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Sample records for elastic network modeling

  1. New generation of elastic network models.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    The intrinsic flexibility of proteins and nucleic acids can be grasped from remarkably simple mechanical models of particles connected by springs. In recent decades, Elastic Network Models (ENMs) combined with Normal Model Analysis widely confirmed their ability to predict biologically relevant motions of biomolecules and soon became a popular methodology to reveal large-scale dynamics in multiple structural biology scenarios. The simplicity, robustness, low computational cost, and relatively high accuracy are the reasons behind the success of ENMs. This review focuses on recent advances in the development and application of ENMs, paying particular attention to combinations with experimental data. Successful application scenarios include large macromolecular machines, structural refinement, docking, and evolutionary conservation. PMID:26716577

  2. Anisotropic elastic network modeling of entire microtubules.

    PubMed

    Deriu, Marco A; Soncini, Monica; Orsi, Mario; Patel, Mishal; Essex, Jonathan W; Montevecchi, Franco M; Redaelli, Alberto

    2010-10-01

    Microtubules are supramolecular structures that make up the cytoskeleton and strongly affect the mechanical properties of the cell. Within the cytoskeleton filaments, the microtubule (MT) exhibits by far the highest bending stiffness. Bending stiffness depends on the mechanical properties and intermolecular interactions of the tubulin dimers (the MT building blocks). Computational molecular modeling has the potential for obtaining quantitative insights into this area. However, to our knowledge, standard molecular modeling techniques, such as molecular dynamics (MD) and normal mode analysis (NMA), are not yet able to simulate large molecular structures like the MTs; in fact, their possibilities are normally limited to much smaller protein complexes. In this work, we developed a multiscale approach by merging the modeling contribution from MD and NMA. In particular, MD simulations were used to refine the molecular conformation and arrangement of the tubulin dimers inside the MT lattice. Subsequently, NMA was used to investigate the vibrational properties of MTs modeled as an elastic network. The coarse-grain model here developed can describe systems of hundreds of interacting tubulin monomers (corresponding to up to 1,000,000 atoms). In particular, we were able to simulate coarse-grain models of entire MTs, with lengths up to 350 nm. A quantitative mechanical investigation was performed; from the bending and stretching modes, we estimated MT macroscopic properties such as bending stiffness, Young modulus, and persistence length, thus allowing a direct comparison with experimental data.

  3. Adaptive elastic networks as models of supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Le; Wyart, Matthieu

    2015-08-01

    The thermodynamics and dynamics of supercooled liquids correlate with their elasticity. In particular for covalent networks, the jump of specific heat is small and the liquid is strong near the threshold valence where the network acquires rigidity. By contrast, the jump of specific heat and the fragility are large away from this threshold valence. In a previous work [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 6307 (2013), 10.1073/pnas.1300534110], we could explain these behaviors by introducing a model of supercooled liquids in which local rearrangements interact via elasticity. However, in that model the disorder characterizing elasticity was frozen, whereas it is itself a dynamic variable in supercooled liquids. Here we study numerically and theoretically adaptive elastic network models where polydisperse springs can move on a lattice, thus allowing for the geometry of the elastic network to fluctuate and evolve with temperature. We show numerically that our previous results on the relationship between structure and thermodynamics hold in these models. We introduce an approximation where redundant constraints (highly coordinated regions where the frustration is large) are treated as an ideal gas, leading to analytical predictions that are accurate in the range of parameters relevant for real materials. Overall, these results lead to a description of supercooled liquids, in which the distance to the rigidity transition controls the number of directions in phase space that cost energy and the specific heat.

  4. Systematic multiscale parameterization of heterogeneous elastic network models of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Edward; Pfaendtner, Jim; Voth, Gregory A

    2008-11-01

    We present a method to parameterize heterogeneous elastic network models (heteroENMs) of proteins to reproduce the fluctuations observed in atomistic simulations. Because it is based on atomistic simulation, our method allows the development of elastic coarse-grained models of proteins under different conditions or in different environments. The method is simple and applicable to models at any level of coarse-graining. We validated the method in three systems. First, we computed the persistence length of ADP-bound F-actin, using a heteroENM model. The value of 6.1 +/- 1.6 microm is consistent with the experimentally measured value of 9.0 +/- 0.5 microm. We then compared our method to a uniform elastic network model and a realistic extension algorithm via covariance Hessian (REACH) model of carboxy myoglobin, and found that the heteroENM method more accurately predicted mean-square fluctuations of alpha-carbon atoms. Finally, we showed that the method captures critical differences in effective harmonic interactions for coarse-grained models of the N-terminal Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (N-BAR) domain of amphiphysin, by building models of N-BAR both bound to a membrane and free in solution.

  5. Analytical network-averaging of the tube model:. Rubber elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiêm, Vu Ngoc; Itskov, Mikhail

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a micromechanical model for rubber elasticity is proposed on the basis of analytical network-averaging of the tube model and by applying a closed-form of the Rayleigh exact distribution function for non-Gaussian chains. This closed-form is derived by considering the polymer chain as a coarse-grained model on the basis of the quantum mechanical solution for finitely extensible dumbbells (Ilg et al., 2000). The proposed model includes very few physically motivated material constants and demonstrates good agreement with experimental data on biaxial tension as well as simple shear tests.

  6. Towards synthetic molecular motors: a model elastic-network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amartya; Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-04-01

    Protein molecular motors play a fundamental role in biological cells and development of their synthetic counterparts is a major challenge. Here, we show how a model motor system with the operation mechanism resembling that of muscle myosin can be designed at the concept level, without addressing the implementation aspects. The model is constructed as an elastic network, similar to the coarse-grained descriptions used for real proteins. We show by numerical simulations that the designed synthetic motor can operate as a deterministic or Brownian ratchet and that there is a continuous transition between such two regimes. The motor operation under external load, approaching the stall condition, is also analysed.

  7. Elastic Network Models are Robust to Variations in Formalism.

    PubMed

    Leioatts, Nicholas; Romo, Tod D; Grossfield, Alan

    2012-07-10

    Understanding the functions of biomolecules requires insight not only from structures, but from dynamics as well. Often, the most interesting processes occur on time scales too slow for exploration by conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. For this reason, alternative computational methods such as elastic network models (ENMs) have become increasingly popular. These simple, coarse-grained models represent molecules as beads connected by harmonic springs; the system's motions are solved analytically by normal mode analysis. In the past few years, many different formalisms for performing ENM calculations have emerged, and several have been optimized using all-atom MD simulations. In contrast to other studies, we have compared the various formalisms in a systematic, quantitative way. In this study, we optimize many ENM functional forms using a uniform dataset containing only long (> 1 μs) all-atom MD simulations. Our results show that all models once optimized produce spring constants for immediate neighboring residues that are orders of magnitude stiffer than more distal contacts. In addition, the statistical significance of ENM performance varied with model resolution. We also show that fitting long trajectories does not improve ENM performance due to a problem inherent in all network models tested: they underestimate the relative importance of the most concerted motions. Finally, we characterize ENMs' resilience by tessellating the parameter space to show that broad ranges of parameters produce similar quality predictions. Taken together our data reveals that choice of spring function and parameters are not vital to performance of a network model and that simple parameters can by derived "by hand" when no data is available for fitting, thus illustrating the robustness of these models. PMID:22924033

  8. Elastic Network Models are Robust to Variations in Formalism.

    PubMed

    Leioatts, Nicholas; Romo, Tod D; Grossfield, Alan

    2012-07-10

    Understanding the functions of biomolecules requires insight not only from structures, but from dynamics as well. Often, the most interesting processes occur on time scales too slow for exploration by conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. For this reason, alternative computational methods such as elastic network models (ENMs) have become increasingly popular. These simple, coarse-grained models represent molecules as beads connected by harmonic springs; the system's motions are solved analytically by normal mode analysis. In the past few years, many different formalisms for performing ENM calculations have emerged, and several have been optimized using all-atom MD simulations. In contrast to other studies, we have compared the various formalisms in a systematic, quantitative way. In this study, we optimize many ENM functional forms using a uniform dataset containing only long (> 1 μs) all-atom MD simulations. Our results show that all models once optimized produce spring constants for immediate neighboring residues that are orders of magnitude stiffer than more distal contacts. In addition, the statistical significance of ENM performance varied with model resolution. We also show that fitting long trajectories does not improve ENM performance due to a problem inherent in all network models tested: they underestimate the relative importance of the most concerted motions. Finally, we characterize ENMs' resilience by tessellating the parameter space to show that broad ranges of parameters produce similar quality predictions. Taken together our data reveals that choice of spring function and parameters are not vital to performance of a network model and that simple parameters can by derived "by hand" when no data is available for fitting, thus illustrating the robustness of these models.

  9. Modeling dynamic fracture growth with an elastic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jau-Inn

    1992-09-01

    A conceptually simple model, consisting of a network of particles and springs, is used to model dynamic fracturing processes. In this model, the springs provide the resistance to compression and deformation, and particle masses provide the inertial effect. When such a network is subjected to a dynamic loading, Newton's equations of motion are solved to determine the evolution of the network. If a spring is stretched or compressed beyond prescribed threshold limits at any time-step, the spring breaks and initiates a fracture. The model results indicate that the fracture pattern depends on the inhomogeneities of the rock, the active crack-driving force, and the in-situ stresses.

  10. Modeling the elastic moduli of fiber networks and nanocomposites: Transversely isotropic filler particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Avik P.

    2008-03-01

    A model is developed for the elastic moduli of networks composed of transversely isotropic elongated particles characterized by aspect ratio polydispersity. An effective medium approach is employed to integrate our treatment of elastic fiber networks with results from (i) the Mori-Tanaka model for dispersions of transversely isotropic inclusions and from (ii) percolation theory, and to describe fiber-reinforced nanocomposites. Model calculations are presented for the dependences of composite moduli on particle aspect ratios, volume fractions, and polydispersities, and on anisotropy in the fiber stiffness tensor.

  11. Efficient perturbation analysis of elastic network models - Application to acetylcholinesterase of T. californica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, K.

    2010-09-01

    Elastic network models in their different flavors have become useful models for the dynamics and functions of biomolecular systems such as proteins and their complexes. Perturbation to the interactions occur due to randomized and fixated changes (in molecular evolution) or designed modifications of the protein structures (in bioengineering). These perturbations are modifications in the topology and the strength of the interactions modeled by the elastic network models. We discuss how a naive approach to compute properties for a large number of perturbed structures and interactions by repeated diagonalization can be replaced with an identity found in linear algebra. We argue about the computational complexity and discuss the advantages of the protocol. We apply the proposed algorithm to the acetylcholinesterase, a well-known enzyme in neurobiology, and show how one can gain insight into the "breathing dynamics" of a structural funnel necessary for the function of the protein. The computational speed-up was a 60-fold increase in this example.

  12. A multiscale modelling of bone ultrastructure elastic proprieties using finite elements simulation and neural network method.

    PubMed

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Tlili, Brahim; Vercher-Martínez, Ana; Hambli, Ridha

    2016-10-01

    Bone is a living material with a complex hierarchical structure which entails exceptional mechanical properties, including high fracture toughness, specific stiffness and strength. Bone tissue is essentially composed by two phases distributed in approximately 30-70%: an organic phase (mainly type I collagen and cells) and an inorganic phase (hydroxyapatite-HA-and water). The nanostructure of bone can be represented throughout three scale levels where different repetitive structural units or building blocks are found: at the first level, collagen molecules are arranged in a pentameric structure where mineral crystals grow in specific sites. This primary bone structure constitutes the mineralized collagen microfibril. A structural organization of inter-digitating microfibrils forms the mineralized collagen fibril which represents the second scale level. The third scale level corresponds to the mineralized collagen fibre which is composed by the binding of fibrils. The hierarchical nature of the bone tissue is largely responsible of their significant mechanical properties; consequently, this is a current outstanding research topic. Scarce works in literature correlates the elastic properties in the three scale levels at the bone nanoscale. The main goal of this work is to estimate the elastic properties of the bone tissue in a multiscale approach including a sensitivity analysis of the elastic behaviour at each length scale. This proposal is achieved by means of a novel hybrid multiscale modelling that involves neural network (NN) computations and finite elements method (FEM) analysis. The elastic properties are estimated using a neural network simulation that previously has been trained with the database results of the finite element models. In the results of this work, parametric analysis and averaged elastic constants for each length scale are provided. Likewise, the influence of the elastic constants of the tissue constituents is also depicted. Results highlight

  13. A multiscale modelling of bone ultrastructure elastic proprieties using finite elements simulation and neural network method.

    PubMed

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Tlili, Brahim; Vercher-Martínez, Ana; Hambli, Ridha

    2016-10-01

    Bone is a living material with a complex hierarchical structure which entails exceptional mechanical properties, including high fracture toughness, specific stiffness and strength. Bone tissue is essentially composed by two phases distributed in approximately 30-70%: an organic phase (mainly type I collagen and cells) and an inorganic phase (hydroxyapatite-HA-and water). The nanostructure of bone can be represented throughout three scale levels where different repetitive structural units or building blocks are found: at the first level, collagen molecules are arranged in a pentameric structure where mineral crystals grow in specific sites. This primary bone structure constitutes the mineralized collagen microfibril. A structural organization of inter-digitating microfibrils forms the mineralized collagen fibril which represents the second scale level. The third scale level corresponds to the mineralized collagen fibre which is composed by the binding of fibrils. The hierarchical nature of the bone tissue is largely responsible of their significant mechanical properties; consequently, this is a current outstanding research topic. Scarce works in literature correlates the elastic properties in the three scale levels at the bone nanoscale. The main goal of this work is to estimate the elastic properties of the bone tissue in a multiscale approach including a sensitivity analysis of the elastic behaviour at each length scale. This proposal is achieved by means of a novel hybrid multiscale modelling that involves neural network (NN) computations and finite elements method (FEM) analysis. The elastic properties are estimated using a neural network simulation that previously has been trained with the database results of the finite element models. In the results of this work, parametric analysis and averaged elastic constants for each length scale are provided. Likewise, the influence of the elastic constants of the tissue constituents is also depicted. Results highlight

  14. An improved scheduled traffic model utilizing bandwidth splitting in elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Upama; Prakash, Shashi

    2016-07-01

    The surge of traffic in today's networks gave birth to elastic optical networking paradigm. In this paper, first we propose to use the scheduled traffic model (STM) in elastic optical networks (EONs) to ensure guaranteed availability of resources to demands which enter into the network with a predetermined start and end times. In optical networks, such demands are referred to as scheduled lightpath demands (SLDs). To increase the amount of bandwidth accepted in network, next we introduce a time aware routing and spectrum assignment (TA-RSA) approach. We observed that provisioning of bulky SLDs has become more challenging in EONs due to enforcement of RSA constraints. To address this challenge, we improve the proposed STM and designed three heuristics for its implementation in EONs. In this work, we collectively refer to these heuristics as bandwidth segmented RSA (BSRSA). The improved STM (iSTM) allows splitting of SLDs in bandwidth dimension by utilizing the knowledge of attributes viz. demand holding time, overlapping in time and bandwidth requested by SLDs. Our numerical results show that BSRSA consistently outperformed over TA-RSA under all distinctive experimental cases that we considered and achieved fairness in serving heterogeneous bandwidth SLDs. The impact of splitting on the number and capacity of transponders at nodes is also gauged. It is observed that ingenious splitting of demands increases the number of resources (on links and nodes) used, and their utilization, leading to an increase in bandwidth accepted in the network.

  15. Optimization of an Elastic Network Augmented Coarse Grained Model to Study CCMV Capsid Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Globisch, Christoph; Krishnamani, Venkatramanan; Deserno, Markus; Peter, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The major protective coat of most viruses is a highly symmetric protein capsid that forms spontaneously from many copies of identical proteins. Structural and mechanical properties of such capsids, as well as their self-assembly process, have been studied experimentally and theoretically, including modeling efforts by computer simulations on various scales. Atomistic models include specific details of local protein binding but are limited in system size and accessible time, while coarse grained (CG) models do get access to longer time and length scales but often lack the specific local interactions. Multi-scale models aim at bridging this gap by systematically connecting different levels of resolution. Here, a CG model for CCMV (Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus), a virus with an icosahedral shell of 180 identical protein monomers, is developed, where parameters are derived from atomistic simulations of capsid protein dimers in aqueous solution. In particular, a new method is introduced to combine the MARTINI CG model with a supportive elastic network based on structural fluctuations of individual monomers. In the parametrization process, both network connectivity and strength are optimized. This elastic-network optimized CG model, which solely relies on atomistic data of small units (dimers), is able to correctly predict inter-protein conformational flexibility and properties of larger capsid fragments of 20 and more subunits. Furthermore, it is shown that this CG model reproduces experimental (Atomic Force Microscopy) indentation measurements of the entire viral capsid. Thus it is shown that one obvious goal for hierarchical modeling, namely predicting mechanical properties of larger protein complexes from models that are carefully parametrized on elastic properties of smaller units, is achievable. PMID:23613730

  16. A connection rule for alpha-carbon coarse-grained elastic network models using chemical bond information.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jay I; Jang, Yunho; Kim, Moon K

    2006-01-01

    A sparser but more efficient connection rule (called a bond-cutoff method) for a simplified alpha-carbon coarse-grained elastic network model is presented. One of conventional connection rules for elastic network models is the distance-cutoff method, where virtual springs connect an alpha-carbon with all neighbor alpha-carbons within predefined distance-cutoff value. However, though the maximum interaction distance between alpha-carbons is reported as 7 angstroms, this cutoff value can make the elastic network unstable in many cases of protein structures. Thus, a larger cutoff value (>11 angstroms) is often used to establish a stable elastic network model in previous researches. To overcome this problem, a connection rule for backbone model is proposed, which satisfies the minimum condition to stabilize an elastic network. Based on the backbone connections, each type of chemical interactions is considered and added to the elastic network model: disulfide bonds, hydrogen bonds, and salt-bridges. In addition, the van der Waals forces between alpha-carbons are modeled by using the distance-cutoff method. With the proposed connection rule, one can make an elastic network model with less than 7 angstroms distance cutoff, which can reveal protein flexibility more sharply. Moreover, the normal modes from the new elastic network model can reflect conformational changes of a given protein better than ones by the distance-cutoff method. This method can save the computational cost when calculating normal modes of a given protein structure, because it can reduce the total number of connections. As a validation, six example proteins are tested. Computational times and the overlap values between the conformational change and infinitesimal motion calculated by normal mode analysis are presented. Those animations are also available at UMass Morph Server (http://biomechanics.ecs.umass.edu/umms.html).

  17. Vibrational characteristics of graphene sheets elucidated using an elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Kim, Daejoong; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Moon Ki

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies of graphene have demonstrated its great potential for highly sensitive resonators. In order to capture the intrinsic vibrational characteristics of graphene, we propose an atomistic modeling method called the elastic network model (ENM), in which a graphene sheet is modeled as a mass-spring network of adjacent atoms connected by various linear springs with specific bond ratios. Normal mode analysis (NMA) reveals the various vibrational features of bi-layer graphene sheets (BLGSs) clamped at two edges. We also propose a coarse-graining (CG) method to extend our graphene study into the meso- and macroscales, at which experimental measurements and synthesis of graphene become practical. The simulation results show good agreement with experimental observations. Therefore, the proposed ENM approach will not only shed light on the theoretical study of graphene mechanics, but also play an important role in the design of highly-sensitive graphene-based resonators.

  18. Predicting order of conformational changes during protein conformational transitions using an interpolated elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Tekpinar, Mustafa; Zheng, Wenjun

    2010-08-15

    The decryption of sequence of structural events during protein conformational transitions is essential to a detailed understanding of molecular functions of various biological nanomachines. Coarse-grained models have proven useful by allowing highly efficient simulations of protein conformational dynamics. By combining two coarse-grained elastic network models constructed based on the beginning and end conformations of a transition, we have developed an interpolated elastic network model to generate a transition pathway between the two protein conformations. For validation, we have predicted the order of local and global conformational changes during key ATP-driven transitions in three important biological nanomachines (myosin, F(1) ATPase and chaperonin GroEL). We have found that the local conformational change associated with the closing of active site precedes the global conformational change leading to mechanical motions. Our finding is in good agreement with the distribution of intermediate experimental structures, and it supports the importance of local motions at active site to drive or gate various conformational transitions underlying the workings of a diverse range of biological nanomachines.

  19. Elastic network models capture the motions apparent within ensembles of RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael T; Jernigan, Robert L

    2014-06-01

    The role of structure and dynamics in mechanisms for RNA becomes increasingly important. Computational approaches using simple dynamics models have been successful at predicting the motions of proteins and are often applied to ribonucleo-protein complexes but have not been thoroughly tested for well-packed nucleic acid structures. In order to characterize a true set of motions, we investigate the apparent motions from 16 ensembles of experimentally determined RNA structures. These indicate a relatively limited set of motions that are captured by a small set of principal components (PCs). These limited motions closely resemble the motions computed from low frequency normal modes from elastic network models (ENMs), either at atomic or coarse-grained resolution. Various ENM model types, parameters, and structure representations are tested here against the experimental RNA structural ensembles, exposing differences between models for proteins and for folded RNAs. Differences in performance are seen, depending on the structure alignment algorithm used to generate PCs, modulating the apparent utility of ENMs but not significantly impacting their ability to generate functional motions. The loss of dynamical information upon coarse-graining is somewhat larger for RNAs than for globular proteins, indicating, perhaps, the lower cooperativity of the less densely packed RNA. However, the RNA structures show less sensitivity to the elastic network model parameters than do proteins. These findings further demonstrate the utility of ENMs and the appropriateness of their application to well-packed RNA-only structures, justifying their use for studying the dynamics of ribonucleo-proteins, such as the ribosome and regulatory RNAs.

  20. Elastic regimes of subisostatic athermal fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Licup, A J; Sharma, A; MacKintosh, F C

    2016-01-01

    Athermal models of disordered fibrous networks are highly useful for studying the mechanics of elastic networks composed of stiff biopolymers. The underlying network architecture is a key aspect that can affect the elastic properties of these systems, which include rich linear and nonlinear elasticity. Existing computational approaches have focused on both lattice-based and off-lattice networks obtained from the random placement of rods. It is not obvious, a priori, whether the two architectures have fundamentally similar or different mechanics. If they are different, it is not clear which of these represents a better model for biological networks. Here, we show that both approaches are essentially equivalent for the same network connectivity, provided the networks are subisostatic with respect to central force interactions. Moreover, for a given subisostatic connectivity, we even find that lattice-based networks in both two and three dimensions exhibit nearly identical nonlinear elastic response. We provide a description of the linear mechanics for both architectures in terms of a scaling function. We also show that the nonlinear regime is dominated by fiber bending and that stiffening originates from the stabilization of subisostatic networks by stress. We propose a generalized relation for this regime in terms of the self-generated normal stresses that develop under deformation. Different network architectures have different susceptibilities to the normal stress but essentially exhibit the same nonlinear mechanics. Such a stiffening mechanism has been shown to successfully capture the nonlinear mechanics of collagen networks. PMID:26871101

  1. Mechanics of elastic networks

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a periodic lattice structure in d=2 or 3 dimensions with unit cell comprising Z thin elastic members emanating from a similarly situated central node. A general theoretical approach provides an algebraic formula for the effective elasticity of such frameworks. The method yields the effective cubic elastic constants for three-dimensional space-filling lattices with Z=4, 6, 8, 12 and 14, the last being the ‘stiffest’ lattice proposed by Gurtner & Durand (Gurtner & Durand 2014 Proc. R. Soc. A 470, 20130611. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2013.0611)). The analytical expressions provide explicit formulae for the effective properties of pentamode materials, both isotropic and anisotropic, obtained from the general formulation in the stretch-dominated limit for Z=d+1. PMID:25484608

  2. Mechanics of elastic networks.

    PubMed

    Norris, Andrew N

    2014-12-01

    We consider a periodic lattice structure in d=2 or 3 dimensions with unit cell comprising Z thin elastic members emanating from a similarly situated central node. A general theoretical approach provides an algebraic formula for the effective elasticity of such frameworks. The method yields the effective cubic elastic constants for three-dimensional space-filling lattices with Z=4, 6, 8, 12 and 14, the last being the 'stiffest' lattice proposed by Gurtner & Durand (Gurtner & Durand 2014 Proc. R. Soc. A470, 20130611. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2013.0611)). The analytical expressions provide explicit formulae for the effective properties of pentamode materials, both isotropic and anisotropic, obtained from the general formulation in the stretch-dominated limit for Z=d+1.

  3. Modeling the influence of nucleus elasticity on cell invasion in fiber networks and microchannels.

    PubMed

    Scianna, Marco; Preziosi, Luigi

    2013-01-21

    Cell migration in highly constrained extracellular matrices is exploited in scaffold-based tissue engineering and is fundamental in a wide variety of physiological and pathological phenomena, among others in cancer invasion and development. Research into the critical processes involved in cell migration has mainly focused on cell adhesion and proteolytic degradation of the external environment. However, rising evidence has recently shown that a number of cell-derived biophysical and mechanical parameters, among others nucleus stiffness and cell deformability, plays a major role in cell motility, especially in the ameboid-like migration mode in 3D confined tissue structures. We here present an extended cellular Potts model (CPM) first used to simulate a micro-fabricated migration chip, which tests the active invasive behavior of cancer cells into narrow channels. As distinct features of our approach, cells are modeled as compartmentalized discrete objects, differentiated in the nucleus and in the cytosolic region, while the migration chamber is composed of channels of different widths. We find that cell motile phenotype and velocity in open spaces (i.e., 2D flat surfaces or large channels) are not significantly influenced by cell elastic properties. On the contrary, the migratory behavior of cells within subcellular and subnuclear structures strongly relies on the deformability of the cytosol and of the nuclear cluster, respectively. Further, we characterize two migration dynamics: a stepwise way, characterized by fluctuations in cell length, within channels smaller than nucleus dimensions and a smooth sliding (i.e., maintaining constant cell length) behavior within channels larger than the nuclear cluster. These resulting observations are then extended looking at cell migration in an artificial fiber network, which mimics cell invasion in a 3D extracellular matrix. In particular, in this case, we analyze the effect of variations in elasticity of the nucleus on cell

  4. Identification of Motions in Membrane Proteins by Elastic Network Models and Their Experimental Validation

    PubMed Central

    Isin, Basak; Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Oltvai, Zoltán N.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Bahar, Ivet

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the functional motions of membrane proteins is difficult because they range from large-scale collective dynamics to local small atomic fluctuations at different timescales that are difficult to measure experimentally due to the hydrophobic nature of these proteins. Elastic Network Models, and in particular their most widely used implementation, the Anisotropic Network Model (ANM), have proven to be useful computational methods in many recent applications to predict membrane protein dynamics. These models are based on the premise that biomolecules possess intrinsic mechanical characteristics uniquely defined by their particular architectures. In the ANM, interactions between residues in close proximity are represented by harmonic potentials with a uniform spring constant. The slow mode shapes generated by the ANM provide valuable information on the global dynamics of biomolecules that are relevant to their function. In its recent extension in the form of ANM-guided molecular dynamics (MD), this coarse-grained approach is augmented with atomic detail. The results from ANM and its extensions can be used to guide experiments and thus speedup the process of quantifying motions in membrane proteins. Testing the predictions can be accomplished through (a) direct observation of motions through studies of structure and biophysical probes, (b) perturbation of the motions by, e.g., cross-linking or site-directed mutagenesis, and (c) by studying the effects of such perturbations on protein function, typically through ligand binding and activity assays. To illustrate the applicability of the combined computational ANM—experimental testing framework to membrane proteins, we describe—alongside the general protocols—here the application of ANM to rhodopsin, a prototypical member of the pharmacologically relevant G-protein coupled receptor family. PMID:22976035

  5. Strategy for designing broadband vibration isolation systems through exactly solvable models of graded elastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Ka Ki; Chan, Wai Soen; Yu, Kin Wah

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by the need of seismic base isolation, we have proposed a strategy to design vibration isolation systems to achieve near-zero amplitude vibration under external excitations over a broad frequency band. The strategy combines two ideas from previous works: (i) zeros assignment for broadband epsilon-near-zero metamaterials [Sun, and Yu (2012)]; and (ii) the localization of vibrational modes in graded elastic networks [Xiao, Yakubo, and Yu (2006)]. Firstly, we aim to assign zeros (anti-resonance frequencies) over an operating frequency band. Starting from an exactly solvable model of zigzag diatomic chains, we demonstrate a one-to-one correspondence between the zeros and one type of the masses after solving the models. Hence, the zeros can be assigned at will by tuning the masses. Secondly, in order to achieve further vibrational suppression by gradon localization, a band overlapping picture is applied to tune the rest of the masses to an optimal value. The results can be generalized to 2D and 3D structures for more realistic applications.

  6. Nonlinear elasticity of semiflexible filament networks.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanlong; Terentjev, Eugene M

    2016-08-10

    We develop a continuum theory for equilibrium elasticity of a network of crosslinked semiflexible filaments, spanning the full range between flexible entropy-driven chains to stiff athermal rods. We choose the 3-chain constitutive model of network elasticity over several plausible candidates, and derive analytical expressions for the elastic energy at arbitrary strain, with the corresponding stress-strain relationship. The theory fits well to a wide range of experimental data on simple shear in different filament networks, quantitatively matching the differential shear modulus variation with stress, with only two adjustable parameters (which represent the filament stiffness and the pre-tension in the network, respectively). The general theory accurately describes the crossover between the positive and negative Poynting effect (normal stress on imposed shear) on increasing the stiffness of filaments forming the network. We discuss the network stability (the point of marginal rigidity) and the phenomenon of tensegrity, showing that filament pre-tension on crosslinking into the network determines the magnitude of linear modulus G0. PMID:27444846

  7. Nonlinear elasticity of semiflexible filament networks.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanlong; Terentjev, Eugene M

    2016-08-10

    We develop a continuum theory for equilibrium elasticity of a network of crosslinked semiflexible filaments, spanning the full range between flexible entropy-driven chains to stiff athermal rods. We choose the 3-chain constitutive model of network elasticity over several plausible candidates, and derive analytical expressions for the elastic energy at arbitrary strain, with the corresponding stress-strain relationship. The theory fits well to a wide range of experimental data on simple shear in different filament networks, quantitatively matching the differential shear modulus variation with stress, with only two adjustable parameters (which represent the filament stiffness and the pre-tension in the network, respectively). The general theory accurately describes the crossover between the positive and negative Poynting effect (normal stress on imposed shear) on increasing the stiffness of filaments forming the network. We discuss the network stability (the point of marginal rigidity) and the phenomenon of tensegrity, showing that filament pre-tension on crosslinking into the network determines the magnitude of linear modulus G0.

  8. Modeling the collagen fibril network of biological tissues as a nonlinearly elastic material using a continuous volume fraction distribution function

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Reza; Vena, Pasquale; Sah, Robert L.; Klisch, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite distinct mechanical functions, biological soft tissues have a common microstructure in which a ground matrix is reinforced by a collagen fibril network. The microstructural properties of the collagen network contribute to continuum mechanical tissue properties that are strongly anisotropic with tensile-compressive asymmetry. In this study, a novel approach based on a continuous distribution of collagen fibril volume fractions is developed to model fibril reinforced soft tissues as a nonlinearly elastic and anisotropic material. Compared with other approaches that use a normalized number of fibrils for the definition of the distribution function, this representation is based on a distribution parameter (i.e. volume fraction) that is commonly measured experimentally while also incorporating pre-stress of the collagen fibril network in a tissue natural configuration. After motivating the form of the collagen strain energy function, examples are provided for two volume fraction distribution functions. Consequently, collagen second-Piola Kirchhoff stress and elasticity tensors are derived, first in general form and then specifically for a model that may be used for immature bovine articular cartilage. It is shown that the proposed strain energy is a convex function of the deformation gradient tensor and, thus, is suitable for the formation of a polyconvex tissue strain energy function. PMID:23390357

  9. Nonequilibrium Relaxation of Conformational Dynamics Facilitates Catalytic Reaction in an Elastic Network Model of T7 DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziqing W; Xie, X Sunney; Ge, Hao

    2016-03-24

    Nucleotide-induced conformational closing of the finger domain of DNA polymerase is crucial for its catalytic action during DNA replication. Such large-amplitude molecular motion is often not fully accessible to either direct experimental monitoring or molecular dynamics simulations. However, a coarse-grained model can offer an informative alternative, especially for probing the relationship between conformational dynamics and catalysis. Here we investigate the dynamics of T7 DNA polymerase catalysis using a Langevin-type elastic network model incorporating detailed structural information on the open conformation without the substrate bound. Such a single-parameter model remarkably captures the induced conformational dynamics of DNA polymerase upon dNTP binding, and reveals its close coupling to the advancement toward transition state along the coordinate of the target reaction, which contributes to significant lowering of the activation energy barrier. Furthermore, analysis of stochastic catalytic rates suggests that when the activation energy barrier has already been significantly lowered and nonequilibrium relaxation toward the closed form dominates the catalytic rate, one must appeal to a picture of two-dimensional free energy surface in order to account for the full spectrum of catalytic modes. Our semiquantitative study illustrates the general role of conformational dynamics in achieving transition-state stabilization, and suggests that such an elastic network model, albeit simplified, possesses the potential to furnish significant mechanistic insights into the functioning of a variety of enzymatic systems.

  10. Elasticity of fibrous networks under uniaxial prestress.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Mahsa; Sharma, Abhinav; Licup, Albert James; van Oosten, Anne S G; Galie, Peter A; Janmey, Paul A; MacKintosh, Fred C

    2016-06-14

    We present theoretical and experimental studies of the elastic response of fibrous networks subjected to uniaxial strain. Uniaxial compression or extension is applied to extracellular networks of fibrin and collagen using a shear rheometer with free water in/outflow. Both uniaxial stress and the network shear modulus are measured. Prior work [van Oosten, et al., Sci. Rep., 2015, 6, 19270] has shown softening/stiffening of these networks under compression/extension, together with a nonlinear response to shear, but the origin of such behaviour remains poorly understood. Here, we study how uniaxial strain influences the nonlinear mechanics of fibrous networks. Using a computational network model with bendable and stretchable fibres, we show that the softening/stiffening behaviour can be understood for fixed lateral boundaries in 2D and 3D networks with comparable average connectivities to the experimental extracellular networks. Moreover, we show that the onset of stiffening depends strongly on the imposed uniaxial strain. Our study highlights the importance of both uniaxial strain and boundary conditions in determining the mechanical response of hydrogels. PMID:27174568

  11. The Intrinsic Dynamics and Unfolding Process of an Antibody Fab Fragment Revealed by Elastic Network Model.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhang, Xiao; Han, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Li, Chun-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies have been increasingly used as pharmaceuticals in clinical treatment. Thermal stability and unfolding process are important properties that must be considered in antibody design. In this paper, the structure-encoded dynamical properties and the unfolding process of the Fab fragment of the phosphocholine-binding antibody McPC603 are investigated by use of the normal mode analysis of Gaussian network model (GNM). Firstly, the temperature factors for the residues of the protein were calculated with GNM and then compared with the experimental measurements. A good result was obtained, which provides the validity for the use of GNM to study the dynamical properties of the protein. Then, with this approach, the mean-square fluctuation (MSF) of the residues, as well as the MSF in the internal distance (MSFID) between all pairwise residues, was calculated to investigate the mobility and flexibility of the protein, respectively. It is found that the mobility and flexibility of the constant regions are higher than those of the variable regions, and the six complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) in the variable regions also exhibit relative large mobility and flexibility. The large amplitude motions of the CDRs are considered to be associated with the immune function of the antibody. In addition, the unfolding process of the protein was simulated by iterative use of the GNM. In our method, only the topology of protein native structure is taken into account, and the protein unfolding process is simulated through breaking the native contacts one by one according to the MSFID values between the residues. It is found that the flexible regions tend to unfold earlier. The sequence of the unfolding events obtained by our method is consistent with the hydrogen-deuterium exchange experimental results. Our studies imply that the unfolding behavior of the Fab fragment of antibody McPc603 is largely determined by the intrinsic dynamics of the protein.

  12. Elastic anomalies in disordered square networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukarzel, Cristian F.

    2015-04-01

    The compressive elastic modulus B of a square network with an amount ɛ of positional disorder, which is a simple structural model of isostatic networks such as glasses, is studied numerically under fixed (FBC) and periodic (PBC) boundary conditions. Under PBC, anomalous properties are found and compared with results for FBC. It is already known for isostatic networks, that B is finite and size-independent when ɛ = 0, but goes to zero with increasing size for nonzero disorder, in a manner that depends on boundary conditions. It is reported here that, under FBC, B is constant for L < L0(ɛ) and decays as 1/L for L > L0. For PBC, B ∼ 1/L when L < L0 and B ∼ 1/L2 for L > L0. It is shown how these large-size behaviors for both FBC and PBC can be understood using an extension of previously published arguments. The crossover length L0(ɛ) is found to behave in both cases as 1/ɛ2 and a justification for this behavior is provided. Additionally, the case of PBC shows surprising properties, which do not admit a simple explanation, such as: (a) B(PBC)(ɛ, L) is a discontinuous function of disorder strength ɛ, for all sizes L, since it is constant for zero disorder but decays as 1/L in the limit ɛ → 0 and (b) the amount of site-displacement D(PBC)=<(δ r)^2> due to compression, while being exactly zero for ɛ = 0 (ordered square networks), behaves as 1/ɛ2 for nonzero disorder. These puzzling properties are due to the existence of degenerate flexes in the undistorted network with PBC, which do not exist for FBC. The undistorted square network with PBC (but not with FBC) is thus unstable under compression, within nonlinear elasticity, which makes it inappropriate as a model to study the static and/or dynamic properties of disordered isostatic networks. Key ideas to understand these anomalies are advanced, leaving a detailed analytical treatment for a forthcoming publication.

  13. The elastic network model reveals a consistent picture on intrinsic functional dynamics of type II restriction endonucleases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyar, A.; Kurkcuoglu, O.; Nilsson, L.; Doruker, P.

    2011-10-01

    The vibrational dynamics of various type II restriction endonucleases, in complex with cognate/non-cognate DNA and in the apo form, are investigated with the elastic network model in order to reveal common functional mechanisms in this enzyme family. Scissor-like and tong-like motions observed in the slowest modes of all enzymes and their complexes point to common DNA recognition and cleavage mechanisms. Normal mode analysis further points out that the scissor-like motion has an important role in differentiating between cognate and non-cognate sequences at the recognition site, thus implying its catalytic relevance. Flexible regions observed around the DNA-binding site of the enzyme usually concentrate on the highly conserved β-strands, especially after DNA binding. These β-strands may have a structurally stabilizing role in functional dynamics for target site recognition and cleavage. In addition, hot spot residues based on high-frequency modes reveal possible communication pathways between the two distant cleavage sites in the enzyme family. Some of these hot spots also exist on the shortest path between the catalytic sites and are highly conserved.

  14. Mathematical Models for Elastic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaggio, Piero

    1997-10-01

    During the seventeenth century, several useful theories of elastic structures emerged, with applications to civil and mechanical engineering problems. Recent and improved mathematical tools have extended applications into new areas such as mathematical physics, geomechanics, and biomechanics. This book offers a critically filtered collection of the most significant theories dealing with elastic slender bodies. It includes mathematical models involving elastic structures that are used to solve practical problems with particular emphasis on nonlinear problems.

  15. Elastic model of dry friction

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E.

    2013-09-15

    Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

  16. Computational Simulation of the Activation Cycle of Gα Subunit in the G Protein Cycle Using an Elastic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Ryung; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Choi, Jae Boong; Chung, Ka Young; Kim, Moon Ki

    2016-01-01

    Agonist-activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) interact with GDP-bound G protein heterotrimers (Gαβγ) promoting GDP/GTP exchange, which results in dissociation of Gα from the receptor and Gβγ. The GTPase activity of Gα hydrolyzes GTP to GDP, and the GDP-bound Gα interacts with Gβγ, forming a GDP-bound G protein heterotrimer. The G protein cycle is allosterically modulated by conformational changes of the Gα subunit. Although biochemical and biophysical methods have elucidated the structure and dynamics of Gα, the precise conformational mechanisms underlying the G protein cycle are not fully understood yet. Simulation methods could help to provide additional details to gain further insight into G protein signal transduction mechanisms. In this study, using the available X-ray crystal structures of Gα, we simulated the entire G protein cycle and described not only the steric features of the Gα structure, but also conformational changes at each step. Each reference structure in the G protein cycle was modeled as an elastic network model and subjected to normal mode analysis. Our simulation data suggests that activated receptors trigger conformational changes of the Gα subunit that are thermodynamically favorable for opening of the nucleotide-binding pocket and GDP release. Furthermore, the effects of GTP binding and hydrolysis on mobility changes of the C and N termini and switch regions are elucidated. In summary, our simulation results enabled us to provide detailed descriptions of the structural and dynamic features of the G protein cycle. PMID:27483005

  17. Elasticity of F-actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardel, Margaret Lise

    This thesis presents a study of the elasticity and microstructure of three filamentous actin (F-actin) based materials. Using bulk rheology, microrheology, multiple particle tracking and imaging techniques, we study the microscopic origins of the mechanical properties of F-actin networks. We briefly introduce aspects of F-actin and rheology essential to provide a background for and motivate this thesis in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we describe the materials and methods used. An introduction to microrheology is given in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, we study solutions of entangled F-actin. We elucidate the microscopic origins of bulk elasticity using microrheology techniques. We also show that multiple particle tracking can also probe the dynamics of the F-actin solution microstructure. We explore the effect of rigid, incompliant chemical cross-links between actin filaments in Chapter 5. We explore changes in the network microstructure as the concentration of cross-links is varied. We find that the elastic stiffness of these networks is extremely sensitive to small changes in cross-link density. Despite this large variation, the linear viscoelasticity of all networks can be scaled onto a universal master curve; this scaling reveals that the mechanical dissipation of the networks is due to thermal fluctuations of F-actin. At large stresses, the mechanical stiffness of these networks diverges. The form of this stress stiffening response is consistent with the non-linear force extension of a single semi-flexible polymer. Thus, over a large range of conditions, the linear and nonlinear mechanical response of rigidly cross-linked networks is entropic in origin. Finally, at very low cross-link and filament densities, we observe a transition to a qualitatively different type of elasticity; this is consistent with a transition to an enthalpic network elasticity dominated by bending of F-actin. In Chapter 6, we study the elastic properties of F-actin networks assembled with a

  18. Multiaxial deformations of end-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) networks. 4. Further assessment of the slip-link model for chain-entanglement effect on rubber elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urayama, Kenji; Kawamura, Takanobu; Kohjiya, Shinzo

    2003-03-01

    The Edwards-Vilgis slip-link model for the chain-entanglement effect on rubber elasticity is critically assessed on the basis of quasiequilibrium biaxial stress—strain data of end-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) networks with different entanglement densities. The PDMS networks with different entanglement densities were prepared by end-linking end-reactive long precursor PDMS in solutions with different solvent contents. The slip-link model, in which trapped entanglement is modeled by fictitious mobile slip-link attaching two entangled chains, satisfactorily describes the biaxial data over the entire range of deformation for all the networks examined. The model-specific parameters, i.e., slippage of slip-link (η) and inextensibility of network (α), were employed as adjustable parameters in data-fitting. The fitted values of η and α vary reasonably with the degree of dilution at network preparation, i.e., entanglement density. With an increase in dilution, i.e., decrease in entanglement density, η increases, whereas α decreases. In addition, the fitted values of η and α are in good agreement with the estimates from another molecular approach independent of mechanical testings: η=Me/Mc, where Me and Mc are the molecular masses between neighboring entanglements and between adjacent cross-links, respectively; α=nj-1/2, where nj is the number of Kuhn segments between adjacent elastically effective junctions including cross-links and trapped entanglements. The satisfactory data-fit with the model parameters of physically reasonable magnitudes supports the validity of the slip-link model for entanglement effects on rubber elasticity.

  19. Analysis of conformational motions and related key residue interactions responsible for a specific function of proteins with elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji Guo; Han, Xiao Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Hou, Yan Xue; Zhu, Jian Zhuo; Wu, Yi Dong

    2016-01-01

    Protein collective motions play a critical role in many biochemical processes. How to predict the functional motions and the related key residue interactions in proteins is important for our understanding in the mechanism of the biochemical processes. Normal mode analysis (NMA) of the elastic network model (ENM) is one of the effective approaches to investigate the structure-encoded motions in proteins. However, the motion modes revealed by the conventional NMA approach do not necessarily correspond to a specific function of protein. In the present work, a new analysis method was proposed to identify the motion modes responsible for a specific function of proteins and then predict the key residue interactions involved in the functional motions by using a perturbation approach. In our method, an internal coordinate that accounts for the specific function was introduced, and the Cartesian coordinate space was transformed into the internal/Cartesian space by using linear approximation, where the introduced internal coordinate serves as one of the axes of the coordinate space. NMA of ENM in this internal/Cartesian space was performed and the function-relevant motion modes were identified according to their contributions to the specific function of proteins. Then the key residue interactions important for the functional motions of the protein were predicted as the interactions whose perturbation largely influences the fluctuation along the internal coordinate. Using our proposed methods, the maltose transporter (MalFGK2) from E. Coli was studied. The functional motions and the key residue interactions that are related to the channel-gating function of this protein were successfully identified.

  20. Rubber elasticity for incomplete polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Kengo; Chijiishi, Masashi; Katsumoto, Yukiteru; Nakao, Toshio; Fujii, Kenta; Chung, Ung-il; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takamasa; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2012-12-14

    We investigated the relationship between the elastic modulus, G and the reaction probability, p for polymer networks. First, we pointed out that the elastic modulus is expressed by G = {(fp∕2 - 1) + O((p - 1)(2))} Nk(B)T∕V (percolated network law), which does not depend on the local topology of the network structure or the existence of the loops. Here, N is the number of lattice point, V is the system volume, f is the functionality of the cross-link, k(B) is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature. We also conducted simulations for polymer networks with triangular and diamond lattices, and mechanical testing experiments on tetra-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) gel with systematically tuning the reaction probability. Here, the tetra-PEG gel was confirmed to be a potential candidate for ideal polymer networks consisting of unimodal strands free from defects and entanglements. From the results of simulations and experiments, it was revealed, for the first time, that the elastic modulus obeys this law in the wide range of p (p(c) ≪ p ≤ 1), where p(c) is the reaction probability at gelation threshold.

  1. Nonlinear and heterogeneous elasticity of multiply-crosslinked biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amuasi, H. E.; Heussinger, C.; Vink, R. L. C.; Zippelius, A.

    2015-08-01

    We simulate randomly crosslinked networks of biopolymers, characterizing linear and nonlinear elasticity under different loading conditions (uniaxial extension, simple shear, and pure shear). Under uniaxial extension, and upon entering the nonlinear regime, the network switches from a dilatant to contractile response. Analogously, under isochoric conditions (pure shear), the normal stresses change their sign. Both effects are readily explained with a generic weakly nonlinear elasticity theory. The elastic moduli display an intermediate super-stiffening regime, where moduli increase much stronger with applied stress σ than predicted by the force-extension relation of a single wormlike-chain ({G}{wlc}∼ {σ }3/2). We interpret this super-stiffening regime in terms of the reorientation of filaments with the maximum tensile direction of the deformation field. A simple model for the reorientation response gives an exponential stiffening, G∼ {{{e}}}σ , in qualitative agreement with our data. The heterogeneous, anisotropic structure of the network is reflected in correspondingly heterogeneous and anisotropic elastic properties. We provide a coarse-graining scheme to quantify the local anisotropy, the fluctuations of the elastic moduli, and the local stresses as a function of coarse-graining length. Heterogeneities of the elastic moduli are strongly correlated with the local density and increase with applied strain.

  2. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D visco-elastic simulations against in vitro measurements.

    PubMed

    Alastruey, Jordi; Khir, Ashraf W; Matthys, Koen S; Segers, Patrick; Sherwin, Spencer J; Verdonck, Pascal R; Parker, Kim H; Peiró, Joaquim

    2011-08-11

    The accuracy of the nonlinear one-dimensional (1-D) equations of pressure and flow wave propagation in Voigt-type visco-elastic arteries was tested against measurements in a well-defined experimental 1:1 replica of the 37 largest conduit arteries in the human systemic circulation. The parameters required by the numerical algorithm were directly measured in the in vitro setup and no data fitting was involved. The inclusion of wall visco-elasticity in the numerical model reduced the underdamped high-frequency oscillations obtained using a purely elastic tube law, especially in peripheral vessels, which was previously reported in this paper [Matthys et al., 2007. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D numerical simulations against in vitro measurements. J. Biomech. 40, 3476-3486]. In comparison to the purely elastic model, visco-elasticity significantly reduced the average relative root-mean-square errors between numerical and experimental waveforms over the 70 locations measured in the in vitro model: from 3.0% to 2.5% (p<0.012) for pressure and from 15.7% to 10.8% (p<0.002) for the flow rate. In the frequency domain, average relative errors between numerical and experimental amplitudes from the 5th to the 20th harmonic decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p<0.107) for pressure and from 7.0% to 3.3% (p<10(-6)) for the flow rate. These results provide additional support for the use of 1-D reduced modelling to accurately simulate clinically relevant problems at a reasonable computational cost.

  3. Efficiency gain from elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, Annalisa; Rival, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    We compare the cost-efficiency of optical networks based on mixed datarates (10, 40, 100Gb/s) and datarateelastic technologies. A European backbone network is examined under various traffic assumptions (volume of transported data per demand and total number of demands) to better understand the impact of traffic characteristics on cost-efficiency. Network dimensioning is performed for static and restorable networks (resilient to one-link failure). In this paper we will investigate the trade-offs between price of interfaces, reach and reconfigurability, showing that elastic solutions can be more cost-efficient than mixed-rate solutions because of the better compatibility between different datarates, increased reach of channels and simplified wavelength allocation.

  4. Normal mode analysis based on an elastic network model for biomolecules in the Protein Data Bank, which uses dihedral angles as independent variables.

    PubMed

    Wako, Hiroshi; Endo, Shigeru

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a computer program, named PDBETA, that performs normal mode analysis (NMA) based on an elastic network model that uses dihedral angles as independent variables. Taking advantage of the relatively small number of degrees of freedom required to describe a molecular structure in dihedral angle space and a simple potential-energy function independent of atom types, we aimed to develop a program applicable to a full-atom system of any molecule in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The algorithm for NMA used in PDBETA is the same as the computer program FEDER/2, developed previously. Therefore, the main challenge in developing PDBETA was to find a method that can automatically convert PDB data into molecular structure information in dihedral angle space. Here, we illustrate the performance of PDBETA with a protein-DNA complex, a protein-tRNA complex, and some non-protein small molecules, and show that the atomic fluctuations calculated by PDBETA reproduce the temperature factor data of these molecules in the PDB. A comparison was also made with elastic-network-model based NMA in a Cartesian-coordinate system.

  5. Topological rubber elasticity theory. II. SCL networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Kazuyoshi

    1982-06-01

    The theory presented in part I [Iwata, J. Chem. Phys. 76, 6363 (1982)] is applied to networks having a simple-cubic-lattice (SCL) regular connection pattern, for which the projection matrix Γ* is computed easily. Derivatives of elastic free energies in regard to parameter λ for macroscopic deformation ∂F˜e/∂λ are computed numerically for isotropic deformations (swelling or deswelling) and for simple deformations (extension or contraction under swelling by α times). The initial arrangement of junction points r0 is assumed to be exactly SCL, and δ = d0/√νb is chosen as one of parameters in the calculation, where d0 is an end-to-end distance of the strands at the time of network formation, ν is a degree of polymerization in regard to the strands, and b is a statistical length per monomer. A repeating cell is chosen as a cube composed of 3×3×3 ( = 27) junction points and 3×27 ( = 81) strands. The following are found in this work. (1) Among four terms ∂F0,ph/∂λ, ∂F˜0,top/∂λ, ∂F˜1/∂λ, and ∂F˜2/∂λ of the derivative of the elastic free energy, the principal term is ∂F˜0,top/∂λ, which comes from the topological interaction among the strands; the phantom network term ∂F0,ph/∂λ is only a small correction to the net stress. (2) In isotropic deformations, the elastic free energy takes a minimum at λ0, a little below λ = 1; for compression below λ0, a strong postitive inner pressure, which comes from the topological repulsive forces among the strands, arises. (3) In simple deformations, the Mooney-Rivlin term appears for unswollen systems and it disappears as swelling of the network proceeds. Experimental plans are proposed which will reveal the existence of the topological repulsive interactions in the networks.

  6. Elastic scattering in geometrical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plebaniak, Zbigniew; Wibig, Tadeusz

    2016-10-01

    The experimental data on proton-proton elastic and inelastic scattering emerging from the measurements at the Large Hadron Collider, calls for an efficient model to fit the data. We have examined the optical, geometrical picture and we have found the simplest, linear dependence of this model parameters on the logarithm of the interaction energy with the significant change of the respective slopes at one point corresponding to the energy of about 300 GeV. The logarithmic dependence observed at high energies allows one to extrapolate the proton-proton elastic, total (and inelastic) cross sections to ultra high energies seen in cosmic rays events which makes a solid justification of the extrapolation to very high energy domain of cosmic rays and could help us to interpret the data from an astrophysical and a high energy physics point of view.

  7. Advantages of IP over elastic optical networks using multi-flow transponders from cost and equipment count aspects.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takafumi; Hirano, Akira; Jinno, Masahiko

    2014-01-13

    To evaluate the cost efficiency of IP over elastic optical network architectures, we use a multi-layer network design scheme that covers network to node equipment level. An evaluation in a static traffic environment shows that the multi-flow optical transponder-based elastic optical network reduces total cost as well as equipment counts compared to other elastic network models based on fixed-rate, mixed-line-rate and bandwidth-variable transponders. PMID:24514966

  8. Bridging between NMA and Elastic Network Models: Preserving All-Atom Accuracy in Coarse-Grained Models

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyuntae; Jernigan, Robert L.; Song, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics can provide deep insights into the functional mechanisms of proteins and protein complexes. For large protein complexes such as GroEL/GroES with more than 8,000 residues, obtaining a fine-grained all-atom description of its normal mode motions can be computationally prohibitive and is often unnecessary. For this reason, coarse-grained models have been used successfully. However, most existing coarse-grained models use extremely simple potentials to represent the interactions within the coarse-grained structures and as a result, the dynamics obtained for the coarse-grained structures may not always be fully realistic. There is a gap between the quality of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures given by all-atom models and that by coarse-grained models. In this work, we resolve an important question in protein dynamics computations—how can we efficiently construct coarse-grained models whose description of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures remains as accurate as that given by all-atom models? Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of the Hessian matrix and achieves a high efficiency with a novel iterative matrix projection approach. The result is highly significant since it can provide descriptions of normal mode motions at an all-atom level of accuracy even for the largest biomolecular complexes. The application of our method to GroEL/GroES offers new insights into the mechanism of this biologically important chaperonin, such as that the conformational transitions of this protein complex in its functional cycle are even more strongly connected to the first few lowest frequency modes than with other coarse-grained models. PMID:26473491

  9. Bridging between NMA and Elastic Network Models: Preserving All-Atom Accuracy in Coarse-Grained Models.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyuntae; Jernigan, Robert L; Song, Guang

    2015-10-01

    Dynamics can provide deep insights into the functional mechanisms of proteins and protein complexes. For large protein complexes such as GroEL/GroES with more than 8,000 residues, obtaining a fine-grained all-atom description of its normal mode motions can be computationally prohibitive and is often unnecessary. For this reason, coarse-grained models have been used successfully. However, most existing coarse-grained models use extremely simple potentials to represent the interactions within the coarse-grained structures and as a result, the dynamics obtained for the coarse-grained structures may not always be fully realistic. There is a gap between the quality of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures given by all-atom models and that by coarse-grained models. In this work, we resolve an important question in protein dynamics computations--how can we efficiently construct coarse-grained models whose description of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures remains as accurate as that given by all-atom models? Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of the Hessian matrix and achieves a high efficiency with a novel iterative matrix projection approach. The result is highly significant since it can provide descriptions of normal mode motions at an all-atom level of accuracy even for the largest biomolecular complexes. The application of our method to GroEL/GroES offers new insights into the mechanism of this biologically important chaperonin, such as that the conformational transitions of this protein complex in its functional cycle are even more strongly connected to the first few lowest frequency modes than with other coarse-grained models.

  10. Deformable elastic network refinement for low-resolution macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Schröder, Gunnar F.; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T.

    2014-09-01

    An overview of applications of the deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method is presented together with recommendations for its optimal usage. Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determinion of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed, recommendations for its optimal usage are provided and its limitations are discussed. Representative examples of the application of DEN refinement to challenging cases of refinement at low resolution are presented. These cases include soluble as well as membrane proteins determined at limiting resolutions ranging from 3 to 7 Å. Potential extensions of the DEN refinement technique and future perspectives for the interpretation of low-resolution crystal structures are also discussed.

  11. Drainage fracture networks in elastic solids with internal fluid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobchenko, Maya; Hafver, Andreas; Jettestuen, Espen; Galland, Olivier; Renard, François; Meakin, Paul; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Dysthe, Dag K.

    2013-06-01

    Experiments in which CO2 gas was generated by the yeast fermentation of sugar in an elastic layer of gelatine gel confined between two glass plates are described and analyzed theoretically. The CO2 gas pressure causes the gel layer to fracture. The gas produced is drained on short length scales by diffusion and on long length scales by flow in a fracture network, which has topological properties that are intermediate between river networks and hierarchical-fracture networks. A simple model for the experimental system with two parameters that characterize the disorder and the intermediate (river-fracture) topology of the network was developed and the results of the model were compared with the experimental results.

  12. Quantifying the impact of molecular defects on polymer network elasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Mingjiang; Wang, Rui; Kawamoto, Ken; Olsen, Bradley D; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2016-09-16

    Elasticity, one of the most important properties of a soft material, is difficult to quantify in polymer networks because of the presence of topological molecular defects in these materials. Furthermore, the impact of these defects on bulk elasticity is unknown. We used rheology, disassembly spectrometry, and simulations to measure the shear elastic modulus and count the numbers of topological "loop" defects of various order in a series of polymer hydrogels, and then used these data to evaluate the classical phantom and affine network theories of elasticity. The results led to a real elastic network theory (RENT) that describes how loop defects affect bulk elasticity. Given knowledge of the loop fractions, RENT provides predictions of the shear elastic modulus that are consistent with experimental observations. PMID:27634530

  13. Domain Motions and Functionally-Key Residues of l-Alanine Dehydrogenase Revealed by an Elastic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Yuan; Zhang, Jing-Chao; Zhu, Yan-Ying; Su, Ji-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis l-alanine dehydrogenase (l-MtAlaDH) plays an important role in catalyzing l-alanine to ammonia and pyruvate, which has been considered to be a potential target for tuberculosis treatment. In the present work, the functional domain motions encoded in the structure of l-MtAlaDH were investigated by using the Gaussian network model (GNM) and the anisotropy network model (ANM). The slowest modes for the open-apo and closed-holo structures of the enzyme show that the domain motions have a common hinge axis centered in residues Met133 and Met301. Accompanying the conformational transition, both the 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-binding domain (NBD) and the substrate-binding domain (SBD) move in a highly coupled way. The first three slowest modes of ANM exhibit the open-closed, rotation and twist motions of l-MtAlaDH, respectively. The calculation of the fast modes reveals the residues responsible for the stability of the protein, and some of them are involved in the interaction with the ligand. Then, the functionally-important residues relevant to the binding of the ligand were identified by using a thermodynamic method. Our computational results are consistent with the experimental data, which will help us to understand the physical mechanism for the function of l-MtAlaDH. PMID:26690143

  14. Inferring a weighted elastic network from partial unfolding with coarse-grained simulations.

    PubMed

    de Mendonça, Matheus R; Rizzi, Leandro G; Contessoto, Vinicius; Leite, Vitor B P; Alves, Nelson A

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that simple elastic network models can reproduce experimental B-factors, providing insights into the structure-function properties of proteins. Here, we report a study on how to improve an elastic network model and explore its performance by predicting the experimental B-factors. Elastic network models are built on the experimental Cα coordinates, and they only take the pairs of Cα atoms within a given cutoff distance rc into account. These models describe the interactions by elastic springs with the same force constant. We have developed a method based on numerical simulations with a simple coarse-grained force field, to attribute weights to these spring constants. This method considers the time that two Cα atoms remain connected in the network during partial unfolding, establishing a means of measuring the strength of each link. We examined two different coarse-grained force fields and explored the computation of these weights by unfolding the native structures.

  15. Energy distribution in disordered elastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, Gustavo R.

    2010-09-01

    Disordered networks are found in many natural and artificial materials, from gels or cytoskeletal structures to metallic foams or bones. Here, the energy distribution in this type of networks is modeled, taking into account the orientation of the struts. A correlation between the orientation and the energy per unit volume is found and described as a function of the connectivity in the network and the relative bending stiffness of the struts. If one or both parameters have relatively large values, the struts aligned in the loading direction present the highest values of energy. On the contrary, if these have relatively small values, the highest values of energy can be reached in the struts oriented transversally. This result allows explaining in a simple way remodeling processes in biological materials, for example, the remodeling of trabecular bone and the reorganization in the cytoskeleton. Additionally, the correlation between the orientation, the affinity, and the bending-stretching ratio in the network is discussed.

  16. Elastic Optical Path Network Architecture: Framework for Spectrally-Efficient and Scalable Future Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, Masahiko; Takara, Hidehiko; Sone, Yoshiaki; Yonenaga, Kazushige; Hirano, Akira

    This paper presents an elastic optical path network architecture as a novel networking framework to address the looming capacity crunch problem in internet protocol (IP) and optical networks. The basic idea is to introduce elasticity and adaptation into the optical domain to yield spectrally-efficient optical path accommodation, heightened network scalability through IP traffic offloading to the elastic optical layer, and enhanced survivability for serious disasters.

