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Sample records for elastic wavefields computed

  1. Visualization of elastic wavefields computed with a finite difference code

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, S.; Harris, D.

    1994-11-15

    The authors have developed a finite difference elastic propagation model to simulate seismic wave propagation through geophysically complex regions. To facilitate debugging and to assist seismologists in interpreting the seismograms generated by the code, they have developed an X Windows interface that permits viewing of successive temporal snapshots of the (2D) wavefield as they are calculated. The authors present a brief video displaying the generation of seismic waves by an explosive source on a continent, which propagate to the edge of the continent then convert to two types of acoustic waves. This sample calculation was part of an effort to study the potential of offshore hydroacoustic systems to monitor seismic events occurring onshore.

  2. Elastic wavefield migration and tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yuting

    Wavefield migration and tomography are well-developed under the acoustic assumption; however, multicomponent recorded seismic data include shear waves (S-modes) in addition to the compressional waves (P-modes). Constructing multicomponent wavefields and considering multiparameter model properties make it possible to utilize information provided by various wave modes, and this information allows for better characterization of the subsurface. In my thesis, I apply popular wavefield imaging and tomography to elastic media, and propose methods to address challenges posed by elastic multicomponent wavefields and multiparameter models. The key novelty of my research consists of new elastic imaging conditions, which generate elastic images with improved qualities and clear physical meaning. Moreover, I demonstrate an elastic wavefield tomography method to obtain realistic elastic models which benefits elastic migration. Migration techniques, including conventional RTM, extended RTM, and least-squares RTM (LSRTM), provide images of subsurface structures. I propose one imaging condition that computes potential images (PP, PS, SP, and SS). This imaging condition exploits pure P- and S-modes obtained by Helmholtz decomposition and corrects for the polarity reversal in PS and SP images. Using this imaging condition, I propose methods for conventional RTM and extended RTM. The extended imaging condition makes it possible to compute angle gathers for converted waves. The amplitudes of the scalar images indicate reflectivities, which can be used for amplitude verse offset (AVO) analysis; however, this imaging condition requires knowledge of the geologic dip. I propose a second imaging condition that computes perturbation images, i.e., P and S velocity perturbations. Because these images correspond to perturbations to material properties that are angle-independent, they do not have polarity reversals; therefore, they do not need dip information for polarity correction. I use this

  3. Modeling and Processing of Continuous 3D Elastic Wavefield Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milkereit, B.; Bohlen, T.

    2001-12-01

    Continuous seismic wavefields are excited by earthquake clustering, induced seismicity in reservoirs, and mining. In hydrocarbon reservoirs, for example, pore pressure changes and fluid flow (mass transfer) will cause incremental deviatoric stresses sufficient to trigger and sustain seismic activity. Here we address three aspects of seismic wavefields in three-dimensional heterogeneous media triggered by distributed sources in space and time: forward modeling, multichannel data processing, and source location imaging. A power law distribution of seismic sources (such as the Gutenberg-Richter law) is used for the modeling of viscoelastic/elastic wave propagation through a realistic earth model. 3D modeling provides new insight in the interaction of multi-source wavefields and the role of scale-dependend elastic model parameters on transmitted and reflected/back-scattered wavefields. There exists a strong correlation between the spatial properties of the compressional, shear wave and density perturbations and the lateral correlation length of the resulting reflected or transmitted seismic wavefields. Modeling is based on the implementation of 3D elastic/viscoelastic FD codes on massive parallel and/or distributed computing resources using MPI (message passing interface). For parallelization, large grid 3D earth models are decomposed into subvolume processing elements whereby each processing element is updating the wavefield within its portion of the grid. Processing of continuous seismic wavefields excited by multiple distributed sources is based on a combination of crosscorrelated or slowness-transformed array data and Kirchhoff or reverse time migration for source location or source volume imaging. The appearance of slowness in both migration and array data processing suggests the possibility of combining them into a single process. In order to place further constraints on the migration, the directivity properties of 3-component receiver arrays can be included in

  4. ELASTIC-WAVEFIELD SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY: A NEW SEISMIC IMAGING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Bob A. Hardage

    2004-05-06

    The focus of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy research shifted from onshore prospects to marine environments during this report period. Four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4-C OBC) seismic data acquired in water depths of 2400 to 2500 feet across Green Canyon Block 237 in the Gulf of Mexico were processed and analyzed. The P-P and P-SV images of strata immediately below the seafloor exhibit amazing differences in P-P and P-SV seismic facies. These data may be one of the classic examples of the basic concepts of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy.

  5. Elastic-Wavefield Seismic Stratigraphy: A New Seismic Imaging Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bob A. Hardage; Milo M. Backus; Michael V. DeAngelo; Sergey Fomel; Khaled Fouad; Robert J. Graebner; Paul E. Murray; Randy Remington; Diana Sava

    2006-07-31

    The purpose of our research has been to develop and demonstrate a seismic technology that will provide the oil and gas industry a better methodology for understanding reservoir and seal architectures and for improving interpretations of hydrocarbon systems. Our research goal was to expand the valuable science of seismic stratigraphy beyond the constraints of compressional (P-P) seismic data by using all modes (P-P, P-SV, SH-SH, SV-SV, SV-P) of a seismic elastic wavefield to define depositional sequences and facies. Our objective was to demonstrate that one or more modes of an elastic wavefield may image stratal surfaces across some stratigraphic intervals that are not seen by companion wave modes and thus provide different, but equally valid, information regarding depositional sequences and sedimentary facies within that interval. We use the term elastic wavefield stratigraphy to describe the methodology we use to integrate seismic sequences and seismic facies from all modes of an elastic wavefield into a seismic interpretation. We interpreted both onshore and marine multicomponent seismic surveys to select the data examples that we use to document the principles of elastic wavefield stratigraphy. We have also used examples from published papers that illustrate some concepts better than did the multicomponent seismic data that were available for our analysis. In each interpretation study, we used rock physics modeling to explain how and why certain geological conditions caused differences in P and S reflectivities that resulted in P-wave seismic sequences and facies being different from depth-equivalent S-wave sequences and facies across the targets we studied.

  6. Elastic modeling and steep dips: unraveling the reflected wavefield

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelting, C. J.; Gherasim, M.; House, L. S.; Marfurt, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a larger elastic numerical modeling project, we have been investigating how energy reflected from steeply dipping interfaces is recorded using typical multicomponent acquisition geometries. Specifically, we have been interpreting how rcflection events from the flanks of salt dome structures are distributed on 3C and 4C phones for vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) and ocean bottom seismic (OBS) or land surface surveys. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to improve the structural imaging of steeply dipping interfaces and eventually to evaluate the usc of the recorded elastic wavefield for fluid description near these interfaces. In the current work, we focus on a common assumption used when processing converted wave reflection seismic data that most PP energy is recorded on the vertical geophone and/or the hydrophone and that most PS energy is recorded on the horizontal geophones. This is a useful assumption when it is valid, because it eliminates the need for separation of the recorded wavefield into P and S wavetypes. Using two elastic models and different acquisition geometries, we examine the validity of this assumption in the presence of steeply dipping interfaces and discuss the implications for converted-wave and vector imaging of salt flanks.

  7. Elastic-Wavefield Seismic Stratigraphy: A New Seismic Imaging Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bob A. Hardage

    2005-07-31

    We have developed a numerical technique that will adjust 3-D S-wave seismic images so that they are depth equivalent to 3-D P-wave seismic images. The ability to make this type of P-SV to P-P depth registration is critical to our elastic wavefield seismic stratigraphy research because we now have higher confidence that depth-equivalent data windows are being used in the P-SV to P-P comparisons that we are making.

  8. The shallow elastic structure of the lunar crust: New insights from seismic wavefield gradient analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollberger, David; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Nakamura, Yosio; Khan, Amir

    2016-10-01

    Enigmatic lunar seismograms recorded during the Apollo 17 mission in 1972 have so far precluded the identification of shear-wave arrivals and hence the construction of a comprehensive elastic model of the shallow lunar subsurface. Here, for the first time, we extract shear-wave information from the Apollo active seismic data using a novel waveform analysis technique based on spatial seismic wavefield gradients. The star-like recording geometry of the active seismic experiment lends itself surprisingly well to compute spatial wavefield gradients and rotational ground motion as a function of time. These observables, which are new to seismic exploration in general, allowed us to identify shear waves in the complex lunar seismograms, and to derive a new model of seismic compressional and shear-wave velocities in the shallow lunar crust, critical to understand its lithology and constitution, and its impact on other geophysical investigations of the Moon's deep interior.

  9. Wavefield separation and polarity reversal correction in elastic reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ma, Xiaona; Fu, Chao; Liang, Guanghe

    2016-04-01

    In elastic reverse time migration (RTM), one of the problems that are often encountered is the cross-talk between P- and S-wavefields. A useful processing technique to reduce the cross-talk is separating the P- and S-wavefields by using divergence and curl operators before applying an elastic imaging condition. However, the separated wavefields lose their physical meaning because their phase and amplitude are changed. In this paper, we modify the divergence and curl operators to give the separated wavefields a clear physical meaning: the separated wavefield is the first derivative of the input wavefield with respect to time. Another problem often encountered is polarity reversals in PS and SP images, which can cause destructive interference in the final stacked image and thus destroy the migrated events. In this paper we also develop a procedure for polarity reversal correction based on the polarization vectors of the P- and S-wavefields in the common-shot domain. The correction factor is first calculated at every imaging point during the wavefield reconstruction and is then multiplied by the PS and SP images at each time step when an elastic imaging condition is applied. Numerical examples with synthetic data have shown that the modified wavefield separation method is correct, and the procedure of polarity reversal correction is effective for a complex model.

  10. Anisotropic Fracture Zone Imaging with Wavefield-Separated Elastic Reverse-Time Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, K.; Huang, L.

    2016-12-01

    Fracture detection and characterization is crucial for many applications such as oil/gas and geothermal energy exploration and monitoring for enhanced geothermal systems and potential CO2 leakage through fault zones. However, it is challenging to accurately image fracture zones because medium properties in fracture zones are usually highly heterogeneous and anisotropic, resulting in complex wavefields. The imaging problem can be even more challenging when the surrounding rocks are also anisotropic. We develop an anisotropic elastic reverse-time migration (AERTM) method based on implicit directional wavefield separation imaging condition and explicit qP-qS wavefield separation for high-resolution imaging of fracture zones. The implicit directional wavefield separation imaging condition is adopted to image steeply-dipping faults and to efficiently eliminate low-wavenumber image artifacts. The qP-qS wavefield separation can improve the imaging quality by separating the total elastic wavefield into qP- and qS-wavefield components in strongly anisotropic media where the conventional isotropic P-S wavefield separation fails. The combination of aforementioned two types of wavefield separation enables us to obtain high-resolution images of fracture zones. We use synthetic and field data examples to valid our new AERTM method, and demonstrate that our method can improve the imaging quality in complex, anisotropic fracture zones.

  11. An iterative method for 2D inverse scattering problems by alternating reconstruction of medium properties and wavefields: theory and application to the inversion of elastic waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuti, G.; Gisolf, A.

    2017-03-01

    We study a reconstruction algorithm for the general inverse scattering problem based on the estimate of not only medium properties, as in more conventional approaches, but also wavefields propagating inside the computational domain. This extended set of unknowns is justified as a way to prevent local minimum stagnation, which is a common issue for standard methods. At each iteration of the algorithm, (i) the model parameters are obtained by solution of a convex problem, formulated from a special bilinear relationship of the data with respect to properties and wavefields (where the wavefield is kept fixed), and (ii) a better estimate of the wavefield is calculated, based on the previously reconstructed properties. The resulting scheme is computationally convenient since step (i) can greatly benefit from parallelization and the wavefield update (ii) requires modeling only in the known background model, which can be sped up considerably by factorization-based direct methods. The inversion method is successfully tested on synthetic elastic datasets.

  12. Localized time-lapse elastic waveform inversion using wavefield injection and extrapolation: 2-D parametric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shihao; Fuji, Nobuaki; Singh, Satish; Borisov, Dmitry

    2017-06-01

    We present a methodology to invert seismic data for a localized area by combining source-side wavefield injection and receiver-side extrapolation method. Despite the high resolving power of seismic full waveform inversion, the computational cost for practical scale elastic or viscoelastic waveform inversion remains a heavy burden. This can be much more severe for time-lapse surveys, which require real-time seismic imaging on a daily or weekly basis. Besides, changes of the structure during time-lapse surveys are likely to occur in a small area rather than the whole region of seismic experiments, such as oil and gas reservoir or CO2 injection wells. We thus propose an approach that allows to image effectively and quantitatively the localized structure changes far deep from both source and receiver arrays. In our method, we perform both forward and back propagation only inside the target region. First, we look for the equivalent source expression enclosing the region of interest by using the wavefield injection method. Second, we extrapolate wavefield from physical receivers located near the Earth's surface or on the ocean bottom to an array of virtual receivers in the subsurface by using correlation-type representation theorem. In this study, we present various 2-D elastic numerical examples of the proposed method and quantitatively evaluate errors in obtained models, in comparison to those of conventional full-model inversions. The results show that the proposed localized waveform inversion is not only efficient and robust but also accurate even under the existence of errors in both initial models and observed data.

  13. Converted-waves Imaging Condition for Elastic Reverse-Time Migration with Decomposed Wavefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Choi, H.; Seol, S. J.; Byun, J.

    2015-12-01

    To successfully deal with responses from the elastic earth, imaging techniques need to incorporate the elastic wave equation. Elastic Reverse-Time Migration (ERTM) with separating-while-imaging approach is capable of yielding physically meaningful PP, PS, SP, and SS images from multicomponent data. Even in PP images, ERTM has brought enhancements comparing to those from acoustic RTM because ERTM can handle converted waves. Converted-wave images, core results of ERTM, however, have two major problems related to characteristics of S-waves. First, polarity reversals according to propagation directions of S-waves cause destructive effect to final PS and SP images while each migrated result is stacked over the shots. In addition, non-existent spurious events which are produced by crosscorrelating downgoing S-waves in source wavefields and reflections associated with downgoing P-waves in receiver wavefields lead masking effects over true reflection events in SP and SS images. In this study, we adopt a wavefield decomposition method to solve the polarity problems and derive a new converted-wave imaging condition for SP and SS images to alleviate the generation of spurious events. The acceleration vector wavefield decomposition method used in our ERTM has advantages over the conventional wavefield separation method based on the Helmholtz decomposition because the wavefield decomposition can automatically compensate polarity changes in PS and SP images when the zero-lag crosscorrelation for vector wavefields is applied. To suppress spurious events in SP and SS images, our imaging condition is designed to make images only where S- and converted P-waves from source wavefields are coexisted with decomposed wavefields from receiver wavefields at reflection boundaries. To verify our new imaging condition, we tested our algorithm with OBC (Ocean Bottom Cable) data from elastic Marmousi-II model and compared the migrated images with those from ERTM with the zero

  14. Implementation of elastic reverse-time migration using wavefield separation in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Wookeen; Pyun, Sukjoon; Bae, Ho Seuk; Shin, Changsoo; Marfurt, Kurt J.

    2012-06-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to the migration of multicomponent data in elastic media with wavefield separation techniques being the most successful. Most of this work has been carried out in the time domain. In this paper, we formulate a multicomponent migration technique in the frequency domain. Reverse-time migration can be viewed as the zero-lag cross-correlation between virtual source and back-propagated wavefields. Cross-correlating the Helmholtz decomposed wavefields rather than directly correlating the vector displacement fields results in sharper, more interpretable images, contaminated by fewer crosstalk artefacts. The end products are separate P and S wave (and if desired, PS and SP) migration images. We test our migration algorithm on synthetic seismic data generated using the SEG/EAGE salt-dome, Overthrust and Marmousi-2 models. We correctly image the location and shape of the target zone for oil exploration using these data sets. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our new migration technique provides good images even when the initial velocity model is only approximate.

  15. Source Stacking for Numerical Wavefield Computations - Application to Global Scale Seismic Mantle Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, L. S.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wavefield computations using the Spectral Element Method are now regularly used to recover tomographic images of the upper mantle and crust at the local, regional, and global scales (e.g. Fichtner et al., GJI, 2009; Tape et al., Science 2010; Lekic and Romanowicz, GJI, 2011; French and Romanowicz, GJI, 2014). However, the heaviness of the computations remains a challenge, and contributes to limiting the resolution of the produced images. Using source stacking, as suggested by Capdeville et al. (GJI,2005), can considerably speed up the process by reducing the wavefield computations to only one per each set of N sources. This method was demonstrated through synthetic tests on low frequency datasets, and therefore should work for global mantle tomography. However, the large amplitudes of surface waves dominates the stacked seismograms and these cases can no longer be separated by windowing in the time domain. We have developed a processing approach that helps address this issue and demonstrate its usefulness through a series of synthetic tests performed at long periods (T >60 s) on toy upper mantle models. The summed synthetics are computed using the CSEM code (Capdeville et al., 2002). As for the inverse part of the procedure, we use a quasi-Newton method, computing Frechet derivatives and Hessian using normal mode perturbation theory.

  16. The scattering potential of partial derivative wavefields in 3-D elastic orthorhombic media: an inversion prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ju-Won; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2016-09-01

    Multiparameter full waveform inversion (FWI) applied to an elastic orthorhombic model description of the subsurface requires in theory a nine-parameter representation of each pixel of the model. Even with optimal acquisition on the Earth surface that includes large offsets, full azimuth, and multicomponent sensors, the potential for trade-off between the elastic orthorhombic parameters are large. The first step to understanding such trade-off is analysing the scattering potential of each parameter, and specifically, its scattering radiation patterns. We investigate such radiation patterns for diffraction and for scattering from a horizontal reflector considering a background isotropic model. The radiation patterns show considerable potential for trade-off between the parameters and the potentially limited resolution in their recovery. The radiation patterns of C11, C22, and C33 are well separated so that we expect to recover these parameters with limited trade-offs. However, the resolution of their recovery represented by recovered range of model wavenumbers varies between these parameters. We can only invert for the short wavelength components (reflection) of C33 while we can mainly invert for the long wavelength components (transmission) of the elastic coefficients C11 and C22 if we have large enough offsets. The elastic coefficients C13, C23, and C12 suffer from strong trade-offs with C55, C44, and C66, respectively. The trade-offs between C13 and C55, as well as C23 and C44, can be partially mitigated if we acquire P-SV and SV-SV waves. However, to reduce the trade-offs between C12 and C66, we require credible SH-SH waves. The analytical radiation patterns of the elastic constants are supported by numerical gradients of these parameters.

  17. EXPLORING FOR SUBTLE MISSION CANYON STRATIGRAPHIC TRAPS WITH ELASTIC WAVEFIELD SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    John Beecherl

    2004-02-01

    The 9C3D seismic data that will form the principal data base needed for this research program have been successfully acquired. The seismic field data exhibit a good signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio for all elastic-wave modes. Thus the major hurdle of acquiring optimal-quality 9-C seismic data has been cleared. The stratigraphic oil-reservoir target that will be the imaging objective of the seismic data-processing effort is described in this report to indicate the challenge that now confronts the data-processing phase of the project.

  18. Regional seismic wavefield computation on a 3-D heterogeneous Earth model by means of coupled traveling wave synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2002-01-01

    I present a new algorithm for calculating seismic wave propagation through a three-dimensional heterogeneous medium using the framework of mode coupling theory originally developed to perform very low frequency (f < ???0.01-0.05 Hz) seismic wavefield computation. It is a Greens function approach for multiple scattering within a defined volume and employs a truncated traveling wave basis set using the locked mode approximation. Interactions between incident and scattered wavefields are prescribed by mode coupling theory and account for the coupling among surface waves, body waves, and evanescent waves. The described algorithm is, in principle, applicable to global and regional wave propagation problems, but I focus on higher frequency (typically f ??????0.25 Hz) applications at regional and local distances where the locked mode approximation is best utilized and which involve wavefields strongly shaped by propagation through a highly heterogeneous crust. Synthetic examples are shown for P-SV-wave propagation through a semi-ellipsoidal basin and SH-wave propagation through a fault zone.

  19. Anisotropic Shear Velocity Models of the North American Upper Mantle Based on Waveform Inversion and Numerical Wavefield Computations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earthscope TA deployment across the continental United-State (US) has reached its eastern part, providing the opportunity for high-resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere across the entire north-American continent (NA). Previously (Yuan et al., 2014), we presented a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave (Vs) model of North America (NA) lithospheric mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. Regional wavefield computations were performed numerically, using a regional Spectral Element code (RegSEM, Cupillard et al., 2012), while teleseismic computations were performed approximately, using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). For both datasets, the inversion was performed iteratively, using a Gauss-Newton scheme, with kernels computed using either NACT or the surface wave, path average approximation (PAVA), depending on the source-station distance. We here present a new radially anisotropic lithospheric/asthenospheric model of Vs for NA based entirely on SEM-based numerical waveforms from an augmented dataset of 155 regional events and 70 teleseismic events. The forward wavefield computations are performed using RegSEM down to 40s, starting from our most recent whole mantle 3D radially anisotropic Vs model (SEMUCB-wm1, French and Romanowicz, 2014). To model teleseismic wavefields within our regional computational domain, we developed a new modeling technique which allows us to replace a distant source by virtual sources at the boundary of the computational domain (Masson et al., 2014). Computing virtual sources requires one global simulation per teleseismic events.We then compare two models obtained: one using NACT/PAVA kernels as in our previous work, and another using hybrid kernels, where the Hessian is computed using NACT/PAVA, but the gradient is computed numerically from the adjoint wavefield, providing more accurate kernels

  20. Elastic modes and their computation

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, G.W.

    1995-04-01

    In this note we summarize the theory of modes in stratified elastic media, and we discuss some of the considerations necessary to achieve reliable numerical computations. We also point out the consequences of the fact that the corresponding eigenvalue problem is not selfadjoint. 14 refs.

  1. Reconstruction of a 2D seismic wavefield by seismic gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-12-01

    We reconstructed a 2D seismic wavefield and obtained its propagation properties by using the seismic gradiometry method together with dense observations of the Hi-net seismograph network in Japan. The seismic gradiometry method estimates the wave amplitude and its spatial derivative coefficients at any location from a discrete station record by using a Taylor series approximation. From the spatial derivatives in horizontal directions, the properties of a propagating wave packet, including the arrival direction, slowness, geometrical spreading, and radiation pattern can be obtained. In addition, by using spatial derivatives together with free-surface boundary conditions, the 2D vector elastic wavefield can be decomposed into divergence and rotation components. First, as a feasibility test, we performed an analysis with a synthetic seismogram dataset computed by a numerical simulation for a realistic 3D medium and the actual Hi-net station layout. We confirmed that the wave amplitude and its spatial derivatives were very well-reproduced for period bands longer than 25 s. Applications to a real large earthquake showed that the amplitude and phase of the wavefield were well reconstructed, along with slowness vector. The slowness of the reconstructed wavefield showed a clear contrast between body and surface waves and regional non-great-circle-path wave propagation, possibly owing to scattering. Slowness vectors together with divergence and rotation decomposition are expected to be useful for determining constituents of observed wavefields in inhomogeneous media.

  2. A General-applications Direct Global Matrix Algorithm for Rapid Seismo-acoustic Wavefield Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, H.; Tango, G. J.; Werby, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    A new matrix method for rapid wave propagation modeling in generalized stratified media, which has recently been applied to numerical simulations in diverse areas of underwater acoustics, solid earth seismology, and nondestructive ultrasonic scattering is explained and illustrated. A portion of recent efforts jointly undertaken at NATOSACLANT and NORDA Numerical Modeling groups in developing, implementing, and testing a new fast general-applications wave propagation algorithm, SAFARI, formulated at SACLANT is summarized. The present general-applications SAFARI program uses a Direct Global Matrix Approach to multilayer Green's function calculation. A rapid and unconditionally stable solution is readily obtained via simple Gaussian ellimination on the resulting sparsely banded block system, precisely analogous to that arising in the Finite Element Method. The resulting gains in accuracy and computational speed allow consideration of much larger multilayered air/ocean/Earth/engineering material media models, for many more source-receiver configurations than previously possible. The validity and versatility of the SAFARI-DGM method is demonstrated by reviewing three practical examples of engineering interest, drawn from ocean acoustics, engineering seismology and ultrasonic scattering.

  3. Wavefield Compression for Full-Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas; de la Puente, Josep; Hanzich, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    We present compression techniques tailored to iterative nonlinear minimization methods that significantly reduce the memory requirements to store the forward wavefield for the computation of sensitivity kernels. Full-waveform inversion on 3d data sets requires massive computing and memory capabilities. Adjoint techniques offer a powerful tool to compute the first and second derivatives. However, due to the asynchronous nature of forward and adjoint simulations, a severe bottleneck is introduced by the necessity to access both wavefields simultaneously when computing sensitivity kernels. There exist two opposing strategies to deal with this challenge. On the one hand, conventional approaches save the whole forward wavefield to the disk, which yields a significant I/O overhead and might require several terabytes of storage capacity per seismic event. On the other hand, checkpointing techniques allow to trade an almost arbitrary amount of memory requirements for a - potentially large - number of additional forward simulations. We propose an alternative approach that strikes a balance between memory requirements and the need for additional computations. Here, we aim at compressing the forward wavefield in such a way that (1) the I/O overhead is reduced substantially without the need for additional simulations, (2) the costs for compressing/decompressing the wavefield are negligible, and (3) the approximate derivatives resulting from the compressed forward wavefield do not affect the rate of convergence of a Newton-type minimization method. To this end, we apply an adaptive re-quantization of the displacement field that uses dynamically adjusted floating-point accuracies - i.e., a locally varying number of bits - to store the data. Furthermore, the spectral element functions are adaptively downsampled to a lower polynomial degree. In addition, a sliding-window cubic spline re-interpolates the temporal snapshots to recover a smooth signal. Moreover, a preprocessing step

  4. Going to high frequency for full waveform inversion of teleseismic wavefields based upon a SEM-DSM hybrid method and massive High-Performance Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Monteiller, Vadim; Chevrot, Sébastien; Wang, Yi; Durochat, Clément

    2015-04-01

    We present a method for high-resolution imaging of lithospheric structures based on full waveform inversion of teleseismic wavefields. We model the propagation of seismic waves using our recently developed Direct Solution Method (DSM) / Spectral-Element Method (SEM) hybrid technique, which allows us to simulate the propagation of short period teleseismic waves through a regional 3-D model. We implement an iterative quasi-Newton method based upon the L-BFGS algorithm, with a gradient of the misfit function computed with the adjoint-state method. Compared to gradient or conjugate-gradient methods, the L-BFGS algorithm finds solutions that better explain the observed waveforms, and at a much faster convergence rate. We illustrate the potential of this method on a synthetic test case that consists in a crustal model with a crustal discontinuity at 25 km depth and a sharp Moho jump. This simple model contains short and long wavelength heterogeneities along both the lateral and vertical dimensions. In order to do that successfully we resort to high-performance computing on supercomputing clusters using an improved version of our SPECFEM3D open-source software package, which exhibits excellent scalability on parallel machines.

  5. Enhanced damage characterization using wavefield imaging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackshire, James L.

    2017-02-01

    Wavefield imaging methods are becoming a popular tool for characterizing and studying elastic field interactions in a wide variety of material systems. By using a scanning laser vibrometry detection system, the transient displacement fields generated by an ultrasonic source can be visualized and studied in detail. As a tool for quantitative nondestructive evaluation, the visualization of elastic waves provides a unique opportunity for understanding the scattering of elastic waves from insipient damage, where the detection and characterization of damage features using ultrasound can be enhanced in many instances. In the present effort, the detection and direct imaging of fatigue cracks in metals, and delaminations in composites, is described. An examination of the transient displacement fields near the scattering sites show additional details related to the local damage morphology, which can be difficult to account for using traditional far-field NDE sensing methods. A combination of forward models and experimental wavefield imaging methods were used to explore enhancement opportunities for the full 3-dimensional characterization of surface-breaking cracks and delaminations.

