundamental issues surrounding the effective use of piezoelectric actuators is the quantitative evaluation of the resulting elastic wave propagation by considering the coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior between the actuator and the host medium. Accurate characterization of the local interfacial stress distribution between the actuator and the host medium is the key issue for the problem. This paper presents a review of the development of analytical, numerical and hybrid approaches for modeling of the coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior. The resulting elastic wave propagation for structural health monitoring is also summarized. PMID:22319319

  19. Quantitative modeling of coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior of piezoelectric actuators bonded to an elastic medium for structural health monitoring: a review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoliang; Song, Fei; Wang, Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Elastic waves, especially guided waves, generated by a piezoelectric actuator/sensor network, have shown great potential for on-line health monitoring of advanced aerospace, nuclear, and automotive structures in recent decades. Piezoelectric materials can function as both actuators and sensors in these applications due to wide bandwidth, quick response and low costs. One of the most fundamental issues surrounding the effective use of piezoelectric actuators is the quantitative evaluation of the resulting elastic wave propagation by considering the coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior between the actuator and the host medium. Accurate characterization of the local interfacial stress distribution between the actuator and the host medium is the key issue for the problem. This paper presents a review of the development of analytical, numerical and hybrid approaches for modeling of the coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior. The resulting elastic wave propagation for structural health monitoring is also summarized.

  20. Quantifying the contribution of actin networks to the elastic strength of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Guck, Jochen; Wottawah, Falk; Schinkinger, Stefan; Lincoln, Bryan; Romeyke, Maren; Moon, Tess; Käs, Josef

    2006-09-21

    The structural models created to understand the cytoskeletal mechanics of cells in suspension are described here. Suspended cells can be deformed by well-defined surface stresses in an Optical Stretcher [Guck, J., Ananthakrishnan, R., Mahmood, H., Moon, T.J., Cunningham, C.C., Käs, J., 2001. The optical stretcher: a novel laser tool to micromanipulate cells. Biophys. J. 81(2), 767-784], a two-beam optical trap designed for the contact-free deformation of cells. Suspended cells have a well-defined cytoskeleton, displaying a radially symmetric actin cortical network underlying the cell membrane with no actin stress fibers, and microtubules and intermediate filaments in the interior. Based on experimental data using suspended fibroblasts, we create two structural models: a thick shell actin cortex model that describes cell deformation for a localized stress distribution on these cells and a three-layered model that considers the entire cytoskeleton when a broad stress distribution is applied. Applying the models to data, we obtain a (actin) cortical shear moduli G of approximately 220 Pa for normal fibroblasts and approximately 185 Pa for malignantly transformed fibroblasts. Additionally, modeling the cortex as a transiently crosslinked isotropic actin network, we show that actin and its crosslinkers must be co-localized into a tight shell to achieve these cortical strengths. The similar moduli values and cortical actin and crosslinker densities but different deformabilities of the normal and cancerous cells suggest that a cell's structural strength is not solely determined by cytoskeletal composition but equally importantly by (actin) cytoskeletal architecture via differing cortical thicknesses. We also find that although the interior structural elements (microtubules, nucleus) contribute to the deformed cell's exact shape via their loose coupling to the cortex, it is the outer actin cortical shell (and its thickness) that mainly determines the cell's structural

  1. Data modeling of network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Faucheux, Jeffery P.; Harris, Brad

    2004-01-01

    This paper highlights Data Modeling theory and its use for text data mining as a graphical network search engine. Data Modeling is then used to create a real-time filter capable of monitoring network traffic down to the port level for unusual dynamics and changes in business as usual. This is accomplished in an unsupervised fashion without a priori knowledge of abnormal characteristics. Two novel methods for converting streaming binary data into a form amenable to graphics based search and change detection are introduced. These techniques are then successfully applied to 1999 KDD Cup network attack data log-on sessions to demonstrate that Data Modeling can detect attacks without prior training on any form of attack behavior. Finally, two new methods for data encryption using these ideas are proposed.

  2. The elastic fibre network of the human lumbar anulus fibrosus: architecture, mechanical function and potential role in the progression of intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fazzalari, Nicola L.

    2009-01-01

    Elastic fibres are critical constituents of dynamic biological structures that functionally require elasticity and resilience. The network of elastic fibres in the anulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc is extensive, however until recently, the majority of histological, biochemical and biomechanical studies have focussed on the roles of other extracellular matrix constituents such as collagens and proteoglycans. The resulting lack of detailed descriptions of elastic fibre network architecture and mechanical function has limited understanding of the potentially important contribution made by elastic fibres to healthy disc function and their possible roles in the progression of disc degeneration. In addition, it has made it difficult to postulate what the consequences of elastic fibre related disorders would be for intervertebral disc behaviour, and to develop treatments accordingly. In this paper, we review recent and historical studies which have examined both the structure and the function of the human lumbar anulus fibrosus elastic fibre network, provide a synergistic discussion in an attempt to clarify its potentially critical contribution both to normal intervertebral disc behaviour and the processes relating to its degeneration, and recommend critical areas for future research. PMID:19263091

  3. Non-Newtonian bile flow in elastic cystic duct: one- and three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, W G; Luo, X Y; Chin, S B; Hill, N A; Johnson, A G; Bird, N C

    2008-11-01

    Bile flow is thought to play an essential role in the pathophysiological genesis of cholelithiasis (gallstone formation) and in gallbladder pain. In this paper, we extend our previous study of the human biliary system (Li et al., 2007, J. Biomech. Eng., 129:164-173) to include two important factors: the non-Newtonian properties of bile, and elastic deformation of the cystic duct. A one-dimensional (1D) model is analyzed and compared with three-dimensional (3D) fluid-structure interaction simulations. It is found that non-Newtonian bile raises resistance to the flow of bile, which can be augmented significantly by the elastic deformation (collapse) of the cystic duct. We also show that the 1D model predicts the pressure drop of the cystic duct flow well for all cases considered (Newtonian or non-Newtonian flow, rigid or elastic ducts), when compared with the full 3D simulations.

  4. From Process Modeling to Elastic Property Prediction for Long-Fiber Injection-Molded Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara J.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Holbery, James D.; Smith, Mark T.

    2007-09-13

    This paper presents an experimental-modeling approach to predict the elastic properties of long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). The approach accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in LFTs. LFT samples were injection-molded for the study, and fiber length and orientation distributions were measured at different locations for use in the computation of the composite properties. The current fiber orientation model was assessed to determine its capability to predict fiber orientation in LFTs. Predicted fiber orientations for the studied LFT samples were also used in the calculation of the elastic properties of these samples, and the predicted overall moduli were then compared with the experimental results. The elastic property prediction was based on the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka method combined with the orientation averaging technique. The predictions reasonably agree with the experimental LFT data

  5. Low-Dimensional Generalized Coordinate Models of Large-Deformation Elastic Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odhner, Lael; Dollar, Aaron

    2012-02-01

    In the field of robotics, it is increasingly common to use elastic elements such as rods, beams or sheets to allow motion between the rigid links of a robot, rather than conventional sliding mechanisms such as pin joints. Although these elastic joints are simpler to manufacture, especially at meso- and micro-scales, representational simplicity is sacrificed. It is far easier to compute the Lagrangian of a robot using joint angles as generalized coordinates, rather than by considering the large-deformation continuum behavior of elastic joints. In this talk, we will discuss our work toward finding accurate, low-dimensional discretizations of elastic joint mechanics, suitable for use in generalized coordinate models of robot kinematics and dynamics. We use modally parameterized backbone curves to describe the kinematic configuration of the elastic joints, and compute the energy associated with deformation using rod and shell theory. In the plane, only three smooth deformation modes are sufficient to describe Euler-Bernoulli bending of 90 degrees to within 1 percent. Parametric models for the three-dimensional motion of sheet hinges are more complex, but can be simplified significantly using boundary conditions and constraints imposed by ruled surface assumptions.

  6. A general one-dimension nonlinear magneto-elastic coupled constitutive model for magnetostrictive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Da-Guang; Li, Meng-Han; Zhou, Hao-Miao

    2015-10-15

    For magnetostrictive rods under combined axial pre-stress and magnetic field, a general one-dimension nonlinear magneto-elastic coupled constitutive model was built in this paper. First, the elastic Gibbs free energy was expanded into polynomial, and the relationship between stress and strain and the relationship between magnetization and magnetic field with the polynomial form were obtained with the help of thermodynamic relations. Then according to microscopic magneto-elastic coupling mechanism and some physical facts of magnetostrictive materials, a nonlinear magneto-elastic constitutive with concise form was obtained when the relations of nonlinear strain and magnetization in the polynomial constitutive were instead with transcendental functions. The comparisons between the prediction and the experimental data of different magnetostrictive materials, such as Terfenol-D, Metglas and Ni showed that the predicted magnetostrictive strain and magnetization curves were consistent with experimental results under different pre-stresses whether in the region of low and moderate field or high field. Moreover, the model can fully reflect the nonlinear magneto-mechanical coupling characteristics between magnetic, magnetostriction and elasticity, and it can effectively predict the changes of material parameters with pre-stress and bias field, which is useful in practical applications.

  7. The permeability and elastic moduli of tuff from Campi Flegrei, Italy: implications for ground deformation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Meredith, P. G.; Vinciguerra, S.; Reuschlé, T.

    2013-07-01

    The accuracy of ground deformation modelling at active volcanoes is a principal requirement in volcanic hazard mitigation. However, the reliability of such models relies on the accuracy of the rock physical property (permeability and elastic moduli) input parameters. Unfortunately, laboratory-derived values on representative rocks are usually rare. To this end we have performed a systematic laboratory study of the influence of pressure and temperature on the permeability and elastic moduli of the two most widespread tuffs from the Campi Flegrei volcanic district, Italy. Our data show that the water permeability of Neapolitan Yellow Tuff and a tuff from the Campanian Ignimbrite differ by about two orders of magnitude, highlighting the heterogeneous nature of the tuffs at Campi Flegrei. As pressure (depth) increases beyond the critical point for inelastic pore collapse (at an effective pressure of 10-15 MPa, or a depth of about 750 m), permeability and porosity decrease significantly, and ultrasonic wave velocities and dynamic elastic moduli increase significantly. Increasing the thermal stressing temperature increases the permeability and decreases the ultrasonic wave velocities and dynamic elastic moduli of the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff; whereas the tuff from the Campanian Ignimbrite remains unaffected. This difference is due the presence of thermally unstable zeolites within the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. For both rocks we also find, under the same pressure conditions, that the dynamic (calculated from ultrasonic wave velocities) and static (calculated from triaxial stress-strain data) elastic moduli differ significantly. The choice of elastic moduli in ground deformation modelling is therefore an important consideration. While we urge that these new laboratory data should be considered in routine ground deformation modelling, we highlight the heterogeneous nature of the rocks that comprise the caldera at Campi Flegrei.

  8. Elastic and Viscoelastic Modeling of Stresses Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Sone, Hiroki; Dabrowski, Marcin; Jarosinski, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is one of the most important engineering tasks in the development of an unconventional gas or oil play. Further exploitation of the reservoir is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of this process. Knowledge about the in situ stress state, and its changes is critical for successful fracturing of a reservoir. Hydraulic fracturing is usually carried out in several stages. The previous stages influence the later ones, because the induced and reactivated fractures, and the corresponding strain tend to increase the minimum horizontal stress (Shmin). This phenomena may lead to changes in the stress regime. The stress state, and fracture network changes result also in consecutive scattering of the microseismic events related to each of the stages. The goal of the present work was to investigate what happens to the stress state after each of the hydraulic fracturing stages, and how it may affect the success of whole operation. Our investigation was divided in two major parts: first we characterized the rheological behavior of the shale rocks from prospective reservoir in northern Poland, and later we incorporated the constitutive models obtained in the laboratory into numerical models of the reservoir. Laboratory testing consisted of fourteen 72-hours-long triaxial creep tests, with ultrasonic acquisition (P, S1 and S2 waves) on cylindrical rock samples from different depths of one borehole. This procedure allowed us to construct a reliable vertical profile of rheological parameters. We did not only focus on the prospective intervals, but we also collected data for the interbedded marl or limestone layers. Numerical modeling was performed with different rheological settings: we started with a simple one layer isotropic elastic material, and then we increased the complexity in steps. Finally we arrived at layered anisotropic viscoelastic material with several fracturing stages which were superimposed on each other.

  9. Thermal Network Modelling Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Thermal mathematical modelling is discussed in detail. A three-fold purpose was established: (1) to acquaint the new user with the terminology and concepts used in thermal mathematical modelling, (2) to present the more experienced and occasional user with quick formulas and methods for solving everyday problems, coupled with study cases which lend insight into the relationships that exist among the various solution techniques and parameters, and (3) to begin to catalog in an orderly fashion the common formulas which may be applied to automated conversational language techniques.

  10. Modeling non-crystalline networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming

    In this thesis, the author reports the modeling of both the static and the dynamical aspects of non-crystalline networks. Porous silicon and silica have attracted attention recently due to their unusual photoelectronic properties. Porosity is central to these striking properties which are not present in non-porous silicon and silica. We propose an algorithm that is effective in building fully-coordinated amorphous networks that are discontinuous in certain regions---that is, they contain large voids of mesoscopic or macroscopic dimensions. Such networks can be both porous and amorphous, and can also be finite in certain dimensions. Voids of arbitrary shapes and sizes are first superimposed on a crystalline silicon network. The atoms in the pore regions are removed. Local "defects" are created, then eliminated, as pairs of them are brought together by a defect migration process. The network is fully coordinated after the defect migration process. The Wooten Winer Weaire (WWW) algorithm, is then applied to make the network amorphous. Oxygen is inserted on every silicon-silicon bond to create a porous silica network. Silica networks in the form of an amorphous fiber and an amorphous film are created by this procedure. Distortions due to surface effects are investigated. The local atomic arrangement in these discontinuous networks is similar to that in bulk amorphous silica. Covalent bond lengths and angles in amorphous networks do not vary much because of the high energies associated with bond length and angle distortions. Therefore, they can be viewed as constraints that do not change with time in any significant way. Proteins, viewed as another type of non-crystalline network, are glued together by covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions, and other interactions. The concentration of constraints in some regions of the proteins are so high that these regions are rigid. The other regions are flexible. The flexible regions of protein can exhibit large

  11. Elastic Properties of Human Osteon and Osteonal Lamella Computed by a Bidirectional Micromechanical Model and Validated by Nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Korsa, Radim; Lukes, Jaroslav; Sepitka, Josef; Mares, Tomas

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of the anisotropic elastic properties of osteon and osteonal lamellae provides a better understanding of various pathophysiological conditions, such as aging, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and other degenerative diseases. For this reason, it is important to investigate and understand the elasticity of cortical bone. We created a bidirectional micromechanical model based on inverse homogenization for predicting the elastic properties of osteon and osteonal lamellae of cortical bone. The shape, the dimensions, and the curvature of osteon and osteonal lamellae are described by appropriately chosen curvilinear coordinate systems, so that the model operates close to the real morphology of these bone components. The model was used to calculate nine orthotropic elastic constants of osteonal lamellae. The input values have the elastic properties of a single osteon. We also expressed the dependence of the elastic properties of the lamellae on the angle of orientation. To validate the model, we performed nanoindentation tests on several osteonal lamellae. We compared the experimental results with the calculated results, and there was good agreement between them. The inverted model was used to calculate the elastic properties of a single osteon, where the input values are the elastic constants of osteonal lamellae. These calculations reveal that the model can be used in both directions of homogenization, i.e., direct homogenization and also inverse homogenization. The model described here can provide either the unknown elastic properties of a single lamella from the known elastic properties at the level of a single osteon, or the unknown elastic properties of a single osteon from the known elastic properties at the level of a single lamella.

  12. Global communications network modeling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Marc A.; Baraniuk, Steven P.

    The authors are developing a list of requirements for a general computer-aided engineering tool which will support the design and evaluation of global communications networks into the next decade. The target applications of this tool include simulating the operation of large C3I networks, including both terrestrial and space segments. Hierarchical modeling and specification strategies, based on those in OPNET, will be the core of the tool architecture. A key modeling requirement is the determination of link closure, based on node dynamics and orientation. Specification of satellite orbits will be based on the six classical orbital elements, and will feature graphical feedback in the form of azimuth/elevation plots. Detailed terrestrial scenario specification will be supported, including the deployment of fixed ground, mobile ground, and airborne nodes. Decision support features will generate graphical views of node and network variables, including availability plots and connectivity maps.

  13. Calculation of single chain cellulose elasticity using fully atomistic modeling

    Treesearch

    Xiawa Wu; Robert J. Moon; Ashlie Martini

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals, a potential base material for green nanocomposites, are ordered bundles of cellulose chains. The properties of these chains have been studied for many years using atomic-scale modeling. However, model predictions are difficult to interpret because of the significant dependence of predicted properties on model details. The goal of this study is...

  14. Service entity network virtualization architecture and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xue-Guang; Shou, Guo-Chu; Hu, Yi-Hong; Guo, Zhi-Gang

    2017-07-01

    Communication network can be treated as a complex network carrying a variety of services and service can be treated as a network composed of functional entities. There are growing interests in multiplex service entities where individual entity and link can be used for different services simultaneously. Entities and their relationships constitute a service entity network. In this paper, we introduced a service entity network virtualization architecture including service entity network hierarchical model, service entity network model, service implementation and deployment of service entity networks. Service entity network oriented multiplex planning model were also studied and many of these multiplex models were characterized by a significant multiplex of the links or entities in different service entity network. Service entity networks were mapped onto shared physical resources by dynamic resource allocation controller. The efficiency of the proposed architecture was illustrated in a simulation environment that allows for comparative performance evaluation. The results show that, compared to traditional networking architecture, this architecture has a better performance.