  17. Drainage fracture networks in elastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafver, Andreas; Kobchenko, Maya; Jettestuen, Espen; Renard, Francois; Galland, Olivier; Mathhiesen, Joachim; Meakin, Paul; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2013-04-01

    Several geological processes generate large fluid pressures pervasively inside the solid and the fluid is drained out of the solid volume and transported towards the surface by buoyancy. Important examples of this includes dehydrating subducting slabs, hydrocarbon producing kerogen rich shales and partially molten magmas. Such internal production and exsolution of fluids may induce mechanical failure of the solid rock. The resulting fractures provide drainage pathways for the fluid releasing the large fluid pressures. We have performed analogue 2D experiments with uniform gas production in gelatine. We observe fracture patterns that are topologically intermediate between the tree-like structure of river networks and the hierarchical patterns observed in other transport controlled fracture processes, exemplified by cracks in drying mud, hexagonal columnar joints formed in cooling basalts or sequential splitting of igneous rock due to weathering. We propose a simple two-parmeter statistical model that captures the essential features of the gelatine experiments and that is able to produce fracture networks ranging in topology from tree-like to hierarchical. The model is explored and compared with the experiments to gain insight into this class of drainage fracture processes. We also present a discrete element model which is used to investigate the effect of fluid-solid coupling on fracture network topology and fluid expulsion.

  18. Ligand Docking to Intermediate and Close-To-Bound Conformers Generated by an Elastic Network Model Based Algorithm for Highly Flexible Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Doruker, Pemra

    2016-01-01

    Incorporating receptor flexibility in small ligand-protein docking still poses a challenge for proteins undergoing large conformational changes. In the absence of bound structures, sampling conformers that are accessible by apo state may facilitate docking and drug design studies. For this aim, we developed an unbiased conformational search algorithm, by integrating global modes from elastic network model, clustering and energy minimization with implicit solvation. Our dataset consists of five diverse proteins with apo to complex RMSDs 4.7-15 Å. Applying this iterative algorithm on apo structures, conformers close to the bound-state (RMSD 1.4-3.8 Å), as well as the intermediate states were generated. Dockings to a sequence of conformers consisting of a closed structure and its "parents" up to the apo were performed to compare binding poses on different states of the receptor. For two periplasmic binding proteins and biotin carboxylase that exhibit hinge-type closure of two dynamics domains, the best pose was obtained for the conformer closest to the bound structure (ligand RMSDs 1.5-2 Å). In contrast, the best pose for adenylate kinase corresponded to an intermediate state with partially closed LID domain and open NMP domain, in line with recent studies (ligand RMSD 2.9 Å). The docking of a helical peptide to calmodulin was the most challenging case due to the complexity of its 15 Å transition, for which a two-stage procedure was necessary. The technique was first applied on the extended calmodulin to generate intermediate conformers; then peptide docking and a second generation stage on the complex were performed, which in turn yielded a final peptide RMSD of 2.9 Å. Our algorithm is effective in producing conformational states based on the apo state. This study underlines the importance of such intermediate states for ligand docking to proteins undergoing large transitions. PMID:27348230

  19. Ligand Docking to Intermediate and Close-To-Bound Conformers Generated by an Elastic Network Model Based Algorithm for Highly Flexible Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Doruker, Pemra

    2016-01-01

    Incorporating receptor flexibility in small ligand-protein docking still poses a challenge for proteins undergoing large conformational changes. In the absence of bound structures, sampling conformers that are accessible by apo state may facilitate docking and drug design studies. For this aim, we developed an unbiased conformational search algorithm, by integrating global modes from elastic network model, clustering and energy minimization with implicit solvation. Our dataset consists of five diverse proteins with apo to complex RMSDs 4.7–15 Å. Applying this iterative algorithm on apo structures, conformers close to the bound-state (RMSD 1.4–3.8 Å), as well as the intermediate states were generated. Dockings to a sequence of conformers consisting of a closed structure and its “parents” up to the apo were performed to compare binding poses on different states of the receptor. For two periplasmic binding proteins and biotin carboxylase that exhibit hinge-type closure of two dynamics domains, the best pose was obtained for the conformer closest to the bound structure (ligand RMSDs 1.5–2 Å). In contrast, the best pose for adenylate kinase corresponded to an intermediate state with partially closed LID domain and open NMP domain, in line with recent studies (ligand RMSD 2.9 Å). The docking of a helical peptide to calmodulin was the most challenging case due to the complexity of its 15 Å transition, for which a two-stage procedure was necessary. The technique was first applied on the extended calmodulin to generate intermediate conformers; then peptide docking and a second generation stage on the complex were performed, which in turn yielded a final peptide RMSD of 2.9 Å. Our algorithm is effective in producing conformational states based on the apo state. This study underlines the importance of such intermediate states for ligand docking to proteins undergoing large transitions. PMID:27348230

  20. Deformable elastic network refinement for low-resolution macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Gunnar F; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T

    2014-09-01

    Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determinion of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed, recommendations for its optimal usage are provided and its limitations are discussed. Representative examples of the application of DEN refinement to challenging cases of refinement at low resolution are presented. These cases include soluble as well as membrane proteins determined at limiting resolutions ranging from 3 to 7 Å. Potential extensions of the DEN refinement technique and future perspectives for the interpretation of low-resolution crystal structures are also discussed.

  1. Nonlinear model of elastic field sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, B. I.; Zagorodny, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    A general concept of the long-range elastic interactions in continuous medium is proposed. The interaction is determined as a consequence of symmetry breaking of the elastic field distribution produced by the topological defect as isolated inclusions. It is proposed to treat topological defects as the source of elastic field that can be described in terms of this field. The source is considered as a nonlinear object which determines the effective charge of the field at large distances in the linear theory. The models of the nonlinear source are proposed.

  2. Dynamics Behaviors of Scale-Free Networks with Elastic Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Lai; Sun, Hui-Jun; Wu, Jian-Jun

    Many real-world networks, such as transportation networks and Internet, have the scale-free properties. It is important to study the bearing capacity of such networks. Considering the elastic demand condition, we analyze load distributions and bearing capacities with different parameters through artificially created scale-free networks. The simulation results show that the load distribution follows a power-law form, which means some ordered pairs, playing the dominant role in the transportation network, have higher demand than other pairs. We found that, with the decrease of perceptual error, the total and average ordered pair demand will decrease and then stay in a steady state. However, with the increase of the network size, the average demand of each ordered pair will decrease, which is particularly interesting for the network design problem.

  3. Adaptive Quality of Transmission Control in Elastic Optical Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xinran

    Optical fiber communication is becoming increasingly important due to the burgeoning demand in the internet capacity. However, traditional wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technique fails to address such demand because of its inefficient spectral utilization. As a result, elastic optical networking (EON) has been under extensive investigation recently. Such network allows sub-wavelength and super-wavelength channel accommodation, and mitigates the stranded bandwidth problem in the WDM network. In addition, elastic optical network is also able to dynamically allocate the spectral resources of the network based on channel conditions and impairments, and adaptively control the quality of transmission of a channel. This application requires two aspects to be investigated: an efficient optical performance monitoring scheme and networking control and management algorithms to reconfigure the network in a dynamic fashion. This thesis focuses on the two aspects discussed above about adaptive QoT control. We demonstrated a supervisory channel method for optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) and chromatic dispersion (CD) monitoring. In addition, our proof-of-principle testbed experiments show successful impairment aware reconfiguration of the network with modulation format switching (MFS) only and MFS combined with lightpath rerouting (LR) for hundred-GHz QPSK superchannels undergoing time-varying OSNR impairment.

  4. A Mixed Protein Structure Network and Elastic Network Model Approach to Predict the Structural Communication in Biomolecular Systems: The PDZ2 Domain from Tyrosine Phosphatase 1E As a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Francesco; Felline, Angelo; Seeber, Michele; Mariani, Simona; Fanelli, Francesca

    2013-05-14

    Graph theory is being increasingly used to study the structural communication in biomolecular systems. This requires incorporating information on the system's dynamics, which is time-consuming and not suitable for high-throughput investigations. We propose a mixed Protein Structure Network (PSN) and Elastic Network Model (ENM)-based strategy, i.e., PSN-ENM, for fast investigation of allosterism in biological systems. PSN analysis and ENM-Normal Mode Analysis (ENM-NMA) are implemented in the structural analysis software Wordom, freely available at http://wordom.sourceforge.net/ . The method performs a systematic search of the shortest communication pathways that traverse a protein structure. A number of strategies to compare the structure networks of a protein in different functional states and to get a global picture of communication pathways are presented as well. The approach was validated on the PDZ2 domain from tyrosine phosphatase 1E (PTP1E) in its free (APO) and peptide-bound states. PDZ domains are, indeed, the systems whose structural communication and allosteric features are best characterized both in vitro and in silico. The agreement between predictions by the PSN-ENM method and in vitro evidence is remarkable and comparable to or higher than that reached by more time-consuming computational approaches tested on the same biological system. Finally, the PSN-ENM method was able to reproduce the salient communication features of unbound and bound PTP1E inferred from molecular dynamics simulations. High speed makes this method suitable for high throughput investigation of the communication pathways in large sets of biomolecular systems in different functional states.

  5. A microchannel flow model for soft tissue elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K. J.

    2014-08-01

    A number of advances, including imaging of tissue displacements, have increased our ability to make measurements of tissue elastic properties of animal and human tissues. Accordingly, the question is increasingly asked, ‘should our data be fit to a viscoelastic model, and if so which one?’ In this paper we focus solely on soft tissues in a functional (non-pathological) state, and develop a model of elastic behavior that is based on the flow of viscous fluids through the extensive network of tissue microchannels in response to applied stress. This behavior can be captured in a 2-parameter model, and the model appears to predict the stress-relaxation behavior and the dispersive shear wave behavior of bovine liver specimens and other soft tissues and phantoms. The relationship of the microchannel flow model to more traditional models is also examined.

  6. Dynamic Elasticity Model of Resilin Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Duki, Solomon

    2013-03-01

    Resilin proteins are `super elastic rubbers' in the flight and jumping systems of most insects, and can extend and retract millions of times. Natural resilin exhibits high resilience (> 95%) under high-frequency conditions, and could be stretched to over 300% of its original length with a low elastic modulus of 0.1-3 MPa. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. We report on the dynamic structure transitions and functions of full length resilin from fruit fly (D. melanogaster CG15920) and its different functional domains. A dynamic computational model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for resilins, as well as other elastomeric proteins. A strong beta-turn transition was experimentally identified in the full length resilin and its non-elastic domains (Exon III). Changes in periodic long-range order were demonstrated during this transition, induced either by thermal or mechanical inputs, to confirm the universality of proposed mechanism. Further, this model offers new options for designing protein-based biopolymers with tunable material applications.

  7. An elastic contour matching model for tropical cyclone pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Lee, R T; Lin, J K

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an elastic graph dynamic link model (EGDLM) based on elastic contour matching is proposed to automate the Dvorak technique for tropical cyclone (TC) pattern interpretation from satellite images. This method integrates traditional dynamic link architecture (DLA) for neural dynamics and the active contour model (ACM) for contour extraction of TC patterns. Using satellite pictures provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 120 tropical cyclone cases that appeared in the period from 1990 to 1998 were extracted for the study. An overall correct rate for TC classification was found to be above 95%. For hurricanes with distinct "eye" formation, the model reported a deviation within 3 km from the "actual eye" location, which was obtained from the aircraft measurement of minimum surface pressure by reconnaissance. Compared with the classical DLA model, the proposed model has simplified the feature representation, the network initialization, and the training process. This leads to a tremendous improvement of recognition performance by more than 1000 times.

  8. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Kengo E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Noguchi, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Sakai, Takamasa E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-11-14

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G{sub 0}, must be equal to G/G{sub 0} = (p − 2/f)/(1 − 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  9. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kengo; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takamasa; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-01

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G0, must be equal to G/G0 = (p - 2/f)/(1 - 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  10. Rubber Elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kengo; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Sakai, Takamasa

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation for Hookian spring network (EMA) to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1 ,G0, must be equal to G /G0 = (p - 2 / f) / (1 - 2 / f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA, and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  11. Modeling Pseudo-elastic Behavior of Springback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Z. Cedric

    2005-08-01

    One of the principal foundations of mathematical theory of conventional plasticity for rate-independent metals is that there exists a well-defined yield surface in stress space for any material point under deformation. A material point can undergo further plastic deformation if the applied stresses are beyond current yield surface which is generally referred as "plastic loading". On the other hand, if the applied stress state falls within or on the yield surface, the metal will deform elastically only and is said to be undergoing "elastic unloading". Although it has been always recognized throughout the history of development of plasticity theory that there is indeed inelastic deformation accompanying elastic unloading, which leads to metal's hysteresis behavior, its effects were thought to be negligible and were largely ignored in the mathematical treatment. Recently there have been renewed interests in the study of unloading behavior of sheet metals upon large plastic deformation and its implications on springback prediction. Springback is essentially an elastic recovery process of a formed sheet metal blank when it is released from the forming dies. Its magnitude depends on the stress states and compliances of the deformed sheet metal if no further plastic loading occurs during the relaxation process. Therefore the accurate determination of material compliances during springback and its effective incorporation into simulation software are important aspects for springback calculation. Some of the studies suggest that the unloading curve might deviate from linearity, and suggestions were made that a reduced elastic modulus be used for springback simulation. The aim of this study is NOT to take a position on the debate of whether elastic moduli are changed during sheet metal forming process. Instead we propose an approach of modeling observed psuedoelastic behavior within the context of mathematical theory of plasticity, where elastic moduli are treated to be

  12. Elastic model for dinucleosome structure and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Hashem; Khodabandeh, Fatemeh; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid

    2016-04-01

    The equilibrium structure of a dinucleosome is studied using an elastic model that takes into account the force and torque balance conditions. Using the proper boundary conditions, it is found that the conformational energy of the problem does not depend on the length of the linker DNA. In addition it is shown that the two histone octamers are almost perpendicular to each other, and the linker DNA in short lengths is almost straight. These findings could shed some light on the role of DNA elasticity in the chromatin structure.

  13. Hypo-Elastic Model for Lung Parenchyma

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    A simple elastic isotropic constitutive model for the spongy tissue in lung is derived from the theory of hypoelasticity. The model is shown to exhibit a pressure dependent behavior that has been interpreted by some as indicating extensional anisotropy. In contrast, we show that this behavior arises natural from an analysis of isotropic hypoelastic invariants, and is a likely result of non-linearity, not anisotropy. The response of the model is determined analytically for several boundary value problems used for material characterization. These responses give insight into both the material behavior as well as admissible bounds on parameters. The model is characterized against published experimental data for dog lung. Future work includes non-elastic model behavior.

  14. A collagen and elastic network in the wing of the bat.

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, K A; Odland, G F

    1978-01-01

    Bundles of collagen fibrils, elastic fibres and fibroblasts are organized into a network that lies in the plane of a large portion of the bat wing. By ultrastructural (TEM and SEM) and biochemical analyses it was found that individual bundles of the net are similar to elastic ligaments. Although elastic fibres predominate, they are integrated and aligned in parallel with small bundles of collagen. A reticulum of fibroblasts, joined by focal junctions, forms a cellular framework throughout each bundle. Because of the unique features of the fibre bundles of the bat's wing, in particular their accessibility, and the parallel alignment of the collagen fibrils and elastic fibres in each easily isolatable fibre bundle, they should prove a most valuable model for connective tissue studies, particularly for the study of collagen-elastin interactions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:649500

  15. Stepwise Elastic Behavior in a Model Elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawe, Dhananjay M.; Cohen, Claude; Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2004-12-01

    MonteCarlo simulations of an entanglement-free cross-linked polymer network of semiflexible chains reveal a peculiar stepwise elastic response. For increasing stress, step jumps in strain are observed that do not correlate with changes in the number of aligned chains. We show that this unusual behavior stems from the ability of the system to form multiple ordered chain domains that exclude the cross-linking species. This novel elastomer shows a toughening behavior similar to that observed in biological structural materials, such as muscle proteins and abalone shell adhesive.

  16. Modeling orthotropic elasticity, localized plasticity and fracture in trabecular bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, D. T.; Elkhodary, K. I.; Fouad, Y.; Greene, M. S.; Sabet, F. A.; Qian, J.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, W. K.; Jasiuk, I.

    2016-09-01

    This work develops a model for the mechanical response of trabecular bone including plasticity, damage and fracture. It features a resultant lamellar orientation that captures trabecular strut anisotropic elasticity, and introduces asymmetric J2 plasticity with isotropic hardening to capture evolving strut tensile and compressive dissipative properties. A continuum compatibility based damage and fracture criterion is also proposed to model fracture surface generation. We investigated fracture of a trabecular bone network under a compressive load, for which failure modes of both tension and compression were identified at the strut level. The predicted trabecular network response was found to fall within the range of experimental results reported in literature. We also investigated the response of idealized struts under compression, tension and bending using our model. Individual struts were found to exhibit micro-buckling under compression and micro-necking under tension. These instabilities are however masked by the multiplicity and complexity of strut orientations at the trabecular network level.

  17. Shape memory polymer network with thermally distinct elasticity and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Zou, Weike; Luo, Yingwu; Xie, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive materials with sophisticated yet controllable shape-changing behaviors are highly desirable for real-world device applications. Among various shape-changing materials, the elastic nature of shape memory polymers allows fixation of temporary shapes that can recover on demand, whereas polymers with exchangeable bonds can undergo permanent shape change via plasticity. We integrate the elasticity and plasticity into a single polymer network. Rational molecular design allows these two opposite behaviors to be realized at different temperature ranges without any overlap. By exploring the cumulative nature of the plasticity, we demonstrate easy manipulation of highly complex shapes that is otherwise extremely challenging. The dynamic shape-changing behavior paves a new way for fabricating geometrically complex multifunctional devices. PMID:26824077

  18. Shape memory polymer network with thermally distinct elasticity and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Zou, Weike; Luo, Yingwu; Xie, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive materials with sophisticated yet controllable shape-changing behaviors are highly desirable for real-world device applications. Among various shape-changing materials, the elastic nature of shape memory polymers allows fixation of temporary shapes that can recover on demand, whereas polymers with exchangeable bonds can undergo permanent shape change via plasticity. We integrate the elasticity and plasticity into a single polymer network. Rational molecular design allows these two opposite behaviors to be realized at different temperature ranges without any overlap. By exploring the cumulative nature of the plasticity, we demonstrate easy manipulation of highly complex shapes that is otherwise extremely challenging. The dynamic shape-changing behavior paves a new way for fabricating geometrically complex multifunctional devices. PMID:26824077

  19. SAHBNET, an Accessible Surface-Based Elastic Network: An Application to Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dony, Nicolas; Crowet, Jean Marc; Joris, Bernard; Brasseur, Robert; Lins, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics is a method of choice for membrane simulations and the rising of coarse-grained forcefields has opened the way to longer simulations with reduced calculations times. Here, we present an elastic network, SAHBNET (Surface Accessibility Hydrogen-Bonds elastic NETwork), that will maintain the structure of soluble or membrane proteins based on the hydrogen bonds present in the atomistic structure and the proximity between buried residues. This network is applied on the coarse-grained beads defined by the MARTINI model, and was designed to be more physics-based than a simple elastic network. The SAHBNET model is evaluated against atomistic simulations, and compared with ELNEDYN models. The SAHBNET is then used to simulate two membrane proteins inserted in complex lipid bilayers. These bilayers are formed by self-assembly and the use of a modified version of the GROMACS tool genbox (which is accessible through the gcgs.gembloux.ulg.ac.be website). The results show that SAHBNET keeps the structure close to the atomistic one and is successfully used for the simulation of membrane proteins. PMID:23722660

  20. Elastic model for crimped collagen fibrils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the nonlinear elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils in a fascicle have a three-dimensional structure at the micron scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this wave form allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form: all integrals become analytic. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendinece.

  1. Continuum elastic modeling of graphene resonators.

    PubMed

    Atalaya, Juan; Isacsson, Andreas; Kinaret, Jari M

    2008-12-01

    Starting from an atomistic approach, we have derived a hierarchy of successively more simplified continuum elasticity descriptions for modeling the mechanical properties of suspended graphene sheets. We find that already for deflections of the order of 0.5 A a theory that correctly accounts for nonlinearities is necessary and that for many purposes a set of coupled Duffing-type equations may be used to accurately describe the dynamics of graphene membranes. The descriptions are validated by applying them to square graphene-based resonators with clamped edges and studying numerically their mechanical responses. Both static and dynamic responses are treated, and we find good agreement with recent experimental findings. PMID:19367927

  2. Approach to the unfolding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch upon adenine dissociation using a coarse-grained elastic network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhua; Lv, Dashuai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Feng; Wang, Cunxin; Su, Jiguo; Zhang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding mRNA segments that can regulate the gene expression via altering their structures in response to specific metabolite binding. We proposed a coarse-grained Gaussian network model (GNM) to examine the unfolding and folding dynamics of adenosine deaminase (add) A-riboswitch upon the adenine dissociation, in which the RNA is modeled by a nucleotide chain with interaction networks formed by connecting adjoining atomic contacts. It was shown that the adenine binding is critical to the folding of the add A-riboswitch while the removal of the ligand can result in drastic increase of the thermodynamic fluctuations especially in the junction regions between helix domains. Under the assumption that the native contacts with the highest thermodynamic fluctuations break first, the iterative GNM simulations showed that the unfolding process of the adenine-free add A-riboswitch starts with the denature of the terminal helix stem, followed by the loops and junctions involving ligand binding pocket, and then the central helix domains. Despite the simplified coarse-grained modeling, the unfolding dynamics and pathways are shown in close agreement with the results from atomic-level MD simulations and the NMR and single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Overall, the study demonstrates a new avenue to investigate the binding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch molecule which can be readily extended for other RNA molecules.

  3. A Membrane Model from Implicit Elasticity Theory

    PubMed Central

    Freed, A. D.; Liao, J.; Einstein, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    A Fungean solid is derived for membranous materials as a body defined by isotropic response functions whose mathematical structure is that of a Hookean solid where the elastic constants are replaced by functions of state derived from an implicit, thermodynamic, internal-energy function. The theory utilizes Biot’s (1939) definitions for stress and strain that, in 1-dimension, are the stress/strain measures adopted by Fung (1967) when he postulated what is now known as Fung’s law. Our Fungean membrane model is parameterized against a biaxial data set acquired from a porcine pleural membrane subjected to three, sequential, proportional, planar extensions. These data support an isotropic/deviatoric split in the stress and strain-rate hypothesized by our theory. These data also demonstrate that the material response is highly non-linear but, otherwise, mechanically isotropic. These data are described reasonably well by our otherwise simple, four-parameter, material model. PMID:24282079

  4. Simple models of unusual elastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, K. W.

    2004-04-01

    Elastic properties of a class of two-dimensional model systems, consisted of hard cyclic multimers, are discussed. Each multimer is composed of m = 3k (where k is a positive integer) hard discs of diameter σ and centers forming a perfect polygon of m-sides, where the side length is l. Close packed structures of such systems, which are isotropic from the point of view of elastic properties, were solved exactly in the close packing limit at zero temperature. It was shown that the Poisson ratio, vP, of the multimers is negative when their roughness parameter, defined as α ≡ l/(2σ), is large. In the limit m → ∞ one obtains hard disc-like particles, which in contrast to the standard hard discs are rough. It is conjectured that the formula obtained for the Poisson ratio of the 3k-multimers, vP = (1 - 2α2)/(3 - 2α2), is valid also for m ≠ 3k in the limit m → ∞.

  5. Nonlinear Elasticity: From Single Chain to Networks and Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, Andrey; Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Mackintosh, Fred

    2014-03-01

    Biological and polymeric networks show highly nonlinear stress-strain behavior leading to material hardening with increasing deformation. Using a combination of theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulations we develop a model of network deformation that describes nonlinear mechanical properties of a broad variety of biological and polymeric networks and gels by relating their macroscopic strain-hardening behavior with molecular parameters of the network strands. The starting point of our approach is a nonlinear force/elongation relation for discrete chain model with varying bending rigidity. This theory provides a universal relationship between the strain-dependent network modulus and the network deformation as a function of the first invariant and chain elongation ratio that depends on a ratio of the unperturbed chain size to chain dimension in a fully extended conformation. The model predictions for the nonlinear shear modulus and differential shear modulus for uniaxial and shear deformations are in a very good agreement with both the results of molecular dynamics simulations of networks and with experimental data for biopolymer networks of actin, collagen, fibrin, vimentin, neurofilaments, and pectin. NSF-DMR-1004576

  6. A neural network for controlling the configuration of frame structure with elastic members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsutsumi, Kazuyoshi

    1989-01-01

    A neural network for controlling the configuration of frame structure with elastic members is proposed. In the present network, the structure is modeled not by using the relative angles of the members but by using the distances between the joint locations alone. The relationship between the environment and the joints is also defined by their mutual distances. The analog neural network attains the reaching motion of the manipulator as a minimization problem of the energy constructed by the distances between the joints, the target, and the obstacles. The network can generate not only the final but also the transient configurations and the trajectory. This framework with flexibility and parallelism is very suitable for controlling the Space Telerobotic systems with many degrees of freedom.

  7. Benefit of adaptive FEC in shared backup path protected elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Dai, Hua; Wang, Chao; Li, Yongcheng; Bose, Sanjay K; Shen, Gangxiang

    2015-07-27

    We apply an adaptive forward error correction (FEC) allocation strategy to an Elastic Optical Network (EON) operated with shared backup path protection (SBPP). To maximize the protected network capacity that can be carried, an Integer Linear Programing (ILP) model and a spectrum window plane (SWP)-based heuristic algorithm are developed. Simulation results show that the FEC coding overhead required by the adaptive FEC scheme is significantly lower than that needed by a fixed FEC allocation strategy resulting in higher network capacity for the adaptive strategy. The adaptive FEC allocation strategy can also significantly outperform the fixed FEC allocation strategy both in terms of the spare capacity redundancy and the average FEC coding overhead needed per optical channel. The proposed heuristic algorithm is efficient and not only performs closer to the ILP model but also does much better than the shortest-path algorithm. PMID:26367673

  8. Benefit of adaptive FEC in shared backup path protected elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Dai, Hua; Wang, Chao; Li, Yongcheng; Bose, Sanjay K; Shen, Gangxiang

    2015-07-27

    We apply an adaptive forward error correction (FEC) allocation strategy to an Elastic Optical Network (EON) operated with shared backup path protection (SBPP). To maximize the protected network capacity that can be carried, an Integer Linear Programing (ILP) model and a spectrum window plane (SWP)-based heuristic algorithm are developed. Simulation results show that the FEC coding overhead required by the adaptive FEC scheme is significantly lower than that needed by a fixed FEC allocation strategy resulting in higher network capacity for the adaptive strategy. The adaptive FEC allocation strategy can also significantly outperform the fixed FEC allocation strategy both in terms of the spare capacity redundancy and the average FEC coding overhead needed per optical channel. The proposed heuristic algorithm is efficient and not only performs closer to the ILP model but also does much better than the shortest-path algorithm.

  9. A model for compression-weakening materials and the elastic fields due to contractile cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosakis, Phoebus; Notbohm, Jacob; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-12-01

    We construct a homogeneous, nonlinear elastic constitutive law that models aspects of the mechanical behavior of inhomogeneous fibrin networks. Fibers in such networks buckle when in compression. We model this as a loss of stiffness in compression in the stress-strain relations of the homogeneous constitutive model. Problems that model a contracting biological cell in a finite matrix are solved. It is found that matrix displacements and stresses induced by cell contraction decay slower (with distance from the cell) in a compression weakening material than linear elasticity would predict. This points toward a mechanism for long-range cell mechanosensing. In contrast, an expanding cell would induce displacements that decay faster than in a linear elastic matrix.

  10. Flexible multi-dimensional modulation method for elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zilong; Liu, Wentao; Shi, Sheping; Shen, Bailin; Chen, Xue; Gao, Xiqing; Zhang, Qi; Shang, Dongdong; Ji, Yongning; Liu, Yingfeng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a flexible multi-dimensional modulation method for elastic optical networks. We compare the flexible multi-dimensional modulation formats PM-kSC-mQAM with traditional modulation formats PM-mQAM using numerical simulations in back-to-back and wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) transmission (50 GHz-spaced) scenarios at the same symbol rate of 32 Gbaud. The simulation results show that PM-kSC-QPSK and PM-kSC-16QAM can achieve obvious back-to-back sensitivity gain with respect to PM-QPSK and PM-16QAM at the expense of spectral efficiency reduction. And the WDM transmission simulation results show that PM-2SC-QPSK can achieve 57.5% increase in transmission reach compared to PM-QPSK, and 48.5% increase for PM-2SC-16QAM over PM-16QAM. Furthermore, we also experimentally investigate the back to back performance of PM-2SC-QPSK, PM-4SC-QPSK, PM-2SC-16QAM and PM-3SC-16QAM, and the experimental results agree well with the numerical simulations.

  11. Deformation of an Elastic beam due to Viscous Flow in an Embedded Channel Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matia, Yoav; Gat, Amir

    2015-11-01

    Elastic deformation due to embedded fluidic networks is currently studied in the context of soft-actuators and soft-robotic applications. In this work, we analyze the time dependent interaction between elastic deformation of a slender beam and viscous flow within a long serpentine channel, embedded in the elastic structure. The channel is positioned asymmetrically with regard to the midplane of the elastic beam, and thus pressure within the channel creates a local moment deforming the beam. We focus on creeping flows and small deformations of the elastic beam and obtain, in leading order, a convection-diffusion equation governing the pressure-field within the serpentine channel. The beam time-dependent deformation is then obtained as a function of the pressure-field and the geometry of the embedded network. This relation enables the design of complex time-dependent deformation patterns of beams with embedded channel networks. Our theoretical results were illustrated and verified by numerical computations.

  12. Multipath protection for data center services in OpenFlow-based software defined elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Cheng, Lei; Yuan, Jian; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yongli; Lee, Young

    2015-06-01

    With the rapid growth of data center services, the elastic optical network is a very promising networking architecture to interconnect data centers because it can elastically allocate spectrum tailored for various bandwidth requirements. In case of a link failure, to ensure a high-level quality of service (QoS) for user request after the failure becomes a research focus. In light of it, in this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate multipath protection for data center services in OpenFlow-based software defined elastic optical network testbed aiming at improving network reliability. We first propose an OpenFlow-based software defined elastic optical network architecture for data center service protection. Then, based on the proposed architecture, multipath protection scheme is figured based on the importance level of the service. To implement the proposed scheme in the architecture, OpenFlow protocol is extended to support multipath protection in elastic optical network. The performance of our proposed multipath protection scheme is evaluated by means of experiment on our OpenFlow-based testbed. The feasibility of our proposed scheme is also demonstrated in software defined elastic optical networks.

  13. Multiscale design of coarse-grained elastic network-based potentials for the μ opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Fossépré, Mathieu; Leherte, Laurence; Laaksonen, Aatto; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2016-09-01

    Despite progress in computer modeling, most biological processes are still out of reach when using all-atom (AA) models. Coarse-grained (CG) models allow classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to be accelerated. Although simplification of spatial resolution at different levels is often investigated, simplification of the CG potential in itself has been less common. CG potentials are often similar to AA potentials. In this work, we consider the design and reliability of purely mechanical CG models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In this sense, CG force fields (FF) consist of a set of holonomic constraints guided by an elastic network model (ENM). Even though ENMs are used widely to perform normal mode analysis (NMA), they are not often implemented as a single FF in the context of MD simulations. In this work, various ENM-like potentials were investigated by varying their force constant schemes and connectivity patterns. A method was established to systematically parameterize ENM-like potentials at different spatial resolutions by using AA data. To do so, new descriptors were introduced. The choice of conformation descriptors that also include flexibility information is important for a reliable parameterization of ENMs with different degrees of sensitivity. Hence, ENM-like potentials, with specific parameters, can be sufficient to accurately reproduce AA MD simulations of μOR at highly coarse-grained resolutions. Therefore, the essence of the flexibility properties of μOR can be captured with simple models at different CG spatial resolutions, opening the way to mechanical approaches to understanding GPCR functions. Graphical Abstract All atom structure, residue interaction network and coarse-grained elastic network models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR). PMID:27566318

  14. Multiscale design of coarse-grained elastic network-based potentials for the μ opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Fossépré, Mathieu; Leherte, Laurence; Laaksonen, Aatto; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2016-09-01

    Despite progress in computer modeling, most biological processes are still out of reach when using all-atom (AA) models. Coarse-grained (CG) models allow classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to be accelerated. Although simplification of spatial resolution at different levels is often investigated, simplification of the CG potential in itself has been less common. CG potentials are often similar to AA potentials. In this work, we consider the design and reliability of purely mechanical CG models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In this sense, CG force fields (FF) consist of a set of holonomic constraints guided by an elastic network model (ENM). Even though ENMs are used widely to perform normal mode analysis (NMA), they are not often implemented as a single FF in the context of MD simulations. In this work, various ENM-like potentials were investigated by varying their force constant schemes and connectivity patterns. A method was established to systematically parameterize ENM-like potentials at different spatial resolutions by using AA data. To do so, new descriptors were introduced. The choice of conformation descriptors that also include flexibility information is important for a reliable parameterization of ENMs with different degrees of sensitivity. Hence, ENM-like potentials, with specific parameters, can be sufficient to accurately reproduce AA MD simulations of μOR at highly coarse-grained resolutions. Therefore, the essence of the flexibility properties of μOR can be captured with simple models at different CG spatial resolutions, opening the way to mechanical approaches to understanding GPCR functions. Graphical Abstract All atom structure, residue interaction network and coarse-grained elastic network models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR).

  15. Mechanics of disordered solids. II. Percolation on elastic networks with bond-bending forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahimi, Muhammad; Arbabi, Sepehr

    1993-01-01

    Bond and site percolation on two- and three-dimensional (3D) elastic and superelastic percolation networks with central and bond-bending (BB) forces are studied. We calculate the force distribution and show that, depending on the relative contributions of the central and BB forces, its shape can be unimodal or bimodal, both near and away from the percolation threshold pc. The Poisson ratios of various 2D and 3D, isotropic and anisotropic BB models are calculated and are shown to take on negative values near pc. Several experimental realizations of this peculiar property are given. We then analyze various experimental data on elastic and rheological properties of gel polymers near pc. The scaling laws for elastic properties of gel polmers near pc and their associated critical exponents f are divided into two groups. In one group are physical gels in which the contribution of BB forces to the elastic energy dominates that of central forces (CF's), and their scaling properties are described by the BB model, with f~=3.75. In the second group are chemical gels in most of which CF's are dominant, with f~=2.1. The scaling laws for the viscosity of a gelling solution near the gel point can also be divided into two groups. In one group are gelling solutions that are close to the Zimm regime. We propose that the scaling properties of the viscosity of such gels is analogous to the shear modulus of a static superelastic percolation network that diverges, as pc is approached from below, with an exponent τ=ν-βp/2~=0.68 in 3D, where ν and βp are the critical exponents of the correlation length and the strength of percolation networks, respectively. In the second group are gelling solutions that are close to the Rouse limit. We propose that the scaling law for the divergence of the viscosity of such gels is the same as that of the shear modulus of a dynamic superelastic percolation network, with τ'=2τ~=1.35 in 3D.

  16. Studies in cutaneous aging: I. The elastic fiber network

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, I.M.; Fonferko, E.

    1982-05-01

    We studied by light and electron microscopy the elastic fibers in he sun exposed and sun protected skin of normal and psoriatic individuals of different ages in order to separate the changes of actinic damage from those of chronological aging. The sun exposed skin showed 2 types of elastic fiber abnormalities-one related to actinic damage and the other to chronological aging. The sun protected buttock skin showed only the latter. From ages 30 to 70, a minority of the elastic fibers exhibited abnormalities that appeared to represent a process of fiber disintegration. After age 70, the majority of elastic fibers showed these abnormalities. These abnormalities were present without accompanying inflammatory cells. Also, there was morphological evidence of continuing synthesis of elastic fibers during the lifetime of these subjects, except that from ages 50-93, the fibers appeared to be loosely, rather than compactly, assembled. Incubation of dermal slices from buttock skin of young adults with porcine pancreatic elastase and bovine chymotrypsin produced elastic fiber degradation that closely simulated the changes that were observed in aged sun protected skin. Researcher propose that one of the features of cutaneous aging is a slow, spontaneous, progressive degradative process inherent in the elastic fiber that can be enzymatically accelerated from decades to hours by elastase and chymotrypsin.

  17. Models for elastic shells with incompatible strains

    PubMed Central

    Lewicka, Marta; Mahadevan, L.; Pakzad, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional shapes of thin lamina, such as leaves, flowers, feathers, wings, etc., are driven by the differential strain induced by the relative growth. The growth takes place through variations in the Riemannian metric given on the thin sheet as a function of location in the central plane and also across its thickness. The shape is then a consequence of elastic energy minimization on the frustrated geometrical object. Here, we provide a rigorous derivation of the asymptotic theories for shapes of residually strained thin lamina with non-trivial curvatures, i.e. growing elastic shells in both the weakly and strongly curved regimes, generalizing earlier results for the growth of nominally flat plates. The different theories are distinguished by the scaling of the mid-surface curvature relative to the inverse thickness and growth strain, and also allow us to generalize the classical Föppl–von Kármán energy to theories of prestrained shallow shells. PMID:24808750

  18. Free energy of contact formation in proteins: Efficient computation in the elastic network approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Kay

    2011-07-01

    Biomolecular simulations have become a major tool in understanding biomolecules and their complexes. However, one can typically only investigate a few mutants or scenarios due to the severe computational demands of such simulations, leading to a great interest in method development to overcome this restriction. One way to achieve this is to reduce the complexity of the systems by an approximation of the forces acting upon the constituents of the molecule. The harmonic approximation used in elastic network models simplifies the physical complexity to the most reduced dynamics of these molecular systems. The reduced polymer modeled this way is typically comprised of mass points representing coarse-grained versions of, e.g., amino acids. In this work, we show how the computation of free energy contributions of contacts between two residues within the molecule can be reduced to a simple lookup operation in a precomputable matrix. Being able to compute such contributions is of great importance: protein design or molecular evolution changes introduce perturbations to these pair interactions, so we need to understand their impact. Perturbation to the interactions occurs due to randomized and fixated changes (in molecular evolution) or designed modifications of the protein structures (in bioengineering). These perturbations are modifications in the topology and the strength of the interactions modeled by the elastic network models. We apply the new algorithm to (1) the bovine trypsin inhibitor, a well-known enzyme in biomedicine, and show the connection to folding properties and the hydrophobic collapse hypothesis and (2) the serine proteinase inhibitor CI-2 and show the correlation to Φ values to characterize folding importance. Furthermore, we discuss the computational complexity and show empirical results for the average case, sampled over a library of 77 structurally diverse proteins. We found a relative speedup of up to 10 000-fold for large proteins with respect to

  19. Determination of elastic properties of a film-substrate system by using the neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Baiqiang; Shen Zhonghua; Ni Xiaowu; Wang Jijun; Guan Jianfei; Lu Jian

    2004-12-20

    An inverse method based on artificial neural network (ANN) is presented to determine the elastic properties of films from laser-genrated surface waves. The surface displacement responses are used as the inputs for the ANN model; the outputs of the ANN are the Young's modulus, density, Poisson's ratio, and thickness of the film. The finite element method is used to calculate the surface displacement responses in a film-substrate system. Levenberg Marquardt algorithm is used as numerical optimization to speed up the training process for the ANN model. In this method, the materials parameters are not recovered from the dispersion curves but rather directly from the transient surface displacement. We have also found that this procedure is very efficient for determining the materials parameters of layered systems.

  20. Mathematical modeling of spinning elastic bodies for modal analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.; Barbera, F. J.; Baddeley, V.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of modal analysis of an elastic appendage on a rotating base is examined to establish the relative advantages of various mathematical models of elastic structures and to extract general inferences concerning the magnitude and character of the influence of spin on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of rotating structures. In realization of the first objective, it is concluded that except for a small class of very special cases the elastic continuum model is devoid of useful results, while for constant nominal spin rate the distributed-mass finite-element model is quite generally tractable, since in the latter case the governing equations are always linear, constant-coefficient, ordinary differential equations. Although with both of these alternatives the details of the formulation generally obscure the essence of the problem and permit very little engineering insight to be gained without extensive computation, this difficulty is not encountered when dealing with simple concentrated mass models.

  1. Exploring elasticity and energy dissipation in mussel-inspired hydrogel transient networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindy, Scott; Learsch, Robert; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    Dynamic, reversible crosslinks have been shown to specifically control the mechanical properties of a wide variety of mechanically tough and resilient biomaterials. We have shown that reversible histidine-metal ion interactions, known to contribute to the strong mechanical properties and self-healing nature of mussel byssal threads, can be used to control and engineer the temporally-hierarchical mechanical properties of model hydrogels orthogonally from the spatial structure of the material. Here, we explore the scaling relationships in our model networks to further inform our abilities to control the relative elasticity and energy dissipation on hierarchical timescales. Scaling arguments suggest that the elasticity is dominated by long-range entanglements, while the dissipation is controlled by the exchange kinetics of the transient crosslinks. Further, we show that by using UV light, we can further control the viscoelastic properties of our mussel-inspired hydrogels in situ. This process opens the door for creating biocompatible hydrogel materials with arbitrary spatial control over their viscoelastic mechanical properties. Overall, we show that by understanding the interplay between bio-inspired dynamic crosslinks and soft matter physics allows us to rationally design high-strength hydrogels for specific states of dynamic loading.

  2. The Modified Semidirect Onlay Technique With Articulated Elastic Model.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Efstratios; Diamantopoulou, Sofia

    2015-12-01

    The modified semidirect onlay technique with articulated elastic model involves the fabrication of a stone model that is quickly mounted on an articulator and it includes an elastic part that enables the fabrication of a restoration with proper occlusal anatomy. The technique overcomes the disadvantages of the direct technique such as polymerization shrinkage stress and difficulty in achieving proper contours and, compared to the indirect technique, treatment is completed in a single appointment, without laboratory cost. The novelty of the technique is that, since the restoration is fabricated on an articulated model it eliminates time for occlusal adjustments. PMID:26767243

  3. The Modified Semidirect Onlay Technique With Articulated Elastic Model.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Efstratios; Diamantopoulou, Sofia

    2015-12-01

    The modified semidirect onlay technique with articulated elastic model involves the fabrication of a stone model that is quickly mounted on an articulator and it includes an elastic part that enables the fabrication of a restoration with proper occlusal anatomy. The technique overcomes the disadvantages of the direct technique such as polymerization shrinkage stress and difficulty in achieving proper contours and, compared to the indirect technique, treatment is completed in a single appointment, without laboratory cost. The novelty of the technique is that, since the restoration is fabricated on an articulated model it eliminates time for occlusal adjustments.

  4. Pore network microarchitecture influences human cortical bone elasticity during growth and aging.

    PubMed

    Bala, Yohann; Lefèvre, Emmanuelle; Roux, Jean-Paul; Baron, Cécile; Lasaygues, Philippe; Pithioux, Martine; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Follet, Hélène

    2016-10-01

    Cortical porosity is a major determinant of bone strength. Haversian and Volkmann׳s canals are׳seen' as pores in 2D cross-section but fashion a dynamic network of interconnected channels in 3D, a quantifiable footprint of intracortical remodeling. Given the changes in bone remodeling across life, we hypothesized that the 3D microarchitecture of the cortical pore network influences its stiffness during growth and ageing. Cubes of cortical bone of 2 mm side-length were harvested in the distal 1/3 of the fibula in 13 growing children (mean age±SD: 13±4 yrs) and 16 adults (age: 75±13 yrs). The cubes were imaged using desktop micro-CT (8.14µm isotropic voxel size). Pores were segmented as a solid to assess pore volume fraction, number, diameter, separation, connectivity and structure model index. Elastic coefficients were derived from measurements of ultrasonic bulk compression and shear wave velocities and apparent mass density. The pore volume fraction did not significantly differ between children and adults but originates from different microarchitectural patterns. Compared to children, adults had 42% (p=0.033) higher pore number that were more connected (Connective Density: +205%, p=0.001) with a 18% (p=0.007) lower pore separation. After accounting for the contribution of pore volume fraction, axial elasticity in traction-compression mode was significantly correlated with better connectivity in growing children and with pore separation among adults. The changes in intracortical remodeling across life alter the distribution, size and connectedness of the channels from which cortical void fraction originates. These alterations in pore network microarchitecture participate in changes in compressive and shear mechanical behavior, partly in a porosity-independent manner. The assessment of pore volume fraction (i.e., porosity) provides only a limited understanding of the role of cortical void volume fraction in its mechanical properties. PMID:27389322

  5. A mesoscopic network model for permanent set in crosslinked elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Weisgraber, T H; Gee, R H; Maiti, A; Clague, D S; Chinn, S; Maxwell, R S

    2009-01-29

    A mesoscopic computational model for polymer networks and composites is developed as a coarse-grained representation of the composite microstructure. Unlike more complex molecular dynamics simulations, the model only considers the effects of crosslinks on mechanical behavior. The elastic modulus, which depends only on the crosslink density and parameters in the bond potential, is consistent with rubber elasticity theory, and the network response satisfies the independent network hypothesis of Tobolsky. The model, when applied to a commercial filled silicone elastomer, quantitatively reproduces the experimental permanent set and stress-strain response due to changes in the crosslinked network from irradiation.

  6. Elastic-plastic models for multi-site damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Actis, Ricardo L.; Szabo, Barna A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments in advanced analysis methods for the computation of stress site damage. The method of solution is based on the p-version of the finite element method. Its implementation was designed to permit extraction of linear stress intensity factors using a superconvergent extraction method (known as the contour integral method) and evaluation of the J-integral following an elastic-plastic analysis. Coarse meshes are adequate for obtaining accurate results supported by p-convergence data. The elastic-plastic analysis is based on the deformation theory of plasticity and the von Mises yield criterion. The model problem consists of an aluminum plate with six equally spaced holes and a crack emanating from each hole. The cracks are of different sizes. The panel is subjected to a remote tensile load. Experimental results are available for the panel. The plasticity analysis provided the same limit load as the experimentally determined load. The results of elastic-plastic analysis were compared with the results of linear elastic analysis in an effort to evaluate how plastic zone sizes influence the crack growth rates. The onset of net-section yielding was determined also. The results show that crack growth rate is accelerated by the presence of adjacent damage, and the critical crack size is shorter when the effects of plasticity are taken into consideration. This work also addresses the effects of alternative stress-strain laws: The elastic-ideally-plastic material model is compared against the Ramberg-Osgood model.

  7. Modeling worldwide highway networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villas Boas, Paulino R.; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; da F. Costa, Luciano

    2009-12-01

    This Letter addresses the problem of modeling the highway systems of different countries by using complex networks formalism. More specifically, we compare two traditional geographical models with a modified geometrical network model where paths, rather than edges, are incorporated at each step between the origin and the destination vertices. Optimal configurations of parameters are obtained for each model and used for the comparison. The highway networks of Australia, Brazil, India, and Romania are considered and shown to be properly modeled by the modified geographical model.

  8. Modeling the citation network by network cosmology.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zheng; Ouyang, Zhenzheng; Zhang, Pengyuan; Yi, Dongyun; Kong, Dexing

    2015-01-01

    Citation between papers can be treated as a causal relationship. In addition, some citation networks have a number of similarities to the causal networks in network cosmology, e.g., the similar in-and out-degree distributions. Hence, it is possible to model the citation network using network cosmology. The casual network models built on homogenous spacetimes have some restrictions when describing some phenomena in citation networks, e.g., the hot papers receive more citations than other simultaneously published papers. We propose an inhomogenous causal network model to model the citation network, the connection mechanism of which well expresses some features of citation. The node growth trend and degree distributions of the generated networks also fit those of some citation networks well.

  9. Modeling and Feed-Forward Control of Structural Elastic Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M.; Otter, M.; Ulbrich, H.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper an approach for modeling and control of robots with elasticities in power trains and in structural parts is presented and experimentally verified. For this purpose object-oriented, nonlinear models are developed in the modeling language Modelica. A system theoretical study of the generated models shows that a direct inversion of the models, due to the unstable zero dynamics, is not possible. Therefore an algorithm for the approximate inversion is developed. With this inversion method an approximate inverse model considering structural elasticity for a 6-axis robot is created and verified for the control of the robot. The new control leads to a considerable improvement of the driving characteristics of the robot in the experiment.

  10. Elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model for fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, T. S.; Sun, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    A constitutive model to describe the elastic/viscoplastic behavior of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites under plane stress conditions is presented. Formulations are given for quasi-static plasticity and time-dependent viscoplasticity. Experimental procedures required to generate the necessary material constants are explained, and the experimental data is compared to the predicted behavior.

  11. Modeling of Nonlinear Elastic Tissues for Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Sarthak; Ramesh, K. T.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2010-01-01

    Realistic modeling of the interaction between surgical instruments and human organs has been recognized as a key requirement in the development of high-fidelity surgical simulators. Primarily due to computational considerations, most of the past real-time surgical simulation research has assumed linear elastic behavior for modeling tissues, even though human soft tissues generally possess nonlinear properties. For a nonlinear model, the well-known Poynting effect developed during shearing of the tissue results in normal forces not seen in a linear elastic model. Using constitutive equations of nonlinear tissue models together with experiments, we show that the Poynting effect results in differences in force magnitude larger than the absolute human perception threshold for force discrimination in some tissues (e.g. myocardial tissues) but not in others (e.g. brain tissue simulants). PMID:20503126

  12. The role of mode of delivery on elastic fiber architecture and vaginal vault elasticity: a rodent model study

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Keith; Billah, Mubashir; Raparia, Eva; Shah, Anup; Silverstein, Moshe; Ahmad, Amanda; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    We report on an experimental study of the role of mode of delivery and pregnancy on the architecture of vaginal elastic fibers and vaginal vault elasticity in female Sprague-Dawley rats. In primiparous rats submitted to spontaneous or Cesarean delivery and virgin rats submitted to simulated delivery, the tortuosity of elastic fibers (defined as the ratio of length to end-to-end distance) was observed to decrease when measured two days to two weeks postpartum. In addition, the measured tortuosity of elastic fibers in multiparous rats was greater than that of virgin rats. The tortuosity of elastic fibers of all rats measured at two days postpartum were found to be similar to that of multiparous rats. At two weeks postpartum the measured tortuosity of vaginal elastic fibers was indistinguishable from virgin rats, regardless of the delivery method. Borrowing from the field of polymer physics, a model is suggested that connects elastic fiber tortuosity to the resulting tension under an applied stress; fibers having high tortuosity are expected to provide less structural support than more linear, low tortuosity fibers. To probe the macroscopic effects in elasticity due to architectural changes observed in elastic fibers, we have measured the stiffness of the vaginal vault in each cohort using a pressure-infusion system. The vaginal vault stiffness of all primiparous rats measured two weeks postpartum was greater than that measured two days postpartum. In addition, the vaginal vault of virgin rats was stiffer than that of multiparous rats. These observations confirmed that vaginal vault elastic fibers undergo significant remodeling due to pregnancy and parturition, and that the complex remodeling may be a significant contributor to tissue elasticity. Remarkably, regardless of the mode of delivery or simulated tissue trauma, elastic fiber tortuosity is observed to decrease from two days to two weeks postpartum indicating the onset of repair and recovery of tissue stiffness

  13. Articulated registration: elastic registration based on a wire-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Fernandez, Miguel A.; Munyoz-Moreno, Emma; Martin-Fernandez, Marcos; Alberola-Lopez, Carlos

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we propose a new method of elastic registration of anatomical structures that bears an inner skeleton, such as the knee, hand or spine. Such a method has to deal with great degrees of variability, specially for the case of inter-subject registration; but even for the intra-subject case the degree of variability of images will be large since the structures we bear in mind are articulated. Rigid registration methods are clearly inappropriate for this problem, and well-known elastic methods do not usually incorporate the restriction of maintaining long skeletal structures straight. A new method is therefore needed to deal with such a situation; we call this new method "articulated registration". The inner bone skeleton is modeled with a wire model, where wires are drawn by connecting landmarks located in the main joints of the skeletal structure to be registered (long bones). The main feature of our registration method is that within the bone axis (specifically, where the wires are) an exact registration is guaranteed, while for the remaining image points an elastic registration is carried out based on a distance transform (with respect to the model wires); this causes the registration on long bones to be affine to all practical purposes, while the registration of soft tissue -- far from the bones -- is elastic. As a proof-of-concept of this method we describe the registration of hands on radiographs.

  14. Modelling Elastic Media With Arbitrary Shapes Using the Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, J. W.; Cardoso, F. A.; Rosa, J. W.; Aki, K.

    2004-12-01

    We extend the new method proposed by Rosa et al. (2001) for the study of elastic bodies with complete arbitrary shapes. The method was originally developed for modelling 2-D elastic media with the application of the wavelet transform, and was extended to cases where discontinuities simulated geologic faults between two different elastic media. In addition to extending the method for the study of bodies with complete arbitrary shapes, we also test new transforms with the objective of making the related matrices more compact, which are also applied to the most general case of the method. The basic method consists of the discretization of the polynomial expansion for the boundary conditions of the 2-D problem involving the stress and strain relations for the media. This parameterization leads to a system of linear equations that should be solved for the determination of the expansion coefficients, which are the model parameters, and their determination leads to the solution of the problem. Despite the fact that the media we studied originally were 2-D bodies, the result of the application of this new method can be viewed as an approximate solution to some specific 3-D problems. Among the motivations for developing this method are possible geological applications (that is, the study of tectonic plates and geologic faults) and simulations of the elastic behaviour of materials in several other fields of science. The wavelet transform is applied with two main objectives, namely to decrease the error related to the truncation of the polynomial expansion and to make the system of linear equations more compact for computation. Having validated this method for the original 2-D elastic media, we plan that this extension to elastic bodies with complete arbitrary shapes will enable it to be even more attractive for modelling real media. Reference Rosa, J. W. C., F. A. C. M. Cardoso, K. Aki, H. S. Malvar, F. A. V. Artola, and J. W. C. Rosa, Modelling elastic media with the

  15. Deconstruction and elastic {pi}{pi} scattering in Higgsless models

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2007-02-01

    We study elastic pion-pion scattering in global linear moose models and apply the results to a variety of Higgsless models in flat and anti-de Sitter (AdS) space using the equivalence theorem. In order to connect the global moose to Higgsless models, we first introduce a block-spin transformation which corresponds, in the continuum, to the freedom to perform coordinate transformations in the Higgsless model. We show that it is possible to make an 'f-flat' deconstruction in which all of the f-constants f{sub j} of the linear moose model are identical; the phenomenologically relevant f-flat models are those in which the coupling constants of the groups at either end of the moose are small--corresponding to the global linear moose. In studying pion-pion scattering, we derive various sum rules, including one analogous to the Kawarabayashi-Suzuki-Riazuddin-Fayyazuddin (KSRF) relation, and use them in evaluating the low-energy and high-energy forms of the leading elastic partial-wave scattering amplitudes. We obtain elastic unitarity bounds as a function of the mass of the lightest KK mode and discuss their physical significance.

  16. Deconstruction and elastic ππ scattering in Higgsless models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2007-02-01

    We study elastic pion-pion scattering in global linear moose models and apply the results to a variety of Higgsless models in flat and anti-de Sitter (AdS) space using the equivalence theorem. In order to connect the global moose to Higgsless models, we first introduce a block-spin transformation which corresponds, in the continuum, to the freedom to perform coordinate transformations in the Higgsless model. We show that it is possible to make an “f-flat” deconstruction in which all of the f-constants fj of the linear moose model are identical; the phenomenologically relevant f-flat models are those in which the coupling constants of the groups at either end of the moose are small—corresponding to the global linear moose. In studying pion-pion scattering, we derive various sum rules, including one analogous to the Kawarabayashi-Suzuki-Riazuddin-Fayyazuddin (KSRF) relation, and use them in evaluating the low-energy and high-energy forms of the leading elastic partial-wave scattering amplitudes. We obtain elastic unitarity bounds as a function of the mass of the lightest KK mode and discuss their physical significance.

  17. NEXT-GENERATION NUMERICAL MODELING: INCORPORATING ELASTICITY, ANISOTROPY AND ATTENUATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. LARSEN; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    A new effort has been initiated between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) to investigate what features the next generation of numerical seismic models should contain that will best address current technical problems encountered during exploration in increasingly complex geologies. This collaborative work is focused on designing and building these new models, generating synthetic seismic data through simulated surveys of various geometries, and using these data to test and validate new and improved seismic imaging algorithms. The new models will be both 2- and 3-dimensional and will include complex velocity structures as well as anisotropy and attenuation. Considerable attention is being focused on multi-component acoustic and elastic effects because it is now widely recognized that converted phases could play a vital role in improving the quality of seismic images. An existing, validated 3-D elastic modeling code is being used to generate the synthetic data. Preliminary elastic modeling results using this code are presented here along with a description of the proposed new models that will be built and tested.

  18. Mechanistic Constitutive Models for Rubber Elasticity and Viscoelasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M

    2003-01-21

    Physically based models which describe the finite strain behavior of vulcanized rubber are developed. Constitutive laws for elasticity and viscoelasticity are derived by integrating over orientation space the forces due to each individual polymer chain. A novel scheme is presented which effectively approximates these integrals in terms of strain and strain invariants. In addition, the details involving the implementation of such models into a quasi-static large strain finite element formulation are provided. In order to account for the finite extensibility of a molecular chain, Langevin statistics is used to model the chain response. The classical statistical model of rubber assumes that polymer chains interact only at the chemical crosslinks. It is shown that such model when fitted for uniaxial tension data cannot fit compression or equibiaxial data. A model which incorporates the entanglement interactions of surrounding chains, in addition to the finite extensibility of the chains, is shown to give better predictions than the classical model. The technique used for approximating the orientation space integral was applied to both the classical and entanglement models. A viscoelasticity model based on the force equilibration process as described by Doi and Edwards is developed. An assumed form for the transient force in the chain is postulated. The resulting stress tensor is composed of an elastic and a viscoelastic portion with the elastic stress given by the proposed entanglement model. In order to improve the simulation of experimental data, it was found necessary to include the effect of unattached or dangling polymer chains in the viscoelasticity model. The viscoelastic effect of such chains is the manifestation of a disengagement process. This disengagement model for unattached polymer chains motivated an empirical model which was very successful in simulating the experimental results considered.

  19. The influence of elastic modulus and thickness on the release of the soft-fouling green alga Ulva linza (syn. Enteromorpha linza) from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) model networks.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Manoj K; Finlay, John A; Chung, Jun Young; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A

    2005-01-01

    The effect of modulus and film thickness on the release of adhered spores and sporelings (young plants) of the green fouling alga Ulva (syn. Enteromorpha) was investigated. PDMS elastomers of constant thickness (100 microm) but different elastic moduli were prepared by varying cross-link density with functional silicone oligomers with degrees of polymerization ranging from 18-830. This provided a 50-fold range of modulus values between 0.2 and 9.4 MPa. Three PDMS coatings of different thicknesses were tested at constant elastic modulus (0.8 MPa). The data revealed no significant increase in percentage spore removal except at the lowest modulus of 0.2 MPa although sporelings released more readily at all but the highest modulus. The influence of coating thickness was also greater for the release of sporelings compared to spores. The release data are discussed in the light of fracture mechanics models that have been applied to hard fouling. New concepts appertaining to the release of soft fouling organisms are proposed, which take into account the deformation in the adhesive base of the adherand and deformation of the PDMS film.

  20. Stress transmission through a model system of cohesionless elastic grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Miguel; Rajchenbach, Jean

    2000-08-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of granular materials is important for applications in civil and chemical engineering, geophysical sciences and the food industry, as well as for the control or prevention of avalanches and landslides. Unlike continuous media, granular materials lack cohesion, and cannot resist tensile stresses. Current descriptions of the mechanical properties of collections of cohesionless grains have relied either on elasto-plastic models classically used in civil engineering, or on a recent model involving hyperbolic equations. The former models suggest that collections of elastic grains submitted to a compressive load will behave elastically. Here we present the results of an experiment on a two-dimensional model system-made of discrete square cells submitted to a point load-in which the region in which the stress is confined is photoelastically visualized as a parabola. These results, which can be interpreted within a statistical framework, demonstrate that the collective response of the pile contradicts the standard elastic predictions and supports a diffusive description of stress transmission. We expect that these findings will be applicable to problems in soil mechanics, such as the behaviour of cohesionless soils or sand piles.

  1. Self-consistent Modeling of Elastic Anisotropy in Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Wenk, H.; Matthies, S.; Vasin, R.