  6. Prestack elastic generalized-screen migration for multicomponent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Yeop; Seol, Soon Jee; Lee, Ho-Young; Byun, Joongmoo

    2016-03-01

    An efficient prestack depth migration method based on the elastic one-way wave equation was developed using an improved elastic generalized-screen propagator, which effectively describes the behavior of elastic waves with mode conversion at the interfaces and efficiently computes wave propagation in media with lateral velocity variations. The elastic propagator presented in this study was improved from the elastic generalized-screen propagator. Several terms of the vertical slowness right symbol with orders are corrected from the original formulation, and the vertical slowness operator in the propagator was expanded up to the 2nd order which yields a more accurate approximation. In each screen propagation step, the multicomponent wavefields are automatically separated into the P and S wavefields by the P-S decomposition operator included in the elastic generalized-screen propagator. This process facilitates the imaging of the P and S waves separately without any additional P and S separation process after the wavefield extrapolation. Impulse response tests of the improved elastic generalized-screen propagator in a uniform-property medium proved that propagation accuracy increases with order, even when large medium perturbations are assigned. Migration tests using the developed algorithm on a simple layered model and two complex models (the SEG/EAGE salt and elastic Marmousi-2 model) demonstrated the functional advantages and capabilities of the algorithm compared with elastic migration using the scalar wave equation.

  7. Guided wavefield reconstruction from sparse measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesnil, Olivier; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    Guided wave measurements are at the basis of several Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) techniques. Although sparse measurements of guided wave obtained using piezoelectric sensors can efficiently detect and locate defects, extensive informa-tion on the shape and subsurface location of defects can be extracted from full-field measurements acquired by Laser Doppler Vibrometers (LDV). Wavefield acquisition from LDVs is generally a slow operation due to the fact that the wave propagation to record must be repeated for each point measurement and the initial conditions must be reached between each measurement. In this research, a Sparse Wavefield Reconstruction (SWR) process using Compressed Sensing is developed. The goal of this technique is to reduce the number of point measurements needed to apply NDE techniques by at least one order of magnitude by extrapolating the knowledge of a few randomly chosen measured pixels over an over-sampled grid. To achieve this, the Lamb wave propagation equation is used to formulate a basis of shape functions in which the wavefield has a sparse representation, in order to comply with the Compressed Sensing requirements and use l1-minimization solvers. The main assumption of this reconstruction process is that every material point of the studied area is a potential source. The Compressed Sensing matrix is defined as being the contribution that would have been received at a measurement location from each possible source, using the dispersion relations of the specimen computed using a Semi-Analytical Finite Element technique. The measurements are then processed through an l1-minimizer to find a minimum corresponding to the set of active sources and their corresponding excitation functions. This minimum represents the best combination of the parameters of the model matching the sparse measurements. Wavefields are then reconstructed using the propagation equation. The set of active sources found by minimization contains all the wave

  8. Pseudo-spectral reverse time migration based on wavefield decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zengli; Liu, Jianjun; Xu, Feng; Li, Yongzhang

    2017-02-01

    The accuracy of seismic numerical simulations and the effectiveness of imaging conditions are important in reverse time migration studies. Using the pseudo-spectral method, the precision of the calculated spatial derivative of the seismic wavefield can be improved, increasing the vertical resolution of images. Low-frequency background noise, generated by the zero-lag cross-correlation of mismatched forward-propagated and backward-propagated wavefields at the impedance interfaces, can be eliminated effectively by using the imaging condition based on the wavefield decomposition technique. The computation complexity can be reduced when imaging is performed in the frequency domain. Since the Fourier transformation in the z-axis may be derived directly as one of the intermediate results of the spatial derivative calculation, the computation load of the wavefield decomposition can be reduced, improving the computation efficiency of imaging. Comparison of the results for a pulse response in a constant-velocity medium indicates that, compared with the finite difference method, the peak frequency of the Ricker wavelet can be increased by 10-15 Hz for avoiding spatial numerical dispersion, when the second-order spatial derivative of the seismic wavefield is obtained using the pseudo-spectral method. The results for the SEG/EAGE and Sigsbee2b models show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the profile and the imaging quality of the boundaries of the salt dome migrated using the pseudo-spectral method are better than those obtained using the finite difference method.

  9. Pseudospectral reverse time migration based on wavefield decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zengli; Liu, Jianjun; Xu, Feng; Li, Yongzhang

    2017-05-01

    The accuracy of seismic numerical simulations and the effectiveness of imaging conditions are important in reverse time migration studies. Using the pseudospectral method, the precision of the calculated spatial derivative of the seismic wavefield can be improved, increasing the vertical resolution of images. Low-frequency background noise, generated by the zero-lag cross-correlation of mismatched forward-propagated and backward-propagated wavefields at the impedance interfaces, can be eliminated effectively by using the imaging condition based on the wavefield decomposition technique. The computation complexity can be reduced when imaging is performed in the frequency domain. Since the Fourier transformation in the z-axis may be derived directly as one of the intermediate results of the spatial derivative calculation, the computation load of the wavefield decomposition can be reduced, improving the computation efficiency of imaging. Comparison of the results for a pulse response in a constant-velocity medium indicates that, compared with the finite difference method, the peak frequency of the Ricker wavelet can be increased by 10-15 Hz for avoiding spatial numerical dispersion, when the second-order spatial derivative of the seismic wavefield is obtained using the pseudospectral method. The results for the SEG/EAGE and Sigsbee2b models show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the profile and the imaging quality of the boundaries of the salt dome migrated using the pseudospectral method are better than those obtained using the finite difference method.

  10. Explicit Fourier wavefield operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, R. J.; Margrave, G. F.

    2006-04-01

    Explicit wavefield extrapolators are based on direct analytic mathematical formulae that express the output as an extrapolation operator acting on the input, while implicit methods usually require the calculation of the numerical inverse of a matrix to obtain the output. Typically, explicit methods are faster than implicit methods, and they often give more insight into the physics of the wave propagation, but they often suffer from instability. Four different explicit extrapolators based on Fourier theory are presented and analysed. They are: PS (ordinary phase shift), GPSPI (generalized phase shift plus interpolation), NSPS (non-stationary phase shift) and SNPS (symmetric non-stationary phase shift). A formal proof is given that NSPS in a direction orthogonal to the velocity gradient is the mathematical adjoint process to GPSPI in the opposite direction. This motivates the construction of SNPS that combines NSPS and GPSPI in a symmetric fashion. This symmetry (under interchange of input and output lateral coordinates) is required by reciprocity arguments. PS and SNPS are symmetric while NSPS and GPSPI are not. A numerical stability study using SVD (singular value decomposition) shows that all of these extrapolators can become unstable for strong lateral velocity gradients. Unstable operators allow amplitudes to grow non-physically in a recursion. Stability is enhanced by introducing a small (~3 per cent) imaginary component to the velocities. This causes a numerical attenuation that tends to stabilize the operators but does not address the cause of the instability. For the velocity model studied (a very challenging case) GPSPI and NSPS have exactly the same instability while SNPS is always more stable. Instability manifests in a complicated way as a function of extrapolation step size, frequency, velocity gradient, and strength of numerical attenuation. The SNPS operator can be stabilized over a wide range of conditions with considerably less attenuation than is

  11. Full wave-field reflection coefficient inversion.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    This paper develops a Bayesian inversion for recovering multilayer geoacoustic (velocity, density, attenuation) profiles from a full wave-field (spherical-wave) seabed reflection response. The reflection data originate from acoustic time series windowed for a single bottom interaction, which are processed to yield reflection coefficient data as a function of frequency and angle. Replica data for inversion are computed using a wave number-integration model to calculate the full complex acoustic pressure field, which is processed to produce a commensurate seabed response function. To address the high computational cost of calculating short range acoustic fields, the inversion algorithms are parallelized and frequency averaging is replaced by range averaging in the forward model. The posterior probability density is interpreted in terms of optimal parameter estimates, marginal distributions, and credibility intervals. Inversion results for the full wave-field seabed response are compared to those obtained using plane-wave reflection coefficients. A realistic synthetic study indicates that the plane-wave assumption can fail, producing erroneous results with misleading uncertainty bounds, whereas excellent results are obtained with the full-wave reflection inversion.

  12. Simplified computational methods for elastic and elastic-plastic fracture problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, Satya N.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is given of some of the recent (1984-1991) developments in computational/analytical methods in the mechanics of fractures. Topics covered include analytical solutions for elliptical or circular cracks embedded in isotropic or transversely isotropic solids, with crack faces being subjected to arbitrary tractions; finite element or boundary element alternating methods for two or three dimensional crack problems; a 'direct stiffness' method for stiffened panels with flexible fasteners and with multiple cracks; multiple site damage near a row of fastener holes; an analysis of cracks with bonded repair patches; methods for the generation of weight functions for two and three dimensional crack problems; and domain-integral methods for elastic-plastic or inelastic crack mechanics.

  13. Simplified computational methods for elastic and elastic-plastic fracture problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, Satya N.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is given of some of the recent (1984-1991) developments in computational/analytical methods in the mechanics of fractures. Topics covered include analytical solutions for elliptical or circular cracks embedded in isotropic or transversely isotropic solids, with crack faces being subjected to arbitrary tractions; finite element or boundary element alternating methods for two or three dimensional crack problems; a 'direct stiffness' method for stiffened panels with flexible fasteners and with multiple cracks; multiple site damage near a row of fastener holes; an analysis of cracks with bonded repair patches; methods for the generation of weight functions for two and three dimensional crack problems; and domain-integral methods for elastic-plastic or inelastic crack mechanics.

  14. Lossy Wavefield Compression for Full-Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, C.; Fichtner, A.; de la Puente, J.; Hanzich, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present lossy compression techniques, tailored to the inexact computation of sensitivity kernels, that significantly reduce the memory requirements of adjoint-based minimization schemes. Adjoint methods are a powerful tool to solve tomography problems in full-waveform inversion (FWI). Yet they face the challenge of massive memory requirements caused by the opposite directions of forward and adjoint simulations and the necessity to access both wavefields simultaneously during the computation of the sensitivity kernel. Thus, storage, I/O operations, and memory bandwidth become key topics in FWI. In this talk, we present strategies for the temporal and spatial compression of the forward wavefield. This comprises re-interpolation with coarse time steps and an adaptive polynomial degree of the spectral element shape functions. In addition, we predict the projection errors on a hierarchy of grids and re-quantize the residuals with an adaptive floating-point accuracy to improve the approximation. Furthermore, we use the first arrivals of adjoint waves to identify "shadow zones" that do not contribute to the sensitivity kernel at all. Updating and storing the wavefield within these shadow zones is skipped, which reduces memory requirements and computational costs at the same time. Compared to check-pointing, our approach has only a negligible computational overhead, utilizing the fact that a sufficiently accurate sensitivity kernel does not require a fully resolved forward wavefield. Furthermore, we use adaptive compression thresholds during the FWI iterations to ensure convergence. Numerical experiments on the reservoir scale and for the Western Mediterranean prove the high potential of this approach with an effective compression factor of 500-1000. Furthermore, it is computationally cheap and easy to integrate in both, finite-differences and finite-element wave propagation codes.

  15. Computational Model of Three Dimensional Elastic Wing Driven by Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. Jane; Cowen, Nathaniel; Peskin, Charles S.; Childress, Stephen W.

    2003-11-01

    The flapping wing motion observed in nature results from couplings of muscles, flexible wing structures, and unsteady flows. Previously we have studied the unsteady flows and forces of a rigid two dimensional wing undergoing prescribed motion similar to kinematics observed in insects, as a means of understanding basic unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms. In this talk, we describe our recent progress in constructing a more realistic model insect, which consists of a pair of elastic wings immersed in fluids, and is driven by periodically contracting 'muscles'. A natural computational framework for such a system is the immersed boundary method, which is used here. We present simulations of flapping flight at Reynolds number 10^2, in the same range as that of fruitflies and butterflies.

  16. Performance of parallel computation using CUDA for solving the one-dimensional elasticity equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmawan, J. B. B.; Mungkasi, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of parallel computation in solving the one-dimensional elasticity equations. Elasticity equations are usually implemented in engineering science. Solving these equations fast and efficiently is desired. Therefore, we propose the use of parallel computation. Our parallel computation uses CUDA of the NVIDIA. Our research results show that parallel computation using CUDA has a great advantage and is powerful when the computation is of large scale.

  17. Generation, Diffraction and Radiation of Subsonic Flexural Waves on Membranes and Plates: Observations of Structural and Acoustical Wavefields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matula, Thomas John

    Electromagnetic acoustic wave transducers (EMATs) are described for generating low-frequency tone bursts on metalized membranes in air and elastic plates in water. Bursts on the membrane have phase velocities much less than the speed of sound in the surrounding air and are accompanied by plane evanescent waves. The frequency and time-domain responses of the EMAT and the dependence on gap spacing between the coupling coil and the membrane were studied. Wave -number selective optical and capacitive probes were used to measure the wave properties. Versions of these transducers are insensitive to long wavelength motion of the membrane. Diffraction of the burst by a sharp edge in air was observed as a function of the gap between the membrane and a razor edge. The scattered pressure decreases exponentially with increasing gap as expected from an approximate analysis of edge diffraction of evanescent waves. In related work an EMAT is used to generate 28 kHz tone bursts of bending waves on an aluminum plate. The bursts propagate down into water where the surrounding wavefield is probed. Observations described indicate that there occurs a branching of energy as the wave crosses the air-water interface. Radiation from subsonic flexural plate waves due to the discontinuity in fluid -loading is observed. It is partially analogous to the transition radiation of fast charged particles crossing a dielectric interface. The angular radiation pattern resembles that of a line quadrupole. Near the interface there exists an interference between the two energy branches in water that produces a series of pressure nulls. The pressure nulls are associated with a pi phase change in the wavefield and are indicators of wavefront dislocations. A computation of the wavefield in an unbounded fluid due to a line-moment excitation of a plate is comparable with the null pattern observed but differs in certain details.

  18. Passive Imaging in Nondiffuse Acoustic Wavefields

    SciTech Connect

    Mulargia, Francesco; Castellaro, Silvia

    2008-05-30

    A main property of diffuse acoustic wavefields is that, taken any two points, each of them can be seen as the source of waves and the other as the recording station. This property is shown to follow simply from array azimuthal selectivity and Huygens principle in a locally isotropic wavefield. Without time reversal, this property holds approximately also in anisotropic azimuthally uniform wavefields, implying much looser constraints for undistorted passive imaging than those required by a diffuse field. A notable example is the seismic noise field, which is generally nondiffuse, but is found to be compatible with a finite aperture anisotropic uniform wavefield. The theoretical predictions were confirmed by an experiment on seismic noise in the mainland of Venice, Italy.

  19. Local wavefield velocity imaging for damage evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Chen Ciang; Gan, Chia Sheng; Mustapha, F.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic Propagation Imaging or Acoustic Wavefield Imaging has been widely used to evaluate structural damages and internal features. Inspecting complete wavefield time history for damage identification is tedious and error-prone. A more effective way is by extracting damage-related information into a single image. A wavefield velocity imaging method that maps the local estimates of group or phase velocity is proposed. Actual velocity values rather than arbitrarily-scaled intensities are mapped, enabling damage sizing without the need of supervised training or inspecting wavefield propagation video. Performance of the proposed method was tested by inspecting a 100 mm by 100 mm area of a 2 mm thick stainless steel specimen. Local phase velocity maps of A0 mode showed a half-thickness hole of 2 mm diameter as significant change in local phase velocity from the nominal 2 m/ms. Full width at half maximum of relevant velocity profiles proved the accuracy and consistency of the damage sizing.

  20. Lithospheric imaging from teleseismic data by frequency-domain elastic full-waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pageot, D.; Operto, S.; Vallée, M.; Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.; Seiscope

    2010-12-01

    Teleseismic data recorded by dense multicomponent surveys are potentially amenable to multichannel processing such as full waveform inversion to develop high-resolution lithospheric models. In this study, 2D frequency-domain full waveform tomography (FWT) is tailored to suit teleseismic geometries. Frequency-domain FWT seeks to estimate the elastic properties of the Earth by minimizing a misfit function between recorded and modeled full wavefields. FWT is designed to invert few discrete frequencies by proceeding hierarchically from the low frequencies to the higher ones, following a multiscale approach useful to mitigate the inversion nonlinearity. In teleseismic framework, seismic sources are planar incident wavefields impinging the base of the lithosphere with arbitrary incidence and obliquity angles. The full wavefield is computed using a scattered-field formulation in the frequency domain. First, an analytical wavefield is computed in a homogeneous background model with free surface on the topside for an incident compressional plane wave. Then, a scattering source is formed by the product of the analytical planewave with the difference of the forward problem operators associated with the homogeneous background and lithospheric models. The scattered wavefield is then computed by performing a simulation in the lithospheric model using the scattering source, and, finally, the full wavefield is built by summation of the analytical wavefield and of the scattered wavefield. The 2D P-SV wave modeling is performed with a finite element discontinuous Galerkin method allowing for unstructured triangular meshes. Teleseismic experiments are characterized by a narrow illumination of aperture angles because of the limited number of planewave sources related to the teleseismic earthquake distribution. This narrow aperture bandwith requires the use of finely-sampled frequencies to prevent spatial aliasing in the reconstructed FWT models. Moreover, planewave propagation from

  1. Wavefield tomography in three dimensions: application to field data in the absence of a realistic starting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Michael; Shah, Nikhil; Guasch, Lluís.; Umpleby, Adrian; Stekl, Ivan; Morgan, Joanna

    2010-05-01

    Wavefield tomography (AKA full waveform inversion) is a method of inverting geophysical field data that seeks to find a quantitative model of physical properties in the subsurface that can be used to generate synthetic data that match field data "wiggle-for-wiggle". It is most often applied to active-source seismic data, but it can also be applied to passive seismic data and to controlled-source electro-magnetic data. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution and fidelity than can be achieved using conventional imaging methods. The first practical methods were developed in 2D, mostly in the frequency domain. Here we report recent algorithmic developments which, coupled with hardware advances, make these methods tractable in three dimensions. We have implemented finite-difference computer codes for 3D acoustic and elastic wavefield tomography by explicit time-stepping in the time-domain, and for visco-acoustic tomography by iterative solution of the implicit matrix equations in the frequency-domain. Unlike the situation in two dimensions, where frequency-domain methods have proven to be far more efficient, in three dimensions both methods require approximately similar computational resource, and have largely complementary properties in terms of their effectiveness. We have applied these methods to a variety of synthetic and real-world problems taken from petroleum, mining and academic field datasets with a variety of 3D acquisition geometries and target depths. These include conventional marine multi-streamer acquisition, multi-azimuth marine OBC, high-resolution land surveys, and deep-ocean single-streamer acquisition. In each case, wavefield tomography was able to obtain a high-resolution high-fidelity velocity model of the heterogeneous overburden, and consequently to improve subsequent depth imaging of an underlying target. One of the serious practical limitations on the wider applicability of wavefield tomography is the necessity to have low

  2. Efficient full waveform inversion using the excitation representation of the source wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Mahesh; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2017-09-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is an iterative method of data-fitting, aiming at high-resolution recovery of the unknown model parameters. However, its conventional implementation is a cumbersome process, requiring a long computational time and large memory space/disk storage. One of the reasons for this computational limitation is the gradient calculation step. Based on the adjoint state method, it involves the temporal cross-correlation of the forward propagated source wavefield with the backward propagated residuals, in which we usually need to store the source wavefield, or include an extra extrapolation step to propagate the source wavefield from its storage at the boundary. We propose, alternatively, an amplitude excitation gradient calculation based on the excitation imaging condition concept that represents the source wavefield history by a single, specifically the most energetic arrival. An excitation based Born modelling allows us to derive the adjoint operation. In this case, the source wavelet is injected by a cross-correlation step applied to the data residual directly. Representing the source wavefield through the excitation amplitude and time, we reduce the large requirements for both storage and the computational time. We demonstrate the application of this approach on a two-layer model with an anomaly, the Marmousi II model and a marine data set acquired by CGG.

  3. Computation of graphene elastic moduli at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zubko, I. Yu. Kochurov, V. I.

    2015-10-27

    Finding the values of parameters for the simplest Mie’s family potentials is performed in order to estimate elastic moduli of graphene monolayers using lattice statics approach. The coincidence criterion of the experimentally determined Poisson’s ratio with the estimated value is taken in order to select dimensionless power parameters of the Mie-type potential. It allowed obtaining more precise estimation of elastic properties in comparison with variety of other potentials for carbon atoms in graphene monolayer.

  4. Imaging and characterization of a subhorizontal non-welded interface from point source elastic scattering response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Shohei; Ghose, Ranajit

    2014-05-01

    The inverse scattering of seismic waves can reveal the spatial distribution of the elastic compliances along a non-welded interface, such as a fracture surface. The spatial heterogeneity along the surface of a fracture is a key determinant for fracture-associated hydraulic properties. In this paper, we demonstrate that the inverse scattering solution can be successfully applied to the point source response of a subhorizontal fracture. In the scale of seismic exploration, it is more appropriate to consider spherical waves from a point source than plane waves. Further, from only the P-wave point source response it is possible to estimate both normal and tangential fracture compliances. The synthetic seismic wavefield due to a P-wave point source in a 2-D elastic medium was computed using a time-domain finite difference approach. On this spherical wave data set, the correct estimation of the position and dip of the non-welded interface was possible through reverse-time migration followed by least-square fitting of the maximum amplitude of the P-P reflection. In order to estimate the heterogeneity along the non-welded interface, we first extract the elastic wavefield at the interface position. The extrapolated wavefield is then rotated such that the horizontal axis aligns along the fracture plane. Next, using this extrapolated and rotated wavefield, we solve the linear-slip boundary condition to obtain the distribution of normal and tangential compliances. Our result shows that the estimates of normal compliance are very accurate around the dominant frequency of the incident seismic wavefield. At lower frequencies, the estimated compliance distribution is less accurate and rather smooth due to the presence of evanescent waves. Extracting the distribution of the tangential compliance requires a larger stabilization factor. For a correct estimation of the tangential compliance, one needs S-wave sources or multiple sources providing more grazing angles to avoid the shadow

  5. Computing elastic moduli on 3-D X-ray computed tomography image stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garboczi, E. J.; Kushch, V. I.

    2015-03-01

    A numerical task of current interest is to compute the effective elastic properties of a random composite material by operating on a 3D digital image of its microstructure obtained via X-ray computed tomography (CT). The 3-D image is usually sub-sampled since an X-ray CT image is typically of order 10003 voxels or larger, which is considered to be a very large finite element problem. Two main questions for the validity of any such study are then: can the sub-sample size be made sufficiently large to capture enough of the important details of the random microstructure so that the computed moduli can be thought of as accurate, and what boundary conditions should be chosen for these sub-samples? This paper contributes to the answer of both questions by studying a simulated X-ray CT cylindrical microstructure with three phases, cut from a random model system with known elastic properties. A new hybrid numerical method is introduced, which makes use of finite element solutions coupled with exact solutions for elastic moduli of square arrays of parallel cylindrical fibers. The new method allows, in principle, all of the microstructural data to be used when the X-ray CT image is in the form of a cylinder, which is often the case. Appendix A describes a similar algorithm for spherical sub-samples, which may be of use when examining the mechanical properties of particles. Cubic sub-samples are also taken from this simulated X-ray CT structure to investigate the effect of two different kinds of boundary conditions: forced periodic and fixed displacements. It is found that using forced periodic displacements on the non-geometrically periodic cubic sub-samples always gave more accurate results than using fixed displacements, although with about the same precision. The larger the cubic sub-sample, the more accurate and precise was the elastic computation, and using the complete cylindrical sample with the new method gave still more accurate and precise results. Fortran 90

  6. The seismic noise wavefield is not diffuse.

    PubMed

    Mulargia, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    Passive seismology is burgeoning under the apparent theoretical support of diffuse acoustics. However, basic physical arguments suggest that this theory may not be applicable to seismic noise. A procedure is developed to establish the applicability of the diffuse field paradigm to a wavefield, based on testing the latter for azimuthal isotropy and spatial homogeneity. This procedure is then applied to the seismic noise recorded at 65 sites covering a wide variety of environmental and subsoil conditions. Considering the instantaneous oscillation vector measured at single triaxial stations, the hypothesis of azimuthal isotropy is rejected in all cases with high confidence, which makes the spatial homogeneity test unnecessary and leads directly to conclude that the seismic noise wavefield is not diffuse. However, such a conclusion has no practical effect on passive imaging, which is also possible in non-diffuse wavefields.

  7. Computation of vibration mode elastic-rigid and effective weight coefficients from finite-element computer program output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1991-01-01

    Post-processing algorithms are given to compute the vibratory elastic-rigid coupling matrices and the modal contributions to the rigid-body mass matrices and to the effective modal inertias and masses. Recomputation of the elastic-rigid coupling matrices for a change in origin is also described. A computational example is included. The algorithms can all be executed by using standard finite-element program eigenvalue analysis output with no changes to existing code or source programs.

  8. Wavefield tomography using image-warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Francesco

    strength of the perturbation in the wavefields and in the model. In order to remove these assumptions, I use the insight gained about the relationship between the orientation of the structural features in the image and the warping vector field to design an optimization problem that does not involve any up-front linearization of the propagation operator. Using adjoint-state techniques, I was able to compute the gradient of the objective function and thus implement a two-way wavefield tomography scheme. The basic building block of my tomography algorithm is the measure of the apparent displacement between two nearby shot gathers along the normal direction to the imaged reflector. Because no stacking of partial images is needed to obtain the measure of velocity error, my approach is intrinsically shot-based. This feature of the error measure and inversion scheme allows one to reconstruct errors in the migration velocity from a minimum number of experiments. I show how this approach can reconstruct, using a single experiment, the anomaly in a hydrocarbon reservoir that undergoes depletion because of production. The measure of local apparent displacements with penalized local correlations proves to be effective in scenarios where the geometry of the reflectors is simple and the orientation of the structural features can be unambiguously computed. Moreover, penalized local correlations are particularly sensitive to the shot distance for shallow interfaces and may suffer from crosstalk due to other reflectors falling in the same correlation window. Following these considerations and using the relationship between image difference and image-warping, I show that image-warping can be used to modify the expression of the adjoint sources for standard differential semblance optimization to make the method robust against cycle skipping in the image domain even with strong errors in the velocity model.

  9. Feasibility study of complex wavefield retrieval in off-axis acoustic holography employing an acousto-optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Guillermo López; Weber, Joshua; Sandhu, Jaswinder Singh; Anastasio, Mark A

    2011-12-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new method for complex-valued wavefield retrieval in off-axis acoustic holography. The method involves use of an intensity-sensitive acousto-optic (AO) sensor, optimized for use at 3.3 MHz, to record the acoustic hologram and a computational method for reconstruction of the object wavefield. The proposed method may circumvent limitations of conventional implementations of acoustic holography and may facilitate the development of acoustic-holography-based biomedical imaging methods.

  10. Parallel computations using a cluster of workstations to simulate elasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmawan, J. B. B.; Mungkasi, S.