  15. MRI Evaluation of an Elastic TPU Mesh under Pneumoperitoneum in IPOM Position in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Lambertz, A; van den Hil, L C L; Ciritsis, A; Eickhoff, R; Kraemer, N A; Bouvy, N D; Müllen, A; Klinge, U; Neumann, U P; Klink, C D

    2017-06-08

    The frequency of laparoscopic approaches increased in hernia surgery over the past years. After mesh placement in IPOM position, the real extent of the meshes configurational changes after termination of pneumoperitoneum is still largely unknown. To prevent a later mesh folding it might be useful to place the mesh while it is kept under tension. Conventionally used meshes may lose their Effective Porosity under these conditions due to poor elastic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate a newly developed elastic thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) containing mesh that retains its Effective Porosity under mechanical strain in IPOM position in a porcine model. It was visualized under pneumoperitoneum using MRI in comparison to polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) meshes with similar structure. In each of ten minipigs, a mesh (TPU containing or native PVDF, 10 × 20 cm) was randomly placed in IPOM position at the center of the abdominal wall. After 8 weeks, six pigs underwent MRI evaluation with and without pneumoperitoneum to assess the visibility and elasticity of the mesh. Finally, pigs were euthanized and abdominal walls were explanted for histological and immunohistochemical assessment. The degree of adhesion formation was documented. Laparoscopic implantation of elastic TPU meshes in IPOM position was feasible and safe in a minipig model. Mesh position could be precisely visualized and assessed with and without pneumoperitoneum using MRI after 8 weeks. Elastic TPU meshes showed a significantly higher surface increase under pneumoperitoneum in comparison to PVDF. Immunohistochemically, the amount of CD45-positive cells was significantly lower and the Collagen I/III ratio was significantly higher in TPU meshes after 8 weeks. There were no differences regarding adhesion formation between study groups. The TPU mesh preserves its elastic properties in IPOM position in a porcine model after 8 weeks. Immunohistochemistry indicates superior biocompatibility

  16. A novel two-layer, coupled finite element approach for modeling the nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic behavior of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Klöppel, Thomas; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2011-07-01

    A novel finite element approach is presented to simulate the mechanical behavior of human red blood cells (RBC, erythrocytes). As the RBC membrane comprises a phospholipid bilayer with an intervening protein network, we propose to model the membrane with two distinct layers. The fairly complex characteristics of the very thin lipid bilayer are represented by special incompressible solid shell elements and an anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model. Properties of the protein network are modeled with an isotropic hyperelastic third-order material. The elastic behavior of the model is validated with existing optical tweezers studies with quasi-static deformations. Employing material parameters consistent with literature, simulation results are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Available models in literature neglect either the surface area conservation of the RBC membrane or realistic loading conditions of the optical tweezers experiments. The importance of these modeling assumptions, that are both included in this study, are discussed and their influence quantified. For the simulation of the dynamic motion of RBC, the model is extended to incorporate the cytoplasm. This is realized with a monolithic fully coupled fluid-structure interaction simulation, where the fluid is described by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian framework. It is shown that both membrane viscosity and cytoplasm viscosity have significant influence on simulation results. Characteristic recovery times and energy dissipation for varying strain rates in dynamic laser trap experiments are calculated for the first time and are found to be comparable with experimental data.

  17. Three-dimensional elasticity models for buckling of anisotropic and auxetic beams and plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Eltigani

    The three-dimensional elasticity model is developed to determine the critical buckling load for isotropic, anisotropic, and auxetic beams and plates. Different beam theories are studied and compared to the elasticity theory. The study was based on the assessment of those beam theories using different beam cross-sections and boundary conditions. The elasticity theory for anisotropic beams obtained well results for large slenderness ratios when it compared with Euler-Bernoulli theory which is considered in this study the main area of comparison study. For small values of slenderness ratio the elasticity theory obtained significant difference than the Euler-Bernoulli theory, which means that Euler-Bernoulli is weaker when it is used for short beams than long beams. The orientation of the anisotropy behavior is also studied and has showed how the buckling load can be changed due to the orientation of the elasticity modulus. The auxetic beams behave differently than the anisotropic behavior, it gives results higher and lower than the Euler-Bernoulli theory according to the slenderness ratio and the Poisson's ratio values. A significant behavior was noticed in using beams with negative Poisson's the ratio which can be useful in structure mechanics field.

  18. An elastic-support model for enhanced bistable piezoelectric energy harvesting from random vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Y. G.; Gao, Y. J.; Tan, D.; Fan, S. B.; Lai, Z. H.

    2015-02-01

    To overcome the defect of conventional nonlinear piezoelectric cantilever vibration energy harvesters, in this paper we conceive an elastic-support model to study the performance of energy converters under two types of variable-intensity excitation conditions: filtered Gaussian noises and pink noises. When excitation intensity is insufficient, thanks to the system's variable potential function, frequent bistable transition oscillations between two wells occur in elastic-support systems, while only weak oscillations in either well could be observed in rigid-support systems. In practical applications, the structural parameters of energy harvesters are not allowed to make real-time changes. If considered remaining the magnet interval and the spring's elastic stiffness unchanged while receiving stable maximum output voltage, elastic-support systems can be made full use toward variable-intensity filtered Gaussian noises. It has been proven that elastic-support systems are capable of adapting to random excitations with variable intensity, through which maximum power output and sufficient electromechanical energy conversion of the system can be accomplished.

  19. Proxy model materials to simulate the elastic properties of digested municipal sludge.

    PubMed

    Eshtiaghi, Nicky; Markis, Flora; Baudez, Jean-Christophe; Slatter, Paul

    2013-10-01

    The elastic rheological properties of sludge are complex and evolve with time as a result of ageing and microbial activity. Due to the peculiar nature of sludge, this makes the measurement of physical parameters difficul. The challenge is to identify a reference material that can be used as a proxy for industrial process design or optimization. In this study, respectively the mixtures of 0.5%, 0.7% and 1% glass beads suspension in water have been added to 0.5%, 0.7% and 1% carbopol dissolved in water and neutralized with NaOH to prepare gel, at different ratios. Elastic and loss moduli have been determined for different glass bead suspension ratios in the range of 0%-80%. The results showed that there is a critical glass bead suspension/carbopol ratio at which the elastic properties of the mixture changes dramatically. The elastic properties of these model mixtures of different glass bead/carbopol ratio suspensions are compared with the elastic property of municipal sludge sampled from a Melbourne Waste Water Treatment Plant, and similarity established.

  20. A straightforward approach to Eringen's nonlocal elasticity stress model and applications for nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoumaris, C. Chr.; Eptaimeros, K. G.; Zisis, T.; Tsamasphyros, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    The nonlocal theory of elasticity is widely employed to the study of nanoscale problems. The differential approach of Eringen's nonlocal beam theory has been widely used to solve problems whose size effect is substantial in structures. However, in the case of Euler-Bernoulli beam theory (EBBT), this approach reveals inconsistencies that do not allow for the energy functional formulation. To avoid these inconsistencies, an alternative route is to use the integral form of nonlocal elasticity. This study revolves around the nonlocal integral beam model for various attenuation functions with the intention to explore the static response of a beam (or a nanobeam) for different types of loadings and boundary conditions (BC).

  1. Covariant Newtonian and relativistic dynamics of (magneto)-elastic solid model for neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B.; Chachoua, E.; Chamel, N.

    2006-01-01

    This work develops the dynamics of a perfectly elastic solid model for application to the outer crust of a magnetised neutron star. Particular attention is given to the Noether identities responsible for energy-momentum conservation, using a formulation that is fully covariant, not only (as is usual) in a fully relativistic treatment but also (sacrificing accuracy and elegance for economy of degrees of gravitational freedom) in the technically more complicated case of the Newtonian limit. The results are used to obtain explicit (relativistic and Newtonian) formulae for the propagation speeds of generalised (Alfven type) magneto-elastic perturbation modes.

  2. Network Modeling and Simulation (NEMSE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Dimensional M2TS MPEG 2 Transport Stream AFRL Air Force Research Laboratory MAC Media Access Control AFOSR Air Force Office of Scientific Research M&S...CASCON Close Air Support Connectivity MPEG Moving Pictures Experts Group CORE Common Open Research Emulator NEMSE Network Modeling and Simulations

  3. Computer simulation of model cohesive powders: Plastic consolidation, structural changes, and elasticity under isotropic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilabert, F. A.; Roux, J.-N.; Castellanos, A.

    2008-09-01

    The quasistatic behavior of a simple two-dimensional model of a cohesive powder under isotropic loads is investigated by discrete element simulations. We ignore contact plasticity and focus on the effect of geometry and collective rearrangements on the material behavior. The loose packing states, as assembled and characterized in a previous numerical study [Gilabert, Roux, and Castellanos, Phys. Rev. E 75, 011303 (2007)], are observed, under growing confining pressure P , to undergo important structural changes, while solid fraction Φ irreversibly increases (typically, from 0.4-0.5 to 0.75-0.8). The system state goes through three stages, with different forms of the plastic consolidation curve, i.e., Φ as a function of the growing reduced pressure P*=Pa/F0 , defined with adhesion force F0 and grain diameter a . In the low-confinement regime (I), the system undergoes negligible plastic compaction, and its structure is influenced by the assembling process. In regime II the material state is independent of initial conditions, and the void ratio varies linearly with lnP [i.e., Δ(1/Φ)=λΔ(lnP*) ], as described in the engineering literature. Plasticity index λ is reduced in the presence of a small rolling resistance (RR). In the last stage of compaction (III), Φ approaches an asymptotic, maximum solid fraction Φmax , as a power law Φmax-Φ∝(P*)-α , with α≃1 , and properties of cohesionless granular packs are gradually retrieved. Under consolidation, while the range ξ of fractal density correlations decreases, force patterns reorganize from self-balanced clusters to force chains, with correlative evolutions of force distributions, and elastic moduli increase by a large amount. Plastic deformation events correspond to very small changes in the network topology, while the denser regions tend to move like rigid bodies. Elastic properties are dominated by the bending of thin junctions in loose systems. For growing RR those tend to form particle chains, the

  4. A cell model for homogenization of fiber-reinforced composites: General theory and nonlinear elasticity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.; Addessio, F.L.

    1995-11-01

    The theoretical basis of the homogenization technique developed by Aboudi is presented and assessed. Given the constitutive relations of the constituents, this technique provides an equivalent, homogeneous, constitutive model of unidirectional, continuous-fiber-reinforced composites. The expressions that comprise the first-order version of the technique are given special attention as this treatment has considerable practical value. Nonlinear elasticity effects are added to it. This extension increases the accuracy of numerical simulations of high strain-rate loadings. It is particularly important for any dynamic loading in which shock waves might be produced, including crash safety, armor, and munitions applications. Examples illustrate that elastic nonlinearity can make substantial contributions at strains of only a few per cent. These contributions are greatest during post-yield inelastic deformation. The micromechanics-based homogenization technique is shown to facilitate use of an efficient approximate treatment of elastic nonlinearity in composites with isotropic matrix materials.

  5. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-09-06

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment's shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object.

  6. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment’s shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object. PMID:27608021

  7. On the the Contact Lens Problem: Modeling Rigid and Elastic Beams on Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Philippe; Wilson, Stephen; Stone, Howard

    2011-11-01

    Generally, contact lenses are prescribed by the practitioner to fit each individual patient's eye, but these fitting-philosophies are based on empirical studies and a certain degree of trial-and-error. A badly fitted lens can cause a range of afflictions, which varies from mild dry-eye-discomfort, to more serious corneal diseases. Thus, at this heart of this problem, is the question of how a rigid or elastic plate interacts with the free-surface of a thin viscous film. In this talk, we present several mathematical models for the study of these plate-and-fluid problems. Asymptotic and numerical results are described, and we explain the role of elasticity, surface tension, viscosity, and pressure in determining the equilibrium solutions. Finally, we discuss the implications of our work on the contact lens problem, as well as on other coating processes which involve elastic substrates.

  8. Modeling ventricular function during cardiac assist: does time-varying elastance work?

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Stijn; Segers, Patrick; Steendijk, Paul; Meyns, Bart; Dion, Robert A E; Antaki, James F; Verdonck, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    The time-varying elastance theory of Suga et al. is widely used to simulate left ventricular function in mathematical models and in contemporary in vitro models. We investigated the validity of this theory in the presence of a left ventricular assist device. Left ventricular pressure and volume data are presented that demonstrate the heart-device interaction for a positive-displacement pump (Novacor) and a rotary blood pump (Medos). The Novacor was implanted in a calf and used in fixed-rate mode (85 BPM), whereas the Medos was used at several flow levels (0-3 l/min) in seven healthy sheep. The Novacor data display high beat-to-beat variations in the amplitude of the elastance curve, and the normalized curves deviate strongly from the typical bovine curve. The Medos data show how the maximum elastance depends on the pump flow level. We conclude that the original time-varying elastance theory insufficiently models the complex hemodynamic behavior of a left ventricle that is mechanically assisted, and that there is need for an updated ventricular model to simulate the heart-device interaction.

  9. Finite element model for aero-elastically tailored residential wind turbine blade design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Eric Alan

    Advances in passive wind turbine control systems have allowed wind turbines to achieve higher efficiencies and operate in wider inflow conditions than ever before. Within recent years, the adoption of aero-elastically tailored (bend-twist coupled) composite blades have been a pursued strategy. Unfortunately, for this strategy to be applied, traditional means of modeling, designing and manufacturing are no longer adequate. New parameters regarding non-linearities in deflections, stiffness, and aerodynamic loadings must now be implemented. To aid in the development of passive wind turbine system design, a finite element based aero-elastic program capable of computationally predicting blade deflection and twist under loading was constructed. The program was built around the idea of iteratively solving a blade composite structure to reach a maximum aero-elastic twist configuration under elevated wind speeds. Adopting a pre-existing blade geometry, from a pitch controlled small scale (3.5kW) turbine design, the program was tested to discover the geometry bend-twist coupling potential. This research would be a contributing factor in designing a passive pitch control replacement system for the turbine. A study of various model loading configurations was first performed to insure model validity. Then, a final model was used to analyze composite layups for selected spar configurations. Results characterize the aero-elastic twist properties for the selected configurations.

  10. Van der Waals Type Model for Neutron-Proton Elastic Scattering at High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleem, F.

    1980-12-01

    The most recent measurements of the angular distribution and total cross-section for neutron-proton elastic scattering between 70< pL <400 GeV/c with squared four momentum transfer -t ≤ 3.6 (GeV/c)2 have been explained using Van der Waals type model.

  11. Nonlinear Visco-Elastic Response of Composites via Micro-Mechanical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Sridharan, Srinivasan

    2005-01-01

    Micro-mechanical models for a study of nonlinear visco-elastic response of composite laminae are developed and their performance compared. A single integral constitutive law proposed by Schapery and subsequently generalized to multi-axial states of stress is utilized in the study for the matrix material. This is used in conjunction with a computationally facile scheme in which hereditary strains are computed using a recursive relation suggested by Henriksen. Composite response is studied using two competing micro-models, viz. a simplified Square Cell Model (SSCM) and a Finite Element based self-consistent Cylindrical Model (FECM). The algorithm is developed assuming that the material response computations are carried out in a module attached to a general purpose finite element program used for composite structural analysis. It is shown that the SSCM as used in investigations of material nonlinearity can involve significant errors in the prediction of transverse Young's modulus and shear modulus. The errors in the elastic strains thus predicted are of the same order of magnitude as the creep strains accruing due to visco-elasticity. The FECM on the other hand does appear to perform better both in the prediction of elastic constants and the study of creep response.

  12. A spline-based parameter and state estimation technique for static models of elastic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Daniel, P. L.; Armstrong, E. S.

    1983-01-01

    Parameter and state estimation techniques for an elliptic system arising in a developmental model for the antenna surface in the Maypole Hoop/Column antenna are discussed. A computational algorithm based on spline approximations for the state and elastic parameters is given and numerical results obtained using this algorithm are summarized.

  13. Polymer networks: Modeling and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Hassan

    Polymer networks are an important class of materials that are ubiquitously found in natural, biological, and man-made systems. The complex mesoscale structure of these soft materials has made it difficult for researchers to fully explore their properties. In this dissertation, we introduce a coarse-grained computational model for permanently cross-linked polymer networks than can properly capture common properties of these materials. We use this model to study several practical problems involving dry and solvated networks. Specifically, we analyze the permeability and diffusivity of polymer networks under mechanical deformations, we examine the release of encapsulated solutes from microgel capsules during volume transitions, and we explore the complex tribological behavior of elastomers. Our simulations reveal that the network transport properties are defined by the network porosity and by the degree of network anisotropy due to mechanical deformations. In particular, the permeability of mechanically deformed networks can be predicted based on the alignment of network filaments that is characterized by a second order orientation tensor. Moreover, our numerical calculations demonstrate that responsive microcapsules can be effectively utilized for steady and pulsatile release of encapsulated solutes. We show that swollen gel capsules allow steady, diffusive release of nanoparticles and polymer chains, whereas gel deswelling causes burst-like discharge of solutes driven by an outward flow of the solvent initially enclosed within a shrinking capsule. We further demonstrate that this hydrodynamic release can be regulated by introducing rigid microscopic rods in the capsule interior. We also probe the effects of velocity, temperature, and normal load on the sliding of elastomers on smooth and corrugated substrates. Our friction simulations predict a bell-shaped curve for the dependence of the friction coefficient on the sliding velocity. Our simulations also illustrate

  14. Elastic-plastic constitutive modeling of concrete. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.

    1983-03-01

    The need to understand concrete behavior under high temperatures in the nuclear industry has become rather accute. For this purpose, a constitutive model of concrete especially developed for this severe environment is indispensable. This report reviews the presently available constitutive models of concrete at standard-temperature conditions and considers their advantages and drawbacks. A rather simple but effective approach is selected to treat concrete behavior at high temperatures. Special emphasis is devoted to the modeling of concrete up to and including failure. The derived constitutive model is checked with biaxial and triaxial benchmark experimental results. Very good agreement is obtained.