    2012-12-01

    Elastic anisotropy in clay-rich sedimentary rocks has increasingly received attention because of significance for prospecting of petroleum deposits, as well as seals in the context of nuclear waste and CO2 sequestration. The orientation of component minerals and pores/fractures is a critical factor that influences elastic anisotropy. In this study, we investigate lattice and shape preferred orientation (LPO and SPO) of three shales from the North Sea in UK, the Qusaiba Formation in Saudi Arabia, and the Officer Basin in Australia (referred to as N1, Qu3, and L1905, respectively) to calculate elastic properties and compare them with experimental results. Synchrotron hard X-ray diffraction and microtomography experiments were performed to quantify LPO, weight proportions, and three-dimensional SPO of constituent minerals and pores. Our preliminary results show that the degree of LPO and total amount of clays are highest in Qu3 (3.3-6.5 m.r.d and 74vol%), moderately high in N1 (2.4-5.6 m.r.d. and 70vol%), and lowest in L1905 (2.3-2.5 m.r.d. and 42vol%). In addition, porosity in Qu3 is as low as 2% while it is up to 6% in L1605 and 8% in N1, respectively. Based on this information and single crystal elastic properties of mineral components, we apply a self-consistent averaging method to calculate macroscopic elastic properties and corresponding seismic velocities for different shales. The elastic model is then compared with measured acoustic velocities on the same samples. The P-wave velocities measured from Qu3 (4.1-5.3 km/s, 26.3%Ani.) are faster than those obtained from L1905 (3.9-4.7 km/s, 18.6%Ani.) and N1 (3.6-4.3 km/s, 17.7%Ani.). By making adjustments for pore structure (aspect ratio) and single crystal elastic properties of clay minerals, a good agreement between our calculation and the ultrasonic measurement is obtained.

  2. A damage model based on singular elastic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leguillon, Dominique

    2008-03-01

    At re-entrant corners in elastic structures, the stress field is known to increase to infinity following a power law. From the material viewpoint it is paradoxical that it can locally sustain such an overburden. To avoid this paradox we propose a damage model where the Young's modulus of the material decreases (damage) also following a power law and such that the resulting stress field remains bounded. To cite this article: D. Leguillon, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  3. Performance evaluation of time-aware enhanced software defined networking (TeSDN) for elastic data center optical interconnection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Li, Hui; Lin, Yi; Li, Gang; Han, Jianrui; Lee, Young; Ma, Teng

    2014-07-28

    Data center interconnection with elastic optical networks is a promising scenario to meet the high burstiness and high-bandwidth requirements of data center services. We previously implemented enhanced software defined networking over elastic optical network for data center application [Opt. Express 21, 26990 (2013)]. On the basis of it, this study extends to consider the time-aware data center service scheduling with elastic service time and service bandwidth according to the various time sensitivity requirements. A novel time-aware enhanced software defined networking (TeSDN) architecture for elastic data center optical interconnection has been proposed in this paper, by introducing a time-aware resources scheduling (TaRS) scheme. The TeSDN can accommodate the data center services with required QoS considering the time dimensionality, and enhance cross stratum optimization of application and elastic optical network stratums resources based on spectrum elasticity, application elasticity and time elasticity. The overall feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture is experimentally verified on our OpenFlow-based testbed. The performance of TaRS scheme under heavy traffic load scenario is also quantitatively evaluated based on TeSDN architecture in terms of blocking probability and resource occupation rate.

  4. Efficient routing and spectrum assignment in elastic optical networks with time scheduled traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yang; Fan, Zheyu; Chan, Chun-Kit

    2016-07-01

    Elastic optical networks (EONs) employ dynamic routing and spectrum assignment (RSA) algorithms to support diverse services and heterogeneous requests. However, these RSA algorithms may possibly induce spectrum fragments when allocating spectrum to accommodate different service requests. Therefore, such induced spectrum fragments should also be regarded as spectrum consumption besides the allocated spectrum by RSA algorithms. In this paper, by additionally considering the holding times of lightpaths and service connections, we first introduce a comprehensive spectrum consumption model to simultaneously investigate both the allocated and the fragmented spectrum consumptions. Then we solve this model in both static and dynamic traffic scenarios, by either formulating the RSA problem with time-scheduled traffic or introducing a time-aware spectrum-efficient heuristics algorithm. Since no defragmentation is executed in spectrum allocation, the proposed RSA algorithm requires no traffic disruption and can be realized more easily in reality. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm reduces the comprehensive spectrum consumption and has lower bandwidth blocking probability than the typical first-fit RSA algorithm.

  5. Elastic modeling and steep dips: unraveling the reflected wavefield

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelting, C. J.; Gherasim, M.; House, L. S.; Marfurt, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a larger elastic numerical modeling project, we have been investigating how energy reflected from steeply dipping interfaces is recorded using typical multicomponent acquisition geometries. Specifically, we have been interpreting how rcflection events from the flanks of salt dome structures are distributed on 3C and 4C phones for vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) and ocean bottom seismic (OBS) or land surface surveys. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to improve the structural imaging of steeply dipping interfaces and eventually to evaluate the usc of the recorded elastic wavefield for fluid description near these interfaces. In the current work, we focus on a common assumption used when processing converted wave reflection seismic data that most PP energy is recorded on the vertical geophone and/or the hydrophone and that most PS energy is recorded on the horizontal geophones. This is a useful assumption when it is valid, because it eliminates the need for separation of the recorded wavefield into P and S wavetypes. Using two elastic models and different acquisition geometries, we examine the validity of this assumption in the presence of steeply dipping interfaces and discuss the implications for converted-wave and vector imaging of salt flanks.

  6. Elastic instability model of rapid beak closure in hummingbirds.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Yanega, G M; Ruina, A

    2011-08-01

    The hummingbird beak, specialized for feeding on floral nectars, is also uniquely adapted to eating flying insects. During insect capture the beak often appears to close at a rate that cannot be explained by direct muscular action alone. Here we show that the lower jaw of hummingbirds has a shape and compliance that allows for a controlled elastic snap. Furthermore, hummingbirds have the musculature needed to independently bend and twist the sides of the lower jaw. According to both our simple physical model and our elastic instability calculation, the jaw can be smoothly opened and then snapped closed through an appropriate sequence of bending and twisting actions by the muscles of the lower jaw.

  7. Supersymmetric sigma model of disordered, isotropic, elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Photiadis, Douglas

    The supersymmetry method proposed by Efetov in 1983 has been enormously successful at describing a broad range of phenomena involving disorder, providing a framework for understanding and going beyond the successes of random matrix theory and allowing a calculation of the slowing of diffusion as the Anderson transition is approached. The original model described the propagation of a scalar wave in a disordered medium, and subsequent work extended these ideas to classical waves, optical or elastic, with the approximation that the wave propagation can be similarly described by a scalar theory. Such a theory cannot however account correctly for scattering between different polarizations. A direct attempt to derive a supersymmetric model describing elastic waves results in a non-renormalizable field theory, and poses substantial difficulties. We have obtained a supersymmetric sigma model by considering the dual model which describes a generalized superstress field. The model enables one to fully account for the different wave types and polarizations in the medium. We will present our recent results in this area, including model predictions for the obtained diffusion constants, and the effects of renormalization to first order. This research was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  8. A non-Gaussian theory of rubberlike elasticity based on rotational isomeric state simulations of network chain configurations. II. Bimodal poly(dimethylsiloxane) networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curro, John G.; Mark, James E.

    1984-05-01

    Bimodal, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) networks containing a large mole fraction of very short chains have been shown to be unusually tough elastomers. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the rubber elasticity behavior of these bimodal networks. As a first approach, we have assumed that the average chain deformation is affine. This deformation, however, is partitioned nonaffinely between the long and short chains so that the free energy is minimized. Gaussian statistics are used for the long chains. The distribution function for the short chains is found from Monte Carlo calculations. This model predicts an upturn in the stress-strain curve, the steepness depending on the network composition, as is observed experimentally.

  9. Phase-field elasticity model based on mechanical jump conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Daniel; Tschukin, Oleg; Choudhury, Abhik; Selzer, Michael; Böhlke, Thomas; Nestler, Britta

    2015-05-01

    Computational models based on the phase-field method typically operate on a mesoscopic length scale and resolve structural changes of the material and furthermore provide valuable information about microstructure and mechanical property relations. An accurate calculation of the stresses and mechanical energy at the transition region is therefore indispensable. We derive a quantitative phase-field elasticity model based on force balance and Hadamard jump conditions at the interface. Comparing the simulated stress profiles calculated with Voigt/Taylor (Annalen der Physik 274(12):573, 1889), Reuss/Sachs (Z Angew Math Mech 9:49, 1929) and the proposed model with the theoretically predicted stress fields in a plate with a round inclusion under hydrostatic tension, we show the quantitative characteristics of the model. In order to validate the elastic contribution to the driving force for phase transition, we demonstrate the absence of excess energy, calculated by Durga et al. (Model Simul Mater Sci Eng 21(5):055018, 2013), in a one-dimensional equilibrium condition of serial and parallel material chains. To validate the driving force for systems with curved transition regions, we relate simulations to the Gibbs-Thompson equilibrium condition (Johnson and Alexander, J Appl Phys 59(8):2735, 1986).

  10. The adaptive FEM elastic model for medical image registration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingya; Wang, Jiajun; Wang, Xiuying; Feng, Dagan

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive mesh refinement strategy for the finite element method (FEM) based elastic registration model. The signature matrix for mesh refinement takes into account the regional intensity variance and the local deformation displacement. The regional intensity variance reflects detailed information for improving registration accuracy and the deformation displacement fine-tunes the mesh refinement for a more efficient algorithm. The gradient flows of two different similarity metrics, the sum of the squared difference and the spatially encoded mutual information for the mono-modal and multi-modal registrations, are used to derive external forces to drive the model to the equilibrium state. We compared our approach to three other models: (1) the conventional multi-resolution FEM registration algorithm; (2) the FEM elastic method that uses variation information for mesh refinement; and (3) the robust block matching based registration. Comparisons among different methods in a dataset with 20 CT image pairs upon artificial deformation demonstrate that our registration method achieved significant improvement in accuracies. Experimental results in another dataset of 40 real medical image pairs for both mono-modal and multi-modal registrations also show that our model outperforms the other three models in its accuracy.

  11. Hybrid Simulation Modeling to Estimate U.S. Energy Elasticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylin-Stern, Adam C.

    This paper demonstrates how an U.S. application of CIMS, a technologically explicit and behaviourally realistic energy-economy simulation model which includes macro-economic feedbacks, can be used to derive estimates of elasticity of substitution (ESUB) and autonomous energy efficiency index (AEEI) parameters. The ability of economies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions depends on the potential for households and industry to decrease overall energy usage, and move from higher to lower emissions fuels. Energy economists commonly refer to ESUB estimates to understand the degree of responsiveness of various sectors of an economy, and use estimates to inform computable general equilibrium models used to study climate policies. Using CIMS, I have generated a set of future, 'pseudo-data' based on a series of simulations in which I vary energy and capital input prices over a wide range. I then used this data set to estimate the parameters for transcendental logarithmic production functions using regression techniques. From the production function parameter estimates, I calculated an array of elasticity of substitution values between input pairs. Additionally, this paper demonstrates how CIMS can be used to calculate price-independent changes in energy-efficiency in the form of the AEEI, by comparing energy consumption between technologically frozen and 'business as usual' simulations. The paper concludes with some ideas for model and methodological improvement, and how these might figure into future work in the estimation of ESUBs from CIMS. Keywords: Elasticity of substitution; hybrid energy-economy model; translog; autonomous energy efficiency index; rebound effect; fuel switching.

  12. Elastic Model Transitions Using Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2012-01-01

    A technique is presented for initializing multiple discrete finite element model (FEM) mode sets for certain types of flight dynamics formulations that rely on superposition of orthogonal modes for modeling the elastic response. Such approaches are commonly used for modeling launch vehicle dynamics, and challenges arise due to the rapidly time-varying nature of the rigid-body and elastic characteristics. By way of an energy argument, a quadratic inequality constrained least squares (LSQI) algorithm is employed to e ect a smooth transition from one set of FEM eigenvectors to another with no requirement that the models be of similar dimension or that the eigenvectors be correlated in any particular way. The physically unrealistic and controversial method of eigenvector interpolation is completely avoided, and the discrete solution approximates that of the continuously varying system. The real-time computational burden is shown to be negligible due to convenient features of the solution method. Simulation results are presented, and applications to staging and other discontinuous mass changes are discussed

  13. Accurate numerical solutions for elastic-plastic models. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Schreyer, H. L.; Kulak, R. F.; Kramer, J. M.

    1980-03-01

    The accuracy of two integration algorithms is studied for the common engineering condition of a von Mises, isotropic hardening model under plane stress. Errors in stress predictions for given total strain increments are expressed with contour plots of two parameters: an angle in the pi plane and the difference between the exact and computed yield-surface radii. The two methods are the tangent-predictor/radial-return approach and the elastic-predictor/radial-corrector algorithm originally developed by Mendelson. The accuracy of a combined tangent-predictor/radial-corrector algorithm is also investigated.

  14. Elastic Moduli of Vortex Lattices within Nonlocal London Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranović, P.; Kogan, V. G.

    2001-09-01

    Vortex lattice (VL) elastic response is analyzed within the nonlocal London model which holds for high- κ clean superconductors. The squash modulus vanishes at the field H□ where VL undergoes a square-to-rhombus transition. For H>H□, where the square VL is stable, the rotation modulus turns zero at H = Hr, indicating VL instability to rotations. The shear modulus depends on the shear direction; the dependence is strong in the vicinity of H□ where the square VL is soft with respect to the shear along [110]. The H dependences of the moduli are evaluated for LuNi2B2C.

  15. An Elastic Model of Blebbing in Nuclear Lamin Meshworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funkhouser, Chloe; Sknepnek, Rastko; Shimi, Takeshi; Goldman, Anne; Goldman, Robert; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2013-03-01

    A two-component continuum elastic model is introduced to analyze a nuclear lamin meshwork, a structural element of the lamina of the nuclear envelope. The main component of the lamina is a meshwork of lamin protein filaments providing mechanical support to the nucleus and also playing a role in gene expression. Abnormalities in nuclear shape are associated with a variety of pathologies, including some forms of cancer and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, and are often characterized by protruding structures termed nuclear blebs. Nuclear blebs are rich in A-type lamins and may be related to pathological gene expression. We apply the two-dimensional elastic shell model to determine which characteristics of the meshwork could be responsible for blebbing, including heterogeneities in the meshwork thickness and mesh size. We find that if one component of the lamin meshwork, rich in A-type lamins, has a tendency to form a larger mesh size than that rich in B-type lamins, this is sufficient to cause segregation of the lamin components and also to form blebs rich in A-type lamins. The model produces structures with comparable morphologies and mesh size distributions as the lamin meshworks of real, pathological nuclei. Funded by US DoE Award DEFG02-08ER46539 and by the DDR&E and AFOSR under Award FA9550-10-1-0167; simulations performed on NU Quest cluster

  16. Elastic response of DNA molecules under the action of interfacial traction and stretching: An elastic thin rod model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing; Qiang, Lei; Gao, Jun

    2015-11-01

    In a multivalent salt solution, a segment of DNA is modeled as an elastic rod subjected to the interfacial traction. The shooting method is used to calculate the equilibrium configurations of condensed DNA under the action of the longitudinal end-force and interfacial traction simultaneously. The results show that the shapes of DNA are mainly determined by the competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of stretching. The change of end-to-end distance with the longitudinal end-force is consistent with the worm-like chain (WLC) model. The higher the concentration is, the stronger the condensation of DNA.

  17. Measuring in vivo elasticities of Calvin cycle enzymes: network structure and patterns of modulations.

    PubMed

    Kreim, Michael; Giersch, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    To measure the kinetics of enzymes, the proteins are usually assayed in vitro after isolation from their parent organisms. We make an attempt to show how one might determine enzyme elasticities in an intact system by a multiple modulation approach. Certain target enzymes are modulated in their activities and the changes in metabolite concentrations and flux rates upon the modulations are used to calculate the enzyme elasticities. Central to this approach is that the modulations must be independent of each other, and an algorithm is developed for finding all independent modulations that allow determining the elasticities of a given enzyme. This approach is applied to a mass-action model of the Calvin cycle. The goal is to determine the elasticities of as many enzymes as possible by modulating the activities of as few of them as possible. It is shown that the elasticities of 20 (out of 22) Calvin cycle enzymes can be determined by modulating just five reactions. Moreover, visualization of independence of modulations may be used to decompose the Calvin cycle into several sections that are independent of each other regarding flow of matter and information.

  18. Effective-medium theory of elastic waves in random networks of rods.

    PubMed

    Katz, J I; Hoffman, J J; Conradi, M S; Miller, J G

    2012-06-01

    We formulate an effective medium (mean field) theory of a material consisting of randomly distributed nodes connected by straight slender rods, hinged at the nodes. Defining wavelength-dependent effective elastic moduli, we calculate both the static moduli and the dispersion relations of ultrasonic longitudinal and transverse elastic waves. At finite wave vector k the waves are dispersive, with phase and group velocities decreasing with increasing wave vector. These results are directly applicable to networks with empty pore space. They also describe the solid matrix in two-component (Biot) theories of fluid-filled porous media. We suggest the possibility of low density materials with higher ratios of stiffness and strength to density than those of foams, aerogels, or trabecular bone.

  19. Elastic-wave velocity in marine sediments with gas hydrates: Effective medium modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.; Sakai, A.; Collett, T.

    1999-01-01

    We offer a first-principle-based effective medium model for elastic-wave velocity in unconsolidated, high porosity, ocean bottom sediments containing gas hydrate. The dry sediment frame elastic constants depend on porosity, elastic moduli of the solid phase, and effective pressure. Elastic moduli of saturated sediment are calculated from those of the dry frame using Gassmann's equation. To model the effect of gas hydrate on sediment elastic moduli we use two separate assumptions: (a) hydrate modifies the pore fluid elastic properties without affecting the frame; (b) hydrate becomes a component of the solid phase, modifying the elasticity of the frame. The goal of the modeling is to predict the amount of hydrate in sediments from sonic or seismic velocity data. We apply the model to sonic and VSP data from ODP Hole 995 and obtain hydrate concentration estimates from assumption (b) consistent with estimates obtained from resistivity, chlorinity and evolved gas data. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Dynamics of Elastic Beams with Embedded Fluid-Filled Parallel-Channel Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gat, Amir D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A pressurized fluid-filled parallel-channel network embedded in an elastic beam, asymmetrically to the neutral plane, will create a deformation field within the beam. Deformation due to embedded fluidic networks is currently studied in the context of soft actuators and soft-robotic applications. Expanding on this concept, configurations can be designed so that the pressure in the channel network is created directly from external forces acting on the beam, and thus can be viewed as passive solid–fluid composite structures. We approximate the deformation of such structures and relate the fluid pressure and geometry of the network to a continuous deformation-field function. This enables the design of networks creating steady arbitrary deformation fields as well as to eliminate deformation created by external time-varying forces, thus increasing the effective rigidity of the beam. In addition, by including the effects of the deformation created by the channel network on the beam inertia, we can modify the response of the beam to external time-varying forces. We present a scheme to design channel networks that create predefined oscillating deformation patterns in response to external oscillating forces. The ability to include inertial effects is relevant to the design of dynamic soft robots and soft actuators. Our results are illustrated and validated by numerical computations.

  1. Hierarchical Chain Model of Spider Capture Silk Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haijun; Zhang, Yang

    2005-01-01

    Spider capture silk is a biomaterial with both high strength and high elasticity, but the structural design principle underlying these remarkable properties is still unknown. It was revealed recently by atomic force microscopy that an exponential force-extension relationship holds both for capture silk mesostructures and for intact capture silk fibers [N. Becker et al.,

    Nat. Mater. 2, 278 (2003)1476-1122
    ]. In this Letter a simple hierarchical chain model was proposed to understand and reproduce this striking observation. In the hierarchical chain model, a polymer is composed of many structural motifs which organize into structural modules and supramodules in a hierarchical manner. Each module in this hierarchy has its own characteristic force. The repetitive patterns in the amino-acid sequence of the major flagelliform protein of spider capture silk is in support of this model.

  2. MAVENs: Motion analysis and visualization of elastic networks and structural ensembles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ability to generate, visualize, and analyze motions of biomolecules has made a significant impact upon modern biology. Molecular Dynamics has gained substantial use, but remains computationally demanding and difficult to setup for many biologists. Elastic network models (ENMs) are an alternative and have been shown to generate the dominant equilibrium motions of biomolecules quickly and efficiently. These dominant motions have been shown to be functionally relevant and also to indicate the likely direction of conformational changes. Most structures have a small number of dominant motions. Comparing computed motions to the structure's conformational ensemble derived from a collection of static structures or frames from an MD trajectory is an important way to understand functional motions as well as evaluate the models. Modes of motion computed from ENMs can be visualized to gain functional and mechanistic understanding and to compute useful quantities such as average positional fluctuations, internal distance changes, collectiveness of motions, and directional correlations within the structure. Results Our new software, MAVEN, aims to bring ENMs and their analysis to a broader audience by integrating methods for their generation and analysis into a user friendly environment that automates many of the steps. Models can be constructed from raw PDB files or density maps, using all available atomic coordinates or by employing various coarse-graining procedures. Visualization can be performed either with our software or exported to molecular viewers. Mixed resolution models allow one to study atomic effects on the system while retaining much of the computational speed of the coarse-grained ENMs. Analysis options are available to further aid the user in understanding the computed motions and their importance for its function. Conclusion MAVEN has been developed to simplify ENM generation, allow for diverse models to be used, and facilitate useful analyses

  3. A Double Scattering Analytical Model For Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barradas, N. P.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.; Darakchieva, V.

    2011-06-01

    We present an analytical model for calculation of double scattering in elastic recoil detection measurements. Only events involving the beam particle and the recoil are considered, i.e. 1) an ion scatters off a target element and then produces a recoil, and 2) an ion produces a recoil which then scatters off a target element. Events involving intermediate recoils are not considered, i.e. when the primary ion produces a recoil which then produces a second recoil. If the recoil element is also present in the stopping foil, recoil events in the stopping foil are also calculated. We included the model in the standard code for IBA data analysis NDF, and applied it to the measurement of hydrogen in Si.

  4. Relating Cohesive Zone Model to Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The conditions required for a cohesive zone model (CZM) to predict a failure load of a cracked structure similar to that obtained by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis are investigated in this paper. This study clarifies why many different phenomenological cohesive laws can produce similar fracture predictions. Analytical results for five cohesive zone models are obtained, using five different cohesive laws that have the same cohesive work rate (CWR-area under the traction-separation curve) but different maximum tractions. The effect of the maximum traction on the predicted cohesive zone length and the remote applied load at fracture is presented. Similar to the small scale yielding condition for an LEFM analysis to be valid. the cohesive zone length also needs to be much smaller than the crack length. This is a necessary condition for a CZM to obtain a fracture prediction equivalent to an LEFM result.

  5. Folding model calculations for 6He+12C elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, A. Ibraheem

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of the double folding model, we used the α+2n and di-triton configurations for the nuclear matter density of the 6He nucleus to generate the real part of the optical potential for the system 6He+12C. As an alternative, we also use the high energy approximation to generate the optical potential for the same system. The derived potentials are employed to analyze the elastic scattering differential cross section at energies of 38.3, 41.6 and 82.3 MeV/u. For the imaginary part of the potential we adopt the squared Woods-Saxon form. The obtained results are compared with the corresponding measured data as well as with available results in the literature. The calculated total reaction cross sections are investigated and compared with the optical limit Glauber model description.

  6. Modelling of poro-visco-elastic biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilotsky, Y.; Gasik, M.

    2015-09-01

    The research of mechanical properties of poro-visco-elastic biomaterials is an important task, especially for tailoring the best conditions for in-growth and healing of implants. In this work we analysed the behaviour of biomaterials under different static and dynamic loading regimes, in "dry" and "wet" conditions. Retrieved data revealed nonlinear relations between applied force and resulting deformation, with time and frequency dependence. These features were described by a nonlinear model, which reasonably fits mentioned peculiarities. The simplified model was validated with numerical simulations using COMSOL software. Upon validation it allows incorporation of the experimental data obtained by biomechanical spectroscopy towards prediction of biomaterials behaviour in "in vitro" conditions, with the purpose to extrapolate to clinically-relevant environment.

  7. Hybrid Modeling of Elastic Wave Scattering in a Welded Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, A.; Shah, A. H.; Popplewell, N.

    2003-03-01

    In the present study, a 3D hybrid method, which couples the finite element region with guided elastic wave modes, is formulated to investigate the scattering by a non-axisymmetric crack in a welded steel pipe. The algorithm is implemented on a parallel computing platform. Implementation is facilitated by the dynamic memory allocation capabilities of Fortran 90™ and the parallel processing directives of OpenMp™. The algorithm is validated against available numerical results. The agreement with a previous 2D hybrid model is excellent. Novel results are presented for the scattering of the first longitudinal mode from different non-axisymmetric cracks. The trend of the new results is consistent with the previous findings for the axisymmetric case. The developed model has potential application in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of welded steel pipes.

  8. Distinct Tensile Response of Model Semi-flexible Elastomer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera-Mercado, Bernardo M.; Cohen, Claude; Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2011-03-01

    Through coarse-grained molecular modeling, we study how the elastic response strongly depends upon nanostructural heterogeneities in model networks made of semi-flexible chains exhibiting both regular and realistic connectivity. Idealized regular polymer networks have been shown to display a peculiar elastic response similar to that of super-tough natural materials (e.g., organic adhesives inside abalone shells). We investigate the impact of chain stiffness, and the effect of including tri-block copolymer chains, on the network's topology and elastic response. We find in some systems a dual tensile response: a liquid-like behavior at small deformations, and a distinct saw-tooth shaped stress-strain curve at moderate to large deformations. Additionally, stiffer regular networks exhibit a marked hysteresis over loading-unloading cycles that can be deleted by heating-cooling cycles or by performing deformations along different axes. Furthermore, small variations of chain stiffness may entirely change the nature of the network's tensile response from an entropic to an enthalpic elastic regime, and micro-phase separation of different blocks within elastomer networks may significantly enhance their mechanical strength. This work was supported by the American Chemical Society.

  9. A study of self-propelled elastic cylindrical micro-swimmers using modeling and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingling; Čanić, Sunčica; Quaini, Annalisa; Pan, Tsorng-Whay

    2016-06-01

    We study propulsion of micro-swimmers in 3D creeping flow. The swimmers are assumed to be made of elastic cylindrical hollow tubes. The swimming is generated by the contractions of the tube's elastic membrane walls producing a traveling wave in the form of a "step-function" traversing the swimmer from right to left, propelling the swimmer from left to right. The problem is motivated by medical applications such as drug delivery. The influence of several non-dimensional design parameters on the velocity of the swimmer is investigated, including the swimmer aspect ratio, and the amplitude of the traveling wave relative to the swimmer radius. An immersed boundary method based on a finite element method approach is successfully combined with an elastic spring network model to simulate the two-way fluid-structure interaction coupling between the elastic cylindrical tube and the flow of a 3D viscous, incompressible fluid. To gain a deeper insight into the influence of various parameters on the swimmer speed, a reduced 1D fluid-structure interaction model was derived and validated. It was found that fast swimmers are those with large tube aspect ratios, and with the amplitude of the traveling wave which is roughly 50% of the reference swimmer radius. It was shown that the speed of our "optimal swimmer" is around 1.5 swimmer lengths per second, which is at the top of the class of all currently manufactured micro-swimmers swimming in low Reynolds number flows (Re =10-6), reported in [11].

  10. Modeling of the wave transmission properties of large arteries using nonlinear elastic tubes.

    PubMed

    Pythoud, F; Stergiopulos, N; Meister, J J

    1994-11-01

    We propose a new, simple way of constructing elastic tubes which can be used to model the nonlinear elastic properties of large arteries. The tube models are constructed from a silicon elastomer (Sylgard 184, Dow Corning), which exhibits a nonlinear behavior with increased stiffness at high strains. Tests conducted on different tube models showed that, with the proper choice of geometric parameters, the elastic properties, in terms of area-pressure relation and compliance, can be similar to that of real arteries.

  11. Elastic Moduli of Vortex Lattices within Nonlocal London Model

    SciTech Connect

    Miranovic, P.; Kogan, V. G.

    2001-09-24

    Vortex lattice (VL) elastic response is analyzed within the nonlocal London model which holds for high-{kappa} clean superconductors. The squash modulus vanishes at the field H{sub (open square)} where VL undergoes a square-to-rhombus transition. For H>H{sub (open square)}, where the square VL is stable, the rotation modulus turns zero at H=H{sub r} , indicating VL instability to rotations. The shear modulus depends on the shear direction; the dependence is strong in the vicinity of H{sub (open square)} where the square VL is soft with respect to the shear along [110] . The H dependences of the moduli are evaluated for LuNi{sub 2}B {sub 2}C .

  12. Modeling of thermal stresses in elastic multilayer coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chunxue; Zhao, Zhiwei; Li, Xuehua

    2015-02-01

    The performance and reliability of multilayer coating systems are strongly influenced by thermal stresses. The present study develops an alternative analytical model to predict the thermal stresses in elastic multilayer coating systems. An exact closed-form solution is obtained which is independent of the number of coating layers. In addition, with the definition of the coordinate system, the closed-form solution is concisely formulated. Specific results are calculated for thermal stresses in HfO2/SiO2 multilayer optical coatings, and a finite element analysis is performed to confirm the analytical results. The two results agree fairly well with each other. Also, when the thicknesses of the coating layers are much less than the substrate thickness, the approximate solution is obtained based on the exact closed-form solution, and its accuracy is examined.

  13. Survivable VON mapping with ambiguity similitude for differentiable maximum shared capacity in elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Zhu, Xiaoxu; Bai, Wei; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Zhu; Zhou, Ziguan; Ou, Qinghai

    2016-09-01

    Virtualization is considered to be a promising solution to support various emerging applications. This paper illustrates the problem of virtual mapping from a new perspective, and mainly focuses on survivable mapping of virtual networks and the potential trade-off between spectral resource usage effectiveness and failure resilience level. We design an optimum shared protection mapping (OSPM) scheme in elastic optical networks. A differentiable maximum shared capacity of each frequency slot is defined to more efficiently shared protection resource. In order to satisfy various assessment standards, a metric called ambiguity similitude is defined for the first time to give insight on the optimizing difficulty. Simulation results are presented to compare the outcome of the novel OSPM algorithm with traditional dedicated link protection and maximum shared protection mapping. By synthetic analysis, OSPM outperforms the other two schemes in terms of striking a perfect balance among blocking probability, resources utilization, protective success rate, and spectrum redundancy.

  14. Dynamic Visco-elastic Buckling Analysis for Airway Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Kiyoshi; Ohba, Kenkichi; Yamanoi, Yuta

    In order to clarify the mechanism by which the lung airway narrows during an asthma attack, dynamic buckling analysis of the wall was conducted. The wall was modeled using a visco-elastic thin-walled circular cylinder of the Voigt model for the planestress state. A governing equation for dynamic buckling was derived, and in the equation, the contraction of smooth muscle was replaced by uniform inward transmural pressure. The non-dimensional parameters for the buckling wave number n were nondimensional retardation time τ, non-dimensional increasing velocity of inward transmural pressure β, thickness radius ratio α2, radius length ratio η, density ratio ζ, and Poisson's ratio ν. The validity of the theoretical model was confirmed by comparing the calculated wave number with that obtained from the experiment, in which a silicone rubber tube blended with silicone potting gel was used as the in vitro airway model. In addition, the wave number n increased with β. It was necessary to consider the damping effect of the tube model or the airway wall, and n increased by 1.5 to 2 due to the additional mass effect of surrounding tissues of the basement membrane in the airway wall.

  15. Evolution of a fracture network in an elastic medium with internal fluid generation and expulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobchenko, Maya; Hafver, Andreas; Jettestuen, Espen; Renard, François; Galland, Olivier; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Meakin, Paul; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2014-11-01

    A simple and reproducible analog experiment was used to simulate fracture formation in a low-permeability elastic solid during internal fluid/gas production, with the objective of developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that control the dynamics of fracturing, fracture opening and closing, and fluid transport. In the experiment, nucleation, propagation, and coalescence of fractures within an elastic gelatin matrix, confined in a Hele-Shaw cell, occurred due to CO2 production via fermentation of sugar, and it was monitored by optical means. We first quantified how a fracture network develops, and then how intermittent fluid transport is controlled by the dynamics of opening and closing of fractures. The gas escape dynamics exhibited three characteristic behaviors: (1) Quasiperiodic release of gas with a characteristic frequency that depends on the gas production rate but not on the system size. (2) A 1 /f power spectrum for the fluctuations in the total open fracture area over an intermediate range of frequencies (f ), which we attribute to collective effects caused by interaction between fractures in the drainage network. (3) A 1 /f2 power spectrum was observed at high frequencies, which can be explained by the characteristic behavior of single fractures.

  16. Asymptotic analysis of mathematical models for elastic composite media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, S. K.

    The main subject of the thesis is the asymptotic analysis of models in mechanics of composite materials. It is based on the extension of the theory of the Polya-Szego tensors to the problems of homogenization and fracture. Such a technique allows one to obtain an asymptotic solution to a problem where most of numerical algorithms fail due to the presence of a singular perturbation. As a result of this work, a number of interesting effects have been found in optimization of composites and inverse problems of crack-inclusion interaction. Chapter 1 is an introductory chapter that contains the main definitions and bibliographical remarks. In Chapter 2 the Polya-Szego dipole tensors are employed for analysis of plane elasticity problems in non-homogeneous media. Classes of equivalence for defects (cavities and rigid inclusions) are specified for the Laplace and Navier operators: composite materials with defects of the same class have the same effective elastic moduli. Explicit asymptotic formulae for the effective compliance matrices of dilute composites are obtained. The problem of the optimal cavity shape is analyzed in Chapter 3. The analysis uses the Polya-Szego tensors calculated in Chapter 2. A new type of structure which is optimal for shear loading has been found. Properties of the optimal cavity are described. The crack-inclusion interaction problem considered in Chapter 4 has been solved by the asymptotic methods. An analysis of crack trajectories is performed in Chapter 5 for different types of defects and interface conditions. The algorithm employs the Polya-Szego tensors as integral characteristics describing the defect. Comparison with experimental data (Ceramic Centre, Bologna) is presented. In Chapter 6 we use the method of compound asymptotic expansions to treat the homogenization problem for thin-walled composites. The technique of boundary layer fields is employed to derive the junction condition in the region connecting thin walls. The asymptotic

  17. An Elastic Plastic Contact Model with Strain Hardening for the LAMMPS Granular Package

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhr, Bryan; Brake, Matthew Robert; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2015-03-01

    The following details the implementation of an analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening for normal im pacts into the LAMMPS granular package. The model assumes that, upon impact, the co llision has a period of elastic loading followed by a period of mixed elastic plas tic loading, with contributions to each mechanism estimated by a hyperbolic seca nt weight function. This function is implemented in the LAMMPS source code as the pair style gran/ep/history. Preliminary tests, simulating the pouring of pure nickel spheres, showed the elastic/plastic model took 1.66x as long as similar runs using gran/hertz/history.

  18. Nonlinear elastic model for faceting of vesicles with soft grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sknepnek, Rastko; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2012-05-01

    We use an elastic model to explore faceting of solid-wall vesicles with elastic heterogeneities. We show that faceting occurs in regions where the vesicle wall is softer, such as areas of reduced wall thicknesses or concentrated in crystalline defects. The elastic heterogeneities are modeled as a second component with reduced elastic parameters. Using simulated annealing Monte Carlo simulations we obtain the vesicle shape by optimizing the distributions of facets and boundaries. Our model allows us to reduce the effects of the residual stress generated by crystalline defects, and reveals a robust faceting mechanism into polyhedra other than the icosahedron.

  19. Modeling the Elastic Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Edward; Gibaud, Thomas; Zakhary, Mark; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2011-03-01

    Model membranes such as lipid bilayers have been indispensable tools for our understanding of the elastic properties of biological membranes. In this talk, I will introduce a colloidal model for membranes and demonstrate that the physical properties of these colloidal membranes are identical to lipid bilayers. The model system is unique in that the constituent molecules are homogenous and non-amphiphilic, yet their self-assembly into membranes and other hierarchical assemblages, such as a lamellar type phases and chiral ribbons, proceeds spontaneously in solution. Owing to the large size of the constituent molecules, individual molecules can be directly visualized and simultaneous observations at the continuum and molecular lengthscales are used to characterize the behavior of model membranes with unprecedented detail. Moreover, once assembled in solution, molecular interactions can be controlled in situ. In particular, the strength of chiral interactions can be varied, leading to fascinating transitions in behavior that resembles the formation of starfish vesicles. These observations point towards the important role of line tension, and have potential implications for phase separated lipid mixtures or lipid rafts.

  20. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Cloetingh, Sierd A. P. L.

    2013-08-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young modulus (E) within the lithosphere. In view of the large uncertainties affecting strength estimates, we evaluate global strength and Te distributions for possible end-member 'hard' (HRM) and a 'soft' (SRM) rheology models of the continental crust. Temperature within the lithosphere has been estimated using a recent tomography model of Ritsema et al. (2011), which has much higher horizontal resolution than previous global models. Most of the strength is localized in the crust for the HRM and in the mantle for the SRM. These results contribute to the long debates on applicability of the "crème brulée" or "jelly-sandwich" model for the lithosphere structure. Changing from the SRM to HRM turns most of the continental areas from the totally decoupled mode to the fully coupled mode of the lithospheric layers. However, in the areas characterized by a high thermal regime and thick crust, the layers remain decoupled even for the HRM. At the same time, for the inner part of the cratons the lithospheric layers are coupled in both models. Therefore, rheological variations lead to large changes in the integrated strength and Te distribution in the regions characterized by intermediate thermal conditions. In these areas temperature uncertainties have a greater effect, since this parameter principally determines rheological behavior. Comparison of the Te estimates for both models with those determined from the flexural loading and spectral analysis shows that the 'hard' rheology is likely applicable for cratonic areas, whereas the 'soft' rheology is more representative for young orogens.

  1. Dynamic optical resource allocation for mobile core networks with software defined elastic optical networking.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongli; Chen, Zhendong; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xinbo

    2016-07-25

    Driven by the forthcoming of 5G mobile communications, the all-IP architecture of mobile core networks, i.e. evolved packet core (EPC) proposed by 3GPP, has been greatly challenged by the users' demands for higher data rate and more reliable end-to-end connection, as well as operators' demands for low operational cost. These challenges can be potentially met by software defined optical networking (SDON), which enables dynamic resource allocation according to the users' requirement. In this article, a novel network architecture for mobile core network is proposed based on SDON. A software defined network (SDN) controller is designed to realize the coordinated control over different entities in EPC networks. We analyze the requirement of EPC-lightpath (EPCL) in data plane and propose an optical switch load balancing (OSLB) algorithm for resource allocation in optical layer. The procedure of establishment and adjustment of EPCLs is demonstrated on a SDON-based EPC testbed with extended OpenFlow protocol. We also evaluate the OSLB algorithm through simulation in terms of bandwidth blocking ratio, traffic load distribution, and resource utilization ratio compared with link-based load balancing (LLB) and MinHops algorithms. PMID:27464120

  2. Modeling the elastic energy of alloys: Potential pitfalls of continuum treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, Arvind; Ratsch, Christian; Smereka, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Some issues that arise when modeling elastic energy for binary alloys are discussed within the context of a Keating model and density-functional calculations. The Keating model is a simplified atomistic formulation based on modeling elastic interactions of a binary alloy with harmonic springs whose equilibrium length is species dependent. It is demonstrated that the continuum limit for the strain field are the usual equations of linear elasticity for alloys and that they correctly capture the coarse-grained behavior of the displacement field. In addition, it is established that Euler-Lagrange equation of the continuum limit of the elastic energy will yield the same strain field equation. This is the same energy functional that is often used to model elastic effects in binary alloys. However, a direct calculation of the elastic energy atomistic model reveals that the continuum expression for the elastic energy is both qualitatively and quantitatively incorrect. This is because it does not take atomistic scale compositional nonuniformity into account. Importantly, this result also shows that finely mixed alloys tend to have more elastic energy than segregated systems, which is the exact opposite of predictions made by some continuum theories. It is also shown that for strained thin films the traditionally used effective misfit for alloys systematically underestimate the strain energy. In some models, this drawback is handled by including an elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing, which is characterized in terms of the continuum concentration. The direct calculation of the atomistic model reveals that this approach suffers serious difficulties. It is demonstrated that elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing is nonisotropic and scale dependent. It is also shown that such effects are present in density-functional theory calculations for the Si-Ge system. This work demonstrates that it is critical to include the microscopic arrangements in any elastic

  3. Modeling the elastic energy of alloys: Potential pitfalls of continuum treatments.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Arvind; Ratsch, Christian; Smereka, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Some issues that arise when modeling elastic energy for binary alloys are discussed within the context of a Keating model and density-functional calculations. The Keating model is a simplified atomistic formulation based on modeling elastic interactions of a binary alloy with harmonic springs whose equilibrium length is species dependent. It is demonstrated that the continuum limit for the strain field are the usual equations of linear elasticity for alloys and that they correctly capture the coarse-grained behavior of the displacement field. In addition, it is established that Euler-Lagrange equation of the continuum limit of the elastic energy will yield the same strain field equation. This is the same energy functional that is often used to model elastic effects in binary alloys. However, a direct calculation of the elastic energy atomistic model reveals that the continuum expression for the elastic energy is both qualitatively and quantitatively incorrect. This is because it does not take atomistic scale compositional nonuniformity into account. Importantly, this result also shows that finely mixed alloys tend to have more elastic energy than segregated systems, which is the exact opposite of predictions made by some continuum theories. It is also shown that for strained thin films the traditionally used effective misfit for alloys systematically underestimate the strain energy. In some models, this drawback is handled by including an elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing, which is characterized in terms of the continuum concentration. The direct calculation of the atomistic model reveals that this approach suffers serious difficulties. It is demonstrated that elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing is nonisotropic and scale dependent. It is also shown that such effects are present in density-functional theory calculations for the Si-Ge system. This work demonstrates that it is critical to include the microscopic arrangements in any elastic

  4. Modeling the elastic energy of alloys: Potential pitfalls of continuum treatments.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Arvind; Ratsch, Christian; Smereka, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Some issues that arise when modeling elastic energy for binary alloys are discussed within the context of a Keating model and density-functional calculations. The Keating model is a simplified atomistic formulation based on modeling elastic interactions of a binary alloy with harmonic springs whose equilibrium length is species dependent. It is demonstrated that the continuum limit for the strain field are the usual equations of linear elasticity for alloys and that they correctly capture the coarse-grained behavior of the displacement field. In addition, it is established that Euler-Lagrange equation of the continuum limit of the elastic energy will yield the same strain field equation. This is the same energy functional that is often used to model elastic effects in binary alloys. However, a direct calculation of the elastic energy atomistic model reveals that the continuum expression for the elastic energy is both qualitatively and quantitatively incorrect. This is because it does not take atomistic scale compositional nonuniformity into account. Importantly, this result also shows that finely mixed alloys tend to have more elastic energy than segregated systems, which is the exact opposite of predictions made by some continuum theories. It is also shown that for strained thin films the traditionally used effective misfit for alloys systematically underestimate the strain energy. In some models, this drawback is handled by including an elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing, which is characterized in terms of the continuum concentration. The direct calculation of the atomistic model reveals that this approach suffers serious difficulties. It is demonstrated that elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing is nonisotropic and scale dependent. It is also shown that such effects are present in density-functional theory calculations for the Si-Ge system. This work demonstrates that it is critical to include the microscopic arrangements in any elastic

  5. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel.

    PubMed

    Ben-Isaac, E; Fodor, É; Visco, P; van Wijland, F; Gov, Nir S

    2015-07-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels both in artificial (in vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells has been extensively studied with experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct nonthermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures," and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies.

  6. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Isaac, E.; Fodor, É.; Visco, P.; van Wijland, F.; Gov, Nir S.

    2015-07-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels both in artificial (in vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells has been extensively studied with experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct nonthermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures," and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies.

  7. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel.

    PubMed

    Ben-Isaac, E; Fodor, É; Visco, P; van Wijland, F; Gov, Nir S

    2015-07-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels both in artificial (in vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells has been extensively studied with experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct nonthermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures," and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies. PMID:26274211

  8. Size effects and internal length scales in the elasticity of random fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picu, Catalin; Berkache, Kamel; Shahsavari, Ali; Ganghoffer, Jean-Francois

    Random fiber networks are the structural element of many biological and man-made materials, including connective tissue, various consumer products and packaging materials. In all cases of practical interest the scale at which the material is used and the scale of the fiber diameter or the mean segment length of the network are separated by several orders of magnitude. This precludes solving boundary value problems defined on the scale of the application while resolving every fiber in the system, and mandates the development of continuum equivalent models. To this end, we study the intrinsic geometric and mechanical length scales of the network and the size effect associated with them. We consider both Cauchy and micropolar continuum models and calibrate them based on the discrete network behavior. We develop a method to predict the characteristic length scales of the problem and the minimum size of a representative element of the network based on network structural parameters and on fiber properties.

  9. The Elastic Body Model: A Pedagogical Approach Integrating Real Time Measurements and Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, C.; Guastella, I.; Tarantino, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a pedagogical approach to elastic body movement based on measurements of the contact times between a metallic rod and small bodies colliding with it and on modelling of the experimental results by using a microcomputer-based laboratory and simulation tools. The experiments and modelling activities have been built in the…

  10. An elastic model of partial budding of retroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2008-03-01

    Retroviruses are characterized by their unique infection strategy of reverse transcription, in which the genetic information flows from RNA back to DNA. The most well known representative is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Unlike budding of traditional enveloped viruses, retrovirus budding happens together with the formation of spherical virus capsids at the cell membrane. Led by this unique budding mechanism, we proposed an elastic model of retrovirus budding in this work. We found that if the lipid molecules of the membrane are supplied fast enough from the cell interior, the budding always proceeds to completion. In the opposite limit, there is an optimal size of partially budded virions. The zenith angle of these partially spherical capsids, α, is given by α˜(2̂/κσ)^1/4, where κ is the bending modulus of the membrane, σ is the surface tension of the membrane, and τ characterizes the strength of capsid protein interaction. If τ is large enough such that α˜π, the budding is complete. Our model explained many features of retrovirus partial budding observed in experiments.

  11. Double porosity modeling in elastic wave propagation for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J. G., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Phenomenological equations for the poroelastic behavior of a double porosity medium have been formulated and the coefficients in these linear equations identified. The generalization from a single porosity model increases the number of independent coefficients from three to six for an isotropic applied stress. In a quasistatic analysis, the physical interpretations are based upon considerations of extremes in both spatial and temporal scales. The limit of very short times is the one most relevant for wave propagation, and in this case both matrix porosity and fractures behave in an undrained fashion. For the very long times more relevant for reservoir drawdown,the double porosity medium behaves as an equivalent single porosity medium At the macroscopic spatial level, the pertinent parameters (such as the total compressibility) may be determined by appropriate field tests. At the mesoscopic scale pertinent parameters of the rock matrix can be determined directly through laboratory measurements on core, and the compressibility can be measured for a single fracture. We show explicitly how to generalize the quasistatic results to incorporate wave propagation effects and how effects that are usually attributed to squirt flow under partially saturated conditions can be explained alternatively in terms of the double-porosity model. The result is therefore a theory that generalizes, but is completely consistent with, Biot`s theory of poroelasticity and is valid for analysis of elastic wave data from highly fractured reservoirs.

  12. Visualizing tropoelastin in a long-term human elastic fibre cell culture model

    PubMed Central

    Halm, M.; Schenke-Layland, K.; Jaspers, S.; Wenck, H.; Fischer, F.

    2016-01-01

    Elastin is an essential protein found in a variety of tissues where resilience and flexibility are needed, such as the skin and the heart. When aiming to engineer suitable implants, elastic fibres are needed to allow adequate tissue renewal. However, the visualization of human elastogenesis remains in the dark. To date, the visualization of human tropoelastin (TE) production in a human cell context and its fibre assembly under live cell conditions has not been achieved. Here, we present a long-term cell culture model of human dermal fibroblasts expressing fluorescence-labelled human TE. We employed a lentiviral system to stably overexpress Citrine-labelled TE to build a fluorescent fibre network. Using immunofluorescence, we confirmed the functionality of the Citrine-tagged TE. Furthermore, we visualized the fibre assembly over the course of several days using confocal microscopy. Applying super resolution microscopy, we were able to investigate the inner structure of the elastin–fibrillin-1 fibre network. Future investigations will allow the tracking of TE produced under various conditions. In tissue engineering applications the fluorescent fibre network can be visualized under various conditions or it serves as a tool for investigating fibre degradation processes in disease-in-a-dish-models. PMID:26842906

  13. Visualizing tropoelastin in a long-term human elastic fibre cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Halm, M; Schenke-Layland, K; Jaspers, S; Wenck, H; Fischer, F

    2016-02-04

    Elastin is an essential protein found in a variety of tissues where resilience and flexibility are needed, such as the skin and the heart. When aiming to engineer suitable implants, elastic fibres are needed to allow adequate tissue renewal. However, the visualization of human elastogenesis remains in the dark. To date, the visualization of human tropoelastin (TE) production in a human cell context and its fibre assembly under live cell conditions has not been achieved. Here, we present a long-term cell culture model of human dermal fibroblasts expressing fluorescence-labelled human TE. We employed a lentiviral system to stably overexpress Citrine-labelled TE to build a fluorescent fibre network. Using immunofluorescence, we confirmed the functionality of the Citrine-tagged TE. Furthermore, we visualized the fibre assembly over the course of several days using confocal microscopy. Applying super resolution microscopy, we were able to investigate the inner structure of the elastin-fibrillin-1 fibre network. Future investigations will allow the tracking of TE produced under various conditions. In tissue engineering applications the fluorescent fibre network can be visualized under various conditions or it serves as a tool for investigating fibre degradation processes in disease-in-a-dish-models.

  14. Introduction to physical properties and elasticity models: Chapter 20

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorkin, Jack; Helgerud, Michael B.; Waite, William F.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Nur, Amos

    2003-01-01

    Estimating the in situ methane hydrate volume from seismic surveys requires knowledge of the rock physics relations between wave speeds and elastic moduli in hydrate/sediment mixtures. The elastic moduli of hydrate/sediment mixtures depend on the elastic properties of the individual sedimentary particles and the manner in which they are arranged. In this chapter, we present some rock physics data currently available from literature. The unreferenced values in Table I were not measured directly, but were derived from other values in Tables I and II using standard relationships between elastic properties for homogeneous, isotropic material. These derivations allow us to extend the list of physical property estimates, but at the expense of introducing uncertainties due to combining property values measured under different physical conditions. This is most apparent in the case of structure II (sII) hydrate for which very few physical properties have been measured under identical conditions.

  15. Elastic-Net Copula Granger Causality for Inference of Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Siyal, Mohammad Yakoob

    2016-01-01

    Aim In bioinformatics, the inference of biological networks is one of the most active research areas. It involves decoding various complex biological networks that are responsible for performing diverse functions in human body. Among these networks analysis, most of the research focus is towards understanding effective brain connectivity and gene networks in order to cure and prevent related diseases like Alzheimer and cancer respectively. However, with recent advances in data procurement technology, such as DNA microarray analysis and fMRI that can simultaneously process a large amount of data, it yields high-dimensional data sets. These high dimensional dataset analyses possess challenges for the analyst. Background Traditional methods of Granger causality inference use ordinary least-squares methods for structure estimation, which confront dimensionality issues when applied to high-dimensional data. Apart from dimensionality issues, most existing methods were designed to capture only the linear inferences from time series data. Method and Conclusion In this paper, we address the issues involved in assessing Granger causality for both linear and nonlinear high-dimensional data by proposing an elegant form of the existing LASSO-based method that we call “Elastic-Net Copula Granger causality”. This method provides a more stable way to infer biological networks which has been verified using rigorous experimentation. We have compared the proposed method with the existing method and demonstrated that this new strategy outperforms the existing method on all measures: precision, false detection rate, recall, and F1 score. We have also applied both methods to real HeLa cell data and StarPlus fMRI datasets and presented a comparison of the effectiveness of both methods. PMID:27792750

  16. Piezoresistive Sensor with High Elasticity Based on 3D Hybrid Network of Sponge@CNTs@Ag NPs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Nishuang; Shi, Yuling; Liu, Weijie; Yue, Yang; Wang, Siliang; Ma, Yanan; Wen, Li; Li, Luying; Long, Fei; Zou, Zhengguang; Gao, Yihua

    2016-08-31

    Pressure sensors with high elasticity are in great demand for the realization of intelligent sensing, but there is a need to develope a simple, inexpensive, and scalable method for the manufacture of the sensors. Here, we reported an efficient, simple, facile, and repeatable "dipping and coating" process to manufacture a piezoresistive sensor with high elasticity, based on homogeneous 3D hybrid network of carbon nanotubes@silver nanoparticles (CNTs@Ag NPs) anchored on a skeleton sponge. Highly elastic, sensitive, and wearable sensors are obtained using the porous structure of sponge and the synergy effect of CNTs/Ag NPs. Our sensor was also tested for over 2000 compression-release cycles, exhibiting excellent elasticity and cycling stability. Sensors with high performance and a simple fabrication process are promising devices for commercial production in various electronic devices, for example, sport performance monitoring and man-machine interfaces. PMID:27482721

  17. Piezoresistive Sensor with High Elasticity Based on 3D Hybrid Network of Sponge@CNTs@Ag NPs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Nishuang; Shi, Yuling; Liu, Weijie; Yue, Yang; Wang, Siliang; Ma, Yanan; Wen, Li; Li, Luying; Long, Fei; Zou, Zhengguang; Gao, Yihua

    2016-08-31

    Pressure sensors with high elasticity are in great demand for the realization of intelligent sensing, but there is a need to develope a simple, inexpensive, and scalable method for the manufacture of the sensors. Here, we reported an efficient, simple, facile, and repeatable "dipping and coating" process to manufacture a piezoresistive sensor with high elasticity, based on homogeneous 3D hybrid network of carbon nanotubes@silver nanoparticles (CNTs@Ag NPs) anchored on a skeleton sponge. Highly elastic, sensitive, and wearable sensors are obtained using the porous structure of sponge and the synergy effect of CNTs/Ag NPs. Our sensor was also tested for over 2000 compression-release cycles, exhibiting excellent elasticity and cycling stability. Sensors with high performance and a simple fabrication process are promising devices for commercial production in various electronic devices, for example, sport performance monitoring and man-machine interfaces.

  18. Freeze fracturing of elastic porous media: a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Vlahou, I.; Worster, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a mathematical model of the fracturing of water-saturated rocks and other porous materials in cold climates. Ice growing inside porous rocks causes large pressures to develop that can significantly damage the rock. We study the growth of ice inside a penny-shaped cavity in a water-saturated porous rock and the consequent fracturing of the medium. Premelting of the ice against the rock, which results in thin films of unfrozen water forming between the ice and the rock, is one of the dominant processes of rock fracturing. We find that the fracture toughness of the rock, the size of pre-existing faults and the undercooling of the environment are the main parameters determining the susceptibility of a medium to fracturing. We also explore the dependence of the growth rates on the permeability and elasticity of the medium. Thin and fast-fracturing cracks are found for many types of rocks. We consider how the growth rate can be limited by the existence of pore ice, which decreases the permeability of a medium, and propose an expression for the effective ‘frozen’ permeability. PMID:25792954

  19. A staggered-grid convolutional differentiator for elastic wave modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Zhou, Binzhong; Fu, Li-Yun

    2015-11-01

    The computation of derivatives in governing partial differential equations is one of the most investigated subjects in the numerical simulation of physical wave propagation. An analytical staggered-grid convolutional differentiator (CD) for first-order velocity-stress elastic wave equations is derived in this paper by inverse Fourier transformation of the band-limited spectrum of a first derivative operator. A taper window function is used to truncate the infinite staggered-grid CD stencil. The truncated CD operator is almost as accurate as the analytical solution, and as efficient as the finite-difference (FD) method. The selection of window functions will influence the accuracy of the CD operator in wave simulation. We search for the optimal Gaussian windows for different order CDs by minimizing the spectral error of the derivative and comparing the windows with the normal Hanning window function for tapering the CD operators. It is found that the optimal Gaussian window appears to be similar to the Hanning window function for tapering the same CD operator. We investigate the accuracy of the windowed CD operator and the staggered-grid FD method with different orders. Compared to the conventional staggered-grid FD method, a short staggered-grid CD operator achieves an accuracy equivalent to that of a long FD operator, with lower computational costs. For example, an 8th order staggered-grid CD operator can achieve the same accuracy of a 16th order staggered-grid FD algorithm but with half of the computational resources and time required. Numerical examples from a homogeneous model and a crustal waveguide model are used to illustrate the superiority of the CD operators over the conventional staggered-grid FD operators for the simulation of wave propagations.

  20. Allosteric transitions in biological nanomachines are described by robust normal modes of elastic networks.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Brooks, Bernard R; Thirumalai, D

    2009-04-01

    Allostery forms the basis of intra-molecular communications in various enzymes, however the underlying conformational changes are largely elusive. Recently, we have proposed to employ an elastic model based normal mode analysis to investigate the allosteric transitions in several molecular nanomachines (including myosin II, DNA polymerase and chaperonin GroEL). After combining with bioinformatics analysis of the evolutionary sequence variations, we have been able to identify the highly conserved and robust modes of collective motions that are capable of transmitting molecular signals over long distances.

  1. Elastic Coupling of Nascent apCAM Adhesions to Flowing Actin Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mejean, Cecile O.; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Buck, Kenneth B.; Kress, Holger; Shundrovsky, Alla; Merrill, Jason W.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Forscher, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Adhesions are multi-molecular complexes that transmit forces generated by a cell’s acto-myosin networks to external substrates. While the physical properties of some of the individual components of adhesions have been carefully characterized, the mechanics of the coupling between the cytoskeleton and the adhesion site as a whole are just beginning to be revealed. We characterized the mechanics of nascent adhesions mediated by the immunoglobulin-family cell adhesion molecule apCAM, which is known to interact with actin filaments. Using simultaneous visualization of actin flow and quantification of forces transmitted to apCAM-coated beads restrained with an optical trap, we found that adhesions are dynamic structures capable of transmitting a wide range of forces. For forces in the picoNewton scale, the nascent adhesions’ mechanical properties are dominated by an elastic structure which can be reversibly deformed by up to 1 µm. Large reversible deformations rule out an interface between substrate and cytoskeleton that is dominated by a number of stiff molecular springs in parallel, and favor a compliant cross-linked network. Such a compliant structure may increase the lifetime of a nascent adhesion, facilitating signaling and reinforcement. PMID:24039928

  2. Temporal evolution of a drainage fracture network into an elastic medium with internal fluid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobchenko, Maya; Hafver, Andreas; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Renard, Francois

    2013-04-01

    Escape of internally generated fluids from low permeability rocks plays an important role in several geological systems. Primary migration of hydrocarbons, dehydration of sediments and hydrated mantellic rocks in subduction zones in the Earth's crust are geological examples where the existing permeability cannot accommodate transport of generated fluids in low permeability rocks and fluid pressure build-up may alter the permeability by fracturing. Fractures form and propagate in the rock due to internal pressure build-up. We develop an easy and reproducible analog experiment to simulate fracture formation in low permeability rock during internal fluid/gas production. This work aims to describe the physical mechanism of fracture network growth and temporal evolution of created fractures. A tight elastic gelatin matrix is used as a rock analog. The nucleation, propagation and coalescence of fractures within the solid matrix occurs due to CO2 production by yeast consuming sugar and is followed using optical means. We quantify first how an equilibrium fracture network self-develop, and then how the intermittent fluid transport is controlled by the dynamics of opening and closing of fractures, with a well-defined time frequency.

  3. Analysis of Nonlinear Poro-Elastic and Poro-Visco-Elastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bociu, Lorena; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Sacco, Riccardo; Webster, Justin T.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the initial and boundary value problem for a system of partial differential equations describing the motion of a fluid-solid mixture under the assumption of full saturation. The ability of the fluid phase to flow within the solid skeleton is described by the permeability tensor, which is assumed here to be a multiple of the identity and to depend nonlinearly on the volumetric solid strain. In particular, we study the problem of the existence of weak solutions in bounded domains, accounting for non-zero volumetric and boundary forcing terms. We investigate the influence of viscoelasticity on the solution functional setting and on the regularity requirements for the forcing terms. The theoretical analysis shows that different time regularity requirements are needed for the volumetric source of linear momentum and the boundary source of traction depending on whether or not viscoelasticity is present. The theoretical results are further investigated via numerical simulations based on a novel dual mixed hybridized finite element discretization. When the data are sufficiently regular, the simulations show that the solutions satisfy the energy estimates predicted by the theoretical analysis. Interestingly, the simulations also show that, in the purely elastic case, the Darcy velocity and the related fluid energy might become unbounded if indeed the data do not enjoy the time regularity required by the theory.

  4. Rigid-plug elastic-water model for transient pipe flow with entrapped air pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; OU, CHANGQI

    2011-01-01

    Pressure transients in a rapidly filling pipe with an entrapped air pocket are investigated analytically. A rigid-plug elastic water model is developed by applying elastic water hammer to the majority of the water column while applying rigid water analysis to a small portion near the air-water interface, which avoids effectively the interpolation error of previous approaches. Moreover, another two simplified models are introduced respectively based on constant water length and by neglecting water elasticity. Verification of the three models is confirmed by experimental results. Calculations show that the simplification of constant water length is feasible for small air pockets. The complete rigid water model is appropriate for cases with large initial air volume. The rigid-plug elastic model can predict all the essential features for the entire range of initial air fraction considered in this study, and it is the effective model for analysis of pressure transients of entrapped air.