    2016-11-01

    Computational physics has played important roles in real world problems. This paper is within the applied computational physics area. The aim of this study is to observe the performance of parallel computations using a cluster of workstations (COW) to simulate elasticity problems. Parallel computations with the COW configuration are conducted using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. In parallel computations with COW, we consider five scenarios with twenty simulations. In addition to the execution time, efficiency is used to evaluate programming algorithm scenarios. Sequential and parallel programming performances are evaluated based on their execution time and efficiency. Results show that the one-dimensional elasticity equations are not appropriate to be solved in parallel with MPI_Send and MPI_Recv technique in the MPI standard, because the total amount of time to exchange data is considered more dominant compared with the total amount of time to conduct the basic elasticity computation.

  11. Inter-station coda wavefield studies using a novel icequake database on Erebus volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, J. A.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.; Aster, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent theoretical advances pertaining to the properties of multiply scattered wavefields have yielded a plethora of numerical and controlled source studies aiming to better understand what information may be derived from these otherwise chaotic signals. Practically, multiply scattered wavefields are difficult to compare to numerically derived models due to a combination of source paucity/directionality and array density limitations, particularly in passive seismology scenarios. Furthermore, in situations where data quantities are abundant, such as for ambient noise correlations, it remains very difficult to recover pseudo-Green's function symmetry in the ballistic components of the wavefield, let alone in the coda of the correlations. In this study, we use a large network of short period and broadband instruments on Erebus volcano to show that actual Green's function recovery is indeed possible in some cases. We make use of a large database of small impulsive icequakes distributed randomly on the summit plateau and, using fundamental theoretical properties of equipartitioned wavefields and interstation icequake coda correlations, are able to directly derive notoriously difficult quantities such as the bulk elastic mean free path for the volcano, demonstrations of correlation coda symmetry and its dependence on the number of icequakes used, and a theoretically predicted coherent backscattering amplification factor associated with weak localization. We furthermore show that stable equipartition and H^2/V^2 ratios may be consistently observed for icequake coda, and we perform simple depth inversions of these frequency dependent quantities to compare with known structures.

  12. Computer Simulation of the Elastic Properties of Titanium Alloys for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez, Elsa Paz; Burganova, R. M.; Lysogorskii, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    Results of a computer simulation of the elastic properties of α+β- and β-titanium alloys, used for medical purposes, within the framework of the molecular-dynamics method are presented. It is shown that β-titanium alloys are best suited for the use as bone implants because of their small moduli of elasticity. The advisability of the use of the molecular-dynamics method for the study of the elastic properties of titanium alloys, serving as bone implants, is demonstrated.

  13. Elastic properties of graphene obtained by computational mechanical tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Markus A.; Todt, Melanie; Rammerstorfer, Franz G.; Fischer, Franz D.; Paris, Oskar

    2013-09-01

    The basic building block of many carbon nanostructures like fullerenes, carbon onions or nanotubes is the truly two-dimensional material graphene. Commercial finite element codes, widely used to predict the mechanical properties of these structures, rely on the knowledge of the mechanical properties of the basic material. In this paper using an atomistic simulation approach we determine the membrane and bending stiffness of graphene, as well as the corresponding effective parameters: the effective elastic modulus E=2.4\\ \\text{TPa} , Poisson ratio \

  14. Reconstruction of 2D seismic wavefield from Long-Period Seismogram and Short-Period Seismogram Envelope by Seismic Gradiometry applied to the Hi-net Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-04-01

    The high-sensitive seismograph network (Hi-net) operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) has about 800 stations with average separation of 20 km all over the Japanese archipelago. Although it is equipped with short-period seismometers, we also can observe long-period seismic wave up to 100 s in periods for significantly large earthquakes. In this case, we may treat long-period seismic waves as a 2D wavefield with station separations shorter than wavelength rather than individual traces at stations. In this study, we attempt to reconstruct 2D wavefield and obtain its propagation properties from seismic gradiometry (SG) method. The SG estimates the wave amplitude and its spatial derivative coefficients from discrete station record by the Taylor series approximation with an inverse problem. By using spatial derivatives in horizontal directions, we can obtain properties of propagating wave packet such as the arrival direction, slowness, geometrical spreading and radiation pattern. In addition, by using spatial derivatives together with free-surface boundary condition, we may decompose the vector elastic 2D wavefield estimated by the SG into divergence and rotation components. First, we applied the seismic gradiometry to a synthetic long-period (20-50 s) seismogram dataset computed by numerical simulation in realistic 3D medium at the Hi-net station layout as a feasibility test. We confirmed that the wave amplitude and its spatial derivatives are very well reproduced with average correlation coefficients higher than 0.99 in this period range. Applications to a real large earthquakes show that the amplitude and phase of the wavefield are well reconstructed with additional information of arrival direction and its slowness. The reconstructed wavefield contained a clear contrast in slowness between body and surface waves, regional non-great-circle-path wave propagation which may be attributed to scattering. Slowness

  15. Modeling scattering from azimuthally symmetric bathymetric features using wavefield superposition.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, John A

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, an approach for modeling the scattering from azimuthally symmetric bathymetric features is described. These features are useful models for small mounds and indentations on the seafloor at high frequencies and seamounts, shoals, and basins at low frequencies. A bathymetric feature can be considered as a compact closed region, with the same sound speed and density as one of the surrounding media. Using this approach, a number of numerical methods appropriate for a partially buried target or facet problem can be applied. This paper considers the use of wavefield superposition and because of the azimuthal symmetry, the three-dimensional solution to the scattering problem can be expressed as a Fourier sum of solutions to a set of two-dimensional scattering problems. In the case where the surrounding two half spaces have only a density contrast, a semianalytic coupled mode solution is derived. This provides a benchmark solution to scattering from a class of penetrable hemispherical bosses or indentations. The details and problems of the numerical implementation of the wavefield superposition method are described. Example computations using the method for a simple scattering feature on a seabed are presented for a wide band of frequencies.

  16. Ultrasonic wavefield imaging: Research tool or emerging NDE method?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic wavefield imaging refers to acquiring full waveform data over a region of interest for waves generated by a stationary source. Although various implementations of wavefield imaging have existed for many years, the widespread availability of laser Doppler vibrometers that can acquire signals in the high kHz and low MHz range has resulted in a rapid expansion of fundamental research utilizing full wavefield data. In addition, inspection methods based upon wavefield imaging have been proposed for standalone nondestructive evaluation (NDE) with most of these methods coming from the structural health monitoring (SHM) community and based upon guided waves. If transducers are already embedded in or mounted on the structure as part of an SHM system, then a wavefield-based inspection can potentially take place with very little required disassembly. A frequently-proposed paradigm for wavefield NDE is its application as a follow-up inspection method using embedded SHM transducers as guided wave sources if the in situ SHM system generates an alarm. Discussed here is the broad role of wavefield imaging as it relates to ultrasonic NDE, both as a research tool and as an emerging NDE method. Examples of current research are presented based upon both guided and bulk wavefield imaging in metals and composites, drawing primarily from the author's work. Progress towards wavefield NDE is discussed in the context of defect detection and characterization capabilities, scan times, data quality, and required data analysis. Recent research efforts are summarized that can potentially enable wavefield NDE.

  17. Composite Characterization Using Ultrasonic Wavefield Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Juarez, Peter D.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    The large-scale use of composite components in aerospace applications is expected to continue due to the benefits of composite materials, such as reduced weight, increased strength, and tailorability. NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP) has the goals of reducing the timeline for certification of composite materials and enabling the expanded use of advanced composite materials. A key technical challenge area for accomplishing these goals is the need for nondestructive evaluation and materials characterization techniques that are optimized for rapid inspection and detailed defect/damage characterization in composite materials. This presentation will discuss ongoing research investigating the use of ultrasonic wavefield techniques for the characterization of defects such as fiber waviness and delamination damage. Ongoing work includes the development of realistic ultrasonic simulation tools for use in predicting the inspectability of composites and optimizing inspection methodologies. Recent studies on detecting/characterizing delamination damage and fiber waviness via wavefield methods will be described.

  18. Computing the Dynamic Response of a Stratified Elastic Half Space Using Diffuse Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Perton, M.; Molina Villegas, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The analytical solution for the dynamic response of an elastic half-space for a normal point load at the free surface is due to Lamb (1904). For a tangential force, we have Chaós (1960) formulae. For an arbitrary load at any depth within a stratified elastic half space, the resulting elastic field can be given in the same fashion, by using an integral representation in the radial wavenumber domain. Typically, computations use discrete wave number (DWN) formalism and Fourier analysis allows for solution in space and time domain. Experimentally, these elastic Greeńs functions might be retrieved from ambient vibrations correlations when assuming a diffuse field. In fact, the field could not be totally diffuse and only parts of the Green's functions, associated to surface or body waves, are retrieved. In this communication, we explore the computation of Green functions for a layered media on top of a half-space using a set of equipartitioned elastic plane waves. Our formalism includes body and surface waves (Rayleigh and Love waves). These latter waves correspond to the classical representations in terms of normal modes in the asymptotic case of large separation distance between source and receiver. This approach allows computing Green's functions faster than DWN and separating the surface and body wave contributions in order to better represent Green's function experimentally retrieved.

  19. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  20. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-05

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme.

  1. ElAM: A computer program for the analysis and representation of anisotropic elastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmier, Arnaud; Lethbridge, Zoe A. D.; Walton, Richard I.; Smith, Christopher W.; Parker, Stephen C.; Evans, Kenneth E.

    2010-12-01

    The continuum theory of elasticity has been used for more than a century and has applications in many fields of science and engineering. It is very robust, well understood and mathematically elegant. In the isotropic case elastic properties are easily represented, but for non-isotropic materials, even in the simple cubic symmetry, it can be difficult to visualise how properties such as Young's modulus or Poisson's ratio vary with stress/strain orientation. The ElAM ( Elastic Anisotropy Measures) code carries out the required tensorial operations (inversion, rotation, diagonalisation) and creates 3D models of an elastic property's anisotropy. It can also produce 2D cuts in any given plane, compute averages following diverse schemes and query a database of elastic constants to support meta-analyses. Program summaryProgram title: ElAM1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEHB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 43 848 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 498 882 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran90 Computer: Any Operating system: Linux, Windows (XP, Vista) RAM: Depends chiefly on the size of the arrays representing elastic properties in 3D Classification: 7.7 Nature of problem: Representation of elastic moduli and ratios, and of wave velocities, in 3D; automatic discovery of unusual elastic properties. Solution method: Stiffness matrix (6×6) inversion and conversion to compliance tensor (3×3×3×3), tensor rotation, dynamic matrix diagonalisation, simple optimisation, postscript and VRML output preparation. Running time: Dependent on angular accuracy and size of elastic constant database (from a few seconds to a few hours). The tests provided take from a

  2. Elastic Cloud Computing Infrastructures in the Open Cirrus Testbed Implemented via Eucalyptus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baun, Christian; Kunze, Marcel

    Cloud computing realizes the advantages and overcomes some restrictionsof the grid computing paradigm. Elastic infrastructures can easily be createdand managed by cloud users. In order to accelerate the research ondata center management and cloud services the OpenCirrusTM researchtestbed has been started by HP, Intel and Yahoo!. Although commercialcloud offerings are proprietary, Open Source solutions exist in the field ofIaaS with Eucalyptus, PaaS with AppScale and at the applications layerwith Hadoop MapReduce. This paper examines the I/O performance ofcloud computing infrastructures implemented with Eucalyptus in contrastto Amazon S3.

  3. Accessing the diffracted wavefield by coherent subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Benjamin; Gajewski, Dirk

    2017-10-01

    Diffractions have unique properties which are still rarely exploited in common practice. Aside from containing subwavelength information on the scattering geometry or indicating small-scale structural complexity, they provide superior illumination compared to reflections. While diffraction occurs arguably on all scales and in most realistic media, the respective signatures typically have low amplitudes and are likely to be masked by more prominent wavefield components. It has been widely observed that automated stacking acts as a directional filter favouring the most coherent arrivals. In contrast to other works, which commonly aim at steering the summation operator towards fainter contributions, we utilize this directional selection to coherently approximate the most dominant arrivals and subtract them from the data. Supported by additional filter functions which can be derived from wave front attributes gained during the stacking procedure, this strategy allows for a fully data-driven recovery of faint diffractions and makes them accessible for further processing. A complex single-channel field data example recorded in the Aegean sea near Santorini illustrates that the diffracted background wavefield is surprisingly rich and despite the absence of a high channel count can still be detected and characterized, suggesting a variety of applications in industry and academia.

  4. Localized time-lapse elastic waveform inversion using wave-equation redatuming method: 2D parametric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, S.; Fuji, N.; Singh, S. C.; Borisov, D.

    2016-12-01

    We present a novel methodology to invert seismic data locally through the combination of wavefield injection and extrapolation method. Seismic full waveform inversion has proved its promising resolving power in seismology community for these decades. However, the computational cost for 3D practical scale elastic or viscoelastic waveform inversion remains still challenging. The computational cost is much more severe for time-lapse surveys, which requires real-time model estimation on a daily or weekly basis. Besides, changes of the structures during time-lapse surveys are likely to occur within a smaller area, such as oil and gas reservoir or CO2 injection wells. We propose methods that effectively and quantitatively image the localized structure change relatively far from source and receiver arrays. We thus have to perform both forward modeling and waveform inversions inside the region that contain neither source nor receiver. Firstly, we look for the equivalent source expression inside the region of interest by wavefield injection method. Secondly, we extrapolate wavefield from physical receivers to an array of virtual receivers by using correlation-type representation theorem. In this paper, we present elastic 2D numerical examples of our methods and quantitatively evaluate errors of obtained models, in comparison with those from full-model inversions. The results show that the proposed localized waveform inversion is more efficient, accurate and robust even under existence of errors in both initial models and data.

  5. Waveform Inversion of the Teleseismic Wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Levander, A.; Niu, F.

    2006-12-01

    The issue of seismic inversion/imaging can be generalized to find the velocity perturbation field that provides the best explanation for seismic data. Theoretically, migration is the first iteration in the inversion process, not the solution that minimizes the RMS error between observed and model-predicted wavefield. Waveform inversion, however, seeks to find the true perturbation field by directly solving the partial differential wave equations. When the wavefield is densely sampled, waveform inversion has been proven to be able to image sub-wavelength scale structure. Recent developments in passive seismic observations make it possible to apply imaging techniques developed for petroleum exploration, such as waveform tomography, to investigate crustal and mantle structures. We have been attempting to apply this technique to the teleseismic wavefield. Here we start with the relative simple 2D SH-wave case with reflection source-receiver geometry to target the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region. Many studies suggest that the lowermost several hundreds of kilometers of Earth's mantle, the D" layer is complicated and heterogeneous in terms of seismic structure. D" heterogeneities cover a wide range of scales that vary from a few kilometers to a few thousands of kilometers laterally and tenths to tens of percents in intensity. The D" layer also has very different 1D velocity structure. Different techniques have been used to study these very different structures. It is thus very interesting to see whether we can use teleseismic S and ScS waveforms to image these heterogeneities. The partial differential SH wave equation is parameterized in the discrete frequency-space domain. Inversion is performed iteratively to minimize the misfit between observed and model-predicted waveforms using a local descent algorithm. Iteration is employed at discrete frequencies, moving from low to high to mitigate the nonlinearity of the problem. The teleseismic wavefield is approximated by a

  6. A mechanical model to compute elastic modulus of tissues for harmonic motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Shan, Baoxiang; Pelegri, Assimina A; Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2008-07-19

    Numerous experimental and computational methods have been developed to estimate tissue elasticity. The existing testing techniques are generally classified into in vitro, invasive in vivo and non-invasive in vivo. For each experimental method, a computational scheme is accordingly proposed to calculate mechanical properties of soft biological tissues. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a new technique that performs radio frequency (RF) signal tracking to estimate the localized oscillatory motion resulting from a radiation force produced by focused ultrasound. A mechanical model and computational scheme based on the superposition principle are developed in this paper to estimate the Young's modulus of a tissue mimicking phantom and bovine liver in vitro tissue from the harmonic displacement measured by HMI. The simulation results are verified by two groups of measurement data, and good agreement is shown in each comparison. Furthermore, an inverse function is observed to correlate the elastic modulus of uniform phantoms with amplitude of displacement measured in HMI. The computational scheme is also implemented to estimate 3D elastic modulus of bovine liver in vitro.

  7. The Seismoacoustic Wavefield: A New Paradigm in Studying Geophysical Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrowsmith, Stephen J.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Drob, Douglas P.; Hedlin, Michael A. H.

    2010-12-01

    The field of seismoacoustics is emerging as an important discipline in its own right, owing to the value of colocated seismic and infrasound arrays that sample elastic energy propagating in both the solid Earth and the atmosphere. The fusion of seismic and infrasonic data provides unique constraints for studying a broad range of topics including the source physics of natural and man-made events, interaction of mechanical waves in Earth's crust and atmosphere, source location and characterization, and inversion of atmospheric and shallow subsurface properties. This review article traces the seismoacoustic wavefield from source to receiver. Beginning at the source, we review the latest insights into the physics of natural and anthropogenic sources that have arisen from the analysis of seismoacoustic data. Next, a comparative review of 3-D models of the atmosphere and solid Earth and the latest algorithms for modeling the propagation of mechanical waves through these media provides the framework for a discussion of the seismoacoustic path. The optimal measurement of seismic and acoustic waves, including a discussion of instrumentation, as well as of array configurations and regional networks, is then outlined. Finally, we focus on broad research applications where the analysis of seismoacoustic data is starting to yield important new results, such as in the field of nuclear explosion monitoring. This review is intended to provide a primer on the field of seismoacoustics for seismologists or acousticians, while also providing a more general review of what constraints seismoacoustics can uniquely provide for understanding geophysical phenomena.

  8. Computer program for investigating effects of nonlinear suspension-system elastic properties on parachute inflation loads and motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program is presented by which the effects of nonlinear suspension-system elastic characteristics on parachute inflation loads and motions can be investigated. A mathematical elastic model of suspension-system geometry is coupled to the planar equations of motion of a general vehicle and canopy. Canopy geometry and aerodynamic drag characteristics and suspension-system elastic properties are tabular inputs. The equations of motion are numerically integrated by use of an equivalent fifth-order Runge-Kutta technique.

  9. Computing elastic anisotropy to discover gum-metal-like structural alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, I. S.; de Jong, M.; Asta, M.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2017-08-01

    The computer aided discovery of structural alloys is a burgeoning but still challenging area of research. A primary challenge in the field is to identify computable screening parameters that embody key structural alloy properties. Here, an elastic anisotropy parameter that captures a material's susceptibility to solute solution strengthening is identified. The parameter has many applications in the discovery and optimization of structural materials. As a first example, the parameter is used to identify alloys that might display the super elasticity, super strength, and high ductility of the class of TiNb alloys known as gum metals. In addition, it is noted that the parameter can be used to screen candidate alloys for shape memory response, and potentially aid in the optimization of the mechanical properties of high-entropy alloys.

  10. Comparison of Predicted and Measured Wavefields for Model 5365 Hull Form

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-30

    Basin Model 5365 (R/ V Athena) was chosen by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) to be used to establish the current state of Computational Fluid...7 8 iii NSWCCD-50-TR-2005/061 FIGURES Figure 1. T he R / V A thena I...59 v NSWCCD-50-TR-2005/061 Figure 49: Predicted (NFA) normalized wavefield elevations (Z/L) compared with experiment, Fr = 0.43; zoomed

  11. Fast computation of high energy elastic collision scattering angle for electric propulsion plume simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Samuel J.

    2016-11-01

    In the plumes of Hall thrusters and ion thrusters, high energy ions experience elastic collisions with slow neutral atoms. These collisions involve a process of momentum exchange, altering the initial velocity vectors of the collision pair. In addition to the momentum exchange process, ions and atoms can exchange electrons, resulting in slow charge-exchange ions and fast atoms. In these simulations, it is particularly important to accurately perform computations of ion-atom elastic collisions in determining the plume current profile and assessing the integration of spacecraft components. The existing models are currently capable of accurate calculation but are not fast enough such that the calculation can be a bottleneck of plume simulations. This study investigates methods to accelerate an ion-atom elastic collision calculation that includes both momentum- and charge-exchange processes. The scattering angles are pre-computed through a classical approach with ab initio spin-orbit free potential and are stored in a two-dimensional array as functions of impact parameter and energy. When performing a collision calculation for an ion-atom pair, the scattering angle is computed by a table lookup and multiple linear interpolations, given the relative energy and randomly determined impact parameter. In order to further accelerate the calculations, the number of collision calculations is reduced by properly defining two cut-off cross-sections for the elastic scattering. In the MCC method, the target atom needs to be sampled; however, it is confirmed that initial target atom velocity does not play a significant role in typical electric propulsion plume simulations such that the sampling process is unnecessary. With these implementations, the computational run-time to perform a collision calculation is reduced significantly compared to previous methods, while retaining the accuracy of the high fidelity models.

  12. Inverse computational analysis of in vivo corneal elastic modulus change after collagen crosslinking for keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Sinha Roy, Abhijit; Rocha, Karol M.; Randleman, J. Bradley; Stulting, R. Doyle; Dupps, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Corneal collagen crosslinking with riboflavin photosensitization and ultraviolet irradiation is a novel approach to limiting the progression of keratoconus in patients by increasing the elastic modulus of the degenerate cornea. Beneficial reductions in corneal steepness and aberrations after crosslinking also frequently occur. In a previous study, we described a computational modeling approach to simulating topographic progression in keratoconus and regression of disease with corneal collagen crosslinking. In the current study, this model has been expanded and applied to the inverse problem of estimating longitudinal time-dependent changes in the corneal elastic modulus after crosslinking using in vivo measurements from 16 human eyes. Topography measured before crosslinking was used to construct a patient-specific finite element model with assumed hyperelastic properties. Then the properties of the cornea were altered using an inverse optimization method to minimize the difference between the model-predicted and in vivo corneal shape after crosslinking. Effects of assumptions regarding sclera-to-cornea elastic modulus ratio and spatial attenuation of treatment effect due to ultraviolet beam characteristics on the predicted change in elastic modulus were also investigated. Corneal property changes computed by inverse finite element analysis provided excellent geometric agreement with clinical topography measurements in patient eyes post-crosslinking. Over all post-treatment time points, the estimated increase in corneal elastic modulus was 110.8±48.1%, and slightly less stiffening was required to produce the same amount of corneal topographic regression of disease when the sclera-to-cornea modulus ratio was increased. Including the effect of beam attenuation resulted in greater estimates of stiffening in the anterior cornea. Corneal shape responses to crosslinking varied considerably and emphasize the importance of a patient-specific approach. PMID:23664859

  13. Inverse computational analysis of in vivo corneal elastic modulus change after collagen crosslinking for keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Sinha Roy, Abhijit; Rocha, Karol M; Randleman, J Bradley; Stulting, R Doyle; Dupps, William J

    2013-08-01

    Corneal collagen crosslinking with riboflavin photosensitization and ultraviolet irradiation is a novel approach to limiting the progression of keratoconus in patients by increasing the elastic modulus of the degenerate cornea. Beneficial reductions in corneal steepness and aberrations after crosslinking also frequently occur. In a previous study, we described a computational modeling approach to simulating topographic progression in keratoconus and regression of disease with corneal collagen crosslinking. In the current study, this model has been expanded and applied to the inverse problem of estimating longitudinal time-dependent changes in the corneal elastic modulus after crosslinking using in vivo measurements from 16 human eyes. Topography measured before crosslinking was used to construct a patient-specific finite element model with assumed hyperelastic properties. Then the properties of the cornea were altered using an inverse optimization method to minimize the difference between the model-predicted and in vivo corneal shape after crosslinking. Effects of assumptions regarding sclera-to-cornea elastic modulus ratio and spatial attenuation of treatment effect due to ultraviolet beam characteristics on the predicted change in elastic modulus were also investigated. Corneal property changes computed by inverse finite element analysis provided excellent geometric agreement with clinical topography measurements in patient eyes post-crosslinking. Over all post-treatment time points, the estimated increase in corneal elastic modulus was 110.8 ± 48.1%, and slightly less stiffening was required to produce the same amount of corneal topographic regression of disease when the sclera-to-cornea modulus ratio was increased. Including the effect of beam attenuation resulted in greater estimates of stiffening in the anterior cornea. Corneal shape responses to crosslinking varied considerably and emphasize the importance of a patient-specific approach.

  14. Feasibility study of complex wavefield retrieval in off-axis acoustic holography employing an acousto-optic sensor

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Guillermo López; Weber, Joshua; Sandhu, Jaswinder Singh; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new method for complex-valued wavefield retrieval in off-axis acoustic holography. The method involves use of an intensity-sensitive acousto-optic (AO) sensor, optimized for use at 3.3 MHz, to record the acoustic hologram and a computational method for reconstruction of the object wavefield. The proposed method may circumvent limitations of conventional implementations of acoustic holography and may facilitate the development of acoustic-holography-based biomedical imaging methods. PMID:21669451

  15. Robust baseline subtraction for ultrasonic full wavefield analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alguri, K. Supreet; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Harley, Joel B.

    2017-02-01

    Full wavefield analysis is used to study and characterize the interaction between waves and structural damage. Yet, as wavefields are measured and as damage evolves in a structure, environmental and operational variations can significantly affect wave propagation. Several approaches, including time-stretching and optimal baseline selection methods, can reduce variations, but these methods are often limited to specific effects, are ineffective for large environmental variations, or require an impractical number of prior baseline measurements. This paper presents a robust methodology for subtracting wavefields and isolating wave-damage interactions. The method is based on dictionary learning. It is robust to multiple types of environmental and operational variations and requires only one initial baseline. We learn the dictionary, which describes wave propagation for a particular wavefield, based on multiple frequencies of a baseline wavefield. We then use the dictionary and sparse regression to create new baselines for measurements with different environmental and operational conditions. The new baseline is then subtracted from the new wavefield to isolate damage wavefield.

  16. Isolation of ultrasonic scattering by wavefield baseline subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2016-03-01

    Wavefield imaging generally refers to the measurement of signals over a two-dimensional rectilinear grid that originate from a spatially fixed source. Subtraction of such wavefields is investigated as a means of separating scattered signals from the total wavefield; that is, baseline wavefield data acquired from a defect-free specimen are subtracted from analogous data acquired after introduction of a defect. The wavefields considered here are generated by a 5 MHz angle-beam probe and measured over an area of the accessible specimen surface using a laser vibrometer. The primary challenge in isolating the scattered waves is imperfect temporal and spatial alignment of the two wavefields. Two methods for aligning the wavefields in space and time prior to performing baseline subtraction are presented and their efficacy is evaluated using data acquired before and after introducing notches that originate from a through-hole. Although perfect baseline subtraction is not achieved, the improvement in performance after alignment using either method allows for scattered waves from small defects to be separated and visualized, even when their amplitudes are much smaller than those of the incident waves.

  17. A computationally efficient method for simulating fluid flow in elastic pipes in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctors, G. M.; Mazzeo, M. D.; Coveney, P. V.

    2010-09-01

    We propose a new method for carrying out lattice-Boltzmann simulations of pulsatile fluid flow in three-dimensional elastic pipes. It is based on estimating the distances from sites at the edge of the simulation box to the wall along the lattice directions from the displacement of the closest point on the wall and the curvature there, followed by application of a nonequilibrium extrapolation method. Viscous flow in an elastic pipe is studied in three dimensions at a wall displacement of 5% of the radius of the pipe, which is realistic for blood flow through large cerebral arteries. The numerical results for the pressure difference, wall displacement and flow velocity agree well with the analytical predictions. At all sites, the calculation depends only on information from nearest neighbours, so the method proposed is suitable for efficient computation on multicore machines. Compared to simulations with rigid walls, simulations with elastic walls require only 13% more computational effort at the parameters chosen in this study.