  15. Dynamic routing and spectrum assignment based on multilayer virtual topology and ant colony optimization in elastic software-defined optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Qinghua; Tian, Feng; Rao, Lan; Xin, Xiangjun

    2017-07-01

    Elastic software-defined optical networks greatly improve the flexibility of the optical switching network while it has brought challenges to the routing and spectrum assignment (RSA). A multilayer virtual topology model is proposed to solve RSA problems. Two RSA algorithms based on the virtual topology are proposed, which are the ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm of minimum consecutiveness loss and the ACO algorithm of maximum spectrum consecutiveness. Due to the computing power of the control layer in the software-defined network, the routing algorithm avoids the frequent link-state information between routers. Based on the effect of the spectrum consecutiveness loss on the pheromone in the ACO, the path and spectrum of the minimal impact on the network are selected for the service request. The proposed algorithms have been compared with other algorithms. The results show that the proposed algorithms can reduce the blocking rate by at least 5% and perform better in spectrum efficiency. Moreover, the proposed algorithms can effectively decrease spectrum fragmentation and enhance available spectrum consecutiveness.

  16. Routing and spectrum assignment based on ant colony optimization of minimum consecutiveness loss in elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun; Tian, Qinghua; Zhang, Qi; Rao, Lan; Tian, Feng; Luo, Biao; Liu, Yingjun; Tang, Bao

    2016-10-01

    Elastic Optical Networks are considered to be a promising technology for future high-speed network. In this paper, we propose a RSA algorithm based on the ant colony optimization of minimum consecutiveness loss (ACO-MCL). Based on the effect of the spectrum consecutiveness loss on the pheromone in the ant colony optimization, the path and spectrum of the minimal impact on the network are selected for the service request. When an ant arrives at the destination node from the source node along a path, we assume that this path is selected for the request. We calculate the consecutiveness loss of candidate-neighbor link pairs along this path after the routing and spectrum assignment. Then, the networks update the pheromone according to the value of the consecutiveness loss. We save the path with the smallest value. After multiple iterations of the ant colony optimization, the final selection of the path is assigned for the request. The algorithms are simulated in different networks. The results show that ACO-MCL algorithm performs better in blocking probability and spectrum efficiency than other algorithms. Moreover, the ACO-MCL algorithm can effectively decrease spectrum fragmentation and enhance available spectrum consecutiveness. Compared with other algorithms, the ACO-MCL algorithm can reduce the blocking rate by at least 5.9% in heavy load.

  17. A thermodynamic model of thermal end elastic properties of curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povzner, A. A.; Filanovich, A. N.; Oskina, V. A.

    2013-11-01

    A self-consistent thermodynamic model of curium is developed. In the framework of this model the temperature dependencies of heat capacity, coefficient of thermal expansion, bulk modulus and Debye temperature of Cm are calculated. It is shown that the phonon anharmonicity of Cm is weaker than in the case of Np and δ-Pu, but stronger than in lanthanides.

  18. Simple Elasticity Modeling and Failure Prediction for Composite Flexbeams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makeev, Andrew; Armanios, Erian; OBrien, T. Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A simple 2D boundary element analysis, suitable for developing cost effective models for tapered composite laminates, is presented. Constant stress and displacement elements are used. Closed-form fundamental solutions are derived. Numerical results are provided for several configurations to illustrate the accuracy of the model.

  19. Conductive network formation of carbon nanotubes in elastic polymer microfibers and its effect on the electrical conductance: Experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Jeongmin; Kim, Un Jeong; Im, Kyuhyun; Park, Jong-Jin; Sung, Bong June

    2016-05-21

    We investigate how the electrical conductance of microfibers (made of polymers and conductive nanofillers) decreases upon uniaxial deformation by performing both experiments and simulations. Even though various elastic conductors have been developed due to promising applications for deformable electronic devices, the mechanism at a molecular level for electrical conductance change has remained elusive. Previous studies proposed that the decrease in electrical conductance would result from changes in either distances or contact numbers between conductive fillers. In this work, we prepare microfibers of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)/polyvinyl alcohol composites and investigate the electrical conductance and the orientation of SWCNTs upon uniaxial deformation. We also perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations, which reproduce experimental results for the relative decrease in conductance and the SWCNTs orientation. We investigate the electrical networks of SWCNTs in microfibers and find that the decrease in the electrical conductance upon uniaxial deformation should be attributed to a subtle change in the topological structure of the electrical network.

  20. Uncoupling shear and uniaxial elastic moduli of semiflexible biopolymer networks: compression-softening and stretch-stiffening.

    PubMed

    van Oosten, Anne S G; Vahabi, Mahsa; Licup, Albert J; Sharma, Abhinav; Galie, Peter A; MacKintosh, Fred C; Janmey, Paul A

    2016-01-13

    Gels formed by semiflexible filaments such as most biopolymers exhibit non-linear behavior in their response to shear deformation, e.g., with a pronounced strain stiffening and negative normal stress. These negative normal stresses suggest that networks would collapse axially when subject to shear stress. This coupling of axial and shear deformations can have particularly important consequences for extracellular matrices and collagenous tissues. Although measurements of uniaxial moduli have been made on biopolymer gels, these have not directly been related to the shear response. Here, we report measurements and simulations of axial and shear stresses exerted by a range of hydrogels subjected to simultaneous uniaxial and shear strains. These studies show that, in contrast to volume-conserving linearly elastic hydrogels, the Young's moduli of networks formed by the biopolymers are not proportional to their shear moduli and both shear and uniaxial moduli are strongly affected by even modest degrees of uniaxial strain.

  1. Uncoupling shear and uniaxial elastic moduli of semiflexible biopolymer networks: compression-softening and stretch-stiffening

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten, Anne S. G.; Vahabi, Mahsa; Licup, Albert J.; Sharma, Abhinav; Galie, Peter A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Gels formed by semiflexible filaments such as most biopolymers exhibit non-linear behavior in their response to shear deformation, e.g., with a pronounced strain stiffening and negative normal stress. These negative normal stresses suggest that networks would collapse axially when subject to shear stress. This coupling of axial and shear deformations can have particularly important consequences for extracellular matrices and collagenous tissues. Although measurements of uniaxial moduli have been made on biopolymer gels, these have not directly been related to the shear response. Here, we report measurements and simulations of axial and shear stresses exerted by a range of hydrogels subjected to simultaneous uniaxial and shear strains. These studies show that, in contrast to volume-conserving linearly elastic hydrogels, the Young’s moduli of networks formed by the biopolymers are not proportional to their shear moduli and both shear and uniaxial moduli are strongly affected by even modest degrees of uniaxial strain. PMID:26758452

  2. Transmission and pass-drop operations of mixed baudrate Nyquist OTDM-WDM signals for all-optical elastic network.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hung Nguyen; Inoue, Takashi; Kurosu, Takayuki; Namiki, Shu

    2013-08-26

    We propose the use of Nyquist OTDM-WDM signal for highly efficient, fully elastic all-optical networks. With the possibility of generation of ultra-coarse yet flexible granular channels, Nyquist OTDM-WDM can eliminate guard-bands in conventional WDM systems, and hence improves the spectral efficiency in network perspective. In this paper, transmission and pass-drop operations of mixed baudrate Nyquist OTDM-WDM channels from 43 Gbaud to dual-polarization 344 Gbaud are successfully demonstrated over 320 km fiber link with four FlexGrid-compatible WSS nodes. A stable clock recovery is also carried out for different baudrate Nyquist OTDMs by optical null-header insertion technique.

  3. Random graph models of social networks

    PubMed Central

    Newman, M. E. J.; Watts, D. J.; Strogatz, S. H.

    2002-01-01

    We describe some new exactly solvable models of the structure of social networks, based on random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions. We give models both for simple unipartite networks, such as acquaintance networks, and bipartite networks, such as affiliation networks. We compare the predictions of our models to data for a number of real-world social networks and find that in some cases, the models are in remarkable agreement with the data, whereas in others the agreement is poorer, perhaps indicating the presence of additional social structure in the network that is not captured by the random graph. PMID:11875211

  4. Elastic and thermal expansion asymmetry in dense molecular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Joseph A.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-09-01

    The elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion are fundamental properties of elastically stiff molecular materials and are assumed to be the same (symmetric) under both tension and compression loading. We show that molecular materials can have a marked asymmetric elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion that are inherently related to terminal chemical groups that limit molecular network connectivity. In compression, terminal groups sterically interact to stiffen the network, whereas in tension they interact less and disconnect the network. The existence of asymmetric elastic and thermal expansion behaviour has fundamental implications for computational approaches to molecular materials modelling and practical implications on the thermomechanical strains and associated elastic stresses. We develop a design space to control the degree of elastic asymmetry in molecular materials, a vital step towards understanding their integration into device technologies.

  5. Elastic and thermal expansion asymmetry in dense molecular materials.

    PubMed

    Burg, Joseph A; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2016-09-01

    The elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion are fundamental properties of elastically stiff molecular materials and are assumed to be the same (symmetric) under both tension and compression loading. We show that molecular materials can have a marked asymmetric elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion that are inherently related to terminal chemical groups that limit molecular network connectivity. In compression, terminal groups sterically interact to stiffen the network, whereas in tension they interact less and disconnect the network. The existence of asymmetric elastic and thermal expansion behaviour has fundamental implications for computational approaches to molecular materials modelling and practical implications on the thermomechanical strains and associated elastic stresses. We develop a design space to control the degree of elastic asymmetry in molecular materials, a vital step towards understanding their integration into device technologies.

  6. Robust Detection of Impaired Resting State Functional Connectivity Networks in Alzheimer's Disease Using Elastic Net Regularized Regression

    PubMed Central

    Teipel, Stefan J.; Grothe, Michel J.; Metzger, Coraline D.; Grimmer, Timo; Sorg, Christian; Ewers, Michael; Franzmeier, Nicolai; Meisenzahl, Eva; Klöppel, Stefan; Borchardt, Viola; Walter, Martin; Dyrba, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The large number of multicollinear regional features that are provided by resting state (rs) fMRI data requires robust feature selection to uncover consistent networks of functional disconnection in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we compared elastic net regularized and classical stepwise logistic regression in respect to consistency of feature selection and diagnostic accuracy using rs-fMRI data from four centers of the “German resting-state initiative for diagnostic biomarkers” (psymri.org), comprising 53 AD patients and 118 age and sex matched healthy controls. Using all possible pairs of correlations between the time series of rs-fMRI signal from 84 functionally defined brain regions as the initial set of predictor variables, we calculated accuracy of group discrimination and consistency of feature selection with bootstrap cross-validation. Mean areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves as measure of diagnostic accuracy were 0.70 in unregularized and 0.80 in regularized regression. Elastic net regression was insensitive to scanner effects and recovered a consistent network of functional connectivity decline in AD that encompassed parts of the dorsal default mode as well as brain regions involved in attention, executive control, and language processing. Stepwise logistic regression found no consistent network of AD related functional connectivity decline. Regularized regression has high potential to increase diagnostic accuracy and consistency of feature selection from multicollinear functional neuroimaging data in AD. Our findings suggest an extended network of functional alterations in AD, but the diagnostic accuracy of rs-fMRI in this multicenter setting did not reach the benchmark defined for a useful biomarker of AD. PMID:28101051

  7. The ultra-structural organization of the elastic network in the intra- and inter-lamellar matrix of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, J; Elliott, D M; Costi, J J

    2017-08-01

    The inter-lamellar matrix (ILM)-located between adjacent lamellae of the annulus fibrosus-consists of a complex structure of elastic fibers, while elastic fibers of the intra-lamellar region are aligned predominantly parallel to the collagen fibers. The organization of elastic fibers under low magnification, in both inter- and intra-lamellar regions, was studied by light microscopic analysis of histologically prepared samples; however, little is known about their ultrastructure. An ultrastructural visualization of elastic fibers in the inter-lamellar matrix is crucial for describing their contribution to structural integrity, as well as mechanical properties of the annulus fibrosus. The aims of this study were twofold: first, to present an ultrastructural analysis of the elastic fiber network in the ILM and intra-lamellar region, including cross section (CS) and in-plane (IP) lamellae, of the AF using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and second, to -compare the elastic fiber orientation between the ILM and intra-lamellar region. Four samples (lumbar sheep discs) from adjacent sections (30μm thickness) of anterior annulus were partially digested by a developed NaOH-sonication method for visualization of elastic fibers by SEM. Elastic fiber orientation and distribution were quantified relative to the tangential to circumferential reference axis. Visualization of the ILM under high magnification revealed a dense network of elastic fibers that has not been previously described. Within the ILM, elastic fibers form a complex network, consisting of different size and shape fibers, which differed to those located in the intra-lamellar region. For both regions, the majority of fibers were oriented near 0° with respect to tangential to circumferential (TCD) direction and two minor symmetrical orientations of approximately±45°. Statistically, the orientation of elastic fibers between the ILM and intra-lamellar region was not different (p=0.171). The present study used

  8. Dynamical model of encapsulated gas microbubble under ultrasound based on elastic mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Feng, JiangTao; Xu, KaiYu

    2017-07-01

    Based on the theory of elastic mechanics, a dynamical model of an encapsulated gas microbubble under ultrasound is presented. The dynamical motion of the microbubble is divided into three states: buckled, elastic, and ruptured. The model describes the compression-only behavior appropriately and derives the transient variation of the resonance frequency of the damped oscillation and the relation between the critical rupture radius and initial outer radius. The normal stress in the tangential direction plays the principal role in the rupture and buckling of the encapsulating shell, resulting in likely rupture for a larger microbubble and resistance to rupture for a thicker-shell microbubble. Comparison of proposed dynamical model with Marmottant's model has been given. The dynamical model can be employed in ultrasound medical diagnostics and therapy of drug incorporation or extravasation through further understanding the influence of the encapsulating shell.

  9. Effects of disorder and chain stiffening on the elasticity of flexible polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, Christiane; Lemaître, Anaël

    2017-03-01

    We examine how the distribution of contour lengths and the high-stretch stiffening of individual chain segments affect the macroscopic shear modulus of flexible polymer gels, using a two-dimensional numerical model in which polymer segments form a triangular network and disorder is introduced by varying their contour lengths. We show that, in the relevant parameter range: (i) the nonaffine contribution to the shear modulus is negligible, i.e., the Born approximation is satisfactory, and (ii) the shear modulus is dominated by the contribution originating from equilibrium chain tensions. Moreover, mechanical equilibration at the nodes induces specific correlations between the end-to-end distances and contour lengths of chain segments, which must be properly accounted for to construct reasonable estimates of chain pressure and shear modulus.

  10. Well-posedness of a two-scale model for liquid phase epitaxy with elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Michael; Rohde, Christian; Sändig, Anna-Margarete

    2017-07-01

    Epitaxy, a special form of crystal growth, is a technically relevant process for the production of thin films and layers. It can generate microstructures of different morphologies, such as steps, spirals or pyramids. These microstructures are influenced by elastic effects in the epitaxial layer. There are different epitaxial techniques, one being liquid phase epitaxy. Thereby, single particles are deposited out of a supersaturated liquid solution on a substrate where they contribute to the growth process. This article studies a two-scale model including elasticity, introduced in Eck et al. (Eur Phys J Special Topics 177:5-21, 2009) and extended in Eck et al. (2006). It consists of a macroscopic Navier-Stokes system and a macroscopic convection-diffusion equation for the transport of matter in the liquid, and a microscopic problem that combines a phase field approximation of a Burton-Cabrera-Frank model for the evolution of the epitaxial layer, a Stokes system for the fluid flow near the layer and an elasticity system for the elastic deformation of the solid film. Suitable conditions couple the single parts of the model. As the main result, existence and uniqueness of a solution are proven in suitable function spaces. Furthermore, an iterative solving procedure is proposed, which reflects, on the one hand, the strategy of the proof of the main result via fixed point arguments and, on the other hand, can be the basis for a numerical algorithm.

  11. Bayesian Networks for Social Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Paul D.; White, Amanda M.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Dalton, Angela C.; Brothers, Alan J.

    2011-03-28

    This paper describes a body of work developed over the past five years. The work addresses the use of Bayesian network (BN) models for representing and predicting social/organizational behaviors. The topics covered include model construction, validation, and use. These topics show the bulk of the lifetime of such model, beginning with construction, moving to validation and other aspects of model ‘critiquing’, and finally demonstrating how the modeling approach might be used to inform policy analysis. To conclude, we discuss limitations of using BN for this activity and suggest remedies to address those limitations. The primary benefits of using a well-developed computational, mathematical, and statistical modeling structure, such as BN, are 1) there are significant computational, theoretical and capability bases on which to build 2) ability to empirically critique the model, and potentially evaluate competing models for a social/behavioral phenomena.

  12. Tissue elasticity measurement method using forward and inversion algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Ha; Won, Chang-Hee; Park, Hee-Jun; Ku, Jeonghun; Heo, Yun Seok; Kim, Yoon-Nyun

    2013-03-01

    Elasticity is an important indicator of tissue health, with increased stiffness pointing to an increased risk of cancer. We investigated a tissue elasticity measurement method using forward and inversion algorithms for the application of early breast tumor identification. An optical based elasticity measurement system is developed to capture images of the embedded lesions using total internal reflection principle. From elasticity images, we developed a novel method to estimate the elasticity of the embedded lesion using 3-D finite-element-model-based forward algorithm, and neural-network-based inversion algorithm. The experimental results showed that the proposed characterization method can be diffierentiate the benign and malignant breast lesions.