  5. Shared end-to-content backup path protection in k-node (edge) content connected elastic optical datacenter networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Huang, Shanguo; Yin, Shan; Guo, Bingli; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Min; Gu, Wanyi

    2016-05-01

    To quantitatively measure content connectivity and provide protection for different kinds of content, the concept of k-node (edge) content connectivity is proposed recently. Based on k-node (edge) content connectivity, k-node (edge) content connected elastic optical datacenter network (KC-EODN) is proposed to design disaster-resilient and spectrum-efficient optical datacenter networks. In KC-EODN, k independent end-to-content paths are established for each request. However, it will consume too much resource to assign dedicated spectrum for each end-to-content path. Spectrum sharing among multiple end-to-content paths of different requests can greatly improve resource efficiency. In this paper, a novel perfect matching based sharing principle among multiple end-to-content paths of different requests is proposed. Based on the new proposed sharing principle, we present the shared end-to-content backup path protection (SEBPP) scheme for KC-EODN. Integer linear program (ILP) model and heuristic algorithms are designed for SEBPP scheme with the objective of minimizing the total of working and backup spectrum resources. Numerical results show that the proposed SEBPP scheme can greatly reduce spectrum consumption while ensuring the survivability against natural disaster and multi-failures. PMID:27137559

  6. Shared end-to-content backup path protection in k-node (edge) content connected elastic optical datacenter networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Huang, Shanguo; Yin, Shan; Guo, Bingli; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Min; Gu, Wanyi

    2016-05-01

    To quantitatively measure content connectivity and provide protection for different kinds of content, the concept of k-node (edge) content connectivity is proposed recently. Based on k-node (edge) content connectivity, k-node (edge) content connected elastic optical datacenter network (KC-EODN) is proposed to design disaster-resilient and spectrum-efficient optical datacenter networks. In KC-EODN, k independent end-to-content paths are established for each request. However, it will consume too much resource to assign dedicated spectrum for each end-to-content path. Spectrum sharing among multiple end-to-content paths of different requests can greatly improve resource efficiency. In this paper, a novel perfect matching based sharing principle among multiple end-to-content paths of different requests is proposed. Based on the new proposed sharing principle, we present the shared end-to-content backup path protection (SEBPP) scheme for KC-EODN. Integer linear program (ILP) model and heuristic algorithms are designed for SEBPP scheme with the objective of minimizing the total of working and backup spectrum resources. Numerical results show that the proposed SEBPP scheme can greatly reduce spectrum consumption while ensuring the survivability against natural disaster and multi-failures.

  7. Evaluation of massless-spring modeling of suspension-line elasticity during the parachute unfurling process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Huckins, E. K., III

    1972-01-01

    A general theory on mathematical modeling of elastic parachute suspension lines during the unfurling process was developed. Massless-spring modeling of suspension-line elasticity was evaluated in detail. For this simple model, equations which govern the motion were developed and numerically integrated. The results were compared with flight test data. In most regions, agreement was satisfactory. However, poor agreement was obtained during periods of rapid fluctuations in line tension.

  8. Complex Networks in Psychological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemann, R. S.; Carvalho, L. S. A. V. D.; Donangelo, R.

    We develop schematic, self-organizing, neural-network models to describe mechanisms associated with mental processes, by a neurocomputational substrate. These models are examples of real world complex networks with interesting general topological structures. Considering dopaminergic signal-to-noise neuronal modulation in the central nervous system, we propose neural network models to explain development of cortical map structure and dynamics of memory access, and unify different mental processes into a single neurocomputational substrate. Based on our neural network models, neurotic behavior may be understood as an associative memory process in the brain, and the linguistic, symbolic associative process involved in psychoanalytic working-through can be mapped onto a corresponding process of reconfiguration of the neural network. The models are illustrated through computer simulations, where we varied dopaminergic modulation and observed the self-organizing emergent patterns at the resulting semantic map, interpreting them as different manifestations of mental functioning, from psychotic through to normal and neurotic behavior, and creativity.

  9. Modeling semiflexible polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broedersz, C. P.; MacKintosh, F. C.

    2014-07-01

    This is an overview of theoretical approaches to semiflexible polymers and their networks. Such semiflexible polymers have large bending rigidities that can compete with the entropic tendency of a chain to crumple up into a random coil. Many studies on semiflexible polymers and their assemblies have been motivated by their importance in biology. Indeed, cross-linked networks of semiflexible polymers form a major structural component of tissue and living cells. Reconstituted networks of such biopolymers have emerged as a new class of biological soft matter systems with remarkable material properties, which have spurred many of the theoretical developments discussed here. Starting from the mechanics and dynamics of individual semiflexible polymers, the physics of semiflexible bundles, entangled solutions, and disordered cross-linked networks are reviewed. Finally, recent developments on marginally stable fibrous networks, which exhibit critical behavior similar to other marginal systems such as jammed soft matter, are discussed.

  10. On the origin of Gaussian network theory in the thermo/chemo-responsive shape memory effect of amorphous polymers undergoing photo-elastic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Huang, Wei Min; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-06-01

    Amorphous polymers are normally isotropic in their physical properties, however, upon stress their structural randomness is disturbed and they become anisotropic. There is a close connection between the optical anisotropy and the elastic (or mechanical) anisotropy, since both are related to the type of symmetry exhibited by the molecular structure. On the origin of Gaussian network theory, a phenomenological constitutive framework was proposed to study the photo-elastic transition and working mechanism of the thermo-/chemo-responsive shape-memory effect (SME) in amorphous shape memory polymers (SMPs). Optically refractive index was initially employed to couple the stress, strain and the anisotropy of the random link in macromolecule chain. Based on the Arrhenius law, a constitutive framework was then applied for the temperature dependence of optical (or elastic or mechanical) anisotropy according to the fictive temperature parameter. Finally, the phenomenological photo-elastic model was proposed to quantitatively identify the influential factors behind the thermo-/chemo-responsive SME in SMPs, of which the shape recovery behavior is predicted and verified by the available experimental data reported in the literature.

  11. Mechanical Model Analysis for Quantitative Evaluation of Liver Fibrosis Based on Ultrasound Tissue Elasticity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Maki, Tomonori; Yamakawa, Makoto; Mitake, Tsuyoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Kenji

    2012-07-01

    Precise evaluation of the stage of chronic hepatitis C with respect to fibrosis has become an important issue to prevent the occurrence of cirrhosis and to initiate appropriate therapeutic intervention such as viral eradication using interferon. Ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging, i.e., elastography can visualize tissue hardness/softness, and its clinical usefulness has been studied to detect and evaluate tumors. We have recently reported that the texture of elasticity image changes as fibrosis progresses. To evaluate fibrosis progression quantitatively on the basis of ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging, we introduced a mechanical model of fibrosis progression and simulated the process by which hepatic fibrosis affects elasticity images and compared the results with those clinical data analysis. As a result, it was confirmed that even in diffuse diseases like chronic hepatitis, the patterns of elasticity images are related to fibrous structural changes caused by hepatic disease and can be used to derive features for quantitative evaluation of fibrosis stage.

  12. Elastic properties of alpha quartz and the alkali halides based on an interatomic force model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, D. J.; Simmons, G.

    1972-01-01

    A two-body central-force atomic model can be used to describe accurately the elastic properties of alpha quartz if the nontetrahedral O:O forces are included. The strength of the Si:O interaction has little effect on the bulk modulus. The technique is sufficiently general to allow calculations of the elastic properties of a specified structure under arbitrary pressure from a complete description of the interatomic forces. The elastic constants for the NaCl structure and the CsCl structure are examined. Our model includes two-body, central, anion-anion, anion-cation, and electrostatic interactions.

  13. Transient Networks and Dense Colloidal Suspensions: From Viscous Flow to Elastic Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2013-03-01

    In order to analyze the mechanical response of viscoelastic materials in highly non-linear regimes, we have designed a new kind of Hele-Shaw cell where both viscous liquids and soft elastic solids can be tested at a controlled loading rate. We first consider model Maxwell liquids - characterized by a single relaxation time - with the project of benchmarking the response of complex, glassy systems. We use several solutions of microemulsions connected by telechelic polymers. We show that these materials undergo instability in a broad range of loading rates. At low rates, this instability is shown to be of the viscous Saffman-Taylor type. At high rates, we observe a purely elastic bulk instability discovered recently in the context of soft elastomers. A microfluidic version of our cell makes it possible to study the response of colloidal suspensions. We use more or less concentrated PNIPA aqueous solutions for which temperature controls the volume fraction. Observations are interpreted in the light of our understanding of their viscoelastic properties. This work was done in collaboration with Maxime Lefranc, Baudouin Saintyves, Olivier Dauchot and Serge Mora. It was funded by ANR, France.

  14. Probing elastic modulus and depth of bottom-supported inclusions in model tissues using piezoelectric cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2007-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated the depth sensitivity limit of a piezoelectric cantilever tissue elastic modulus sensor and simultaneously determined the elastic modulus and the depth of a tumor directly. Using model tissues consisting of bottom-supported modeling clay inclusions of various depths in a gelatin matrix, we empirically determined that the depth sensitivity limit of a piezoelectric cantilever sensor was twice the linear dimension of the indentation area (or the cantilever width). Knowing the depth sensitivity limit of the individual cantilever sensor as input and treating a model tissue that has the gelatin matrix on top and the modeling clay inclusion at the bottom as two springs in series, we showed that the elastic moduli and depths of the hard inclusions could be simultaneously determined with the elastic modulus profiles measured by two cantilevers with different widths as input.

  15. POLICY VARIATION, LABOR SUPPLY ELASTICITIES, AND A STRUCTURAL MODEL OF RETIREMENT

    PubMed Central

    MANOLI, DAY; MULLEN, KATHLEEN J.; WAGNER, MATHIS

    2015-01-01

    This paper exploits a combination of policy variation from multiple pension reforms in Austria and administrative data from the Austrian Social Security Database. Using the policy changes for identification, we estimate social security wealth and accrual elasticities in individuals’ retirement decisions. Next, we use these elasticities to estimate a dynamic programming model of retirement decisions. Finally, we use the estimated model to examine the labor supply and welfare consequences of potential social security reforms. PMID:26472916

  16. Modeling viscoelastic networks and cell deformation in the context of the immersed boundary method

    SciTech Connect

    Bottino, D.C.

    1998-11-20

    The author presents a straightforward numerical technique for modeling passive viscoelastic networks, such as the actin cytoskeleton of ameboid cells, in the context of the immersed boundary method. The technique involves modeling the cytoskeletal material as a network of dynamic elastic links immersed in the ambient cytosol. Linking rules of varying complexity allow the numerical network to exhibit varying degrees of viscosity, elasticity, shear thinning, and thixotropy (stress-overshoot). A series of simulated viscometer tests are used to analyze the mechanical properties of the model networks and the effects of input parameters on these properties. The numerical network is then used in the context of a full-cell model involving simulated micropipette aspiration. These micropipette aspiration tests indicate that the immersed boundary method--with the added enhancement of the viscoelastic network model presented here--can be developed into a versatile tool for studying the free-boundary deformations of passively stressed and actively moving ameboid cells.

  17. Fractional-order elastic models of cartilage: A multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Royston, Thomas J.

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this research is to develop new quantitative methods to describe the elastic properties (e.g., shear modulus, viscosity) of biological tissues such as cartilage. Cartilage is a connective tissue that provides the lining for most of the joints in the body. Tissue histology of cartilage reveals a multi-scale architecture that spans a wide range from individual collagen and proteoglycan molecules to families of twisted macromolecular fibers and fibrils, and finally to a network of cells and extracellular matrix that form layers in the connective tissue. The principal cells in cartilage are chondrocytes that function at the microscopic scale by creating nano-scale networks of proteins whose biomechanical properties are ultimately expressed at the macroscopic scale in the tissue's viscoelasticity. The challenge for the bioengineer is to develop multi-scale modeling tools that predict the three-dimensional macro-scale mechanical performance of cartilage from micro-scale models. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR elastography (MRE) provide a basis for developing such models based on the nondestructive biomechanical assessment of cartilage in vitro and in vivo. This approach, for example, uses MRI to visualize developing proto-cartilage structure, MRE to characterize the shear modulus of such structures, and fractional calculus to describe the dynamic behavior. Such models can be extended using hysteresis modeling to account for the non-linear nature of the tissue. These techniques extend the existing computational methods to predict stiffness and strength, to assess short versus long term load response, and to measure static versus dynamic response to mechanical loads over a wide range of frequencies (50-1500 Hz). In the future, such methods can perhaps be used to help identify early changes in regenerative connective tissue at the microscopic scale and to enable more effective diagnostic monitoring of the onset of disease.

  18. Campus network security model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-ku; Song, Li-ren

    2011-12-01

    Campus network security is growing importance, Design a very effective defense hacker attacks, viruses, data theft, and internal defense system, is the focus of the study in this paper. This paper compared the firewall; IDS based on the integrated, then design of a campus network security model, and detail the specific implementation principle.

  19. [Near-infrared spectrum quantitative analysis model based on principal components selected by elastic net].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-hui; Liu, Xu-hua; He, Xiong-kui; Min, Shun-geng; Zhang, Lu-da

    2010-11-01

    Elastic net is an improvement of the least-squares method by introducing in L1 and L2 penalties, and it has the advantages of the variable selection. The quantitative analysis model build by Elastic net can improve the prediction accuracy. Using 89 wheat samples as the experiment material, the spectrum principal components of the samples were selected by Elastic net. The analysis model was established for the near-infrared spectrum and the wheat's protein content, and the feasibility of using Elastic net to establish the quantitative analysis model was confirmed. In experiment, the 89 wheat samples were randomly divided into two groups, with 60 samples being the model set and 29 samples being the prediction set. The 60 samples were used to build analysis model to predict the protein contents of the 29 samples, and correlation coefficient (R) of the predicted value and chemistry observed value was 0. 984 9, with the mean relative error being 2.48%. To further investigate the feasibility and stability of the model, the 89 samples were randomly selected five times, with 60 samples to be model set and 29 samples to be prediction set. The five groups of principal components which were selected by Elastic net for building model were basically consistent, and compared with the PCR and PLS method, the model prediction accuracies were all better than PCR and similar with PLS. In view of the fact that Elastic net can realize the variable selection and the model has good prediction, it was shown that Elastic net is suitable method for building chemometrics quantitative analysis model. PMID:21284156

  20. Identification of thin elastic isotropic plate parameters applying Guided Wave Measurement and Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabisek, Ewa; Waszczyszyn, Zenon

    2015-12-01

    A new hybrid computational system for material identification (HCSMI) is presented, developed for the identification of homogeneous, elastic, isotropic plate parameters. Attention is focused on the construction of dispersion curves, related to Lamb waves. The main idea of the system HCSMI lies in separation of two essential basic computational stages, corresponding to direct or inverse analyses. In the frame of the first stage an experimental dispersion curve DCexp is constructed, applying Guided Wave Measurement (GWM) technique. Then, in the other stage, corresponding to the inverse analysis, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is trained 'off line'. The substitution of results of the first stage, treated as inputs of the ANN, gives the values of identified plate parameters. In such a way no iteration is needed, unlike to the classical approach. In such an approach, the "distance" between the approximate experimental curves DCexp and dispersion curves DCnum obtained in the direct analysis, is iteratively minimized. Two case studies are presented, corresponding either to measurements in laboratory tests or those related to pseudo-experimental noisy data of computer simulations. The obtained results prove high numerical efficiency of HCSMI, applied to the identification of aluminum plate parameters.

  1. Low Activation Joining of SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion Applications: Modeling Miniature Torsion Tests with Elastic and Elastic-Plastic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kurtz, Richard J.; Ferraris, Monica; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-06-30

    The international fusion community designed miniature torsion specimens for joint testing and irradiation in test reactors with limited irradiation volumes since SiC and SiC-composites used in fission or fusion environments require joining methods for assembling systems. Torsion specimens fail out-of-plane when joints are strong and when elastic moduli are comparable to SiC, which causes difficulties in determining shear strengths for many joints or for comparing unirradiated and irradiated joints. A finite element damage model was developed to treat elastic joints such as SiC/Ti3SiC2+SiC and elastic-plastic joints such as SiC/epoxy and steel/epoxy. The model uses constitutive shear data and is validated using epoxy joint data. The elastic model indicates fracture is likely to occur within the joined pieces to cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. Lower modulus epoxy joints always fail in plane and provide good model validation.

  2. The Elastic Behaviour of Sintered Metallic Fibre Networks: A Finite Element Study by Beam Theory

    PubMed Central

    Bosbach, Wolfram A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The finite element method has complimented research in the field of network mechanics in the past years in numerous studies about various materials. Numerical predictions and the planning efficiency of experimental procedures are two of the motivational aspects for these numerical studies. The widespread availability of high performance computing facilities has been the enabler for the simulation of sufficiently large systems. Objectives and Motivation In the present study, finite element models were built for sintered, metallic fibre networks and validated by previously published experimental stiffness measurements. The validated models were the basis for predictions about so far unknown properties. Materials and Methods The finite element models were built by transferring previously published skeletons of fibre networks into finite element models. Beam theory was applied as simplification method. Results and Conclusions The obtained material stiffness isn’t a constant but rather a function of variables such as sample size and boundary conditions. Beam theory offers an efficient finite element method for the simulated fibre networks. The experimental results can be approximated by the simulated systems. Two worthwhile aspects for future work will be the influence of size and shape and the mechanical interaction with matrix materials. PMID:26569603

  3. Numerical solution of an elastic and viscoelastic gravitational models by the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjona Almodóvar, A.; Chacón Rebollo, T.; Gómez Marmol, M.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic areas present a lower effective viscosity than usually in the Earth's crust. Both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models allow the computation of gravity, deformation, and gravitational potential changes in order to investigate crustal deformations of Earth (see for instance Battaglia & Segall, 2004; Fernández et al. 1999, 2001; Rundle 1980 and 1983). These models can be represented by a coupled system of linear parabolic (for the elastic deformations), hyperbolic (for the viscoelastic deformations) and elliptic partial differential equations (for gravitational potential changes) (see for instance Arjona et al. 2008 and 2010). The existence and uniqueness of weak solutions for both the elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational problem was demonstrated in Arjona et al. (2008 and 2014). The stabilization to solutions of the associated stationary system was proved in Arjona and Díaz (2007). Here we consider the internal source as response to the effect of a pressurized magma reservoir into a multilayered, elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational earth model. We introduce the numerical analysis of a simplified steady elastic-gravitational model, solved by means of the finite element method. We also present some numerical tests in realistic situations that confirm the predictions of theoretical order of convergence. Finally, we describe the methodology for both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models using 2D and 3D test examples performed with FreeFEM++.

  4. Duplication models for biological networks.

    PubMed

    Chung, Fan; Lu, Linyuan; Dewey, T Gregory; Galas, David J

    2003-01-01

    Are biological networks different from other large complex networks? Both large biological and nonbiological networks exhibit power-law graphs (number of nodes with degree k, N(k) approximately k(-beta)), yet the exponents, beta, fall into different ranges. This may be because duplication of the information in the genome is a dominant evolutionary force in shaping biological networks (like gene regulatory networks and protein-protein interaction networks) and is fundamentally different from the mechanisms thought to dominate the growth of most nonbiological networks (such as the Internet). The preferential choice models used for nonbiological networks like web graphs can only produce power-law graphs with exponents greater than 2. We use combinatorial probabilistic methods to examine the evolution of graphs by node duplication processes and derive exact analytical relationships between the exponent of the power law and the parameters of the model. Both full duplication of nodes (with all their connections) as well as partial duplication (with only some connections) are analyzed. We demonstrate that partial duplication can produce power-law graphs with exponents less than 2, consistent with current data on biological networks. The power-law exponent for large graphs depends only on the growth process, not on the starting graph.

  5. Neural network modeling of emotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Daniel S.

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews the history and development of computational neural network modeling of cognitive and behavioral processes that involve emotion. The exposition starts with models of classical conditioning dating from the early 1970s. Then it proceeds toward models of interactions between emotion and attention. Then models of emotional influences on decision making are reviewed, including some speculative (not and not yet simulated) models of the evolution of decision rules. Through the late 1980s, the neural networks developed to model emotional processes were mainly embodiments of significant functional principles motivated by psychological data. In the last two decades, network models of these processes have become much more detailed in their incorporation of known physiological properties of specific brain regions, while preserving many of the psychological principles from the earlier models. Most network models of emotional processes so far have dealt with positive and negative emotion in general, rather than specific emotions such as fear, joy, sadness, and anger. But a later section of this article reviews a few models relevant to specific emotions: one family of models of auditory fear conditioning in rats, and one model of induced pleasure enhancing creativity in humans. Then models of emotional disorders are reviewed. The article concludes with philosophical statements about the essential contributions of emotion to intelligent behavior and the importance of quantitative theories and models to the interdisciplinary enterprise of understanding the interactions of emotion, cognition, and behavior.

  6. The modified Black-Scholes model via constant elasticity of variance for stock options valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edeki, S. O.; Owoloko, E. A.; Ugbebor, O. O.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the classical Black-Scholes option pricing model is visited. We present a modified version of the Black-Scholes model via the application of the constant elasticity of variance model (CEVM); in this case, the volatility of the stock price is shown to be a non-constant function unlike the assumption of the classical Black-Scholes model.

  7. Specimen-specific multi-scale model for the anisotropic elastic constants of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Deuerling, Justin M; Yue, Weimin; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A; Roeder, Ryan K

    2009-09-18

    The anisotropic elastic constants of human cortical bone were predicted using a specimen-specific micromechanical model that accounted for structural parameters across multiple length scales. At the nano-scale, the elastic constants of the mineralized collagen fibril were estimated from measured volume fractions of the constituent phases, namely apatite crystals and Type I collagen. The elastic constants of the extracellular matrix (ECM) were predicted using the measured orientation distribution function (ODF) for the apatite crystals to average the contribution of misoriented mineralized collagen fibrils. Finally, the elastic constants of cortical bone tissue were determined by accounting for the measured volume fraction of Haversian porosity within the ECM. Model predictions using the measured apatite crystal ODF were not statistically different from experimental measurements for both the magnitude and anisotropy of elastic constants. In contrast, model predictions using common idealized assumptions of perfectly aligned or randomly oriented apatite crystals were significantly different from the experimental measurements. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the apatite crystal volume fraction and ODF were the most influential structural parameters affecting model predictions of the magnitude and anisotropy, respectively, of elastic constants.

  8. How can cells sense the elasticity of a substrate? An analysis using a cell tensegrity model.

    PubMed

    De Santis, G; Lennon, A B; Boschetti, F; Verhegghe, B; Verdonck, P; Prendergast, P J

    2011-01-01

    A eukaryotic cell attaches and spreads on substrates, whether it is the extracellular matrix naturally produced by the cell itself, or artificial materials, such as tissue-engineered scaffolds. Attachment and spreading require the cell to apply forces in the nN range to the substrate via adhesion sites, and these forces are balanced by the elastic response of the substrate. This mechanical interaction is one determinant of cell morphology and, ultimately, cell phenotype. In this paper we use a finite element model of a cell, with a tensegrity structure to model the cytoskeleton of actin filaments and microtubules, to explore the way cells sense the stiffness of the substrate and thereby adapt to it. To support the computational results, an analytical 1D model is developed for comparison. We find that (i) the tensegrity hypothesis of the cytoskeleton is sufficient to explain the matrix-elasticity sensing, (ii) cell sensitivity is not constant but has a bell-shaped distribution over the physiological matrix-elasticity range, and (iii) the position of the sensitivity peak over the matrix-elasticity range depends on the cytoskeletal structure and in particular on the F-actin organisation. Our model suggests that F-actin reorganisation observed in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in response to change of matrix elasticity is a structural-remodelling process that shifts the sensitivity peak towards the new value of matrix elasticity. This finding discloses a potential regulatory role of scaffold stiffness for cell differentiation.

  9. How can cells sense the elasticity of a substrate? An analysis using a cell tensegrity model.

    PubMed

    De Santis, G; Lennon, A B; Boschetti, F; Verhegghe, B; Verdonck, P; Prendergast, P J

    2011-01-01

    A eukaryotic cell attaches and spreads on substrates, whether it is the extracellular matrix naturally produced by the cell itself, or artificial materials, such as tissue-engineered scaffolds. Attachment and spreading require the cell to apply forces in the nN range to the substrate via adhesion sites, and these forces are balanced by the elastic response of the substrate. This mechanical interaction is one determinant of cell morphology and, ultimately, cell phenotype. In this paper we use a finite element model of a cell, with a tensegrity structure to model the cytoskeleton of actin filaments and microtubules, to explore the way cells sense the stiffness of the substrate and thereby adapt to it. To support the computational results, an analytical 1D model is developed for comparison. We find that (i) the tensegrity hypothesis of the cytoskeleton is sufficient to explain the matrix-elasticity sensing, (ii) cell sensitivity is not constant but has a bell-shaped distribution over the physiological matrix-elasticity range, and (iii) the position of the sensitivity peak over the matrix-elasticity range depends on the cytoskeletal structure and in particular on the F-actin organisation. Our model suggests that F-actin reorganisation observed in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in response to change of matrix elasticity is a structural-remodelling process that shifts the sensitivity peak towards the new value of matrix elasticity. This finding discloses a potential regulatory role of scaffold stiffness for cell differentiation. PMID:22048898

  10. Substitution and price elasticity estimates using inter-countrypooled data in a translog cost model

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Joyashree; Sanstad, Alan H.; Sathaye, Jayant A.; Khaddaria,Raman

    2006-06-01

    Pooled data across several developing countries and the U.S. were used to estimate long-run substitution and price elasticities ina translog framework for the paper, iron and steel, and aggregatemanufacturing industries. While the quality of the estimates variesacross the several industry-specific models, the results suggest highervalues for these elasticities than appear commonly used in integratedassessment models. Estimates of own-price elasticities of energy rangefrom - 0.80 to - 1.76 and are comparable to estimates from previouseconometric studies in the context of developed countries (- 0.77 to -0.87). Substitution elasticities show wider variation across countriesand industries. For energy and capital they range from -1.96 to 9.80, forlabor and energy from 2.61 to 7.11, and for energy and material from -0.26 to 2.07.

  11. Self-consistent modeling of visco-elastic polycrystals: Application to irradiation creep and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, P. A.; Tomé, C. N.

    1993-07-01

    w EPRESENT a model that permits the simulation of the transient response of polycrystalline aggregates to externally imposed loads and temperature gradients. The mechanical response of the constitutive grains includes elastic, Newtonian (linearly viscous), thermal and growth terms. The formulation explicitly accounts for the anisotropy in the elastic, creep, thermal and growth properties of both grains and polycrystals, and describes the time evolution of the overall visco-elastic moduli and of the internal stresses. It also provides, as limit cases, the correct overall elastic, thermal, creep and growth moduli of the polycrystal. The model is applied to analyse the characteristics of irradiation creep and growth in reactor tubes subjected to hydrostatic pressure. The influence of texture, grain anisotropy, grain shape and thermal stresses over the predicted polycrystal response, and expecially over the transient regime, is analysed in detail.

  12. A Network Synthesis Model for Generating Protein Interaction Network Families

    PubMed Central

    Sahraeian, Sayed Mohammad Ebrahim; Yoon, Byung-Jun

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a novel network synthesis model that can generate families of evolutionarily related synthetic protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks. Given an ancestral network, the proposed model generates the network family according to a hypothetical phylogenetic tree, where the descendant networks are obtained through duplication and divergence of their ancestors, followed by network growth using network evolution models. We demonstrate that this network synthesis model can effectively create synthetic networks whose internal and cross-network properties closely resemble those of real PPI networks. The proposed model can serve as an effective framework for generating comprehensive benchmark datasets that can be used for reliable performance assessment of comparative network analysis algorithms. Using this model, we constructed a large-scale network alignment benchmark, called NAPAbench, and evaluated the performance of several representative network alignment algorithms. Our analysis clearly shows the relative performance of the leading network algorithms, with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The algorithm and source code of the network synthesis model and the network alignment benchmark NAPAbench are publicly available at http://www.ece.tamu.edu/bjyoon/NAPAbench/. PMID:22912671

  13. Elastic models for the non-Arrhenius viscosity of glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyre, J.; Christensen, T.; Olsen, N.

    2006-11-01

    This paper first reviews the shoving model for the non-Arrhenius viscosity of viscous liquids. According to this model the main contribution to the activation energy of a flow event is the energy needed for molecules to shove aside the surrounding, an energy which is proportional to the instantaneous shear modulus of the liquid. Data are presented supporting the model. It is shown that the fractional Debye-Stokes-Einstein relation, that quantitatively expresses the frequently observed decoupling of, e.g., conductivity from viscous flow, may be understood within the model. The paper goes on to review several related explanations for the non-Arrhenius viscosity. Most of these are also "elastic models," i.e., they express the viscosity activation energy in terms of short-time elastic properties of the liquid. Finally, two new arguments for elastic models are given, a general solid-state defect argument and an Occam's razor type argument.

  14. A Three-Dimensional Computational Model of Collagen Network Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Zhou, Xin; Riching, Kristin; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Keely, Patricia J.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Weaver, Alissa M.; Jiang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) strongly influences cellular behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, and particularly migration. In cancer, the rigidity of the stromal collagen environment is thought to control tumor aggressiveness, and collagen alignment has been linked to tumor cell invasion. While the mechanical properties of collagen at both the single fiber scale and the bulk gel scale are quite well studied, how the fiber network responds to local stress or deformation, both structurally and mechanically, is poorly understood. This intermediate scale knowledge is important to understanding cell-ECM interactions and is the focus of this study. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic collagen fiber network model (bead-and-spring model) and studied fiber network behaviors for various biophysical conditions: collagen density, crosslinker strength, crosslinker density, and fiber orientation (random vs. prealigned). We found the best-fit crosslinker parameter values using shear simulation tests in a small strain region. Using this calibrated collagen model, we simulated both shear and tensile tests in a large linear strain region for different network geometry conditions. The results suggest that network geometry is a key determinant of the mechanical properties of the fiber network. We further demonstrated how the fiber network structure and mechanics evolves with a local formation, mimicking the effect of pulling by a pseudopod during cell migration. Our computational fiber network model is a step toward a full biomechanical model of cellular behaviors in various ECM conditions. PMID:25386649

  15. Modeling elastic momentum transfer cross-sections from mobility data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitović, Ž. D.; Stojanović, V. D.; Raspopović, Z. M.

    2016-04-01

    In this letter we present a new method to simply obtain the elastic momentum transfer cross-section which predicts a maximum of reduced mobility and its sensitivity to the temperature variation at low energies. We first determined the transport cross-section which resembles mobility data for similar closed-shell systems by using the Monte Carlo method. Second, we selected the most probable reactive processes and compiled cross-sections from experimental and theoretical data. At the end, an elastic momentum transfer cross-section is obtained by subtracting the compiled cross-sections from the momentum transfer cross-section, taking into account the effects of the angular scattering distributions. Finally, the cross-section set determined in such a way is used as an input in a final Monte Carlo code run, to calculate the flux and bulk reduced mobility for Ne+ + CF4 which were discussed as functions of the reduced electric field E/N (N is the gas density) for the temperature T = 300 K.

  16. Coarse grain modeling of imperfect networks and gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliozberg, Yelena; Chantawansri, Tanya; Sirk, Timothy; Andzelm, Jan; Mrozek, Randy; Lenhart, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    There is a strong interest in chemically and physically cross-linked entangled polymer networks and gels due to their tailorability in respect to both mechanical and structural properties. Even so, these properties are sensitive to imperfections in the polymer networks, such as dangling ends and loops. Computational modeling is a viable tool to understand the effects of these imperfections on properties in a controlled environment, in which specific defects can be systematically created and varied. In this study, we have employed generic bead-spring models of flexible chains to study a chemically and physically cross-linked network. Our results will show the importance defects, such as dangling ends and loops, on the mechanical and structural properties of these networks. We will also discuss the effects of these defects on the time-dependent elastic modulus. The simulation results qualitatively agree with experimental results and the other theoretical predictions.

  17. Sufficient minimal model for DNA denaturation: Integration of harmonic scalar elasticity and bond energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amit Raj; Granek, Rony

    2016-10-01

    We study DNA denaturation by integrating elasticity — as described by the Gaussian network model — with bond binding energies, distinguishing between different base pairs and stacking energies. We use exact calculation, within the model, of the Helmholtz free-energy of any partial denaturation state, which implies that the entropy of all formed "bubbles" ("loops") is accounted for. Considering base pair bond removal single events, the bond designated for opening is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all remaining base pair bonds. Despite of its great simplicity, for several known DNA sequences our results are in accord with available theoretical and experimental studies. Moreover, we report free-energy profiles along the denaturation pathway, which allow to detect stable or meta-stable partial denaturation states, composed of bubble, as local free-energy minima separated by barriers. Our approach allows to study very long DNA strands with commonly available computational power, as we demonstrate for a few random sequences in the range 200-800 base-pairs. For the latter, we also elucidate the self-averaging property of the system. Implications for the well known breathing dynamics of DNA are elucidated.

  18. Elastic electron-deuteron scattering within a relativistic potential model

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhlov, N. A. Vakulyuk, A. A.

    2015-01-15

    Elastic electron-deuteron scattering was considered in the point form of relativistic quantum mechanics. Observables of this process and the dependence of the deuteron form factors on the 4-momentum transfer Q up to 8 fm{sup −1} were calculated. The nucleon-nucleon potentials used in the calculations included the Nijmegen potentials NijmI and NijmII, the Bonn potential CD-Bonn, and the Moscow potential involving forbidden states. A parametrization of the nucleon form factors that complies with present-day experimental results was used as input data. The results of the calculations that employ all of the above potential types describe experimental data at least up to Q ≈ 5 fm{sup −}1.

  19. An Elastic-Plastic Damage Model for Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil

    2009-08-11

    This article proposes an elastic-plastic damage model that combines micromechanical modeling with continuum damage mechanics to predict the stress-strain response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics. The model accounts for distributions of orientation and length of elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic matrix whose behavior is elastic-plastic and damageable. The elastic-plastic damage behavior of the matrix is described by the modified Ramberg-Osgood relation and the three-dimensional damage model in deformation assuming isotropic hardening. Fiber/matrix debonding is accounted for using a parameter that governs the fiber/matrix interface compliance. A linear relationship between this parameter and the matrix damage variable is assumed. First, the elastic-plastic damage behavior of the reference aligned-fiber composite containing the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite is computed using an incremental Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka mean field approach. The incremental response of the latter is then obtained from the solution for the aligned-fiber composite by averaging over all fiber orientations. The model is validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  20. The impact of ice I rheology on interior models of Ganymede: The elastic vs. the visco-elastic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrügge, Gregor; Hussmann, Hauke; Sohl, Frank; Oberst, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Many investigations on key processes of icy satellites are driven by the rheological behavior of planetary ices. Future missions to Jupiter's icy moons (e.g. JUICE / Europa clipper) aimed at constraining the thickness of the outer ice shell using radio science and/or laser altimetry will have to address this problem. We investigate for the case of Ganymede under which conditions the ice I viscosity could be constrained by measuring the phase-lag of the tidal response using laser altimetry. In the absence of seismic data, interior structure models are constrained by the satellite's mean density and mean moment-of-inertia factor. One key observable to reduce the ambiguity of the corresponding structural models is the measurement of the dynamic response of the satellite's outer ice shells to tidal forces exerted by Jupiter and characterized by the body tide surface Love numbers h2 and k2. The Love number k2 measures the variation of the gravitational potential due to tidally induced internal redistribution of mass and can be inferred from radio science experiments. The Love number h2 is a measure for the tide-induced radial displacement of the satellite's surface. It is an advantage that Ganymede's surface displacement Love number h2 can be expected to be measured with a high accuracy using laser altimetry (Steinbrügge et al., 2014). However, the determination of the resulting ice thickness further depends on the possible existence of a liquid subsurface water ocean and on the tidally effective rheology of the outer ice shell (Moore and Schubert, 2003). Here, we distinguish between an elastic, visco-elastic or even fluid behavior in the sense of the Maxwell model and alternative rheological models. In the case of Ganymede the fluid case would imply high ice temperatures which are at odds with thermal equilibrium models calculated by Spohn and Schubert (2003). However the visco-elastic case is still possible. Laboratory measurements of ice I (e.g. Sotin et al., 1998

  1. The design, analysis and experimental evaluation of an elastic model wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavin, R. K., III; Thisayakorn, C.

    1974-01-01

    An elastic orbiter model was developed to evaluate the effectiveness of aeroelasticity computer programs. The elasticity properties were introduced by constructing beam-like straight wings for the wind tunnel model. A standard influence coefficient mathematical model was used to estimate aeroelastic effects analytically. In general good agreement was obtained between the empirical and analytical estimates of the deformed shape. However, in the static aeroelasticity case, it was found that the physical wing exhibited less bending and more twist than was predicted by theory.

  2. Performance evaluation of data center service localization based on virtual resource migration in software defined elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; Tan, Yuanlong; Lin, Yi; Han, Jianrui; Lee, Young

    2015-09-01

    Data center interconnection with elastic optical network is a promising scenario to meet the high burstiness and high-bandwidth requirements of data center services. In our previous work, we implemented cross stratum optimization of optical network and application stratums resources that allows to accommodate data center services. In view of this, this study extends the data center resources to user side to enhance the end-to-end quality of service. We propose a novel data center service localization (DCSL) architecture based on virtual resource migration in software defined elastic data center optical network. A migration evaluation scheme (MES) is introduced for DCSL based on the proposed architecture. The DCSL can enhance the responsiveness to the dynamic end-to-end data center demands, and effectively reduce the blocking probability to globally optimize optical network and application resources. The overall feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture are experimentally verified on the control plane of our OpenFlow-based enhanced SDN testbed. The performance of MES scheme under heavy traffic load scenario is also quantitatively evaluated based on DCSL architecture in terms of path blocking probability, provisioning latency and resource utilization, compared with other provisioning scheme.

  3. Low Activation Joining of SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion Applications: Modeling Miniature Torsion Tests with Elastic and Elastic-Plastic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Ferraris, Monica; Ventrella, Andrea; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-03-01

    The use of SiC and SiC-composites in fission or fusion environments requires joining methods for assembling systems. The international fusion community designed miniature torsion specimens for joint testing and irradiation in test reactors with limited irradiation volumes. These torsion specimens fail out-of-plane when joints are strong and when elastic moduli are within a certain range compared to SiC, which causes difficulties in determining shear strengths for joints or for comparing unirradiated and irradiated joints. A finite element damage model was developed that indicates fracture is likely to occur within the joined pieces to cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model was extended to treat elastic-plastic joints such as SiC/epoxy and steel/epoxy joints tested as validation of the specimen design.

  4. Elasticity analyses of size-based red and white abalone matrix models: management and conservation.

    PubMed

    Rogers-Bennett, Laura; Leaf, Robert T

    2006-02-01

    Prospective elasticity analyses have been used to aid in the management of fished species and the conservation of endangered species. Elasticities were examined for deterministic size-based matrix models of red abalone, Haliotis rufescens, and white abalone, H. sorenseni, to evaluate which size classes influenced population growth (lambda) the most. In the red abalone matrix, growth transitions were determined from a tag recapture study and grouped into nine size classes. In the white abalone matrix, abalone growth was determined from a laboratory study and grouped into five size classes. Survivorship was estimated from tag recapture data for red abalone using a Jolly-Seber model with size as a covariate and used for both red and white abalone. Reproduction estimates for both models used averages of the number of mature eggs produced by female red and white abalone in each size class from four-year reproduction studies. Population growth rate (lambda) was set to 1.0, and the first-year survival (larval survival through to the first size class) was estimated by iteration. Survival elasticities were higher than fecundity elasticities in both the red and white matrix models. The sizes classes with the greatest survival elasticities, and therefore the most influence on population growth in the model, were the sublegal red abalone (150-178 mm) and the largest white abalone size class (140-175 mm). For red abalone, the existing minimum legal size (178 mm) protects the size class the model suggests is critical to population growth. Implementation of education programs for novice divers coupled with renewed enforcement may serve to minimize incidental mortality of the critical size class. For white abalone, conservation efforts directed at restoring adults may have more of an impact on population growth than efforts focusing on juveniles. Our work is an example of how prospective elasticity analyses of size-structured matrix models can be used to quantitatively evaluate

  5. Data modeling of network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Faucheux, Jeffery P.; Harris, Brad

    2004-01-01

    This paper highlights Data Modeling theory and its use for text data mining as a graphical network search engine. Data Modeling is then used to create a real-time filter capable of monitoring network traffic down to the port level for unusual dynamics and changes in business as usual. This is accomplished in an unsupervised fashion without a priori knowledge of abnormal characteristics. Two novel methods for converting streaming binary data into a form amenable to graphics based search and change detection are introduced. These techniques are then successfully applied to 1999 KDD Cup network attack data log-on sessions to demonstrate that Data Modeling can detect attacks without prior training on any form of attack behavior. Finally, two new methods for data encryption using these ideas are proposed.

  6. Micromechanics-based elastic model for functionally graded materials with particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, H.M.; Sun, L.Z.; Paulino, G.H

    2004-07-12

    A micromechanics-based elastic model is developed for two-phase functionally graded materials with locally pair-wise interactions between particles. While the effective material properties change gradually along the gradation direction, there exist two microstructurally distinct zones: particle-matrix zone and transition zone. In the particle-matrix zone, pair-wise interactions between particles are employed using a modified Green's function method. By integrating the interactions from all other particles over the representative volume element, the homogenized elastic fields are obtained. The effective stiffness distribution over the gradation direction is further derived. In the transition zone, a transition function is constructed to make the homogenized elastic fields continuous and differentiable in the gradation direction. The model prediction is compared with other models and experimental data to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method.

  7. An approach for modeling vulnerability of the network of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Song, Bo; Zhang, Zhaojun; Liu, Haikuan

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a framework is given to model the network of networks and to investigate the vulnerability of the network of networks subjected to failures. Because there are several redundant systems in infrastructure systems, the dependent intensity between two networks is introduced and adopted to discuss the vulnerability of the interdependent infrastructure networks subjected to failures. Shanghai electrified rail transit network is used to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed framework. Because the rail network is dependent on the power grid and communication network, the corresponding power grid and communication network are also included in this system. Meanwhile the failures to the power grid and communication network are utilized to investigate the vulnerability of the rail network. The results show that the rail network strongly depends on the power grid and weakly depends on the communication network, and the transport functionality loss of the rail network increases with the increase of dependent intensity. Meanwhile the highest betweenness node-based attack to the power grid and the largest degree node-based attack to the communication network can result in the most functionality losses to the rail network. Moreover, the functionality loss of the rail network has the smallest value when the tolerance parameter of the power grid equals 0.75 and the critical nodes of the power grid and communication network can be obtained by simulations.

  8. On the influence of model parametrization in elastic full waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, D.; De Nil, D.; Kurzmann, A.; Przebindowska, A.; Bohlen, T.

    2012-10-01

    Elastic Full Waveform Tomography (FWT) aims to reduce the misfit between recorded and modelled data, to deduce a very detailed model of elastic material parameters in the underground. The choice of the elastic model parameters to be inverted affects the convergence and quality of the reconstructed subsurface model. Using the Cross-Triangle-Squares (CTS) model three elastic parametrizations, Lamé parameters m1 = [λ, μ, ρ], seismic velocities m2 = [Vp, Vs, ρ] and seismic impedances m3 = [Ip, Is, ρ] for far-offset reflection seismic acquisition geometries with explosive point sources and free-surface condition are studied. In each CTS model the three elastic parameters are assigned to three different geometrical objects that are spatially separated. The results of the CTS model study reveal a strong requirement of a sequential frequency inversion from low to high frequencies to reconstruct the density model. Using only high-frequency data, cross-talk artefacts have an influence on the quantitative reconstruction of the material parameters, while for a sequential frequency inversion only structural artefacts, representing the boundaries of different model parameters, are present. During the inversion, the Lamé parameters, seismic velocities and impedances could be reconstructed well. However, using the Lamé parametrization ?-artefacts are present in the λ model, while similar artefacts are suppressed when using seismic velocities or impedances. The density inversion shows the largest ambiguity for all parametrizations. However, the artefacts are again more dominant, when using the Lamé parameters and suppressed for seismic velocity and impedance parametrization. The afore mentioned results are confirmed for a geologically more realistic modified Marmousi-II model. Using a conventional streamer acquisition geometry the P-velocity, S-velocity and density models of the subsurface were reconstructed successfully and are compared with the results of the Lam

  9. Tuition Elasticity of the Demand for Higher Education among Current Students: A Pricing Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Glenn A.; Whipple, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A pricing model is offered, based on retention of current students, that colleges can use to determine appropriate tuition. A computer-based model that quantifies the relationship between tuition elasticity and projected net return to the college was developed and applied to determine an appropriate tuition rate for a small, private liberal arts…

  10. Validation of an analytical compressed elastic tube model for acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hirtum, A.; Blandin, R.; Pelorson, X.

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic wave propagation through a compressed elastic tube is a recurrent problem in engineering. Compression of the tube is achieved by pinching it between two parallel bars so that the pinching effort as well as the longitudinal position of pinching can be controlled. A stadium-based geometrical tube model is combined with a plane wave acoustic model in order to estimate acoustic wave propagation through the elastic tube as a function of pinching effort, pinching position, and outlet termination (flanged or unflanged). The model outcome is validated against experimental data obtained in a frequency range from 3.5 kHz up to 10 kHz by displacing an acoustic probe along the tube's centerline. Due to plane wave model assumptions and the decrease of the lowest higher order mode cut-on frequency with increasing pinching effort, the difference between modeled and measured data is analysed in three frequency bands, up to 5 kHz, 8 kHz, and 9.5 kHz, respectively. It is seen that the mean and standard error within each frequency band do not significantly vary with pinching effort, pinching position, or outlet termination. Therefore, it is concluded that the analytical tube model is suitable to approximate the elastic tube geometry when modeling acoustic wave propagation through the pinched elastic tube with either flanged or unflanged termination.

  11. Shear-stress fluctuations in self-assembled transient elastic networks.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, J P; Kriuchevskyi, I; Cavallo, A; Xu, H; Baschnagel, J

    2016-06-01

    Focusing on shear-stress fluctuations, we investigate numerically a simple generic model for self-assembled transient networks formed by repulsive beads reversibly bridged by ideal springs. With Δt being the sampling time and t_{☆}(f)∼1/f the Maxwell relaxation time (set by the spring recombination frequency f), the dimensionless parameter Δx=Δt/t_{☆}(f) is systematically scanned from the liquid limit (Δx≫1) to the solid limit (Δx≪1) where the network topology is quenched and an ensemble average over m-independent configurations is required. Generalizing previous work on permanent networks, it is shown that the shear-stress relaxation modulus G(t) may be efficiently determined for all Δx using the simple-average expression G(t)=μ_{A}-h(t) with μ_{A}=G(0) characterizing the canonical-affine shear transformation of the system at t=0 and h(t) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress as a function of time t. This relation is compared to the standard expression G(t)=c[over ̃](t) using the (rescaled) shear-stress autocorrelation function c[over ̃](t). Lower bounds for the m configurations required by both relations are given.

  12. Shear-stress fluctuations in self-assembled transient elastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Kriuchevskyi, I.; Cavallo, A.; Xu, H.; Baschnagel, J.

    2016-06-01

    Focusing on shear-stress fluctuations, we investigate numerically a simple generic model for self-assembled transient networks formed by repulsive beads reversibly bridged by ideal springs. With Δ t being the sampling time and t(f ) ˜1 /f the Maxwell relaxation time (set by the spring recombination frequency f ), the dimensionless parameter Δ x =Δ t /t(f ) is systematically scanned from the liquid limit (Δ x ≫1 ) to the solid limit (Δ x ≪1 ) where the network topology is quenched and an ensemble average over m -independent configurations is required. Generalizing previous work on permanent networks, it is shown that the shear-stress relaxation modulus G (t ) may be efficiently determined for all Δ x using the simple-average expression G (t ) =μA-h (t ) with μA=G (0 ) characterizing the canonical-affine shear transformation of the system at t =0 and h (t ) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress as a function of time t . This relation is compared to the standard expression G (t ) =c ˜(t ) using the (rescaled) shear-stress autocorrelation function c ˜(t ) . Lower bounds for the m configurations required by both relations are given.

  13. Shear-stress fluctuations in self-assembled transient elastic networks.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, J P; Kriuchevskyi, I; Cavallo, A; Xu, H; Baschnagel, J

    2016-06-01

    Focusing on shear-stress fluctuations, we investigate numerically a simple generic model for self-assembled transient networks formed by repulsive beads reversibly bridged by ideal springs. With Δt being the sampling time and t_{☆}(f)∼1/f the Maxwell relaxation time (set by the spring recombination frequency f), the dimensionless parameter Δx=Δt/t_{☆}(f) is systematically scanned from the liquid limit (Δx≫1) to the solid limit (Δx≪1) where the network topology is quenched and an ensemble average over m-independent configurations is required. Generalizing previous work on permanent networks, it is shown that the shear-stress relaxation modulus G(t) may be efficiently determined for all Δx using the simple-average expression G(t)=μ_{A}-h(t) with μ_{A}=G(0) characterizing the canonical-affine shear transformation of the system at t=0 and h(t) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress as a function of time t. This relation is compared to the standard expression G(t)=c[over ̃](t) using the (rescaled) shear-stress autocorrelation function c[over ̃](t). Lower bounds for the m configurations required by both relations are given. PMID:27415324

  14. Thermal Network Modelling Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Thermal mathematical modelling is discussed in detail. A three-fold purpose was established: (1) to acquaint the new user with the terminology and concepts used in thermal mathematical modelling, (2) to present the more experienced and occasional user with quick formulas and methods for solving everyday problems, coupled with study cases which lend insight into the relationships that exist among the various solution techniques and parameters, and (3) to begin to catalog in an orderly fashion the common formulas which may be applied to automated conversational language techniques.

  15. Modeling the Cell Muscle Membrane from Normal and Desmin- or Dystrophin-null Mice as an Elastic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Santamaría-Holek, Ivan; Bloch, Robert J.; Ortega, Alicia; González-Serratos, Hugo

    2010-12-01

    Two of the most important proteins linking the contractile apparatus and costameres at the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers are dystrophin and desmin. We have developed an elastic model of the proteins that link the sarcolemma to the myofibrils. This is a distributed model, with an elastic constant, k, that includes the main protein components of the costameres. The distributed spring model is composed of parallel units attached in series. To test the model, we performed experiments in which we applied negative pressure, generated by an elastimeter, to a small area of the sarcolemma from single myofiber. The negative pressure formed a bleb of variable height, dependent on the pressure applied. We normalized our measurements of k in dystrophin-null (mdx) and desmin-null (des-/-) mice to the value we obtained for wild type (WT) mice, which was set at 1.0. The relative experimental value for the stiffness of myofibers from mice lacking dystrophin or desmin was 0.5 and 0.7, respectively. The theoretical k values of the individual elements were obtained using neural networks (NN), in which the input was the k value for each parallel spring component and the output was the solution of each resulting parallel system. We compare the experimental values of k in control and mutant muscles to the theoretical values obtained by NN for each protein. Computed theoretical values were 0.4 and 0.8 for dystrophin- and desmin-null muscles, respectively, and 0.9 for WT, in reasonable agreement with our experimental results. This suggests that, although it is a simplified spring model solved by NN, it provides a good approximation of the distribution of spring elements and the elastic constants of the proteins that form the costameres. Our results show that dystrophin is the protein that contributes more than any other to the strength of the connections between the sarcolemma and the contractile apparatus, the costameres.

  16. Modeling obesity using abductive networks.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, R E; Mangoud, A M

    1997-12-01

    This paper investigates the use of abductive-network machine learning for modeling and predicting outcome parameters in terms of input parameters in medical survey data. Here we consider modeling obesity as represented by the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) risk factor to investigate the influence of various parameters. The same approach would be useful in predicting values of clinical parameters that are difficult or expensive to measure from others that are more readily available. The AIM abductive network machine learning tool was used to model the WHR from 13 other health parameters. Survey data were collected for a randomly selected sample of 1100 persons aged 20 yr and over attending nine primary health care centers at Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Models were synthesized by training on a randomly selected set of 800 cases, using both continuous and categorical representations of the parameters, and evaluated by predicting the WHR value for the remaining 300 cases. Models for WHR as a continuous variable predict the actual values within an error of 7.5% at the 90% confidence limits. Categorical models predict the correct logical value of WHR with an error in only 2 of the 300 evaluation cases. Analytical relationships derived from simple categorical models explain global observations on the total survey population to an accuracy as high as 99%. Simple continuous models represented as analytical functions highlight global relationships and trends. Results confirm the strong correlation between WHR and diastolic blood pressure, cholesterol level, and family history of obesity. Compared to other statistical and neural network approaches, AIM abductive networks provide faster and more automated model synthesis. A review is given of other areas where the proposed modeling approach can be useful in clinical practice.

  17. Quantitative modeling of coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior of piezoelectric actuators bonded to an elastic medium for structural health monitoring: a review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoliang; Song, Fei; Wang, Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Elastic waves, especially guided waves, generated by a piezoelectric actuator/sensor network, have shown great potential for on-line health monitoring of advanced aerospace, nuclear, and automotive structures in recent decades. Piezoelectric materials can function as both actuators and sensors in these applications due to wide bandwidth, quick response and low costs. One of the most fundamental issues surrounding the effective use of piezoelectric actuators is the quantitative evaluation of the resulting elastic wave propagation by considering the coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior between the actuator and the host medium. Accurate characterization of the local interfacial stress distribution between the actuator and the host medium is the key issue for the problem. This paper presents a review of the development of analytical, numerical and hybrid approaches for modeling of the coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior. The resulting elastic wave propagation for structural health monitoring is also summarized. PMID:22319319

  18. Quantitative Modeling of Coupled Piezo-Elastodynamic Behavior of Piezoelectric Actuators Bonded to an Elastic Medium for Structural Health Monitoring: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guoliang; Song, Fei; Wang, Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Elastic waves, especially guided waves, generated by a piezoelectric actuator/sensor network, have shown great potential for on-line health monitoring of advanced aerospace, nuclear, and automotive structures in recent decades. Piezoelectric materials can function as both actuators and sensors in these applications due to wide bandwidth, quick response and low costs. One of the most fundamental issues surrounding the effective use of piezoelectric actuators is the quantitative evaluation of the resulting elastic wave propagation by considering the coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior between the actuator and the host medium. Accurate characterization of the local interfacial stress distribution between the actuator and the host medium is the key issue for the problem. This paper presents a review of the development of analytical, numerical and hybrid approaches for modeling of the coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior. The resulting elastic wave propagation for structural health monitoring is also summarized. PMID:22319319

  19. From Process Modeling to Elastic Property Prediction for Long-Fiber Injection-Molded Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara J.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Holbery, James D.; Smith, Mark T.

    2007-09-13

    This paper presents an experimental-modeling approach to predict the elastic properties of long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). The approach accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in LFTs. LFT samples were injection-molded for the study, and fiber length and orientation distributions were measured at different locations for use in the computation of the composite properties. The current fiber orientation model was assessed to determine its capability to predict fiber orientation in LFTs. Predicted fiber orientations for the studied LFT samples were also used in the calculation of the elastic properties of these samples, and the predicted overall moduli were then compared with the experimental results. The elastic property prediction was based on the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka method combined with the orientation averaging technique. The predictions reasonably agree with the experimental LFT data

  20. Local interaction simulation approach to modelling nonclassical, nonlinear elastic behavior in solids.

    PubMed

    Scalerandi, Marco; Agostini, Valentina; Delsanto, Pier Paolo; Van Den Abeele, Koen; Johnson, Paul A

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies show that a broad category of materials share "nonclassical" nonlinear elastic behavior much different from "classical" (Landau-type) nonlinearity. Manifestations of "nonclassical" nonlinearity include stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasistatic experiments, and specific dependencies of the harmonic amplitudes with respect to the drive amplitude in dynamic wave experiments, which are remarkably different from those predicted by the classical theory. These materials have in common soft "bond" elements, where the elastic nonlinearity originates, contained in hard matter (e.g., a rock sample). The bond system normally comprises a small fraction of the total material volume, and can be localized (e.g., a crack in a solid) or distributed, as in a rock. In this paper a model is presented in which the soft elements are treated as hysteretic or reversible elastic units connected in a one-dimensional lattice to elastic elements (grains), which make up the hard matrix. Calculations are performed in the framework of the local interaction simulation approach (LISA). Experimental observations are well predicted by the model, which is now ready both for basic investigations about the physical origins of nonlinear elasticity and for applications to material damage diagnostics.

  1. A general one-dimension nonlinear magneto-elastic coupled constitutive model for magnetostrictive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Da-Guang; Li, Meng-Han; Zhou, Hao-Miao

    2015-10-15

    For magnetostrictive rods under combined axial pre-stress and magnetic field, a general one-dimension nonlinear magneto-elastic coupled constitutive model was built in this paper. First, the elastic Gibbs free energy was expanded into polynomial, and the relationship between stress and strain and the relationship between magnetization and magnetic field with the polynomial form were obtained with the help of thermodynamic relations. Then according to microscopic magneto-elastic coupling mechanism and some physical facts of magnetostrictive materials, a nonlinear magneto-elastic constitutive with concise form was obtained when the relations of nonlinear strain and magnetization in the polynomial constitutive were instead with transcendental functions. The comparisons between the prediction and the experimental data of different magnetostrictive materials, such as Terfenol-D, Metglas and Ni showed that the predicted magnetostrictive strain and magnetization curves were consistent with experimental results under different pre-stresses whether in the region of low and moderate field or high field. Moreover, the model can fully reflect the nonlinear magneto-mechanical coupling characteristics between magnetic, magnetostriction and elasticity, and it can effectively predict the changes of material parameters with pre-stress and bias field, which is useful in practical applications.

  2. Immuno-compatibility of soft hydrophobic poly (n-butyl acrylate) networks with elastic moduli for regeneration of functional tissues.

    PubMed

    Roch, T; Cui, J; Kratz, K; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2012-01-01

    The need for engineered devices to treat cardiovascular diseases is increasing due to an aging population and a changing lifestyle. Soft poly(n-butyl acrylate) (cPnBA) networks were recently described as polymer networks with adjustable mechanical properties and suggested as soft substrates for cells, which could potentially be used for cardiovascular implants. Vascular prostheses designed to be implanted in arteries should have an elasticity similar to blood vessels (elastic modulus at body temperature between 100 and 1200 kPa). Therefore, cPnBA networks with E-moduli of 250 kPa (cPnBA0250) and 1100 kPa (cPnBA1100) were developed. Recently, it was shown that both materials were non-cytotoxic for murin fibroblasts, human primary endothelial cells and human monocytes. However, before such newly developed polymers can be used in vivo, it has to be assured that the sterilized materials have a very low endotoxin load to avoid an unspecific activation of the immune system, which otherwise might cause local or systemic inflammatory responses and could lead to severe pathologies. In this study we investigated the immuno-compatibility of sterilized cPnBA0250 and cPnBA1100 with the help of an immuno-competent macrophage cell line as well as with whole human blood.

  3. To what extent can cortical bone millimeter-scale elasticity be predicted by a two-phase composite model with variable porosity?

    PubMed

    Granke, Mathilde; Grimal, Quentin; Parnell, William J; Raum, Kay; Gerisch, Alf; Peyrin, Françoise; Saïed, Amena; Laugier, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    An evidence gap exists in fully understanding and reliably modeling the variations in elastic anisotropy that are observed at the millimeter scale in human cortical bone. The porosity (pore volume fraction) is known to account for a large part, but not all, of the elasticity variations. This effect may be modeled by a two-phase micromechanical model consisting of a homogeneous matrix pervaded by cylindrical pores. Although this model has been widely used, it lacks experimental validation. The aim of the present work is to revisit experimental data (elastic coefficients, porosity) previously obtained from 21 cortical bone specimens from the femoral mid-diaphysis of 10 donors and test the validity of the model by proposing a detailed discussion of its hypotheses. This includes investigating to what extent the experimental uncertainties, pore network modeling, and matrix elastic properties influence the model's predictions. The results support the validity of the two-phase model of cortical bone which assumes that the essential source of variations of elastic properties at the millimeter-scale is the volume fraction of vascular porosity. We propose that the bulk of the remaining discrepancies between predicted stiffness coefficients and experimental data (RMSE between 6% and 9%) is in part due to experimental errors and part due to small variations of the extravascular matrix properties. More significantly, although most of the models that have been proposed for cortical bone were based on several homogenization steps and a large number of variable parameters, we show that a model with a single parameter, namely the volume fraction of vascular porosity, is a suitable representation for cortical bone. The results could provide a guide to build specimen-specific cortical bone models. This will be of interest to analyze the structure-function relationship in bone and to design bone-mimicking materials.

  4. To what extent can cortical bone millimeter-scale elasticity be predicted by a two-phase composite model with variable porosity?

    PubMed

    Granke, Mathilde; Grimal, Quentin; Parnell, William J; Raum, Kay; Gerisch, Alf; Peyrin, Françoise; Saïed, Amena; Laugier, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    An evidence gap exists in fully understanding and reliably modeling the variations in elastic anisotropy that are observed at the millimeter scale in human cortical bone. The porosity (pore volume fraction) is known to account for a large part, but not all, of the elasticity variations. This effect may be modeled by a two-phase micromechanical model consisting of a homogeneous matrix pervaded by cylindrical pores. Although this model has been widely used, it lacks experimental validation. The aim of the present work is to revisit experimental data (elastic coefficients, porosity) previously obtained from 21 cortical bone specimens from the femoral mid-diaphysis of 10 donors and test the validity of the model by proposing a detailed discussion of its hypotheses. This includes investigating to what extent the experimental uncertainties, pore network modeling, and matrix elastic properties influence the model's predictions. The results support the validity of the two-phase model of cortical bone which assumes that the essential source of variations of elastic properties at the millimeter-scale is the volume fraction of vascular porosity. We propose that the bulk of the remaining discrepancies between predicted stiffness coefficients and experimental data (RMSE between 6% and 9%) is in part due to experimental errors and part due to small variations of the extravascular matrix properties. More significantly, although most of the models that have been proposed for cortical bone were based on several homogenization steps and a large number of variable parameters, we show that a model with a single parameter, namely the volume fraction of vascular porosity, is a suitable representation for cortical bone. The results could provide a guide to build specimen-specific cortical bone models. This will be of interest to analyze the structure-function relationship in bone and to design bone-mimicking materials. PMID:25462527

  5. Neural Network model for memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipin, Meena; Srivastava, Vipin; Granato, Enzo

    1992-10-01

    We propose a model for memory within the framework of Neural Network which is akin to the realistic memory, in that it tends to forget upon learning more, and has both long-term as well as short-term memories. It has great advantage over the existing models proposed so far by Parisi and Gordon which have only short-term and long-term memories respectively. Our model resorts to learning within bounds like the previous two models, however, the essential difference lies in the reinitialization of the synaptic efficacy after it accumulates up to a preassigned value.