  18. 3D Discontinuous Galerkin elastic seismic wave modeling based upon a grid injection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, V.

    2015-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a seismic imaging method that estimates thesub-surface physical properties with a spatial resolution of the order of thewavelength. FWI is generally recast as the iterative optimization of anobjective function that measures the distance between modeled and recordeddata. In the framework of local descent methods, FWI requires to perform atleast two seismic modelings per source and per FWI iteration.Due to the resulting computational burden, applications of elastic FWI have been usuallyrestricted to 2D geometries. Despite the continuous growth of high-performancecomputing facilities, application of 3D elastic FWI to real-scale problemsremain computationally too expensive. To perform elastic seismic modeling with a reasonable amount of time, weconsider a reduced computational domain embedded in a larger background modelin which seismic sources are located. Our aim is to compute repeatedly thefull wavefield in the targeted domain after model alteration, once theincident wavefield has been computed once for all in the background model. Toachieve this goal, we use a grid injection method referred to as the Total-Field/Scattered-Field (TF/SF) technique in theelectromagnetic community. We implemented the Total-Field/Scattered-Field approach in theDiscontinuous Galerkin Finite Element method (DG-FEM) that is used to performmodeling in the local domain. We show how to interface the DG-FEM with any modeling engine (analytical solution, finite difference or finite elements methods) that is suitable for the background simulation. One advantage of the Total-Field/Scattered-Field approach is related to thefact that the scattered wavefield instead of the full wavefield enter thePMLs, hence making more efficient the absorption of the outgoing waves at theouter edges of the computational domain. The domain reduction in which theDG-FEM is applied allows us to use modest computational resources opening theway for high-resolution imaging by full

  19. Computation of Temperature-Dependent Legendre Moments of a Double-Differential Elastic Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Arbanas, Goran; Dunn, Michael E; Larson, Nancy M; Leal, Luiz C; Williams, Mark L; Becker, B.; Dagan, R

    2011-01-01

    A general expression for temperature-dependent Legendre moments of a double-differential elastic scattering cross section was derived by Ouisloumen and Sanchez [Nucl. Sci. Eng. 107, 189-200 (1991)]. Attempts to compute this expression are hindered by the three-fold nested integral, limiting their practical application to just the zeroth Legendre moment of an isotropic scattering. It is shown that the two innermost integrals could be evaluated analytically to all orders of Legendre moments, and for anisotropic scattering, by a recursive application of the integration by parts method. For this method to work, the anisotropic angular distribution in the center of mass is expressed as an expansion in Legendre polynomials. The first several Legendre moments of elastic scattering of neutrons on U-238 are computed at T=1000 K at incoming energy 6.5 eV for isotropic scattering in the center of mass frame. Legendre moments of the anisotropic angular distribution given via Blatt-Biedenharn coefficients are computed at ~1 keV. The results are in agreement with those computed by the Monte Carlo method.

  20. Software to compute elastostatic Green's functions for sources in 3D homogeneous elastic layers above a (visco)elastic halfspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. M.; Segall, P.

    2012-12-01

    We describe software, in development, to calculate elastostatic displacement Green's functions and their derivatives for point and polygonal dislocations in three-dimensional homogeneous elastic layers above an elastic or a viscoelastic halfspace. The steps to calculate a Green's function for a point source at depth zs are as follows. 1. A grid in wavenumber space is chosen. 2. A six-element complex rotated stress-displacement vector x is obtained at each grid point by solving a two-point boundary value problem (2P-BVP). If the halfspace is viscoelastic, the solution is inverse Laplace transformed. 3. For each receiver, x is propagated to the receiver depth zr (often zr = 0) and then, 4, inverse Fourier transformed, with the Fourier component corresponding to the receiver's horizontal position. 5. The six elements are linearly combined into displacements and their derivatives. The dominant work is in step 2. The grid is chosen to represent the wavenumber-space solution with as few points as possible. First, the wavenumber space is transformed to increase sampling density near 0 wavenumber. Second, a tensor-product grid of Chebyshev points of the first kind is constructed in each quadrant of the transformed wavenumber space. Moment-tensor-dependent symmetries further reduce work. The numerical solution of the 2P-BVP problem in step 2 involves solving a linear equation A x = b. Half of the elements of x are of geophysical interest; the subset depends on whether zr ≤ zs. Denote these \\hat x. As wavenumber k increases, \\hat x can become inaccurate in finite precision arithmetic for two reasons: 1. The condition number of A becomes too large. 2. The norm-wise relative error (NWRE) in \\hat x is large even though it is small in x. To address this problem, a number of researchers have used determinants to obtain x. This may be the best approach for 6-dimensional or smaller 2P-BVP, where the combinatorial increase in work is still moderate. But there is an alternative

  1. Green's Functions, Source Signatures and the Normalization of Teleseismic Wavefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, M. G.

    2003-12-01

    We examine the canonical source/Green's function separation problem within the context of teleseismic body wave propagation and scattering from receiver-side lithospheric/upper-mantle structure. Our principal objective is the recovery of the intramodal P-impulse response for use in multi-parameter wavefield inversions. The time-normalized transfer operator that describes the response of a 1-D stratified, elastic half-space to a plane wave incident from below, can be factored into pure transmission and free-surface reverberation parts. Assuming pre-critical interactions, the intramodal entries of the reverberation operator are always minimum phase. The intramodal entries of the transmission operator are not generally minimum phase, but they will be for P-waves in weak to moderate contrast stratification; a characteristic that, we argue, persists for the class of laterally heterogeneous media representing real Earth environments. Transformation to minimum phase thus provides a means of normalizing the source within teleseismic P-seismograms and serves to emphasize weaker secondary arrivals. The shaping filter derived from this transformation can, moreover, be applied to additional non-minimum-phase wave components to effect a similar source normalization. Minimum-phase normalization facilitates the implementation of simultaneous, source-receiver, multi-channel deconvolution within the log-spectral domain through the provision of statistical constraint equations, and facilitation of phase unwrapping. Examples using both synthetic data and seismograms from the Canadian National Seismograph Network demonstrate the recovery of accurate and reproducible estimates of the intramodal P-impulse response.

  2. 3-D Teleseismic Imaging of Scattered Wavefields Using Both Kirchhoff and Born Approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Gabler, J.; Zelt, C. A.; Levander, A.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study is to compare imaging with scattered teleseismic wavefields using 3-D Kirchhoff- and Born-approximate inversion methods. Kirchhoff and Born-approximate inversions have been well developed in exploration seismology based on the inverse scattering framework (e.g. Beylkin and Burridge, 1990) to image subsurface structure that generates secondary wavefields due to localized heterogeneities. Application of these methods in global seismology has been somewhat limited to 1-D reference models due to high computational cost and the lack of dense receiver arrays (Bostock, 2002, Frederiksen and Revenaugh, 2004; Cao et al., 2010). Due to the deployment of the USArray Transportable and Flexible arrays across the United States and dense array recordings in other countries, we seek to extend teleseismic scattered wavefield imaging with each of these approximations from 2-D to 3-D for both scalar and vector wavefields to resolve the contrast of material parameters in the lowermost crust and the upper mantle. Following Bostock and coworkers (2001, 2002), making each approximation allows us to derive the 3-D multimode (P-to-P, P-to-S etc.) inversion formulae by phrasing the problem in terms of a generalized Radon transform (or its inverse) and then inverting the scattered waves. To demonstrate the relative accuracy of the two different inversions, we examine several synthetic cases with a variety of discontinuity surfaces. In the forward scattering modeling, we extend the method to utilize a 3-D background velocity model by calculating 3-D finite-difference traveltimes and amplitudes, backprojected from the receivers using an eikonal solver. We compare our Kirchhoff- and Born-approximation imaging with the common-conversion point (CCP) stacked receiver function imaging for the synthetic data. We apply these methods to USArray data.

  3. Elastic properties computation and fluid substitution simulation from X-ray CT scan images in Middle East carbonates samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouini, M. S.; Vega, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most common problems in rock physics is the prediction of the elastic rock properties. Although about half hydrocarbons reserves in the world are in carbonate reservoir rocks, little has been published concerning their elastic properties. Fluid substitution experiments in laboratory are time consuming and can affect the original carbonate elastic rock properties, due to chemical interaction with fluids and re-crystallization. Nowadays, computational methods make possible to conduct complex, fast and realistic simulations of elasticity equations directly on digitized models. Carbonate digital structures can be obtained by a nondestructive technique using X-ray computed tomography scanner providing a 3-D structure representing rock density for each voxel. The main advantages of such a technique are to provide a data representative of core plug scale and to allow repeating indefinitely simulations without any impact in the original rock frame. In this paper, an image processing technique is used to segment automatically into rock matrix and pore space the digitalized structure of a high porosity carbonate reservoir samples in the Middle East. However due to the medium resolution of our data (20µm), we added a pre-processing step to enhance the contrast of the digitalized structure in order to improve the segmentation result (Fig). The rock elastic properties are then computed by simulating a static deformation experiment after assigning for each voxel its specific elastic moduli. The finite elements method is used to estimate local and average strains providing an estimation of bulk and shear moduli. Finally, we assume that linear elasticity laws are valid within the sample which allows converting elastic moduli into elastic-wave velocities. In order to validate these results, we compared our simulated elastic moduli with laboratory measurements in the carbonates samples under different saturation conditions: dried, oil saturated and brine saturated

  4. A computational framework for polyconvex large strain elasticity for geometrically exact beam theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortigosa, Rogelio; Gil, Antonio J.; Bonet, Javier; Hesch, Christian

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a new computational framework is presented for the analysis of nonlinear beam finite elements subjected to large strains. Specifically, the methodology recently introduced in Bonet et al. (Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 283:1061-1094, 2015) in the context of three dimensional polyconvex elasticity is extended to the geometrically exact beam model of Simo (Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 49:55-70, 1985), the starting point of so many other finite element beam type formulations. This new variational framework can be viewed as a continuum degenerate formulation which, moreover, is enhanced by three key novelties. First, in order to facilitate the implementation of the sophisticated polyconvex constitutive laws particularly associated with beams undergoing large strains, a novel tensor cross product algebra by Bonet et al. (Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 283:1061-1094, 2015) is adopted, leading to an elegant and physically meaningful representation of an otherwise complex computational framework. Second, the paper shows how the novel algebra facilitates the re-expression of any invariant of the deformation gradient, its cofactor and its determinant in terms of the classical beam strain measures. The latter being very useful whenever a classical beam implementation is preferred. This is particularised for the case of a Mooney-Rivlin model although the technique can be straightforwardly generalised to other more complex isotropic and anisotropic polyconvex models. Third, the connection between the two most accepted restrictions for the definition of constitutive models in three dimensional elasticity and beams is shown, bridging the gap between the continuum and its degenerate beam description. This is carried out via a novel insightful representation of the tangent operator.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo Computations for Equations of State, Phase Transitions, and Elasticity of Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. E.; Militzer, B.; Wu, Z.; Driver, K.; Rios, P. L.; Towler, M.; Needs, R.

    2007-12-01

    We have performed Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) computations for silica in the quartz, stishovite, and α- PbO2 structures as functions of compression as benchmark computations. QMC uses no approximate density functional, and the many-body, correlated, Schrödinger equation is effectively solved stochastically. In spite of the great success of DFT there are still some fundamental problems that need improvement. First is the need for increased accuracy for some rather ordinary materials such as silica. Although the local density approximation (LDA) gives excellent results for individual silica phases, such as the CaCl2 transition [1,2], it is not so good for comparing energetics of very different structures, such as quartz versus stishovite. LDA predicts stishovite to be the stable ground state structure rather than quartz. One of the first great successes of the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) was to give the correct energy difference between quartz and stishovite [3]. Less well appreciated is the fact that almost all other properties, such as structure, equations of state, elastic constants, etc., are worse with the GGA than the LDA. Our QMC results will be used to improve density functionals, and show the way towards more accurate computations for Earth materials. Thermal contributions are included using density functional perturbation theory with the code ABINIT. We have also computed the shear elastic constant c11-c12 in stishovite, which is associated with the phase transition to the CaCl2 structure [1], with QMC. We find excellent agreement with experiments. We find that the main differences between QMC and DFT are crystalline phase dependent energy and pressure shifts. This work is supported by NSF grants EAR-0530282, EAR-0310139, and by DOE contract DE-FG02-99ER45795 to John Wilkins. Computations were performed on Blueice at NCAR under a BTS grant, Tungsten and Abe at NCSA, Franklin at NERSC within the friendly user program, and at the Carnegie

  6. Elasticity and phase stability of pyrope garnet from ab initio computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Kenji; Tsuchiya, Taku

    2015-03-01

    We study the high-pressure stability and elastic properties of Mg3Al2Si3O12 pyrope garnet using the density functional first principles computation method. Pyrope garnet is found to dissociate into an assemblage of MgSiO3 Mg-perovskite (Pv) and Al2O3 corundum (Cor) solid solutions at ∼19.7 GPa at static conditions. Then, this assemblage undergoes a phase transition to pyropic (Al-bearing) Pv at ∼65 GPa. The enthalpy of an assemblage of MgAl2O4 calcium ferrite (CF), MgPv, and stishovite (St) is less stable than that of MgPv plus Cor. A continuous reaction in the MgSiO3-Al2O3 system suggested by this study is consistent with previous experimental and computational studies but not with a recently modeled phase diagram. This implies that the formation of pyropic Pv could not cause any seismic scatterers in the mid-lower mantle. The investigated anisotropy of elastic velocities further indicates that pyrope garnet is a very isotropic mineral. Our results suggest that seismological anisotropy inferred in the upper mantle could not be due to garnet.

  7. Computing Green's function of elasticity in a half-plane with impedance boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán, Mario; Godoy, Eduardo; Nédélec, Jean-Claude

    2006-12-01

    This Note presents an effective and accurate method for numerical calculation of the Green's function G associated with the time harmonic elasticity system in a half-plane, where an impedance boundary condition is considered. The need to compute this function arises when studying wave propagation in underground mining and seismological engineering. To theoretically obtain this Green's function, we have drawn our inspiration from the paper by Durán et al. (2005), where the Green's function for the Helmholtz equation has been computed. The method consists in applying a partial Fourier transform, which allows an explicit calculation of the so-called spectral Green's function. In order to compute its inverse Fourier transform, we separate Gˆ as a sum of two terms. The first is associated with the whole plane, whereas the second takes into account the half-plane and the boundary conditions. The first term corresponds to the Green's function of the well known time-harmonic elasticity system in R (cf. J. Dompierre, Thesis). The second term is separated as a sum of three terms, where two of them contain singularities in the spectral variable (pseudo-poles and poles) and the other is regular and decreasing at infinity. The inverse Fourier transform of the singular terms are analytically computed, whereas the regular one is numerically obtained via an FFT algorithm. We present a numerical result. Moreover, we show that, under some conditions, a fourth additional slowness appears and which could produce a new surface wave. To cite this article: M. Durán et al., C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  8. Free energy of contact formation in proteins: Efficient computation in the elastic network approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Kay

    2011-07-01

    Biomolecular simulations have become a major tool in understanding biomolecules and their complexes. However, one can typically only investigate a few mutants or scenarios due to the severe computational demands of such simulations, leading to a great interest in method development to overcome this restriction. One way to achieve this is to reduce the complexity of the systems by an approximation of the forces acting upon the constituents of the molecule. The harmonic approximation used in elastic network models simplifies the physical complexity to the most reduced dynamics of these molecular systems. The reduced polymer modeled this way is typically comprised of mass points representing coarse-grained versions of, e.g., amino acids. In this work, we show how the computation of free energy contributions of contacts between two residues within the molecule can be reduced to a simple lookup operation in a precomputable matrix. Being able to compute such contributions is of great importance: protein design or molecular evolution changes introduce perturbations to these pair interactions, so we need to understand their impact. Perturbation to the interactions occurs due to randomized and fixated changes (in molecular evolution) or designed modifications of the protein structures (in bioengineering). These perturbations are modifications in the topology and the strength of the interactions modeled by the elastic network models. We apply the new algorithm to (1) the bovine trypsin inhibitor, a well-known enzyme in biomedicine, and show the connection to folding properties and the hydrophobic collapse hypothesis and (2) the serine proteinase inhibitor CI-2 and show the correlation to Φ values to characterize folding importance. Furthermore, we discuss the computational complexity and show empirical results for the average case, sampled over a library of 77 structurally diverse proteins. We found a relative speedup of up to 10 000-fold for large proteins with respect to

  9. A one dimensional numerical approach for computing the eigenmodes of elastic waves in buried pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wenbo; Kirby, Ray; Mudge, Peter; Gan, Tat-Hean

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves are often used in the detection of defects in oil and gas pipelines. It is common for these pipelines to be buried underground and this may restrict the length of the pipe that can be successfully tested. This is because acoustic energy travelling along the pipe walls may radiate out into the surrounding medium. Accordingly, it is important to develop a better understanding of the way in which elastic waves propagate along the walls of buried pipes, and so in this article a numerical model is developed that is suitable for computing the eigenmodes for uncoated and coated buried pipes. This is achieved by combining a one dimensional eigensolution based on the semi-analytic finite element (SAFE) method, with a perfectly matched layer (PML) for the infinite medium surrounding the pipe. This article also explores an alternative exponential complex coordinate stretching function for the PML in order to improve solution convergence. It is shown for buried pipelines that accurate solutions may be obtained over the entire frequency range typically used in long range ultrasonic testing (LRUT) using a PML layer with a thickness equal to the pipe wall thickness. This delivers a fast and computationally efficient method and it is shown for pipes buried in sand or soil that relevant eigenmodes can be computed and sorted in less than one second using relatively modest computer hardware. The method is also used to find eigenmodes for a buried pipe coated with the viscoelastic material bitumen. It was recently observed in the literature that a viscoelastic coating may effectively isolate particular eigenmodes so that energy does not radiate from these modes into the surrounding [elastic] medium. A similar effect is also observed in this article and it is shown that this occurs even for a relatively thin layer of bitumen, and when the shear impedance of the coating material is larger than that of the surrounding medium.

  10. GPU computing with OpenCL to model 2D elastic wave propagation: exploring memory usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Molero-Armenta, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have become increasingly powerful in recent years. Programs exploring the advantages of this architecture could achieve large performance gains and this is the aim of new initiatives in high performance computing. The objective of this work is to develop an efficient tool to model 2D elastic wave propagation on parallel computing devices. To this end, we implement the elastodynamic finite integration technique, using the industry open standard open computing language (OpenCL) for cross-platform, parallel programming of modern processors, and an open-source toolkit called [Py]OpenCL. The code written with [Py]OpenCL can run on a wide variety of platforms; it can be used on AMD or NVIDIA GPUs as well as classical multicore CPUs, adapting to the underlying architecture. Our main contribution is its implementation with local and global memory and the performance analysis using five different computing devices (including Kepler, one of the fastest and most efficient high performance computing technologies) with various operating systems.

  11. Signal and image processing algorithm performance in a virtual and elastic computing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kelly W.; Robertson, James

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) supports the development of classification, detection, tracking, and localization algorithms using multiple sensing modalities including acoustic, seismic, E-field, magnetic field, PIR, and visual and IR imaging. Multimodal sensors collect large amounts of data in support of algorithm development. The resulting large amount of data, and their associated high-performance computing needs, increases and challenges existing computing infrastructures. Purchasing computer power as a commodity using a Cloud service offers low-cost, pay-as-you-go pricing models, scalability, and elasticity that may provide solutions to develop and optimize algorithms without having to procure additional hardware and resources. This paper provides a detailed look at using a commercial cloud service provider, such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), to develop and deploy simple signal and image processing algorithms in a cloud and run the algorithms on a large set of data archived in the ARL Multimodal Signatures Database (MMSDB). Analytical results will provide performance comparisons with existing infrastructure. A discussion on using cloud computing with government data will discuss best security practices that exist within cloud services, such as AWS.

  12. Local guided wavefield analysis for characterization of delaminations in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogge, M. D.; Leckey, C. A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Delaminations in composite laminates resulting from impact events may be accompanied by minimal indication of damage at the surface. As such, inspection techniques are required to ensure defects are within allowable limits. Conventional ultrasonic scanning techniques have been shown to effectively characterize the size and depth of delaminations but require physical contact with the structure. Alternatively, a noncontact scanning laser vibrometer may be used to measure guided wave propagation in the laminate structure. A local Fourier domain analysis method is presented for processing guided wavefield data to estimate spatially-dependent wavenumber values, which can be used to determine delamination depth. The technique is applied to simulated wavefields and results are analyzed to determine limitations of the technique with regards to determining defect size and depth. Finally, experimental wavefield data obtained in quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with impact damage is analyzed and wavenumber is measured to an accuracy of 8.5% in the region of shallow delaminations.

  13. Incident Wave Removal for Defect Enhancement in Acoustic Wavefield Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Master, Zubin M.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2007-03-01

    The method of Acoustic Wavefield Imaging (AWI) offers many advantages over conventional ultrasonic techniques for nondestructive evaluation, and also provides a means of incorporating fixed ultrasonic sensors used for structural health monitoring into subsequent inspections. AWI utilizes these fixed sensors as wave sources and an externally scanned ultrasonic transducer (or laser interferometer) as a receiver to acquire complete waveform data over the surface. When displayed as time-dependent images, these signals show the propagation of acoustic waves through a structure and subsequent interactions of these waves with both defects and structural geometry. Defect areas appear as stationary scattering sources on these images, but such scattered wave energy is often obscured by the stronger incident acoustic wavefield. The objective of the work presented here is to develop multidimensional signal processing algorithms to enhance the appearance of structural defects on wavefield images via removal of the incident wave. Results are presented for analysis of images from aluminum plate and solid laminate composite specimens.

  14. Three-dimensional full-wavefield seismic tomography on field data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.; Stekl, I.; Guasch, L.

    2010-12-01

    In contrast to conventional seismic tomography, where we minimise the mismatch between observed and calculated seismic travel times, in full-wavefield tomography we seek a model that is able to match the entire observed wavefield, wiggle-for-wiggle. Wavefield tomography has a long history, but it is only recently that advances in algorithms and in hardware have made the technique feasible on realistic-sized datasets in three dimensions. With sponsorship from the petroleum industry, we have developed full 3D codes for anisotropic acoustic, and isotropic elastic, wavefield tomography in the time-domain, and for visco-acoustic tomography in the frequency domain. In both domains, we solve the wave equation using finite differences on a regular mesh; we use explicit time-stepping in the time domain, and use an implicit iterative solver in the frequency domain. The codes are parallelised to run on a cluster of multi-core nodes, and they are able to deal with large irregular 3D datasets efficiently. We report here the results of applying these codes to a 3D ocean-bottom seismic dataset acquired over the Tommeliten oil field in the North Sea. The field data are composed of 1920 four-component ocean-bottom receivers, recording about 30,000 air-gun sources over an area of 12 x 9 km. A low-velocity, high-attenuation gas cloud is located at a depth of 1 to 2 km; this gas cloud partially obscures the geology of the underlying oil field. There is significant anisotropy within the section; vertical and horizontal p-wave velocities can differ by more than 15%. Wavefield tomography is successful in imaging the complex velocity structure in 3D within this gas cloud with a lateral resolution of about 25 m. This resolution is much better than that obtained using reflection travel-time tomography or migration velocity analysis. Subsequent pre-stack reverse-time depth migration of the underlying reflection data demonstrates that the recovered velocity structure is real. It is necessary

  15. Structural symmetry within nonlocal integral elasticity: theoretical issues and computational strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Aurora Angela; Fuschi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The structural symmetry and the appropriate definition of a reduced (symmetric) mechanical/ numerical model is discussed within a nonlocal elasticity context. In particular, reference is made to an integral model of Eringen-type. The paper highlights how the classical, i.e. local, concepts of structural symmetry have to be rephrased through the definition of an enlarged symmetric model of the analyzed structure. This enlarged model, endowed with apposite nonlocal boundary conditions enforced in an iterative fashion, is proved to be able to recover the nonlocal effects that the neglected portion of the structure exerts on the portion chosen for the analysis. It is shown how the mirrored symmetric solution exactly matches the complete one. Theoretical issues and computational strategies referred to a nonlocal version of the finite element method are discussed with reference to the analysis of a case-study.

  16. Elastic Extension of a CMS Computing Centre Resources on External Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codispoti, G.; Di Maria, R.; Aiftimiei, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Calligola, P.; Ciaschini, V.; Costantini, A.; Dal Pra, S.; DeGirolamo, D.; Grandi, C.; Michelotto, D.; Panella, M.; Peco, G.; Sapunenko, V.; Sgaravatto, M.; Taneja, S.; Zizzi, G.

    2016-10-01

    After the successful LHC data taking in Run-I and in view of the future runs, the LHC experiments are facing new challenges in the design and operation of the computing facilities. The computing infrastructure for Run-II is dimensioned to cope at most with the average amount of data recorded. The usage peaks, as already observed in Run-I, may however originate large backlogs, thus delaying the completion of the data reconstruction and ultimately the data availability for physics analysis. In order to cope with the production peaks, CMS - along the lines followed by other LHC experiments - is exploring the opportunity to access Cloud resources provided by external partners or commercial providers. Specific use cases have already been explored and successfully exploited during Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) and the first part of Run 2. In this work we present the proof of concept of the elastic extension of a CMS site, specifically the Bologna Tier-3, on an external OpenStack infrastructure. We focus on the “Cloud Bursting” of a CMS Grid site using a newly designed LSF configuration that allows the dynamic registration of new worker nodes to LSF. In this approach, the dynamically added worker nodes instantiated on the OpenStack infrastructure are transparently accessed by the LHC Grid tools and at the same time they serve as an extension of the farm for the local usage. The amount of resources allocated thus can be elastically modeled to cope up with the needs of CMS experiment and local users. Moreover, a direct access/integration of OpenStack resources to the CMS workload management system is explored. In this paper we present this approach, we report on the performances of the on-demand allocated resources, and we discuss the lessons learned and the next steps.

  17. The influence of a dynamic elastic garment on musculoskeletal and respiratory wellness in computer users.

    PubMed

    Decker, Michael; Gomas, Kellie A; Narvy, Steven J; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Evidence is growing that computer users are at increased risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders, particularly those involving the upper extremity, with significant financial cost and lost productivity. The purpose of this study was to determine the short-term effects of wearing a dynamic elastic garment (Posture Shirt[Formula: see text]; AlignMed, USA) on musculoskeletal wellness and health in the computer workplace. Ninety-six computer users were evaluated. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire was completed. A functional assessment of posture, lung function, and grip strength was performed after wearing the Posture Shirt[Formula: see text] for 4 weeks. A training log was kept to track usage of the garment, as well as weekly sensations of fatigue, productivity, and energy level. After 4 weeks, there was statistically significant improvement in forward shoulder and head posture, thoracic kyphosis, and grip strength. Improvements in spirometry measures did not meet statistical significance. Postural fatigue and muscular fatigue decreased by 21% and 29%, respectively, and energy level and productivity increased by 20% and 13%, respectively. This prospective study demonstrated positive short-term impact of the Posture Shirt[Formula: see text] on both subjective and objective measures of posture, lung function, grip strength, fatigue, and productivity.