  13. A random interacting network model for complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Bedartha; Shekatkar, Snehal M.; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Ambika, G.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a RAndom Interacting Network (RAIN) model to study the interactions between a pair of complex networks. The model involves two major steps: (i) the selection of a pair of nodes, one from each network, based on intra-network node-based characteristics, and (ii) the placement of a link between selected nodes based on the similarity of their relative importance in their respective networks. Node selection is based on a selection fitness function and node linkage is based on a linkage probability defined on the linkage scores of nodes. The model allows us to relate within-network characteristics to between-network structure. We apply the model to the interaction between the USA and Schengen airline transportation networks (ATNs). Our results indicate that two mechanisms: degree-based preferential node selection and degree-assortative link placement are necessary to replicate the observed inter-network degree distributions as well as the observed inter-network assortativity. The RAIN model offers the possibility to test multiple hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying network interactions. It can also incorporate complex interaction topologies. Furthermore, the framework of the RAIN model is general and can be potentially adapted to various real-world complex systems. PMID:26657032

  14. Inertio-elastic instability in Taylor-Couette flow of a model wormlike micellar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadigoushki, Hadi; Muller, Susan J.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we use flow visualization and rheometry techniques to study the dynamics and evolution of secondary flows in a model wormlike micellar solution sheared between concentric cylinders, i.e., in a Taylor-Couette (TC) cell. The wormlike micellar solution studied in this work contains cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium salicylate (NaSal). This system can be shear banding and highly elastic, non-shear banding and moderately elastic, or nearly Newtonian as the temperature is varied over a narrow range. The effect of elasticity on transitions and instabilities is probed by changing the temperature over a wide range of elasticity (El<< 1, El ~1, and El>>1). Elasticity is defined as the ratio of the Weissenberg number to the Reynolds number. For shear banding wormlike micelle solutions where El>> 1, a primary transition from the base Couette flow to stationary vortices that are evenly spaced in the axial direction of the shear cell and are characterized by an asymptotic wave-length is observed. The dimensionless wave- length at the onset of this shear banding transition for CTAB/NaSal system turns out to be much larger than those reported for other shear banding wormlike micelle systems. For the same fluid at a temperature where it shear-thins but does not display shear banding, El~1, and for slow ramp speeds, the primary transition is to distinct structures that are not stationary but rather travel in the axial direction. At low elasticity (El<< 1), where the fluid behaves as a nearly Newtonian fluid, several transitions from purely azimuthal Couette flow to modified Taylor vortex flows and finally chaotic regimes are documented. The behavior in the shear-banding and non-shear-banding regimes are discussed and compared with results in related systems.

  15. Research on the model of home networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Xiang; Feng, Xiancheng

    2007-11-01

    It is the research hotspot of current broadband network to combine voice service, data service and broadband audio-video service by IP protocol to transport various real time and mutual services to terminal users (home). Home Networking is a new kind of network and application technology which can provide various services. Home networking is called as Digital Home Network. It means that PC, home entertainment equipment, home appliances, Home wirings, security, illumination system were communicated with each other by some composing network technology, constitute a networking internal home, and connect with WAN by home gateway. It is a new network technology and application technology, and can provide many kinds of services inside home or between homes. Currently, home networking can be divided into three kinds: Information equipment, Home appliances, Communication equipment. Equipment inside home networking can exchange information with outer networking by home gateway, this information communication is bidirectional, user can get information and service which provided by public networking by using home networking internal equipment through home gateway connecting public network, meantime, also can get information and resource to control the internal equipment which provided by home networking internal equipment. Based on the general network model of home networking, there are four functional entities inside home networking: HA, HB, HC, and HD. (1) HA (Home Access) - home networking connects function entity; (2) HB (Home Bridge) Home networking bridge connects function entity; (3) HC (Home Client) - Home networking client function entity; (4) HD (Home Device) - decoder function entity. There are many physical ways to implement four function entities. Based on theses four functional entities, there are reference model of physical layer, reference model of link layer, reference model of IP layer and application reference model of high layer. In the future home network

  16. Efficient finite element modeling of radiation forces on elastic particles of arbitrary size and geometry.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Peter; Mishra, Puja P; Boltryk, Rosemary J; Hill, Martyn

    2013-04-01

    A finite element based method is presented for calculating the acoustic radiation force on arbitrarily shaped elastic and fluid particles. Importantly for future applications, this development will permit the modeling of acoustic forces on complex structures such as biological cells, and the interactions between them and other bodies. The model is based on a non-viscous approximation, allowing the results from an efficient, numerical, linear scattering model to provide the basis for the second-order forces. Simulation times are of the order of a few seconds for an axi-symmetric structure. The model is verified against a range of existing analytical solutions (typical accuracy better than 0.1%), including those for cylinders, elastic spheres that are of significant size compared to the acoustic wavelength, and spheroidal particles.

  17. Hierarchical modeling of the elastic properties of bone at submicron scales: the role of extrafibrillar mineralization.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Raabe, Dierk

    2008-06-01

    We model the elastic properties of bone at the level of mineralized collagen fibrils via step-by-step homogenization from the staggered arrangement of collagen molecules up to an array of parallel mineralized fibrils. A new model for extrafibrillar mineralization is proposed, assuming that the extrafibrillar minerals are mechanically equivalent to reinforcing rings coating each individual fibril. Our modeling suggests that no more than 30% of the total mineral content is extrafibrillar and the fraction of extrafibrillar minerals grows linearly with the overall degree of mineralization. It is shown that the extrafibrillar mineralization considerably reinforces the fibrils' mechanical properties in the transverse directions and the fibrils' shear moduli. The model predictions for the elastic moduli and constants are found to be in a good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature.

  18. A piloted comparison of elastic and rigid blade-element rotor models using parallel processing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gary; Du Val, Ronald W.; Green, John A.; Huynh, Loc C.

    1990-01-01

    A piloted comparison of rigid and aeroelastic blade-element rotor models was conducted at the Crew Station Research and Development Facility (CSRDF) at Ames Research Center. FLIGHTLAB, a new simulation development and analysis tool, was used to implement these models in real time using parallel processing technology. Pilot comments and quantitative analysis performed both on-line and off-line confirmed that elastic degrees of freedom significantly affect perceived handling qualities. Trim comparisons show improved correlation with flight test data when elastic modes are modeled. The results demonstrate the efficiency with which the mathematical modeling sophistication of existing simulation facilities can be upgraded using parallel processing, and the importance of these upgrades to simulation fidelity.

  19. Using the Theory of Elasticity to Model the Structure of DNA Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaeff, Alexander; Mahadevan, L.; Schulten, Klaus

    2000-03-01

    A fast computational method to study the conformation and energetics of short DNA loops is presented. The DNA is modeled as an electrically charged elastic rod. The ensemble of equilibrium conformations of the DNA loop, attainable for given boundary conditions, is generated as a set of numerical solutions to the equations of the Kirchhoff-Love theory of elasticity. The equations are augmented by electrostatic and van der Waals force terms. These modifications allow one to account for the DNA self-repulsion and to model the DNA loop interactions with other macromolecules, involved in a biomolecular system. We demonstrate the application of the method to the test system: the looped lac operon promoter of E. coli clamped by the repressor protein and stabilized by the catabolite gene activator protein. The developed coarse-grained modeling method provides the basis for multi-resolution modeling of protein-DNA complexes, e.g., in combination with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

  20. Deformation of facial model for complete denture prosthesis using ARAP group method and elastic properties.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Dai, Ning; Sun, Yuchun; Jiang, Xiaotong; Li, Weiwei

    2017-02-07

    With the development of 3D printing and computer graphics technology, mouth rehabilitation has increasingly adopted digital methods. This research proposes a new method to transform the appearance of facial model after complete denture prosthesis. A feature template with few feature points is first constructed according to the facial muscle anatomy and facial deformation after complete denture prosthesis. Next, the traditional as-rigid-as-possible (ARAP) method is optimised by clustering based on facial muscles. The optimised ARAP method is then used for real-time and interactive simulations. Finally, by classifying the degrees of elasticity in the model with additional weights, the simulation can be customised to the skin of individual patients. Different degrees of elastic deformation and post-operative models are superimposed for match analysis. Compared with our previous study, the error is reduced by 24.05%. Results show that our method can deform facial models accurately and efficiently.

  1. Validation of elastic cross section models for space radiation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werneth, C. M.; Xu, X.; Norman, R. B.; Ford, W. P.; Maung, K. M.

    2017-02-01

    The space radiation field is composed of energetic particles that pose both acute and long-term risks for astronauts in low earth orbit and beyond. In order to estimate radiation risk to crew members, the fluence of particles and biological response to the radiation must be known at tissue sites. Given that the spectral fluence at the boundary of the shielding material is characterized, radiation transport algorithms may be used to find the fluence of particles inside the shield and body, and the radio-biological response is estimated from experiments and models. The fidelity of the radiation spectrum inside the shield and body depends on radiation transport algorithms and the accuracy of the nuclear cross sections. In a recent study, self-consistent nuclear models based on multiple scattering theory that include the option to study relativistic kinematics were developed for the prediction of nuclear cross sections for space radiation applications. The aim of the current work is to use uncertainty quantification to ascertain the validity of the models as compared to a nuclear reaction database and to identify components of the models that can be improved in future efforts.

  2. Modeling of porous elastic viscoplastic material with tensile failure

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L A; Rubin, M; Vorobiev, O

    1998-11-01

    This work describes simple but comprehensive constitutive equations that model a number of physical phenomena exhibited by dry porous geological materials and metals. Moreover, formulas have been developed for robust numerical integration of the evolution equations at the element level that can be easily implemented into standard computer programs for dynamic response of materials.

  3. Modified fractal model and rheological properties of colloidal networks.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dongming; Marangoni, Alejandro G

    2008-02-15

    The scaling relationship between the storage modulus (G(')) and the volume fraction of solids (Phi) in fat crystal networks has been explained by the fractal model developed by our group. However, many experimental results and simulation studies suggest that the stress distribution within a colloidal network is dramatically heterogeneous, which means that a small part of the network carries most of the stress, while the other part of the network does not contribute much to the elastic properties of the system. This concept was introduced into a modified fractal model. The volume fraction of solids term (Phi) in the original fractal model was replaced by Phi(e), the effective volume fraction of solids, in the modified fractal model, which represents the volume fraction of stress-carrying solids. A proposed expression for Phi(e) is given and a modified expression for the scaling relationship between G(') and Phi is obtained. The modified fractal model fits the experiment data well and successfully explains the sometimes observed nonlinear log-log behavior between the storage modulus of colloidal networks and their volume fraction of solids.

  4. AeroPropulsoServoElasticity: Dynamic Modeling of the Variable Cycle Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2012-01-01

    This presentation was made at the 2012 Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference and it covers research work for the Dynamic Modeling of the Variable cycle Propulsion System that was done under the Supersonics Project, in the area of AeroPropulsoServoElasticity. The presentation covers the objective for the propulsion system dynamic modeling work, followed by the work that has been done so far to model the variable Cycle Engine, modeling of the inlet, the nozzle, the modeling that has been done to model the affects of flow distortion, and finally presenting some concluding remarks and future plans.

  5. Modeling phototaxis in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2006-03-01

    Phototaxis is the movement of organisms towards or away from light. It is one of the most important photo-biological processes, which in turn are responsible for light reception and the use of photons as a source of information. We briefly review current models of phototaxis of biological organisms and we develop a simple, minimal model for synthetic microscale units that can undergo phototactic motion. We then use this model to simulate the collective motion of such photosensitive artificial objects within a complex network, which is illuminated in a non-uniform manner by an external light.

  6. Seismic response modeling of multi-story buildings using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Joel P.; Durrani, Ahmad J.; Shelton, Robert O.

    1994-05-01

    A neural network based approach to model the seismic response of multi-story frame buildings is presented. The seismic response of frames is emulated using multi-layer feedforward neural networks with a backpropagation learning algorithm. Actual earthquake accelerograms and corresponding structural response obtained from analytical models of buildings are used in training the neural networks. The application of the neural network model is demonstrated by studying one to six story high building frames subjected to seismic base excitation. Furthermore, the learning ability of the network is examined for the case of multiple inputs where lateral forces at floor levels are included simultaneously with the base excitation. The effects of the network parameters on learning and accuracy of predictions are discussed. Based on this study, it is found that appropriately configured neural network models can successfully learn and simulate the linear elastic dynamic behavior of multi-story buildings.

  7. Modelling land-fast sea ice using a linear elastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Mathieu; Tremblay, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Land-fast ice is an important component of the Arctic system, capping the coastal Arctic waters for most of the year and exerting a large influence on ocean-atmosphere heat exchanges. Yet, the accurate representation of land-fast ice in most large-scale sea ice models remains a challenge, part due to the difficult (and sometimes non-physical) parametrisation of ice fracture. In this study, a linear elastic model is developed to investigate the internal stresses induced by the wind forcing on the land-fast ice, modelled as a 2D elastic plate. The model simulates ice fracture by the implementation of a damage coefficient which causes a local reduction in internal stress. This results in a cascade propagation of damage, simulating the ice fracture that determines the position of the land-fast ice edge. The modelled land-fast ice cover is sensitive to the choice of failure criterion. The parametrised cohesion, tensile and compressive strength and the relationship with the land-fast ice stability is discussed. To estimate the large scale mechanical properties of land-fast ice, these results are compared to a set of land-fast ice break up events and ice bridge formations observed in the Siberian Arctic. These events are identified using brightness temperature imagery from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Terra and Aqua satellites, from which the position of the flaw lead is identifiable by the opening of polynyi adjacent to the land-fast ice edge. The shape of the land-fast ice before, during and after these events, along with the characteristic scale of the resulting ice floes, are compared to the model results to extrapolate the stress state that corresponds to these observations. The model setting that best reproduce the scale of the observed break up events is used to provide an estimation of the strength of the ice relative to the wind forcing. These results will then be used to investigate the relationship between the ice thickness and the

  8. A 3D Orthotropic Strain-Rate Dependent Elastic Damage Material Model.

    SciTech Connect

    English, Shawn Allen

    2014-09-01

    A three dimensional orthotropic elastic constitutive model with continuum damage and cohesive based fracture is implemented for a general polymer matrix composite lamina. The formulation assumes the possibility of distributed (continuum) damage followed b y localized damage. The current damage activation functions are simply partially interactive quadratic strain criteria . However, the code structure allows for changes in the functions without extraordinary effort. The material model formulation, implementation, characterization and use cases are presented.

  9. Comparison of micromechanical models for elastic properties. [for unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1992-01-01

    Results for the predicted effective elastic properties of unidirectional composites are presented for glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy using eight different models. A brief review of each of the models is given along with the final equations in most cases. It is shown that there is wide variation in some predictions for glass/epoxy and that the upper and lower composite cylinder assemblage bounds do not always fall close together for this material.

  10. Determination of Viral Capsid Elastic Properties from Equilibrium Thermal Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Eric R.; Brooks, Charles L., III

    2011-05-01

    We apply two-dimensional elasticity theory to viral capsids to develop a framework for calculating elastic properties of viruses from equilibrium thermal fluctuations of the capsid surface in molecular dynamics and elastic network model trajectories. We show that the magnitudes of the long wavelength modes of motion available in a simulation with all atomic degrees of freedom are recapitulated by an elastic network model. For the mode spectra to match, the elastic network model must be scaled appropriately by a factor which can be determined from an icosahedrally constrained all-atom simulation. With this method we calculate the two-dimensional Young’s modulus Y, bending modulus κ, and Föppl-von Kármán number γ, for the T=1 mutant of the Sesbania mosaic virus. The values determined are in the range of previous theoretical estimates.

  11. Modelling of nonlinear wave scattering in a delaminated elastic bar

    PubMed Central

    Khusnutdinova, K. R.; Tranter, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Integrity of layered structures, extensively used in modern industry, strongly depends on the quality of their interfaces; poor adhesion or delamination can lead to a failure of the structure. Can nonlinear waves help us to control the quality of layered structures? In this paper, we numerically model the dynamics of a long longitudinal strain solitary wave in a split, symmetric layered bar. The recently developed analytical approach, based on matching two asymptotic multiple-scales expansions and the integrability theory of the Korteweg–de Vries equation by the inverse scattering transform, is used to develop an effective semi-analytical numerical approach for these types of problems. We also employ a direct finite-difference method and compare the numerical results with each other, and with the analytical predictions. The numerical modelling confirms that delamination causes fission of an incident solitary wave and, thus, can be used to detect the defect. PMID:26730218

  12. Anisotropic Elastic Resonance Scattering model for the Neutron Transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed Ouisloumen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Shadi Z. Ghrayeb

    2014-11-24

    The resonance scattering transfer cross-section has been reformulated to account for anisotropic scattering in the center-of-mass of the neutron-nucleus system. The main innovation over previous implementations is the relaxation of the ubiquitous assumption of isotropic scattering in the center-of-mass and the actual effective use of scattering angle distributions from evaluated nuclear data files in the computation of the angular moments of the resonant scattering kernels. The formulas for the high order anisotropic moments in the laboratory system are also derived. A multi-group numerical formulation is derived and implemented into a module incorporated within the NJOY nuclear data processing code. An ultra-fine energy mesh cross section library was generated using these new theoretical models and then was used for fuel assembly calculations with the PARAGON lattice physics code. The results obtained indicate a strong effect of this new model on reactivity, multi-group fluxes and isotopic inventory during depletion.