  6. Bayesian Networks for Social Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Paul D.; White, Amanda M.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Dalton, Angela C.; Brothers, Alan J.

    2011-03-28

    This paper describes a body of work developed over the past five years. The work addresses the use of Bayesian network (BN) models for representing and predicting social/organizational behaviors. The topics covered include model construction, validation, and use. These topics show the bulk of the lifetime of such model, beginning with construction, moving to validation and other aspects of model ‘critiquing’, and finally demonstrating how the modeling approach might be used to inform policy analysis. To conclude, we discuss limitations of using BN for this activity and suggest remedies to address those limitations. The primary benefits of using a well-developed computational, mathematical, and statistical modeling structure, such as BN, are 1) there are significant computational, theoretical and capability bases on which to build 2) ability to empirically critique the model, and potentially evaluate competing models for a social/behavioral phenomena.

  7. An engineering model for yield inception in slip-stick elastic contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinu, S.; Gradinaru, D.

    2015-11-01

    The failure of the mechanical contact due to plastic yielding is generally predicted employing stress analysis coupled with the von Mises yield criterion, which uses the maximum of the second deviatoric stress invariant as a threshold value. This paper aims to establish the relation between the frictional regime and the normal and tangential loading components which lead to yield inception in the slip-stick spherical contact between similarly elastic materials. The Boussinesq and Cerruti fundamental solutions for the elastic half-space are used in a robust semi-analytical method based on the superposition principle applicable in the frame of linear elasticity, and enhanced with an acceleration technique derived from the convolution theorem. A rapid algorithm for accurate computation of elastic stresses induced in subsurface by a known but arbitrary distribution of surface tractions, normal or shear, is advanced. The obtained data is normalized to allow model extension to any elastic constants or contact curvature, and curve fitting is employed to derive simple empirical formulas pertinent to practical engineering applications.

  8. Heteroepitaxial growth modes with dislocations in a two-dimensional elastic lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuno, Hiroyasu; Uwaha, Makio; Saito, Yukio

    2008-11-01

    We study equilibrium shapes of adsorbate crystals by allowing a possibility of dislocations on an elastic substrate in a two-dimensional lattice model. The ground state energy is calculated numerically with the use of an elastic lattice Green's function. From the equilibrium shapes determined for various coverages, we infer the growth mode. As the misfit parameter increases, the growth mode changes from the Frank-van der Merwe (FM) to the Stranski-Krastanov (SK), further to the FM with dislocations for a parameter range of ordinary semiconductor materials. Conceivable growth modes such as the SK with dislocations appear in a parameter range between the SK and the FM with dislocations.

  9. Covariant Newtonian and relativistic dynamics of (magneto)-elastic solid model for neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B.; Chachoua, E.; Chamel, N.

    2006-01-01

    This work develops the dynamics of a perfectly elastic solid model for application to the outer crust of a magnetised neutron star. Particular attention is given to the Noether identities responsible for energy-momentum conservation, using a formulation that is fully covariant, not only (as is usual) in a fully relativistic treatment but also (sacrificing accuracy and elegance for economy of degrees of gravitational freedom) in the technically more complicated case of the Newtonian limit. The results are used to obtain explicit (relativistic and Newtonian) formulae for the propagation speeds of generalised (Alfven type) magneto-elastic perturbation modes.

  10. Computer simulation of model cohesive powders: Plastic consolidation, structural changes, and elasticity under isotropic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilabert, F. A.; Roux, J.-N.; Castellanos, A.

    2008-09-01

    The quasistatic behavior of a simple two-dimensional model of a cohesive powder under isotropic loads is investigated by discrete element simulations. We ignore contact plasticity and focus on the effect of geometry and collective rearrangements on the material behavior. The loose packing states, as assembled and characterized in a previous numerical study [Gilabert, Roux, and Castellanos, Phys. Rev. E 75, 011303 (2007)], are observed, under growing confining pressure P , to undergo important structural changes, while solid fraction Φ irreversibly increases (typically, from 0.4-0.5 to 0.75-0.8). The system state goes through three stages, with different forms of the plastic consolidation curve, i.e., Φ as a function of the growing reduced pressure P*=Pa/F0 , defined with adhesion force F0 and grain diameter a . In the low-confinement regime (I), the system undergoes negligible plastic compaction, and its structure is influenced by the assembling process. In regime II the material state is independent of initial conditions, and the void ratio varies linearly with lnP [i.e., Δ(1/Φ)=λΔ(lnP*) ], as described in the engineering literature. Plasticity index λ is reduced in the presence of a small rolling resistance (RR). In the last stage of compaction (III), Φ approaches an asymptotic, maximum solid fraction Φmax , as a power law Φmax-Φ∝(P*)-α , with α≃1 , and properties of cohesionless granular packs are gradually retrieved. Under consolidation, while the range ξ of fractal density correlations decreases, force patterns reorganize from self-balanced clusters to force chains, with correlative evolutions of force distributions, and elastic moduli increase by a large amount. Plastic deformation events correspond to very small changes in the network topology, while the denser regions tend to move like rigid bodies. Elastic properties are dominated by the bending of thin junctions in loose systems. For growing RR those tend to form particle chains, the

  11. Finite element model for aero-elastically tailored residential wind turbine blade design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Eric Alan

    Advances in passive wind turbine control systems have allowed wind turbines to achieve higher efficiencies and operate in wider inflow conditions than ever before. Within recent years, the adoption of aero-elastically tailored (bend-twist coupled) composite blades have been a pursued strategy. Unfortunately, for this strategy to be applied, traditional means of modeling, designing and manufacturing are no longer adequate. New parameters regarding non-linearities in deflections, stiffness, and aerodynamic loadings must now be implemented. To aid in the development of passive wind turbine system design, a finite element based aero-elastic program capable of computationally predicting blade deflection and twist under loading was constructed. The program was built around the idea of iteratively solving a blade composite structure to reach a maximum aero-elastic twist configuration under elevated wind speeds. Adopting a pre-existing blade geometry, from a pitch controlled small scale (3.5kW) turbine design, the program was tested to discover the geometry bend-twist coupling potential. This research would be a contributing factor in designing a passive pitch control replacement system for the turbine. A study of various model loading configurations was first performed to insure model validity. Then, a final model was used to analyze composite layups for selected spar configurations. Results characterize the aero-elastic twist properties for the selected configurations.

  12. Nonlinear Visco-Elastic Response of Composites via Micro-Mechanical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Sridharan, Srinivasan

    2005-01-01

    Micro-mechanical models for a study of nonlinear visco-elastic response of composite laminae are developed and their performance compared. A single integral constitutive law proposed by Schapery and subsequently generalized to multi-axial states of stress is utilized in the study for the matrix material. This is used in conjunction with a computationally facile scheme in which hereditary strains are computed using a recursive relation suggested by Henriksen. Composite response is studied using two competing micro-models, viz. a simplified Square Cell Model (SSCM) and a Finite Element based self-consistent Cylindrical Model (FECM). The algorithm is developed assuming that the material response computations are carried out in a module attached to a general purpose finite element program used for composite structural analysis. It is shown that the SSCM as used in investigations of material nonlinearity can involve significant errors in the prediction of transverse Young's modulus and shear modulus. The errors in the elastic strains thus predicted are of the same order of magnitude as the creep strains accruing due to visco-elasticity. The FECM on the other hand does appear to perform better both in the prediction of elastic constants and the study of creep response.

  13. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment's shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object. PMID:27608021

  14. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-09-06

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment's shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object.

  15. On the the Contact Lens Problem: Modeling Rigid and Elastic Beams on Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Philippe; Wilson, Stephen; Stone, Howard

    2011-11-01

    Generally, contact lenses are prescribed by the practitioner to fit each individual patient's eye, but these fitting-philosophies are based on empirical studies and a certain degree of trial-and-error. A badly fitted lens can cause a range of afflictions, which varies from mild dry-eye-discomfort, to more serious corneal diseases. Thus, at this heart of this problem, is the question of how a rigid or elastic plate interacts with the free-surface of a thin viscous film. In this talk, we present several mathematical models for the study of these plate-and-fluid problems. Asymptotic and numerical results are described, and we explain the role of elasticity, surface tension, viscosity, and pressure in determining the equilibrium solutions. Finally, we discuss the implications of our work on the contact lens problem, as well as on other coating processes which involve elastic substrates.

  16. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment’s shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object. PMID:27608021

  17. A cell model for homogenization of fiber-reinforced composites: General theory and nonlinear elasticity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.; Addessio, F.L.

    1995-11-01

    The theoretical basis of the homogenization technique developed by Aboudi is presented and assessed. Given the constitutive relations of the constituents, this technique provides an equivalent, homogeneous, constitutive model of unidirectional, continuous-fiber-reinforced composites. The expressions that comprise the first-order version of the technique are given special attention as this treatment has considerable practical value. Nonlinear elasticity effects are added to it. This extension increases the accuracy of numerical simulations of high strain-rate loadings. It is particularly important for any dynamic loading in which shock waves might be produced, including crash safety, armor, and munitions applications. Examples illustrate that elastic nonlinearity can make substantial contributions at strains of only a few per cent. These contributions are greatest during post-yield inelastic deformation. The micromechanics-based homogenization technique is shown to facilitate use of an efficient approximate treatment of elastic nonlinearity in composites with isotropic matrix materials.

  18. Simple Elasticity Modeling and Failure Prediction for Composite Flexbeams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makeev, Andrew; Armanios, Erian; OBrien, T. Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A simple 2D boundary element analysis, suitable for developing cost effective models for tapered composite laminates, is presented. Constant stress and displacement elements are used. Closed-form fundamental solutions are derived. Numerical results are provided for several configurations to illustrate the accuracy of the model.

  19. A random interacting network model for complex networks.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Bedartha; Shekatkar, Snehal M; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Ambika, G; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a RAndom Interacting Network (RAIN) model to study the interactions between a pair of complex networks. The model involves two major steps: (i) the selection of a pair of nodes, one from each network, based on intra-network node-based characteristics, and (ii) the placement of a link between selected nodes based on the similarity of their relative importance in their respective networks. Node selection is based on a selection fitness function and node linkage is based on a linkage probability defined on the linkage scores of nodes. The model allows us to relate within-network characteristics to between-network structure. We apply the model to the interaction between the USA and Schengen airline transportation networks (ATNs). Our results indicate that two mechanisms: degree-based preferential node selection and degree-assortative link placement are necessary to replicate the observed inter-network degree distributions as well as the observed inter-network assortativity. The RAIN model offers the possibility to test multiple hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying network interactions. It can also incorporate complex interaction topologies. Furthermore, the framework of the RAIN model is general and can be potentially adapted to various real-world complex systems. PMID:26657032

  20. A random interacting network model for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Bedartha; Shekatkar, Snehal M.; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Ambika, G.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We propose a RAndom Interacting Network (RAIN) model to study the interactions between a pair of complex networks. The model involves two major steps: (i) the selection of a pair of nodes, one from each network, based on intra-network node-based characteristics, and (ii) the placement of a link between selected nodes based on the similarity of their relative importance in their respective networks. Node selection is based on a selection fitness function and node linkage is based on a linkage probability defined on the linkage scores of nodes. The model allows us to relate within-network characteristics to between-network structure. We apply the model to the interaction between the USA and Schengen airline transportation networks (ATNs). Our results indicate that two mechanisms: degree-based preferential node selection and degree-assortative link placement are necessary to replicate the observed inter-network degree distributions as well as the observed inter-network assortativity. The RAIN model offers the possibility to test multiple hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying network interactions. It can also incorporate complex interaction topologies. Furthermore, the framework of the RAIN model is general and can be potentially adapted to various real-world complex systems.

  1. Research on the model of home networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Xiang; Feng, Xiancheng

    2007-11-01

    It is the research hotspot of current broadband network to combine voice service, data service and broadband audio-video service by IP protocol to transport various real time and mutual services to terminal users (home). Home Networking is a new kind of network and application technology which can provide various services. Home networking is called as Digital Home Network. It means that PC, home entertainment equipment, home appliances, Home wirings, security, illumination system were communicated with each other by some composing network technology, constitute a networking internal home, and connect with WAN by home gateway. It is a new network technology and application technology, and can provide many kinds of services inside home or between homes. Currently, home networking can be divided into three kinds: Information equipment, Home appliances, Communication equipment. Equipment inside home networking can exchange information with outer networking by home gateway, this information communication is bidirectional, user can get information and service which provided by public networking by using home networking internal equipment through home gateway connecting public network, meantime, also can get information and resource to control the internal equipment which provided by home networking internal equipment. Based on the general network model of home networking, there are four functional entities inside home networking: HA, HB, HC, and HD. (1) HA (Home Access) - home networking connects function entity; (2) HB (Home Bridge) Home networking bridge connects function entity; (3) HC (Home Client) - Home networking client function entity; (4) HD (Home Device) - decoder function entity. There are many physical ways to implement four function entities. Based on theses four functional entities, there are reference model of physical layer, reference model of link layer, reference model of IP layer and application reference model of high layer. In the future home network

  2. Temperature dependence of elastic constants of embedded-atom models of palladium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Ralph J.; Mansour, Khalid A.; Lee, Myung W.; Ray, John R.

    1992-10-01

    The elastic constants of fcc palladium are calculated as a function of temperature for four different embedded-atom-method (EAM) models and compared to experimental values. Two of these EAM models have been derived by other workers whereas two of the models are new. Because of the elastic anomaly near 120 K, in the shear constant C44 of Pd, the use of this zero-temperature elastic constant to determine the Pd EAM potential leads to errors in the calculated C44 above the Debye temperature of 280 K where the potentials are to be used. To correct this behavior we determine the EAM potential in the two new EAM models so that C44 is in much better agreement with the experimental value above the Debye temperature. Interestingly in both of these new models the melting temperature is significantly higher and in better agreement with the experimental value of 1825 K. One of our models uses a conventional EAM third-neighbor interaction model whereas our other model is a fifth-neighbor interaction model.

  3. Uncoupling shear and uniaxial elastic moduli of semiflexible biopolymer networks: compression-softening and stretch-stiffening

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten, Anne S. G.; Vahabi, Mahsa; Licup, Albert J.; Sharma, Abhinav; Galie, Peter A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Gels formed by semiflexible filaments such as most biopolymers exhibit non-linear behavior in their response to shear deformation, e.g., with a pronounced strain stiffening and negative normal stress. These negative normal stresses suggest that networks would collapse axially when subject to shear stress. This coupling of axial and shear deformations can have particularly important consequences for extracellular matrices and collagenous tissues. Although measurements of uniaxial moduli have been made on biopolymer gels, these have not directly been related to the shear response. Here, we report measurements and simulations of axial and shear stresses exerted by a range of hydrogels subjected to simultaneous uniaxial and shear strains. These studies show that, in contrast to volume-conserving linearly elastic hydrogels, the Young’s moduli of networks formed by the biopolymers are not proportional to their shear moduli and both shear and uniaxial moduli are strongly affected by even modest degrees of uniaxial strain. PMID:26758452

  4. Transmission and pass-drop operations of mixed baudrate Nyquist OTDM-WDM signals for all-optical elastic network.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hung Nguyen; Inoue, Takashi; Kurosu, Takayuki; Namiki, Shu

    2013-08-26

    We propose the use of Nyquist OTDM-WDM signal for highly efficient, fully elastic all-optical networks. With the possibility of generation of ultra-coarse yet flexible granular channels, Nyquist OTDM-WDM can eliminate guard-bands in conventional WDM systems, and hence improves the spectral efficiency in network perspective. In this paper, transmission and pass-drop operations of mixed baudrate Nyquist OTDM-WDM channels from 43 Gbaud to dual-polarization 344 Gbaud are successfully demonstrated over 320 km fiber link with four FlexGrid-compatible WSS nodes. A stable clock recovery is also carried out for different baudrate Nyquist OTDMs by optical null-header insertion technique.

  5. Conductive network formation of carbon nanotubes in elastic polymer microfibers and its effect on the electrical conductance: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Jeongmin; Kim, Un Jeong; Im, Kyuhyun; Park, Jong-Jin; Sung, Bong June

    2016-05-01

    We investigate how the electrical conductance of microfibers (made of polymers and conductive nanofillers) decreases upon uniaxial deformation by performing both experiments and simulations. Even though various elastic conductors have been developed due to promising applications for deformable electronic devices, the mechanism at a molecular level for electrical conductance change has remained elusive. Previous studies proposed that the decrease in electrical conductance would result from changes in either distances or contact numbers between conductive fillers. In this work, we prepare microfibers of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)/polyvinyl alcohol composites and investigate the electrical conductance and the orientation of SWCNTs upon uniaxial deformation. We also perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations, which reproduce experimental results for the relative decrease in conductance and the SWCNTs orientation. We investigate the electrical networks of SWCNTs in microfibers and find that the decrease in the electrical conductance upon uniaxial deformation should be attributed to a subtle change in the topological structure of the electrical network.

  6. Toward ultra-broadband elastic optical networks: reconfigurable quasi-Nyquist transmitter for metro- and long-haul scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Franciscangelis, Carolina; de Carvalho, Luis H. H.; da Silva, Edson P.; Diniz, Júlio C. M.; de Oliveira, Júlio César R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Next generation ultra-broadband elastic optical networks maximize system-bandwidth utilization based on flexible diverse traffic demands accommodation. Research on novel network architectures and system components such as datarate variable transponders and hybrid amplification schemes are needed to allow geographical context adjustability as well as capacity system upgradeability from Gbps to Tbps. In this paper we report experimental validations on deployed Brazilian optical fiber of a data-rate variable transmitter feasible for both metro and long-haul applications. The developed transmission system exhibits spectral efficiencies of 4.58, 6.25 and 3.41 b/s/Hz for 1400, 700 and 4900 km of optical transmission respectively.

  7. Well-posedness of a two-scale model for liquid phase epitaxy with elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Michael; Rohde, Christian; Sändig, Anna-Margarete

    2015-08-01

    Epitaxy, a special form of crystal growth, is a technically relevant process for the production of thin films and layers. It can generate microstructures of different morphologies, such as steps, spirals or pyramids. These microstructures are influenced by elastic effects in the epitaxial layer. There are different epitaxial techniques, one being liquid phase epitaxy. Thereby, single particles are deposited out of a supersaturated liquid solution on a substrate where they contribute to the growth process. This article studies a two-scale model including elasticity, introduced in Eck et al. (Eur Phys J Special Topics 177:5-21, 2009) and extended in Eck et al. (2006). It consists of a macroscopic Navier-Stokes system and a macroscopic convection-diffusion equation for the transport of matter in the liquid, and a microscopic problem that combines a phase field approximation of a Burton-Cabrera-Frank model for the evolution of the epitaxial layer, a Stokes system for the fluid flow near the layer and an elasticity system for the elastic deformation of the solid film. Suitable conditions couple the single parts of the model. As the main result, existence and uniqueness of a solution are proven in suitable function spaces. Furthermore, an iterative solving procedure is proposed, which reflects, on the one hand, the strategy of the proof of the main result via fixed point arguments and, on the other hand, can be the basis for a numerical algorithm.

  8. A stable scheme for a nonlinear, multiphase tumor growth model with an elastic membrane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Wise, Steven M; Shenoy, Vivek B; Lowengrub, John S

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the 3D multispecies diffuse-interface model of the tumor growth, which was derived in Wise et al. (Three-dimensional multispecies nonlinear tumor growth-I: model and numerical method, J. Theor. Biol. 253 (2008) 524-543), and incorporate the effect of a stiff membrane to model tumor growth in a confined microenvironment. We then develop accurate and efficient numerical methods to solve the model. When the membrane is endowed with a surface energy, the model is variational, and the numerical scheme, which involves adaptive mesh refinement and a nonlinear multigrid finite difference method, is demonstrably shown to be energy stable. Namely, in the absence of cell proliferation and death, the discrete energy is a nonincreasing function of time for any time and space steps. When a simplified model of membrane elastic energy is used, the resulting model is derived analogously to the surface energy case. However, the elastic energy model is actually nonvariational because certain coupling terms are neglected. Nevertheless, a very stable numerical scheme is developed following the strategy used in the surface energy case. 2D and 3D simulations are performed that demonstrate the accuracy of the algorithm and illustrate the shape instabilities and nonlinear effects of membrane elastic forces that may resist or enhance growth of the tumor. Compared with the standard Crank-Nicholson method, the time step can be up to 25 times larger using the new approach.

  9. A stable scheme for a nonlinear, multiphase tumor growth model with an elastic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Wise, Steven M.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Lowengrub, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this paper, we extend the 3D multispecies diffuse-interface model of the tumor growth, which was derived in Wise et al. (Three-dimensional multispecies nonlinear tumor growth-I: model and numerical method, J. Theor. Biol. 253 (2008) 524–543), and incorporate the effect of a stiff membrane to model tumor growth in a confined microenvironment. We then develop accurate and efficient numerical methods to solve the model. When the membrane is endowed with a surface energy, the model is variational, and the numerical scheme, which involves adaptive mesh refinement and a nonlinear multigrid finite difference method, is demonstrably shown to be energy stable. Namely, in the absence of cell proliferation and death, the discrete energy is a nonincreasing function of time for any time and space steps. When a simplified model of membrane elastic energy is used, the resulting model is derived analogously to the surface energy case. However, the elastic energy model is actually nonvariational because certain coupling terms are neglected. Nevertheless, a very stable numerical scheme is developed following the strategy used in the surface energy case. 2D and 3D simulations are performed that demonstrate the accuracy of the algorithm and illustrate the shape instabilities and nonlinear effects of membrane elastic forces that may resist or enhance growth of the tumor. Compared with the standard Crank–Nicholson method, the time step can be up to 25 times larger using the new approach. PMID:24443369

  10. Plant Growth Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we descrive our motivation and approach to devloping models and the neural network architecture. Initial use of the artificial neural network for modeling the single plant process of transpiration is presented.

  11. Probabilistic logic modeling of network reliability for hybrid network architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, G.D.; Schriner, H.K.; Gaylor, T.R.

    1996-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has found that the reliability and failure modes of current-generation network technologies can be effectively modeled using fault tree-based probabilistic logic modeling (PLM) techniques. We have developed fault tree models that include various hierarchical networking technologies and classes of components interconnected in a wide variety of typical and atypical configurations. In this paper we discuss the types of results that can be obtained from PLMs and why these results are of great practical value to network designers and analysts. After providing some mathematical background, we describe the `plug-and-play` fault tree analysis methodology that we have developed for modeling connectivity and the provision of network services in several current- generation network architectures. Finally, we demonstrate the flexibility of the method by modeling the reliability of a hybrid example network that contains several interconnected ethernet, FDDI, and token ring segments. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Elastic and thermal expansion asymmetry in dense molecular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Joseph A.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-09-01

    The elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion are fundamental properties of elastically stiff molecular materials and are assumed to be the same (symmetric) under both tension and compression loading. We show that molecular materials can have a marked asymmetric elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion that are inherently related to terminal chemical groups that limit molecular network connectivity. In compression, terminal groups sterically interact to stiffen the network, whereas in tension they interact less and disconnect the network. The existence of asymmetric elastic and thermal expansion behaviour has fundamental implications for computational approaches to molecular materials modelling and practical implications on the thermomechanical strains and associated elastic stresses. We develop a design space to control the degree of elastic asymmetry in molecular materials, a vital step towards understanding their integration into device technologies.

  13. Network model of human language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markošová, Mária

    2008-01-01

    The phenomenon of human language is widely studied from various points of view. It is interesting not only for social scientists, antropologists or philosophers, but also for those, interested in the network dynamics. In several recent papers word web, or language as a graph has been investigated [R.F. Cancho, R. Solé, The small world of human language, Proc. R. Soc. London B 268 (2001) 2261-2265; A.E. Motter, P.S. de Moura, Lai Ying-Cheng, P. Dasgupta, Topology of the conceptual network of language, Phys. Rev. E 65 (2002) R 065102; M. Steyvers, J.B. Tenenbaum, The large-scale structure of semantic networks: Statistical analysis and a model of semantic growth, Cogn. Sci. 29 (2005) 41-78]. In this paper I revise recent studies of syntactical word web [R.F. Cancho, R. Solé, The small world of human language, Proc. R. Soc. London B 268 (2001) 2261-2265; S.N. Dorogovtsev, J.F.F. Mendes, Language as an evolving word web, Proc. R. Soc. London B 268 (2001) 2603-2606]. I present a model of growing network in which such processes as node addition, edge rewiring and new link creation are taken into account. I argue, that this model is a satisfactory minimal model explaining measured data [R.F. Cancho, R. Solé, The small world of human language, Proc. R. Soc. London B 268 (2001) 2261-2265; M. Markošová, P. Náther, Language as a graph, in: V. Kvasnička, P. Trebatický, J. Pospíchal (Eds.), Mind, Intelligence and Life, Kelemen, STU Bratislava, 2007, pp. 298-307 (in Slovak)].

  14. Modelling land-fast sea ice using a linear elastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Mathieu; Tremblay, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Land-fast ice is an important component of the Arctic system, capping the coastal Arctic waters for most of the year and exerting a large influence on ocean-atmosphere heat exchanges. Yet, the accurate representation of land-fast ice in most large-scale sea ice models remains a challenge, part due to the difficult (and sometimes non-physical) parametrisation of ice fracture. In this study, a linear elastic model is developed to investigate the internal stresses induced by the wind forcing on the land-fast ice, modelled as a 2D elastic plate. The model simulates ice fracture by the implementation of a damage coefficient which causes a local reduction in internal stress. This results in a cascade propagation of damage, simulating the ice fracture that determines the position of the land-fast ice edge. The modelled land-fast ice cover is sensitive to the choice of failure criterion. The parametrised cohesion, tensile and compressive strength and the relationship with the land-fast ice stability is discussed. To estimate the large scale mechanical properties of land-fast ice, these results are compared to a set of land-fast ice break up events and ice bridge formations observed in the Siberian Arctic. These events are identified using brightness temperature imagery from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Terra and Aqua satellites, from which the position of the flaw lead is identifiable by the opening of polynyi adjacent to the land-fast ice edge. The shape of the land-fast ice before, during and after these events, along with the characteristic scale of the resulting ice floes, are compared to the model results to extrapolate the stress state that corresponds to these observations. The model setting that best reproduce the scale of the observed break up events is used to provide an estimation of the strength of the ice relative to the wind forcing. These results will then be used to investigate the relationship between the ice thickness and the

  15. A 3-D elasticity theory based model for acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates.

    PubMed

    Shen, C; Xin, F X; Lu, T J

    2014-05-01

    A theoretical model built upon three-dimensional elasticity theory is developed to investigate the acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates subjected to a harmonic point force excitation. Fourier transform technique and stationary phase method are combined to predict the far-field radiated sound pressure of one-side water immersed plate. Compared to equivalent single-layer plate models, the present model based on elasticity theory can differentiate radiated sound pressure between dry-side and wet-side excited cases, as well as discrepancies induced by different layer sequences for multilayered anisotropic plates. These results highlight the superiority of the present theoretical model especially for handling multilayered anisotropic structures. PMID:24815294

  16. AeroPropulsoServoElasticity: Dynamic Modeling of the Variable Cycle Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2012-01-01

    This presentation was made at the 2012 Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference and it covers research work for the Dynamic Modeling of the Variable cycle Propulsion System that was done under the Supersonics Project, in the area of AeroPropulsoServoElasticity. The presentation covers the objective for the propulsion system dynamic modeling work, followed by the work that has been done so far to model the variable Cycle Engine, modeling of the inlet, the nozzle, the modeling that has been done to model the affects of flow distortion, and finally presenting some concluding remarks and future plans.

  17. Flight Dynamics and Control of Elastic Hypersonic Vehicles Uncertainty Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, Frank R.; Schmidt, David K.

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown previously that hypersonic air-breathing aircraft exhibit strong aeroelastic/aeropropulsive dynamic interactions. To investigate these, especially from the perspective of the vehicle dynamics and control, analytical expressions for key stability derivatives were derived, and an analysis of the dynamics was performed. In this paper, the important issue of model uncertainty, and the appropriate forms for representing this uncertainty, is addressed. It is shown that the methods suggested in the literature for analyzing the robustness of multivariable feedback systems, which as a prerequisite to their application assume particular forms of model uncertainty, can be difficult to apply on real atmospheric flight vehicles. Also, the extent to which available methods are conservative is demonstrated for this class of vehicle dynamics.

  18. Modelling of nonlinear wave scattering in a delaminated elastic bar

    PubMed Central

    Khusnutdinova, K. R.; Tranter, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Integrity of layered structures, extensively used in modern industry, strongly depends on the quality of their interfaces; poor adhesion or delamination can lead to a failure of the structure. Can nonlinear waves help us to control the quality of layered structures? In this paper, we numerically model the dynamics of a long longitudinal strain solitary wave in a split, symmetric layered bar. The recently developed analytical approach, based on matching two asymptotic multiple-scales expansions and the integrability theory of the Korteweg–de Vries equation by the inverse scattering transform, is used to develop an effective semi-analytical numerical approach for these types of problems. We also employ a direct finite-difference method and compare the numerical results with each other, and with the analytical predictions. The numerical modelling confirms that delamination causes fission of an incident solitary wave and, thus, can be used to detect the defect. PMID:26730218

  19. Elastic properties of model 3-D porous ceramics and foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Anthony; Garboczi, Edward

    2000-03-01

    The novel properties of many new porous materials are related to their interesting internal microstructure. Apart from simple cases, there exist no theoretical means of predicting the bulk properties of these materials. This limits our ability to guide microstructure optimization for a particular purpose. We use a large scale finite element method to demonstrate the complex relationship between microstructure and the effective properties of realistic three-dimensional model porous ceramics and foams. We find that pore-shape and interconnectivity strongly influence the properties of sintered ceramics. For porous foams we have studied the role of coordination number, random disorder, and strut shape on the Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. We find that that Voronoi tesselations, commonly used to model solid foams, show unphysical behavior, in particular they are incompressible (rubber-like) at low densities. Deletion of just 10% of the bonds in the model reduces the bulk modulus by 75%, more in line with experimental evidence. The FEM results are generally in good agreement with experimental data for ceramics and foams, and can be used as both a predictive and interpretative tool by experimentalists.

  20. A 3D Orthotropic Strain-Rate Dependent Elastic Damage Material Model.

    SciTech Connect

    English, Shawn Allen

    2014-09-01

    A three dimensional orthotropic elastic constitutive model with continuum damage and cohesive based fracture is implemented for a general polymer matrix composite lamina. The formulation assumes the possibility of distributed (continuum) damage followed b y localized damage. The current damage activation functions are simply partially interactive quadratic strain criteria . However, the code structure allows for changes in the functions without extraordinary effort. The material model formulation, implementation, characterization and use cases are presented.

  1. Modeling the Dynamics of Compromised Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, B; Merl, D M

    2011-09-12

    Accurate predictive models of compromised networks would contribute greatly to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the detection and control of network attacks. Compartmental epidemiological models have been applied to modeling attack vectors such as viruses and worms. We extend the application of these models to capture a wider class of dynamics applicable to cyber security. By making basic assumptions regarding network topology we use multi-group epidemiological models and reaction rate kinetics to model the stochastic evolution of a compromised network. The Gillespie Algorithm is used to run simulations under a worst case scenario in which the intruder follows the basic connection rates of network traffic as a method of obfuscation.

  2. An Elastic-Plastic and Strength Prediction Model for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper applies a recently developed model to predict the elastic-plastic stress/strain response and strength of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model combines a micro-macro constitutive modeling approach with experimental characterization and modeling of the composite microstructure to determine the composite stress/strain response and strength. Specifically, it accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length, orientation and volume fraction distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Injection-molded-long-glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP) specimens were prepared for mechanical characterization and testing. Fiber length, orientation, and volume fraction distributions were then measured at some selected locations for use in the computation. Fiber orientations in these specimens were also predicted using an anisotropic rotary diffusion model developed for LFTs. The stress-strain response of the as-formed composite was computed by an incremental procedure that uses the Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method, the Mori-Tanaka assumption and a fiber orientation averaging technique. The model has been validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for these long-glass-fiber/PP specimens.

  3. Electro-elastic modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric

    2004-07-01

    A dielectric elastomer diaphragm is to be designed for potential use in a prosthetic blood pump. Application of an electric field deforms the membrane such that it moves from an initially flat configuration to an inflated state. This motion creates positive displacement of blood from the cardiac chambers thus mimicking the pump-like behavior of the natural heart. A comprehensive large deformation model accounting for the combined dielectric and elastic effect has been formulated. This paper presents recent developments in the model to further incorporate the entire nonlinear range of material elastic behavior and to more accurately represent the applied electric field by keeping the voltage constant as the membrane thickness decreases. The updated model is used to calculate the effects of varying system parameters such as pressure, voltage, prestretch, material constants, and membrane geometry. Analytical results are obtained for biaxially stretched 3M VHB 4905 polyacrylate films.

  4. Determination of Viral Capsid Elastic Properties from Equilibrium Thermal Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Eric R.; Brooks, Charles L., III

    2011-05-01

    We apply two-dimensional elasticity theory to viral capsids to develop a framework for calculating elastic properties of viruses from equilibrium thermal fluctuations of the capsid surface in molecular dynamics and elastic network model trajectories. We show that the magnitudes of the long wavelength modes of motion available in a simulation with all atomic degrees of freedom are recapitulated by an elastic network model. For the mode spectra to match, the elastic network model must be scaled appropriately by a factor which can be determined from an icosahedrally constrained all-atom simulation. With this method we calculate the two-dimensional Young’s modulus Y, bending modulus κ, and Föppl-von Kármán number γ, for the T=1 mutant of the Sesbania mosaic virus. The values determined are in the range of previous theoretical estimates.

  5. Multilayer weighted social network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Yohsuke; Török, János; Jo, Hang-Hyun; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2014-11-01

    Recent empirical studies using large-scale data sets have validated the Granovetter hypothesis on the structure of the society in that there are strongly wired communities connected by weak ties. However, as interaction between individuals takes place in diverse contexts, these communities turn out to be overlapping. This implies that the society has a multilayered structure, where the layers represent the different contexts. To model this structure we begin with a single-layer weighted social network (WSN) model showing the Granovetterian structure. We find that when merging such WSN models, a sufficient amount of interlayer correlation is needed to maintain the relationship between topology and link weights, while these correlations destroy the enhancement in the community overlap due to multiple layers. To resolve this, we devise a geographic multilayer WSN model, where the indirect interlayer correlations due to the geographic constraints of individuals enhance the overlaps between the communities and, at the same time, the Granovetterian structure is preserved.

  6. Relation between elastic modulus and glass softening temperature in the delocalized atom model

    SciTech Connect

    Sanditov, B. D.; Sangadiev, S. Sh.; Sanditov, D. S.

    2012-09-15

    The ratio of softening temperature (glass transition temperature) to elastic modulus (T{sub g}/E) is mainly determined by the limiting elastic deformation of an interatomic bond, which characterizes the transition of a structural microregion from an elastic into a viscous-flow state. In silicate glasses, this transition is caused by the limiting deformation of directed ionic-covalent Si-O-Si bonds. In the case of amorphous hydrocarbons, it is related to the relatively weak intermolecular bonds between regions in chain macromolecules, and the T{sub g}/E ratio is significantly higher than in inorganic glasses. In glassy systems of one class, this ratio turns out to be constant (T{sub g}/E Almost-Equal-To const), and a linear correlation is detected between softening temperature and elastic modulus, which can be explained in terms of the delocalized atom model. The values of T{sub g}/E can be used to classify glasses similarly to the well-known Angell classification according to so-called fragility.

  7. Small oscillations of a pressurized, elastic, spherical shell: Model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, K. A.; Hunt, H. E. M.; Lister, John R.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a model for the small oscillations of a pressurized, elastic, spherical shell subject to internal and external fluid effects. The shell has three features: a pressure difference across the skin; a thin, tensioned shell; and a double curved interfacial surface. An analytical solution for the natural frequencies and mode shapes, incorporating the inertia both of the shell and the surrounding fluids, is derived. Two key parameters that quantify the effect of pre-stress and fluid inertia on the shell's behaviour are identified. When the skin tension is set to zero and the inertial effects of the fluid are removed, the results converge to the analytical solution for an elastic spherical shell, and when the skin elasticity is neglected, the results converge to the constant-tension solution of a bubble. The analytical solution is used to predict the natural frequencies of a small balloon, based on a value for the elastic modulus that is determined using inflation measurements. These predictions are compared to experimental measurements of balloon vibrations using impact-hammer testing, and good agreement is seen.

  8. Three-parameter-based streamflow elasticity model: application to MOPEX basins in the USA at annual and seasonal scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konapala, Goutam; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2016-07-01

    We present a three-parameter streamflow elasticity model as a function of precipitation, potential evaporation, and change in groundwater storage applicable at both seasonal and annual scales. The model was applied to 245 Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) basins spread across the continental USA. The analysis of the modified equation at annual and seasonal scales indicated that the groundwater and surface water storage change contributes significantly to the streamflow elasticity. Overall, in case of annual as well as seasonal water balances, precipitation has higher elasticity values when compared to both potential evapotranspiration and storage changes. The streamflow elasticities show significant nonlinear associations with the climate conditions of the catchments indicating a complex interplay between elasticities and climate variables with substantial seasonal variations.

  9. Network Bandwidth Utilization Forecast Model on High Bandwidth Network

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Wucherl; Sim, Alex

    2014-07-07

    With the increasing number of geographically distributed scientific collaborations and the scale of the data size growth, it has become more challenging for users to achieve the best possible network performance on a shared network. We have developed a forecast model to predict expected bandwidth utilization for high-bandwidth wide area network. The forecast model can improve the efficiency of resource utilization and scheduling data movements on high-bandwidth network to accommodate ever increasing data volume for large-scale scientific data applications. Univariate model is developed with STL and ARIMA on SNMP path utilization data. Compared with traditional approach such as Box-Jenkins methodology, our forecast model reduces computation time by 83.2percent. It also shows resilience against abrupt network usage change. The accuracy of the forecast model is within the standard deviation of the monitored measurements.

  10. Models for Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Inferred from Hydraulic Permeability and Elastic Velocities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments strongly depend on how gas hydrate accumulates in pore spaces and various gas hydrate accumulation models are proposed to predict physical property changes due to gas hydrate concentrations. Elastic velocities and permeability predicted from a cementation model differ noticeably from those from a pore-filling model. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log provides in-situ water-filled porosity and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. To test the two competing models, the NMR log along with conventional logs such as velocity and resistivity logs acquired at the Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, were analyzed. When the clay content is less than about 12 percent, the NMR porosity is 'accurate' and the gas hydrate concentrations from the NMR log are comparable to those estimated from an electrical resistivity log. The variation of elastic velocities and relative permeability with respect to the gas hydrate concentration indicates that the dominant effect of gas hydrate in the pore space is the pore-filling characteristic.

  11. Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion for the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo; Calandra, Henri

    2016-06-01

    Laplace-domain waveform inversion reconstructs long-wavelength subsurface models by using the zero-frequency component of damped seismic signals. Despite the computational advantages of Laplace-domain waveform inversion over conventional frequency-domain waveform inversion, an acoustic assumption and an iterative matrix solver have been used to invert 3D marine datasets to mitigate the intensive computing cost. In this study, we develop a Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion algorithm for 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media by using a parallel sparse direct solver library (MUltifrontal Massively Parallel Solver, MUMPS). We precisely simulate a real marine environment by coupling the 3D acoustic and elastic wave equations with the proper boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface. In addition, we can extract the elastic properties of the Earth below the sea bottom from the recorded acoustic pressure datasets. As a matrix solver, the parallel sparse direct solver is used to factorize the non-symmetric impedance matrix in a distributed memory architecture and rapidly solve the wave field for a number of shots by using the lower and upper matrix factors. Using both synthetic datasets and real datasets obtained by a 3D wide azimuth survey, the long-wavelength component of the P-wave and S-wave velocity models is reconstructed and the proposed modeling and inversion algorithm are verified. A cluster of 80 CPU cores is used for this study.

  12. Improved free-surface expression for frequency-domain elastic optimal mixed-grid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Chen, Jing-Bo; Dai, Meng-Xue

    2016-07-01

    An accurate and efficient forward modeling is the foundation of full-waveform inversion (FWI). In elastic wave modeling, one of the key problems is how to deal with the free-surface boundary condition appropriately. For the representation of the free-surface boundary condition, conventional displacement-based approaches and staggered-grid approaches are often used in time-domain. In frequency-domain, considering the saving of storage and CPU time, we integrate the idea of physical parameter-modified staggered-grid approach in time-domain with an elastic optimal mixed-grid modeling scheme to design an improved parameter-modified free-surface expression. Accuracy analysis shows that an elastic optimal mixed-grid modeling scheme using the parameter-modified free-surface expression can provide more accurate solutions with only 4 grid points per smallest shear wavelength than conventional displacement-based approaches and is stable for most Poisson ratios. Besides, it also yields smaller condition number of the resulting impedance matrix than conventional displacement-based approaches in laterally varying complex media. These advantages reveal great potential of this free-surface expression in big-data practical application.

  13. Position and torque tracking: series elastic actuation versus model-based-controlled hydraulic actuation.

    PubMed

    Otten, Alexander; van Vuuren, Wieke; Stienen, Arno; van Asseldonk, Edwin; Schouten, Alfred; van der Kooij, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Robotics used for diagnostic measurements on, e.g. stroke survivors, require actuators that are both stiff and compliant. Stiffness is required for identification purposes, and compliance to compensate for the robots dynamics, so that the subject can move freely while using the robot. A hydraulic actuator can act as a position (stiff) or a torque (compliant) actuator. The drawback of a hydraulic actuator is that it behaves nonlinear. This article examines two methods for controlling a nonlinear hydraulic actuator. The first method that is often applied uses an elastic element (i.e. spring) connected in series with the hydraulic actuator so that the torque can be measured as the deflection of the spring. This torque measurement is used for proportional integral control. The second method of control uses the inverse of the model of the actuator as a linearizing controller. Both methods are compared using simulation results. The controller designed for the series elastic hydraulic actuator is faster to implement, but only shows good performance for the working range for which the controller is designed due to the systems nonlinear behavior. The elastic element is a limiting factor when designing a position controller due to its low torsional stiffness. The model-based controller linearizes the nonlinear system and shows good performance when used for torque and position control. Implementing the model-based controller does require building and validating of the detailed model. PMID:22275654

  14. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  15. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of a Hypersonic Vehicle with Significant Aero-Thermo-Elastic-Propulsion Interactions: Elastic, Thermal and Mass Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Jaidev

    This thesis examines themodeling, analysis, and control system design issues for scramjet powered hypersonic vehicles. A nonlinear three degrees of freedom longitudinal model which includes aero-propulsion-elasticity effects was used for all analyses. This model is based upon classical compressible flow and Euler-Bernouli structural concepts. Higher fidelity computational fluid dynamics and finite element methods are needed for more precise intermediate and final evaluations. The methods presented within this thesis were shown to be useful for guiding initial control relevant design. The model was used to examine the vehicle's static and dynamic characteristics over the vehicle's trimmable region. The vehicle has significant longitudinal coupling between the fuel equivalency ratio (FER) and the flight path angle (FPA). For control system design, a two-input two-output plant (FER - elevator to speed-FPA) with 11 states (including 3 flexible modes) was used. Velocity, FPA, and pitch were assumed to be available for feedback. Aerodynamic heat modeling and design for the assumed TPS was incorporated to original Bolender's model to study the change in static and dynamic properties. De-centralized control stability, feasibility and limitations issues were dealt with the change in TPS elasticity, mass and physical dimension. The impact of elasticity due to TPS mass, TPS physical dimension as well as prolonged heating was also analyzed to understand performance limitations of de-centralized control designed for nominal model.

  16. A thermomechanical anisotropic model for shock loading of elastic-plastic and elastic-viscoplastic materials with application to jointed rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M. B.; Vorobiev, O.; Vitali, E.

    2016-07-01

    A large deformation thermomechanical model is developed for shock loading of a material that can exhibit elastic and inelastic anisotropy. Use is made of evolution equations for a triad of microstructural vectors mathbf{m}i (hbox {i}=1,2,3) which model elastic deformations and directions of anisotropy. Specific constitutive equations are presented for a material with orthotropic elastic response. The rate of inelasticity depends on an orthotropic yield function that can be used to model weak fault planes with failure in shear and which exhibits a smooth transition to isotropic response at high compression. Moreover, a robust, strongly objective numerical algorithm is proposed for both rate-independent and rate-dependent response. The predictions of the continuum model are examined by comparison with exact steady-state solutions. Also, the constitutive equations are used to obtain a simplified continuum model of jointed rock which is compared with high fidelity numerical solutions that model a persistent system of joints explicitly in the rock medium.

  17. A Separable Model for Dynamic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Krivitsky, Pavel N.; Handcock, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Models of dynamic networksnetworks that evolve over time — have manifold applications. We develop a discrete-time generative model for social network evolution that inherits the richness and flexibility of the class of exponential-family random graph models. The model — a Separable Temporal ERGM (STERGM) — facilitates separable modeling of the tie duration distributions and the structural dynamics of tie formation. We develop likelihood-based inference for the model, and provide computational algorithms for maximum likelihood estimation. We illustrate the interpretability of the model in analyzing a longitudinal network of friendship ties within a school. PMID:24443639

  18. Plate and butt-weld stresses beyond elastic limit, material and structural modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1991-01-01

    Ultimate safety factors of high performance structures depend on stress behavior beyond the elastic limit, a region not too well understood. An analytical modeling approach was developed to gain fundamental insights into inelastic responses of simple structural elements. Nonlinear material properties were expressed in engineering stresses and strains variables and combined with strength of material stress and strain equations similar to numerical piece-wise linear method. Integrations are continuous which allows for more detailed solutions. Included with interesting results are the classical combined axial tension and bending load model and the strain gauge conversion to stress beyond the elastic limit. Material discontinuity stress factors in butt-welds were derived. This is a working-type document with analytical methods and results applicable to all industries of high reliability structures.

  19. A comparison of classical mechanics models and finite element simulation of elastically tailored wing boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Pickings, Richard D.; Chang, Stephen; Holl, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Structural tailoring concepts were developed to create wings with elastically produced camber for the purpose of increasing lift during takeoff conditions. Simple models based upon enhancements to the thin walled composite beam theory of Rehfield were developed to investigate prospects for elastic tailoring of the chordwise deformation of wing structures. The purpose here is to provide a comparison of the theoretical results with a finite element model for the bending method of producing camber. Finite element correlation studies were completed for two cases: a bonded unstiffened structural box, and a bolted unstiffened structural box. Results from these studies show an error of less than one percent for the bonded case and less than six percent for the bolted case in predicting camber curvature for the structural box. Examination of the results shows that the theory is very accurate for the cases studied and will provide an excellent basis for conducting further tailoring studies.

  20. Phase field modelling of strain induced crystal growth in an elastic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghmach, Rabia; Candau, Nicolas; Chazeau, Laurent; Munch, Etienne; Biben, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    When a crystal phase grows in an amorphous matrix, such as a crystallisable elastomer, containing cross-links and/or entanglements, these "topological constraints" need to be pushed away from the crystal phase to allow further crystallization. The accumulation of these topological constraints in the vicinity of the crystal interface may store elastic energy and affect the phase transition. To evaluate the consequences of such mechanism, we introduce a phase field model based on the Flory theory of entropic elasticity. We show that the growth process is indeed sensibly affected, in particular, an exponential increase of the surface energy with the displacement of the interface is induced. This explains the formation of stable nano-crystallites as it is observed in the Strain Induced Crystallization (SIC) of natural rubber. Although simple, the model developed here is able to account for many interesting features of SIC, for instance, the crystallite shapes and their sizes which depend on the applied deformation.

  1. Elastic and Piezoelectric Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites. Part II; Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. Alicia; Hardie, Robert; Yamakov, Vesselin; Park, Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part series where the first part presents a molecular dynamics model of a single Boron Nitride Nanotube (BNNT) and this paper scales up to multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix. This paper presents finite element (FE) models to investigate the effective elastic and piezoelectric properties of (BNNT) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites studied in this paper are thin films of polymer matrix with aligned co-planar BNNTs. The FE modelling approach provides a computationally efficient way to gain an understanding of the material properties. We examine several FE models to identify the most suitable models and investigate the effective properties with respect to the BNNT volume fraction and the number of nanotube walls. The FE models are constructed to represent aligned and randomly distributed BNNTs in a matrix of resin using 2D and 3D hollow and 3D filled cylinders. The homogenisation approach is employed to determine the overall elastic and piezoelectric constants for a range of volume fractions. These models are compared with an analytical model based on Mori-Tanaka formulation suitable for finite length cylindrical inclusions. The model applies to primarily single-wall BNNTs but is also extended to multi-wall BNNTs, for which preliminary results will be presented. Results from the Part 1 of this series can help to establish a constitutive relationship for input into the finite element model to enable the modeling of multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix.

  2. Implementation of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and advanced signal processing for elastic optical networking in accordance with networking and transmission constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stanley

    An increasing adoption of digital signal processing (DSP) in optical fiber telecommunication has brought to the fore several interesting DSP enabled modulation formats. One such format is orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), which has seen great success in wireless and wired RF applications, and is being actively investigated by several research groups for use in optical fiber telecom. In this dissertation, I present three implementations of OFDM for elastic optical networking and distributed network control. The first is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based real-time implementation of a version of OFDM conventionally known as intensity modulation and direct detection (IMDD) OFDM. I experimentally demonstrate the ability of this transmission system to dynamically adjust bandwidth and modulation format to meet networking constraints in an automated manner. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first real-time software defined networking (SDN) based control of an OFDM system. In the second OFDM implementation, I experimentally demonstrate a novel OFDM transmission scheme that supports both direct detection and coherent detection receivers simultaneously using the same OFDM transmitter. This interchangeable receiver solution enables a trade-off between bit rate and equipment cost in network deployment and upgrades. I show that the proposed transmission scheme can provide a receiver sensitivity improvement of up to 1.73 dB as compared to IMDD OFDM. I also present two novel polarization analyzer based detection schemes, and study their performance using experiment and simulation. In the third implementation, I present an OFDM pilot-tone based scheme for distributed network control. The first instance of an SDN-based OFDM elastic optical network with pilot-tone assisted distributed control is demonstrated. An improvement in spectral efficiency and a fast reconfiguration time of 30 ms have been achieved in this experiment. Finally, I

  3. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling of the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle for AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Seiel, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report

  4. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling of the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle for AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Seidel, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the lowboom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural-aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report.

  5. Stochastic multiscale modelling of cortical bone elasticity based on high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Vittorio; Gagliardi, Davide; Desceliers, Christophe; Bousson, Valérie; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Peyrin, Françoise; Haïat, Guillaume; Naili, Salah

    2016-02-01

    Accurate and reliable assessment of bone quality requires predictive methods which could probe bone microstructure and provide information on bone mechanical properties. Multiscale modelling and simulation represent a fast and powerful way to predict bone mechanical properties based on experimental information on bone microstructure as obtained through X-ray-based methods. However, technical limitations of experimental devices used to inspect bone microstructure may produce blurry data, especially in in vivo conditions. Uncertainties affecting the experimental data (input) may question the reliability of the results predicted by the model (output). Since input data are uncertain, deterministic approaches are limited and new modelling paradigms are required. In this paper, a novel stochastic multiscale model is developed to estimate the elastic properties of bone while taking into account uncertainties on bone composition. Effective elastic properties of cortical bone tissue were computed using a multiscale model based on continuum micromechanics. Volume fractions of bone components (collagen, mineral, and water) were considered as random variables whose probabilistic description was built using the maximum entropy principle. The relevance of this approach was proved by analysing a human bone sample taken from the inferior femoral neck. The sample was imaged using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography. 3-D distributions of Haversian porosity and tissue mineral density extracted from these images supplied the experimental information needed to build the stochastic models of the volume fractions. Thus, the stochastic multiscale model provided reliable statistical information (such as mean values and confidence intervals) on bone elastic properties at the tissue scale. Moreover, the existence of a simpler "nominal model", accounting for the main features of the stochastic model, was investigated. It was shown that such a model does exist, and its relevance

  6. Analytical applications and effective properties of a second gradient isotropic elastic material model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enakoutsa, Koffi

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the works by Toupin, Mindlin, Sokolowski and Germain have been developed following two research streams. In the first one, higher-order gradient continuum models were developed based on the Cauchy tetrahedron argument (see, e.g., dell'Isola and Seppecher in Comptes Rendus de l Academie de Sciences 17 Serie IIb: Mecanique, Physique, Chimie, Astronomie 321:303-308, 1995, Meccanica 32:33-52 1997, Zeitschrift fr Angewandte Mathematik und Physik 63(6):1119-1141, 2012). In the second one, the structure of higher-order gradient models is developed with a view to the applications. In particular in the model of linear isotropic solids proposed by Dell'Isola, Sciarra and Vidoli (DSV), the main constitutive equation is obtained for the case of second gradient models. This model introduces in addition to the two well-known Lame's elastic constants five constitutive constants. The practical applications of this model remain in its infancy since the issue of determining the new moduli it introduces is not yet completely addressed. Also, analytical solutions of simple boundary value problems that can be helpful to grasp some of the physical foundations of this model are missing. This paper aims to address these two issues by providing the analytical solutions for two model problems, a spherical shell subjected to axisymmetric loading conditions and the circular bending of a beam in plane strain, both the beam and the shell obeying the DSV second gradient isotropic elastic model. The solution of the circular bending of a beam has served to grasp some of the physical soundness of the model. A framework based on homogenization under inhomogeneous boundary conditions is also suggested to determine the unknown constitutive constants, which are provided in the particular case of elastic porous heterogeneous materials.

  7. Analytical applications and effective properties of a second gradient isotropic elastic material model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enakoutsa, Koffi

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the works by Toupin, Mindlin, Sokolowski and Germain have been developed following two research streams. In the first one, higher-order gradient continuum models were developed based on the Cauchy tetrahedron argument (see, e.g., dell'Isola and Seppecher in Comptes Rendus de l Academie de Sciences 17 Serie IIb: Mecanique, Physique, Chimie, Astronomie 321:303-308, 1995, Meccanica 32:33-52 1997, Zeitschrift fr Angewandte Mathematik und Physik 63(6):1119-1141, 2012). In the second one, the structure of higher-order gradient models is developed with a view to the applications. In particular in the model of linear isotropic solids proposed by Dell'Isola, Sciarra and Vidoli (DSV), the main constitutive equation is obtained for the case of second gradient models. This model introduces in addition to the two well-known Lame's elastic constants five constitutive constants. The practical applications of this model remain in its infancy since the issue of determining the new moduli it introduces is not yet completely addressed. Also, analytical solutions of simple boundary value problems that can be helpful to grasp some of the physical foundations of this model are missing. This paper aims to address these two issues by providing the analytical solutions for two model problems, a spherical shell subjected to axisymmetric loading conditions and the circular bending of a beam in plane strain, both the beam and the shell obeying the DSV second gradient isotropic elastic model. The solution of the circular bending of a beam has served to grasp some of the physical soundness of the model. A framework based on homogenization under inhomogeneous boundary conditions is also suggested to determine the unknown constitutive constants, which are provided in the particular case of elastic porous heterogeneous materials.

  8. An Adaptive Complex Network Model for Brain Functional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gomez Portillo, Ignacio J.; Gleiser, Pablo M.

    2009-01-01

    Brain functional networks are graph representations of activity in the brain, where the vertices represent anatomical regions and the edges their functional connectivity. These networks present a robust small world topological structure, characterized by highly integrated modules connected sparsely by long range links. Recent studies showed that other topological properties such as the degree distribution and the presence (or absence) of a hierarchical structure are not robust, and show different intriguing behaviors. In order to understand the basic ingredients necessary for the emergence of these complex network structures we present an adaptive complex network model for human brain functional networks. The microscopic units of the model are dynamical nodes that represent active regions of the brain, whose interaction gives rise to complex network structures. The links between the nodes are chosen following an adaptive algorithm that establishes connections between dynamical elements with similar internal states. We show that the model is able to describe topological characteristics of human brain networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. In particular, when the dynamical rules of the model allow for integrated processing over the entire network scale-free non-hierarchical networks with well defined communities emerge. On the other hand, when the dynamical rules restrict the information to a local neighborhood, communities cluster together into larger ones, giving rise to a hierarchical structure, with a truncated power law degree distribution. PMID:19738902

  9. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... the UAB-SCIMS More The UAB-SCIMS Information Network The University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information Network as a resource to promote knowledge in the ...

  10. Random polycrystals of grains containing cracks: Model ofquasistatic elastic behavior for fractured systems

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, James G.; Grechka, Vladimir

    2006-07-08

    A model study on fractured systems was performed using aconcept that treats isotropic cracked systems as ensembles of crackedgrains by analogy to isotropic polycrystalline elastic media. Theapproach has two advantages: (a) Averaging performed is ensembleaveraging, thus avoiding the criticism legitimately leveled at mosteffective medium theories of quasistatic elastic behavior for crackedmedia based on volume concentrations of inclusions. Since crack effectsare largely independent of the volume they occupy in the composite, sucha non-volume-based method offers an appealingly simple modelingalternative. (b) The second advantage is that both polycrystals andfractured media are stiffer than might otherwise be expected, due tonatural bridging effects of the strong components. These same effectshave also often been interpreted as crack-crack screening inhigh-crack-density fractured media, but there is no inherent conflictbetween these two interpretations of this phenomenon. Results of thestudy are somewhat mixed. The spread in elastic constants observed in aset of numerical experiments is found to be very comparable to the spreadin values contained between the Reuss and Voigt bounds for thepolycrystal model. However, computed Hashin-Shtrikman bounds are much tootight to be in agreement with the numerical data, showing thatpolycrystals of cracked grains tend to violate some implicit assumptionsof the Hashin-Shtrikman bounding approach. However, the self-consistentestimates obtained for the random polycrystal model are nevertheless verygood estimators of the observed average behavior.

  11. Multiple scale model for cell migration in monolayers: Elastic mismatch between cells enhances motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Bresler, Yony; Wirtz, Denis; Grant, Martin

    2015-07-01

    We propose a multiscale model for monolayer of motile cells that comprise normal and cancer cells. In the model, the two types of cells have identical properties except for their elasticity; cancer cells are softer and normal cells are stiffer. The goal is to isolate the role of elasticity mismatch on the migration potential of cancer cells in the absence of other contributions that are present in real cells. The methodology is based on a phase-field description where each cell is modeled as a highly-deformable self-propelled droplet. We simulated two types of nearly confluent monolayers. One contains a single cancer cell in a layer of normal cells and the other contains normal cells only. The simulation results demonstrate that elasticity mismatch alone is sufficient to increase the motility of the cancer cell significantly. Further, the trajectory of the cancer cell is decorated by several speed “bursts” where the cancer cell quickly relaxes from a largely deformed shape and consequently increases its translational motion. The increased motility and the amplitude and frequency of the bursts are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments.

  12. An evolutionary model of social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, M.; Abell, P.

    2007-07-01

    Social networks in communities, markets, and societies self-organise through the interactions of many individuals. In this paper we use a well-known mechanism of social interactions — the balance of sentiment in triadic relations — to describe the development of social networks. Our model contrasts with many existing network models, in that people not only establish but also break up relations whilst the network evolves. The procedure generates several interesting network features such as a variety of degree distributions and degree correlations. The resulting network converges under certain conditions to a steady critical state where temporal disruptions in triangles follow a power-law distribution.

  13. Finite element implementation of a generalized Fung-elastic constitutive model for planar soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Sacks, Michael S

    2005-11-01

    Numerical simulations of the anisotropic mechanical properties of soft tissues and tissue-derived biomaterials using accurate constitutive models remain an important and challenging research area in biomechanics. While most constitutive modeling efforts have focused on the characterization of experimental data, only limited studies are available on the feasibility of utilizing those models in complex computational applications. An example is the widely utilized exponential constitutive model proposed by Fung. Although present in the biomechanics literature for several decades, implementation of this model into finite element (FE) simulations has been limited. A major reason for limited numerical implementations are problems associated with inherent numerical instability and convergence. To address this issue, we developed and applied two restrictions for a generalized Fung-elastic constitutive model necessary to achieve numerical stability. These are (1) convexity of the strain energy function, and (2) the condition number of material stiffness matrix set lower than a prescribed value. These constraints were implemented in the nonlinear regression used for constitutive model parameter estimation to the experimental biaxial mechanical data. We then implemented the generalized Fung-elastic model into a commercial FE code (ABAQUS, Pawtucket, RI, USA). Single element and multi-element planar biaxial test simulations were conducted to verify the accuracy and robustness of the implementation. Results indicated that numerical convergence and accurate FE implementation were consistently obtained. The present study thus presents an integrated framework for accurate and robust implementation of pseudo-elastic constitutive models for planar soft tissues. Moreover, since our approach is formulated within a general FE code, it can be straightforwardly adopted across multiple software platforms.