  18. Implementation of Elastic Prestack Reverse-Time Migration Using an Efficient Finite-Difference Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongyong; Yang, Lei; Dai, Hengchang; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2016-10-01

    Elastic reverse-time migration (RTM) can reflect the underground elastic information more comprehensively than single-component Pwave migration. One of the most important requirements of elastic RTM is to solve wave equations. The imaging accuracy and efficiency of RTM depends heavily on the algorithms used for solving wave equations. In this paper, we propose an efficient staggered-grid finite-difference (SFD) scheme based on a sampling approximation method with adaptive variable difference operator lengths to implement elastic prestack RTM. Numerical dispersion analysis and wavefield extrapolation results show that the sampling approximation SFD scheme has greater accuracy than the conventional Taylor-series expansion SFD scheme. We also test the elastic RTM algorithm on theoretical models and a field data set, respectively. Experiments presented demonstrate that elastic RTM using the proposed SFD scheme can generate better images than that using the Taylor-series expansion SFD scheme, particularly for PS images. FurH. thermore, the application of adaptive variable difference operator lengths can effectively improve the computational efficiency of elastic RTM.

  19. Nonlinear dispersion effects in elastic plates: numerical modelling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijanka, Piotr; Radecki, Rafal; Packo, Pawel; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Leamy, Michael J.

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear features of elastic wave propagation have attracted significant attention recently. The particular interest herein relates to complex wave-structure interactions, which provide potential new opportunities for feature discovery and identification in a variety of applications. Due to significant complexity associated with wave propagation in nonlinear media, numerical modeling and simulations are employed to facilitate design and development of new measurement, monitoring and characterization systems. However, since very high spatio- temporal accuracy of numerical models is required, it is critical to evaluate their spectral properties and tune discretization parameters for compromise between accuracy and calculation time. Moreover, nonlinearities in structures give rise to various effects that are not present in linear systems, e.g. wave-wave interactions, higher harmonics generation, synchronism and | recently reported | shifts to dispersion characteristics. This paper discusses local computational model based on a new HYBRID approach for wave propagation in nonlinear media. The proposed approach combines advantages of the Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA) and Cellular Automata for Elastodynamics (CAFE). The methods are investigated in the context of their accuracy for predicting nonlinear wavefields, in particular shifts to dispersion characteristics for finite amplitude waves and secondary wavefields. The results are validated against Finite Element (FE) calculations for guided waves in copper plate. Critical modes i.e., modes determining accuracy of a model at given excitation frequency - are identified and guidelines for numerical model parameters are proposed.

  20. A weighted Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin method for wavefield modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xijun; Yang, Dinghui; Wu, Hao

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a weighted Runge-Kutta (RK) discontinuous Galerkin (WRKDG) method for wavefield modelling. For this method, we first transform the seismic wave equations in 2-D heterogeneous anisotropic media into a first-order hyperbolic system, and then combine the discontinuous Galerkin method (DGM) with a weighted RK time discretization. The time discretization is based on an implicit diagonal RK method and an explicit technique, which changes the implicit RK method into an explicit one. In addition, we introduce a weighting factor in the process. Linear and quadratic polynomials for spatial basis functions are typically employed. We investigate the properties of the method in great detail, including the stability criteria and numerical dispersion relations for solving the 2-D acoustic equations. Our analysis indicates that the stability condition for the WRKDG method is more relaxed compared with the classic total variation diminishing (TVD) RK discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) method, resulting in a 1.7 times superiority for P1 element and is about as efficient as TVD RKDG method for P2 element in computational efficiency. We also demonstrate that the WRKDG method can suppress numerical dispersion more efficiently than the staggered-grid (SG) method on the same grid. The WRKDG method is applied to simulate the wavefields in a large velocity contrast model, a 2-D homogeneous transversely isotropic (TI) model, a fluid-filled fracture model, and a 2-D SEG/EAGE salt dome model. Regular rectangular and irregular triangular elements are used. The numerical results show that the WRKDG method can effectively suppress numerical dispersion and provide accurate information on the wavefield on a coarse mesh. Therefore, the method evidently reduces the scale of the problem and increases computational efficiency. In addition, promising numerical tests show that the WRKDG method combines well with split perfectly matched layer boundary conditions.

  1. Large computer simulations on elastic networks: Small eigenvalues and eigenvalue spectra of the Kirchhoff matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Shy, L.Y.; Eichinger, B.E.

    1989-05-01

    Computer simulations of the formation of trifunctional and tetrafunctional polydimethyl-siloxane networks that are crosslinked by condensation of telechelic chains with multifunctional crosslinking agents have been carried out on systems containing up to 1.05 x 10/sup 6/ chains. Eigenvalue spectra of Kirchhoff matrices for these networks have been evaluated at two levels of approximation: (1) inclusion of all midchain modes, and (2) suppression of midchain modes. By use of the recursion method of Haydock and Nex, we have been able to effectively diagonalize matrices with 730 498 rows and columns without actually constructing matrices of this size. The small eigenvalues have been computed by use of the Lanczos algorithm. We demonstrate the following results: (1) The smallest eigenvalues (with chain modes suppressed) vary as ..mu../sup -2//sup ///sup 3/ for sufficiently large ..mu.., where ..mu.. is the number of junctions in the network; (2) the eigenvalue spectra of the Kirchhoff matrices are well described by McKay's theory for random regular graphs in the range of the larger eigenvalues, but there are significant departures in the region of small eigenvalues where computed spectra have many more small eigenvalues than random regular graphs; (3) the smallest eigenvalues vary as n/sup -1.78/ where n is the number of Rouse beads in the chains that comprise the network. Computations are done for both monodisperse and polydisperse chain length distributions. Large eigenvalues associated with localized motion of the junctions are found as predicted by theory. The relationship between the small eigenvalues and the equilibrium modulus of elasticity is discussed, as is the relationship between viscoelasticity and the band edge of the spectrum.

  2. Determining the elastic modulus of thin films using a buckling-based method: computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiu-Peng; Cao, Yan-Ping; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Jiang, Hanqing; Y Huang, Yonggang

    2009-09-01

    The buckling mode of a thin film lying on a soft substrate has been used to determine the elastic modulus of thin films and one-dimensional objects (e.g. nanowires and nanotubes). In this paper, dimensional analysis and three-dimensional nonlinear finite element computations have been made to investigate the buckling of a film with finite width bonded to a compliant substrate. Our study demonstrates that the effect of Poisson's ratio of the film can be neglected when its width-thickness ratio is smaller than 20. For wider films, omitting the influence of Poisson's ratio may lead to a significant systematic error in the measurement of the Young's modulus and, therefore, the film should be treated as a plate. It is also found that the assumption of the uniform interfacial normal stress along the width of the film made in the theoretical analysis does not cause an evident error, even when its width is comparable to its thickness. Based on the computational results, we further present a simple expression to correlate the buckling wavelength with the width and thickness of the film and the material properties (Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios) of the film and substrate, which has a similar form to that in the classical plane-strain problem. The fundamental solutions reported here are not only very accurate in a broad range of geometric and material parameters but also convenient for practical use since they do not involve any complex calculation.

  3. Elastic wave field computation in multilayered nonplanar solid structures: a mesh-free semianalytical approach.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sourav; Kundu, Tribikram

    2008-03-01

    Multilayered solid structures made of isotropic, transversely isotropic, or general anisotropic materials are frequently used in aerospace, mechanical, and civil structures. Ultrasonic fields developed in such structures by finite size transducers simulating actual experiments in laboratories or in the field have not been rigorously studied. Several attempts to compute the ultrasonic field inside solid media have been made based on approximate paraxial methods like the classical ray tracing and multi-Gaussian beam models. These approximate methods have several limitations. A new semianalytical method is adopted in this article to model elastic wave field in multilayered solid structures with planar or nonplanar interfaces generated by finite size transducers. A general formulation good for both isotropic and anisotropic solids is presented in this article. A variety of conditions have been incorporated in the formulation including irregularities at the interfaces. The method presented here requires frequency domain displacement and stress Green's functions. Due to the presence of different materials in the problem geometry various elastodynamic Green's functions for different materials are used in the formulation. Expressions of displacement and stress Green's functions for isotropic and anisotropic solids as well as for the fluid media are presented. Computed results are verified by checking the stress and displacement continuity conditions across the interface of two different solids of a bimetal plate and investigating if the results for a corrugated plate with very small corrugation match with the flat plate results.

  4. Local Guided Wavefield Analysis for Characterization of Delaminations in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogge, Matthew D.; Campbell Leckey, Cara A.

    2012-01-01

    Delaminations in composite laminates resulting from impact events may be accompanied by minimal indication of damage at the surface. As such, inspection techniques are required to ensure defects are within allowable limits. Conventional ultrasonic scanning techniques have been shown to effectively characterize the size and depth of delaminations but require physical contact with the structure. Alternatively, a noncontact scanning laser vibrometer may be used to measure guided wave propagation in the laminate structure. A local Fourier domain analysis method is presented for processing guided wavefield data to estimate spatially-dependent wavenumber values, which can be used to determine delamination depth. The technique is applied to simulated wavefields and results are analyzed to determine limitations of the technique with regards to determining defect size and depth. Finally, experimental wavefield data obtained in quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with impact damage is analyzed and wavenumber is measured to an accuracy of 8.5% in the region of shallow delaminations. Keywords: Ultrasonic wavefield imaging, Windowed Fourier transforms, Guided waves, Structural health monitoring, Nondestructive evaluation

  5. Impact Induced Delamination Detection and Quantification With Guided Wavefield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Yu, Lingyu; Seebo, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies impact induced delamination detection and quantification by using guided wavefield data and spatial wavenumber imaging. The complex geometry impact-like delamination is created through a quasi-static indentation on a CFRP plate. To detect and quantify the impact delamination in the CFRP plate, PZT-SLDV sensing and spatial wavenumber imaging are performed. In the PZT-SLDV sensing, the guided waves are generated from the PZT, and the high spatial resolution guided wavefields are measured by the SLDV. The guided wavefield data acquired from the PZT-SLDV sensing represent guided wave propagation in the composite laminate and include guided wave interaction with the delamination damage. The measured guided wavefields are analyzed through the spatial wavenumber imaging method, which generates an image containing the dominant local wavenumber at each spatial location. The spatial wavenumber imaging result for the simple single layer Teflon insert delamination provided quantitative information on delamination damage size and location. The location of delamination damage is indicated by the area with larger wavenumbers in the spatial wavenumber image. The impact-like delamination results only partially agreed with the damage size and shape. The results also demonstrated the dependence on excitation frequency. Future work will further investigate the accuracy of the wavenumber imaging method for real composite damage and the dependence on frequency of excitation.

  6. Computer program for the load and trajectory analysis of two DOF bodies connected by an elastic tether: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, G. R., Jr.; Burbick, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The derivation of the differential equations of motion of a 3 Degrees of Freedom body joined to a 3 Degrees of Freedom body by an elastic tether. The tether is represented by a spring and dashpot in parallel. A computer program which integrates the equations of motion is also described. Although the derivation of the equations of motions are for a general system, the computer program is written for defining loads in large boosters recovered by parachutes.

  7. AxiSEM and instaseis: Fast simulation of global wavefields across the frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, T.; van Driel, M.; Krischer, L.; Stähler, S. C.; Hosseini, K.; Leng, K.

    2015-12-01

    We present our seismic modeling methods AxiSEM and instaseis. These methods exploit recent developments in high-performance computing and suitable numerical methods for seismic wave propagation, while operating efficiently across the vast observable frequency spectrum of global waves in sparse yet realistic structures. AxiSEM (www.axisem.info and geodynamics.org) relies upon axisymmetric (including spherically symmetric) models, thereby satisfying a large fraction of observable data. The benefit of this method lies in the resultant dimensional collapse to two numerical dimensions, whereby the third azimuthal dimension is tackled analytically. For high-frequency wave propagation, this leads to 3-4 orders of magnitude speedup in computational cost compared to 3D domain discretizations. AxiSEM is highly scalable and accommodates efficient implementations of viscoelasticity and anisotropy. We will present benchmarks, data comparisons, a diverse range of applications from inner-core anisotropy to noise modeling and lowermost mantle structures, and wavefields for sensitivity kernels. We also touch upon ongoing efforts for linking computational cost to structural complexity in the vein of Occam's razor, eventually allowing for an adaptive rendition of 1D, 2D and 3D structures at optimally low computational cost, as well as 1D/3D hybrid approaches. Instaseis (www.instaseis.net) is a methodology to extract full, broadband and accurate waveforms instantaneously from wavefield databases computed with AxiSEM. This "once-and-for-all solution" relies on reciprocity and requires only two AxiSEM simulations to construct the databases, while allowing for arbitrary parameter changes (e.g. source, processing, structure) instantaneously with modest computational cost and storage requirements. The instaseis python package is integrated with ObsPy, contains a graphical user interface, and can be used for source inversion, noise simulations, finite-fault modeling, waveform tomography

  8. Computation of elastic properties of 3D digital cores from the Longmaxi shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Fu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Yan; Jin, Wei-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of elastic moduli of shales on the mineralogy and microstructure of shales is important for the prediction of sweet spots and shale gas production. Based on 3D digital images of the microstructure of Longmaxi black shale samples using X-ray CT, we built detailed 3D digital images of cores with porosity properties and mineral contents. Next, we used finite-element (FE) methods to derive the elastic properties of the samples. The FE method can accurately model the shale mineralogy. Particular attention is paid to the derived elastic properties and their dependence on porosity and kerogen. The elastic moduli generally decrease with increasing porosity and kerogen, and there is a critical porosity (0.75) and kerogen content (ca. ≤3%) over which the elastic moduli decrease rapidly and slowly, respectively. The derived elastic moduli of gas- and oil-saturated digital cores differ little probably because of the low porosity (4.5%) of the Longmaxi black shale. Clearly, the numerical experiments demonstrated the feasibility of combining microstructure images of shale samples with elastic moduli calculations to predict shale properties.

  9. Imaging crustal structure beneath the southern Appalachians with wavefield migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, E.; Fischer, K. M.; Rondenay, S.; Hawman, R. B.; Wagner, L. S.

    2016-12-01

    To constrain crustal structures in the southern Appalachians and the suture zone with the Gondwanan-affinity Suwannee terrane, we applied the 2-D generalized Radon transform wavefield migration method to the scattered incident P wavefield recorded by the EarthScope Southeastern Suture of the Appalachian Margin Experiment and adjacent Transportable Array stations. We resolve the root of thickened crust beneath the high topography of the Blue Ridge Mountains and estimate its density contrast with the mantle to be only 104 ± 20 kg/m3. A weak velocity contrast across the crustal root Moho is observed and may be related to an ongoing crustal delamination event, possibly contributing to local tectonic rejuvenation. Beneath the Suwannee terrane, we confirm prior observations of a gently south-southeastward dipping crustal suture, indicating the terminal collision of Laurentia and Gondwana involved several hundred kilometers of overthrusting.

  10. Preliminary Analysis of the Oklahoma Wavefields Demonstration Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.; Sweet, J. R.; Woodward, R.; Karplus, M. S.; DeShon, H. R.; Magnani, M. B.; Hayward, C.; Langston, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    In June 2016, a field crew of 50 students, faculty, industry personnel and IRIS staff deployed a total of 390 stations as part of a community seismic experiment above an active seismic lineament in north-central Oklahoma. The goals of the experiment were to test new instrumentation and deployment strategies that record the full wavefield, and to advance understanding of earthquake source processes and regional lithospheric structure. The crew deployed 363 3C 4.5Hz Generation 2 Fairfield Z-Land nodes along three seismic lines and in a seven-layer nested gradiometer array. The seismic lines spanned a region 13 km long by 5 km wide. The nested gradiometer was designed to measure the full seismic wavefield using standard frequency-wavenumber techniques and spatial wave gradients. A broadband, 18 station "Golay 3x6" array was deployed around the gradiometer and seismic lines with an aperture of approximately 5 km to collect waveform data from local and regional events. In addition, 9 infrasound stations were deployed in order to capture and identify acoustic events that might be recorded by the seismic arrays and to quantify the wind acoustic noise effect on co-located broadband stations. The variety of instrumentation used in this deployment was chosen to capture the full seismic wavefield generated by the local and regional seismicity beneath the array and the surrounding region. We present preliminary results from the data collected during the experiment. We analyze the level of signal coherence observed across the nested gradiometer and Golay array as well as array design fidelity. We report on data quality, including completeness and noise levels, for the various types of instrumentation. We also examine the performance of co-located surface and buried nodes to determine the benefits of each installation type. Finally, we present performance comparisons between co-located nodes and broadband stations and compare these results to prior wavefield/large-N deployments

  11. A Survey of Current Temperature Dependent Elastic-Plastic-Creep Constitutive Laws for Applicability to Finite Element Computer Codes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-31

    data that several phenomena which should be modelled by the constitutive theory are: (1) the Bauschinger effect for reverse loading, (2) the nonunique ...evidence of its importance. Although significant work has been done to obtain working constitutive models, in many cases the theory has not been cast...nonlinear visco- elasticity theory for applicability to the conservation of momentum. Based on physical accuracy as well as computational efficiency the

  12. Guided Wave Delamination Detection and Quantification With Wavefield Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Campbell Leckey, Cara A.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Yu, Lingyu

    2014-01-01

    Unexpected damage can occur in aerospace composites due to impact events or material stress during off-nominal loading events. In particular, laminated composites are susceptible to delamination damage due to weak transverse tensile and inter-laminar shear strengths. Developments of reliable and quantitative techniques to detect delamination damage in laminated composites are imperative for safe and functional optimally-designed next-generation composite structures. In this paper, we investigate guided wave interactions with delamination damage and develop quantification algorithms by using wavefield data analysis. The trapped guided waves in the delamination region are observed from the wavefield data and further quantitatively interpreted by using different wavenumber analysis methods. The frequency-wavenumber representation of the wavefield shows that new wavenumbers are present and correlate to trapped waves in the damage region. These new wavenumbers are used to detect and quantify the delamination damage through the wavenumber analysis, which can show how the wavenumber changes as a function of wave propagation distance. The location and spatial duration of the new wavenumbers can be identified, providing a useful means not only for detecting the presence of delamination damage but also allowing for estimation of the delamination size. Our method has been applied to detect and quantify real delamination damage with complex geometry (grown using a quasi-static indentation technique). The detection and quantification results show the location, size, and shape of the delamination damage.

  13. On the shaping factors of the secondary microseismic wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, L.; Stutzmann, E.; Capdeville, Y.; Farra, V.; Mangeney, A.; Morelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic noise in the period band 3-10 s is known as secondary microseism and it is generated at the ocean surface by the interaction of ocean gravity waves coming from nearly opposite directions. The seismic wavefield generated by a noise source is strongly affected by the source location and the propagation across 3D structures. In order to study the relative noise amplitudes recorded at the ocean bottom and on continental regions and investigate the seismic wavefield content, a simplified 2D model based on the spectral element method has been employed. The seismic wavefield recorded on the vertical component seismograms below the seafloor is mainly composed by the fundamental mode and the first overtone of Rayleigh waves and a mode conversion from the first overtone to the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves occurs at the ocean-continent boundary. The presence of a continental shelf at the ocean-continent boundary produces a negligible effect on land-recorded seismograms, whereas the source site effect, i.e. the source location with respect to the local ocean depth and sediment thickness, plays the major role. A source in shallow water mostly enhances the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves, whereas a source in deep water mainly enhances the first overtone of Rayleigh waves. Land-recorded long period signals (T>6 s) are mostly due to deep water sources, whereas land-recorded short period signals (T<6 s) are due to sources in relatively shallow water, located close to the shelf break.

  14. A Spatial Coherence Analysis of Seismic Wavefields Based on Array Covariance Matrix : Application to One Year of the USArray Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N.; de Rosny, J.; Landes, M.

    2015-12-01

    Theoretical demonstrations of the Green's function reconstruction from cross-correlations of the ambient noise rely on a strong hypothesis about the spatial homogeneity of the noise sources distribution. However, real seismic noise within the Earth is not homogeneously distributed. In particular, strongly coherent signals from earthquakes or localized noise sources might be harmful to the application of this method. Most of signal pre-processing techniques used to compensate for the wavefield inhomogeneity are based on temporal or spectral normalization of individual seismograms. Here we consider an approach based on simultaneous analysis of records from multiple sensors of a seismic array. We perform a time-frequency analysis of the eigenvalue spectrum of the covariance matrix. In a case of a wavefield dominated by a single noise source, the rank of the array covariance matrix is very low. Consequently, its eigenvalue spectrum contains a single dominant value. In a case of a well distribution of uncorrelated noise sources, the matrix rank increases and the eigenvalue spectrum is much broader. Therefore, we use the width of the eigenvalue spectrum as a measure of the level of the wavefield spatial coherence. The results are interpreted within the random matrix theory. We apply this approach on the wavefield recorded during the year 2010 by the USArray, and evaluate the effect of the energy normalization usually applied to single data prior to cross-correlation computation. We show that many coherent events resist to this normalization, and are still harmful to ambient noise tomography. We finally propose a new way to improve the energy normalization of data. We modify the eigenvalue spectrum of the covariance matrix to mitigate the effect of strong events. We show that cross-correlation symmetry is improved with this new technique, that may allow to use noise cross-correlations in zones where the seismic activity usually prevents the use of ambient seismic noise in

  15. A model reduction technique based on the PGD for elastic-viscoplastic computational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relun, N.; Néron, D.; Boucard, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a model reduction approach for elastic-viscoplastic evolution problems is considered. Enhancement of the PGD reduced model by a new iterative technique involving only elastic problems is investigated and allows to reduce CPU cost. The accuracy of the solution and convergence properties are tested on an academic example and a calculation time comparison with the commercial finite element code Abaqus is presented in the case of an industrial structure.

  16. Seismic spatial wavefield gradient and rotational rate measurements as new observables in land seismic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelzbach, Cedric; Sollberger, David; Van Renterghem, Cédéric; Häusler, Mauro; Robertsson, Johan; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, land-seismic data acquisition is conducted using vertical-component sensors. A more complete representation of the seismic wavefield can be obtained by employing multicomponent sensors recording the full vector wavefield. If groups of multicomponent sensors are deployed, then spatial seismic wavefield gradients and rotational rates can be estimated by differencing the outputs of closely spaced sensors. Such data capture all six degrees of freedom of a rigid body (three components of translation and three components of rotation), and hence allow an even more complete representation of the seismic wavefield compared to single station triaxial data. Seismic gradient and rotation data open up new possibilities to process land-seismic data. Potential benefits and applications of wavefield gradient data include local slowness estimation, improved arrival identification, wavefield separation and noise suppression. Using synthetic and field data, we explored the reliability and sensitivity of various multicomponent sensor layouts to estimate seismic wavefield gradients and rotational rates. Due to the wavelength and incidence-angle dependence of sensor-group reception patterns as a function of the number of sensors, station spacing and layout, one has to counterbalance the impacts of truncation errors, random noise attenuation, and sensitivity to perturbations such as amplitude variations and positioning errors when searching for optimum receiver configurations. Field experiments with special rotational rate sensors were used to verify array-based rotational-rate estimates. Seismic wavefield gradient estimates and inferred wavefield attributes such as instantaneous slowness enable improved arrival identification, e.g. wave type and path. Under favorable conditions, seismic-wavefield gradient attributes can be extracted from conventional vertical-component data and used to, for example, enhance the identification of shear waves. A further promising

  17. Challenges in the separation and analysis of scattered waves in angle-beam wavefield data

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2015-03-31

    The measurement of ultrasonic signals on a 2-D rectilinear grid resulting from a fixed source, referred to as wavefield imaging, is a powerful tool for visualizing wave propagation and scattering. Wavefield imaging provides a more complete picture of wave propagation than conventional single-point measurements, but creates more challenges for analysis. This work considers the development of wavefield-based methods for analyzing angle-beam wave propagation and scattering in plates. Methods of analysis focus on the separation of scattered waves from the total wavefield with the eventual goal of quantitative scatterer characterization in a laboratory environment. Two methods for wave separation are considered: frequency-wavenumber filtering and wavefield baseline subtraction. Frequency-wavenumber filtering is applied to wavefield data that are finely sampled in both space and time, whereas baseline subtraction is a technique that has typically been applied to individual signals recorded from fixed transducers rather than to full wavefield data. Baseline subtraction of wavefields, particularly for the frequency range considered here, is sensitive to both specimen alignment and temperature variations, whereas frequency-wavenumber methods are limited in their ability to separate waves traveling in the same direction. Results are shown for both methods with a focus on investigating and overcoming the challenges to full wavefield baseline subtraction.

  18. Estimation of the elastic parameters of human liver biomechanical models by means of medical images and evolutionary computation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, F; Rupérez, M J; Martín-Guerrero, J D; Monserrat, C; Lago, M A; Pareja, E; Brugger, S; López-Andújar, R

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a method to computationally estimate the elastic parameters of two biomechanical models proposed for the human liver. The method is aimed at avoiding the invasive measurement of its mechanical response. The chosen models are a second order Mooney-Rivlin model and an Ogden model. A novel error function, the geometric similarity function (GSF), is formulated using similarity coefficients widely applied in the field of medical imaging (Jaccard coefficient and Hausdorff coefficient). This function is used to compare two 3D images. One of them corresponds to a reference deformation carried out over a finite element (FE) mesh of a human liver from a computer tomography image, whilst the other one corresponds to the FE simulation of that deformation in which variations in the values of the model parameters are introduced. Several search strategies, based on GSF as cost function, are developed to accurately find the elastics parameters of the models, namely: two evolutionary algorithms (scatter search and genetic algorithm) and an iterative local optimization. The results show that GSF is a very appropriate function to estimate the elastic parameters of the biomechanical models since the mean of the relative mean absolute errors committed by the three algorithms is lower than 4%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Seismic Interferometry at a Large, Dense Array: Capturing the Wavefield at the Source Physics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzel, E.; Mellors, R. J.; Magana-Zook, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic interferometry is based on the observation that the Earth's background wavefield includes coherent energy, which can be recovered by observing over long time periods, allowing the incoherent energy to cancel out. The cross correlation of the energy recorded at a pair of stations results in an estimate of the Green's Function (GF) and is equivalent to the record of a simple source located at one of the stations as recorded by the other. This allows high resolution imagery beneath dense seismic networks even in areas of low seismicity. The power of these inter-station techniques increases rapidly as the number of seismometers in a network increases. For large networks the number of correlations computed can run into the millions and this becomes a "big-data" problem where data-management dominates the efficiency of the computations. In this study, we use several methods of seismic interferometry to obtain highly detailed images at the site of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE). The objective of SPE is to obtain a physics-based understanding of how seismic waves are created at and scattered near the source. In 2015, a temporary deployment of 1,000 closely spaced geophones was added to the main network of instruments at the site. We focus on three interferometric techniques: Shot interferometry (SI) uses the SPE shots as rich sources of high frequency, high signal energy. Coda interferometry (CI) isolates the energy from the scattered wavefield of distant earthquakes. Ambient noise correlation (ANC) uses the energy of the ambient background field. In each case, the data recorded at one seismometer are correlated with the data recorded at another to obtain an estimate of the GF between the two. The large network of mixed geophone and broadband instruments at the SPE allows us to calculate over 500,000 GFs, which we use to characterize the site and measure the localized wavefield. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by

  20. Iterative image reconstruction in elastic inhomogenous media with application to transcranial photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Joemini; Matthews, Thomas P.; Mitsuhashi, Kenji; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is an emerging computed imaging modality that exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles to form images of the photoacoustically induced initial pressure distribution within tissue. The PACT reconstruction problem corresponds to a time-domain inverse source problem, where the initial pressure distribution is recovered from the measurements recorded on an aperture outside the support of the source. A major challenge in transcranial PACT brain imaging is to compensate for aberrations in the measured data due to the propagation of the photoacoustic wavefields through the skull. To properly account for these effects, a wave equation-based inversion method should be employed that can model the heterogeneous elastic properties of the medium. In this study, an iterative image reconstruction method for 3D transcranial PACT is developed based on the elastic wave equation. To accomplish this, a forward model based on a finite-difference time-domain discretization of the elastic wave equation is established. Subsequently, gradient-based methods are employed for computing penalized least squares estimates of the initial source distribution that produced the measured photoacoustic data. The developed reconstruction algorithm is validated and investigated through computer-simulation studies.