  13. Random Boolean network models and the yeast transcriptional network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Stuart; Peterson, Carsten; Samuelsson, Björn; Troein, Carl

    2003-12-01

    The recently measured yeast transcriptional network is analyzed in terms of simplified Boolean network models, with the aim of determining feasible rule structures, given the requirement of stable solutions of the generated Boolean networks. We find that for ensembles of generated models, those with canalyzing Boolean rules are remarkably stable, whereas those with random Boolean rules are only marginally stable. Furthermore, substantial parts of the generated networks are frozen, in the sense that they reach the same state regardless of initial state. Thus, our ensemble approach suggests that the yeast network shows highly ordered dynamics.

  14. Probabilistic logic modeling of network reliability for hybrid network architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, G.D.; Schriner, H.K.; Gaylor, T.R.

    1996-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has found that the reliability and failure modes of current-generation network technologies can be effectively modeled using fault tree-based probabilistic logic modeling (PLM) techniques. We have developed fault tree models that include various hierarchical networking technologies and classes of components interconnected in a wide variety of typical and atypical configurations. In this paper we discuss the types of results that can be obtained from PLMs and why these results are of great practical value to network designers and analysts. After providing some mathematical background, we describe the `plug-and-play` fault tree analysis methodology that we have developed for modeling connectivity and the provision of network services in several current- generation network architectures. Finally, we demonstrate the flexibility of the method by modeling the reliability of a hybrid example network that contains several interconnected ethernet, FDDI, and token ring segments. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Plant Growth Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we descrive our motivation and approach to devloping models and the neural network architecture. Initial use of the artificial neural network for modeling the single plant process of transpiration is presented.

  16. Plant Growth Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we descrive our motivation and approach to devloping models and the neural network architecture. Initial use of the artificial neural network for modeling the single plant process of transpiration is presented.

  17. An Elastic-Plastic and Strength Prediction Model for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper applies a recently developed model to predict the elastic-plastic stress/strain response and strength of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model combines a micro-macro constitutive modeling approach with experimental characterization and modeling of the composite microstructure to determine the composite stress/strain response and strength. Specifically, it accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length, orientation and volume fraction distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Injection-molded-long-glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP) specimens were prepared for mechanical characterization and testing. Fiber length, orientation, and volume fraction distributions were then measured at some selected locations for use in the computation. Fiber orientations in these specimens were also predicted using an anisotropic rotary diffusion model developed for LFTs. The stress-strain response of the as-formed composite was computed by an incremental procedure that uses the Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method, the Mori-Tanaka assumption and a fiber orientation averaging technique. The model has been validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for these long-glass-fiber/PP specimens.

  18. A modified elastance model to control mock ventricles in real-time: numerical and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Colacino, Francesco Maria; Moscato, Francesco; Piedimonte, Fabio; Danieli, Guido; Nicosia, Salvatore; Arabia, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an elastance-based mock ventricle able to reproduce the correct ventricular pressure-volume relationship and its correct interaction with the hydraulic circuit connected to it. A real-time control of the mock ventricle was obtained by a new left ventricular mathematical model including resistive and inductive terms added to the classical Suga-Sagawa elastance model throughout the whole cardiac cycle. A valved piston pump was used to mimic the left ventricle. The pressure measured into the pump chamber was fed back into the mathematical model and the calculated reference left ventricular volume was used to drive the piston. Results show that the classical model is very sensitive to pressure disturbances, especially during the filling phase, while the modified model is able to filter out the oscillations thus eliminating their detrimental effects. The presented model is thus suitable to control mock ventricles in real-time, where sudden pressure disturbances represent a key issue and are not negligible. This real-time controlled mock ventricle is able to reproduce the elastance mechanism of a natural ventricle by mimicking its preload (mean atrial pressure) and afterload (mean aortic pressure) sensitivity, i.e., the Starling law. Therefore, it can be used for designing and testing cardiovascular prostheses due to its capability to reproduce the correct ventricle-vascular system interaction.

  19. An anisotropic, elastic-decohesive constitutive relation for modeling Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulsky, D.; Tran, H.; Schreyer, H.

    2016-12-01

    As high-resolution simulations become increasingly possible and popular, questions are being raised about isotropic constitutive models for sea ice that are based on averaging material behavior over 100 km scales. At finer resolutions, it may not be appropriate to average over concentrated deformations which occur in leads and ridges since small regions do not contain sufficient numbers of these features at arbitrary orientations to support the assumption of isotropy. An elastic-decohesive constitutive model for pack ice has been developed that explicitly accounts for leads. The constitutive model is based on elasticity combined with a cohesive crack law that predicts the initiation, orientation and opening of leads. This talk presents extensions of the original model that tie it more closely to the thermodynamics and thickness distribution. Before failure, sea ice itself is assumed to be described by isotropic elasticity. However, an element of ice composed of different thicknesses, including refrozen leads and/or ridges, is modeled as an equivalent anisotropic elastic material of uniform thickness. The classical rule-of-mixtures is applied for the ice `composite' having an oriented distribution of thickness to derive the moduli and the strengths of the equivalent material. At failure, a decohesive constitutive relation based on the traction on a potential crack plane is employed in the anisotropic material. Sample paths in stress and strain space are examined to illustrate the aspects of the model when simulating the failure of sea ice. Simulations with the improved model show how failure is influenced by the oriented thickness distribution, for example, by failure occurring preferentially in thin ice.

  20. A Novel 3D Microstructural Model for Trabecular Bone: I. The Relationship between Fabric and Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Zysset, P. K.; Ominsky, M. S.; Goldstein, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    A novel 3D microstructural model is proposed to investigate the relationship between morphology and mechanical properties of trabecular bone. Open and closed cell geometries were selected with varying volume fractions and degrees of anisotropy that simulate the architectures of human cancellous bone over a broad range of anatomical locations. Finite element models of both cells were developed using beams and shells. Volume fraction and mean intercept length were calculated analytically and the effective elastic tensors were computed with linear tissue properties and periodic boundary conditions. Distinct, but strong relationships were obtained between fabric and the elastic tensors for open and closed cell geometries, which bound the experimental results obtained for human bone and support the relevance of the selected model to address trabecular bone fragility.

  1. Electro-elastic modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric

    2004-07-01

    A dielectric elastomer diaphragm is to be designed for potential use in a prosthetic blood pump. Application of an electric field deforms the membrane such that it moves from an initially flat configuration to an inflated state. This motion creates positive displacement of blood from the cardiac chambers thus mimicking the pump-like behavior of the natural heart. A comprehensive large deformation model accounting for the combined dielectric and elastic effect has been formulated. This paper presents recent developments in the model to further incorporate the entire nonlinear range of material elastic behavior and to more accurately represent the applied electric field by keeping the voltage constant as the membrane thickness decreases. The updated model is used to calculate the effects of varying system parameters such as pressure, voltage, prestretch, material constants, and membrane geometry. Analytical results are obtained for biaxially stretched 3M VHB 4905 polyacrylate films.

  2. Effective Medium Model for Ultrasonic Attenuation Due to the Thermo-Elastic Effect in Concentrated Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemar, Y.; Herrmann, N.; Lemaréchal, P.; Hocquart, R.; Lequeux, F.

    1997-04-01

    In this article, we deal with the propagation of ultrasonic waves in monodisperse concentrated oil in water emulsions. Using the approximation of Isakovich, we propose two different models, a mirror model and a core shell model, aiming to describe the temperature field in the dense medium and to supply a correct expression of the ultrasonic wave vector. The comparison between experimental data and theoretical models shows that the core shell model leads to a very accurate description of the ultrasonic attenuation, in a wide range of frequencies and concentrations, in the case where the thermo elastic effect, due to the scattering of thermal waves by the particles, is the dominant loss mechanism.

  3. Small oscillations of a pressurized, elastic, spherical shell: Model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, K. A.; Hunt, H. E. M.; Lister, John R.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a model for the small oscillations of a pressurized, elastic, spherical shell subject to internal and external fluid effects. The shell has three features: a pressure difference across the skin; a thin, tensioned shell; and a double curved interfacial surface. An analytical solution for the natural frequencies and mode shapes, incorporating the inertia both of the shell and the surrounding fluids, is derived. Two key parameters that quantify the effect of pre-stress and fluid inertia on the shell's behaviour are identified. When the skin tension is set to zero and the inertial effects of the fluid are removed, the results converge to the analytical solution for an elastic spherical shell, and when the skin elasticity is neglected, the results converge to the constant-tension solution of a bubble. The analytical solution is used to predict the natural frequencies of a small balloon, based on a value for the elastic modulus that is determined using inflation measurements. These predictions are compared to experimental measurements of balloon vibrations using impact-hammer testing, and good agreement is seen.

  4. Relation between elastic modulus and glass softening temperature in the delocalized atom model

    SciTech Connect

    Sanditov, B. D.; Sangadiev, S. Sh.; Sanditov, D. S.

    2012-09-15

    The ratio of softening temperature (glass transition temperature) to elastic modulus (T{sub g}/E) is mainly determined by the limiting elastic deformation of an interatomic bond, which characterizes the transition of a structural microregion from an elastic into a viscous-flow state. In silicate glasses, this transition is caused by the limiting deformation of directed ionic-covalent Si-O-Si bonds. In the case of amorphous hydrocarbons, it is related to the relatively weak intermolecular bonds between regions in chain macromolecules, and the T{sub g}/E ratio is significantly higher than in inorganic glasses. In glassy systems of one class, this ratio turns out to be constant (T{sub g}/E Almost-Equal-To const), and a linear correlation is detected between softening temperature and elastic modulus, which can be explained in terms of the delocalized atom model. The values of T{sub g}/E can be used to classify glasses similarly to the well-known Angell classification according to so-called fragility.

  5. Statistical analysis of blocking probability and fragmentation based on Markov modeling of elastic spectrum allocation on fiber link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, A. N. F.; Wiatr, P.; Cavdar, C.; Carvalho, S. V.; Costa, J. C. W. A.; Wosinska, L.

    2015-11-01

    In Elastic Optical Network (EON), spectrum fragmentation refers to the existence of non-aligned, small-sized blocks of free subcarrier slots in the optical spectrum. Several metrics have been proposed in order to quantify a level of spectrum fragmentation. Approximation methods might be used for estimating average blocking probability and some fragmentation measures, but are so far unable to accurately evaluate the influence of different sizes of connection requests and do not allow in-depth investigation of blocking events and their relation to fragmentation. The analytical study of the effect of fragmentation on requests' blocking probability is still under-explored. In this work, we introduce new definitions for blocking that differentiate between the reasons for the blocking events. We developed a framework based on Markov modeling to calculate steady-state probabilities for the different blocking events and to analyze fragmentation related problems in elastic optical links under dynamic traffic conditions. This framework can also be used for evaluation of different definitions of fragmentation in terms of their relation to the blocking probability. We investigate how different allocation request sizes contribute to fragmentation and blocking probability. Moreover, we show to which extend blocking events, due to insufficient amount of available resources, become inevitable and, compared to the amount of blocking events due to fragmented spectrum, we draw conclusions on the possible gains one can achieve by system defragmentation. We also show how efficient spectrum allocation policies really are in reducing the part of fragmentation that in particular leads to actual blocking events. Simulation experiments are carried out showing good match with our analytical results for blocking probability in a small scale scenario. Simulated blocking probabilities for the different blocking events are provided for a larger scale elastic optical link.

  6. Hulthén potential models for α-α and α-He 3 elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BHOI, J.; LAHA, U.

    2017-03-01

    Simple Hulthén-type potential models are proposed to treat the α- α and α {-} {He}3 elastic scattering. The merit of our approach is examined by computing elastic scattering phases through the judicious use of the phase function method. Reasonable agreements in scattering phase shifts are obtained with the standard data.

  7. Modeling the Dynamics of Compromised Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, B; Merl, D M

    2011-09-12

    Accurate predictive models of compromised networks would contribute greatly to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the detection and control of network attacks. Compartmental epidemiological models have been applied to modeling attack vectors such as viruses and worms. We extend the application of these models to capture a wider class of dynamics applicable to cyber security. By making basic assumptions regarding network topology we use multi-group epidemiological models and reaction rate kinetics to model the stochastic evolution of a compromised network. The Gillespie Algorithm is used to run simulations under a worst case scenario in which the intruder follows the basic connection rates of network traffic as a method of obfuscation.

  8. Phase Field Models for Thin Elastic Structures with Topological Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondl, Patrick W.; Lemenant, Antoine; Wojtowytsch, Stephan

    2017-02-01

    This article is concerned with the problem of minimising the Willmore energy in the class of connected surfaces with prescribed area which are confined to a small container. We propose a phase field approximation based on De Giorgi's diffuse Willmore functional to this variational problem. Our main contribution is a penalisation term which ensures connectedness in the sharp interface limit. The penalisation of disconnectedness is based on a geodesic distance chosen to be small between two points that lie on the same connected component of the transition layer of the phase field. We prove that in two dimensions, sequences of phase fields with uniformly bounded diffuse Willmore energy and diffuse area converge uniformly to the zeros of a double-well potential away from the support of a limiting measure. In three dimensions, we show that they converge H^1-almost everywhere on curves. This enables us to show {Γ}-convergence to a sharp interface problem that only allows for connected structures. The results also imply Hausdorff convergence of the level sets in two dimensions and a similar result in three dimensions. Furthermore, we present numerical evidence of the effectiveness of our model. The implementation relies on a coupling of Dijkstra's algorithm in order to compute the topological penalty to a finite element approach for the Willmore term.

  9. Simulation model for flow of neutrophils in pulmonary capillary network.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Atsushi; Fujita, Ryo; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    The concentration of neutrophils in the pulmonary microvasculature is higher than in systemic large vessels. It is thought that the high concentration of neutrophils facilitates their effective recruitment to sites of inflammation. Thus, in order to understand the role of neutrophils in the immune system, it is important to clarify their flow characteristics in the pulmonary microvasculature. In previous studies, we numerically investigated the motion of a neutrophil through a single capillary segment modeled by a moderate axisymmetric constriction in a straight pipe, developing a mathematical model for the prediction of the transit time of the cell through the segment. In the present study, this model was extended for application to network simulation of the motion of neutrophils. First, we numerically investigated shape recovery of a neutrophil after expulsion from a narrow capillary segment. This process was modeled in two different phases: elastic recovery and viscous recovery. The resulting model was combined with the previously developed models to simulate motion of the cells and plasma flow in a capillary network. A numerical simulation of the motion of neutrophils and plasma flow in a simple lattice capillary network showed that neutrophils were widely dispersed in the network with an increased concentration.

  10. If Cell Mechanics Can Be Described by Elastic Modulus: Study of Different Models and Probes Used in Indentation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Guz, Nataliia; Dokukin, Maxim; Kalaparthi, Vivekanand; Sokolov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Here we investigated the question whether cells, being highly heterogeneous objects, could be described with the elastic modulus (effective Young’s modulus) in a self-consistent way. We performed a comparative analysis of the elastic modulus derived from the indentation data obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM) on human cervical epithelial cells (both normal and cancerous). Both sharp (cone) and dull (2500-nm radius sphere) AFM probes were used. The indentation data were processed through different elastic models. The cell was approximated as a homogeneous elastic medium that had either 1), smooth hemispherical boundary (Hertz/Sneddon models) or 2), the boundary covered with a layer of glycocalyx and membrane protrusions (“brush” models). Consistency of these approximations was investigated. Specifically, we tested the independence of the elastic modulus of the indentation depth, which is assumed in these models. We demonstrated that only one model showed consistency in treating cells as a homogeneous elastic medium, namely, the brush model, when processing the indentation data collected with the dull AFM probe. The elastic modulus demonstrated strong depth dependence in all models: Hertz/Sneddon models (no brush taken into account), and when the brush model was applied to the data collected with sharp conical probes. We conclude that it is possible to describe the elastic properties of the cell body by means of an effective elastic modulus, used in a self-consistent way, when using the brush model to analyze data collected with a dull AFM probe. The nature of these results is discussed. PMID:25099796

  11. A highly elastic, capacitive strain gauge based on percolating nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Daniel J; Mitra, Debkishore; Peterson, Kevin; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2012-04-11

    We present a highly elastic strain gauge based on capacitive sensing of parallel, carbon nanotube-based percolation electrodes separated by a dielectric elastomer. The fabrication, relying on vacuum filtration of single-walled carbon nanotubes and hydrophobic patterning of silicone, is both rapid and inexpensive. We demonstrate reliable, linear performance over thousands of cycles at up to 100% strain with less than 3% variability and the highest reported gauge factor for a device of this class (0.99). We further demonstrate use of this sensor in a robotics context to transduce joint angles.

  12. Radius exponent in elastic and rigid arterial models optimized by the least energy principle.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Awa, Shoichi

    2014-02-01

    It was analyzed in normal physiological arteries whether the least energy principle would suffice to account for the radius exponent x. The mammalian arterial system was modeled as two types, the elastic or the rigid, to which Bernoulli's and Hagen-Poiseuille's equations were applied, respectively. We minimized the total energy function E, which was defined as the sum of kinetic, pressure, metabolic and thermal energies, and loss of each per unit time in a single artery transporting viscous incompressible blood. Assuming a scaling exponent α between the vessel radius (r) and length (l) to be 1.0, x resulted in 2.33 in the elastic model. The rigid model provided a continuously changing x from 2.33 to 3.0, which corresponded to Uylings' and Murray's theories, respectively, through a function combining Reynolds number with a proportional coefficient of the l - r relationship. These results were expanded to an asymmetric arterial fractal tree with the blood flow preservation rule. While x in the optimal elastic model accounted for around 2.3 in proximal systemic (r >1 mm) and whole pulmonary arteries (r ≥0.004 mm), optimal x in the rigid model explained 2.7 in elastic-muscular (0.1 < r ≤1 mm) and 3.0 in peripheral resistive systemic arteries (0.004 ≤ r ≤0.1 mm), in agreement with data obtained from angiographic, cast-morphometric, and in vivo experimental studies in the literature. The least energy principle on the total energy basis provides an alternate concept of optimality relating to mammalian arterial fractal dimensions under α = 1.0.