  14. Modeling static and dynamic thermography of the human breast under elastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray H

    2011-01-01

    An abnormal thermogram has been shown to be a reliable indicator of increased risk of breast cancer. Numerical modeling techniques for thermography are proposed to quantify the complex relationships between the breast thermal behaviors and the underlying physiological/pathological conditions. Previous thermal modeling techniques did not account for gravity-induced elastic deformation arising from various body postures, nor did they suggest that a dynamic thermal procedure may be used to enhance clinical diagnosis. In this paper, 3D finite element method (FEM)-based thermal and elastic modeling techniques are developed to characterize comprehensively both the thermal and elastic properties of normal and tumorous breast tissues during static and dynamic thermography. In the steady state, gravity-induced breast deformation is found to cause an upper-lower asymmetric surface temperature contrast for sitting/standing up body posture, even though all the thermal and elastic properties are assumed uniform. Additionally, the tumor-induced surface temperature alterations are found to be caused primarily by shallow tumors and to be less sensitive to tumor size than to tumor depth. In the dynamic state, the breast exhibits distinctive temporal patterns that are associated with distinct thermal events: cold stress and thermal recovery induced by changes in the ambient temperature. Specifically, the tumor-induced thermal contrast shows an opposite initial change and delayed peak as compared with the deformation-induced thermal contrast. These findings are expected to provide a stronger foundation for, and greater specificity and precision in, thermographic diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer.

  15. Double Folding Potential of Different Interaction Models for 16O + 12C Elastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Sh.; Bondok, I.; Abdelmoatmed, M.

    2016-08-01

    The elastic scattering angular distributions for 16O + 12C nuclear system have been analyzed using double folding potential of different interaction models: CDM3Y1, CDM3Y6, DDM3Y1 and BDM3Y1. We have extracted the renormalization factor N r for the different concerned interaction models. Potential created by BDM3Y1 model of interaction has the shallowest depth which reflects the necessity to use higher renormalization factor. The experimental angular distributions for 16O + 12C nuclear system in the energy range 115.9-230 MeV exhibited unmistakable refractive features and rainbow phenomenon.

  16. Modeling Diagnostic Assessments with Bayesian Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Russell G.; DiBello, Louis V.; Moulder, Brad; Zapata-Rivera, Juan-Diego

    2007-01-01

    This paper defines Bayesian network models and examines their applications to IRT-based cognitive diagnostic modeling. These models are especially suited to building inference engines designed to be synchronous with the finer grained student models that arise in skills diagnostic assessment. Aspects of the theory and use of Bayesian network models…

  17. Relationship between Elastic wave Velocity and Permeability of Rock Model with penny-shaped cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamabe, H.; Tsuji, T.; Matsuoka, T.

    2011-12-01

    Estimating underground fluid-flow is of great importance in petroleum engineering and carbon capture and storage (CCS). Permeability is one of the most important parameters which show how easily fluid passes through rock mass. It could be acquired just by measuring rock samples near borehole in lab-experiments. It means that permeability except near borehole should be estimated, considering other information. In this research, elastic wave velocity is focused as a tool of estimating permeability, because it is one of the most popular parameter which has underground information. The relationship between permeability and elastic wave velocities should be revealed, in order to establish a methodology to estimate rock permeability from elastic wave velocity. These two parameters are controlled by pore geometry of rock. Therefore, we focused on pore geometry as connecting bridge between the two parameters: permeability, elastic wave velocity. We modeled the considering rock as a solid mass containing a lot of same-sized penny-shaped cracks randomly. LBM (Lattice Boltzmann Method), which is one of the computational fluid dynamics methods, is adopted for calculating permeability in our study. This method has a storing point especially under complicated fluid-solid boundary condition. Elastic wave velocities are derived from effective elastic moduli (i.e., bulk modulus, stiffness). They are estimated by self-consistent approximation, which needs porosity of rock model, aspect ratio of penny-shaped cracks and volume fraction of each phase. In this research, we assume that solid phase is composed only by quartz and rock's pore space is filled with water. The simulated results demonstrate that aspect ratio of crack can be estimated by P- and S-wave velocity, and aspect ratio and P-wave velocity can determine porosity. Whereas, the relationship between porosity and permeability is dependent on aspect ratio, which means permeability can be estimated by aspect ratio and porosity

  18. A Biologically Inspired Network Design Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoge; Adamatzky, Andrew; Chan, Felix T.S.; Deng, Yong; Yang, Hai; Yang, Xin-She; Tsompanas, Michail-Antisthenis I.; Sirakoulis, Georgios Ch.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    A network design problem is to select a subset of links in a transport network that satisfy passengers or cargo transportation demands while minimizing the overall costs of the transportation. We propose a mathematical model of the foraging behaviour of slime mould P. polycephalum to solve the network design problem and construct optimal transport networks. In our algorithm, a traffic flow between any two cities is estimated using a gravity model. The flow is imitated by the model of the slime mould. The algorithm model converges to a steady state, which represents a solution of the problem. We validate our approach on examples of major transport networks in Mexico and China. By comparing networks developed in our approach with the man-made highways, networks developed by the slime mould, and a cellular automata model inspired by slime mould, we demonstrate the flexibility and efficiency of our approach. PMID:26041508

  19. Multi phase field model for solid state transformation with elastic strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, I.; Apel, M.

    2006-05-01

    A multi phase field model is presented for the investigation of the effect of transformation strain on the transformation kinetics, morphology and thermodynamic stability in multi phase materials. The model conserves homogeneity of stress in the diffuse interface between elastically inhomogeneous phases, in which respect it differs from previous models. The model is formulated consistently with the multi phase field model for diffusional and surface driven phase transitions [I. Steinbach, F. Pezzolla, B. Nestler, M. Seeßelberg, R. Prieler, G.J. Schmitz, J.L.L. Rezende, A phase field concept for multiphase systems, Physica D 94 (1996) 135-147; J. Tiaden, B. Nestler, H.J. Diepers, I. Steinbach, The multiphase-field model with an integrated concept for modeling solute diffusion, Physica D 115 (1998) 73-86; I. Steinbach, F. Pezzolla, A generalized field method for multiphase transformations using interface fields, Physica D 134 (1999) 385] and gives a consistent description of interfacial tension, multi phase thermodynamics and elastic stress balance in multiple junctions between an arbitrary number of grains and phases. Some aspects of the model are demonstrated with respect to numerical accuracy and the relation between transformation strain, external stress and thermodynamic equilibrium.

  20. Models of the elastic x-ray scattering feature for warm dense aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Starrett, Charles Edward; Saumon, Didier

    2015-09-03

    The elastic feature of x-ray scattering from warm dense aluminum has recently been measured by Fletcher et al. [Nature Photonics 9, 274 (2015)] with much higher accuracy than had hitherto been possible. This measurement is a direct test of the ionic structure predicted by models of warm dense matter. We use the method of pseudoatom molecular dynamics to predict this elastic feature for warm dense aluminum with temperatures of 1–100 eV and densities of 2.7–8.1g/cm3. We compare these predictions to experiments, finding good agreement with Fletcher et al. and corroborating the discrepancy found in analyses of an earlier experiment of Ma et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 065001 (2013)]. Lastly, we also evaluate the validity of the Thomas-Fermi model of the electrons and of the hypernetted chain approximation in computing the elastic feature and find them both wanting in the regime currently probed by experiments.

  1. Models of the elastic x-ray scattering feature for warm dense aluminum

    DOE PAGES

    Starrett, Charles Edward; Saumon, Didier

    2015-09-03

    The elastic feature of x-ray scattering from warm dense aluminum has recently been measured by Fletcher et al. [Nature Photonics 9, 274 (2015)] with much higher accuracy than had hitherto been possible. This measurement is a direct test of the ionic structure predicted by models of warm dense matter. We use the method of pseudoatom molecular dynamics to predict this elastic feature for warm dense aluminum with temperatures of 1–100 eV and densities of 2.7–8.1g/cm3. We compare these predictions to experiments, finding good agreement with Fletcher et al. and corroborating the discrepancy found in analyses of an earlier experiment ofmore » Ma et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 065001 (2013)]. Lastly, we also evaluate the validity of the Thomas-Fermi model of the electrons and of the hypernetted chain approximation in computing the elastic feature and find them both wanting in the regime currently probed by experiments.« less

  2. Estimates of the Elastic Thickness of Antarctica from GOCE Gravity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Dan; Yi, Weiyong; Rummel, Reiner

    2015-03-01

    The most recent GOCE models, such as DIR5 are sufficiently accurate at wavelengths as short as 200 km to provide estimates of the elastic thickness Te. The topographic load of Hawaii on the elastic Pacific plate was chosen as test case. It is a region, where independently of GOCE there exist good gravity and bathymetry/topography data. The derived elastic thickness is about 20 km. The same approach was applied to Antarctica, where GOCE is the only gravity data source of sufficient spatial resolution and accuracy. A certain weakness of any GOCE model results from the 6.7 degree data gap around the poles. Bedmap-2 is a new topographic data set with bedrock topography and ice thickness data. From the comparison of gravity and equivalent rock topography a Te of about 20 km resulted for East Antarctica, while the value for West Antarctica is only 6 km. This great difference results from the enormous difference in lithospheric thickness between Antarctica’s West and East.

  3. Point defect modeling in materials: Coupling ab initio and elasticity approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varvenne, Céline; Bruneval, Fabien; Marinica, Mihai-Cosmin; Clouet, Emmanuel

    2013-10-01

    Modeling point defects at an atomic scale requires careful treatment of the long-range atomic relaxations. This elastic field can strongly affect point defect properties calculated in atomistic simulations because of the finite size of the system under study. This is an important restriction for ab initio methods which are limited to a few hundred atoms. We propose an original approach coupling ab initio calculations and linear elasticity theory to obtain the properties of an isolated point defect for reduced supercell sizes. The reliability and benefit of our approach are demonstrated for three problematic cases: the self-interstitial in zirconium, clusters of self-interstitials in iron, and the neutral vacancy in silicon.

  4. Combined thermal and elastic modeling of the normal and tumorous breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray

    2008-03-01

    The abnormal thermogram has been shown to be a reliable indicator of a high risk of breast cancer, but an open question is how to quantify the complex relationships between the breast thermal behaviors and the underlying physiological/pathological conditions. Previous thermal modeling techniques generally did not utilize the breast geometry determined by the gravity-induced elastic deformations arising from various body postures. In this paper, a 3-D finite-element method is developed for combined modeling of the thermal and elastic properties of the breast, including the mechanical nonlinearity associated with large deformations. The effects of the thermal and elastic properties of the breast tissues are investigated quantitatively. For the normal breast in a standing/sitting up posture, the gravity-induced deformation alone is found to be able to cause an asymmetric temperature distribution even though all the thermal/elastic properties are symmetrical, and this temperature asymmetry increases for softer and more compressible breast tissues. For a tumorous breast, we found that the surface-temperature alterations generally can be recognizable for superficial tumors at depths less than 20 mm. Tumor size plays a less important role than the tumor depth in determining the tumor-induced temperature difference. This result may imply that a higher thermal sensitivity is critical for a breast thermogram system when deeper tumors are present, even if the tumor is relatively large. We expect this new method to provide a stronger foundation for, and greater specificity and precision in, thermographic diagnosis and treatment of breast tumors.

  5. Numerical aspects in modeling high Deborah number flow and elastic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Youngdon

    2014-05-01

    Investigating highly nonlinear viscoelastic flow in 2D domain, we explore problem as well as property possibly inherent in the streamline upwinding technique (SUPG) and then present various results of elastic instability. The mathematically stable Leonov model written in tensor-logarithmic formulation is employed in the framework of finite element method for spatial discretization of several representative problem domains. For enhancement of computation speed, decoupled integration scheme is applied for shear thinning and Boger-type fluids. From the analysis of 4:1 contraction flow at low and moderate values of the Deborah number (De) the solution with SUPG method does not show noticeable difference from the one by the computation without upwinding. On the other hand, in the flow regime of high De, especially in the state of elastic instability the SUPG significantly distorts the flow field and the result differs considerably from the solution acquired straightforwardly. When the strength of elastic flow and thus the nonlinearity further increase, the computational scheme with upwinding fails to converge and evolutionary solution does not become available any more. All this result suggests that extreme care has to be taken on occasions where upwinding is applied, and one has to first of all prove validity of this algorithm in the case of high nonlinearity. On the contrary, the straightforward computation with no upwinding can efficiently model representative phenomena of elastic instability in such benchmark problems as 4:1 contraction flow, flow over a circular cylinder and flow over asymmetric array of cylinders. Asymmetry of the flow field occurring in the symmetric domain, enhanced spatial and temporal fluctuation of dynamic variables and flow effects caused by extension hardening are properly described in this study.

  6. Network model of bilateral power markets based on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yang; Liu, Junyong; Li, Furong; Yan, Zhanxin; Zhang, Li

    2014-06-01

    The bilateral power transaction (BPT) mode becomes a typical market organization with the restructuring of electric power industry, the proper model which could capture its characteristics is in urgent need. However, the model is lacking because of this market organization's complexity. As a promising approach to modeling complex systems, complex networks could provide a sound theoretical framework for developing proper simulation model. In this paper, a complex network model of the BPT market is proposed. In this model, price advantage mechanism is a precondition. Unlike other general commodity transactions, both of the financial layer and the physical layer are considered in the model. Through simulation analysis, the feasibility and validity of the model are verified. At same time, some typical statistical features of BPT network are identified. Namely, the degree distribution follows the power law, the clustering coefficient is low and the average path length is a bit long. Moreover, the topological stability of the BPT network is tested. The results show that the network displays a topological robustness to random market member's failures while it is fragile against deliberate attacks, and the network could resist cascading failure to some extent. These features are helpful for making decisions and risk management in BPT markets.

  7. How to model wireless mesh networks topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanni, M. L.; Hashim, A. A.; Anwar, F.; Ahmed, G. S. M.; Ali, S.

    2013-12-01

    The specification of network connectivity model or topology is the beginning of design and analysis in Computer Network researches. Wireless Mesh Networks is an autonomic network that is dynamically self-organised, self-configured while the mesh nodes establish automatic connectivity with the adjacent nodes in the relay network of wireless backbone routers. Researches in Wireless Mesh Networks range from node deployment to internetworking issues with sensor, Internet and cellular networks. These researches require modelling of relationships and interactions among nodes including technical characteristics of the links while satisfying the architectural requirements of the physical network. However, the existing topology generators model geographic topologies which constitute different architectures, thus may not be suitable in Wireless Mesh Networks scenarios. The existing methods of topology generation are explored, analysed and parameters for their characterisation are identified. Furthermore, an algorithm for the design of Wireless Mesh Networks topology based on square grid model is proposed in this paper. The performance of the topology generated is also evaluated. This research is particularly important in the generation of a close-to-real topology for ensuring relevance of design to the intended network and validity of results obtained in Wireless Mesh Networks researches.

  8. Model Of Neural Network With Creative Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Barhen, Jacob

    1993-01-01

    Paper presents analysis of mathematical model of one-neuron/one-synapse neural network featuring coupled activation and learning dynamics and parametrical periodic excitation. Demonstrates self-programming, partly random behavior of suitable designed neural network; believed to be related to spontaneity and creativity of biological neural networks.

  9. A mechanical model to compute elastic modulus of tissues for harmonic motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Shan, Baoxiang; Pelegri, Assimina A; Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2008-07-19

    Numerous experimental and computational methods have been developed to estimate tissue elasticity. The existing testing techniques are generally classified into in vitro, invasive in vivo and non-invasive in vivo. For each experimental method, a computational scheme is accordingly proposed to calculate mechanical properties of soft biological tissues. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a new technique that performs radio frequency (RF) signal tracking to estimate the localized oscillatory motion resulting from a radiation force produced by focused ultrasound. A mechanical model and computational scheme based on the superposition principle are developed in this paper to estimate the Young's modulus of a tissue mimicking phantom and bovine liver in vitro tissue from the harmonic displacement measured by HMI. The simulation results are verified by two groups of measurement data, and good agreement is shown in each comparison. Furthermore, an inverse function is observed to correlate the elastic modulus of uniform phantoms with amplitude of displacement measured in HMI. The computational scheme is also implemented to estimate 3D elastic modulus of bovine liver in vitro.

  10. An Approach to Model Neutron Diffraction Pattern of Uniaxial Deformed Sandstone Using Elastic Properties of Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, S.; Schilling, F. R.; Mueller, B.; Scheffzuek, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical properties of sedimentary rocks such as stress-strain-relations are essential for understanding dynamic processes within the Earth's crust. The measurement of in-situ lattice strain in bulk samples is possible with diffraction methods, e.g. with neutrons. The advantage of neutron diffraction is their high penetration depth, which enables to gather a statistically relevant number of grains by diffraction. The neutron time-of-flight diffraction at the strain diffractometer EPSILON which is located at the pulsed neutron source IBR-2M (JINR Dubna, RUS) enables the detection of the complete diffraction pattern up to λ = 7.1 Å (d = 5.1 Å). Uniaxial cyclic deformation experiments were carried out up to 50 MPa (three steps) on a macroscopically isotropic sandstone from Kuhbach / Lahr (Germany). The aim of the present study is to model diffraction patterns for different applied stress-levels, based on the zero-stress diffraction pattern and known elastic properties of Quartz single crystals. The as received model-predictions are compared to observations, both, in the direction of maximum stress (along the cylindric axis) and perpendicular to it. The results show that the shape of the grains has an influence on the macroscopic elastic behavior of the rock whereas the microscopic strain is affected in a different manner. The model is based on spherical quartz grains. The spheres are divided into slices. By removing some slices, the shape of sand grains is approximated. The reaction of each slice through the applied stress is modelled. Together with the relative volume of each slice and it´s elastic behavior, the diffraction pattern is predicted for different applied loads. Measured and modelled diffraction-patterns at different applied loads are in good agreement.

  11. Radius exponent in elastic and rigid arterial models optimized by the least energy principle

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Awa, Shoichi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It was analyzed in normal physiological arteries whether the least energy principle would suffice to account for the radius exponent x. The mammalian arterial system was modeled as two types, the elastic or the rigid, to which Bernoulli's and Hagen‐Poiseuille's equations were applied, respectively. We minimized the total energy function E, which was defined as the sum of kinetic, pressure, metabolic and thermal energies, and loss of each per unit time in a single artery transporting viscous incompressible blood. Assuming a scaling exponent α between the vessel radius (r) and length (l) to be 1.0, x resulted in 2.33 in the elastic model. The rigid model provided a continuously changing x from 2.33 to 3.0, which corresponded to Uylings’ and Murray's theories, respectively, through a function combining Reynolds number with a proportional coefficient of the l − r relationship. These results were expanded to an asymmetric arterial fractal tree with the blood flow preservation rule. While x in the optimal elastic model accounted for around 2.3 in proximal systemic (r >1 mm) and whole pulmonary arteries (r ≥0.004 mm), optimal x in the rigid model explained 2.7 in elastic‐muscular (0.1 < r ≤1 mm) and 3.0 in peripheral resistive systemic arteries (0.004 ≤ r ≤0.1 mm), in agreement with data obtained from angiographic, cast‐morphometric, and in vivo experimental studies in the literature. The least energy principle on the total energy basis provides an alternate concept of optimality relating to mammalian arterial fractal dimensions under α = 1.0. PMID:24744905

  12. Rapid and complete hitless defragmentation method using a coherent RX LO with fast wavelength tracking in elastic optical networks.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Roberto; Qin, Chuan; Guan, Binbin; Yin, Yawei; Scott, Ryan P; Yu, Runxiang; Yoo, S J B

    2012-11-19

    This paper demonstrates a rapid and full hitless defragmentation method in elastic optical networks exploiting a new technique for fast wavelength tracking in coherent receivers. This technique can be applied to a single-carrier connection or each of the subcarriers forming a super-channel. A proof-of-concept demonstration shows hitless defragmentation of a 10 Gb/s QPSK single-carrier connection from 1547.75 nm to 1550.1 nm in less than 1 µs. This was obtained using a small (0.625 kB) link-layer transmitter buffer without the need for any additional transponder. We also demonstrated that the proposed defragmentation technique is capable of hopping over an existing connection, i.e. 10 Gb/s OOK at 1548.5 nm, without causing any degradation of its real-time Bit Error Rate (BER) value. The proposed scheme gives advantages in terms of overall network blocking probability reduction up to a factor of 40. PMID:23187551

  13. Active patterning and asymmetric transport in a model actomyosin network

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2013-12-21

    Cytoskeletal networks, which are essentially motor-filament assemblies, play a major role in many developmental processes involving structural remodeling and shape changes. These are achieved by nonequilibrium self-organization processes that generate functional patterns and drive intracellular transport. We construct a minimal physical model that incorporates the coupling between nonlinear elastic responses of individual filaments and force-dependent motor action. By performing stochastic simulations we show that the interplay of motor processes, described as driving anti-correlated motion of the network vertices, and the network connectivity, which determines the percolation character of the structure, can indeed capture the dynamical and structural cooperativity which gives rise to diverse patterns observed experimentally. The buckling instability of individual filaments is found to play a key role in localizing collapse events due to local force imbalance. Motor-driven buckling-induced node aggregation provides a dynamic mechanism that stabilizes the two-dimensional patterns below the apparent static percolation limit. Coordinated motor action is also shown to suppress random thermal noise on large time scales, the two-dimensional configuration that the system starts with thus remaining planar during the structural development. By carrying out similar simulations on a three-dimensional anchored network, we find that the myosin-driven isotropic contraction of a well-connected actin network, when combined with mechanical anchoring that confers directionality to the collective motion, may represent a novel mechanism of intracellular transport, as revealed by chromosome translocation in the starfish oocyte.

  14. [Modern poro-elastic biomechanical model of bone tissue. I. Biomechanical function of fluids in bone].

    PubMed

    Rogala, Piotr; Uklejewski, Ryszard; Stryła, Wanda

    2002-01-01

    The modern biomechanical two-phase poroelastic model of bone tissue is presented. Bone tissue is treated in this model as a porous elastically deformed solid filled with a viscous newtonian fluid. Traditional one-phase biomechanical model of bone tissue, which is characterized by the Young modulus and the Poisson's coefficient, is still valid and it can be treated as an approximate model in comparison with the more realistic two-phase model of bone tissue. The biomechanical function of fluids in bone is considered. Bone biodynamics is presented in form of the scheme which illustrates the mechano-adaptive, the mechano-electric and the electrophysiologic properties of bone tissue. Essentials of the poroelastic model of bone tissue is the mechanical load induced flow of intraosseous fluid and the associated strain generated electric potentials SGPs.

  15. Queuing theory models for computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.

    1989-01-01

    A set of simple queuing theory models which can model the average response of a network of computers to a given traffic load has been implemented using a spreadsheet. The impact of variations in traffic patterns and intensities, channel capacities, and message protocols can be assessed using them because of the lack of fine detail in the network traffic rates, traffic patterns, and the hardware used to implement the networks. A sample use of the models applied to a realistic problem is included in appendix A. Appendix B provides a glossary of terms used in this paper. This Ames Research Center computer communication network is an evolving network of local area networks (LANs) connected via gateways and high-speed backbone communication channels. Intelligent planning of expansion and improvement requires understanding the behavior of the individual LANs as well as the collection of networks as a whole.

  16. Modeling the dynamics of a compliant piano action mechanism impacting an elastic stiff string.

    PubMed

    Vyasarayani, Chandrika P; Birkett, Stephen; McPhee, John

    2009-06-01

    A realistic model of the piano hammer-string interaction must treat the action mechanism and string as a single system. In this paper an elastic stiff string model is integrated with a dynamic model of a compliant action mechanism with flexible hammer shank. Action components represented as rotating bodies interact through felt-lined interfaces for which a specialized contact model with hysteretic damping and tangential friction was developed. The motion of the hammer during string contact is governed by the dynamics of the action mechanism, thereby providing a more sophisticated hammer-string interaction than a simple transverse impact hammer model with fixed contact location. Simulations have been used to compare mechanism response for impact on the elastic string as compared to a rigid stop. Hammer head scuffing along the string and time in contact were predicted to increase, while hammer shank vibration amplitude and peak contact force were decreased. Introducing hammer-string friction decreases the duration of contact and reduces the extent of scuffing. Finally, significant differences in hammer and string motion were predicted for a highly flexible hammer shank. Initial contact time and location, length of contact period and peak force, hammer vibration amplitude, scuffing extent, and string spectral content were all influenced. PMID:19507984

  17. Modeling the dynamics of a compliant piano action mechanism impacting an elastic stiff string.

    PubMed

    Vyasarayani, Chandrika P; Birkett, Stephen; McPhee, John

    2009-06-01

    A realistic model of the piano hammer-string interaction must treat the action mechanism and string as a single system. In this paper an elastic stiff string model is integrated with a dynamic model of a compliant action mechanism with flexible hammer shank. Action components represented as rotating bodies interact through felt-lined interfaces for which a specialized contact model with hysteretic damping and tangential friction was developed. The motion of the hammer during string contact is governed by the dynamics of the action mechanism, thereby providing a more sophisticated hammer-string interaction than a simple transverse impact hammer model with fixed contact location. Simulations have been used to compare mechanism response for impact on the elastic string as compared to a rigid stop. Hammer head scuffing along the string and time in contact were predicted to increase, while hammer shank vibration amplitude and peak contact force were decreased. Introducing hammer-string friction decreases the duration of contact and reduces the extent of scuffing. Finally, significant differences in hammer and string motion were predicted for a highly flexible hammer shank. Initial contact time and location, length of contact period and peak force, hammer vibration amplitude, scuffing extent, and string spectral content were all influenced.

  18. Modeling the Elastic Modulus of 2D Woven CVI SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2006-01-01

    The use of fiber, interphase, CVI SiC minicomposites as structural elements for 2D-woven SiC fiber reinforced chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC matrix composites is demonstrated to be a viable approach to model the elastic modulus of these composite systems when tensile loaded in an orthogonal direction. The 0deg (loading direction) and 90deg (perpendicular to loading direction) oriented minicomposites as well as the open porosity and excess SiC associated with CVI SiC composites were all modeled as parallel elements using simple Rule of Mixtures techniques. Excellent agreement for a variety of 2D woven Hi-Nicalon(TradeMark) fiber-reinforced and Sylramic-iBN reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites that differed in numbers of plies, constituent content, thickness, density, and number of woven tows in either direction (i.e, balanced weaves versus unbalanced weaves) was achieved. It was found that elastic modulus was not only dependent on constituent content, but also the degree to which 90deg minicomposites carried load. This depended on the degree of interaction between 90deg and 0deg minicomposites which was quantified to some extent by composite density. The relationships developed here for elastic modulus only necessitated the knowledge of the fractional contents of fiber, interphase and CVI SiC as well as the tow size and shape. It was concluded that such relationships are fairly robust for orthogonally loaded 2D woven CVI SiC composite system and can be implemented by ceramic matrix composite component modelers and designers for modeling the local stiffness in simple or complex parts fabricated with variable constituent contents.

  19. A Conceptual Model of Learning Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koper, Rob

    In the TENCompetence project a set of UML models (Booch et al. 1999) have been developed to specify the core concepts for Learning Networks Services that support professional competence development. The three most important, high-level models are (a) the use case model, (b) the conceptual model, and (c) the domain model. The first model identifies the primary use cases we need in order to support professional competence development. The second model describes the concept of competence and competence development from a theoretical point of view. What is a competence? How does it relate to the cognitive system of an actor? How are competences developed? The third model is a UML Domain Model that defines, among other things, the components of a Learning Network, defines the concepts and relationships between the concepts in a Learning Network and provides a starting point for the design of the overall architecture for Learning Network Services, including the data model.

  20. Structural Modeling of Network Systems in Citation Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaru, Dang

    1997-01-01

    Describes construction of citation network systems and some subsystems (time sequence network, cocitation network, couple network). Establishes structural modeling of these systems by means of system engineering. Explains and analyzes citation network systems. Includes graphs and charts. (JAK)

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Cortical Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; Stiefel, Klaus M.

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we describe efforts at modeling the electrophysiological dynamics of cortical networks in a multi-scale manner. Specifically, we describe the implementation of a network model composed of simple single-compartmental neuron models, in which a single complex multi-compartmental model of a pyramidal neuron is embedded. The network is capable of generating Δ (2 Hz, observed during deep sleep states) and γ (40 Hz, observed during wakefulness) oscillations, which are then imposed onto the multi-compartmental model, thus providing realistic, dynamic boundary conditions. We furthermore discuss the challenges and chances involved in multi-scale modeling of neural function.

  2. A Modeling Approach for Burn Scar Assessment Using Natural Features and Elastic Property

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L V; Zhang, Y; Goldgof, D B; Sarkar, S

    2004-04-02

    A modeling approach is presented for quantitative burn scar assessment. Emphases are given to: (1) constructing a finite element model from natural image features with an adaptive mesh, and (2) quantifying the Young's modulus of scars using the finite element model and the regularization method. A set of natural point features is extracted from the images of burn patients. A Delaunay triangle mesh is then generated that adapts to the point features. A 3D finite element model is built on top of the mesh with the aid of range images providing the depth information. The Young's modulus of scars is quantified with a simplified regularization functional, assuming that the knowledge of scar's geometry is available. The consistency between the Relative Elasticity Index and the physician's rating based on the Vancouver Scale (a relative scale used to rate burn scars) indicates that the proposed modeling approach has high potentials for image-based quantitative burn scar assessment.

  3. A modeling approach for burn scar assessment using natural features and elastic property.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Goldgof, Dmitry B; Sarkar, Sudeep; Tsap, Leonid V

    2004-10-01

    A modeling approach is presented for quantitative burn scar assessment. Emphases are given to: 1) constructing a finite-element model from natural image features with an adaptive mesh and 2) quantifying the Young's modulus of scars using the finite-element model and regularization method. A set of natural point features is extracted from the images of burn patients. A Delaunay triangle mesh is then generated that adapts to the point features. A three-dimensional finite-element model is built on top of the mesh with the aid of range images providing the depth information. The Young's modulus of scars is quantified with a simplified regularization functional, assuming that the knowledge of the scar's geometry is available. The consistency between the relative elasticity index and the physician's rating based on the Vancouver scale (a relative scale used to rate burn scars) indicates that the proposed modeling approach has high potential for image-based quantitative burn scar assessment.

  4. Statistical model for the prediction of elastic wave scattering from finite complicated shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hua

    This thesis develops a simple statistical model to estimate bistatic elastic scattering from finite complicated shells in the mid-frequency range, 3 < ka/ < 10. The model has three parts: (1) sound power injection into the shell; (2) coupling among the elastic waves in the shell and wave power equipartition (3) sound radiation from the shell. Within 30o of beam aspect, sound power injection into the shell is mainly caused by acoustic trace matching, and is estimated by using an infinitely long shell model. Once trace matched, the compressional and shear waves can couple to each other and to the subsonic flexural waves at shell discontinuities such as bulkheads and endcaps. Under extensive wave conversion, wave power, defined as energy density multiplied by axial group speed, is hypothesized to be equipartitioned among the elastic wave types. Numerical calculations are conducted and the results show that the wave power equipartition hypothesis is plausible for a finite endcapped shell with four heavy deep rings. Using the wave power equipartition hypothesis, the shell motion is then converted to sound pressure in the surrounding fluid using Green's theorem. The sound radiation is further extended to the time domain, using random phase realizations and a decay rate model, which considers various dissipation mechanisms in the shells. The predicted target strength is compared with measured data for the ringed shell and the internalled shell, with the internal structures resiliently mounted to the rings. In terms of the mean target strength over the frequency region 3 < ka/ < 10 and the observation region within 30o of beam aspect, the prediction differs from the measured data by less than 2.5 dB for the second and third roundtrip of the trace matched wave in the shells, as well as for a time integrated case. The ring influence on elastic wave speeds is also studied. Inclusion of the influence in the model does not generally yield a better agreement with the

  5. Modelling of multiscale nonlinear interaction of elastic waves with three-dimensional cracks.

    PubMed

    Ciampa, Francesco; Barbieri, Ettore; Meo, Michele

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear elastic material model able to simulate the nonlinear effects generated by the interaction of acoustic/ultrasonic waves with damage precursors and micro-cracks in a variety of materials. Such a constitutive model is implemented in an in-house finite element code and exhibits a multiscale nature where the macroscopic behavior of damaged structures can be represented through a contribution of a number of mesoscopic elements, which are composed by a statistical collection of microscopic units. By means of the semi-analytical Landau formulation and Preisach-Mayergoyz space representation, this multiscale model allows the description of the structural response under continuous harmonic excitation of micro-damaged materials showing both anharmonic and dissipative hysteretic effects. In this manner, nonlinear effects observed experimentally, such as the generation of both even and odd harmonics, can be reproduced. In addition, by using Kelvin eigentensors and eigenelastic constants, the wave propagation problem in both isotropic and orthotropic solids was extended to the three-dimensional Cartesian space. The developed model has been verified for a number of different geometrical and material configurations. Particularly, the influence of a small region with classical and non-classical elasticity and the variations of the input amplitudes on the harmonics generation were analyzed.

  6. Modeling and optimization of an elastic arthroplastic disc for a degenerated disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouchani, Azadeh; Ravari, Mohammad; Mahmoudi, Farid

    2011-10-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the L3-L4 motion segment using ABAQUS v 6.9 has been developed. The model took into account the material nonlinearities and is imposed different loading conditions. In this study, we validated the model by comparison of its predictions with several sets of experimental data. Disc deformation under compression and segmental rotational motions under moment loads for the normal disc model agreed well with the corresponding in vivo studies. By linking ABAQUS with MATLAB 2010.a, we determined the optimal Young s modulus as well as the Poisson's ratio for the artificial disc under different physiologic loading conditions. The results of the present study confirmed that a well-designed elastic arthroplastic disc preferably has an annulus modulus of 19.1 MPa and 1.24 MPa for nucleus section and Poisson ratio of 0.41 and 0.47 respectively. Elastic artificial disc with such properties can then achieve the goal of restoring the disc height and mechanical function of intact disc under different loading conditions and so can reduce low back pain which is mostly caused due to disc degeneration.

  7. On the Opening of Thick Walled Elastic Tubes: A Fluid-Structure Model for Acid Reflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sudip; Kahrilas, Peter

    2005-11-01

    A coupled fluid-structure mathematical model was developed to quantify rapid opening of thick-walled elastic tubes, a phenomenon underlying biological flows such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The wall was modeled using non-linear finite deformation theory to predict space-time radial distention of an axisymmetric tube with luminal fluid flow. Anisotropic azimuthal and longitudinal muscle-induced stresses were incorporated, and interstitial material properties were assumed isotropic and linearly elastic. Fluid flow was modeled using lubrication theory with inertial correction. Opening and flow were driven by a specified inflow pressure and zero pressure gradient was specified at outflow. No-slip and surface force balance were applied at the fluid-wall interface. Viscoelasticity was modeled with ad hoc damping and the evolution of the tube geometry was predicted at mid-layer. A potentially important discovery was made when applied to studies of initiation of opening with GERD: while material stiffness is of minor consequence, small changes in resting lumen distension (˜2 mm diameter) may be a sensitive distinguishing feature of the disease.

  8. High-performance modeling acoustic and elastic waves using the parallel Dichotomy Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Fatyanov, Alexey G.; Terekhov, Andrew V.

    2011-03-01

    A high-performance parallel algorithm is proposed for modeling the propagation of acoustic and elastic waves in inhomogeneous media. An initial boundary-value problem is replaced by a series of boundary-value problems for a constant elliptic operator and different right-hand sides via the integral Laguerre transform. It is proposed to solve difference equations by the conjugate gradient method for acoustic equations and by the GMRES(k) method for modeling elastic waves. A preconditioning operator was the Laplace operator that is inverted using the variable separation method. The novelty of the proposed algorithm is using the Dichotomy Algorithm , which was designed for solving a series of tridiagonal systems of linear equations, in the context of the preconditioning operator inversion. Via considering analytical solutions, it is shown that modeling wave processes for long instants of time requires high-resolution meshes. The proposed parallel fine-mesh algorithm enabled to solve real application seismic problems in acceptable time and with high accuracy. By solving model problems, it is demonstrated that the considered parallel algorithm possesses high performance and efficiency over a wide range of the number of processors (from 2 to 8192).

  9. Neural network modeling of distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Baratti, R.; Vacca, G.; Servida, A.

    1995-06-01

    Neural network modeling (NNM) was implemented for monitoring and control applications on two actual distillation columns: the butane splitter tower and the gasoline stabilizer. The two distillation columns are in operation at the SARAS refinery. Results show that with proper implementation techniques NNM can significantly improve column operation. The common belief that neural networks can be used as black-box process models is not completely true. Effective implementation always requires a minimum degree of process knowledge to identify the relevant inputs to the net. After background and generalities on neural network modeling, the paper describes efforts on the development of neural networks for the two distillation units.

  10. Predicting the elastic properties of selective laser sintered PCL/β-TCP bone scaffold materials using computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Heather; Lohfeld, Stefan; McHugh, Peter

    2014-03-01

    This study assesses the ability of finite element (FE) models to capture the mechanical behaviour of sintered orthopaedic scaffold materials. Individual scaffold struts were fabricated from a 50:50 wt% poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) blend, using selective laser sintering. The tensile elastic modulus of single struts was determined experimentally. High resolution FE models of single struts were generated from micro-CT scans (28.8 μm resolution) and an effective strut elastic modulus was calculated from tensile loading simulations. Three material assignment methods were employed: (1) homogeneous PCL elastic constants, (2) composite PCL/β-TCP elastic constants based on rule of mixtures, and (3) heterogeneous distribution of micromechanically-determined elastic constants. In comparison with experimental results, the use of homogeneous PCL properties gave a good estimate of strut modulus; however it is not sufficiently representative of the real material as it neglects the β-TCP phase. The rule of mixtures method significantly overestimated strut modulus, while there was no significant difference between strut modulus evaluated using the micromechanically-determined elastic constants and experimentally evaluated strut modulus. These results indicate that the multi-scale approach of linking micromechanical modelling of the sintered scaffold material with macroscale modelling gives an accurate prediction of the mechanical behaviour of the sintered structure.

  11. Application of an Uncoupled Elastic-plastic-creep Constitutive Model to Metals at High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    A uniaxial, uncoupled constitutive model to predict the response of thermal and rate dependent elastic-plastic material behavior is presented. The model is based on an incremental classicial plasticity theory extended to account for thermal, creep, and transient temperature conditions. Revisions to he combined hardening rule of the theory allow for better representation of cyclic phenomenon including the high rate of strain hardening upon cyclic reyield and cyclic saturation. An alternative approach is taken to model the rate dependent inelastic deformation which utilizes hysteresis loops and stress relaxation test data at various temperatures. The model is evaluated and compared to experiments which involve various thermal and mechanical load histories on 5086 aluminum alloy, 304 stainless steel and Hastelloy-X.

  12. Free transverse vibrations of cracked nanobeams using a nonlocal elasticity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loya, J.; López-Puente, J.; Zaera, R.; Fernández-Sáez, J.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, flexural vibrations of cracked micro- and nanobeams are studied. The model is based on the theory of nonlocal elasticity applied to Euler-Bernouilli beams. The cracked-beam model is established using a proper modification of the classical cracked-beam theory consisting of dividing the cracked element into two segments connected by a rotational spring located at the cracked section. This model promotes a discontinuity in bending slope, which is proportional to the second derivative of the displacements. Frequency equations of cracked nanobeams with some typical boundary conditions are derived and the natural frequencies for different crack positions, crack lengths, and nonlocal length parameters are calculated. The results are compared with those corresponding to the classical local model, emphasizing the differences occurring when the nonlocal effects are significant.

  13. A Multi-Backup Path Protection scheme for survivability in Elastic Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Dharmendra Singh; Chakraborty, Abhishek; Manoj, B. S.

    2016-07-01

    Two important challenges in designing a survivable optical network are minimizing backup spectrum allocation and ensuring spectrum assignment constraints. Allocating backup spectrum is one important approach for survivable optical network design. Connection requests which are rejected due to the unavailability of a single backup path can be survived using multiple backup routes. Multiple backup routes not only increase connection acceptance rate, but also improve backup resource sharing. In this paper, we present a strategy for survivability which optimizes primary and backup spectrum allocations and multiple backup route assignments for surviving a connection request. In our strategy, named as Backup Spectrum Reservation with MultiPath Protection (BSR-MPP), multiple backup routes are searched over advance reserved backup resources when an optical connection is concerned. Simulation results show that confinement of backup resources result in higher resource sharing and assignment of multiple backup lightpaths. It can also be observed that BSR-MPP has lower Bandwidth Blocking Probability and higher spectrum efficiency as compared to conventional Shared Path Protection (SPP) and MultiPath Protection (MPP) strategies.

  14. Modelling dendritic ecological networks in space: anintegrated network perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Erin E.; Ver Hoef, Jay M.; Isaak, Dan J.; Falke, Jeffrey A.; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Jordon, Chris E.; McNyset, Kristina; Monestiez, Pascal; Ruesch, Aaron S.; Sengupta, Aritra; Som, Nicholas; Steel, E. Ashley; Theobald, David M.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Wenger, Seth J.

    2013-01-01

    the context of stream ecology. Within this context, we summarise the key innovations of a new family of spatial statistical models that describe spatial relationships in DENs. Finally, we discuss how different network analyses may be combined to address more complex and novel research questions. While our main focus is streams, the taxonomy of network analyses is also relevant anywhere spatial patterns in both network and 2-D space can be used to explore the influence of multi-scale processes on biota and their habitat (e.g. plant morphology and pest infestation, or preferential migration along stream or road corridors).

  15. Nonlocal-integro-differential modeling of vibration of elastically supported nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2016-09-01

    In the previously established nonlocal continuum-based models, small characteristic length was commonly incorporated into the mass matrix and the driving force vector which is a bit in contradiction with our sense regarding these factors. Herein, a nonlocal-integro-differential version of the constitutive relations is employed for the bulk and the surface layer of the nanorod. By adopting Hamilton's principle, integro-partial differential equations of motion of elastically supported nanorods are established accounting for both nonlocality and surface energy effects. Then, these are solved by an efficient meshless methodology. For fixed-fixed and fixed-free nanorods, modal analysis of the problem is also performed and the explicit expressions of the mass and stiffness matrices are derived. For these special cases, the obtained results by the meshless technique are successfully verified with those of the modal solution. In the newly developed numerical model, the small-scale parameter is only incorporated into the stiffness matrix which gives us a more realistic sense about the nonlocality effect. Subsequently, the roles of the surface energy, small-scale parameter, elastic supports, and kernel function on natural frequencies of the nanostructure are discussed and explained. This work can be considered as a pivotal step towards a more reasonable nonlocal modeling of vibration of nanoscale structures.

  16. Quantitative endoscopic imaging elastic scattering spectroscopy: model system/tissue phantom validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsley, E. H.; Farkas, D. L.

    2008-02-01

    We have designed and built an imaging elastic scattering spectroscopy endoscopic instrument for the purpose of detecting cancer in vivo. As part of our testing and validation of the system, known targets representing potential disease states of interest were constructed using polystyrene beads of known average diameter and TiO II crystals embedded in a two-layer agarose gel. Final construction geometry was verified using a dissection microscope. The phantoms were then imaged using the endoscopic probe at a known incident angle, and the results compared to model predictions. The mathematical model that was used combines classic ray-tracing optics with Mie scattering to predict the images that would be observed by the probe at a given physical distance from a Mie-regime scattering media. This model was used generate the expected observed response for a broad range of parameter values, and these results were then used as a library to fit the observed data from the phantoms. Compared against the theoretical library, the best matching signal correlated well with known phantom material dimensions. These results lead us to believe that imaging elastic scattering can be useful in detection/diagnosis, but further refinement of the device will be necessary to detect the weak signals in a real clinical setting.

  17. Micromechanical modeling of elastic properties of cortical bone accounting for anisotropy of dense tissue.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Laura; Saadat, Fatemeh; Sevostianov, Igor

    2014-10-17

    The paper analyzes the connection between microstructure of the osteonal cortical bone and its overall elastic properties. The existing models either neglect anisotropy of the dense tissue or simplify cortical bone microstructure (accounting for Haversian canals only). These simplifications (related mostly to insufficient mathematical apparatus) complicate quantitative analysis of the effect of microstructural changes - produced by age, microgravity, or some diseases - on the overall mechanical performance of cortical bone. The present analysis fills this gap; it accounts for anisotropy of the dense tissue and uses realistic model of the porous microstructure. The approach is based on recent results of Sevostianov et al. (2005) and Saadat et al. (2012) on inhomogeneities in a transversely-isotropic material. Bone's microstructure is modeled according to books of Martin and Burr (1989), Currey (2002), and Fung (1993) and includes four main families of pores. The calculated elastic constants for porous cortical bone are in agreement with available experimental data. The influence of each of the pore types on the overall moduli is examined.

  18. Accuracy of the Generalized Self-Consistent Method in Modelling the Elastic Behaviour of Periodic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Kevin P.; Freed, Alan D.; Jordan, Eric H.

    1993-01-01

    Local stress and strain fields in the unit cell of an infinite, two-dimensional, periodic fibrous lattice have been determined by an integral equation approach. The effect of the fibres is assimilated to an infinite two-dimensional array of fictitious body forces in the matrix constituent phase of the unit cell. By subtracting a volume averaged strain polarization term from the integral equation we effectively embed a finite number of unit cells in a homogenized medium in which the overall stress and strain correspond to the volume averaged stress and strain of the constrained unit cell. This paper demonstrates that the zeroth term in the governing integral equation expansion, which embeds one unit cell in the homogenized medium, corresponds to the generalized self-consistent approximation. By comparing the zeroth term approximation with higher order approximations to the integral equation summation, both the accuracy of the generalized self-consistent composite model and the rate of convergence of the integral summation can be assessed. Two example composites are studied. For a tungsten/copper elastic fibrous composite the generalized self-consistent model is shown to provide accurate, effective, elastic moduli and local field representations. The local elastic transverse stress field within the representative volume element of the generalized self-consistent method is shown to be in error by much larger amounts for a composite with periodically distributed voids, but homogenization leads to a cancelling of errors, and the effective transverse Young's modulus of the voided composite is shown to be in error by only 23% at a void volume fraction of 75%.

  19. Modeling elastic waves in coupled media: Estimate of soft tissue influence and application to quantitative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangang; Cheng, Li; Su, Zhongqing; Qin, Ling

    2013-02-01

    The effect of medium coupling on propagation of elastic waves is a general concern in a variety of engineering and bio-medical applications. Although some theories and analytical models are available for describing waves in multi-layered engineering structures, they do not focus on canvassing ultrasonic waves in human bones with coupled soft tissues, where the considerable differences in acoustic impedance between bone and soft tissue may pose a challenge in using these models (the soft tissues having an acoustic impedance around 80% less than that of a typical bone). Without proper treatment of this coupling effect, the precision of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) for clinical bone assessment can be compromised. The coupling effect of mimicked soft tissues on the first-arriving signal (FAS) and second-arriving signal (SAS) in a series of synthesized soft-tissue-bone phantoms was investigated experimentally and calibrated quantitatively. Understanding of the underlying mechanism of the coupling effect was supplemented by a dedicated finite element analysis. As revealed, the medium coupling impacts influence on different wave modes to different degrees: for FAS and SAS, the most significant changes take place when the soft tissues are initially introduced, and the decrease in signal peak energy continues with increase in the thickness or elastic modulus of the soft tissues, but the changes in propagation velocity fluctuate within 5% regardless of further increase in the thickness or elastic modulus of the soft tissues. As an application, the calibrated effects were employed to enhance the precision of SAS-based QUS when used for predicting the simulated healing status of a mimicked bone fracture, to find prediction of healing progress of bone fracture based on changes in velocity of the FAS or the SAS is inaccurate without taking into account the effect of soft tissue coupling, entailing appropriate compensation for the coupling effect.

  20. Autonomous Boolean modeling of gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolar, Joshua; Sun, Mengyang; Cheng, Xianrui

    2014-03-01

    In cases where the dynamical properties of gene regulatory networks are important, a faithful model must include three key features: a network topology; a functional response of each element to its inputs; and timing information about the transmission of signals across network links. Autonomous Boolean network (ABN) models are efficient representations of these elements and are amenable to analysis. We present an ABN model of the gene regulatory network governing cell fate specification in the early sea urchin embryo, which must generate three bands of distinct tissue types after several cell divisions, beginning from an initial condition with only two distinct cell types. Analysis of the spatial patterning problem and the dynamics of a network constructed from available experimental results reveals that a simple mechanism is at work in this case. Supported by NSF Grant DMS-10-68602

  1. Process modeling with the regression network.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, T; Barnard, E; van Deventer, J

    1995-01-01

    A new connectionist network topology called the regression network is proposed. The structural and underlying mathematical features of the regression network are investigated. Emphasis is placed on the intricacies of the optimization process for the regression network and some measures to alleviate these difficulties of optimization are proposed and investigated. The ability of the regression network algorithm to perform either nonparametric or parametric optimization, as well as a combination of both, is also highlighted. It is further shown how the regression network can be used to model systems which are poorly understood on the basis of sparse data. A semi-empirical regression network model is developed for a metallurgical processing operation (a hydrocyclone classifier) by building mechanistic knowledge into the connectionist structure of the regression network model. Poorly understood aspects of the process are provided for by use of nonparametric regions within the structure of the semi-empirical connectionist model. The performance of the regression network model is compared to the corresponding generalization performance results obtained by some other nonparametric regression techniques.

  2. Comparison of elastic-viscous-plastic and viscous-plastic dynamics models using a high resolution Arctic sea ice model

    SciTech Connect

    Hunke, E.C.; Zhang, Y.

    1997-12-31

    A nonlinear viscous-plastic (VP) rheology proposed by Hibler (1979) has been demonstrated to be the most suitable of the rheologies commonly used for modeling sea ice dynamics. However, the presence of a huge range of effective viscosities hinders numerical implementations of this model, particularly on high resolution grids or when the ice model is coupled to an ocean or atmosphere model. Hunke and Dukowicz (1997) have modified the VP model by including elastic waves as a numerical regularization in the case of zero strain rate. This modification (EVP) allows an efficient, fully explicit discretization that adapts well to parallel architectures. The authors present a comparison of EVP and VP dynamics model results from two 5-year simulations of Arctic sea ice, obtained with a high resolution sea ice model. The purpose of the comparison is to determine how differently the two dynamics models behave, and to decide whether the elastic-viscous-plastic model is preferable for high resolution climate simulations, considering its high efficiency in parallel computation. Results from the first year of this experiment (1990) are discussed in detail in Hunke and Zhang (1997).

  3. Towards Reproducible Descriptions of Neuronal Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Nordlie, Eilen; Gewaltig, Marc-Oliver; Plesser, Hans Ekkehard

    2009-01-01

    Progress in science depends on the effective exchange of ideas among scientists. New ideas can be assessed and criticized in a meaningful manner only if they are formulated precisely. This applies to simulation studies as well as to experiments and theories. But after more than 50 years of neuronal network simulations, we still lack a clear and common understanding of the role of computational models in neuroscience as well as established practices for describing network models in publications. This hinders the critical evaluation of network models as well as their re-use. We analyze here 14 research papers proposing neuronal network models of different complexity and find widely varying approaches to model descriptions, with regard to both the means of description and the ordering and placement of material. We further observe great variation in the graphical representation of networks and the notation used in equations. Based on our observations, we propose a good model description practice, composed of guidelines for the organization of publications, a checklist for model descriptions, templates for tables presenting model structure, and guidelines for diagrams of networks. The main purpose of this good practice is to trigger a debate about the communication of neuronal network models in a manner comprehensible to humans, as opposed to machine-readable model description languages. We believe that the good model description practice proposed here, together with a number of other recent initiatives on data-, model-, and software-sharing, may lead to a deeper and more fruitful exchange of ideas among computational neuroscientists in years to come. We further hope that work on standardized ways of describing—and thinking about—complex neuronal networks will lead the scientific community to a clearer understanding of high-level concepts in network dynamics, and will thus lead to deeper insights into the function of the brain. PMID:19662159

  4. 3D Discontinuous Galerkin elastic seismic wave modeling based upon a grid injection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, V.

    2015-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a seismic imaging method that estimates thesub-surface physical properties with a spatial resolution of the order of thewavelength. FWI is generally recast as the iterative optimization of anobjective function that measures the distance between modeled and recordeddata. In the framework of local descent methods, FWI requires to perform atleast two seismic modelings per source and per FWI iteration.Due to the resulting computational burden, applications of elastic FWI have been usuallyrestricted to 2D geometries. Despite the continuous growth of high-performancecomputing facilities, application of 3D elastic FWI to real-scale problemsremain computationally too expensive. To perform elastic seismic modeling with a reasonable amount of time, weconsider a reduced computational domain embedded in a larger background modelin which seismic sources are located. Our aim is to compute repeatedly thefull wavefield in the targeted domain after model alteration, once theincident wavefield has been computed once for all in the background model. Toachieve this goal, we use a grid injection method referred to as the Total-Field/Scattered-Field (TF/SF) technique in theelectromagnetic community. We implemented the Total-Field/Scattered-Field approach in theDiscontinuous Galerkin Finite Element method (DG-FEM) that is used to performmodeling in the local domain. We show how to interface the DG-FEM with any modeling engine (analytical solution, finite difference or finite elements methods) that is suitable for the background simulation. One advantage of the Total-Field/Scattered-Field approach is related to thefact that the scattered wavefield instead of the full wavefield enter thePMLs, hence making more efficient the absorption of the outgoing waves at theouter edges of the computational domain. The domain reduction in which theDG-FEM is applied allows us to use modest computational resources opening theway for high-resolution imaging by full

  5. On the consistency between nearest-neighbor peridynamic discretizations and discretized classical elasticity models

    DOE PAGES

    Seleson, Pablo; Du, Qiang; Parks, Michael L.

    2016-08-16

    The peridynamic theory of solid mechanics is a nonlocal reformulation of the classical continuum mechanics theory. At the continuum level, it has been demonstrated that classical (local) elasticity is a special case of peridynamics. Such a connection between these theories has not been extensively explored at the discrete level. This paper investigates the consistency between nearest-neighbor discretizations of linear elastic peridynamic models and finite difference discretizations of the Navier–Cauchy equation of classical elasticity. While nearest-neighbor discretizations in peridynamics have been numerically observed to present grid-dependent crack paths or spurious microcracks, this paper focuses on a different, analytical aspect of suchmore » discretizations. We demonstrate that, even in the absence of cracks, such discretizations may be problematic unless a proper selection of weights is used. Specifically, we demonstrate that using the standard meshfree approach in peridynamics, nearest-neighbor discretizations do not reduce, in general, to discretizations of corresponding classical models. We study nodal-based quadratures for the discretization of peridynamic models, and we derive quadrature weights that result in consistency between nearest-neighbor discretizations of peridynamic models and discretized classical models. The quadrature weights that lead to such consistency are, however, model-/discretization-dependent. We motivate the choice of those quadrature weights through a quadratic approximation of displacement fields. The stability of nearest-neighbor peridynamic schemes is demonstrated through a Fourier mode analysis. Finally, an approach based on a normalization of peridynamic constitutive constants at the discrete level is explored. This approach results in the desired consistency for one-dimensional models, but does not work in higher dimensions. The results of the work presented in this paper suggest that even though nearest

  6. Reconstruction of elasticity: a stochastic model-based approach in ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The convectional strain-based algorithm has been widely utilized in clinical practice. It can only provide the information of relative information of tissue stiffness. However, the exact information of tissue stiffness should be valuable for clinical diagnosis and treatment. Methods In this study we propose a reconstruction strategy to recover the mechanical properties of the tissue. After the discrepancies between the biomechanical model and data are modeled as the process noise, and the biomechanical model constraint is transformed into a state space representation the reconstruction of elasticity can be accomplished through one filtering identification process, which is to recursively estimate the material properties and kinematic functions from ultrasound data according to the minimum mean square error (MMSE) criteria. In the implementation of this model-based algorithm, the linear isotropic elasticity is adopted as the biomechanical constraint. The estimation of kinematic functions (i.e., the full displacement and velocity field), and the distribution of Young’s modulus are computed simultaneously through an extended Kalman filter (EKF). Results In the following experiments the accuracy and robustness of this filtering framework is first evaluated on synthetic data in controlled conditions, and the performance of this framework is then evaluated in the real data collected from elastography phantom and patients using the ultrasound system. Quantitative analysis verifies that strain fields estimated by our filtering strategy are more closer to the ground truth. The distribution of Young’s modulus is also well estimated. Further, the effects of measurement noise and process noise have been investigated as well. Conclusions The advantage of this model-based algorithm over the conventional strain-based algorithm is its potential of providing the distribution of elasticity under a proper biomechanical model constraint. We address the model

  7. Sound transmission through lined, composite panel structures: Transversely isotropic poro-elastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Woo

    A joint experimental and analytical investigation of the sound transmission loss (STL) and two-dimensional free wave propagation in composite sandwich panels is presented here. An existing panel, a Nomex honeycomb sandwich panel, was studied in detail. For the purpose of understanding the typical behavior of sandwich panels, a composite structure comprising two aluminum sheets with a relatively soft, poro-elastic foam core was also constructed and studied. The cores of both panels were modeled using an anisotropic (transversely isotropic) poro-elastic material theory. Several estimation methods were used to obtain the material properties of the honeycomb core and the skin plates to be used in the numerical calculations. Appropriate values selected from among the estimates were used in the STL and free wave propagation models. The prediction model was then verified in two ways: first, the calculated wave speeds and STL of a single poro-elastic layer were numerically verified by comparison with the predictions of a previously developed isotropic model. Secondly, to physically validate the transversely isotropic model, the measured STL and the phase speeds of the sandwich panels were compared with their predicted values. To analyze the actual treatment of a fuselage structure, multi-layered configurations, including a honeycomb panel and several layers such as air gaps, acoustic blankets and membrane partitions, were formulated. Then, to find the optimal solution for improving the sound barrier performance of an actual fuselage system, air layer depth and glass fiber lining effects were investigated by using these multi-layer models. By using the free wave propagation model, the first anti-symmetric and symmetric modes of the sandwich panels were characterized to allow the identification of the coincidence frequencies of the sandwich panel. The behavior of the STL could then be clearly explained by comparison with the free wave propagation solutions. By performing a

  8. Simulation of post-tetanic potentiation and fatigue in muscle using a visco-elastic model.

    PubMed

    Ducati, A; Parmiggiani, F; Schieppati, M

    1982-01-01

    Post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) in single motor units was simulated using a simple visco-elastic model. Single isometric twitches and unfused tetani were obtained using a wide range of physiological input rates. Values of model parameters were chosen to simulate contraction times close to those of fast and slow muscle fibers. PTP has been attributed either to i) an augmented plateau level of active state or ii) an increase in time constant of active state decay. Our results show that a prolonged decay time of active state can account for most of the experimental data obtained in amphibian and mammalian preparations. In particular, potentiation is more marked in unfused tetani than in single twitches. Moreover the model accounts for PTP even in the case of a reduction of active state plateau due to fatigue.

  9. Elastic-plastic analysis of AS4/PEEK composite laminate using a one-parameter plasticity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    A one-parameter plasticity model was shown to adequately describe the plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK (APC-2) unidirectional thermoplastic composite. This model was verified further for unidirectional and laminated composite panels with and without a hole. The elastic-plastic stress-strain relations of coupon specimens were measured and compared with those predicted by the finite element analysis using the one-parameter plasticity model. The results show that the one-parameter plasticity model is suitable for the analysis of elastic-plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK composite laminates.

  10. A 3-D enlarged cell technique (ECT) for elastic wave modelling of a curved free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Songlin; Zhou, Jianyang; Zhuang, Mingwei; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-09-01

    The conventional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for elastic waves suffers from the staircasing error when applied to model a curved free surface because of its structured grid. In this work, an improved, stable and accurate 3-D FDTD method for elastic wave modelling on a curved free surface is developed based on the finite volume method and enlarged cell technique (ECT). To achieve a sufficiently accurate implementation, a finite volume scheme is applied to the curved free surface to remove the staircasing error; in the mean time, to achieve the same stability as the FDTD method without reducing the time step increment, the ECT is introduced to preserve the solution stability by enlarging small irregular cells into adjacent cells under the condition of conservation of force. This method is verified by several 3-D numerical examples. Results show that the method is stable at the Courant stability limit for a regular FDTD grid, and has much higher accuracy than the conventional FDTD method.

  11. A 3-D enlarged cell technique (ECT) for elastic wave modelling of a curved free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Songlin; Zhou, Jianyang; Zhuang, Mingwei; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-07-01

    The conventional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for elastic waves suffers from the staircasing error when applied to model a curved free surface because of its structured grid. In this work, an improved, stable and accurate 3-D FDTD method for elastic wave modelling on a curved free surface is developed based on the finite volume method and enlarged cell technique (ECT). To achieve a sufficiently accurate implementation, a finite volume scheme is applied to the curved free surface to remove the staircasing error; in the mean time, to achieve the same stability as the FDTD method without reducing the time step increment, the ECT is introduced to preserve the solution stability by enlarging small irregular cells into adjacent cells under the condition of conservation of force. This method is verified by several 3-D numerical examples. Results show that the method is stable at the Courant stability limit for a regular FDTD grid, and has much higher accuracy than the conventional FDTD method.