  1. Fast 3d Hybrid Seismic Modeling: Ray-fd Approach For Elastic Models With Locally Complex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprsal, I.; Brokesova, J.; Faeh, D.; Giardini, D.

    Hybrid approaches may find broad applications wherever full source, path,and site effects modeling methods are too expensive. A new efficient hybrid method allowing to compute seismic wavefield in large 3D elastic models containing a complex local structure embedded in a large, but considerably simpler, structure is designed. This hybrid method combines the ray approach in the large simple structure with the finite difference (FD) approach in the local complex structure. The hybrid method is based on two successive steps. In the 1st one, the source and path information is carried by wavefield propagating in the large simple structure. This wavefield, calculated by the ray method, is incident at the points along a two-fold formal boundary (excitation box, EB) surrounding that part of the model which is to be replaced by the complex medium in the 2nd step. 3D rays are necessary due to ar- bitrary source-EB configuration, even in case the 1st step structure is less dimensional (2D, 1D, homogeneous). Along EB, the ray endpoints may be distributed sparsely thanks to relative simplicity of the structure. This reduces computer time requirements and also the size of the excitation file saved on the disk. The ray wavefield along EB provides (after interpolation in space and time) the input for the second step consisting in calculating the complete wavefield by the 3D FD method on irregular grids. The FD computational domain contains the EB and its close vicinity. The 2nd step model differs from the 1st step model only inside the EB where the local complex structure is inserted. To verify the consistency between the 1st and the 2nd step binding, the 2nd step computation can be performed on (unchanged) 1st step model ('replication test'). This should give the same wavefield as the 1st step inside, and zero wavefield outside the EB. The EB remains fully permeable for all waves propagating within the FD domain. Provided the 1st step structure does not contain too many layers

  2. Direct and Inverse Problems in Statistical Wavefields

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Emil

    2002-09-01

    In this report account is presented of research carried out during the period September 1, 1999-August 31, 2002 under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, grant DE-FG02-90ER14119. The research covered several areas of modern optical physics, particularly propagation of partially coherent light and its interaction with deterministic and with random media, spectroscopy with partially coherent light, polarization properties of statistical wave fields, effects of moving diffusers on coherence and on the spectra of light transmitted and scattered by them, reciprocity inequalities involving spatial and angular correlations of partially coherent beams, spreading of partially coherent beams in-random media, inverse source problems, computed and diffraction tomography and partially coherent solitons. We have discovered a new phenomenon in an emerging field of physical optics, known as singular optics; specifically we found that the spectrum of light changes drastically in the neighborhood of points where the intensity has zero value and where, consequently, the phase becomes singular, We noted some potential applications of this phenomenon. The results of our investigations were reported in 39 publications. They are listed on pages 3 to 5. Summaries of these publications are given on pages 6-13. Scientists who have participated in this research are listed on page 14.

  3. On the shaping factors of the secondary microseismic wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, L.; Stutzmann, E.; Capdeville, Y.; Farra, V.; Mangeney, A.; Morelli, A.

    2015-09-01

    Seismic noise in the period band 3-10 s is known as secondary microseism, and it is generated at the ocean surface by the interaction of ocean gravity waves coming from nearly opposite directions. In this paper, we investigate the seismic content of the wavefield generated by a source at the ocean surface and three of the major wavefield shaping factors using the 2-D spectral element method: the ocean-continent boundary, the source site effect, and the thickness of seafloor sediments. The seismic wavefield recorded on the vertical component seismograms below the seafloor is mainly composed of the fundamental mode and the first overtone of Rayleigh waves. A mode conversion from the first overtone to the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves occurs at the ocean-continent boundary. The presence of a continental shelf at the ocean-continent boundary produces a negligible effect on land-recorded seismograms, whereas the source site effect, i.e., the source location with respect to the local ocean depth and sediment thickness, plays the major role. A source in shallow water mostly enhances the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves, whereas a source in deep water mainly enhances the first overtone of Rayleigh waves. Land-recorded long-period signals (T > 6 s) are mostly due to deep water sources, whereas land-recorded short-period signals (T < 6 s) are due to sources in relatively shallow water, located close to the shelf break. Seafloor sediments around the source region trap seismic waves reducing the amplitude of land-recorded signals, especially at long periods (T > 6 s).

  4. Nuclear-relaxed elastic and piezoelectric constants of materials: Computational aspects of two quantum-mechanical approaches.

    PubMed

    Erba, Alessandro; Caglioti, Dominique; Zicovich-Wilson, Claudio Marcelo; Dovesi, Roberto

    2017-02-15

    Two alternative approaches for the quantum-mechanical calculation of the nuclear-relaxation term of elastic and piezoelectric tensors of crystalline materials are illustrated and their computational aspects discussed: (i) a numerical approach based on the geometry optimization of atomic positions at strained lattice configurations and (ii) a quasi-analytical approach based on the evaluation of the force- and displacement-response internal-strain tensors as combined with the interatomic force-constant matrix. The two schemes are compared both as regards their computational accuracy and performance. The latter approach, not being affected by the many numerical parameters and procedures of a typical quasi-Newton geometry optimizer, constitutes a more reliable and robust mean to the evaluation of such properties, at a reduced computational cost for most crystalline systems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A fourth order accurate finite difference scheme for the computation of elastic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Jordan, K. E.; Lemesurier, B. J.; Turkel, E.

    1986-01-01

    A finite difference for elastic waves is introduced. The model is based on the first order system of equations for the velocities and stresses. The differencing is fourth order accurate on the spatial derivatives and second order accurate in time. The model is tested on a series of examples including the Lamb problem, scattering from plane interf aces and scattering from a fluid-elastic interface. The scheme is shown to be effective for these problems. The accuracy and stability is insensitive to the Poisson ratio. For the class of problems considered here it is found that the fourth order scheme requires for two-thirds to one-half the resolution of a typical second order scheme to give comparable accuracy.

  6. Computer simulation of material behavior at the notch tip: Effect of microrotations on elastic energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, D. D.; Panin, S. V.; Maksimov, P. V.; Panin, V. E.; Babich, D. S.; Berto, F.

    2016-11-01

    The paper is devoted to detailed investigation of rotational deformation modes at the notch tip during shock loading. Using hybrid discrete-continuum approach of Excitable Cellular Automata the series of numerical experiments were conducted to simulate deformation behavior of ductile steel in the vicinities of U-, I- and V-notches. The detailed analysis of the force moment distribution at the notch tip allowed revealing the relationship between the rotational deformation modes at different scales. It was found that the elastic energy release is realized by means of the modulation of the magnitude and the sign of the force moment. The obtained results makes possible to optimize crystal structure for improvement of mechanical properties of the material in the way of elastic energy release by reversible microrotations.

  7. Traction force microscopy on soft elastic substrates: A guide to recent computational advances.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Ulrich S; Soiné, Jérôme R D

    2015-11-01

    The measurement of cellular traction forces on soft elastic substrates has become a standard tool for many labs working on mechanobiology. Here we review the basic principles and different variants of this approach. In general, the extraction of the substrate displacement field from image data and the reconstruction procedure for the forces are closely linked to each other and limited by the presence of experimental noise. We discuss different strategies to reconstruct cellular forces as they follow from the foundations of elasticity theory, including two- versus three-dimensional, inverse versus direct and linear versus non-linear approaches. We also discuss how biophysical models can improve force reconstruction and comment on practical issues like substrate preparation, image processing and the availability of software for traction force microscopy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A preconditioner for the finite element computation of incompressible, nonlinear elastic deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, J. P.

    2017-06-01

    Large, incompressible elastic deformations are governed by a system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The finite element discretisation of these partial differential equations yields a system of nonlinear algebraic equations that are usually solved using Newton's method. On each iteration of Newton's method, a linear system must be solved. We exploit the structure of the Jacobian matrix to propose a preconditioner, comprising two steps. The first step is the solution of a relatively small, symmetric, positive definite linear system using the preconditioned conjugate gradient method. This is followed by a small number of multigrid V-cycles for a larger linear system. Through the use of exemplar elastic deformations, the preconditioner is demonstrated to facilitate the iterative solution of the linear systems arising. The number of GMRES iterations required has only a very weak dependence on the number of degrees of freedom of the linear systems.

  9. Computation of antenna vibration mode elastic-rigid and effective-weight coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1992-01-01

    A significant amount of both qualitative and quantitative information about structures can be derived from the elastic-rigid structural coupling matrices, and from the effective modal inertias and masses. Typical finite-element analysis programs do not provide this information as part of the regular output. This report presents an easy way to develop the necessary information from ordinary program output, and shows how to deal with alternative origins for the reference coordinate system.

  10. A study of self-propelled elastic cylindrical micro-swimmers using modeling and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingling; Čanić, Sunčica; Quaini, Annalisa; Pan, Tsorng-Whay

    2016-06-01

    We study propulsion of micro-swimmers in 3D creeping flow. The swimmers are assumed to be made of elastic cylindrical hollow tubes. The swimming is generated by the contractions of the tube's elastic membrane walls producing a traveling wave in the form of a ;step-function; traversing the swimmer from right to left, propelling the swimmer from left to right. The problem is motivated by medical applications such as drug delivery. The influence of several non-dimensional design parameters on the velocity of the swimmer is investigated, including the swimmer aspect ratio, and the amplitude of the traveling wave relative to the swimmer radius. An immersed boundary method based on a finite element method approach is successfully combined with an elastic spring network model to simulate the two-way fluid-structure interaction coupling between the elastic cylindrical tube and the flow of a 3D viscous, incompressible fluid. To gain a deeper insight into the influence of various parameters on the swimmer speed, a reduced 1D fluid-structure interaction model was derived and validated. It was found that fast swimmers are those with large tube aspect ratios, and with the amplitude of the traveling wave which is roughly 50% of the reference swimmer radius. It was shown that the speed of our ;optimal swimmer; is around 1.5 swimmer lengths per second, which is at the top of the class of all currently manufactured micro-swimmers swimming in low Reynolds number flows (Re =10-6), reported in [11].

  11. Rapid acquisition of high resolution full wave-field borehole seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Sleefe, G.E.; Harding, R.S. Jr.; Fairborn, J.W.; Paulsson, B.N.P.

    1993-04-01

    An essential requirement for both Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) and Cross-Hole Seismic Profiling (CHSP) is the rapid acquisition of high resolution borehole seismic data. Additionally, full wave-field recording using three-component receivers enables the use of both transmitted and reflected elastic wave events in the resulting seismic images of the subsurface. To this end, an advanced three- component multi-station borehole seismic receiver system has been designed and developed by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and OYO Geospace. The system requires data from multiple three-component wall-locking accelerometer packages and telemeters digital data to the surface in real-time. Due to the multiplicity of measurement stations and the real-time data link, acquisition time for the borehole seismic survey is significantly reduced. The system was tested at the Chevron La Habra Test Site using Chevron`s clamped axial borehole vibrator as the seismic source. Several source and receiver fans were acquired using a four-station version of the advanced system. For comparison purposes, an equivalent data set was acquired using a standard analog wall-locking geophone receiver. The test data indicate several enhancements provided by the multi-station receiver relative to the standard, drastically improved signal-to-noise ratio, increased signal bandwidth, the detection of multiple reflectors, and a true 4:1 reduction in survey time.

  12. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Scattered Teleseismic Wavefields in a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, I. B.; Zheng, H.

    2005-12-01

    For a teleseismic array targeting subducting crust in a zone of active subduction, scattering from the zone underlying the trench result in subhorizontally-propagating waves that could be difficult to distinguish from converted P- and S- wave backscattered from the surface. Because back-scattered modes often provide the most spectacular images of subducting slabs, it is important to understand their differences from the arrivals scattered from the trench zone. To investigate the detailed teleseismic wavefield in a subduction zone environment, we performed a full-waveform, 3-D visco-elastic finite-difference modeling of teleseismic wave propagation using a Beowulf cluster. The synthetics show strong scattering from the trench zone, dominated by the mantle and crustal P-waves propagating at 6.2-8.1.km/s and slower. These scattered waves occupy the same time and moveout intervals as the backscattered modes, and also have similar amplitudes. Although their amplitude decay characters are different, with the uncertainties in the velocity and density structure of the subduction zone, unambiguous distinguishing of these modes appears difficult. However, under minimal assumptions (in particular, without invoking slab dehydration), recent observations of receiver function amplitudes decreasing away from the trench favor the interpretation of trench-zone scattering.

  13. 3D elastic full waveform inversion: case study from a land seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormann, Jean; Marti, David; Rodriguez, Juan-Esteban; Marzan, Ignacio; Ferrer, Miguel; Gutierrez, Natalia; Farres, Albert; Hanzich, Mauricio; de la Puente, Josep; Carbonell, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is one of the most advanced processing methods that is recently reaching a mature state after years of solving theoretical and technical issues such as the non-uniqueness of the solution and harnessing the huge computational power required by realistic scenarios. BSIT (Barcelona Subsurface Imaging Tools, www.bsc.es/bsit) includes a FWI algorithm that can tackle with very complex problems involving large datasets. We present here the application of this system to a 3D dataset acquired to constrain the shallow subsurface. This is where the wavefield is the most complicated, because most of the wavefield conversions takes place in the shallow region and also because the media is much more laterally heterogeneous. With this in mind, at least isotropic elastic approximation would be suitable as kernel engine for FWI. The current study explores the possibilities to apply elastic isotropic FWI using only the vertical component of the recorded seismograms. The survey covers an area of 500×500 m2, and consists in a receivers grid of 10 m×20 m combined with a 250 kg accelerated weight-drop as source on a displaced grid of 20 m×20 m. One of the main challenges in this case study is the costly 3D modeling that includes topography and substantial free surface effects. FWI is applied to a data subset (shooting lines 4 to 12), and is performed for 3 frequencies ranging from 15 to 25 Hz. The starting models are obtained from travel-time tomography and the all computation is run on 75 nodes of Mare Nostrum supercomputer during 3 days. The resulting models provide a higher resolution of the subsurface structures, and show a good correlation with the available borehole measurements. FWI allows to extend in a reliable way this 1D knowledge (borehole) to 3D.

  14. Characteristic wavefield in an experimental rock sample inferred from a 3D FDM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimitsu, N.; Furumura, T.; Maeda, T.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the origin of wave packets in elastic waves propagate through a rock sample based on a 3D finite difference method (FDM) simulation. Though direct waves of the transmitted waves have been applied to estimate the internal structure of a rock sample, later part of the waveforms did not utilized because their origin were unclear. Understanding the reflection and conversion effect in a rock sample would help to retrieve more information from whole waveform as with the analysis in natural fields. We numerically simulated the elastic wave propagation in a medium model which covers a cylindrical shape of a rock sample. The model was discretized into 1024 x 1024 x 2048 grid points with an interval of 54 micrometer in horizontal direction and 60 micrometer in vertical direction. The density, P wave velocity, and S wave velocity of the each grid point are assumed to be proportional to the X-ray absorption coefficient derived from the micro focus X-ray CT images of a Westery granite sample. We applied a single point force on the boundary of the model sample which mimics realistic transducer movement. The wave propagation movie obtained from the numerical simulation shows very complicated wavefield in a rock sample. Because a rock sample is small and closed, once waves are radiated, they were trapped in the sample by repeating reflection and conversion. Many reflected waves which followed by the converted waves were generated at the sample side surface as well as the upper and lower end. The phase with the largest amplitude propagate along the curved boundary was detected as Rayleigh wave from the particle motions on the sample side surface. Additionally, the surface waves were observed not only in the horizontal section but also in the vertical section. Our simulation indicated that the later phases of the transmitted waves are highly affected by the sample boundary. In order to extract accurate interior information from the transmitted waves, elimination

  15. Computer-controlled apparatus for measuring complex elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants of polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, T.; Date, M.; Ishida, K.; Ikeda, Y.

    1986-02-01

    Principles and design details are described for a fully automatic system measuring frequency and temperature spectra of the complex elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants of polymer films. A microcomputer is used to control all processes including wave generation, sampling, and calculations. A sinusoidal excitation wave is written onto a RAM, readout by an external clock, and applied to a sample via a D/A converter. The resulting signals related to force, deformation, charge, and voltage are simultaneously sampled using the same clock and are determined as complex quantities through Fourier transformation. Their ratios give corresponding complex response functions. A multifrequency signal consisting of eight sinusoidal waves with frequencies of common ratio 2 is used to obtain frequency spectra over two decades at a time. This system operates over a frequency range from 0.01 to 100 Hz for elastic and piezoelectric measurements and from 0.01 Hz to 10 kHz for dielectric measurements at temperatures from -160 to 250 °C with an accuracy of 0.1% in tan δ.

  16. Validation of a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction model simulating flow through an elastic aperture.

    PubMed

    Quaini, A; Canic, S; Glowinski, R; Igo, S; Hartley, C J; Zoghbi, W; Little, S

    2012-01-10

    This work presents a validation of a fluid-structure interaction computational model simulating the flow conditions in an in vitro mock heart chamber modeling mitral valve regurgitation during the ejection phase during which the trans-valvular pressure drop and valve displacement are not as large. The mock heart chamber was developed to study the use of 2D and 3D color Doppler techniques in imaging the clinically relevant complex intra-cardiac flow events associated with mitral regurgitation. Computational models are expected to play an important role in supporting, refining, and reinforcing the emerging 3D echocardiographic applications. We have developed a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction algorithm based on a semi-implicit, monolithic method, combined with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach to capture the fluid domain motion. The mock regurgitant mitral valve corresponding to an elastic plate with a geometric orifice, was modeled using 3D elasticity, while the blood flow was modeled using the 3D Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible, viscous fluid. The two are coupled via the kinematic and dynamic conditions describing the two-way coupling. The pressure, the flow rate, and orifice plate displacement were measured and compared with numerical simulation results. In-line flow meter was used to measure the flow, pressure transducers were used to measure the pressure, and a Doppler method developed by one of the authors was used to measure the axial displacement of the orifice plate. The maximum recorded difference between experiment and numerical simulation for the flow rate was 4%, the pressure 3.6%, and for the orifice displacement 15%, showing excellent agreement between the two. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Validation of a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction model simulating flow through an elastic aperture

    PubMed Central

    Quaini, A.; Canic, S.; Glowinski, R.; Igo, S.; Hartley, C.J.; Zoghbi, W.; Little, S.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a validation of a fluid-structure interaction computational model simulating the flow conditions in an in vitro mock heart chamber modeling mitral valve regurgitation during the ejection phase during which the trans-valvular pressure drop and valve displacement are not as large. The mock heart chamber was developed to study the use of 2D and 3D color Doppler techniques in imaging the clinically relevant complex intra-cardiac flow events associated with mitral regurgitation. Computational models are expected to play an important role in supporting, refining, and reinforcing the emerging 3D echocardiographic applications. We have developed a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction algorithm based on a semi-implicit, monolithic method, combined with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach to capture the fluid domain motion. The mock regurgitant mitral valve corresponding to an elastic plate with a geometric orifice, was modeled using 3D elasticity, while the blood flow was modeled using the 3D Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible, viscous fluid. The two are coupled via the kinematic and dynamic conditions describing the two-way coupling. The pressure, the flow rate, and orifice plate displacement were measured and compared with numerical simulation results. In-line flow meter was used to measure the flow, pressure transducers were used to measure the pressure, and a Doppler method developed by one of the authors was used to measure the axial displacement of the orifice plate. The maximum recorded difference between experiment and numerical simulation for the flow rate was 4%, the pressure 3.6%, and for the orifice displacement 15%, showing excellent agreement between the two. PMID:22138194

  18. Experimental and computational analysis of micromotions of an uncemented femoral knee implant using elastic and plastic bone material models.

    PubMed

    Berahmani, Sanaz; Janssen, Dennis; Verdonschot, Nico

    2017-08-16

    It is essential to calculate micromotions at the bone-implant interface of an uncemented femoral total knee replacement (TKR) using a reliable computational model. In the current study, experimental measurements of micromotions were compared with predicted micromotions by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using two bone material models: linear elastic and post-yield material behavior, while an actual range of interference fit was simulated. The primary aim was to investigate whether a plasticity model is essential in order to calculate realistic micromotions. Additionally, experimental bone damage at the interface was compared with the FEA simulated range. TKR surgical cuts were applied to five cadaveric femora and micro- and clinical CT- scans of these un-implanted specimens were made to extract geometrical and material properties, respectively. Micromotions at the interface were measured using digital image correlation. Cadaver-specific FEA models were created based on the experimental set-up. The average experimental micromotion of all specimens was 53.1±42.3µm (mean±standard deviation (SD)), which was significantly higher than the micromotions predicted by both models, using either the plastic or elastic material model (26.5±23.9µm and 10.1±10.1µm, respectively; p-value<0.001 for both material models). The difference between the two material models was also significant (p-value<0.001). The predicted damage had a magnitude and distribution which was comparable to the experimental bone damage. We conclude that, although the plastic model could not fully predict the micro motions, it is more suitable for pre-clinical assessment of a press-fit TKR implant than using an elastic bone model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Elastic full waveform inversion based on mode decomposition: the approach and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. F.; Cheng, J. B.

    2017-05-01

    Elastic full waveform inversion (EFWI) aims to reduce the misfit between recorded and modelled multicomponent seismic data for deducing a detailed model of elastic parameters in the subsurface. Because the explicit computation and inversion of the Hessian matrix is extremely resource intensive, a gradient-based (rather than Hessian-based) minimization is generally applied for large-scale applications. However, the multiparameter trade-off effects cause cross-talks in the computed gradients and thus severely affect the convergence and the quality of the inverted model. Recently, preconditioning the gradients based on elastic wave mode decomposition has been suggested for mitigating the parameter trade-offs in the EFWI process. In this paper, we propose a mode decomposition (MD)-based EFWI approach in which the preconditioned gradients are obtained through the cross-correlation of the forward and decomposed adjoint wavefields in the time domain. Based on the decomposed Frechét derivatives, we explain the mechanism of this approach through analyses of Hessian and resolution matrices and comparison with the Gauss-Newton gradients. Numerical examples of a simple fluid-saturated model and the Marmousi-II model demonstrate that the MD-based preconditioned conjugate-gradient approach can mitigate the trade-off between the P- and S-wave velocities and achieve fast convergence without any Hessian-involved calculations.

  20. Health monitoring of complex curved structures using an ultrasonic wavefield propagation imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Takatsubo, Junji; Toyama, Nobuyuki; Kang, Dong-Hoon

    2007-12-01

    An ultrasonic wavefield propagation imaging system is introduced and then applied for ultrasonic wavefield imaging of complex curved surfaces. A Q-switched pulsed laser is utilized as a moving ultrasonic generator, and a PZT ultrasonic sensor is fixed during the laser beam scanning and detects the ultrasonic waves propagated from the points excited by the laser beam. The waveforms are allocated in the spatial domain of the scanned points and then manipulated in the form of a time versus wavefield movie. The visualized wavefields enable easy detection and interpretation of structural defects because anomalies during wavefield propagation can be visualized. Furthermore, this ultrasonic wavefield propagation imaging system enables reference-free inspection, complex curved surface scanning because it does not require control of focal length and incidence angle of the laser beam, and excellent adaptability with built-in structural health monitoring sensors, such as piezoelectric and fiber optic sensors. The system is demonstrated in the applications of wavefield visualization on a drill surface, detection of mass loss parts inside an elbow pipe joint, and detection and characterization of impact damage and stringer disbond in a composite skin-stringer structure.

  1. Multicomponent wavefield characterization with a novel scanning laser interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Thomas E.; Wijk, Kasper van; Pouet, Bruno; Wartelle, Alexis

    2010-07-15

    The in-plane component of the wavefield provides valuable information about media properties from seismology to nondestructive testing. A new compact scanning laser ultrasonic interferometer collects light scattered away from the angle of incidence to provide the absolute ultrasonic displacement for both the out-of-plane and an in-plane components. This new system is tested by measuring the radial and vertical polarization of a Rayleigh wave in an aluminum half-space. The estimated amplitude ratio of the horizontal and vertical displacement agrees well with the theoretical value. The phase difference exhibits a small bias between the two components due to a slightly different frequency response between the two processing channels of the prototype electronic circuitry.

  2. Uniform asymptotic formula for the Aharonov Bohm wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    A uniform asymptotic formula for the Aharonov-Bohm wavefield (that of a plane quantum wave scattered by a thin straight solenoid) far away from the solenoid is obtained in a direct way. Actually quite good accuracy is achieved even down to one wavelength away. The error is numerically of order radius^(-3/2) for all values of polar angle, including directly forwards. Several previous formulas, uniform and otherwise, for the far field limit exist in the literature. All contain the essential ingredient: the Fresnel integral (complex error function), but ordinarily the error in these formulas is of order radius^(-1/2) in the forwards direction where the Fresnel contribution is most important.

  3. Multicomponent wavefield characterization with a novel scanning laser interferometer.

    PubMed

    Blum, Thomas E; van Wijk, Kasper; Pouet, Bruno; Wartelle, Alexis

    2010-07-01

    The in-plane component of the wavefield provides valuable information about media properties from seismology to nondestructive testing. A new compact scanning laser ultrasonic interferometer collects light scattered away from the angle of incidence to provide the absolute ultrasonic displacement for both the out-of-plane and an in-plane components. This new system is tested by measuring the radial and vertical polarization of a Rayleigh wave in an aluminum half-space. The estimated amplitude ratio of the horizontal and vertical displacement agrees well with the theoretical value. The phase difference exhibits a small bias between the two components due to a slightly different frequency response between the two processing channels of the prototype electronic circuitry.

  4. Small-slope scattering from rough elastic ocean floors: general theory and computational algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gragg, R F; Wurmser, D; Gauss, R C

    2001-12-01

    In this article acoustic scattering by a random rough interface that separates a fluid incident medium from an underlying uniform scattering medium, either fluid or elastic solid, in cases for which the Bragg scale lies within the power-law tail of the roughness spectrum is dealt with. The physical foundation is an inherently reciprocity-preserving, local small-slope theory. A fully bistatic formulation is developed for the scattering strength, together with a robust numerical implementation that allows a wide range of spectral exponent values. The practical result for ocean acoustics is a significantly improved description of the interface component of sea floor scattering. Calculations are presented to demonstrate the advantage of this approach over perturbation theory, and to illustrate its dependence on frequency and environmental parameters as well as its operation in bistatic geometries.

  5. Computational Implementation of Nudged Elastic Band, Rigid Rotation, and Corresponding Force Optimization.

    PubMed

    Herbol, Henry C; Stevenson, James; Clancy, Paulette

    2017-07-11

    The nudged elastic band (NEB) algorithm is the leading method of calculating transition states in chemical systems. However, the current literature lacks adequate guidance for users wishing to implement a key part of NEB, namely, the optimization method. Here, we provide details of this implementation for the following six gradient descent algorithms: steepest descent, quick-min Verlet, FIRE, conjugate gradient, Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS), and limited-memory BFGS (LBFGS). We also construct and implement a new, accelerated backtracking line search method in concert with a partial Procrustes superimposition to improve upon existing methods. Validation is achieved through benchmark calculations of two test cases, the isomerization of CNX and BOX (where X ∈ {H, Li, Na}) and the study of a conformational change within an alanine dipeptide. We also make direct comparisons to the well-established codebase known as the atomic simulation environment.