  13. Material characterization of the encapsulation of an ultrasound contrast microbubble and its subharmonic response: Strain-softening interfacial elasticity model

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Shirshendu; Katiyar, Amit; Sarkar, Kausik; Chatterjee, Dhiman; Shi, William T.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    Two nonlinear interfacial elasticity models—interfacial elasticity decreasing linearly and exponentially with area fraction—are developed for the encapsulation of contrast microbubbles. The strain softening (decreasing elasticity) results from the decreasing association between the constitutive molecules of the encapsulation. The models are used to find the characteristic properties (surface tension, interfacial elasticity, interfacial viscosity and nonlinear elasticity parameters) for a commercial contrast agent. Properties are found using the ultrasound attenuation measured through a suspension of contrast agent. Dynamics of the resulting models are simulated, compared with other existing models and discussed. Imposing non-negativity on the effective surface tension (the encapsulation experiences no net compressive stress) shows “compression-only” behavior. The exponential and the quadratic (linearly varying elasticity) models result in similar behaviors. The validity of the models is investigated by comparing their predictions of the scattered nonlinear response for the contrast agent at higher excitations against experimental measurement. All models predict well the scattered fundamental response. The nonlinear strain softening included in the proposed elastic models of the encapsulation improves their ability to predict subharmonic response. They predict the threshold excitation for the initiation of subharmonic response and its subsequent saturation. PMID:20550283

  14. Multiscale Gaussian network model (mGNM) and multiscale anisotropic network model (mANM).

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-11-28

    Gaussian network model (GNM) and anisotropic network model (ANM) are some of the most popular methods for the study of protein flexibility and related functions. In this work, we propose generalized GNM (gGNM) and ANM methods and show that the GNM Kirchhoff matrix can be built from the ideal low-pass filter, which is a special case of a wide class of correlation functions underpinning the linear scaling flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) method. Based on the mathematical structure of correlation functions, we propose a unified framework to construct generalized Kirchhoff matrices whose matrix inverse leads to gGNMs, whereas, the direct inverse of its diagonal elements gives rise to FRI method. With this connection, we further introduce two multiscale elastic network models, namely, multiscale GNM (mGNM) and multiscale ANM (mANM), which are able to incorporate different scales into the generalized Kirchhoff matrices or generalized Hessian matrices. We validate our new multiscale methods with extensive numerical experiments. We illustrate that gGNMs outperform the original GNM method in the B-factor prediction of a set of 364 proteins. We demonstrate that for a given correlation function, FRI and gGNM methods provide essentially identical B-factor predictions when the scale value in the correlation function is sufficiently large. More importantly, we reveal intrinsic multiscale behavior in protein structures. The proposed mGNM and mANM are able to capture this multiscale behavior and thus give rise to a significant improvement of more than 11% in B-factor predictions over the original GNM and ANM methods. We further demonstrate the benefits of our mGNM through the B-factor predictions of many proteins that fail the original GNM method. We show that the proposed mGNM can also be used to analyze protein domain separations. Finally, we showcase the ability of our mANM for the analysis of protein collective motions.

  15. Multiscale Gaussian network model (mGNM) and multiscale anisotropic network model (mANM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kelin; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-11-01

    Gaussian network model (GNM) and anisotropic network model (ANM) are some of the most popular methods for the study of protein flexibility and related functions. In this work, we propose generalized GNM (gGNM) and ANM methods and show that the GNM Kirchhoff matrix can be built from the ideal low-pass filter, which is a special case of a wide class of correlation functions underpinning the linear scaling flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) method. Based on the mathematical structure of correlation functions, we propose a unified framework to construct generalized Kirchhoff matrices whose matrix inverse leads to gGNMs, whereas, the direct inverse of its diagonal elements gives rise to FRI method. With this connection, we further introduce two multiscale elastic network models, namely, multiscale GNM (mGNM) and multiscale ANM (mANM), which are able to incorporate different scales into the generalized Kirchhoff matrices or generalized Hessian matrices. We validate our new multiscale methods with extensive numerical experiments. We illustrate that gGNMs outperform the original GNM method in the B-factor prediction of a set of 364 proteins. We demonstrate that for a given correlation function, FRI and gGNM methods provide essentially identical B-factor predictions when the scale value in the correlation function is sufficiently large. More importantly, we reveal intrinsic multiscale behavior in protein structures. The proposed mGNM and mANM are able to capture this multiscale behavior and thus give rise to a significant improvement of more than 11% in B-factor predictions over the original GNM and ANM methods. We further demonstrate the benefits of our mGNM through the B-factor predictions of many proteins that fail the original GNM method. We show that the proposed mGNM can also be used to analyze protein domain separations. Finally, we showcase the ability of our mANM for the analysis of protein collective motions.

  16. A thermomechanical anisotropic model for shock loading of elastic-plastic and elastic-viscoplastic materials with application to jointed rock

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M. B.; Vorobiev, O.; Vitali, E.

    2016-04-21

    Here, a large deformation thermomechanical model is developed for shock loading of a material that can exhibit elastic and inelastic anisotropy. Use is made of evolution equations for a triad of microstructural vectors mi(i=1,2,3) which model elastic deformations and directions of anisotropy. Specific constitutive equations are presented for a material with orthotropic elastic response. The rate of inelasticity depends on an orthotropic yield function that can be used to model weak fault planes with failure in shear and which exhibits a smooth transition to isotropic response at high compression. Moreover, a robust, strongly objective numerical algorithm is proposed for both rate-independent and rate-dependent response. The predictions of the continuum model are examined by comparison with exact steady-state solutions. Also, the constitutive equations are used to obtain a simplified continuum model of jointed rock which is compared with high fidelity numerical solutions that model a persistent system of joints explicitly in the rock medium.

  17. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of a Hypersonic Vehicle with Significant Aero-Thermo-Elastic-Propulsion Interactions: Elastic, Thermal and Mass Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Jaidev

    This thesis examines themodeling, analysis, and control system design issues for scramjet powered hypersonic vehicles. A nonlinear three degrees of freedom longitudinal model which includes aero-propulsion-elasticity effects was used for all analyses. This model is based upon classical compressible flow and Euler-Bernouli structural concepts. Higher fidelity computational fluid dynamics and finite element methods are needed for more precise intermediate and final evaluations. The methods presented within this thesis were shown to be useful for guiding initial control relevant design. The model was used to examine the vehicle's static and dynamic characteristics over the vehicle's trimmable region. The vehicle has significant longitudinal coupling between the fuel equivalency ratio (FER) and the flight path angle (FPA). For control system design, a two-input two-output plant (FER - elevator to speed-FPA) with 11 states (including 3 flexible modes) was used. Velocity, FPA, and pitch were assumed to be available for feedback. Aerodynamic heat modeling and design for the assumed TPS was incorporated to original Bolender's model to study the change in static and dynamic properties. De-centralized control stability, feasibility and limitations issues were dealt with the change in TPS elasticity, mass and physical dimension. The impact of elasticity due to TPS mass, TPS physical dimension as well as prolonged heating was also analyzed to understand performance limitations of de-centralized control designed for nominal model.

  18. A thermomechanical anisotropic model for shock loading of elastic-plastic and elastic-viscoplastic materials with application to jointed rock

    DOE PAGES

    Rubin, M. B.; Vorobiev, O.; Vitali, E.

    2016-04-21

    Here, a large deformation thermomechanical model is developed for shock loading of a material that can exhibit elastic and inelastic anisotropy. Use is made of evolution equations for a triad of microstructural vectors mi(i=1,2,3) which model elastic deformations and directions of anisotropy. Specific constitutive equations are presented for a material with orthotropic elastic response. The rate of inelasticity depends on an orthotropic yield function that can be used to model weak fault planes with failure in shear and which exhibits a smooth transition to isotropic response at high compression. Moreover, a robust, strongly objective numerical algorithm is proposed for bothmore » rate-independent and rate-dependent response. The predictions of the continuum model are examined by comparison with exact steady-state solutions. Also, the constitutive equations are used to obtain a simplified continuum model of jointed rock which is compared with high fidelity numerical solutions that model a persistent system of joints explicitly in the rock medium.« less

  19. Models for Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Inferred from Hydraulic Permeability and Elastic Velocities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments strongly depend on how gas hydrate accumulates in pore spaces and various gas hydrate accumulation models are proposed to predict physical property changes due to gas hydrate concentrations. Elastic velocities and permeability predicted from a cementation model differ noticeably from those from a pore-filling model. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log provides in-situ water-filled porosity and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. To test the two competing models, the NMR log along with conventional logs such as velocity and resistivity logs acquired at the Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, were analyzed. When the clay content is less than about 12 percent, the NMR porosity is 'accurate' and the gas hydrate concentrations from the NMR log are comparable to those estimated from an electrical resistivity log. The variation of elastic velocities and relative permeability with respect to the gas hydrate concentration indicates that the dominant effect of gas hydrate in the pore space is the pore-filling characteristic.

  20. Random polycrystals of grains containing cracks: Model of quasistatic elastic behavior for fractured systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, James G.; Grechka, Vladimir

    2006-12-01

    A model study on fractured systems was performed using a concept that treats isotropic cracked systems as ensembles of cracked grains by analogy to isotropic polycrystalline elastic media. The approach has two advantages: (a) Averaging performed is ensemble averaging, thus avoiding the criticism legitimately leveled at most effective medium theories of quasistatic elastic behavior for cracked media based on volume concentrations of inclusions. Since crack effects are largely independent of the volume they occupy in the composite, such a non-volume-based method offers an appealingly simple modeling alternative. (b) The second advantage is that both polycrystals and fractured media are stiffer than might otherwise be expected, due to natural bridging effects of the strong components. These same effects have also often been interpreted as crack-crack screening in high-crack-density fractured media, but there is no inherent conflict between these two interpretations of this phenomenon. Results of the study are somewhat mixed. The spread in elastic constants observed in a set of numerical experiments is found to be very comparable to the spread in values contained between the Reuss and Voigt bounds for the polycrystal model. Unfortunately, computed Hashin-Shtrikman bounds are much too tight to be in agreement with the numerical data, showing that polycrystals of cracked grains tend to violate some implicit assumptions of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounding approach. However, the self-consistent estimates obtained for the random polycrystal model are nevertheless very good estimators of the observed average behavior.

  1. Improved free-surface expression for frequency-domain elastic optimal mixed-grid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Chen, Jing-Bo; Dai, Meng-Xue

    2016-07-01

    An accurate and efficient forward modeling is the foundation of full-waveform inversion (FWI). In elastic wave modeling, one of the key problems is how to deal with the free-surface boundary condition appropriately. For the representation of the free-surface boundary condition, conventional displacement-based approaches and staggered-grid approaches are often used in time-domain. In frequency-domain, considering the saving of storage and CPU time, we integrate the idea of physical parameter-modified staggered-grid approach in time-domain with an elastic optimal mixed-grid modeling scheme to design an improved parameter-modified free-surface expression. Accuracy analysis shows that an elastic optimal mixed-grid modeling scheme using the parameter-modified free-surface expression can provide more accurate solutions with only 4 grid points per smallest shear wavelength than conventional displacement-based approaches and is stable for most Poisson ratios. Besides, it also yields smaller condition number of the resulting impedance matrix than conventional displacement-based approaches in laterally varying complex media. These advantages reveal great potential of this free-surface expression in big-data practical application.

  2. A 2D multiring model of blood flow in elastic arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigo, Arthur; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of blood flow in elastic arteries are difficult and costly due to the complex fluid-structure interactions between the motion of the fluid and the displacement of the wall. We propose a two-dimensional multiring model to overcome those difficulties and obtain at a reasonable computational cost an asymptotically valid description of blood flow in large elastic arteries. The multiring equations are derived by integrating over concentric rings of fluid a simplified system of equations based on a long wave approximation of the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations and a thin-cylinder description of the arterial wall. Contrary to classical one-dimensional models, obtained by integrating the same system over a single ring, the multiring model computes the velocity profile as well as the wall shear stress and requires no a priori estimation of model coefficients. We show that by numerically solving the multiring system of equations, we are able to compute a large range of classical blood flow solutions, ranging from the elastic Womersley solution to the rigid tube Poiseuille solution.

  3. Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion for the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo; Calandra, Henri

    2016-06-01

    Laplace-domain waveform inversion reconstructs long-wavelength subsurface models by using the zero-frequency component of damped seismic signals. Despite the computational advantages of Laplace-domain waveform inversion over conventional frequency-domain waveform inversion, an acoustic assumption and an iterative matrix solver have been used to invert 3D marine datasets to mitigate the intensive computing cost. In this study, we develop a Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion algorithm for 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media by using a parallel sparse direct solver library (MUltifrontal Massively Parallel Solver, MUMPS). We precisely simulate a real marine environment by coupling the 3D acoustic and elastic wave equations with the proper boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface. In addition, we can extract the elastic properties of the Earth below the sea bottom from the recorded acoustic pressure datasets. As a matrix solver, the parallel sparse direct solver is used to factorize the non-symmetric impedance matrix in a distributed memory architecture and rapidly solve the wave field for a number of shots by using the lower and upper matrix factors. Using both synthetic datasets and real datasets obtained by a 3D wide azimuth survey, the long-wavelength component of the P-wave and S-wave velocity models is reconstructed and the proposed modeling and inversion algorithm are verified. A cluster of 80 CPU cores is used for this study.

  4. Finite Element Prediction of Sheet Forming Defects Using Elastic-Plastic, Damage and Localization Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddag, Badis; Abed-Meraim, Farid; Balan, Tudor

    2007-05-01

    In this work, an advanced anisotropic elastic-plasticity model is combined with a damage model and a strain localization criterion in the aim to describe accurately the mechanical behavior of sheet metals. Large strain, fully three-dimensional, implicit time integration algorithms are developed for this model and implemented in the finite element code Abaqus. The resulting code is used to predict the strain localization limits as well as the springback after forming of sheet steels. The impact of strain-path dependent hardening models on the limit strains and on the amount of springback is addressed.

  5. Implementation of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and advanced signal processing for elastic optical networking in accordance with networking and transmission constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stanley

    An increasing adoption of digital signal processing (DSP) in optical fiber telecommunication has brought to the fore several interesting DSP enabled modulation formats. One such format is orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), which has seen great success in wireless and wired RF applications, and is being actively investigated by several research groups for use in optical fiber telecom. In this dissertation, I present three implementations of OFDM for elastic optical networking and distributed network control. The first is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based real-time implementation of a version of OFDM conventionally known as intensity modulation and direct detection (IMDD) OFDM. I experimentally demonstrate the ability of this transmission system to dynamically adjust bandwidth and modulation format to meet networking constraints in an automated manner. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first real-time software defined networking (SDN) based control of an OFDM system. In the second OFDM implementation, I experimentally demonstrate a novel OFDM transmission scheme that supports both direct detection and coherent detection receivers simultaneously using the same OFDM transmitter. This interchangeable receiver solution enables a trade-off between bit rate and equipment cost in network deployment and upgrades. I show that the proposed transmission scheme can provide a receiver sensitivity improvement of up to 1.73 dB as compared to IMDD OFDM. I also present two novel polarization analyzer based detection schemes, and study their performance using experiment and simulation. In the third implementation, I present an OFDM pilot-tone based scheme for distributed network control. The first instance of an SDN-based OFDM elastic optical network with pilot-tone assisted distributed control is demonstrated. An improvement in spectral efficiency and a fast reconfiguration time of 30 ms have been achieved in this experiment. Finally, I

  6. Microscopic cluster model analysis of {sup 14}O+p elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.; Leo, F.

    2005-08-01

    The {sup 14}O+p elastic scattering is discussed in detail in a fully microscopic cluster model. The {sup 14}O cluster is described by a closed p shell for protons and a closed p3/2 subshell for neutrons in the translation-invariant harmonic-oscillator model. The exchange and spin-orbit parameters of the effective forces are tuned on the energy levels of the {sup 15}C mirror system. With the generator-coordinate and microscopic R-matrix methods, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated for the {sup 14}O+p elastic scattering. An excellent agreement is found with recent experimental data. A comparison is performed with phenomenological R-matrix fits. Resonances properties in {sup 15}F are discussed.

  7. A comparison of classical mechanics models and finite element simulation of elastically tailored wing boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Pickings, Richard D.; Chang, Stephen; Holl, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Structural tailoring concepts were developed to create wings with elastically produced camber for the purpose of increasing lift during takeoff conditions. Simple models based upon enhancements to the thin walled composite beam theory of Rehfield were developed to investigate prospects for elastic tailoring of the chordwise deformation of wing structures. The purpose here is to provide a comparison of the theoretical results with a finite element model for the bending method of producing camber. Finite element correlation studies were completed for two cases: a bonded unstiffened structural box, and a bolted unstiffened structural box. Results from these studies show an error of less than one percent for the bonded case and less than six percent for the bolted case in predicting camber curvature for the structural box. Examination of the results shows that the theory is very accurate for the cases studied and will provide an excellent basis for conducting further tailoring studies.

  8. Stochastic modeling and generation of random fields of elasticity tensors: A unified information-theoretic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staber, Brian; Guilleminot, Johann

    2017-06-01

    In this Note, we present a unified approach to the information-theoretic modeling and simulation of a class of elasticity random fields, for all physical symmetry classes. The new stochastic representation builds upon a Walpole tensor decomposition, which allows the maximum entropy constraints to be decoupled in accordance with the tensor (sub)algebras associated with the class under consideration. In contrast to previous works where the construction was carried out on the scalar-valued Walpole coordinates, the proposed strategy involves both matrix-valued and scalar-valued random fields. This enables, in particular, the construction of a generation algorithm based on a memoryless transformation, hence improving the computational efficiency of the framework. Two applications involving weak symmetries and sampling over spherical and cylindrical geometries are subsequently provided. These numerical experiments are relevant to the modeling of elastic interphases in nanocomposites, as well as to the simulation of spatially dependent wood properties for instance.