  12. Travelling wave expansion: a model fitting approach to the inverse problem of elasticity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baghani, Ali; Salcudean, Septimiu; Honarvar, Mohammad; Sahebjavaher, Ramin S; Rohling, Robert; Sinkus, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to the problem of elasticity reconstruction is introduced. In this approach, the solution of the wave equation is expanded as a sum of waves travelling in different directions sharing a common wave number. In particular, the solutions for the scalar and vector potentials which are related to the dilatational and shear components of the displacement respectively are expanded as sums of travelling waves. This solution is then used as a model and fitted to the measured displacements. The value of the shear wave number which yields the best fit is then used to find the elasticity at each spatial point. The main advantage of this method over direct inversion methods is that, instead of taking the derivatives of noisy measurement data, the derivatives are taken on the analytical model. This improves the results of the inversion. The dilatational and shear components of the displacement can also be computed as a byproduct of the method, without taking any derivatives. Experimental results show the effectiveness of this technique in magnetic resonance elastography. Comparisons are made with other state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:21813354

  13. Travelling wave expansion: a model fitting approach to the inverse problem of elasticity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baghani, Ali; Salcudean, Septimiu; Honarvar, Mohammad; Sahebjavaher, Ramin S; Rohling, Robert; Sinkus, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to the problem of elasticity reconstruction is introduced. In this approach, the solution of the wave equation is expanded as a sum of waves travelling in different directions sharing a common wave number. In particular, the solutions for the scalar and vector potentials which are related to the dilatational and shear components of the displacement respectively are expanded as sums of travelling waves. This solution is then used as a model and fitted to the measured displacements. The value of the shear wave number which yields the best fit is then used to find the elasticity at each spatial point. The main advantage of this method over direct inversion methods is that, instead of taking the derivatives of noisy measurement data, the derivatives are taken on the analytical model. This improves the results of the inversion. The dilatational and shear components of the displacement can also be computed as a byproduct of the method, without taking any derivatives. Experimental results show the effectiveness of this technique in magnetic resonance elastography. Comparisons are made with other state-of-the-art techniques.

  14. Reduced-Order Modeling for Flutter/LCO Using Recurrent Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Weigang; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the efficacy of a recurrent artificial neural network to provide a high fidelity time-dependent nonlinear reduced-order model (ROM) for flutter/limit-cycle oscillation (LCO) modeling. An artificial neural network is a relatively straightforward nonlinear method for modeling an input-output relationship from a set of known data, for which we use the radial basis function (RBF) with its parameters determined through a training process. The resulting RBF neural network, however, is only static and is not yet adequate for an application to problems of dynamic nature. The recurrent neural network method [1] is applied to construct a reduced order model resulting from a series of high-fidelity time-dependent data of aero-elastic simulations. Once the RBF neural network ROM is constructed properly, an accurate approximate solution can be obtained at a fraction of the cost of a full-order computation. The method derived during the study has been validated for predicting nonlinear aerodynamic forces in transonic flow and is capable of accurate flutter/LCO simulations. The obtained results indicate that the present recurrent RBF neural network is accurate and efficient for nonlinear aero-elastic system analysis

  15. Computational Statistical Methods for Social Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, David R.; Krivitsky, Pavel N.; Schweinberger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We review the broad range of recent statistical work in social network models, with emphasis on computational aspects of these methods. Particular focus is applied to exponential-family random graph models (ERGM) and latent variable models for data on complete networks observed at a single time point, though we also briefly review many methods for incompletely observed networks and networks observed at multiple time points. Although we mention far more modeling techniques than we can possibly cover in depth, we provide numerous citations to current literature. We illustrate several of the methods on a small, well-known network dataset, Sampson’s monks, providing code where possible so that these analyses may be duplicated. PMID:23828720

  16. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling for the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle: AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph; Seidel, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural-aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report.propulsion system dynamics, the structural dynamics, and aerodynamics.

  17. Numerical modeling of elastic waves in inhomogeneous anisotropic media using 3D-elastodynamic finite integration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinta, Prashanth K.; Mayer, K.; Langenberg, K. J.

    2012-05-01

    Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of elastic anisotropic media is very complex because of directional dependency of elastic stiffness tensor. Modeling of elastic waves in such materials gives us intuitive knowledge about the propagation and scattering phenomena. The wave propagation in three dimensional space in anisotropic media gives us the deep insight of the transition of the different elastic wave modes i.e. mode conversion, and scattering of these waves because of inhomogeneities present in the material. The numerical tool Three Dimensional-Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (3D-EFIT) has been proved to be a very efficient tool for the modeling of elastic waves in very complex geometries. The 3D-EFIT is validated using the analytical approach based on the Radon transform. The simulation results of 3D-EFIT applied to inhomogeneous austenitic steel welds and wood structures are presented. In the first application the geometry consists of an austenitic steel weld that joins two isotropic steel blocks. The vertical transversal isotropic (VTI) austenitic steel is used. The convolutional perfectly matched layers are applied at the boundaries that are supported by isotropic steel. In the second application the wave propagation in the orthotropic wooden structure with an air cavity inside is investigated. The wave propagation results are illustrated using time domain elastic wave snapshots.

  18. A network model of the interbank market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouwei; He, Jianmin; Zhuang, Yaming

    2010-12-01

    This work introduces a network model of an interbank market based on interbank credit lending relationships. It generates some network features identified through empirical analysis. The critical issue to construct an interbank network is to decide the edges among banks, which is realized in this paper based on the interbank’s degree of trust. Through simulation analysis of the interbank network model, some typical structural features are identified in our interbank network, which are also proved to exist in real interbank networks. They are namely, a low clustering coefficient and a relatively short average path length, community structures, and a two-power-law distribution of out-degree and in-degree.

  19. Service models and realization of differentiated services networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo, Antonio J.; Garcia Osma, Maria L.; Einsiedler, Hans J.; Roth, Rudolf; Smirnov, Michael I.; Bartoli, Maurizio; Castelli, Paolo; Varga, Balazs; Krampell, Magnus

    2001-07-01

    Internet Service Providers need to offer Quality of Service (QoS) to fulfil the requirements of applications of their customers. Moreover, in a competitive market environment costs must be low. The selected service model must be effective and low in complexity, but it should still provide high quality and service differentiation, that the current Internet is not yet capable to support. The Differentiated Services (DiffServ) Architecture has been proposed for enabling a range of different Classes of Service (CoS). In the EURESCOM project P1006 several European service providers co-operated to examine various aspects involved in the introduction of service differentiation using the DiffServ approach. The project explored a set of service models for Expedited Forwarding (EF) and Assured Forwarding (AF) and identified requirements for network nodes. Besides, we addressed also measurement issues, charging and accounting issues. Special attention has been devoted to requirements of elastic traffic that adapts its sending rate to congestion state and available bandwidth. QoS mechanisms must prove Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) friendliness. TCP performance degrades under multiple losses. Since RED based queue management may still cause multiple discards, a modified marking scheme called Capped Leaky Bucket is proposed to improve the performance of elastic applications.

  20. Modeling Epidemics Spreading on Social Contact Networks

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHAOYANG; WANG, HONGGANG; WANG, CHONGGANG; FANG, HUA

    2016-01-01

    Social contact networks and the way people interact with each other are the key factors that impact on epidemics spreading. However, it is challenging to model the behavior of epidemics based on social contact networks due to their high dynamics. Traditional models such as susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model ignore the crowding or protection effect and thus has some unrealistic assumption. In this paper, we consider the crowding or protection effect and develop a novel model called improved SIR model. Then, we use both deterministic and stochastic models to characterize the dynamics of epidemics on social contact networks. The results from both simulations and real data set conclude that the epidemics are more likely to outbreak on social contact networks with higher average degree. We also present some potential immunization strategies, such as random set immunization, dominating set immunization, and high degree set immunization to further prove the conclusion.

  1. Modeling of the Effective Elastic and Thermal Properties of Glass-Ceramic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Seal Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Milhans, Jacqueline; Ahzi, Said; Garmestani, Hamid; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.

    2009-05-01

    In this study, the effective elastic properties and coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of a glass-ceramic were predicted using homogenization techniques. Using G18, a glass-ceramic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sealant as an initial reference material, the effectiveness of different homogenization models was investigated for a two-phase glass-ceramic. The elastic properties and CTEs of the G18 amorphous phase are currently unknown. Thus, estimated values were used as an input to the models. The predictive model offers accurate macroscopic values on both the elastic modulus and the CTE of glass-ceramic materials, providing the estimated amorphous values are reasonable. This model can be used in designing glass-ceramic SOFC seal materials for its specific operation conditions.

  2. Homophyly/Kinship Model: Naturally Evolving Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Angsheng; Li, Jiankou; Pan, Yicheng; Yin, Xianchen; Yong, Xi

    2015-10-01

    It has been a challenge to understand the formation and roles of social groups or natural communities in the evolution of species, societies and real world networks. Here, we propose the hypothesis that homophyly/kinship is the intrinsic mechanism of natural communities, introduce the notion of the affinity exponent and propose the homophyly/kinship model of networks. We demonstrate that the networks of our model satisfy a number of topological, probabilistic and combinatorial properties and, in particular, that the robustness and stability of natural communities increase as the affinity exponent increases and that the reciprocity of the networks in our model decreases as the affinity exponent increases. We show that both homophyly/kinship and reciprocity are essential to the emergence of cooperation in evolutionary games and that the homophyly/kinship and reciprocity determined by the appropriate affinity exponent guarantee the emergence of cooperation in evolutionary games, verifying Darwin’s proposal that kinship and reciprocity are the means of individual fitness. We propose the new principle of structure entropy minimisation for detecting natural communities of networks and verify the functional module property and characteristic properties by a healthy tissue cell network, a citation network, some metabolic networks and a protein interaction network.

  3. Quantum key distribution networks layer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hao; Han, Zheng-fu; Hong, Pei-lin; Guo, Guang-can

    2008-03-01

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) networks allow multiple users to generate and share secret quantum keys with unconditional security. Although many schemes of QKD networks have been presented, they are only concentrated on the system realization and physical implementations. For the complete practical quantum network, a succinct theoretic model that systematically describes the working processes from physical schemes to key process protocols, from network topology to key management, and from quantum communication to classical communication is still absent. One would hope that research and experience have shown that there are certain succinct model in the design of communication network. With demonstration of the different QKD links and the four primary types of quantum networks including probability multiplexing, wavelength multiplexing, time multiplexing and quantum multiplexing, we suggest a layer model for QKD networks which will be compatible with different implementations and protocols. We divide it into four main layers by their functional independency while defining each layer's services and responsibilities in detail, orderly named quantum links layer, quantum networks layer, quantum key distribution protocols process layer, and keys management layer. It will be helpful for the systematic design and construction of real QKD networks.

  4. Role models for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, J.; White, D. R.

    2007-11-01

    We present a framework for automatically decomposing (“block-modeling”) the functional classes of agents within a complex network. These classes are represented by the nodes of an image graph (“block model”) depicting the main patterns of connectivity and thus functional roles in the network. Using a first principles approach, we derive a measure for the fit of a network to any given image graph allowing objective hypothesis testing. From the properties of an optimal fit, we derive how to find the best fitting image graph directly from the network and present a criterion to avoid overfitting. The method can handle both two-mode and one-mode data, directed and undirected as well as weighted networks and allows for different types of links to be dealt with simultaneously. It is non-parametric and computationally efficient. The concepts of structural equivalence and modularity are found as special cases of our approach. We apply our method to the world trade network and analyze the roles individual countries play in the global economy.

  5. Effective elastic properties of nanocomposites using a novel atomistic-continuum interphase model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Bhasker; Cherkaoui, Mohammed; Fassi-Fehri, Omar

    We have introduced the concept of interphase and revised classical micromechanics to predict the effective elastic properties of heterogeneous materials containing nano-inhomogeneities. An interphase is described as an additional phase between the matrix and inhomogeneity whose constitutive properties are derived from atomistic simulations and then incorporated in a micromechanics model to compute effective properties of nanocomposites. This scale transition approach bridges the gap between discrete atomic level interactions and continuum mechanics. An advantage of this approach is that it combines atomistic with continuum models that consider inhomogeneity and interphase morphology. It thereby enables us to account simultaneously for both the shape and the anisotropy of a nano-inhomogeneity and interphase at the continuum level when we compute material's overall properties. In so doing, it frees us from making any assumptions about the interface characteristics between matrix and the nano-inhomogeneity.

  6. Modeling the effective elastic behavior of a transversely cracked laminated composite

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.J.; Wetherhold, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The solution for the stress state present in the vicinity of transverse matrix cracks within a composite laminate is typically obtained by assuming a regular crack spacing geometry for the problem and applying a shear-lag analysis. In order to explore the validity of this underlying assumption, the probability density function for the location of the next transverse matrix crack within a crack bounded region is examined. The regular crack spacing assumption is shown to be reasonable from an engineering point of view. Continuing with this assumption, a generalized shear-lag model for multilayer, off-axis laminates subjected to full in-plane loads is developed. This model is used to quantitatively evaluate the effective elastic properties of the damaged material. The results are applicable to materials such as ceramic matrix or polymer matrix unidirectional fiber systems where damage in the form of transverse matrix cracks arises.

  7. Elastic-plastic cube model for ultrasonic friction reduction via Poisson's effect.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sheng; Dapino, Marcelo J

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic friction reduction has been studied experimentally and theoretically. This paper presents a new elastic-plastic cube model which can be applied to various ultrasonic lubrication cases. A cube is used to represent all the contacting asperities of two surfaces. Friction force is considered as the product of the tangential contact stiffness and the deformation of the cube. Ultrasonic vibrations are projected onto three orthogonal directions, separately changing contact parameters and deformations. Hence, the overall change of friction forces. Experiments are conducted to examine ultrasonic friction reduction using different materials under normal loads that vary from 40 N to 240 N. Ultrasonic vibrations are generated both in longitudinal and vertical (out-of-plane) directions by way of the Poisson effect. The tests show up to 60% friction reduction; model simulations describe the trends observed experimentally.

  8. An existence result for a model of complete damage in elastic materials with reversible evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Elena; Freddi, Francesco; Segatti, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a model describing evolution of damage in elastic materials, in which stiffness completely degenerates once the material is fully damaged. The model is written by using a phase transition approach, with respect to the damage parameter. In particular, a source of damage is represented by a quadratic form involving deformations, which vanishes in the case of complete damage. Hence, an internal constraint is ensured by a maximal monotone operator. The evolution of damage is considered "reversible", in the sense that the material may repair itself. We can prove an existence result for a suitable weak formulation of the problem, rewritten in terms of a new variable (an internal stress). Some numerical simulations are presented in agreement with the mathematical analysis of the system.

  9. Fully-elastic multi-granular network with space/frequency/time switching using multi-core fibres and programmable optical nodes.

    PubMed

    Amaya, N; Irfan, M; Zervas, G; Nejabati, R; Simeonidou, D; Sakaguchi, J; Klaus, W; Puttnam, B J; Miyazawa, T; Awaji, Y; Wada, N; Henning, I

    2013-04-01

    We present the first elastic, space division multiplexing, and multi-granular network based on two 7-core MCF links and four programmable optical nodes able to switch traffic utilising the space, frequency and time dimensions with over 6000-fold bandwidth granularity. Results show good end-to-end performance on all channels with power penalties between 0.75 dB and 3.7 dB. PMID:23571976

  10. Simplified treatment of exact resonance elastic scattering model in deterministic slowing down equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Wada, K.; Kitada, T.

    2012-07-01

    Simplified treatment of resonance elastic scattering model considering thermal motion of heavy nuclides and the energy dependence of the resonance cross section was implemented into NJOY [1]. In order to solve deterministic slowing down equation considering the effect of up-scattering without iterative calculations, scattering kernel for heavy nuclides is pre-calculated by the formula derived by Ouisloumen and Sanchez [2], and neutron spectrum in up-scattering term is expressed by NR approximation. To check the verification of the simplified treatment, the treatment is applied to U-238 for the energy range from 4 eV to 200 eV. Calculated multi-group capture cross section of U-238 is greater than that of conventional method and the increase of the capture cross sections is remarkable as the temperature becomes high. Therefore Doppler coefficient calculated in UO{sub 2} fuel pin is calculated more negative value than that on conventional method. The impact on Doppler coefficient is equivalent to the results of exact treatment of resonance elastic scattering reported in previous studies [2-7]. The agreement supports the validation of the simplified treatment and therefore this treatment is applied for other heavy nuclide to evaluate the Doppler coefficient in MOX fuel. The result shows that the impact of considering thermal agitation in resonance scattering in Doppler coefficient comes mainly from U-238 and that of other heavy nuclides such as Pu-239, 240 etc. is not comparable in MOX fuel. (authors)

  11. A permeability model for coal and other fractured, sorptive-elastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, E.P.; Christiansen, R.L.

    2008-09-15

    This paper describes the derivation of a new equation that can be used to model the permeability behavior of a fractured, sorptive-elastic medium, such as coal, under variable stress conditions. The equation is applicable to confinement pressure schemes commonly used during the collection of permeability data in the laboratory. The model is derived for cubic geometry under biaxial or hydrostatic confining pressures. The model is designed to handle changes in permeability caused by adsorption and desorption of gases onto and from the matrix blocks in fractured media. The model equations can be used to calculate permeability changes caused by the production of methane (CH{sub 4}) from coal as well as the injection of gases, such as carbon dioxide, for sequestration in coal. Sensitivity analysis of the model found that each of the input variables can have a significant impact on the outcome of the permeability forecast as a function of changing pore pressure, thus, accurate input data are essential. The permeability model also can be used as a tool to determine input parameters for field simulations by curve fitting laboratory-generated permeability data. The new model is compared to two other widely used coal-permeability models using a hypothetical coal with average properties.

  12. A Permeability Model for Coal and Other Fractured, Sorptive-Elastic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson; Richard L. Christiansen

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the derivation of a new equation that can be used to model the permeability behavior of a fractured, sorptive-elastic media, such as coal, under variable stress conditions commonly used during measurement of permeability data in the laboratory. The model is derived for cubic geometry under biaxial or hydrostatic confining pressures. The model is also designed to handle changes in permeability caused by adsorption and desorption of gases from the matrix blocks. The model equations can be used to calculate permeability changes caused by the production of methane from coal as well as the injection of gases, such as carbon dioxide, for sequestration in coal. Sensitivity analysis of the model found that each of the input variables can have a significant impact on the outcome of the permeability forecast as a function of changing pore pressure; thus, accurate input data are essential. The permeability model can also be used as a tool to determine input parameters for field simulations by curve-fitting laboratory-generated permeability data. The new model is compared to two other widely used coal permeability models using a hypothetical coal with average properties.

  13. Elastic thickness of the lithosphere and tectonic evolution: implications for GIA models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amantov, Aleksey; Fjeldskaar, Willy

    2015-04-01

    Rheological properties used in GIA models require independent verifications and possible modifications. To estimate the flexural rigidity of the lithosphere in simple platform areas we use peneplain distortion, which enable us to compute isostatic response from sediment load and compare the results with observed changes in geometry. This was done for several different platform regions: - Baltic (Fennoscandian) Shield, including structural elements of the Russian Platform - Barents Sea platform areas - Kara and Western Siberian domain - Eastern Siberian Platform In the East European and East Siberian old cratons we modeled isostatic distortion of Neoproterozoic Ediacaran peneplain and some other relevant surfaces. For the Arctic we used Mid-Late Jurassic surface (JP) as a distinct unconformity and well-traced (by seismic and well data) surface in the Arctic region. The isostatic distortion of peneplains under sediment load / erosion for the old Archean - Proterozoic cratons in general confirms earlier rheology model with the flexural rigidity of the lithosphere around 5x10**23 Nm (effective elastic thickness of 30-40 km), but could be slightly lower in the Barents basins. Deviations are generally relatively small and could be explained by e.g. by averaging over fault-zones, tectonic events, compaction structures and density variations. However, the situation for the Kara-Western Siberian domain is very different, with large deviations between observations and calculations. With a slight reduction of the effective elastic thickness in the Kara Sea to 10-20 km the fit is much better. Based on the results we suggest two different major types of lithosphere rigidity in the area. This seems reasonable because they typify domains with different crustal age. Western Siberian platform, with Kara continuation has much younger basement, in addition to significant magmatic activity and Early Mesosoic extension. The lithosphere rigidity is a function of age and temperature; as

  14. Autonomous Boolean Models of Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mengyang; Cheng, Xianrui; Socolar, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Autonomous Boolean network (ABN) models have been developed to represent directly the connectivity, logic, and timing of updates in regulatory networks. An ABN is a Boolean network in which the sequence of updates of nodes is determined internally by time delay parameters associated with each link. We propose a method to convert a given ODE model into an ABN that is applicable when the ODE dynamics produces clearly separated high and low values at each node. The ODE parameters are mapped into ABN logic and delay parameters using only local information about each link. Using the example of Ingolia's ODE model of the regulatory network that maintains segment boundaries in the Drosophila embryo, we show that the resulting ABN model captures both the biologically relevant outcomes and the transient dynamics of the ODE model, and that the ABN framework provides direct insights into the mechanism supporting the biological function.

  15. Stochastic discrete model of karstic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquet, O.; Siegel, P.; Klubertanz, G.; Benabderrhamane, H.

    Karst aquifers are characterised by an extreme spatial heterogeneity that strongly influences their hydraulic behaviour and the transport of pollutants. These aquifers are particularly vulnerable to contamination because of their highly permeable networks of conduits. A stochastic model is proposed for the simulation of the geometry of karstic networks at a regional scale. The model integrates the relevant physical processes governing the formation of karstic networks. The discrete simulation of karstic networks is performed with a modified lattice-gas cellular automaton for a representative description of the karstic aquifer geometry. Consequently, more reliable modelling results can be obtained for the management and the protection of karst aquifers. The stochastic model was applied jointly with groundwater modelling techniques to a regional karst aquifer in France for the purpose of resolving surface pollution issues.

  16. Simple models of human brain functional networks.

    PubMed

    Vértes, Petra E; Alexander-Bloch, Aaron F; Gogtay, Nitin; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Bullmore, Edward T

    2012-04-10

    Human brain functional networks are embedded in anatomical space and have topological properties--small-worldness, modularity, fat-tailed degree distributions--that are comparable to many other complex networks. Although a sophisticated set of measures is available to describe the topology of brain networks, the selection pressures that drive their formation remain largely unknown. Here we consider generative models for the probability of a functional connection (an edge) between two cortical regions (nodes) separated by some Euclidean distance in anatomical space. In particular, we propose a model in which the embedded topology of brain networks emerges from two competing factors: a distance penalty based on the cost of maintaining long-range connections; and a topological term that favors links between regions sharing similar input. We show that, together, these two biologically plausible factors are sufficient to capture an impressive range of topological properties of functional brain networks. Model parameters estimated in one set of functional MRI (fMRI) data on normal volunteers provided a good fit to networks estimated in a second independent sample of fMRI data. Furthermore, slightly detuned model parameters also generated a reasonable simulation of the abnormal properties of brain functional networks in people with schizophrenia. We therefore anticipate that many aspects of brain network organization, in health and disease, may be parsimoniously explained by an economical clustering rule for the probability of functional connectivity between different brain areas.

  17. Cyber threat model for tactical radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurdziel, Michael T.

    2014-05-01

    The shift to a full information-centric paradigm in the battlefield has allowed ConOps to be developed that are only possible using modern network communications systems. Securing these Tactical Networks without impacting their capabilities has been a challenge. Tactical networks with fixed infrastructure have similar vulnerabilities to their commercial counterparts (although they need to be secure against adversaries with greater capabilities, resources and motivation). However, networks with mobile infrastructure components and Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANets) have additional unique vulnerabilities that must be considered. It is useful to examine Tactical Network based ConOps and use them to construct a threat model and baseline cyber security requirements for Tactical Networks with fixed infrastructure, mobile infrastructure and/or ad hoc modes of operation. This paper will present an introduction to threat model assessment. A definition and detailed discussion of a Tactical Network threat model is also presented. Finally, the model is used to derive baseline requirements that can be used to design or evaluate a cyber security solution that can be scaled and adapted to the needs of specific deployments.

  18. Predictors of the nicotine reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand in a rodent model of nicotine reduction policy*

    PubMed Central

    Grebenstein, Patricia E.; Burroughs, Danielle; Roiko, Samuel A.; Pentel, Paul R.; LeSage, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The FDA is considering reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products as a population-based strategy to reduce tobacco addiction. Research is needed to determine the threshold level of nicotine needed to maintain smoking and the extent of compensatory smoking that could occur during nicotine reduction. Sources of variability in these measures across sub-populations also need to be identified so that policies can take into account the risks and benefits of nicotine reduction in vulnerable populations. Methods The present study examined these issues in a rodent nicotine self- administration model of nicotine reduction policy to characterize individual differences in nicotine reinforcement thresholds, degree of compensation, and elasticity of demand during progressive reduction of the unit nicotine dose. The ability of individual differences in baseline nicotine intake and nicotine pharmacokinetics to predict responses to dose reduction was also examined. Results Considerable variability in the reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand was evident. High baseline nicotine intake was not correlated with the reinforcement threshold, but predicted less compensation and less elastic demand. Higher nicotine clearance predicted low reinforcement thresholds, greater compensation, and less elastic demand. Less elastic demand also predicted lower reinforcement thresholds. Conclusions These findings suggest that baseline nicotine intake, nicotine clearance, and the essential value of nicotine (i.e. elasticity of demand) moderate the effects of progressive nicotine reduction in rats and warrant further study in humans. They also suggest that smokers with fast nicotine metabolism may be more vulnerable to the risks of nicotine reduction. PMID:25891231

  19. Linking the pressure dependency of elastic and electrical properties of porous rocks by a dual porosity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tongcheng; Gurevich, Boris; Pervukhina, Marina; Clennell, Michael Ben; Zhang, Junfang

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge about the pressure dependency of elastic and electrical properties is important for a variety of geophysical applications. We present a technique to invert for the stiff and compliant porosity from velocity measurements made as a function of differential pressure on saturated sandstones. A dual porosity concept is used for dry rock compressibility and a squirt model is employed for the pressure and frequency dependent elastic properties of the rocks when saturated. The total porosity obtained from inversion shows satisfactory agreement with experimental results. The electrical cementation factor was determined using the inverted porosity in combination with measured electrical conductivity. It was found that cementation factor increased exponentially with increasing differential pressure during isostatic loading. Elastic compressibility, electrical cementation factor and electrical conductivity of the saturated rocks correlate linearly with compliant porosity, and electrical cementation factor and electrical conductivity exhibit linear correlations with elastic compressibility of the saturated rocks under loading. The results show that the dual porosity concept is sufficient to explain the pressure dependency of elastic, electrical and joint elastic-electrical properties of saturated porous sandstones.

  20. Dynamic process modeling with recurrent neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yong; Nikolaou, M. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    Mathematical models play an important role in control system synthesis. However, due to the inherent nonlinearity, complexity and uncertainty of chemical processes, it is usually difficult to obtain an accurate model for a chemical engineering system. A method of nonlinear static and dynamic process modeling via recurrent neural networks (RNNs) is studied. An RNN model is a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations in continuous time domain with nonlinear dynamic node characteristics as well as both feed forward and feedback connections. For such networks, each physical input to a system corresponds to exactly one input to the network. The system's dynamics are captured by the internal structure of the network. The structure of RNN models may be more natural and attractive than that of feed forward neural network models, but computation time for training is longer. Simulation results show that RNNs can learn both steady-state relationships and process dynamics of continuous and batch, single-input/single-output and multi-input/multi-output systems in a simple and direct manner. Training of RNNs shows only small degradation in the presence of noise in the training data. Thus, RNNs constitute a feasible alternative to layered feed forward back propagation neural networks in steady-state and dynamic process modeling and model-based control.

  1. A poroelastic model coupled to a fluid network with applications in lung modelling.

    PubMed

    Berger, Lorenz; Bordas, Rafel; Burrowes, Kelly; Grau, Vicente; Tavener, Simon; Kay, David

    2016-01-01

    We develop a lung ventilation model based on a continuum poroelastic representation of lung parenchyma that is strongly coupled to a pipe network representation of the airway tree. The continuous system of equations is discretized using a low-order stabilised finite element method. The framework is applied to a realistic lung anatomical model derived from computed tomography data and an artificially generated airway tree to model the conducting airway region. Numerical simulations produce physiologically realistic solutions and demonstrate the effect of airway constriction and reduced tissue elasticity on ventilation, tissue stress and alveolar pressure distribution. The key advantage of the model is the ability to provide insight into the mutual dependence between ventilation and deformation. This is essential when studying lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. Thus the model can be used to form a better understanding of integrated lung mechanics in both the healthy and diseased states. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Public transport networks: empirical analysis and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Ferber, C.; Holovatch, T.; Holovatch, Yu.; Palchykov, V.

    2009-03-01

    Public transport networks of fourteen cities of so far unexplored network size are analyzed in standardized graph representations: the simple graph of the network map, the bipartite graph of routes and stations, and both one mode projections of the latter. Special attention is paid to the inter-relations and spatial embedding of transport routes. This systematic approach reveals rich behavior beyond that of the ubiquitous scale-free complex network. We find strong evidence for structures in PTNs that are counter-intuitive and need to be explained, among these a pronounced diversity in the expression of typical network characteristics within the present sample of cities, a surprising geometrical behavior with respect to the two-dimensional geographical embedding and an unexpected attraction between transport routes. A simple model based on these observations reproduces many of the identified PTN properties by growing networks of attractive self-avoiding walks.

  3. Modeling Social Network Topologies in Elementary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Quintanilla, Rodrigo; Canto-Lugo, Efrain; Viga-de Alva, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Complex networks are used to describe interactions in many real world systems, including economic, biological and social systems. An analysis was done of inter-student friendship, enmity and kinship relationships at three elementary schools by building social networks of these relationships and studying their properties. Friendship network measurements were similar between schools and produced a Poisson topology with a high clustering index. Enmity network measurements were also similar between schools and produced a power law topology. Spatial confinement and the sense of belonging to a social group played vital roles in shaping these networks. Two models were developed which generate complex friendship and enmity networks that reproduce the properties observed at the three studied elementary schools. PMID:23408976

  4. Measuring and modeling correlations in multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-09-01

    The interactions among the elementary components of many complex systems can be qualitatively different. Such systems are therefore naturally described in terms of multiplex or multilayer networks, i.e., networks where each layer stands for a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes. There is today a growing interest in understanding when and why a description in terms of a multiplex network is necessary and more informative than a single-layer projection. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting a comprehensive study of correlations in multiplex networks. Correlations in node properties, especially degree-degree correlations, have been thoroughly studied in single-layer networks. Here we extend this idea to investigate and characterize correlations between the different layers of a multiplex network. Such correlations are intrinsically multiplex, and we first study them empirically by constructing and analyzing several multiplex networks from the real world. In particular, we introduce various measures to characterize correlations in the activity of the nodes and in their degree at the different layers and between activities and degrees. We show that real-world networks exhibit indeed nontrivial multiplex correlations. For instance, we find cases where two layers of the same multiplex network are positively correlated in terms of node degrees, while other two layers are negatively correlated. We then focus on constructing synthetic multiplex networks, proposing a series of models to reproduce the correlations observed empirically and/or to assess their relevance. PMID:26465526

  5. Measuring and modeling correlations in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-09-01

    The interactions among the elementary components of many complex systems can be qualitatively different. Such systems are therefore naturally described in terms of multiplex or multilayer networks, i.e., networks where each layer stands for a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes. There is today a growing interest in understanding when and why a description in terms of a multiplex network is necessary and more informative than a single-layer projection. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting a comprehensive study of correlations in multiplex networks. Correlations in node properties, especially degree-degree correlations, have been thoroughly studied in single-layer networks. Here we extend this idea to investigate and characterize correlations between the different layers of a multiplex network. Such correlations are intrinsically multiplex, and we first study them empirically by constructing and analyzing several multiplex networks from the real world. In particular, we introduce various measures to characterize correlations in the activity of the nodes and in their degree at the different layers and between activities and degrees. We show that real-world networks exhibit indeed nontrivial multiplex correlations. For instance, we find cases where two layers of the same multiplex network are positively correlated in terms of node degrees, while other two layers are negatively correlated. We then focus on constructing synthetic multiplex networks, proposing a series of models to reproduce the correlations observed empirically and/or to assess their relevance.

  6. Super-Grid Modeling of the Elastic Wave Equation in Semi-Bounded Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, N. Anders; Sjögreen, Björn

    2014-10-01

    Abstract

    We develop a super-grid modeling technique for solving the elastic wave equation in semi-bounded two- and three-dimensional spatial domains. In this method, waves are slowed down and dissipated in sponge layers near the far-field boundaries. Mathematically, this is equivalent to a coordinate mapping that transforms a very large physical domain to a significantly smaller computational domain, where the elastic wave equation is solved numerically on a regular grid. To damp out waves that become poorly resolved because of the coordinate mapping, a high order artificial dissipation operator is added in layers near the boundaries of the computational domain. We prove by energy estimates that the super-grid modeling leads to a stable numerical method with decreasing energy, which is valid for heterogeneous material properties and a free surface boundary condition on one side of the domain. Our spatial discretization is based on a fourth order accurate finite difference method, which satisfies the principle of summation by parts. We show that the discrete energy estimate holds also when a centered finite difference stencil is combined with homogeneous Dirichlet conditions at several ghost points outside of the far-field boundaries. Therefore, the coefficients in the finite difference stencils need only be boundary modified near the free surface. This allows for improved computational efficiency and significant simplifications of the implementation of the proposed method in multi-dimensional domains. Numerical experiments in three space dimensions show that the modeling error from truncating the domain can be made very small by choosing a sufficiently wide super-grid damping layer. The numerical accuracy is first evaluated against analytical solutions of Lamb’s problem, where fourth order accuracy is observed with a sixth order artificial dissipation. We then use successive grid refinements to study the numerical accuracy in the more

  7. A plane stress finite element model for elastic-plastic mode I/II crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  8. Myxococcus xanthus Gliding Motors Are Elastically Coupled to the Substrate as Predicted by the Focal Adhesion Model of Gliding Motility

    PubMed Central

    Balagam, Rajesh; Litwin, Douglas B.; Czerwinski, Fabian; Sun, Mingzhai; Kaplan, Heidi B.; Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a model organism for studying bacterial social behaviors due to its ability to form complex multi-cellular structures. Knowledge of M. xanthus surface gliding motility and the mechanisms that coordinated it are critically important to our understanding of collective cell behaviors. Although the mechanism of gliding motility is still under investigation, recent experiments suggest that there are two possible mechanisms underlying force production for cell motility: the focal adhesion mechanism and the helical rotor mechanism, which differ in the biophysics of the cell–substrate interactions. Whereas the focal adhesion model predicts an elastic coupling, the helical rotor model predicts a viscous coupling. Using a combination of computational modeling, imaging, and force microscopy, we find evidence for elastic coupling in support of the focal adhesion model. Using a biophysical model of the M. xanthus cell, we investigated how the mechanical interactions between cells are affected by interactions with the substrate. Comparison of modeling results with experimental data for cell-cell collision events pointed to a strong, elastic attachment between the cell and substrate. These results are robust to variations in the mechanical and geometrical parameters of the model. We then directly measured the motor-substrate coupling by monitoring the motion of optically trapped beads and find that motor velocity decreases exponentially with opposing load. At high loads, motor velocity approaches zero velocity asymptotically and motors remain bound to beads indicating a strong, elastic attachment. PMID:24810164

  9. Multi scale modeling of the elastic properties of polymer-clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavan Pour, Maryam

    Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites (PCN) are known to improve the mechanical properties of bulk polymers, even for modest clay loadings. This enhancement is due to the high aspect ratio and mechanical properties of the nanoclay platelets. Additionally, the interphase zone created by altered polymer chains in the vicinity of the nanoclays plays an important reinforcing role. Several analytical approaches exist for predicting the elastic properties of PCN, ranging from simplified two-step models to more complex one-step methods. However, no thorough study has yet rigorously verified the accuracy of these models. On the other hand, the numerical models that are commonly used to evaluate the analytical models are still far from modeling the real PCN microstructure reported in the literature. For example, most of the models have failed to model the detailed 3D microstructure considering randomly positioned reinforcing particles, the large nanoclay aspect ratio and the explicit incorporation of the constituent phases. More significantly, most of numerical studies have been reported without a thorough determination of the appropriate Representative Volume Element (RVE) due its computational burden, resulting in benchmark results of questionable accuracy. The main purpose of this thesis was to evaluate the accuracy of homogenization models for predicting the mechanical behavior of nanoclay nanocomposites. First, the validity of commonly used analytical micromechanical models for the prediction of exfoliated PCN elastic properties was evaluated with the help of 3D Finite Element (FE) simulations. In particular, special attention was devoted to the interphase around the nanoclays. The modeling strategy was a two-step procedure relying on the Effective Particle (EP) concept, in which the multi-layer reinforcing stacks were replaced by homogenized particles. The accuracy of the numerical models was guaranteed, within a given tolerance, by rigorous determination of the RVE. It was

  10. Gene Regulation Networks for Modeling Drosophila Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, E.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila Melanogaster.

  11. Dependence of physical and mechanical properties on polymer architecture for model polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruilan

    Effect of architecture at nanoscale on the macroscopic properties of polymer materials has long been a field of major interest, as evidenced by inhomogeneities in networks, multimodal network topologies, etc. The primary purpose of this research is to establish the architecture-property relationship of polymer networks by studying the physical and mechanical responses of a series of topologically different PTHF networks. Monodispersed allyl-tenninated PTHF precursors were synthesized through "living" cationic polymerization and functional end-capping. Model networks of various crosslink densities and inhomogeneities levels (unimodal, bimodal and clustered) were prepared by endlinking precursors via thiol-ene reaction. Thermal characteristics, i.e., glass transition, melting point, and heat of fusion, of model PTHF networks were investigated as functions of crosslink density and inhomogeneities, which showed different dependence on these two architectural parameters. Study of freezing point depression (FPD) of solvent confined in swollen networks indicated that the size of solvent microcrystals is comparable to the mesh size formed by intercrosslink chains depending on crosslink density and inhomogeneities. Relationship between crystal size and FPD provided a good reflection of the existing architecture facts in the networks. Mechanical responses of elastic chains to uniaxial strains were studied through SANS. Spatial inhomogeneities in bimodal and clustered networks gave rise to "abnormal butterfly patterns", which became more pronounced as elongation ratio increases. Radii of gyration of chains were analyzed at directions parallel and perpendicular to stretching axis. Dependence of Rg on lambda was compared to three rubber elasticity models and the molecular deformation mechanisms for unimodal, bimodal and clustered networks were explored. The thesis focused its last part on the investigation of evolution of free volume distribution of linear polymer (PE

  12. An affine continuum mechanical model for cross-linked F-actin networks with compliant linker proteins.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Unterberger, Michael J; Ogden, Ray W

    2014-10-01

    Cross-linked actin networks are important building blocks of the cytoskeleton. In order to gain deeper insight into the interpretation of experimental data on actin networks, adequate models are required. In this paper we introduce an affine constitutive network model for cross-linked F-actin networks based on nonlinear continuum mechanics, and specialize it in order to reproduce the experimental behavior of in vitro reconstituted model networks. The model is based on the elastic properties of single filaments embedded in an isotropic matrix such that the overall properties of the composite are described by a free-energy function. In particular, we are able to obtain the experimentally determined shear and normal stress responses of cross-linked actin networks typically observed in rheometer tests. In the present study an extensive analysis is performed by applying the proposed model network to a simple shear deformation. The single filament model is then extended by incorporating the compliance of cross-linker proteins and further extended by including viscoelasticity. All that is needed for the finite element implementation is the constitutive model for the filaments, the linkers and the matrix, and the associated elasticity tensor in either the Lagrangian or Eulerian formulation. The model facilitates parameter studies of experimental setups such as micropipette aspiration experiments and we present such studies to illustrate the efficacy of this modeling approach. PMID:25043658

  13. Matrix Pseudospectral Method for (Visco)Elastic Tides Modeling of Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabranova, Eliska; Hanyk, Ladidslav; Matyska, Ctirad

    2010-05-01

    We deal with the equations and boundary conditions describing deformation and gravitational potential of prestressed spherically symmetric elastic bodies by decomposing governing equations into a series of boundary value problems (BVP) for ordinary differential equations (ODE) of the second order. In contrast to traditional Runge-Kutta integration techniques, highly accurate pseudospectral schemes are employed to directly discretize the BVP on Chebyshev grids and a set of linear algebraic equations with an almost block diagonal matrix is derived. As a consequence of keeping the governing ODEs of the second order instead of the usual first-order equations, the resulting algebraic system is half-sized but derivatives of the model parameters are required. Moreover, they can be easily evaluated for models, where structural parametres are piecewise polynomially dependent. Both accuracy and efficiency of the method are tested by evaluating the tidal Love numbers for the Earth's model PREM. Finally, we also derive complex Love numbers for models with the Maxwell viscoelastic rheology, where viscosity is a depth-dependent function. The method is applied to evaluation of the tidal Love numbers for models of Mars and Venus. The Love numbers of the two Martian models - the former optimized to cosmochemical data and the latter to the moment of inertia (Sohl and Spohn, 1997) - are h2=0.172 (0.212) and k2=0.093 (0.113). For Venus, the value of k2=0.295 (Konopliv and Yoder, 1996), obtained from the gravity-field analysis, is consistent with the results for our model with the liquid-core radius of 3110 km (Zábranová et al., 2009). Together with rapid evaluation of free oscillation periods by an analogous method, this combined matrix approach could by employed as an efficient numerical tool in structural studies of planetary bodies. REFERENCES Konopliv, A. S. and Yoder, C. F., 1996. Venusian k2 tidal Love number from Magellan and PVO tracking data, Geophys. Res. Lett., 23, 1857

  14. Telestroke network business model strategies.

    PubMed

    Fanale, Christopher V; Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2012-10-01

    Our objective is to summarize the evidence that supports the reliability of telemedicine for diagnosis and efficacy in acute stroke treatment, identify strategies for funding the development of a telestroke network, and to present issues with respect to economic sustainability, cost effectiveness, and the status of reimbursement for telestroke.

  15. Elastic Model Transitions: a Hybrid Approach Utilizing Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurenko, Robert J.; Bush, T. Jason; Ottander, John A.

    2014-01-01

    A method for transitioning linear time invariant (LTI) models in time varying simulation is proposed that utilizes both quadratically constrained least squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM) algorithms to determine physical displacements. This approach is applicable to the simulation of the elastic behavior of launch vehicles and other structures that utilize multiple LTI finite element model (FEM) derived mode sets that are propagated throughout time. The time invariant nature of the elastic data for discrete segments of the launch vehicle trajectory presents a problem of how to properly transition between models while preserving motion across the transition. In addition, energy may vary between flex models when using a truncated mode set. The LSQI-DSM algorithm can accommodate significant changes in energy between FEM models and carries elastic motion across FEM model transitions. Compared with previous approaches, the LSQI-DSM algorithm shows improvements ranging from a significant reduction to a complete removal of transients across FEM model transitions as well as maintaining elastic motion from the prior state.

  16. Continuum modeling of forces in growing viscoelastic cytoskeletal networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Seob; Sun, Sean X

    2009-02-21

    Mechanical properties of the living cell are important in cell movement, cell division, cancer development and cell signaling. There is considerable interest in measuring local mechanical properties of living materials and the living cytoskeleton using micromechanical techniques. However, living materials are constantly undergoing internal dynamics such as growth and remodeling. A modeling framework that combines mechanical deformations with cytoskeletal growth dynamics is necessary to describe cellular shape changes. The present paper develops a general finite deformation modeling approach that can treat the viscoelastic cytoskeleton. Given the growth dynamics in the cytoskeletal network and the relationship between deformation and stress, the shape of the network is computed in an incremental fashion. The growth dynamics of the cytoskeleton can be modeled as stress dependent. The result is a consistent treatment of overall cell deformation. The framework is applied to a growing 1-d bundle of actin filaments against an elastic cantilever, and a 2-d cell undergoing wave-like protrusion dynamics. In the latter example, mechanical forces on the cell adhesion are examined as a function of the protrusion dynamics. PMID:19041329

  17. Network reconstruction using nonparametric additive ODE models.

    PubMed

    Henderson, James; Michailidis, George

    2014-01-01

    Network representations of biological systems are widespread and reconstructing unknown networks from data is a focal problem for computational biologists. For example, the series of biochemical reactions in a metabolic pathway can be represented as a network, with nodes corresponding to metabolites and edges linking reactants to products. In a different context, regulatory relationships among genes are commonly represented as directed networks with edges pointing from influential genes to their targets. Reconstructing such networks from data is a challenging problem receiving much attention in the literature. There is a particular need for approaches tailored to time-series data and not reliant on direct intervention experiments, as the former are often more readily available. In this paper, we introduce an approach to reconstructing directed networks based on dynamic systems models. Our approach generalizes commonly used ODE models based on linear or nonlinear dynamics by extending the functional class for the functions involved from parametric to nonparametric models. Concomitantly we limit the complexity by imposing an additive structure on the estimated slope functions. Thus the submodel associated with each node is a sum of univariate functions. These univariate component functions form the basis for a novel coupling metric that we define in order to quantify the strength of proposed relationships and hence rank potential edges. We show the utility of the method by reconstructing networks using simulated data from computational models for the glycolytic pathway of Lactocaccus Lactis and a gene network regulating the pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells. For purposes of comparison, we also assess reconstruction performance using gene networks from the DREAM challenges. We compare our method to those that similarly rely on dynamic systems models and use the results to attempt to disentangle the distinct roles of linearity, sparsity, and derivative

  18. Network Reconstruction Using Nonparametric Additive ODE Models

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, James; Michailidis, George

    2014-01-01

    Network representations of biological systems are widespread and reconstructing unknown networks from data is a focal problem for computational biologists. For example, the series of biochemical reactions in a metabolic pathway can be represented as a network, with nodes corresponding to metabolites and edges linking reactants to products. In a different context, regulatory relationships among genes are commonly represented as directed networks with edges pointing from influential genes to their targets. Reconstructing such networks from data is a challenging problem receiving much attention in the literature. There is a particular need for approaches tailored to time-series data and not reliant on direct intervention experiments, as the former are often more readily available. In this paper, we introduce an approach to reconstructing directed networks based on dynamic systems models. Our approach generalizes commonly used ODE models based on linear or nonlinear dynamics by extending the functional class for the functions involved from parametric to nonparametric models. Concomitantly we limit the complexity by imposing an additive structure on the estimated slope functions. Thus the submodel associated with each node is a sum of univariate functions. These univariate component functions form the basis for a novel coupling metric that we define in order to quantify the strength of proposed relationships and hence rank potential edges. We show the utility of the method by reconstructing networks using simulated data from computational models for the glycolytic pathway of Lactocaccus Lactis and a gene network regulating the pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells. For purposes of comparison, we also assess reconstruction performance using gene networks from the DREAM challenges. We compare our method to those that similarly rely on dynamic systems models and use the results to attempt to disentangle the distinct roles of linearity, sparsity, and derivative

  19. Multiscale modeling of the effect of the interfacial transition zone on the modulus of elasticity of fiber-reinforced fine concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. L.; Liu, X.; Yuan, Y.; Mang, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    A multiscale model of fiber-reinforced fine concrete is developed, with special emphasis on the interfacial transition zone (ITZ). It does not only allow the prediction of the modulus of elasticity but also permits the determination of the strain and stress field. The model is based on the mathematical homogenization method and implemented in the frame of the finite element method. A comparison of model predictions with experimental results taken from the literature validates the model's effectiveness for prediction of the elasticity modulus. The effect of the thickness and of the elasticity modulus of the ITZ on the elasticity modulus of the homogenized material as well as the influence of the strength of the ITZ on the elastic limit of the homogenized material, are investigated numerically. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis is carried out to evaluate the influence of fine-scale factors on the elasticity modulus of ultra-high performance concrete.

  20. Modeling mechanophore activation within a viscous rubbery network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Meredith N.; Cremar, Lee D.; Beiermann, Brett A.; Kramer, Sharlotte B.; Martinez, Todd J.; White, Scott R.; Sottos, Nancy R.

    2014-02-01

    Mechanically induced chemical reactivity is a promising means for designing self-sensing and autonomous materials. Force sensitive chemical groups called mechanophores can be covalently linked into polymers in order to trigger specific chemical reactions upon mechanical loading. A model framework is developed to describe the response of these mechanophores to mechanical loading within an elastomeric matrix. A multiscale modeling scheme is used to couple mechanophore kinetics with rubbery elasticity. In particular, transition state theory for the population of mechanophores is modified to account for the stress-induced changes in kinetics within the solid state. The model is specified to the case of spiropyran covalently linked into a polymethacrylate (PMA) backbone. This optically trackable mechanophore (optically active through absorption and fluorescence when triggered) allows the model to be assessed in comparison to observed experimental behavior. The activation predicted by the ideal viscous elastomer model is reasonable, but consistently occurs at a larger strain than in the experiments. The glassy portion of the PMA response accounts for part of the difference in the onset of activation between experiments and the ideal elastomer model. The glassy stress response is therefore included as an additional empirically determined driving force for activation in the model. The remainder of the discrepancy between the experimental and simulation results is attributed to force inhomogeneity within the rubbery network, highlighting that the mechanophore response is correlated with local force history rather than with macroscopic stress.

  1. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System Phase I: Hypo-Elastic Model for CFD Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2011-04-14

    An isotropic constitutive model for the parenchyma of lung has been derived from the theory of hypo-elasticity. The intent is to use it to represent the mechanical response of this soft tissue in sophisticated, computational, fluid-dynamic models of the lung. This demands that the continuum model be accurate, yet simple and effcient. An objective algorithm for its numeric integration is provided. The response of the model is determined for several boundary-value problems whose experiments are used for material characterization. The effective elastic, bulk, and shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratio, as tangent functions, are also derived. The model is characterized against published experimental data for lung. A bridge between this continuum model and a dodecahedral model of alveolar geometry is investigated, with preliminary findings being reported.

  2. A dissipative network model with neighboring activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Fei; Liu, Yun; Zhu, Jiang; Jiang Zhang, Zhen; Chao Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Ying

    2011-11-01

    We propose a network model with dissipative structure taking into consideration the effect of neighboring activation and individual dissipation. Nodes may feel tired of interactions with new nodes step by step, and drop out of the network evolution. However, these dormant nodes can become active again following neighbors. During the whole evolution only active nodes have opportunities to receive new links. We analyze user behavior of a real Internet forum, and the statistical characteristics of this forum are analogous to our model. Under the influence of motivation and dissipation, the degree distribution of our network model decays as a power law with a diversity of tunable power exponents. Furthermore, the network has high clustering, small average path length and positive assortativity coefficients.

  3. Acquired disorders of elastic tissue: Part II. decreased elastic tissue.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kevan G; Bercovitch, Lionel; Dill, Sara W; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie

    2004-08-01

    Elastic fibers in the extracellular matrix are integral components of dermal connective tissue. The resilience and elasticity required for normal structure and function of the skin are attributable to the network of elastic tissue. Advances in our understanding of elastic tissue physiology provide a foundation for studying the pathogenesis of elastic tissue disorders. Many acquired disorders are nevertheless poorly understood owing to the paucity of reported cases. Several acquired disorders in which loss of dermal elastic tissue produces prominent clinical and histopathologic features have recently been described, including middermal elastolysis, papular elastorrhexis, and pseudoxanthoma-like papillary dermal elastolysis, which must be differentiated from more well-known disorders such as anetoderma, acquired cutis laxa, and acrokeratoelastoidosis. Learning objective At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants should have an understanding of the similarities and differences between acquired disorders of elastic tissue that are characterized by a loss of elastic tissue.

  4. Surrogate Modeling of Deformable Joint Contact using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Deformable joint contact models can be used to estimate loading conditions for cartilage-cartilage, implant-implant, human-orthotic, and foot-ground interactions. However, contact evaluations are often so expensive computationally that they can be prohibitive for simulations or optimizations requiring thousands or even millions of contact evaluations. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel surrogate contact modeling method based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). The method uses special sampling techniques to gather input-output data points from an original (slow) contact model in multiple domains of input space, where each domain represents a different physical situation likely to be encountered. For each contact force and torque output by the original contact model, a multi-layer feed-forward ANN is defined, trained, and incorporated into a surrogate contact model. As an evaluation problem, we created an ANN-based surrogate contact model of an artificial tibiofemoral joint using over 75,000 evaluations of a fine-grid elastic foundation (EF) contact model. The surrogate contact model computed contact forces and torques about 1000 times faster than a less accurate coarse grid EF contact model. Furthermore, the surrogate contact model was seven times more accurate than the coarse grid EF contact model within the input domain of a walking motion. For larger input domains, the surrogate contact model showed the expected trend of increasing error with increasing domain size. In addition, the surrogate contact model was able to identify out-of-contact situations with high accuracy. Computational contact models created using our proposed ANN approach may remove an important computational bottleneck from musculoskeletal simulations or optimizations incorporating deformable joint contact models. PMID:26220591

  5. Phase-Field Modeling of Elasticity, Plasticity, and Phase Segregation in Binary Heteroepitaxial Film Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Elder, Ken; Provatas, Nikolas

    2004-03-01

    A continuum phase field model, adapted from the Phase Field Crystals (PFC) model [1], is applied to the study of strained binary heteroepitaxial systems, with emphasis given to the investigation of 2-D species segregation during liquid phase film growth. In addition to (1) phase segregation, it is shown that this model is capable of incorporating (2) surface morphological evolution and (3) defect nucleation and propagation, as well as the interactions of these three phenomena, over all primary epitaxial growth regimes. Additional highlights of the model include consideration of composition-dependent elastic moduli, differing species mobilities, and mass transport within the bulk film. The spatial nature of the phase segregation and its interaction with film surface morphology and defect nucleation are investigated as functions of various material and process parameters. In particular, the interaction between film surface morphology and compositional segregation is investigated, with attention given to its influence on the asymmetry observed in critical thickness between compressive and tensile strains. [1] K.R. Elder, M. Katakowski, M. Haataja, and M. Grant, Physical Review Letters 88, 245701 (2002).

  6. Entropic elasticity in the generation of muscle force--a theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2002-11-01

    A novel simplified structural model of sarcomeric force production in striate muscle is presented. Using some simple assumptions regarding the distribution of myosin spring lengths at different sliding velocities it is possible to derive a very simple expression showing the main components of the experimentally observed force-velocity relationship of muscle: nonlinearity during contraction (Hill, 1938), maximal force production during stretching equal to two times the isometric force (Katz, 1939), yielding at high stretching velocity, slightly concave force-extension relationship during sudden length changes (Ford et al., 1977; Lombardi & Piazzesi, 1990), accurate reproduction of the rate of ATP consumption (Shirakawa et al., 2000; He et al., 2000) and of the extra energy liberation rate (Hill, 1964a). Different assumptions regarding the force-length relationship of individual cross-bridges are explored [linear, power function and worm-like chain (WLC) model based], and it is shown that the best results are obtained if the individual myosin-spring forces are modelled using a WLC model, thus hinting that entropic elasticity could be the main source of force in myosin undergoing the conformational changes associated with the power stroke.

  7. Modeling Emergence in Neuroprotective Regulatory Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Haack, Jereme N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Stevens, S.L.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary

    2013-01-05

    The use of predictive modeling in the analysis of gene expression data can greatly accelerate the pace of scientific discovery in biomedical research by enabling in silico experimentation to test disease triggers and potential drug therapies. Techniques that focus on modeling emergence, such as agent-based modeling and multi-agent simulations, are of particular interest as they support the discovery of pathways that may have never been observed in the past. Thus far, these techniques have been primarily applied at the multi-cellular level, or have focused on signaling and metabolic networks. We present an approach where emergence modeling is extended to regulatory networks and demonstrate its application to the discovery of neuroprotective pathways. An initial evaluation of the approach indicates that emergence modeling provides novel insights for the analysis of regulatory networks that can advance the discovery of acute treatments for stroke and other diseases.

  8. International migration network: Topology and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagiolo, Giorgio; Mastrorillo, Marina

    2013-07-01

    This paper studies international migration from a complex-network perspective. We define the international migration network (IMN) as the weighted-directed graph where nodes are world countries and links account for the stock of migrants originated in a given country and living in another country at a given point in time. We characterize the binary and weighted architecture of the network and its evolution over time in the period 1960-2000. We find that the IMN is organized around a modular structure with a small-world binary pattern displaying disassortativity and high clustering, with power-law distributed weighted-network statistics. We also show that a parsimonious gravity model of migration can account for most of observed IMN topological structure. Overall, our results suggest that socioeconomic, geographical, and political factors are more important than local-network properties in shaping the structure of the IMN.

  9. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-02-19

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There are serious philosophical objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo affine motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, quantum chemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model. When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high strain. Here we provide a brief

  10. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range. PMID:27314712

  11. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range.

  12. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elastic–plastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model is based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elastic–plastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.

  13. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    DOE PAGES

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elastic–plastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model ismore » based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elastic–plastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.« less

  14. Modelling of the PROTO-2 crossover network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proulx, G. A.; Lackner, H.; Spence, P.; Wright, T. P.

    In order to drive a double ring, symmetrically fed bremsstrahlung diode, the PROTO II accelerator was redesigned. The radially converging triplate water line was reconfigured to drive radial converging triplate lines in parallel. The four output lines were connected to the two input lines via an electrically enclosed tubular crossover network. Low-voltage Time Domain Reflectrometry (TDR) experiments were conducted on a full scale water immersed model of one section of the crossover network as an aid in this design. A lumped element analysis of the power flow through the network was inadequate in explaining the observed wave transmission and reflection characteristics. A more detailed analysis was performed with a circuit code in which we considered both localized lump-element and transmission line features of the crossover network. Experimental results of the model tests are given and compared with the circuit simulations.

  15. Network models of soil porous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samec, M.; Santiago, A.; Cardenas, J. P.; Benito, R. M.; Tarquis, A. M.; Mooney, S. J.; Korošak, D.

    2010-05-01

    Soils sustain life on Earth. In times of increasing anthropogenic demands on soils [1] there is growing need to seek for novel approaches to understand the relationships between the soil porous structure and specific soil functions. Recently [2-4], soil pore structure was described as a complex network of pores using spatially embedded varying fitness network model [2] or heterogeneous preferential attachment scheme [3-4], both approaches revealing the apparent scale-free topology of soils. Here, we show, using a large set of soil images of structures obtained by X-ray computed tomography that both methods predict topological similar networks of soil pore structures. Furthermore, by analyzing the node-node link correlation properties of the obtained networks we suggest an approach to quantify the complexity of soil pore structure. [1] R. Lal, Soil science and the carbon civilization, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J., 71: 1425-1437, 2007. [2] S. J. Mooney, D. Korošak, Using Complex Networks to Model Two- and Three-Dimensional Soil Porous Architecture, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J., 73: 1094-1100, 2009. [3] A. Santiago, J. P. Cardenas, J. C. Losada, R. M. Benito, A. M. Tarquis, F. Borondo, Multiscaling of porous soils as heterogeneous complex networks, Nonlin. Proc. Geophys., 15: 893-902, 2008. [4] A. Santiago, R. M. Benito, An extended formalism for preferential attachment in heterogeneous complex networks, Eur. Phys. Lett., 82: 58004, 2008.

  16. Theoretical modelling of frequency dependent elastic loss in composite piezoelectric transducers.

    PubMed

    Orr, Leigh-Ann; Mulholland, Anthony J; O'Leary, Richard L; Parr, Agnes; Pethrick, Richard A; Hayward, Gordon

    2007-12-01

    The large number of degrees of freedom in the design of piezoelectric transducers requires a theoretical model that is computationally efficient so that a large number of iterations can be performed in the design optimisation. The materials used are often lossy, and indeed loss can be used to enhance the operational characteristics of these designs. Motivated by these needs, this paper extends the one-dimensional linear systems model to incorporate frequency dependent elastic loss. The reception sensitivity, electrical impedance and electromechanical coupling coefficient of a 1-3 composite transducer, with frequency dependent loss in the polymer filler, are investigated. By plotting these operating characteristics as a function of the volume fraction of piezoelectric ceramic an optimum design is obtained. A device with a non-standard, high shear attenuation polymer is also simulated and this leads to an increase in the electromechanical coupling coefficient. A comparison with finite element simulations is then performed. This shows that the two methods are in reasonable agreement in their electrical impedance profiles in all the cases considered. The plots are almost identical away from the main resonant peak where the frequency location of the peaks are comparable but there is in some cases a 20% discrepancy in the magnitude of the peak value and in its bandwidth. The finite element model also shows that the use of a high shear attenuation polymer filler damps out the unwanted, low frequency modes whilst maintaining a reasonable impedance magnitude.

  17. Chemo-mechanical modeling of tumor growth in elastic epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsun, Dmitry A.; Zakharov, Andrey P.; Pismen, Len

    2016-08-01

    We propose a multiscale chemo-mechanical model of the cancer tumor development in the epithelial tissue. The epithelium is represented by an elastic 2D array of polygonal cells with its own gene regulation dynamics. The model allows the simulation of the evolution of multiple cells interacting via the chemical signaling or mechanically induced strain. The algorithm includes the division and intercalation of cells as well as the transformation of normal cells into a cancerous state triggered by a local failure of the spatial synchronization of the cellular rhythms driven by transcription/translation processes. Both deterministic and stochastic descriptions of the system are given for chemical signaling. The transformation of cells means the modification of their respective parameters responsible for chemo-mechanical interactions. The simulations reproduce a distinct behavior of invasive and localized carcinoma. Generally, the model is designed in such a way that it can be readily modified to take account of any newly understood gene regulation processes and feedback mechanisms affecting chemo-mechanical properties of cells.