  6. Extension of migration velocity analysis to transmitted wavefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameloise, Charles-Antoine; Chauris, Hervé

    2016-10-01

    Migration velocity analysis aims at automatically updating the large-scale components of the velocity model, called macromodel. Extended Common Image Gathers are panels used to evaluate focusing after imaging and are constructed as a function of a spatial shift introduced in the imaging condition. We investigate how transmitted waves can also be used in migration velocity analysis: instead of back-propagating the residuals associated with reflected waves, we propose to back-propagate the full wavefield. The image function, equivalent to the migrated section for reflected data, does not exhibit localized events in space along horizons but is still sensitive to the choice of the background velocity model and can thus be coupled to the same objective function defined in the image domain. In order to enhance the benefits of direct waves, we consider a cross-well configuration. Direct waves provide a large illumination between two vertical wells. Associated Common Image Gathers present different characteristics than the ones associated with reflected waves in surface acquisition. In particular, energy is spread over up to the maximum penetration depth. We invert cross-well seismic data along two lines. In the first case, the input data contain the full wavefield dominated by transmitted waves. It demonstrates the possibility to handle transmitted waves to determine the velocity model. It appears that the misfit in the data domain is largely reduced after inversion. In the second case, we use the same algorithm, but with reflected observed data only, as in a classical approach. Most of velocity updates are localized around the reflectivity, leading to an incorrect final model. This demonstrates the benefit of transmitted waves for migration velocity analysis in a cross-well configuration.

  7. Computer simulation of model cohesive powders: Plastic consolidation, structural changes, and elasticity under isotropic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilabert, F. A.; Roux, J.-N.; Castellanos, A.

    2008-09-01

    The quasistatic behavior of a simple two-dimensional model of a cohesive powder under isotropic loads is investigated by discrete element simulations. We ignore contact plasticity and focus on the effect of geometry and collective rearrangements on the material behavior. The loose packing states, as assembled and characterized in a previous numerical study [Gilabert, Roux, and Castellanos, Phys. Rev. E 75, 011303 (2007)], are observed, under growing confining pressure P , to undergo important structural changes, while solid fraction Φ irreversibly increases (typically, from 0.4-0.5 to 0.75-0.8). The system state goes through three stages, with different forms of the plastic consolidation curve, i.e., Φ as a function of the growing reduced pressure P*=Pa/F0 , defined with adhesion force F0 and grain diameter a . In the low-confinement regime (I), the system undergoes negligible plastic compaction, and its structure is influenced by the assembling process. In regime II the material state is independent of initial conditions, and the void ratio varies linearly with lnP [i.e., Δ(1/Φ)=λΔ(lnP*) ], as described in the engineering literature. Plasticity index λ is reduced in the presence of a small rolling resistance (RR). In the last stage of compaction (III), Φ approaches an asymptotic, maximum solid fraction Φmax , as a power law Φmax-Φ∝(P*)-α , with α≃1 , and properties of cohesionless granular packs are gradually retrieved. Under consolidation, while the range ξ of fractal density correlations decreases, force patterns reorganize from self-balanced clusters to force chains, with correlative evolutions of force distributions, and elastic moduli increase by a large amount. Plastic deformation events correspond to very small changes in the network topology, while the denser regions tend to move like rigid bodies. Elastic properties are dominated by the bending of thin junctions in loose systems. For growing RR those tend to form particle chains, the

  8. Towards Monitoring-as-a-service for Scientific Computing Cloud applications using the ElasticSearch ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnasco, S.; Berzano, D.; Guarise, A.; Lusso, S.; Masera, M.; Vallero, S.

    2015-12-01

    The INFN computing centre in Torino hosts a private Cloud, which is managed with the OpenNebula cloud controller. The infrastructure offers Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) services to different scientific computing applications. The main stakeholders of the facility are a grid Tier-2 site for the ALICE collaboration at LHC, an interactive analysis facility for the same experiment and a grid Tier-2 site for the BESIII collaboration, plus an increasing number of other small tenants. The dynamic allocation of resources to tenants is partially automated. This feature requires detailed monitoring and accounting of the resource usage. We set up a monitoring framework to inspect the site activities both in terms of IaaS and applications running on the hosted virtual instances. For this purpose we used the ElasticSearch, Logstash and Kibana (ELK) stack. The infrastructure relies on a MySQL database back-end for data preservation and to ensure flexibility to choose a different monitoring solution if needed. The heterogeneous accounting information is transferred from the database to the ElasticSearch engine via a custom Logstash plugin. Each use-case is indexed separately in ElasticSearch and we setup a set of Kibana dashboards with pre-defined queries in order to monitor the relevant information in each case. For the IaaS metering, we developed sensors for the OpenNebula API. The IaaS level information gathered through the API is sent to the MySQL database through an ad-hoc developed RESTful web service. Moreover, we have developed a billing system for our private Cloud, which relies on the RabbitMQ message queue for asynchronous communication to the database and on the ELK stack for its graphical interface. The Italian Grid accounting framework is also migrating to a similar set-up. Concerning the application level, we used the Root plugin TProofMonSenderSQL to collect accounting data from the interactive analysis facility. The BESIII

  9. Elastic Second-Order Computer Analysis of Beam-Columns and Frames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    frame is loaded as shown in Fig. 20 ( Beaufait et al. )[141 El is constant for all members. The deflections and moments at the joints considering the...11- 3, 11-22 [14] Beaufait , Fred W., Rowan, William Jr. H, Hoadley, Peter G., and Hackett, Robert M, Computer Methods of Structural Analysis

  10. Quantification of Shear Wave Scattering From Far-Surface Defects via Ultrasonic Wavefield Measurements.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Alexander J; Michaels, Jennifer E; Kummer, Joseph W; Michaels, Thomas E

    2017-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation methods rely on prior knowledge of the expected interaction of ultrasonic waves with defects to inform detection and characterization decisions. Wavefield imaging, which refers to the measurement of signals originating from a spatially fixed source on a 2-D rectilinear grid, can be applied to visualize the effect of a subsurface scatterer on surface-measured wave motion. Here, obliquely incident shear waves are directed at the far surface of a plate containing a through-hole using the well-known angle-beam ultrasonic inspection method. A laser vibrometer and laboratory scanner are used to record the resulting out-of-plane motion on the plate surface in the vicinity of the through-hole both before and after a far-surface corner notch is introduced and subsequently enlarged. Waves scattered from the notch are isolated from the incident and hole-scattered waves via baseline subtraction of wavefields. The scattered wavefields are then filtered in the frequency-wavenumber domain to separate Rayleigh, shear, and longitudinal contributions to the scattered wavefield. The filtered wavefields are interpolated in space to obtain 2-D radial wavefield slices originating at the base of the notch. Each radial slice is analyzed to quantify scattering as a function of observation direction, resulting in Rayleigh, shear, and longitudinal scattering profiles for each notch size. The results are compared for four different notch sizes and two transducer orientations.

  11. Shear Elastic Modulus on Patellar Tendon Captured from Supersonic Shear Imaging: Correlation with Tangent Traction Modulus Computed from Material Testing System and Test-Retest Reliability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi Jie; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the elastic properties of a tendon could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of tendon injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the shear elastic modulus on the patellar tendon captured from a Supersonic Shear Imaging (SSI) and the tangent traction modulus computed from a Material testing system (MTS) on 8 fresh patellar pig tendons (Experiment I). Test-retest reliability of the shear elastic modulus captured from the SSI was established in Experiment II on 22 patellar tendons of 11 healthy human subjects using the SSI. Spearman Correlation coefficients for the shear elastic modulus and tangent traction modulus ranged from 0.82 to 1.00 (all p<0.05) on the 8 tendons. The intra and inter-operator reliabilities were 0.98 (95% CI: 0.93-0.99) and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.93-0.98) respectively. The results from this study demonstrate that the shear elastic modulus of the patellar tendon measured by the SSI is related to the tangent traction modulus quantified by the MTS. The SSI shows good intra and inter-operator repeatability. Therefore, the present study shows that SSI can be used to assess elastic properties of a tendon.

  12. Hybrid absorbing boundary condition for three-dimensional elastic wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Liu, Yang; Ren, Zhi-Ming; Cai, Xiao-Hui; Li, Bei; Xu, Shi-Gang; Zhou, Le-Kai

    2017-06-01

    Edge reflections are inevitable in numerical modeling of seismic wavefields, and they are usually attenuated by absorbing boundary conditions. However, the commonly used perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary condition requires special treatment for the absorbing zone, and in three-dimensional (3D) modeling, it has to split each variable into three corresponding variables, which increases the computing time and memory storage. In contrast, the hybrid absorbing boundary condition (HABC) has the advantages such as ease of implementation, less computation time, and near-perfect absorption; it is thus able to enhance the computational efficiency of 3D elastic wave modeling. In this study, a HABC is developed from two-dimensional (2D) modeling into 3D modeling based on the 1st Higdon one way wave equations, and a HABC is proposed that is suitable for a 3D elastic wave numerical simulation. Numerical simulation results for a homogenous model and a complex model indicate that the proposed HABC method is more effective and has better absorption than the traditional PML method.

  13. Ceramic and polymeric dental onlays evaluated by photo-elasticity, optical coherence tomography, and micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Topala, Florin; Ionita, Ciprian; Negru, Radu; Fabriky, Mihai; Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Marsavina, Liviu; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Dental onlays are restorations used to repair rear teeth that have a mild to moderate amount of decay. They can also be used to restore teeth that are cracked or fractured if the damage is not severe enough to require a dental crown. The use of onlays requires less tooth reduction than does the use of metal fillings. This allows dentists to conserve more of a patient's natural tooth structure in the treatment process. The aims of this study are to evaluate the biomechanical comportment of the dental onlays, by using the 3D photo elasticity method and to investigate the integrity of the structures and their fitting to the dental support. For this optical coherence tomography and micro-computed tomography were employed. Both methods were used to investigate 37 dental onlays, 17 integral polymeric and 20 integral ceramic. The results permit to observe materials defects inside the ceramic or polymeric onlays situate in the biomechanically tensioned areas that could lead to fracture of the prosthetic structure. Marginal fitting problems of the onlays related to the teeth preparations were presented in order to observe the possibility of secondary cavities. The resulted images from the optical coherence tomography were verified by the micro-computed tomography. In conclusion, the optical coherence tomography can be used as a clinical method in order to evaluate the integrity of the dental ceramic and polymeric onlays and to investigate the quality of the marginal fitting to the teeth preparations.

  14. VFLOW2D - A Vorte-Based Code for Computing Flow Over Elastically Supported Tubes and Tube Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    WOLFE,WALTER P.; STRICKLAND,JAMES H.; HOMICZ,GREGORY F.; GOSSLER,ALBERT A.

    2000-10-11

    A numerical flow model is developed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow past immersed, elastically supported tube arrays. This work is motivated by the objective of predicting forces and motion associated with both deep-water drilling and production risers in the oil industry. This work has other engineering applications including simulation of flow past tubular heat exchangers or submarine-towed sensor arrays and the flow about parachute ribbons. In the present work, a vortex method is used for solving the unsteady flow field. This method demonstrates inherent advantages over more conventional grid-based computational fluid dynamics. The vortex method is non-iterative, does not require artificial viscosity for stability, displays minimal numerical diffusion, can easily treat moving boundaries, and allows a greatly reduced computational domain since vorticity occupies only a small fraction of the fluid volume. A gridless approach is used in the flow sufficiently distant from surfaces. A Lagrangian remap scheme is used near surfaces to calculate diffusion and convection of vorticity. A fast multipole technique is utilized for efficient calculation of velocity from the vorticity field. The ability of the method to correctly predict lift and drag forces on simple stationary geometries over a broad range of Reynolds numbers is presented.

  15. Toward global waveform tomography of the whole mantle using SEM: Efficient simulation of the global wavefield using a homogenized crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, S. W.; Lekic, V.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    As global waveform-modeling schemes rooted in perturbation theory are supplanted by fully numerical alternatives, such as the Spectral Element Method (e.g. SEM: Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002), the improved wavefield accuracy for complex 3D structures also carries increased computational cost. Lekic and Romanowicz (2010) inverted waveforms of fundamental and higher mode surface waves for a radially anisotropic upper-mantle Vs model using SEM (SEMum). The SEM computations were made feasible by an appropriate choice of cutoff period (T≥ 60 s.), as well as the implementation of a homogenized anisotropic crustal layer based on fitting of short period group velocity dispersion curves. These choices allowed for an efficient SEM mesh undeformed by true Moho topography. Further, instead of homogenization of a possibly biased a priori crustal model, Lekic and Romanowicz jointly inverted for the crustal layer, constrained by surface wave group velocity dispersion maps for T≥ 25 s. We are currently developing a radially anisotropic Vs model of the whole mantle using SEM, following an approach broadly similar to that employed in SEMum. Extension of this methodology to imaging of lower-mantle structure requires the inclusion of a body wave dataset, and thus shorter-period modeling of the global wavefield (T≥ 32 s.). While this period range dictates finer sampling of our SEM mesh, reduced computational cost is still possible through the crustal homogenization scheme. Here, we first discuss the development of an analogous homogenized crustal model and its validity for both the fundamental and higher mode surface wave and the body wave datasets. We focus on maintaining a simplified Moho topography, thus obviating expensive deformation of the SEM mesh, while accurately treating valuable surface-reflected body wave phases (ex: multiple ScS). Second, we discuss implications of treating the crust in this manner for the overall inversion methodology. In particular, we intend to

  16. An efficient method of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion using a finite-difference injection method for time-lapse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Dmitry; Singh, Satish C.; Fuji, Nobuaki

    2015-09-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is an objective method to estimate elastic properties of the subsurface and is an important area of research, particularly in seismic exploration community. It is a data-fitting approach, where the difference between observed and synthetic data is minimized iteratively. Due to a very high computational cost, the practical implementation of waveform inversion has so far been restricted to a 2-D geometry with different levels of physics incorporated in it (e.g. elasticity/viscoelasticity) or to a 3-D geometry but using an acoustic approximation. However, the earth is three-dimensional, elastic and heterogeneous and therefore a full 3-D elastic inversion is required in order to obtain more accurate and valuable models of the subsurface. Despite the recent increase in computing power, the application of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion to real-scale problems remains quite challenging on the current computer architecture. Here, we present an efficient method to perform 3-D elastic full waveform inversion for time-lapse seismic data using a finite-difference injection method. In this method, the wavefield is computed in the whole model and is stored on a surface above a finite volume where the model is perturbed and localized inversion is performed. Comparison of the final results using the 3-D finite-difference injection method and conventional 3-D inversion performed within the whole volume shows that our new method provides significant reductions in computational time and memory requirements without any notable loss in accuracy. Our approach shows a big potential for efficient reservoir monitoring in real time-lapse experiments.

  17. Analysis of the seismic wavefield in the Moesian Platform (Bucharest area) for hazard assessment purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Elena Florinela; Michel, Clotaire; Hobiger, Manuel; Fäh, Donat; Cioflan, Carmen Ortanza; Radulian, Mircea

    2017-09-01

    During large earthquakes generated at intermediate depth in the Vrancea seismic zone, the ground motion recorded in Bucharest (Romania) is characterized by predominant long periods with strong amplification. Time-frequency analysis highlights the generation of low frequency surface waves (<1 Hz) for sufficiently strong and superficial events. This phenomenon has been explained by the influence of both source mechanism (radiation pattern, directivity effects) and mechanical properties of the local geological structure (geological layering and geometry). The main goal of our study is to better characterize and understand the seismic wavefield produced by earthquakes in the area of Bucharest, taking into account its location in the centre of the Moesian Platform, a large sedimentary basin (450 km long, 300 km wide and up to 20 km deep). To this aim, we identify the contribution of different seismic surface waves, such as the ones produced at the edges of this large sedimentary basin or multipath interference waves (Airy phases of Love and Rayleigh waves), on ground motion. The data from a 35 km diameter array (URS experiment) were used. The array was installed by the National Institute for Earth Physics in cooperation with the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology and operated during 10 months in 2003 and 2004 in the urban area of Bucharest and adjacent zones. The earthquake wavefield recorded by the URS array was analysed using the MUSIQUE technique. This technique analyses the three-component signals of all sensors of a seismic array together. The analysis includes 19 earthquakes with epicentral distances from 100 to 1560 km and with various backazimuths with enough energy at low frequencies (0.1-1 Hz), within the resolution range of the array. For all events, the largest portion of energy is arriving from the source direction and the wavefield is dominated by Love waves. The results of the array analyses clearly indicate a significant scattering corresponding to 2-D

  18. The global short-period wavefield modelled with a Monte Carlo seismic phonon method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shearer, Peter M.; Earle, Paul

    2004-01-01

    At high frequencies (∼1 Hz), much of the seismic energy arriving at teleseismic distances is not found in the main phases (e.g. P, PP, S, etc.) but is contained in the extended coda that follows these arrivals. This coda results from scattering off small-scale velocity and density perturbations within the crust and mantle and contains valuable information regarding the depth dependence and strength of this heterogeneity as well as the relative importance of intrinsic versus scattering attenuation. Most analyses of seismic coda to date have concentrated on S-wave coda generated from lithospheric scattering for events recorded at local and regional distances. Here, we examine the globally averaged vertical-component, 1-Hz wavefield (>10° range) for earthquakes recorded in the IRIS FARM archive from 1990 to 1999. We apply an envelope-function stacking technique to image the average time–distance behavior of the wavefield for both shallow (≤50 km) and deep (≥500 km) earthquakes. Unlike regional records, our images are dominated by P and P coda owing to the large effect of attenuation on PPand S at high frequencies. Modelling our results is complicated by the need to include a variety of ray paths, the likely contributions of multiple scattering and the possible importance of P-to-S and S-to-P scattering. We adopt a stochastic, particle-based approach in which millions of seismic phonons are randomly sprayed from the source and tracked through the Earth. Each phonon represents an energy packet that travels along the appropriate ray path until it is affected by a discontinuity or a scatterer. Discontinuities are modelled by treating the energy normalized reflection and transmission coefficients as probabilities. Scattering probabilities and scattering angles are computed in a similar fashion, assuming random velocity and density perturbations characterized by an exponential autocorrelation function. Intrinsic attenuation is included by reducing the energy

  19. Finite-Difference Algorithm for Simulating 3D Electromagnetic Wavefields in Conductive Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) wavefields are routinely used in geophysical exploration for detection and characterization of subsurface geological formations of economic interest. Recorded EM signals depend strongly on the current conductivity of geologic media. Hence, they are particularly useful for inferring fluid content of saturated porous bodies. In order to enhance understanding of field-recorded data, we are developing a numerical algorithm for simulating three-dimensional (3D) EM wave propagation and diffusion in heterogeneous conductive materials. Maxwell's equations are combined with isotropic constitutive relations to obtain a set of six, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing the electric and magnetic vectors. An advantage of this system is that it does not contain spatial derivatives of the three medium parameters electric permittivity, magnetic permeability, and current conductivity. Numerical solution methodology consists of explicit, time-domain finite-differencing on a 3D staggered rectangular grid. Temporal and spatial FD operators have order 2 and N, where N is user-selectable. We use an artificially-large electric permittivity to maximize the FD timestep, and thus reduce execution time. For the low frequencies typically used in geophysical exploration, accuracy is not unduly compromised. Grid boundary reflections are mitigated via convolutional perfectly matched layers (C-PMLs) imposed at the six grid flanks. A shared-memory-parallel code implementation via OpenMP directives enables rapid algorithm execution on a multi-thread computational platform. Good agreement is obtained in comparisons of numerically-generated data with reference solutions. EM wavefields are sourced via point current density and magnetic dipole vectors. Spatially-extended inductive sources (current carrying wire loops) are under development. We are particularly interested in accurate representation of high-conductivity sub-grid-scale features that are common

  20. Computational experiences with variable modulus, elastic-plastic, and viscoelastic concrete models. [HTGR

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    Six years ago the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approached the Los Alamos National Laboratory to develop a comprehensive concrete structural analysis code to predict the static and dynamic behavior of Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessels (PCRVs) that serve as the containment structure of a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. The PCRV is a complex concrete structure that must be modeled in three dimensions and posseses other complicating features such as a steel liner for the reactor cavity and woven cables embedded vertically in the PCRV and wound circumferentially on the outside of the PCRV. The cables, or tendons, are used for prestressing the reactor vessel. In addition to developing the computational capability to predict inelastic three dimensional concrete structural behavior, the code response was verified against documented experiments on concrete structural behavior. This code development/verification effort is described.

  1. Elastic Properties of Human Osteon and Osteonal Lamella Computed by a Bidirectional Micromechanical Model and Validated by Nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Korsa, Radim; Lukes, Jaroslav; Sepitka, Josef; Mares, Tomas

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of the anisotropic elastic properties of osteon and osteonal lamellae provides a better understanding of various pathophysiological conditions, such as aging, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and other degenerative diseases. For this reason, it is important to investigate and understand the elasticity of cortical bone. We created a bidirectional micromechanical model based on inverse homogenization for predicting the elastic properties of osteon and osteonal lamellae of cortical bone. The shape, the dimensions, and the curvature of osteon and osteonal lamellae are described by appropriately chosen curvilinear coordinate systems, so that the model operates close to the real morphology of these bone components. The model was used to calculate nine orthotropic elastic constants of osteonal lamellae. The input values have the elastic properties of a single osteon. We also expressed the dependence of the elastic properties of the lamellae on the angle of orientation. To validate the model, we performed nanoindentation tests on several osteonal lamellae. We compared the experimental results with the calculated results, and there was good agreement between them. The inverted model was used to calculate the elastic properties of a single osteon, where the input values are the elastic constants of osteonal lamellae. These calculations reveal that the model can be used in both directions of homogenization, i.e., direct homogenization and also inverse homogenization. The model described here can provide either the unknown elastic properties of a single lamella from the known elastic properties at the level of a single osteon, or the unknown elastic properties of a single osteon from the known elastic properties at the level of a single lamella.

  2. Estimation of local stresses and elastic properties of a mortar sample by FFT computation of fields on a 3D image

    SciTech Connect

    Escoda, J.; Willot, F.; Jeulin, D.; Sanahuja, J.; Toulemonde, C.

    2011-05-15

    This study concerns the prediction of the elastic properties of a 3D mortar image, obtained by micro-tomography, using a combined image segmentation and numerical homogenization approach. The microstructure is obtained by segmentation of the 3D image into aggregates, voids and cement paste. Full-fields computations of the elastic response of mortar are undertaken using the Fast Fourier Transform method. Emphasis is made on highly-contrasted properties between aggregates and matrix, to anticipate needs for creep or damage computation. The representative volume element, i.e. the volume size necessary to compute the effective properties with a prescribed accuracy, is given. Overall, the volumes used in this work were sufficient to estimate the effective response of mortar with a precision of 5%, 6% and 10% for contrast ratios of 100, 1000 and 10,000, resp. Finally, a statistical and local characterization of the component of the stress field parallel to the applied loading is carried out.

  3. Multi-scale computational method for elastic bodies with global and local heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Naoki; Zako, Masaru; Ishizono, Manabu

    2000-05-01

    A multi-scale computational method using the homogenization theory and the finite element mesh superposition technique is presented for the stress analysis of composite materials and structures from both micro- and macroscopic standpoints. The proposed method is based on the continuum mechanics, and the micro-macro coupling effects are considered for a variety of composites with very complex microstructures. To bridge the gap of the length scale between the microscale and the macroscale, the homogenized material model is basically used. The classical homogenized model can be applied to the case that the microstructures are periodically arrayed in the structure and that the macroscopic strain field is uniform within the microscopic unit cell domain. When these two conditions are satisfied, the homogenization theory provides the most reliable homogenized properties rigorously to the continuum mechanics. This theory can also calculate the microscopic stresses as well as the macroscopic stresses, which is the most attractive advantage of this theory over other homogenizing techniques such as the rule of mixture. The most notable feature of this paper is to utilize the finite element mesh superposition technique along with the homogenization theory in order to analyze cases where non-periodic local heterogeneity exists and the macroscopic field is non-uniform. The accuracy of the analysis using the finite element mesh superposition technique is verified through a simple example. Then, two numerical examples of knitted fabric composite materials and particulate reinforced composite material are shown. In the latter example, a shell-solid connection is also adopted for the cost-effective multi-scale modeling and analysis.

  4. Quantum Monte Carlo computations of phase stability, equations of state, and elasticity of high-pressure silica.

    PubMed

    Driver, K P; Cohen, R E; Wu, Zhigang; Militzer, B; Ríos, P López; Towler, M D; Needs, R J; Wilkins, J W

    2010-05-25

    Silica (SiO(2)) is an abundant component of the Earth whose crystalline polymorphs play key roles in its structure and dynamics. First principle density functional theory (DFT) methods have often been used to accurately predict properties of silicates, but fundamental failures occur. Such failures occur even in silica, the simplest silicate, and understanding pure silica is a prerequisite to understanding the rocky part of the Earth. Here, we study silica with quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), which until now was not computationally possible for such complex materials, and find that QMC overcomes the failures of DFT. QMC is a benchmark method that does not rely on density functionals but rather explicitly treats the electrons and their interactions via a stochastic solution of Schrödinger's equation. Using ground-state QMC plus phonons within the quasiharmonic approximation of density functional perturbation theory, we obtain the thermal pressure and equations of state of silica phases up to Earth's core-mantle boundary. Our results provide the best constrained equations of state and phase boundaries available for silica. QMC indicates a transition to the dense alpha-PbO(2) structure above the core-insulating D" layer, but the absence of a seismic signature suggests the transition does not contribute significantly to global seismic discontinuities in the lower mantle. However, the transition could still provide seismic signals from deeply subducted oceanic crust. We also find an accurate shear elastic constant for stishovite and its geophysically important softening with pressure.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo computations of phase stability, equations of state, and elasticity of high-pressure silica

    PubMed Central

    Driver, K. P.; Cohen, R. E.; Wu, Zhigang; Militzer, B.; Ríos, P. López; Towler, M. D.; Needs, R. J.; Wilkins, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Silica (SiO2) is an abundant component of the Earth whose crystalline polymorphs play key roles in its structure and dynamics. First principle density functional theory (DFT) methods have often been used to accurately predict properties of silicates, but fundamental failures occur. Such failures occur even in silica, the simplest silicate, and understanding pure silica is a prerequisite to understanding the rocky part of the Earth. Here, we study silica with quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), which until now was not computationally possible for such complex materials, and find that QMC overcomes the failures of DFT. QMC is a benchmark method that does not rely on density functionals but rather explicitly treats the electrons and their interactions via a stochastic solution of Schrödinger’s equation. Using ground-state QMC plus phonons within the quasiharmonic approximation of density functional perturbation theory, we obtain the thermal pressure and equations of state of silica phases up to Earth’s core–mantle boundary. Our results provide the best constrained equations of state and phase boundaries available for silica. QMC indicates a transition to the dense α-PbO2 structure above the core-insulating D” layer, but the absence of a seismic signature suggests the transition does not contribute significantly to global seismic discontinuities in the lower mantle. However, the transition could still provide seismic signals from deeply subducted oceanic crust. We also find an accurate shear elastic constant for stishovite and its geophysically important softening with pressure. PMID:20457932

  6. Acquisition and analysis of angle-beam wavefield data

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Levine, Ross M.; Chen, Xin; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2014-02-18

    Angle-beam ultrasonic testing is a common practical technique used for nondestructive evaluation to detect, locate, and characterize a variety of material defects and damage. Greater understanding of the both the incident wavefield produced by an angle-beam transducer and the subsequent scattering from a variety of defects and geometrical features is anticipated to increase the reliability of data interpretation. The focus of this paper is on acquiring and analyzing propagating waves from angle-beam transducers in simple, defect-free plates as a first step in the development of methods for flaw characterization. Unlike guided waves, which excite the plate throughout its thickness, angle-beam bulk waves bounce back and forth between the plate surfaces, resulting in the well-known multiple “skips” or “V-paths.” The experimental setup consists of a laser vibrometer mounted on an XYZ scanning stage, which is programmed to move point-to-point on a rectilinear grid to acquire waveform data. Although laser vibrometry is now routinely used to record guided waves for which the frequency content is below 1 MHz, it is more challenging to acquire higher frequency bulk waves in the 1–10 MHz range. Signals are recorded on the surface of an aluminum plate that were generated from a 5 MHz, 65° refracted angle, shear wave transducer-wedge combination. Data are analyzed directly in the x-t domain, via a slant stack Radon transform in the τ-p (offset time-slowness) domain, and via a 2-D Fourier transform in the ω-k domain, thereby enabling identification of specific arrivals and modes. Results compare well to those expected from a simple ray tracing analysis except for the unexpected presence of a strong Rayleigh wave.