  9. Microscopic cluster model analysis of 14O+p elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.; Leo, F.

    2005-08-01

    The 14O+p elastic scattering is discussed in detail in a fully microscopic cluster model. The 14O cluster is described by a closed p shell for protons and a closed p3/2 subshell for neutrons in the translation-invariant harmonic-oscillator model. The exchange and spin-orbit parameters of the effective forces are tuned on the energy levels of the 15C mirror system. With the generator-coordinate and microscopic R-matrix methods, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated for the 14O+p elastic scattering. An excellent agreement is found with recent experimental data. A comparison is performed with phenomenological R-matrix fits. Resonances properties in 15F are discussed.

  10. Plate and butt-weld stresses beyond elastic limit, material and structural modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1991-01-01

    Ultimate safety factors of high performance structures depend on stress behavior beyond the elastic limit, a region not too well understood. An analytical modeling approach was developed to gain fundamental insights into inelastic responses of simple structural elements. Nonlinear material properties were expressed in engineering stresses and strains variables and combined with strength of material stress and strain equations similar to numerical piece-wise linear method. Integrations are continuous which allows for more detailed solutions. Included with interesting results are the classical combined axial tension and bending load model and the strain gauge conversion to stress beyond the elastic limit. Material discontinuity stress factors in butt-welds were derived. This is a working-type document with analytical methods and results applicable to all industries of high reliability structures.

  11. Phase field modelling of strain induced crystal growth in an elastic matrix.

    PubMed

    Laghmach, Rabia; Candau, Nicolas; Chazeau, Laurent; Munch, Etienne; Biben, Thierry

    2015-06-28

    When a crystal phase grows in an amorphous matrix, such as a crystallisable elastomer, containing cross-links and/or entanglements, these "topological constraints" need to be pushed away from the crystal phase to allow further crystallization. The accumulation of these topological constraints in the vicinity of the crystal interface may store elastic energy and affect the phase transition. To evaluate the consequences of such mechanism, we introduce a phase field model based on the Flory theory of entropic elasticity. We show that the growth process is indeed sensibly affected, in particular, an exponential increase of the surface energy with the displacement of the interface is induced. This explains the formation of stable nano-crystallites as it is observed in the Strain Induced Crystallization (SIC) of natural rubber. Although simple, the model developed here is able to account for many interesting features of SIC, for instance, the crystallite shapes and their sizes which depend on the applied deformation.

  12. Gelatine as a crustal analogue: Determining elastic properties for modelling magmatic intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, J. L.; Menand, T.; Daniels, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    Gelatine has often been used as an analogue material to model the propagation of magma-filled fractures in the Earth's brittle and elastic crust. Despite this, there are few studies of the elastic properties of gelatine and how these evolve with time. This important information is required to ensure proper scaling of experiments using gelatine. Gelatine is a viscoelastic material, but at cool temperatures (Tr ~ 5-10 °C) it is in the solid 'gel' state where the elastic behaviour dominates and the viscous component is negligible over short to moderate timescales. We present results from a series of experiments on up to 30 litres of maximum 30 wt.% pigskin gelatine mixtures that document in detail how the elastic properties evolve with time, as a function of the volume used and gel concentration (Cgel). Gelatine's fracture toughness is investigated by measuring the pressure required to propagate a pre-existing crack. In the gel-state, gelatine's Young's modulus can be calculated by measuring the deflection to the free-surface caused by an applied load. The load's geometry can affect the Young's modulus measurement; our results show its diameter needs to be ≲ 10% of both the container diameter and the gelatine thickness (Hgel) for side-wall and base effects to be ignored. Gelatine's Young's modulus increases exponentially with time, reaching a plateau (E∞) after several hours curing. E∞ depends linearly on Cgel, while Tr, Hgel and the gelatine's thermal diffusivity control the time required to reach this value. Gelatine's fracture toughness follows the same relationship as ideal elastic-brittle solids with a calculated surface energy γs = 1.0 ± 0.2 J m- 2. Scaling laws for gelatine as a crustal analogue intruded by magma (dykes or sills) show that mixtures of 2-5 wt.% gelatine cured at ~ 5-10 °C ensure the experiments are geometrically, kinematically and dynamically scaled.

  13. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  14. Elastic and Piezoelectric Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites. Part II; Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. Alicia; Hardie, Robert; Yamakov, Vesselin; Park, Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part series where the first part presents a molecular dynamics model of a single Boron Nitride Nanotube (BNNT) and this paper scales up to multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix. This paper presents finite element (FE) models to investigate the effective elastic and piezoelectric properties of (BNNT) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites studied in this paper are thin films of polymer matrix with aligned co-planar BNNTs. The FE modelling approach provides a computationally efficient way to gain an understanding of the material properties. We examine several FE models to identify the most suitable models and investigate the effective properties with respect to the BNNT volume fraction and the number of nanotube walls. The FE models are constructed to represent aligned and randomly distributed BNNTs in a matrix of resin using 2D and 3D hollow and 3D filled cylinders. The homogenisation approach is employed to determine the overall elastic and piezoelectric constants for a range of volume fractions. These models are compared with an analytical model based on Mori-Tanaka formulation suitable for finite length cylindrical inclusions. The model applies to primarily single-wall BNNTs but is also extended to multi-wall BNNTs, for which preliminary results will be presented. Results from the Part 1 of this series can help to establish a constitutive relationship for input into the finite element model to enable the modeling of multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix.

  15. The nuclear envelope lamina network has elasticity and a compressibility limit suggestive of a molecular shock absorber.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Kris Noel; Kahn, Samuel M; Wilson, Katherine L; Discher, Dennis E

    2004-09-15

    Mechanical properties of the nuclear envelope have implications for cell and nuclear architecture as well as gene regulation. Using isolated Xenopus oocyte nuclei, we have established swelling conditions that separate the intact nuclear envelope (membranes, pore complexes and underlying lamin filament network) from nucleoplasm and the majority of chromatin. Swelling proves reversible with addition of high molecular mass dextrans. Micropipette aspiration of swollen and unswollen nuclear envelopes is also reversible and yields a network elastic modulus, unaffected by nucleoplasm, that averages 25 mN/m. Compared to plasma membranes of cells, the nuclear envelope is much stiffer and more resilient. Our results suggest that the nuclear lamina forms a compressed network shell of interconnected rods that is extensible but limited in compressibility from the native state, thus acting as a 'molecular shock absorber'. In light of the conservation of B-type lamins in metazoan evolution, the mechanical properties determined in this investigation suggest physical mechanisms by which mutated lamins can either destabilize nuclear architecture or influence nuclear responses to mechanical signals in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, progeria syndromes (premature 'aging') and other laminopathies.

  16. Model for the dynamics of a bubble undergoing small shape oscillations between elastic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Hay, Todd A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-09-01

    A model is presented for a pulsating and translating gas bubble in a channel formed by two soft elastic parallel layers. The bubble is free to undergo small shape deformations. Coupled nonlinear second-order differential equations are obtained for the shape and position of the bubble, and numerical integration of an expression for the liquid velocity at the layer interfaces yields an estimate of their displacement. Simulations reveal behavior consistent with laboratory observations.

  17. Van der Waals Type Model and Structure in π-p Elastic Scattering at High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleem, F.

    1982-10-01

    The most recent measurement of the angular distribution for π-p elastic scattering at pL =50 and 200 GeV/c which show a structure near -t ≈ 4(GeV/c)2, with squared four momentum transfer -t extended to 10(GeV/c)2, and the total cross section data for 50 ≤ pL ≤ 370 GeV/c have been simultaneously explained by using Van der Waal's type model.

  18. Network Bandwidth Utilization Forecast Model on High Bandwidth Network

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Wucherl; Sim, Alex

    2014-07-07

    With the increasing number of geographically distributed scientific collaborations and the scale of the data size growth, it has become more challenging for users to achieve the best possible network performance on a shared network. We have developed a forecast model to predict expected bandwidth utilization for high-bandwidth wide area network. The forecast model can improve the efficiency of resource utilization and scheduling data movements on high-bandwidth network to accommodate ever increasing data volume for large-scale scientific data applications. Univariate model is developed with STL and ARIMA on SNMP path utilization data. Compared with traditional approach such as Box-Jenkins methodology, our forecast model reduces computation time by 83.2percent. It also shows resilience against abrupt network usage change. The accuracy of the forecast model is within the standard deviation of the monitored measurements.

  19. Ultrasensitive Wearable Soft Strain Sensors of Conductive, Self-healing, and Elastic Hydrogels with Synergistic "Soft and Hard" Hybrid Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Cao, Wen-Tao; Ma, Ming-Guo; Wan, Pengbo

    2017-08-02

    Robust, stretchable, and strain-sensitive hydrogels have recently attracted immense research interest because of their potential application in wearable strain sensors. The integration of the synergistic characteristics of decent mechanical properties, reliable self-healing capability, and high sensing sensitivity for fabricating conductive, elastic, self-healing, and strain-sensitive hydrogels is still a great challenge. Inspired by the mechanically excellent and self-healing biological soft tissues with hierarchical network structures, herein, functional network hydrogels are fabricated by the interconnection between a "soft" homogeneous polymer network and a "hard" dynamic ferric (Fe(3+)) cross-linked cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs-Fe(3+)) network. Under stress, the dynamic CNCs-Fe(3+) coordination bonds act as sacrificial bonds to efficiently dissipate energy, while the homogeneous polymer network leads to a smooth stress-transfer, which enables the hydrogels to achieve unusual mechanical properties, such as excellent mechanical strength, robust toughness, and stretchability, as well as good self-recovery property. The hydrogels demonstrate autonomously self-healing capability in only 5 min without the need of any stimuli or healing agents, ascribing to the reorganization of CNCs and Fe(3+) via ionic coordination. Furthermore, the resulted hydrogels display tunable electromechanical behavior with sensitive, stable, and repeatable variations in resistance upon mechanical deformations. Based on the tunable electromechanical behavior, the hydrogels can act as a wearable strain sensor to monitor finger joint motions, breathing, and even the slight blood pulse. This strategy of building synergistic "soft and hard" structures is successful to integrate the decent mechanical properties, reliable self-healing capability, and high sensing sensitivity together for assembling a high-performance, flexible, and wearable strain sensor.

  20. Analytical applications and effective properties of a second gradient isotropic elastic material model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enakoutsa, Koffi

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the works by Toupin, Mindlin, Sokolowski and Germain have been developed following two research streams. In the first one, higher-order gradient continuum models were developed based on the Cauchy tetrahedron argument (see, e.g., dell'Isola and Seppecher in Comptes Rendus de l Academie de Sciences 17 Serie IIb: Mecanique, Physique, Chimie, Astronomie 321:303-308, 1995, Meccanica 32:33-52 1997, Zeitschrift fr Angewandte Mathematik und Physik 63(6):1119-1141, 2012). In the second one, the structure of higher-order gradient models is developed with a view to the applications. In particular in the model of linear isotropic solids proposed by Dell'Isola, Sciarra and Vidoli (DSV), the main constitutive equation is obtained for the case of second gradient models. This model introduces in addition to the two well-known Lame's elastic constants five constitutive constants. The practical applications of this model remain in its infancy since the issue of determining the new moduli it introduces is not yet completely addressed. Also, analytical solutions of simple boundary value problems that can be helpful to grasp some of the physical foundations of this model are missing. This paper aims to address these two issues by providing the analytical solutions for two model problems, a spherical shell subjected to axisymmetric loading conditions and the circular bending of a beam in plane strain, both the beam and the shell obeying the DSV second gradient isotropic elastic model. The solution of the circular bending of a beam has served to grasp some of the physical soundness of the model. A framework based on homogenization under inhomogeneous boundary conditions is also suggested to determine the unknown constitutive constants, which are provided in the particular case of elastic porous heterogeneous materials.

  1. Stochastic multiscale modelling of cortical bone elasticity based on high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Vittorio; Gagliardi, Davide; Desceliers, Christophe; Bousson, Valérie; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Peyrin, Françoise; Haïat, Guillaume; Naili, Salah

    2016-02-01

    Accurate and reliable assessment of bone quality requires predictive methods which could probe bone microstructure and provide information on bone mechanical properties. Multiscale modelling and simulation represent a fast and powerful way to predict bone mechanical properties based on experimental information on bone microstructure as obtained through X-ray-based methods. However, technical limitations of experimental devices used to inspect bone microstructure may produce blurry data, especially in in vivo conditions. Uncertainties affecting the experimental data (input) may question the reliability of the results predicted by the model (output). Since input data are uncertain, deterministic approaches are limited and new modelling paradigms are required. In this paper, a novel stochastic multiscale model is developed to estimate the elastic properties of bone while taking into account uncertainties on bone composition. Effective elastic properties of cortical bone tissue were computed using a multiscale model based on continuum micromechanics. Volume fractions of bone components (collagen, mineral, and water) were considered as random variables whose probabilistic description was built using the maximum entropy principle. The relevance of this approach was proved by analysing a human bone sample taken from the inferior femoral neck. The sample was imaged using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography. 3-D distributions of Haversian porosity and tissue mineral density extracted from these images supplied the experimental information needed to build the stochastic models of the volume fractions. Thus, the stochastic multiscale model provided reliable statistical information (such as mean values and confidence intervals) on bone elastic properties at the tissue scale. Moreover, the existence of a simpler "nominal model", accounting for the main features of the stochastic model, was investigated. It was shown that such a model does exist, and its relevance

  2. Analytical applications and effective properties of a second gradient isotropic elastic material model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enakoutsa, Koffi

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the works by Toupin, Mindlin, Sokolowski and Germain have been developed following two research streams. In the first one, higher-order gradient continuum models were developed based on the Cauchy tetrahedron argument (see, e.g., dell'Isola and Seppecher in Comptes Rendus de l Academie de Sciences 17 Serie IIb: Mecanique, Physique, Chimie, Astronomie 321:303-308, 1995, Meccanica 32:33-52 1997, Zeitschrift fr Angewandte Mathematik und Physik 63(6):1119-1141, 2012). In the second one, the structure of higher-order gradient models is developed with a view to the applications. In particular in the model of linear isotropic solids proposed by Dell'Isola, Sciarra and Vidoli (DSV), the main constitutive equation is obtained for the case of second gradient models. This model introduces in addition to the two well-known Lame's elastic constants five constitutive constants. The practical applications of this model remain in its infancy since the issue of determining the new moduli it introduces is not yet completely addressed. Also, analytical solutions of simple boundary value problems that can be helpful to grasp some of the physical foundations of this model are missing. This paper aims to address these two issues by providing the analytical solutions for two model problems, a spherical shell subjected to axisymmetric loading conditions and the circular bending of a beam in plane strain, both the beam and the shell obeying the DSV second gradient isotropic elastic model. The solution of the circular bending of a beam has served to grasp some of the physical soundness of the model. A framework based on homogenization under inhomogeneous boundary conditions is also suggested to determine the unknown constitutive constants, which are provided in the particular case of elastic porous heterogeneous materials.

  3. A better prediction of conformational changes of proteins using minimally connected network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi Toussi, Cyrus; Soheilifard, Reza

    2016-12-01

    Elastic network models have recently been used for studying low-frequency collective motions of proteins. These models simplify the complexity that arises from normal mode analysis by considering a simplified potential involving a few parameters. Two common parameters in most of the elastic network models are cutoff radius and force constant. Although the latter has been studied extensively and even elaborate new models were introduced, for the former usually an ad-hoc cutoff radius is considered. Moreover, the quality of the network models is usually assessed by evaluating their prediction against experimental B-factors. In this work, we consider various common elastic network models with different cutoff radii and assess them by their ability to predict conformational changes of proteins in complexes from unbound to bound state. This prediction is performed by perturbing the unbound structure using a number of low-frequency normal modes of its network model to optimally fit the bound structure. We evaluated a dataset of 30 proteins with distinct unbound and bound structures using this criterion. The results showed that, opposed to the common calibration process based on B-factors, a meaningful relationship exists between the quality of the prediction and model parameters. It was shown that the cutoff radius has a major role in this prediction and minimally connected network models, which use the shortest cutoff radius for which the network is stable, give the best results. It was also shown that by considering the first ten normal modes, the conformational changes can be predicted by about 25 percent. Hence, the evaluation process was extended to the case of considering the contribution of all normal modes in the prediction. The results indicated that minimally connected network models are superior, despite their simplicity, when any number of modes are considered in the prediction.

  4. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling of the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle for AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Seiel, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report

  5. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling of the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle for AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Seidel, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the lowboom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural-aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report.

  6. Multiple scale model for cell migration in monolayers: Elastic mismatch between cells enhances motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Bresler, Yony; Wirtz, Denis; Grant, Martin

    2015-07-01

    We propose a multiscale model for monolayer of motile cells that comprise normal and cancer cells. In the model, the two types of cells have identical properties except for their elasticity; cancer cells are softer and normal cells are stiffer. The goal is to isolate the role of elasticity mismatch on the migration potential of cancer cells in the absence of other contributions that are present in real cells. The methodology is based on a phase-field description where each cell is modeled as a highly-deformable self-propelled droplet. We simulated two types of nearly confluent monolayers. One contains a single cancer cell in a layer of normal cells and the other contains normal cells only. The simulation results demonstrate that elasticity mismatch alone is sufficient to increase the motility of the cancer cell significantly. Further, the trajectory of the cancer cell is decorated by several speed “bursts” where the cancer cell quickly relaxes from a largely deformed shape and consequently increases its translational motion. The increased motility and the amplitude and frequency of the bursts are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments.