  18. Correlation between relaxations and plastic deformation, and elastic model of flow in metallic glasses and glass-forming liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Weihua

    2011-09-01

    We study the similarity and correlations between relaxations and plastic deformation in metallic glasses (MGs) and MG-forming liquids. It is shown that the microscope plastic events, the initiation and formation of shear bands, and the mechanical yield in MGs where the atomic sites are topologically unstable induced by applied stress, can be treated as the glass to supercooled liquid state transition induced by external shear stress. On the other hand, the glass transition, the primary and secondary relaxations, plastic deformation and yield can be attributed to the free volume increase induced flow, and the flow can be modeled as the activated hopping between the inherent states in the potential energy landscape. We then propose an extended elastic model to describe the flow based on the energy landscape theory. That is, the flow activation energy density is linear proportional to the instantaneous elastic moduli, and the activation energy density {rho}{sub E} is determined to be a simple expression of {rho}{sub E}=(10/11)G+(1/11)K. The model indicates that both shear and bulk moduli are critical parameters accounting for both the homogeneous and inhomogeneous flows in MGs and MG-forming liquids. The elastic model is experimentally certified. We show that the elastic perspectives offers a simple scenario for the flow in MGs and MG-forming liquids and are suggestive for understanding the glass transition, plastic deformation, and nature and characteristics of MGs.

  19. Mechanical characterization and non-linear elastic modeling of poly(glycerol sebacate) for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mitsak, Anna G; Dunn, Andrew M; Hollister, Scott J

    2012-07-01

    Scaffold tissue engineering strategies for repairing and replacing soft tissue aim to improve reconstructive and corrective surgical techniques whose limitations include suboptimal mechanical properties, fibrous capsule formation and volume loss due to graft resorption. An effective tissue engineering strategy requires a scaffolding material with low elastic modulus that behaves similarly to soft tissue, which has been characterized as a nonlinear elastic material. The material must also have the ability to be manufactured into specifically designed architectures. Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) is a thermoset elastomer that meets these criteria. We hypothesize that the mechanical properties of PGS can be modulated through curing condition and architecture to produce materials with a range of stiffnesses. To evaluate this hypothesis, we manufactured PGS constructs cured under various conditions and having one of two architectures (solid or porous). Specimens were then tensile tested according to ASTM standards and the data were modeled using a nonlinear elastic Neo-Hookean model. Architecture and testing conditions, including elongation rate and wet versus dry conditions, affected the mechanical properties. Increasing curing time and temperature led to increased tangent modulus and decreased maximum strain for solid constructs. Porous constructs had lower nonlinear elastic properties, as did constructs of both architectures tested under simulated physiological conditions (wetted at 37 °C). Both solid and porous PGS specimens could be modeled well with the Neo-Hookean model. Future studies include comparing PGS properties to other biological tissue types and designing and characterizing PGS scaffolds for regenerating these tissues.

  20. Extra dissipation and flow uniformization due to elastic instabilities of shear-thinning polymer solutions in model porous media.

    PubMed

    Machado, Anaïs; Bodiguel, Hugues; Beaumont, Julien; Clisson, Gérald; Colin, Annie

    2016-07-01

    We study flows of hydrolized polyacrylamide solutions in two dimensional porous media made using microfluidics, for which elastic effects are dominant. We focus on semi-dilute solutions (0.1%-0.4%) which exhibit a strong shear thinning behavior. We systematically measure the pressure drop and find that the effective permeability is dramatically higher than predicted when the Weissenberg number is greater than about 10. Observations of the streamlines of the flow reveal that this effect coincides with the onset of elastic instabilities. Moreover, and importantly for applications, we show using local measurements that the mean flow is modified: it appears to be more uniform at high Weissenberg number than for Newtonian fluids. These observations are compared and discussed using pore network simulations, which account for the effect of disorder and shear thinning on the flow properties. PMID:27478522

  1. Deep space network software cost estimation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A parametric software cost estimation model prepared for Jet PRopulsion Laboratory (JPL) Deep Space Network (DSN) Data System implementation tasks is described. The resource estimation mdel modifies and combines a number of existing models. The model calibrates the task magnitude and difficulty, development environment, and software technology effects through prompted responses to a set of approximately 50 questions. Parameters in the model are adjusted to fit JPL software life-cycle statistics.

  2. Adaptive-network models of collective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschaler, G.

    2012-09-01

    Complex systems can often be modelled as networks, in which their basic units are represented by abstract nodes and the interactions among them by abstract links. This network of interactions is the key to understanding emergent collective phenomena in such systems. In most cases, it is an adaptive network, which is defined by a feedback loop between the local dynamics of the individual units and the dynamical changes of the network structure itself. This feedback loop gives rise to many novel phenomena. Adaptive networks are a promising concept for the investigation of collective phenomena in different systems. However, they also present a challenge to existing modelling approaches and analytical descriptions due to the tight coupling between local and topological degrees of freedom. In this work, which is essentially my PhD thesis, I present a simple rule-based framework for the investigation of adaptive networks, using which a wide range of collective phenomena can be modelled and analysed from a common perspective. In this framework, a microscopic model is defined by the local interaction rules of small network motifs, which can be implemented in stochastic simulations straightforwardly. Moreover, an approximate emergent-level description in terms of macroscopic variables can be derived from the microscopic rules, which we use to analyse the system's collective and long-term behaviour by applying tools from dynamical systems theory. We discuss three adaptive-network models for different collective phenomena within our common framework. First, we propose a novel approach to collective motion in insect swarms, in which we consider the insects' adaptive interaction network instead of explicitly tracking their positions and velocities. We capture the experimentally observed onset of collective motion qualitatively in terms of a bifurcation in this non-spatial model. We find that three-body interactions are an essential ingredient for collective motion to emerge

  3. Electrodynamic soil plate oscillator: Modeling nonlinear mesoscopic elastic behavior and hysteresis in nonlinear acoustic landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, M. S.; Duong, D. V.; Kalsbeck, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    An apparatus (SPO), designed to study flexural vibrations of a soil loaded plate, consists of a thin circular elastic clamped plate (and cylindrical wall) supporting a vertical soil column. A small magnet attached to the center of the plate is driven by a rigid AC coil (located coaxially below the plate) to complete the electrodynamic soil plate oscillator SPO design. The frequency dependent mechanical impedance Zmech (force / particle velocity, at the plate's center) is inversely proportional to the electrical motional impedance Zmot. Measurements of Zmot are made using the complex output to input response of a Wheatstone bridge that has an identical coil element in one of its legs. Near resonance, measurements of Zmot (with no soil) before and after a slight point mass loading at the center help determine effective mass, spring, damping and coupling constant parameters of the system. "Tuning curve" behavior of real{ Zmot } and imaginary{ Zmot } at successively higher vibration amplitudes of dry sifted masonry sand are measured. They exhibit a decrease "softening" in resonance frequency along with a decrease in the quality Q factor. In soil surface vibration measurements a bilinear hysteresis model predicts the tuning curve shape for this nonlinear mesoscopic elastic SPO behavior - which also models the soil vibration over an actual plastic "inert" VS 1.6 buried landmine. Experiments are performed where a buried 1m cube concrete block supports a 12 inch deep by 30 inch by 30 inch concrete soil box for burying a VS 1.6 in dry sifted masonry sand for on-the-mine and off-the-mine soil vibration experiments. The backbone curve (a plot of the peak amplitude vs. corresponding resonant frequency from a family of tuning curves) exhibits mostly linear behavior for "on target" soil surface vibration measurements of the buried VS 1.6 or drum-like mine simulants for relatively low particle velocities of the soil. Backbone curves for "on target" measurements exhibit

  4. Nonconsensus opinion model on directed networks.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bo; Li, Qian; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H Eugene; Wang, Huijuan

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic social opinion models have been widely studied on undirected networks, and most of them are based on spin interaction models that produce a consensus. In reality, however, many networks such as Twitter and the World Wide Web are directed and are composed of both unidirectional and bidirectional links. Moreover, from choosing a coffee brand to deciding who to vote for in an election, two or more competing opinions often coexist. In response to this ubiquity of directed networks and the coexistence of two or more opinions in decision-making situations, we study a nonconsensus opinion model introduced by Shao et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 018701 (2009)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.018701] on directed networks. We define directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links in a network, and we use the linear correlation coefficient ρ between the in-degree and out-degree of a node to quantify the relation between the in-degree and out-degree. We introduce two degree-preserving rewiring approaches which allow us to construct directed networks that can have a broad range of possible combinations of directionality ξ and linear correlation coefficient ρ and to study how ξ and ρ impact opinion competitions. We find that, as the directionality ξ or the in-degree and out-degree correlation ρ increases, the majority opinion becomes more dominant and the minority opinion's ability to survive is lowered. PMID:25493838

  5. Dual modeling of political opinion networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Wang, Q A

    2011-09-01

    We present the result of a dual modeling of opinion networks. The model complements the agent-based opinion models by attaching to the social agent (voters) network a political opinion (party) network having its own intrinsic mechanisms of evolution. These two subnetworks form a global network, which can be either isolated from, or dependent on, the external influence. Basically, the evolution of the agent network includes link adding and deleting, with the opinion changes influenced by social validation, the political climate, the attractivity of the parties, and the interaction between them. The opinion network is initially composed of numerous nodes representing opinions or parties that are located on a one dimensional axis according to their political positions. The mechanism of evolution includes union, splitting, change of position, and attractivity, taking into account the pairwise node interaction decaying with node distance in power law. The global evolution ends in a stable distribution of the social agents over a quasistable and fluctuating stationary number of remaining parties. Empirical study on the lifetime distribution of numerous parties and vote results is carried out to verify numerical results.

  6. Nonconsensus opinion model on directed networks.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bo; Li, Qian; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H Eugene; Wang, Huijuan

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic social opinion models have been widely studied on undirected networks, and most of them are based on spin interaction models that produce a consensus. In reality, however, many networks such as Twitter and the World Wide Web are directed and are composed of both unidirectional and bidirectional links. Moreover, from choosing a coffee brand to deciding who to vote for in an election, two or more competing opinions often coexist. In response to this ubiquity of directed networks and the coexistence of two or more opinions in decision-making situations, we study a nonconsensus opinion model introduced by Shao et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 018701 (2009)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.018701] on directed networks. We define directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links in a network, and we use the linear correlation coefficient ρ between the in-degree and out-degree of a node to quantify the relation between the in-degree and out-degree. We introduce two degree-preserving rewiring approaches which allow us to construct directed networks that can have a broad range of possible combinations of directionality ξ and linear correlation coefficient ρ and to study how ξ and ρ impact opinion competitions. We find that, as the directionality ξ or the in-degree and out-degree correlation ρ increases, the majority opinion becomes more dominant and the minority opinion's ability to survive is lowered.

  7. Flexural models of trench/outer rise topography of coronae on Venus with axisymmetric spherical shell elastic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W.; Schubert, Gerald; Sandwell, David T.

    1992-01-01

    Magellan altimetry has revealed that many coronae on Venus have trenches or moats around their peripheries and rises outboard of the trenches. This trench/outer rise topographic signature is generally associated with the tectonic annulus of the corona. Sandwell and Schubert have interpreted the trench/outer rise topography and the associated tectonic annulus around coronae to be the result of elastic bending of the Venus lithosphere (though the tectonic structures are consequences of inelastic deformation of the lithosphere). They used two-dimensional elastic plate flexure theory to fit topographic profiles across a number of large coronae and inferred elastic lithosphere thicknesses between about 15 and 40 km, similar to inferred values of elastic thickness for the Earth's lithosphere at subduction zones around the Pacific Ocean. Here, we report the results of using axisymmetric elastic flexure theory for the deformation of thin spherical shell plates to interpret the trench/outer rise topography of the large coronae modeled by Sandwell and Schubert and of coronae as small as 250 km in diameter. In the case of a corona only a few hundred kilometers in diameter, the model accounts for the small planform radius of the moat and the nonradial orientation of altimetric traces across the corona. By fitting the flexural topography of coronae we determine the elastic thickness and loading necessary to account for the observed flexure. We calculate the associated bending moment and determine whether the corona interior topographic load can provide the required moment. We also calculate surface stresses and compare the stress distribution with the location of annular tectonic features.

  8. Delay and Disruption Tolerant Networking MACHETE Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segui, John S.; Jennings, Esther H.; Gao, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    To verify satisfaction of communication requirements imposed by unique missions, as early as 2000, the Communications Networking Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) saw the need for an environment to support interplanetary communication protocol design, validation, and characterization. JPL's Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE), described in Simulator of Space Communication Networks (NPO-41373) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 8 (August 2005), p. 44, combines various commercial, non-commercial, and in-house custom tools for simulation and performance analysis of space networks. The MACHETE environment supports orbital analysis, link budget analysis, communications network simulations, and hardware-in-the-loop testing. As NASA is expanding its Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) capabilities to support planned and future missions, building infrastructure to maintain services and developing enabling technologies, an important and broader role is seen for MACHETE in design-phase evaluation of future SCaN architectures. To support evaluation of the developing Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) field and its applicability for space networks, JPL developed MACHETE models for DTN Bundle Protocol (BP) and Licklider/Long-haul Transmission Protocol (LTP). DTN is an Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) architecture providing communication in and/or through highly stressed networking environments such as space exploration and battlefield networks. Stressed networking environments include those with intermittent (predictable and unknown) connectivity, large and/or variable delays, and high bit error rates. To provide its services over existing domain specific protocols, the DTN protocols reside at the application layer of the TCP/IP stack, forming a store-and-forward overlay network. The key capabilities of the Bundle Protocol include custody-based reliability, the ability to cope with intermittent connectivity

  9. Using a fast Fourier method to model sound propagation in a stratified atmosphere over a stratified porous-elastic ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooms, S.; Attenborough, K.

    1990-01-01

    Using a Fast Fourier integration method and a global matrix method for solution of the boundary condition equations at all interfaces simultaneously, a useful tool for predicting acoustic propagation in a stratified fluid over a stratified porous-elastic solid was developed. The model for the solid is a modified Biot-Stoll model incorporating four parameters describing the pore structure corresponding to the Rayleigh-Attenborough rigid-porous structure model. The method is also compared to another Fast Fourier code (CERL-FFP) which models the ground as an impedance surface under a horizontally stratified air. Agreement with the CERL FFP is good. The effects on sound propagation of a combination of ground elasticity, complex ground structure, and atmospheric conditions are demonstrated by theoretical results over a snow layer, and experimental results over a model ground surface.

  10. Performance evaluation of traveling wave ultrasonic motor based on a model with visco-elastic friction layer on stator.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianjun; Sun, Fengyan; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2006-12-01

    A new visco-elastic contact model of traveling wave ultrasonic motor (TWUSM) is proposed. In this model, the rotor is assumed to be rigid body and the friction material on stator teeth surface to be visco-elastic body. Both load characteristics of TWUSM, such as rotation speed, torque and efficiency, and effects of interface parameters between stator and rotor on output characteristic of TWUSM can be calculated and simulated numerically by using MATLAB method based on this model. This model is compared with that one of compliant slider and rigid stator. The results show that this model can obtain bigger stall torque. The simulated results are compared with test results, and found that their load characteristics have good agreement.

  11. Expression-invariant three-dimensional face reconstruction from a single image by facial expression generic elastic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeini, Ali; Faez, Karim; Moeini, Hossein

    2014-09-01

    An efficient method for expression-invariant three-dimensional (3-D) face reconstruction from a frontal face image with a variety of facial expressions (FE) using the FE generic elastic model (GEM) is proposed. Three generic models are employed for FE modeling in the generic elastic model (GEM) framework, which are combined based on the similarity distance around the lips. Exclusively, FE-GEM demonstrated that it is more precisely able to estimate a 3-D model of a frontal face, attaining a more robust and better quality 3-D face reconstruction under a variety of FEs compared to the original GEM approach. It is tested on an available 3-D face database and its accuracy and robustness are demonstrated compared to the GEM approach under a variety of FEs. Also, the FE-GEM method is tested on available two-dimensional face databases and a new synthesized pose is generated from gallery images for handling pose variations in face recognition.

  12. Numerical Modeling for Springback Predictions by Considering the Variations of Elastic Modulus in Stamping Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting springback by considering the variations of elastic modulus on springback in stamping AHSS. Various stamping tests and finite-element method (FEM) simulation codes were used in this study. The cyclic loading-unloading tensile tests were conducted to determine the variations of elastic modulus for dual-phase (DP) 780 sheet steel. The biaxial bulge test was used to obtain plastic flow stress data. The non-linear reduction of elastic modulus for increasing the plastic strain was formulated by using the Yoshida model that was implemented in FEM simulations for springback. To understand the effects of material properties on springback, experiments were conducted with a simple geometry such as U-shape bending and the more complex geometry such as the curved flanging and S-rail stamping. Different measurement methods were used to confirm the final part geometry. Two different commercial FEM codes, LS-DYNA and DEFORM, were used to compare the experiments. The variable elastic modulus improved springback predictions in U-shape bending and curved flanging tests compared to FEM with the constant elastic modulus. However, in S-rail stamping tests, both FEM models with the isotropic hardening model showed limitations in predicting the sidewall curl of the S-rail part after springback. To consider the kinematic hardening and Bauschinger effects that result from material bending-unbending in S-rail stamping, the Yoshida model was used for FEM simulation of S-rail stamping and springback. The FEM predictions showed good improvement in correlating with experiments.

  13. A comprehensive Network Security Risk Model for process control networks.

    PubMed

    Henry, Matthew H; Haimes, Yacov Y

    2009-02-01

    The risk of cyber attacks on process control networks (PCN) is receiving significant attention due to the potentially catastrophic extent to which PCN failures can damage the infrastructures and commodity flows that they support. Risk management addresses the coupled problems of (1) reducing the likelihood that cyber attacks would succeed in disrupting PCN operation and (2) reducing the severity of consequences in the event of PCN failure or manipulation. The Network Security Risk Model (NSRM) developed in this article provides a means of evaluating the efficacy of candidate risk management policies by modeling the baseline risk and assessing expectations of risk after the implementation of candidate measures. Where existing risk models fall short of providing adequate insight into the efficacy of candidate risk management policies due to shortcomings in their structure or formulation, the NSRM provides model structure and an associated modeling methodology that captures the relevant dynamics of cyber attacks on PCN for risk analysis. This article develops the NSRM in detail in the context of an illustrative example.

  14. A comprehensive Network Security Risk Model for process control networks.

    PubMed

    Henry, Matthew H; Haimes, Yacov Y

    2009-02-01

    The risk of cyber attacks on process control networks (PCN) is receiving significant attention due to the potentially catastrophic extent to which PCN failures can damage the infrastructures and commodity flows that they support. Risk management addresses the coupled problems of (1) reducing the likelihood that cyber attacks would succeed in disrupting PCN operation and (2) reducing the severity of consequences in the event of PCN failure or manipulation. The Network Security Risk Model (NSRM) developed in this article provides a means of evaluating the efficacy of candidate risk management policies by modeling the baseline risk and assessing expectations of risk after the implementation of candidate measures. Where existing risk models fall short of providing adequate insight into the efficacy of candidate risk management policies due to shortcomings in their structure or formulation, the NSRM provides model structure and an associated modeling methodology that captures the relevant dynamics of cyber attacks on PCN for risk analysis. This article develops the NSRM in detail in the context of an illustrative example. PMID:19000078

  15. Assessment of Wall Elasticity Variations on Intraluminal Haemodynamics in Descending Aortic Dissections Using a Lumped-Parameter Model

    PubMed Central

    Rudenick, Paula A.; Bijnens, Bart H.; Segers, Patrick; García-Dorado, David; Evangelista, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Descending aortic dissection (DAD) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Aortic wall stiffness is a variable often altered in DAD patients and potentially involved in long-term outcome. However, its relevance is still mostly unknown. To gain more detailed knowledge of how wall elasticity (compliance) might influence intraluminal haemodynamics in DAD, a lumped-parameter model was developed based on experimental data from a pulsatile hydraulic circuit and validated for 8 clinical scenarios. Next, the variations of intraluminal pressures and flows were assessed as a function of wall elasticity. In comparison with the most rigid-wall case, an increase in elasticity to physiological values was associated with a decrease in systolic and increase in diastolic pressures of up to 33% and 63% respectively, with a subsequent decrease in the pressure wave amplitude of up to 86%. Moreover, it was related to an increase in multidirectional intraluminal flows and transition of behaviour as 2 parallel vessels towards a vessel with a side-chamber. The model supports the extremely important role of wall elasticity as determinant of intraluminal pressures and flow patterns for DAD, and thus, the relevance of considering it during clinical assessment and computational modelling of the disease. PMID:25881158

  16. Elastic Model Transitions: A Hybrid Approach Utilizing Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannan, Mike R.; Jurenko, Robert J.; Bush, Jason; Ottander, John

    2014-01-01

    A method for transitioning linear time invariant (LTI) models in time varying simulation is proposed that utilizes a hybrid approach for determining physical displacements by augmenting the original quadratically constrained least squares (LSQI) algorithm with Direct Shape Mapping (DSM) and modifying the energy constraints. The approach presented is applicable to simulation of the elastic behavior of launch vehicles and other structures that utilize discrete LTI finite element model (FEM) derived mode sets (eigenvalues and eigenvectors) that are propagated throughout time. The time invariant nature of the elastic data presents a problem of how to properly transition elastic states from the prior to the new model while preserving motion across the transition and ensuring there is no truncation or excitation of the system. A previous approach utilizes a LSQI algorithm with an energy constraint to effect smooth transitions between eigenvector sets with no requirement that the models be of similar dimension or have any correlation. This approach assumes energy is conserved across the transition, which results in significant non-physical transients due to changing quasi-steady state energy between mode sets, a phenomenon seen when utilizing a truncated mode set. The computational burden of simulating a full mode set is significant so a subset of modes is often selected to reduce run time. As a result of this truncation, energy between mode sets may not be constant and solutions across transitions could produce non-physical transients. In an effort to abate these transients an improved methodology was developed based on the aforementioned approach, but this new approach can handle significant changes in energy across mode set transitions. It is proposed that physical velocities due to elastic behavior be solved for using the LSQI algorithm, but solve for displacements using a two-step process that independently addresses the quasi-steady-state and non

  17. Model-based elastography: a survey of approaches to the inverse elasticity problem

    PubMed Central

    Doyley, M M

    2012-01-01

    Elastography is emerging as an imaging modality that can distinguish normal versus diseased tissues via their biomechanical properties. This article reviews current approaches to elastography in three areas — quasi-static, harmonic, and transient — and describes inversion schemes for each elastographic imaging approach. Approaches include: first-order approximation methods; direct and iterative inversion schemes for linear elastic; isotropic materials; and advanced reconstruction methods for recovering parameters that characterize complex mechanical behavior. The paper’s objective is to document efforts to develop elastography within the framework of solving an inverse problem, so that elastography may provide reliable estimates of shear modulus and other mechanical parameters. We discuss issues that must be addressed if model-based elastography is to become the prevailing approach to quasi-static, harmonic, and transient elastography: (1) developing practical techniques to transform the ill-posed problem with a well-posed one; (2) devising better forward models to capture the transient behavior of soft tissue; and (3) developing better test procedures to evaluate the performance of modulus elastograms. PMID:22222839

  18. Elastic models of the fast traps of carnivorous Dionaea and Aldrovanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyeux, Marc

    2013-09-01

    The carnivorous aquatic waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa L.) and the closely related terrestrial Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Sol. ex J. Ellis) both feature elaborate snap-traps, which shut after reception of an external mechanical stimulus by prey animals. Although Aldrovanda is usually considered a miniature aquatic Dionaea, the shutting mechanisms of the two plants differ quite markedly. The fast shutting of Aldrovanda is indeed based on a simple swelling or shrinking mechanism, while the movement of Dionaea's traps is accelerated by the snap-buckling of the lobes. The purpose of this Brief Report is to describe several key improvements to the elastic models that have recently been introduced to elucidate these movements [Poppinga and Joyeux, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.84.041928 84, 041928 (2011)]. In particular, a precise mechanism for the action of the motor cells of Aldrovanda is proposed, the facts that the opening of the leaves of Dionaea is an irreversible mechanism based on growth and that the strain field is anisotropic and much smaller on the inner than on the outer surface of the leaves during shutting are taken properly into account, and a more accurate formula for calculating mean curvatures is used. The improvements brought to the model are described in detail and the physical consequences of these improvements are discussed.

  19. Elastic models of the fast traps of carnivorous Dionaea and Aldrovanda.

    PubMed

    Joyeux, Marc

    2013-09-01

    The carnivorous aquatic waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa L.) and the closely related terrestrial Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Sol. ex J. Ellis) both feature elaborate snap-traps, which shut after reception of an external mechanical stimulus by prey animals. Although Aldrovanda is usually considered a miniature aquatic Dionaea, the shutting mechanisms of the two plants differ quite markedly. The fast shutting of Aldrovanda is indeed based on a simple swelling or shrinking mechanism, while the movement of Dionaea's traps is accelerated by the snap-buckling of the lobes. The purpose of this Brief Report is to describe several key improvements to the elastic models that have recently been introduced to elucidate these movements [Poppinga and Joyeux, Phys. Rev. E 84, 041928 (2011)]. In particular, a precise mechanism for the action of the motor cells of Aldrovanda is proposed, the facts that the opening of the leaves of Dionaea is an irreversible mechanism based on growth and that the strain field is anisotropic and much smaller on the inner than on the outer surface of the leaves during shutting are taken properly into account, and a more accurate formula for calculating mean curvatures is used. The improvements brought to the model are described in detail and the physical consequences of these improvements are discussed.

  20. ηc elastic and transition form factors: Contact interaction and algebraic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedolla, Marco A.; Raya, Khépani; Cobos-Martínez, J. J.; Bashir, Adnan

    2016-05-01

    For the flavor-singlet heavy-quark system of charmonia in the pseudoscalar [ηc(1 S ) ] channel, we calculate the elastic (EFF) and transition form factors (TFFs) [ηc(1 S )→γ γ* ] for a wide range of photon momentum transfer squared (Q2). The framework for this analysis is provided by a symmetry-preserving Schwinger-Dyson equation and Bethe-Salpeter equation treatment of a vector×vector contact interaction. We also employ an algebraic model, developed earlier to describe the light-quark systems. It correctly correlates infrared and ultraviolet dynamics of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The contact interaction results agree with the lattice data for low Q2. For Q2≥Q02 , the results start deviating from the lattice results by more than 20%. Q02≈2.5 GeV2 for the EFF, and ≈25 GeV2 for the TFF. We also present the results for the EFF, TFF, and ηc(1 S ) parton distribution amplitude for the algebraic model. Wherever the comparison is possible, these results are in excellent agreement with the lattice, perturbative QCD, results obtained through a Schwinger-Dyson equation-Bethe-Salpeter equation study, employing refined truncations, and the experimental findings of the BABAR experiment.

  1. An integrated network model of psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Looijestijn, Jasper; Blom, Jan Dirk; Aleman, André; Hoek, Hans W; Goekoop, Rutger

    2015-12-01

    The full body of research on the nature of psychosis and its determinants indicates that a considerable number of factors are relevant to the development of hallucinations, delusions, and other positive symptoms, ranging from neurodevelopmental parameters and altered connectivity of brain regions to impaired cognitive functioning and social factors. We aimed to integrate these factors in a single mathematical model based on network theory. At the microscopic level this model explains positive symptoms of psychosis in terms of experiential equivalents of robust, high-frequency attractor states of neural networks. At the mesoscopic level it explains them in relation to global brain states, and at the macroscopic level in relation to social-network structures and dynamics. Due to the scale-free nature of biological networks, all three levels are governed by the same general laws, thereby allowing for an integrated model of biological, psychological, and social phenomena involved in the mediation of positive symptoms of psychosis. This integrated network model of psychotic symptoms (INMOPS) is described together with various possibilities for application in clinical practice.

  2. An integrated network model of psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Looijestijn, Jasper; Blom, Jan Dirk; Aleman, André; Hoek, Hans W; Goekoop, Rutger

    2015-12-01

    The full body of research on the nature of psychosis and its determinants indicates that a considerable number of factors are relevant to the development of hallucinations, delusions, and other positive symptoms, ranging from neurodevelopmental parameters and altered connectivity of brain regions to impaired cognitive functioning and social factors. We aimed to integrate these factors in a single mathematical model based on network theory. At the microscopic level this model explains positive symptoms of psychosis in terms of experiential equivalents of robust, high-frequency attractor states of neural networks. At the mesoscopic level it explains them in relation to global brain states, and at the macroscopic level in relation to social-network structures and dynamics. Due to the scale-free nature of biological networks, all three levels are governed by the same general laws, thereby allowing for an integrated model of biological, psychological, and social phenomena involved in the mediation of positive symptoms of psychosis. This integrated network model of psychotic symptoms (INMOPS) is described together with various possibilities for application in clinical practice. PMID:26432501

  3. Cellular automata modelling of biomolecular networks dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bonchev, D; Thomas, S; Apte, A; Kier, L B

    2010-01-01

    The modelling of biological systems dynamics is traditionally performed by ordinary differential equations (ODEs). When dealing with intracellular networks of genes, proteins and metabolites, however, this approach is hindered by network complexity and the lack of experimental kinetic parameters. This opened the field for other modelling techniques, such as cellular automata (CA) and agent-based modelling (ABM). This article reviews this emerging field of studies on network dynamics in molecular biology. The basics of the CA technique are discussed along with an extensive list of related software and websites. The application of CA to networks of biochemical reactions is exemplified in detail by the case studies of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, the FAS-ligand (FASL)-induced and Bcl-2-related apoptosis. The potential of the CA method to model basic pathways patterns, to identify ways to control pathway dynamics and to help in generating strategies to fight with cancer is demonstrated. The different line of CA applications presented includes the search for the best-performing network motifs, an analysis of importance for effective intracellular signalling and pathway cross-talk. PMID:20373215

  4. Features and heterogeneities in growing network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Luca; Cortelezzi, Michele; Yang, Bin; Marmorini, Giacomo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2012-06-01

    Many complex networks from the World Wide Web to biological networks grow taking into account the heterogeneous features of the nodes. The feature of a node might be a discrete quantity such as a classification of a URL document such as personal page, thematic website, news, blog, search engine, social network, etc., or the classification of a gene in a functional module. Moreover the feature of a node can be a continuous variable such as the position of a node in the embedding space. In order to account for these properties, in this paper we provide a generalization of growing network models with preferential attachment that includes the effect of heterogeneous features of the nodes. The main effect of heterogeneity is the emergence of an “effective fitness” for each class of nodes, determining the rate at which nodes acquire new links. The degree distribution exhibits a multiscaling behavior analogous to the the fitness model. This property is robust with respect to variations in the model, as long as links are assigned through effective preferential attachment. Beyond the degree distribution, in this paper we give a full characterization of the other relevant properties of the model. We evaluate the clustering coefficient and show that it disappears for large network size, a property shared with the Barabási-Albert model. Negative degree correlations are also present in this class of models, along with nontrivial mixing patterns among features. We therefore conclude that both small clustering coefficients and disassortative mixing are outcomes of the preferential attachment mechanism in general growing networks.

  5. Features and heterogeneities in growing network models.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Luca; Cortelezzi, Michele; Yang, Bin; Marmorini, Giacomo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2012-06-01

    Many complex networks from the World Wide Web to biological networks grow taking into account the heterogeneous features of the nodes. The feature of a node might be a discrete quantity such as a classification of a URL document such as personal page, thematic website, news, blog, search engine, social network, etc., or the classification of a gene in a functional module. Moreover the feature of a node can be a continuous variable such as the position of a node in the embedding space. In order to account for these properties, in this paper we provide a generalization of growing network models with preferential attachment that includes the effect of heterogeneous features of the nodes. The main effect of heterogeneity is the emergence of an "effective fitness" for each class of nodes, determining the rate at which nodes acquire new links. The degree distribution exhibits a multiscaling behavior analogous to the the fitness model. This property is robust with respect to variations in the model, as long as links are assigned through effective preferential attachment. Beyond the degree distribution, in this paper we give a full characterization of the other relevant properties of the model. We evaluate the clustering coefficient and show that it disappears for large network size, a property shared with the Barabási-Albert model. Negative degree correlations are also present in this class of models, along with nontrivial mixing patterns among features. We therefore conclude that both small clustering coefficients and disassortative mixing are outcomes of the preferential attachment mechanism in general growing networks.

  6. Physical Modeling of Microtubules Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Pierre; Kervrann, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Microtubules (MT) are highly dynamic tubulin polymers that are involved in many cellular processes such as mitosis, intracellular cell organization and vesicular transport. Nevertheless, the modeling of cytoskeleton and MT dynamics based on physical properties is difficult to achieve. Using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, we propose to model the rigidity of microtubules on a physical basis using forces, mass and acceleration. In addition, we link microtubules growth and shrinkage to the presence of molecules (e.g. GTP-tubulin) in the cytosol. The overall model enables linking cytosol to microtubules dynamics in a constant state space thus allowing usage of data assimilation techniques.

  7. Elastic properties of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, Alexandre F.; Malta, C. P.; Galva~O, Douglas S.

    2006-05-01

    We present a model to study Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of the composite material of amorphous nanowires. It is an extension of the model derived by two of us [da Fonseca and Galva~o, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 175502 (2004)] to study the elastic properties of amorphous nanosprings. The model is based on twisting and tensioning a straight nanowire and we propose an experimental setup to obtain the elastic parameters of the nanowire. We used the Kirchhoff rod model to obtain the expressions for the elastic constants of the nanowire.

  8. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. 12 figs.

  9. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, Lars J.; Keller, Paul E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis.

  10. Mechanics of extended continua: modeling and simulation of elastic microstretch materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, N.; Steinmann, P.

    2007-09-01

    The investigation of microstretch and micromorphic continua (which are prominent examples of so-called extended continua) dates back to Eringens pioneering works in the mid 1960, cf. (Eringen in Mechanics of micromorphic materials. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, pp 131-138, 1966; Eringen in Int J Eng Sci 8:819-828; Eringen in Microcontinuum field theories. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, 1999). Here, we re-derive the governing equations of microstretch continua in a variational setting, providing a natural framework within which numerical implementations of the model equations by means of the finite element method can be obtained straightforwardly. In the application of Dirichlets principle, the postulation of an appropriate form of the Helmholtz free energy turns out to be crucial to the derivation of the balance laws and constitutive relations for microstretch continua. At present, the material parameters involved in the free energy have been assigned fixed values throughout all numerical simulations—this simplification is addressed in detail as the influence of those parameters must not be underestimated. Since only few numerical results demonstrating elastic microstretch material behavior in engineering applications are available, the focus is here on the presentation of numerical results for simple twodimensional test specimens subjected to a plane strain condition and uniaxial tension. Confidence in the simulations for microstretch materials is gained by showing that they exhibit a “downward-compatibility” to Cosserat continuum formulation: by switching off all stretch-related effects, the governing set of equations reduces to the one used for polar materials. Further, certain material parameters can be chosen to act as penalty parameters, forcing stretch-related contributions to an almost negligible range in a full microstretch model so that numerical results obtained for a polar model can be obtained as a limiting case from the full

  11. Comparisons of elastic and rigid blade-element rotor models using parallel processing technology for piloted simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gary; Duval, Ronald W.; Green, John A.; Huynh, Loc C.

    1991-01-01

    A piloted comparison of rigid and aeroelastic blade-element rotor models was conducted at the Crew Station Research and Development Facility (CSRDF) at Ames Research Center. A simulation development and analysis tool, FLIGHTLAB, was used to implement these models in real time using parallel processing technology. Pilot comments and quantitative analysis performed both on-line and off-line confirmed that elastic degrees of freedom significantly affect perceived handling qualities. Trim comparisons show improved correlation with flight test data when elastic modes are modeled. The results demonstrate the efficiency with which the mathematical modeling sophistication of existing simulation facilities can be upgraded using parallel processing, and the importance of these upgrades to simulation fidelity.

  12. Double-doorway model for pion-nucleon elastic scattering in the [ital S][sub 11] channel

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, R.J. ); Ernst, D.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Resonance energy pion-nucleon elastic scattering in the [ital S][sub 11] channel is modeled by assuming that the pion plus nucleon couple to two resonances, the resonances couple to inleastic channels, but there is no direct coupling of the pion-nucleon channel to the inelastic channels. The model is solved by matrix [ital N]/[ital D] methods. The coupling of the inelastic channels to the elastic channel is taken directly from data. Using form factors from the constituent quark model, we find the model is able to reproduce the experimentally determined pion-nucleon phases in the [ital S][sub 11] channel over the resonance region and that the resonance part of the amplitude is negligible at low energies.

  13. Predicting Anticancer Drug Responses Using a Dual-Layer Integrated Cell Line-Drug Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yun; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Liu, X. Shirley

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict the response of a cancer patient to a therapeutic agent is a major goal in modern oncology that should ultimately lead to personalized treatment. Existing approaches to predicting drug sensitivity rely primarily on profiling of cancer cell line panels that have been treated with different drugs and selecting genomic or functional genomic features to regress or classify the drug response. Here, we propose a dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model, which uses both cell line similarity network (CSN) data and drug similarity network (DSN) data to predict the drug response of a given cell line using a weighted model. Using the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and Cancer Genome Project (CGP) studies as benchmark datasets, our single-layer model with CSN or DSN and only a single parameter achieved a prediction performance comparable to the previously generated elastic net model. When using the dual-layer model integrating both CSN and DSN, our predicted response reached a 0.6 Pearson correlation coefficient with observed responses for most drugs, which is significantly better than the previous results using the elastic net model. We have also applied the dual-layer cell line-drug integrated network model to fill in the missing drug response values in the CGP dataset. Even though the dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model does not specifically model mutation information, it correctly predicted that BRAF mutant cell lines would be more sensitive than BRAF wild-type cell lines to three MEK1/2 inhibitors tested. PMID:26418249

  14. Individual density-elasticity relationships improve accuracy of subject-specific finite element models of human femurs.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Sebastian; Göttlinger, Michael; Augat, Peter

    2013-09-01

    In a previous study on subject-specific finite-element-models, we found that appropriate density-elasticity relationships to compute the mechanical behavior of femurs seem to be subject-specific. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the predictive error of a cohort of subject-specific finite element-models is lower with subject-specific density-elasticity relationships than with a cohort-specific density-elasticity relationship. Finite-element-analysis and inverse optimization based on response surface methodology were employed to test the hypothesis. Subject-specific FE-models of 17 human femurs and corresponding experimental data from biomechanical tests were taken from a previous study. A power function for the relation between radiological bone density and elastic modulus was set up with the optimization variables a and b: E(MPa)=aρqCT(b)(gK2HPO4/cm(3)). The goal of the optimization was to minimize the root-mean-square error in percent (RMSE%) between computational and experimental results. A Wilcoxon test (p=0.05) was performed on all absolute relative errors between the two groups (subject-specific functions vs. cohort-specific function). The subject-specific functions resulted in a 6% lower overall prediction error and a 6% lower RMSE% than the cohort-specific function (p<0.001). The determined subject-specific relations were mostly linear, with variable a ranging from 9307 to 15673 and variable b ranging from 0.68 to 1.40. For the cohort-specific relation, the following power law was obtained: E(MPa)=12486ρqCT(1.16)(gK2HPO4/cm(3)). We conclude that individual density-elasticity relationships improve the accuracy of subject-specific finite element models. Future subject-specific finite-element-analyses of bones should include the individuality of the elastic properties by a stochastic density-elasticity relationship with mean and standard deviation of a and b.

  15. Adaptive importance sampling for network growth models

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Susan P.

    2016-01-01

    Network Growth Models such as Preferential Attachment and Duplication/Divergence are popular generative models with which to study complex networks in biology, sociology, and computer science. However, analyzing them within the framework of model selection and statistical inference is often complicated and computationally difficult, particularly when comparing models that are not directly related or nested. In practice, ad hoc methods are often used with uncertain results. If possible, the use of standard likelihood-based statistical model selection techniques is desirable. With this in mind, we develop an Adaptive Importance Sampling algorithm for estimating likelihoods of Network Growth Models. We introduce the use of the classic Plackett-Luce model of rankings as a family of importance distributions. Updates to importance distributions are performed iteratively via the Cross-Entropy Method with an additional correction for degeneracy/over-fitting inspired by the Minimum Description Length principle. This correction can be applied to other estimation problems using the Cross-Entropy method for integration/approximate counting, and it provides an interpretation of Adaptive Importance Sampling as iterative model selection. Empirical results for the Preferential Attachment model are given, along with a comparison to an alternative established technique, Annealed Importance Sampling. PMID:27182098

  16. An elastic rod model to evaluate effects of ionic concentration on equilibrium configuration of DNA in salt solution.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing; Wang, Shengnan

    2014-03-01

    As a coarse-gained model, a super-thin elastic rod subjected to interfacial interactions is used to investigate the condensation of DNA in a multivalent salt solution. The interfacial traction between the rod and the solution environment is determined in terms of the Young-Laplace equation. Kirchhoff's theory of elastic rod is used to analyze the equilibrium configuration of a DNA chain under the action of the interfacial traction. Two models are established to characterize the change of the interfacial traction and elastic modulus of DNA with the ionic concentration of the salt solution, respectively. The influences of the ionic concentration on the equilibrium configuration of DNA are discussed. The results show that the condensation of DNA is mainly determined by competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of the DNA itself, and the interfacial traction is one of forces that drive DNA condensation. With the change of concentration, the DNA segments will undergo a series of alteration from the original configuration to the condensed configuration, and the spiral-shape appearing in the condensed configuration of DNA is independent of the original configuration.

  17. Fiber Length and Orientation in Long-Fiber Injection-Molded Thermoplastics. Part I: Modeling of Microstructure and Elastic Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Holbery, James D.; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara J.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2008-05-01

    This paper investigates the effects of fiber length and orientation distributions on the elastic properties of long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). The corrected experimental fiber length distribution and the predicted and experimental orientation distributions were used in modeling to compute the elastic properties of the composite. First, from the fiber length distribution (FLD) data in terms of number of fibers versus fiber length, the probability density functions were built and used in the computation. Also, it has been shown that the two-parameter Weibull’s distribution can be used to represent the actual FLD. Next, the Mori-Tanaka model that employs the Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method was applied to calculate the stiffness matrix of the aligned fiber composite containing the established FLD. The stiffness of the actual as-formed composite was then determined from the stiffness of the computed aligned fiber composite that was averaged over all possible orientations using the orientation averaging method. The methodology to predict the elastic properties of LFTs was validated via experimental verification of the longitudinal and transverse moduli determined for long glass fiber injection-molded polypropylene specimens. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the effect of a variation of FLD on the composite elastic properties.

  18. The noisy voter model on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carro, Adrián; Toral, Raúl; San Miguel, Maxi

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new analytical method to study stochastic, binary-state models on complex networks. Moving beyond the usual mean-field theories, this alternative approach is based on the introduction of an annealed approximation for uncorrelated networks, allowing to deal with the network structure as parametric heterogeneity. As an illustration, we study the noisy voter model, a modification of the original voter model including random changes of state. The proposed method is able to unfold the dependence of the model not only on the mean degree (the mean-field prediction) but also on more complex averages over the degree distribution. In particular, we find that the degree heterogeneity—variance of the underlying degree distribution—has a strong influence on the location of the critical point of a noise-induced, finite-size transition occurring in the model, on the local ordering of the system, and on the functional form of its temporal correlations. Finally, we show how this latter point opens the possibility of inferring the degree heterogeneity of the underlying network by observing only the aggregate behavior of the system as a whole, an issue of interest for systems where only macroscopic, population level variables can be measured.

  19. An evolving model of online bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chu-Xu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Liu, Chuang

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the structure and evolution of online bipartite networks is a significant task since they play a crucial role in various e-commerce services nowadays. Recently, various attempts have been tried to propose different models, resulting in either power-law or exponential degree distributions. However, many empirical results show that the user degree distribution actually follows a shifted power-law distribution, the so-called Mandelbrot’s law, which cannot be fully described by previous models. In this paper, we propose an evolving model, considering two different user behaviors: random and preferential attachment. Extensive empirical results on two real bipartite networks, Delicious and CiteULike, show that the theoretical model can well characterize the structure of real networks for both user and object degree distributions. In addition, we introduce a structural parameter p, to demonstrate that the hybrid user behavior leads to the shifted power-law degree distribution, and the region of power-law tail will increase with the increment of p. The proposed model might shed some lights in understanding the underlying laws governing the structure of real online bipartite networks.

  20. The noisy voter model on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Adrián; Toral, Raúl; San Miguel, Maxi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new analytical method to study stochastic, binary-state models on complex networks. Moving beyond the usual mean-field theories, this alternative approach is based on the introduction of an annealed approximation for uncorrelated networks, allowing to deal with the network structure as parametric heterogeneity. As an illustration, we study the noisy voter model, a modification of the original voter model including random changes of state. The proposed method is able to unfold the dependence of the model not only on the mean degree (the mean-field prediction) but also on more complex averages over the degree distribution. In particular, we find that the degree heterogeneity—variance of the underlying degree distribution—has a strong influence on the location of the critical point of a noise-induced, finite-size transition occurring in the model, on the local ordering of the system, and on the functional form of its temporal correlations. Finally, we show how this latter point opens the possibility of inferring the degree heterogeneity of the underlying network by observing only the aggregate behavior of the system as a whole, an issue of interest for systems where only macroscopic, population level variables can be measured. PMID:27094773

  1. Piping network model program for small computers

    SciTech Connect

    Kruckenberg, N.E.

    1986-07-01

    A model of fluid piping networks was developed to aid in solving problems in the recirculating water coolant system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The piping network model can be used to solve steady state problems in which water flow rates and temperatures are to be determined, or in which temperature is an important factor in determining pressure losses. The model can be implemented on desktop computers to perform these calculations as needed to track changing process conditions. The report includes a description of the coolant system, the mathematical development f the computer model, a case study utilizing the model and a listing and sample run of the computer codes. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Elastic properties of continental carbonate rocks: controlling factors and applicable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Fortin, Jérôme; Guéguen, Yves; Pellerin, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Continental carbonates gained interest following the discovery of the supergiant field in the post- and pre-salt deposits in offshore Brazil, as they account for a large portion of the deepwater production. The genesis of continental carbonates is generally associated with physico-chemical and biological precipitation of carbonates, coupled with a strong influence of clastic mineralogical inputs. This results in a complex mineralogical mixing, associated with a wide heterogeneity of pore types due to the intense diagenetic overprint potential of carbonate deposits (cementation, dissolution, recrystallisation, dolomitisation...). With that in mind, we propose insights on the controling factors of elastic properties in a continental carbonate dataset, analogue of the brazilian pre-salt deposits. An applicable model based on the effective medium theory is proposed and discussed regarding the experimental results, and try to account for the wide variability of the elastic properties. Analyzed samples exhibit large variation of (1) sedimentary texture (coquinas grainstones, muddy facies (mudstones to packtones), travertines and stromatolites, (2) pore types (moldic, intercrystalline, vuggy and micropores) and shapes (aspect ratio values fall between 0.2 and 0.5) and (3) physical properties (porosity, acoustic velocity). Regarding composition, samples are characterized by three major mineralogical assemblages, from pure calcite, dolomite, to quartz/clay mixing. If porosity is clearly the first order parameter controlling P-wave velocities, the mineralogical overprint can be accounted for the wide variability of the p-wave velocities at a given porosity (figure 1). The lower porosity-velocity relationship trend is dominated by samples with low to large quartz/clay proportions, whereas the higher trend is dominated by dolomitized samples. Two input parameters are extracted from the previous experimental observation: porosity and mineralogical composition of each sample

  3. GPU computing with OpenCL to model 2D elastic wave propagation: exploring memory usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Molero-Armenta, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have become increasingly powerful in recent years. Programs exploring the advantages of this architecture could achieve large performance gains and this is the aim of new initiatives in high performance computing. The objective of this work is to develop an efficient tool to model 2D elastic wave propagation on parallel computing devices. To this end, we implement the elastodynamic finite integration technique, using the industry open standard open computing language (OpenCL) for cross-platform, parallel programming of modern processors, and an open-source toolkit called [Py]OpenCL. The code written with [Py]OpenCL can run on a wide variety of platforms; it can be used on AMD or NVIDIA GPUs as well as classical multicore CPUs, adapting to the underlying architecture. Our main contribution is its implementation with local and global memory and the performance analysis using five different computing devices (including Kepler, one of the fastest and most efficient high performance computing technologies) with various operating systems.

  4. GPU performance analysis of a nodal discontinuous Galerkin method for acoustic and elastic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modave, A.; St-Cyr, A.; Warburton, T.

    2016-06-01

    Finite element schemes based on discontinuous Galerkin methods possess features amenable to massively parallel computing accelerated with general purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). However, the computational performance of such schemes strongly depends on their implementation. In the past, several implementation strategies have been proposed. They are based exclusively on specialized compute kernels tuned for each operation, or they can leverage BLAS libraries that provide optimized routines for basic linear algebra operations. In this paper, we present and analyze up-to-date performance results for different implementations, tested in a unified framework on a single NVIDIA GTX980 GPU. We show that specialized kernels written with a one-node-per-thread strategy are competitive for polynomial bases up to the fifth and seventh degrees for acoustic and elastic models, respectively. For higher degrees, a strategy that makes use of the NVIDIA cuBLAS library provides better results, able to reach a net arithmetic throughput 35.7% of the theoretical peak value.

  5. Assessing smectic liquid-crystal continuum models for elastic bilayer deformations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu; Pastor, Richard W.; Andersen, Olaf S.; Im, Wonpil

    2013-01-01

    For four decades, since W. Helfrich’s pioneering study of smectic A liquid crystals in 1973, continuum elastic models (CEMs) have been employed as tools to understand the energetics of protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Among the assumptions underlying this use is that all relevant protein–lipid interactions can be included in the continuum representation of the protein–bilayer interactions through the physical parameters determined for protein-free bilayers and the choice of boundary conditions at the protein/bilayer interface. To better understand this assumption, we review the general structure of CEMs, examine how different choices of boundary conditions and physical moduli profiles alter the predicted bilayer thickness profiles around gramicidin A (gA) and mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC), respectively, and compare these profiles with those obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the profiles differ qualitatively in the first lipid shell around the channels, indicating that the CEMs do not capture accurately the consequences of the protein-induced local changes in lipid bilayer dynamics. Therefore, one needs to be careful when interpreting the results of CEM-based analyses of lipid bilayer-membrane protein interactions. PMID:23348553

  6. A one-dimensional continuum elastic model for membrane-embedded gramicidin dimer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Stember, Joseph N; Andersen, Olaf

    2011-02-04

    Membrane elastic properties, which are subject to alteration by compounds such as cholesterol, lipid metabolites and other amphiphiles, as well as pharmaceuticals, can have important effects on membrane proteins. A useful tool for measuring some of these effects is the gramicidin A channels, which are formed by transmembrane dimerization of non-conducting subunits that reside in each bilayer leaflet. The length of the conducting channels is less than the bilayer thickness, meaning that channel formation is associated with a local bilayer deformation. Electrophysiological studies have shown that the dimer becomes increasingly destabilized as the hydrophobic mismatch between the channel and the host bilayer increases. That is, the bilayer imposes a disjoining force on the channel, which grows larger with increasing hydrophobic mismatch. The energetic analysis of the channel-bilayer coupling is usually pursued assuming that each subunit, as well as the subunit-subunit interface, is rigid. Here we relax the latter assumption and explore how the bilayer junction responds to changes in this disjoining force using a simple one-dimensional energetic model, which reproduces key features of the bilayer regulation of gramicidin channel lifetimes.

  7. Bus-based park-and-ride system: a stochastic model on multimodal network with congestion pricing schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Meng, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on modelling the network flow equilibrium problem on a multimodal transport network with bus-based park-and-ride (P&R) system and congestion pricing charges. The multimodal network has three travel modes: auto mode, transit mode and P&R mode. A continuously distributed value-of-time is assumed to convert toll charges and transit fares to time unit, and the users' route choice behaviour is assumed to follow the probit-based stochastic user equilibrium principle with elastic demand. These two assumptions have caused randomness to the users' generalised travel times on the multimodal network. A comprehensive network framework is first defined for the flow equilibrium problem with consideration of interactions between auto flows and transit (bus) flows. Then, a fixed-point model with unique solution is proposed for the equilibrium flows, which can be solved by a convergent cost averaging method. Finally, the proposed methodology is tested by a network example.

  8. Effects of elastic focusing on global models of Rayleigh wave attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xueyang; Dalton, Colleen A.; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2016-11-01

    Rayleigh wave amplitudes are the primary data set used for imaging shear attenuation in the upper mantle on a global scale. In addition to attenuation, surface-wave amplitudes are influenced by excitation at the earthquake source, focusing and scattering by elastic heterogeneity, and local structure at the receiver and the instrument response. The challenge of isolating the signal of attenuation from these other effects limits both the resolution of global attenuation models and the level of consistency between different global attenuation studies. While the source and receiver terms can be estimated using relatively simple approaches, focusing effects on amplitude are a large component of the amplitude signal and are sensitive to multiscale velocity anomalies. In this study we investigate how different theoretical treatments for focusing effects on Rayleigh wave amplitude influence the retrieved attenuation models. A new data set of fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude at periods of 50 and 100 sis analysed. The amplitudes due to focusing effects are predicted using the great-circle ray approximation (GCRA), exact ray theory (ERT), and finite-frequency theory (FFT). Phase-velocity maps expanded to spherical-harmonic degree 20 and degree 40 are used for the predictions. After correction for focusing effects, the amplitude data are inverted for global attenuation maps and frequency-dependent source and receiver correction factors. The degree-12 attenuation maps, based on different corrections for focusing effects, all contain the same large-scale features, though the magnitude of the attenuation variations depends on the focusing correction. The variance reduction of the amplitudes strongly depends on the predicted focusing amplitudes, with the highest variance reduction for the ray-based approaches at 50 s and for FFT at 100 s. Although failure to account for focusing effects introduces artefacts into the attenuation models at higher spherical

  9. An autocatalytic network model for stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, Marco Antonio Leonel; Yoneyama, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The stock prices of companies with businesses that are closely related within a specific sector of economy might exhibit movement patterns and correlations in their dynamics. The idea in this work is to use the concept of autocatalytic network to model such correlations and patterns in the trends exhibited by the expected returns. The trends are expressed in terms of positive or negative returns within each fixed time interval. The time series derived from these trends is then used to represent the movement patterns by a probabilistic boolean network with transitions modeled as an autocatalytic network. The proposed method might be of value in short term forecasting and identification of dependencies. The method is illustrated with a case study based on four stocks of companies in the field of natural resource and technology.

  10. Exact solutions for network rewiring models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    2007-03-01

    Evolving networks with a constant number of edges may be modelled using a rewiring process. These models are used to describe many real-world processes including the evolution of cultural artifacts such as family names, the evolution of gene variations, and the popularity of strategies in simple econophysics models such as the minority game. The model is closely related to Urn models used for glasses, quantum gravity and wealth distributions. The full mean field equation for the degree distribution is found and its exact solution and generating solution are given.

  11. A Conewise Linear Elasticity mixture model for the analysis of tension-compression nonlinearity in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Soltz, M A; Ateshian, G A

    2000-12-01

    A biphasic mixture model is developed that can account for the observed tension-compression nonlinearity of cartilage by employing the continuum-based Conewise Linear Elasticity (CLE) model of Curnier et al. (J. Elasticity, 37, 1-38, 1995) to describe the solid phase of the mixture. In this first investigation, the orthotropic octantwise linear elasticity model was reduced to the more specialized case of cubic symmetry, to reduce the number of elastic constants from twelve to four. Confined and unconfined compression stress-relaxation, and torsional shear testing were performed on each of nine bovine humeral head articular cartilage cylindrical plugs from 6 month old calves. Using the CLE model with cubic symmetry, the aggregate modulus in compression and axial permeability were obtained from confined compression (H-A = 0.64 +/- 0.22 MPa, k2 = 3.62 +/- 0.97 x 10(-16) m4/N.s, r2 = 0.95 +/- 0.03), the tensile modulus, compressive Poisson ratio, and radial permeability were obtained from unconfined compression (E+Y = 12.75 +/- 1.56 MPa, v- = 0.03 +/- 0.01, kr = 6.06 +/- 2.10 x 10(-16) m4/N.s, r2 = 0.99 +/- 0.00), and the shear modulus was obtained from torsional shear (mu = 0.17 +/- 0.06 MPa). The model was also employed to predict the interstitial fluid pressure successfully at the center of the cartilage plug in unconfined compression (r2 = 0.98 +/- 0.01). The results of this study demonstrate that the integration of the CLE model with the biphasic mixture theory can provide a model of cartilage that can successfully curve-fit three distinct testing configurations while producing material parameters consistent with previous reports in the literature. PMID:11192377

  12. Coseismic Subsidence in the 1700 Great Cascadia Earthquake: Coastal Geological Estimates Versus the Predictions of Elastic Dislocation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, L. J.; Hyndman, R. D.; Mazzotti, S.

    2002-12-01

    Coastal estuaries from N. California to central Vancouver Island preserve evidence of the subsidence that has occurred in Holocene megathrust earthquakes at the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ). Seismic hazard assessments in Cascadia are primarily based on the rupture area of 3-D dislocation models constrained by geodetic data. It is important to test the model by comparing predicted coseismic subsidence with that estimated in coastal marsh studies. Coseismic subsidence causes the burial of soils that are preserved as peat layers in the tidal-marsh stratigraphy. The most recent (1700) event is commonly marked by a peat layer overlain by intertidal mud, often with an intervening sand layer inferred as a tsunami deposit. Estimates of the amount of coseismic subsidence are made using two methods. (1) Contrasts in lithology, macrofossil content, and microfossil assemblages allow elevation changes to be deduced via modern marsh calibrations. (2) Measurements of the subsurface depth of the buried soil, corrected for eustatic sea level rise and interseismic uplift (assessed using a geodetically-constrained elastic dislocation model), provide independent estimates. Further corrections may include postglacial rebound and local tectonics. An elastic dislocation model is used to predict the expected coseismic subsidence, for a magnitude 9 earthquake (assuming 16 m uniform rupture), at the locations of geological subsidence estimates for the 1700 event. From preliminary comparisons, the correlation is remarkably good, corroborating the dislocation model rupture. The model produces a similar N-S trend of coastal subsidence, and for parts of the margin, e.g. N. Oregon and S. Washington, subsidence of similar magnitude (+/- ~ 0.25 m). A significant discrepancy (up to ~ 1.0 m) exists elsewhere, e.g. N. California, S. Oregon, and central Vancouver Island. The discrepancy may arise from measurement uncertainty, uncertainty in the elastic model, the assumption of elastic rather than

  13. The influences of geometric shape of cross section on equilibrium configuration of DNA in elastic rod model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing

    2015-11-15

    The equilibrium configuration equations of DNA chain with elastic rod model are derived in detail by the variation of the free energy functional, which depends on the curvature, torsion, twisting angle and its derivative with respect to the arc-length of central axis curve of rod. With the different shapes of rod, we obtain the equilibrium equations of DNA with circular and noncircular cross sections, which provide an approach to describe the physical behaviors of A-, B-, Z-DNA. The results show that the elastic rod model with circular cross section can accurately characterize the equilibrium configurations of A-, B-DNA, while the model with elliptical cross sections is more suitable for Z-DNA.

  14. A Model of Mental State Transition Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Hua; Jiang, Peilin; Xiao, Shuang; Ren, Fuji; Kuroiwa, Shingo

    Emotion is one of the most essential and basic attributes of human intelligence. Current AI (Artificial Intelligence) research is concentrating on physical components of emotion, rarely is it carried out from the view of psychology directly(1). Study on the model of artificial psychology is the first step in the development of human-computer interaction. As affective computing remains unpredictable, creating a reasonable mental model becomes the primary task for building a hybrid system. A pragmatic mental model is also the fundament of some key topics such as recognition and synthesis of emotions. In this paper a Mental State Transition Network Model(2) is proposed to detect human emotions. By a series of psychological experiments, we present a new way to predict coming human's emotions depending on the various current emotional states under various stimuli. Besides, people in different genders and characters are taken into consideration in our investigation. According to the psychological experiments data derived from 200 questionnaires, a Mental State Transition Network Model for describing the transitions in distribution among the emotions and relationships between internal mental situations and external are concluded. Further more the coefficients of the mental transition network model were achieved. Comparing seven relative evaluating experiments, an average precision rate of 0.843 is achieved using a set of samples for the proposed model.

  15. SUSTAIN: A Network Model of Category Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Bradley C.; Medin, Douglas L.; Gureckis, Todd M.

    2004-01-01

    SUSTAIN (Supervised and Unsupervised STratified Adaptive Incremental Network) is a model of how humans learn categories from examples. SUSTAIN initially assumes a simple category structure. If simple solutions prove inadequate and SUSTAIN is confronted with a surprising event (e.g., it is told that a bat is a mammal instead of a bird), SUSTAIN…

  16. Psychometric Measurement Models and Artificial Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sese, Albert; Palmer, Alfonso L.; Montano, Juan J.

    2004-01-01

    The study of measurement models in psychometrics by means of dimensionality reduction techniques such as Principal Components Analysis (PCA) is a very common practice. In recent times, an upsurge of interest in the study of artificial neural networks apt to computing a principal component extraction has been observed. Despite this interest, the…

  17. Neural Network Model of Memory Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Recanatesi, Stefano; Katkov, Mikhail; Romani, Sandro; Tsodyks, Misha

    2015-01-01

    Human memory can store large amount of information. Nevertheless, recalling is often a challenging task. In a classical free recall paradigm, where participants are asked to repeat a briefly presented list of words, people make mistakes for lists as short as 5 words. We present a model for memory retrieval based on a Hopfield neural network where transition between items are determined by similarities in their long-term memory representations. Meanfield analysis of the model reveals stable states of the network corresponding (1) to single memory representations and (2) intersection between memory representations. We show that osc