  7. Random polycrystals of grains containing cracks: Model ofquasistatic elastic behavior for fractured systems

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, James G.; Grechka, Vladimir

    2006-07-08

    A model study on fractured systems was performed using aconcept that treats isotropic cracked systems as ensembles of crackedgrains by analogy to isotropic polycrystalline elastic media. Theapproach has two advantages: (a) Averaging performed is ensembleaveraging, thus avoiding the criticism legitimately leveled at mosteffective medium theories of quasistatic elastic behavior for crackedmedia based on volume concentrations of inclusions. Since crack effectsare largely independent of the volume they occupy in the composite, sucha non-volume-based method offers an appealingly simple modelingalternative. (b) The second advantage is that both polycrystals andfractured media are stiffer than might otherwise be expected, due tonatural bridging effects of the strong components. These same effectshave also often been interpreted as crack-crack screening inhigh-crack-density fractured media, but there is no inherent conflictbetween these two interpretations of this phenomenon. Results of thestudy are somewhat mixed. The spread in elastic constants observed in aset of numerical experiments is found to be very comparable to the spreadin values contained between the Reuss and Voigt bounds for thepolycrystal model. However, computed Hashin-Shtrikman bounds are much tootight to be in agreement with the numerical data, showing thatpolycrystals of cracked grains tend to violate some implicit assumptionsof the Hashin-Shtrikman bounding approach. However, the self-consistentestimates obtained for the random polycrystal model are nevertheless verygood estimators of the observed average behavior.

  8. Finite difference elastic wave modeling with an irregular free surface using ADER scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhaidib, Abdulaziz M.; Nafi Toksöz, M.

    2015-06-01

    In numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation in the earth, we encounter two important issues: the free surface and the topography of the surface (i.e. irregularities). In this study, we develop a 2D finite difference solver for the elastic wave equation that combines a 4th- order ADER scheme (Arbitrary high-order accuracy using DERivatives), which is widely used in aeroacoustics, with the characteristic variable method at the free surface boundary. The idea is to treat the free surface boundary explicitly by using ghost values of the solution for points beyond the free surface to impose the physical boundary condition. The method is based on the velocity-stress formulation. The ultimate goal is to develop a numerical solver for the elastic wave equation that is stable, accurate and computationally efficient. The solver treats smooth arbitrary-shaped boundaries as simple plane boundaries. The computational cost added by treating the topography is negligible compared to flat free surface because only a small number of grid points near the boundary need to be computed. In the presence of topography, using 10 grid points per shortest shear-wavelength, the solver yields accurate results. Benchmark numerical tests using several complex models that are solved by our method and other independent accurate methods show an excellent agreement, confirming the validity of the method for modeling elastic waves with an irregular free surface.

  9. Modeling static and dynamic thermography of the human breast under elastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray H

    2011-01-07

    An abnormal thermogram has been shown to be a reliable indicator of increased risk of breast cancer. Numerical modeling techniques for thermography are proposed to quantify the complex relationships between the breast thermal behaviors and the underlying physiological/pathological conditions. Previous thermal modeling techniques did not account for gravity-induced elastic deformation arising from various body postures, nor did they suggest that a dynamic thermal procedure may be used to enhance clinical diagnosis. In this paper, 3D finite element method (FEM)-based thermal and elastic modeling techniques are developed to characterize comprehensively both the thermal and elastic properties of normal and tumorous breast tissues during static and dynamic thermography. In the steady state, gravity-induced breast deformation is found to cause an upper-lower asymmetric surface temperature contrast for sitting/standing up body posture, even though all the thermal and elastic properties are assumed uniform. Additionally, the tumor-induced surface temperature alterations are found to be caused primarily by shallow tumors and to be less sensitive to tumor size than to tumor depth. In the dynamic state, the breast exhibits distinctive temporal patterns that are associated with distinct thermal events: cold stress and thermal recovery induced by changes in the ambient temperature. Specifically, the tumor-induced thermal contrast shows an opposite initial change and delayed peak as compared with the deformation-induced thermal contrast. These findings are expected to provide a stronger foundation for, and greater specificity and precision in, thermographic diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer.

  10. A continuum model to study interphase effects on elastic properties of CNT/GS-nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Ashish; Kumar, Dinesh

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, initially a continuum level model of interphase region in a carbon nanotube (CNT)/graphene sheet (GS) based nanocomposite is established. Cohesive zone model through Lennard Jones (i.e. LJ) potential is utilized to model the interphase zone in terms of its thickness and elastic modulus, for different matrix materials containing CNTs of various radii (including graphene—a CNT of infinite radius). Thereafter, a finite element based study is conducted to characterize and compare the CNT- and GS-reinforced nanocomposites with and without interphase, using the method of representative volume element (RVE). Based on the study, it is concluded that the thickness as well as elastic modulus of the interphase zone is significantly affected by the matrix material of nanocomposite which is in contrast to the general assumption, made in the literature, of constant thickness of interphase zone for different matrix materials. In the case of nanocomposite with small radius CNTs, slightly higher, noticeable only at narrow scale, elastic modulus of interphase zone is obtained than the nanocomposite with large radius CNTs, irrespective of matrix materials. For metal nanocomposites, interphase zone results in loss of all stiffness properties of the resulting CNT/GS nanocomposite, and this loss is more prevalent in GS nanocomposite for its out-of-plane stiffness properties. But, on the contrary, in the case of polyethylene (i.e. PE) nanocomposite, the elastic modulus of interphase causes enhanced stiffness properties of the resulting nanocomposite, as compared to the perfectly bonded nanocomposite, for CNT and GS reinforcements.

  11. A system dynamics model for communications networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awcock, A. J.; King, T. E. G.

    1985-09-01

    An abstract model of a communications network in system dynamics terminology is developed as implementation of this model by a FORTRAN program package developed at RSRE is discussed. The result of this work is a high-level simulation package in which the performance of adaptive routing algorithms and other network controls may be assessed for a network of arbitrary topology.

  12. Finite element analysis of nano-scale Timoshenko beams using the integral model of nonlocal elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzzadeh, A.; Ansari, R.

    2017-04-01

    Stress-strain relation in Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory was originally formulated within the framework of an integral model. Due to difficulty of working with that integral model, the differential model of nonlocal constitutive equation is widely used for nanostructures. However, paradoxical results may be obtained by the differential model for some boundary and loading conditions. Presented in this article is a finite element analysis of Timoshenko nano-beams based on the integral model of nonlocal continuum theory without employing any simplification in the model. The entire procedure of deriving equations of motion is carried out in the matrix form of representation, and hence, they can be easily used in the finite element analysis. For comparison purpose, the differential counterparts of equations are also derived. To study the outcome of analysis based on the integral and differential models, some case studies are presented in which the influences of boundary conditions, nonlocal length scale parameter and loading factor are analyzed. It is concluded that, in contrast to the differential model, there is no paradox in the numerical results of developed integral model of nonlocal continuum theory for different situations of problem characteristics. So, resolving the mentioned paradoxes by means of a purely numerical approach based on the original integral form of nonlocal elasticity theory is the major contribution of present study.

  13. Double Folding Potential of Different Interaction Models for 16O + 12C Elastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Sh.; Bondok, I.; Abdelmoatmed, M.

    2016-12-01

    The elastic scattering angular distributions for 16O + 12C nuclear system have been analyzed using double folding potential of different interaction models: CDM3Y1, CDM3Y6, DDM3Y1 and BDM3Y1. We have extracted the renormalization factor N r for the different concerned interaction models. Potential created by BDM3Y1 model of interaction has the shallowest depth which reflects the necessity to use higher renormalization factor. The experimental angular distributions for 16O + 12C nuclear system in the energy range 115.9-230 MeV exhibited unmistakable refractive features and rainbow phenomenon.

  14. Relationship between Elastic wave Velocity and Permeability of Rock Model with penny-shaped cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamabe, H.; Tsuji, T.; Matsuoka, T.

    2011-12-01

    Estimating underground fluid-flow is of great importance in petroleum engineering and carbon capture and storage (CCS). Permeability is one of the most important parameters which show how easily fluid passes through rock mass. It could be acquired just by measuring rock samples near borehole in lab-experiments. It means that permeability except near borehole should be estimated, considering other information. In this research, elastic wave velocity is focused as a tool of estimating permeability, because it is one of the most popular parameter which has underground information. The relationship between permeability and elastic wave velocities should be revealed, in order to establish a methodology to estimate rock permeability from elastic wave velocity. These two parameters are controlled by pore geometry of rock. Therefore, we focused on pore geometry as connecting bridge between the two parameters: permeability, elastic wave velocity. We modeled the considering rock as a solid mass containing a lot of same-sized penny-shaped cracks randomly. LBM (Lattice Boltzmann Method), which is one of the computational fluid dynamics methods, is adopted for calculating permeability in our study. This method has a storing point especially under complicated fluid-solid boundary condition. Elastic wave velocities are derived from effective elastic moduli (i.e., bulk modulus, stiffness). They are estimated by self-consistent approximation, which needs porosity of rock model, aspect ratio of penny-shaped cracks and volume fraction of each phase. In this research, we assume that solid phase is composed only by quartz and rock's pore space is filled with water. The simulated results demonstrate that aspect ratio of crack can be estimated by P- and S-wave velocity, and aspect ratio and P-wave velocity can determine porosity. Whereas, the relationship between porosity and permeability is dependent on aspect ratio, which means permeability can be estimated by aspect ratio and porosity

  15. An Adaptive Complex Network Model for Brain Functional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gomez Portillo, Ignacio J.; Gleiser, Pablo M.

    2009-01-01

    Brain functional networks are graph representations of activity in the brain, where the vertices represent anatomical regions and the edges their functional connectivity. These networks present a robust small world topological structure, characterized by highly integrated modules connected sparsely by long range links. Recent studies showed that other topological properties such as the degree distribution and the presence (or absence) of a hierarchical structure are not robust, and show different intriguing behaviors. In order to understand the basic ingredients necessary for the emergence of these complex network structures we present an adaptive complex network model for human brain functional networks. The microscopic units of the model are dynamical nodes that represent active regions of the brain, whose interaction gives rise to complex network structures. The links between the nodes are chosen following an adaptive algorithm that establishes connections between dynamical elements with similar internal states. We show that the model is able to describe topological characteristics of human brain networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. In particular, when the dynamical rules of the model allow for integrated processing over the entire network scale-free non-hierarchical networks with well defined communities emerge. On the other hand, when the dynamical rules restrict the information to a local neighborhood, communities cluster together into larger ones, giving rise to a hierarchical structure, with a truncated power law degree distribution. PMID:19738902

  16. Network models in epidemiology: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Alun L.; Valeika, Steve

    In this chapter we shall discuss the development and use of network models in epidemiology. While network models have long been discussed in the theoretical epidemiology literature, they have recently received a large amount of attention amongst the statistical physics community. This has been fueled by the desire to better understand the structure of social and large-scale technological networks, and the increases in computational power that have made the simulation of reasonably-sized network models a feasible proposition. A main aim of this review is to bridge the epidemiologic and statistical physics approaches to network models for infectious diseases, highlighting the important contributions made by both research communities.

  17. A nonaffine network model for elastomers undergoing finite deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jacob D.; Goulbourne, N. C.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we construct a new physics-based model of rubber elasticity to capture the strain softening, strain hardening, and deformation-state dependent response of rubber materials undergoing finite deformations. This model is unique in its ability to capture large-stretch mechanical behavior with parameters that are connected to the polymer chemistry and can also be easily identified with the important characteristics of the macroscopic stress-stretch response. The microscopic picture consists of two components: a crosslinked network of Langevin chains and an entangled network with chains confined to a nonaffine tube. These represent, respectively, changes in entropy due to thermally averaged chain conformations and changes in entropy due to the magnitude of these conformational fluctuations. A simple analytical form for the strain energy density is obtained using Rubinstein and Panyukov's single-chain description of network behavior. The model only depends on three parameters that together define the initial modulus, extent of strain softening, and the onset of strain hardening. Fits to large stretch data for natural rubber, silicone rubber, VHB 4905 (polyacrylate rubber), and b186 rubber (a carbon black-filled rubber) are presented, and a comparison is made with other similar constitutive models of large-stretch rubber elasticity. We demonstrate that the proposed model provides a complete description of elastomers undergoing large deformations for different applied loading configurations. Moreover, since the strain energy is obtained using a clear set of physical assumptions, this model may be tested and used to interpret the results of computer simulation and experiments on polymers of known microscopic structure.

  18. Modeling gene regulatory networks: A network simplification algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Luiz Henrique O.; de Castro, Maria Clicia S.; da Silva, Fabricio A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Boolean networks have been used for some time to model Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs), which describe cell functions. Those models can help biologists to make predictions, prognosis and even specialized treatment when some disturb on the GRN lead to a sick condition. However, the amount of information related to a GRN can be huge, making the task of inferring its boolean network representation quite a challenge. The method shown here takes into account information about the interactome to build a network, where each node represents a protein, and uses the entropy of each node as a key to reduce the size of the network, allowing the further inferring process to focus only on the main protein hubs, the ones with most potential to interfere in overall network behavior.

  19. Experimentally-based multiscale model of the elastic moduli of bovine trabecular bone and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Elham; Novitskaya, Ekaterina; Li, Jun; Jasiuk, Iwona; McKittrick, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    The elastic moduli of trabecular bone were modeled using an analytical multiscale approach. Trabecular bone was represented as a porous nanocomposite material with a hierarchical structure spanning from the collagen-mineral level to the trabecular architecture level. In parallel, compression testing was done on bovine femoral trabecular bone samples in two anatomical directions, parallel to the femoral neck axis and perpendicular to it, and the measured elastic moduli were compared with the corresponding theoretical results. To gain insights on the interaction of collagen and minerals at the nanoscale, bone samples were deproteinized or demineralized. After such processing, the treated samples remained as self-standing structures and were tested in compression. Micro-computed tomography was used to characterize the hierarchical structure of these three bone types and to quantify the amount of bone porosity. The obtained experimental data served as inputs to the multiscale model and guided us to represent bone as an interpenetrating composite material. Good agreement was found between the theory and experiments for the elastic moduli of the untreated, deproteinized, and demineralized trabecular bone.

  20. Models of the elastic x-ray scattering feature for warm dense aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-09-01

    The elastic feature of x-ray scattering from warm dense aluminum has recently been measured by Fletcher et al. [Nature Photonics 9, 274 (2015)], 10.1038/nphoton.2015.41 with much higher accuracy than had hitherto been possible. This measurement is a direct test of the ionic structure predicted by models of warm dense matter. We use the method of pseudoatom molecular dynamics to predict this elastic feature for warm dense aluminum with temperatures of 1-100 eV and densities of 2.7 -8.1 g/cm 3 . We compare these predictions to experiments, finding good agreement with Fletcher et al. and corroborating the discrepancy found in analyses of an earlier experiment of Ma et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 065001 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.065001. We also evaluate the validity of the Thomas-Fermi model of the electrons and of the hypernetted chain approximation in computing the elastic feature and find them both wanting in the regime currently probed by experiments.

  1. Models of the elastic x-ray scattering feature for warm dense aluminum

    DOE PAGES

    Starrett, Charles Edward; Saumon, Didier

    2015-09-03

    The elastic feature of x-ray scattering from warm dense aluminum has recently been measured by Fletcher et al. [Nature Photonics 9, 274 (2015)] with much higher accuracy than had hitherto been possible. This measurement is a direct test of the ionic structure predicted by models of warm dense matter. We use the method of pseudoatom molecular dynamics to predict this elastic feature for warm dense aluminum with temperatures of 1–100 eV and densities of 2.7–8.1g/cm3. We compare these predictions to experiments, finding good agreement with Fletcher et al. and corroborating the discrepancy found in analyses of an earlier experiment ofmore » Ma et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 065001 (2013)]. Lastly, we also evaluate the validity of the Thomas-Fermi model of the electrons and of the hypernetted chain approximation in computing the elastic feature and find them both wanting in the regime currently probed by experiments.« less

  2. Models of the elastic x-ray scattering feature for warm dense aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Starrett, Charles Edward; Saumon, Didier

    2015-09-03

    The elastic feature of x-ray scattering from warm dense aluminum has recently been measured by Fletcher et al. [Nature Photonics 9, 274 (2015)] with much higher accuracy than had hitherto been possible. This measurement is a direct test of the ionic structure predicted by models of warm dense matter. We use the method of pseudoatom molecular dynamics to predict this elastic feature for warm dense aluminum with temperatures of 1–100 eV and densities of 2.7–8.1g/cm3. We compare these predictions to experiments, finding good agreement with Fletcher et al. and corroborating the discrepancy found in analyses of an earlier experiment of Ma et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 065001 (2013)]. Lastly, we also evaluate the validity of the Thomas-Fermi model of the electrons and of the hypernetted chain approximation in computing the elastic feature and find them both wanting in the regime currently probed by experiments.

  3. Elastic properties of magnetorheological elastomer: description with the two-particle mesoscopic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, A. M.; Stolbov, O. V.; Raikher, Yu L.

    2017-06-01

    A pair of magnetizable solid particles embedded in a cylinder made of high-elasticity material is considered as a model of a mesoscopic structure element of a magnetorheological elastomer. An applied magnetic field induces ponderomotive interaction of the particles making them to move relative to one another so as to balance the counteracting magnetic and elastic forces. In a certain parameter range, the system exhibits bistability due to which under the increase / decrease of the field, the interparticle distance changes in a hysteretic manner. This behavior has a significant effect on the ability of the mesoscopic element to resist external load. Using the developed two-particle model prone to the magnetomechanical hysteresis, we extend it to the case of a virtually macroscopic sample presenting the latter as a superposition of such elements with distributed interparticle distances. In spite of its simplicity, this scheme in a generally correct way describes the field-induced changes of the internal structure and elastic m