  7. On the measurement of guided wavefields via air-coupled ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2015-03-01

    Guided wavefields are now routinely measured with scanning laser vibrometers for both characterization of guided wave propagation and damage assessment. However, these measurements are usually time-consuming, particularly for imaging of large areas, primarily because of the degree of signal averaging required to reduce incoherent noise. A scanned air-coupled transducer is an alternative wavefield acquisition method that is based upon recording the very small amplitude pressure waves that leak into air from the out-of-plane motion of the guided wavefield. Air-coupled methods are attractive because they are not sensitive to small variations in surface optical reflectivity and special surface preparations are thus not necessary. In addition, not as much averaging is needed, making the acquisition process much faster. Unlike laser vibrometry, the recorded signals are not a direct measure of the wave motion, but experiments have shown that the acquired wavefields resemble those obtained from laser-based systems. For the work presented here, wavefield data were recorded with both methods for the same aluminum plate and composite panel specimens. Data are qualitatively compared in several domains to assess differences in temporal characteristics and modal content. Although signals are not identical, it is shown that the air-coupled transducer data exhibits similar modal content to that of the laser vibrometry data and may provide a reasonable alternative for some applications.

  8. Fast Computation of Global Sensitivity Kernel Database Based on Spectral-Element Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sales de Andrade, Elliott; Liu, Qinya

    2017-07-01

    Finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, a theoretical improvement from simple infinitely thin ray paths, have been used extensively in recent global and regional tomographic inversions. These sensitivity kernels provide more consistent and accurate interpretation of a growing number of broadband measurements, and are critical in mapping 3D heterogeneous structures of the mantle. Based on Born approximation, the calculation of sensitivity kernels requires the interaction of the forward wavefield and an adjoint wavefield generated by placing adjoint sources at stations. Both fields can be obtained accurately through numerical simulations of seismic wave propagation, particularly important for kernels of phases that cannot be sufficiently described by ray theory (such as core-diffracted waves). However, the total number of forward and adjoint numerical simulations required to build kernels for individual source-receiver pairs and to form the design matrix for classical tomography is computationally unaffordable. In this paper, we take advantage of the symmetry of 1D reference models, perform moment tensor forward and point force adjoint spectral-element simulations, and save six-component strain fields only on the equatorial plane based on the open-source spectral-element simulation package, SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. Sensitivity kernels for seismic phases at any epicentral distance can be efficiently computed by combining forward and adjoint strain wavefields from the saved strain field database, which significantly reduces both the number of simulations and the amount of storage required for global tomographic problems. Based on this technique, we compute traveltime, amplitude and/or boundary kernels of isotropic and radially anisotropic elastic parameters for various (P, S, P_{diff}, S_{diff}, depth, surface-reflected, surface wave, S 660 S boundary, etc.) phases for 1D ak135 model, in preparation for future global tomographic inversions.

  9. Towards Simulating a Realistic Planetary Seismic Wavefield: The Contribution of the Megaregolith and Low-Velocity Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmerr, Nicholas C.; Weber, Renee C.; Lin, Pei-Ying Patty; Thorne, Michael Scott; Garnero, Ed J.

    2011-01-01

    Lunar seismograms are distinctly different from their terrestrial counterparts. The Apollo lunar seismometers recorded moonquakes without distinct P- or S-wave arrivals; instead waves arrive as a diffuse coda that decays over several hours making the identification of body waves difficult. The unusual character of the lunar seismic wavefield is generally tied to properties of the megaregolith: it consists of highly fractured and broken crustal rock, the result of extensive bombardment of the Moon. The megaregolith extends several kilometers into the lunar crust, possibly into the mantle in some regions, and is covered by a thin coating of fine-scale dust. These materials possess very low seismic velocities that strongly scatter the seismic wavefield at high frequencies. Directly modeling the effects of the megaregolith to simulate an accurate lunar seismic wavefield is a challenging computational problem, owing to the inherent 3-D nature of the problem and the high frequencies (greater than 1 Hz) required. Here we focus on modeling the long duration code, studying the effects of the low velocities found in the megaregolith. We produce synthetic seismograms using 1-D slowness integration methodologies, GEMINI and reflectivity, and a 3-D Cartesian finite difference code, Wave Propagation Program, to study the effect of thin layers of low velocity on the surface of a planet. These codes allow us generate seismograms with dominant frequencies of approximately 1 Hz. For background lunar seismic structure we explore several models, including the recent model of Weber et al., Science, 2011. We also investigate variations in megaregolithic thickness, velocity, attenuation, and seismogram frequency content. Our results are compared to the Apollo seismic dataset, using both a cross correlation technique and integrated envelope approach to investigate coda decay. We find our new high frequency results strongly support the hypothesis that the long duration of the lunar seismic

  10. Unsupervised pattern recognition in continuous seismic wavefield records using Self-Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Andreas; Ohrnberger, Matthias; Scherbaum, Frank

    2010-09-01

    Modern acquisition of seismic data on receiver networks worldwide produces an increasing amount of continuous wavefield recordings. In addition to manual data inspection, seismogram interpretation requires therefore new processing utilities for event detection, signal classification and data visualization. The use of machine learning techniques automatises decision processes and reveals the statistical properties of data. This approach is becoming more and more important and valuable for large and complex seismic records. Unsupervised learning allows the recognition of wavefield patterns, such as short-term transients and long-term variations, with a minimum of domain knowledge. This study applies an unsupervised pattern recognition approach for the discovery, imaging and interpretation of temporal patterns in seismic array recordings. For this purpose, the data is parameterized by feature vectors, which combine different real-valued wavefield attributes for short time windows. Standard seismic analysis tools are used as feature generation methods, such as frequency-wavenumber, polarization and spectral analysis. We use Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) for a data-driven feature selection, visualization and clustering procedure. The application to continuous recordings of seismic signals from an active volcano (Mount Merapi, Java, Indonesia) shows that volcano-tectonic and rockfall events can be detected and distinguished by clustering the feature vectors. Similar results are obtained in terms of correctly classifying events compared to a previously implemented supervised classification system. Furthermore, patterns in the background wavefield, that is the 24-hr cycle due to human activity, are intuitively visualized by means of the SOM representation. Finally, we apply our technique to an ambient seismic vibration record, which has been acquired for local site characterization. Disturbing wavefield patterns are identified which affect the quality of Love wave dispersion

  11. Wavefield properties of a shallow long-period event and tremor at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccorotti, G.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.

    2001-01-01

    The wavefields of tremor and a long-period (LP) event associated with the ongoing eruptive activity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, are investigated using a combination of dense small-aperture (300 m) and sparse large-aperture (5 km) arrays deployed in the vicinity of the summit caldera. Measurements of azimuth and slowness for tremor recorded on the small-aperture array indicate a bimodal nature of the observed wavefield. At frequencies below 2 Hz, the wavefield is dominated by body waves impinging the array with steep incidence. These arrivals are attributed to the oceanic microseismic noise. In the 2-6 Hz band, the wavefield is dominated by waves propagating from sources located at shallow depths (<1 km) beneath the eastern edge of the Halemaumau pit crater. The hypocenter of the LP event, determined from frequency-slowness analyses combined with phase picks, appears to be located close to the source of tremor but at a shallower depth (<0.1 km). The wavefields of tremor and LP event are characterized by a complex composition of body and surface waves, whose propagation and polarization properties are strongly affected by topographic and structural features in the summit caldera region. Analyses of the directional properties of the wavefield in the 2-6 Hz band point to the directions of main scattering sources, which are consistent with pronounced velocity contrasts imaged in a high-resolution three-dimensional velocity model of the caldera region. The frequency and Q of the dominant peak observed in the spectra of the LP event may be explained as the dominant oscillation mode of a crack with scale length 20-100 m and aperture of a few centimeters filled with bubbly water. The mechanism driving the shallow tremor appears to be consistent with a sustained excitation originating in the oscillations of a bubbly cloud resulting from vesiculation and degassing in the magma. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Predicting the elastic properties of selective laser sintered PCL/β-TCP bone scaffold materials using computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Heather; Lohfeld, Stefan; McHugh, Peter

    2014-03-01

    This study assesses the ability of finite element (FE) models to capture the mechanical behaviour of sintered orthopaedic scaffold materials. Individual scaffold struts were fabricated from a 50:50 wt% poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) blend, using selective laser sintering. The tensile elastic modulus of single struts was determined experimentally. High resolution FE models of single struts were generated from micro-CT scans (28.8 μm resolution) and an effective strut elastic modulus was calculated from tensile loading simulations. Three material assignment methods were employed: (1) homogeneous PCL elastic constants, (2) composite PCL/β-TCP elastic constants based on rule of mixtures, and (3) heterogeneous distribution of micromechanically-determined elastic constants. In comparison with experimental results, the use of homogeneous PCL properties gave a good estimate of strut modulus; however it is not sufficiently representative of the real material as it neglects the β-TCP phase. The rule of mixtures method significantly overestimated strut modulus, while there was no significant difference between strut modulus evaluated using the micromechanically-determined elastic constants and experimentally evaluated strut modulus. These results indicate that the multi-scale approach of linking micromechanical modelling of the sintered scaffold material with macroscale modelling gives an accurate prediction of the mechanical behaviour of the sintered structure.

  13. Delamination detection in foam core composite structures using transient flexural wavefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamboul, B.; Osmont, D.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates a health monitoring technique for foam sandwich structures based on flexural wavefields imaged by Laser Doppler vibrometry. A study of calibrated artificial defect responses in harmonic regime demonstrates that the use of a low frequency regime (below 30 kHz) makes it possible to excite defects in their first flexural resonance modes. The analysis performed in harmonic regime is used to interpret signature patterns obtained with accumulated energy maps from transient wavefield recordings. The potential of the technique is demonstrated on a real impact-induced defect. The robustness of the method relatively to the excitation center frequency selection and to the presence of wave reverberation is demonstrated.

  14. Computational study of structural, elastic and electronic properties of lithium disilicate (Li(2)Si(2)O(5)) glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Biskri, Zine Elabidine; Rached, Habib; Bouchear, Merzoug; Rached, Djamel

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate theoretically the structural, elastic and electronic properties of Lithium Disilicate (LD) crystal (Li2Si2O5), using the pseudo potential method based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA). The calculated structural properties namely the equilibrium lattice parameters and cell volume are in good agreement with the available experimental results. However, for the LD crystal elastic moduli: Shear modulus G, Young's modulus E and Poisson's ratio ν we have found a discrepancy between our theoretical values and experimental ones reported in polycrystalline sample containing LD crystals. The calculated elastic properties show that LD is more rigid compared with other components. We also investigated the mechanical stability of Li2Si2O5 compound and we have noticed that this compound is stable against elastic deformations. On the basis of shear to bulk modulus ratio analysis, we inferred that Li2Si2O5 compound is brittle in nature. In order to complete the fundamental characteristics of this compound we have measured the elastic anisotropy. Our results for the energy band structure and Density of States (DOS) show that Li2Si2O5 compound has an insulator characteristic.

  15. Toward Regional Characterizations of the Oceanic Internal Wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, K. L.; Lvov, Y. V.

    2011-11-01

    Many major oceanographic internal wave observational programs of the last 4 decades are reanalyzed in order to characterize variability of the deep ocean internal wavefield. The observations are discussed in the context of the universal spectral model proposed by C. J. R. Garrett and W. H. Munk. The Garrett and Munk model is a good description of wintertime conditions at Site D on the continental rise north of the Gulf Stream. Elsewhere and at other times, significant deviations in terms of amplitude, separability of the 2-D vertical wavenumber-frequency spectrum, and departure from the model's functional form are reported. Specifically, the Garrett and Munk model overestimates annual average frequency domain spectral levels both at Site D and in general. The bias at Site D is associated with the Garrett and Munk model being a fit to wintertime data from Site D and the presence of an annual cycle in high-frequency energy in the western subtropical North Atlantic having a maximum in winter. The wave spectrum is generally nonseparable, with near-inertial waves typically having greater bandwidth (occupying smaller vertical scales) than continuum frequency waves. Separability is a better approximation for more energetic states, such as wintertime conditions at Site D. Subtle geographic differences from the high-frequency and high vertical wavenumber power laws of the Garrett and Munk spectrum are apparent. Such deviations tend to covary: whiter frequency spectra are partnered with redder vertical wavenumber spectra. We review a general theoretical framework of statistical radiative balance equations and interpret the observed variability in terms of the interplay between generation, propagation, and nonlinearity. First, nonlinearity is a fundamental organizing principle in this work. The observed power laws lie close to the induced diffusion stationary states of the resonant kinetic equation describing the lowest-order nonlinear transfers. Second, eddy variability and

  16. SU-F-207-13: Comparison of Four Dimensional Computed Tomography (4D CT) Versus Breath Hold Images to Determine Pulmonary Nodule Elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Negahdar, M; Loo, B; Maxim, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Elasticity may distinguish malignant from benign pulmonary nodules. To compare determining of malignant pulmonary nodule (MPN) elasticity from four dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images versus inhale/exhale breath-hold CT images. Methods: We analyzed phase 00 and 50 of 4D CT and deep inhale and natural exhale of breath-hold CT images of 30 MPN treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The radius of the smallest MPN was 0.3 cm while the biggest one was 2.1 cm. An intensity based deformable image registration (DIR) workflow was applied to the 4D CT and breath-hold images to determine the volumes of the MPNs and a 1 cm ring of surrounding lung tissue (ring) in each state. Next, an elasticity parameter was derived by calculating the ratio of the volume changes of MPN (exhale:inhale or phase50:phase00) to that of a 1 cm ring of lung tissue surrounding the MPN. The proposed formulation of elasticity enables us to compare volume changes of two different MPN in two different locations of lung. Results: The calculated volume ratio of MPNs from 4D CT (phase50:phase00) and breath-hold images (exhale:inhale) was 1.00±0.23 and 0.95±0.11, respectively. It shows the stiffness of MPN and comparably bigger volume changes of MPN in breath-hold images because of the deeper degree of inhalation. The calculated elasticity of MPNs from 4D CT and breath-hold images was 1.12±0.22 and 1.23±0.26, respectively. For five patients who have had two MPN in their lung, calculated elasticity of tumor A and tumor B follows same trend in both 4D CT and breath-hold images. Conclusion: We showed that 4D CT and breath-hold images are comparable in the ability to calculate the elasticity of MPN. This study has been supported by Department of Defense LCRP 2011 #W81XWH-12-1-0286.

  17. Single-cell mechanics--An experimental-computational method for quantifying the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity of cells.

    PubMed

    Tartibi, M; Liu, Y X; Liu, G-Y; Komvopoulos, K

    2015-11-01

    The membrane-cytoskeleton system plays a major role in cell adhesion, growth, migration, and differentiation. F-actin filaments, cross-linkers, binding proteins that bundle F-actin filaments to form the actin cytoskeleton, and integrins that connect the actin cytoskeleton network to the cell plasma membrane and extracellular matrix are major cytoskeleton constituents. Thus, the cell cytoskeleton is a complex composite that can assume different shapes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based techniques have been used to measure cytoskeleton material properties without much attention to cell shape. A recently developed surface chemical patterning method for long-term single-cell culture was used to seed individual cells on circular patterns. A continuum-based cell model, which uses as input the force-displacement response obtained with a modified AFM setup and relates the membrane-cytoskeleton elastic behavior to the cell geometry, while treating all other subcellular components suspended in the cytoplasmic liquid (gel) as an incompressible fluid, is presented and validated by experimental results. The developed analytical-experimental methodology establishes a framework for quantifying the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity of live cells. This capability may have immense implications in cell biology, particularly in studies seeking to establish correlations between membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity and cell disease, mortality, differentiation, and migration, and provide insight into cell infiltration through nonwoven fibrous scaffolds. The present method can be further extended to analyze membrane-cytoskeleton viscoelasticity, examine the role of other subcellular components (e.g., nucleus envelope) in cell elasticity, and elucidate the effects of mechanical stimuli on cell differentiation and motility. This is the first study to decouple the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity from cell stiffness and introduce an effective approach for measuring the elastic modulus. The

  18. A coupled wavenumber integration approach for calculating the wavefield in large-scale laterally varying structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucifredi, Irena; Ishii, Miaki

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents implementation techniques for the coupled wavenumber integration approach that is occasionally used in the underwater acoustics community to address larger scale problems in seismo-acoustics. This numerically efficient method is suitable for detailed wavefield representation of the long, thin waveguide propagating geometries such as those within subducting plate. It therefore represents an attractive alternative to ray-based solutions and finite element methods when thin layers with strong velocity contrast are expected. This wavefield modelling technique is based upon range-dependent wavenumber integration combined with Kirchhoff approximation. Examples of the details of the propagating wavefield with a dipping slab-like structure and the effects of low-velocity layers (LVLs) are presented. These results include the propagation of the wavefield through the wedge and through very LVLs as a function of setups of different complexity as well as a function of horizontal range. By identifying the existence of a sediment-like layer, the presence of a source within and the effects of the changes in the receiver range location, we demonstrate the ability of the coupled wavenumber technique to capture the physics associated with LVLs configuration, and provide classification features for effective identification of these, often intricate, subducted slab structure characteristic.

  19. Characterization of impact damage in composite laminates using guided wavefield imaging and local wavenumber domain analysis.

    PubMed

    Rogge, Matthew D; Leckey, Cara A C

    2013-09-01

    Delaminations in composite laminates resulting from impact events may be accompanied by minimal indication of damage at the surface. As such, inspections are required to ensure defects are within allowable limits. Conventional ultrasonic scanning techniques have been shown to effectively characterize the size and depth of delaminations but require physical contact with the structure and considerable setup time. Alternatively, a non-contact scanning laser vibrometer may be used to measure guided wave propagation in the laminate structure generated by permanently bonded transducers. A local Fourier domain analysis method is presented for processing guided wavefield data to estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, which can be used to determine delamination depth. The technique is applied to simulated wavefields and results are analyzed to determine limitations of the technique with regards to determining defect size and depth. Based on simulation results, guidelines for application of the technique are developed. Finally, experimental wavefield data is obtained in quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with impact damage. The recorded wavefields are analyzed and wavenumber is measured to an accuracy of up to 8.5% in the region of shallow delaminations. These results show the promise of local wavenumber domain analysis to characterize the depth of delamination damage in composite laminates. The technique can find application in automated vehicle health assurance systems with potential for high detection rates and greatly reduced operator effort and setup time.

  20. INVERSION OF FULL ACOUSTIC WAVEFIELD IN LOCAL HELIOSEISMOLOGY: A STUDY WITH SYNTHETIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Cobden, L. J.; Warner, M. R.; Tong, C. H.

    2011-02-01

    We present the first results from the inversion of full acoustic wavefield in the helioseismic context. In contrast to time-distance helioseismology, which involves analyzing the travel times of seismic waves propagating into the solar interior, wavefield tomography models both the travel times and amplitude variations present in the entire seismic record. Unlike the use of ray-based, Fresnel-zone, Born, or Rytov approximations in previous time-distance studies, this method does not require any simplifications to be made to the sensitivity kernel in the inversion. In this study, the acoustic wavefield is simulated for all iterations in the inversion. The sensitivity kernel is therefore updated while lateral variations in sound-speed structure in the model emerge during the course of the inversion. Our results demonstrate that the amplitude-based inversion approach is capable of resolving sound-speed structures defined by relatively sharp vertical and horizontal boundaries. This study therefore provides the foundation for a new type of subsurface imaging in local helioseismology that is based on the inversion of the entire seismic wavefield.

  1. Seismic wavefield imaging based on the replica exchange Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Masayuki; Nagao, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Daichi; Ito, Shin-ichi; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Hori, Muneo; Hirata, Naoshi

    2016-11-01

    Earthquakes sometimes cause serious disasters not only directly by ground motion itself but also secondarily by infrastructure damage, particularly in densely populated urban areas that have capital functions. To reduce the number and severity of secondary disasters, it is important to evaluate seismic hazards rapidly by analyzing the seismic responses of individual structures to input ground motions. We propose a method that integrates physics-based and data-driven approaches in order to obtain a seismic wavefield for use as input to a seismic response analysis. The new contribution of this study is the use of the replica exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) method, which is one of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, for estimation of a seismic wavefield, together with a one-dimensional (1-D) local subsurface structure and source information. Numerical tests were conducted to verify the proposed method, using synthetic observation data obtained from analytical solutions for two horizontally-layered subsurface structure models. The geometries of the observation sites were determined from the dense seismic observation array called the Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net), which has been in operation in the Tokyo metropolitan area in Japan since 2007. The results of the numerical tests show that the proposed method is able to search the parameters related to the source and the local subsurface structure in a broader parameter space than the Metropolis method, which is an ordinary MCMC method. The proposed method successfully reproduces a seismic wavefield consistent with a true wavefield. In contrast, ordinary kriging, which is a classical data-driven interpolation method for spatial data, is hardly able to reproduce a true wavefield, even in the low frequency bands. This suggests that it is essential to employ both physics-based and data-driven approaches in seismic wavefield imaging, utilizing seismograms from a dense seismic array. The REMC method

  2. Seismic wavefield imaging based on the replica exchange Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Masayuki; Nagao, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Daichi; Ito, Shin-ichi; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Hori, Muneo; Hirata, Naoshi

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes sometimes cause serious disasters not only directly by ground motion itself but also secondarily by infrastructure damage, particularly in densely populated urban areas that have capital functions. To reduce the number and severity of secondary disasters, it is important to evaluate seismic hazards rapidly by analysing the seismic responses of individual structures to input ground motions. We propose a method that integrates physics-based and data-driven approaches in order to obtain a seismic wavefield for use as input to a seismic response analysis. The new contribution of this study is the use of the replica exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) method, which is one of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, for estimation of a seismic wavefield, together with a 1-D local subsurface structure and source information. Numerical tests were conducted to verify the proposed method, using synthetic observation data obtained from analytical solutions for two horizontally layered subsurface structure models. The geometries of the observation sites were determined from the dense seismic observation array called the Metropolitan Seismic Observation network, which has been in operation in the Tokyo metropolitan area in Japan since 2007. The results of the numerical tests show that the proposed method is able to search the parameters related to the source and the local subsurface structure in a broader parameter space than the Metropolis method, which is an ordinary MCMC method. The proposed method successfully reproduces a seismic wavefield consistent with a true wavefield. In contrast, ordinary kriging, which is a classical data-driven interpolation method for spatial data, is hardly able to reproduce a true wavefield, even in the low frequency bands. This suggests that it is essential to employ both physics-based and data-driven approaches in seismic wavefield imaging, utilizing seismograms from a dense seismic array. The REMC method, which provides not only

  3. Time-frequency-wavenumber Decomposition To Investigate Seismic Wavefield: Application To The Annot Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schissele, E.; Cansi, Y.; Gaffet, S.

    Many observations and studies as well as numerical simulations have been done in order to completely understand the whole seismogram recorded during an earthquake. At regional distances, the seismic wavefield is strongly influenced by crustal hetero- geneities. The primary wavefield constituted by Pn, Pg, Sn, Sg, Rg, Lg.... phases is diffracted and refracted by these heterogeneities and hence forms the coda of the seis- mogram. But the different mechanisms of propagation in a heterogeneous medium are not fully understood. The identification of the different phases contributing to the coda seems to be essential to progress in the comprehension of the seismic wavefield propagation. Seismic arrays are then well-adapted tools since they provide the spatio-temporal evo- lution of the wavefield. In 1998, 4 small-scales arrays were deployed for 2 months around the Annot region, located in the southern French Alps. Each array was constituted by 9 short-period seismometers, recording frequencies greater than 0.2 Hz. Its aperture was 250 meters, with a minimal distance between 2 adjacent sensors of 20 meters. That allows us to study the seismic wavefield for very low wavelength without any problem of spatial aliasing. It will be interesting to characterize in terms of wavefield deformation the signature of the different kinds of heterogeneities (fault system, topographic relief, impedance contrast...) surrounding this area. We expect the primary wavefield to be diffracted or refracted by all these heterogeneities. A time-frequency-wavenumber technique which allows us to characterize the whole coherent part of the energy which prop- agates through the seismic array has been derived. Such a characterization involves, for each coherent wavelet, an estimate of: (i) an arrival time and a frequency content and (ii) an azimuth and an apparent velocity. This way, the principal phases will be described. What will be more interesting, is the extraction of the deterministic part of the

  4. Quantifying wave-breaking dissipation using nonlinear phase-resolved wave-field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Y.; Xiao, W.; Yue, D. K. P.

    2014-12-01

    We propose to understand and quantify wave-breaking dissipation in the evolution of general irregular short-crested wave-fields using direct nonlinear phase-resolved simulations based on a High-Order Spectral (HOS) method (Dommermuth & Yue 1987). We implement a robust phenomenological-based energy dissipation model in HOS to capture the effect of wave-breaking dissipation on the overall wave-field evolution (Xiao et al 2013). The efficacy of this model is confirmed by direct comparisons against measurements for the energy loss in 2D and 3D breaking events. By comparing simulated wave-fields with and without the dissipation model in HOS, we obtain the dissipation field δ(x,y,t), which provides the times, locations and intensity of wave breaking events (δ>δc). This is validated by comparison of HOS simulations with Airborne Terrain Mapper (ATM) measurements in the recent ONR Hi-Res field experiment. Figure (a) shows one frame of simulated wave-field (with dissipation model). Figure (b) is the corresponding measurement from ATM, where a large wave breaking event was captured. Figure (c) is the 3D view of the simulated wave-field with the colored region representing dissipation with δ>δc. The HOS predicted high-dissipation area is found to agree well with the measured breaking area. Based on HOS predicted high-dissipation area (δ>δc), we calculate Λ(c) (Phillips 1985), the distribution of total length of breaking wave front per unit surface area per unit increment of breaking velocity c. Figure (d) shows the distribution Λ(c) calculated from HOS. For breaking speeds c greater than 5m/s, the simulated Λ(c) is in qualitative agreement with Phillips theoretical power-law of Λ(c)~c-6. From δ(x,y,t), we further quantify wave breaking by calculating the whitecap coverage rate Wr(t) and energy dissipation rate ΔE'(t), and study the evolution of Wr and ΔE' to understand the role of wave breaking in nonlinear wave-field evolution. We obtain HOS simulations

  5. Statistical redundancy of instantaneous phases: theory and application to the seismic ambient wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudot, Ianis; Beucler, Éric; Mocquet, Antoine; Schimmel, Martin; Le Feuvre, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    In order to detect possible signal redundancies in the seismic ambient wavefield, we develop a new method based on pairwise comparisons among a set of synchronous time-series. This approach is based on instantaneous phase coherence statistics. The first and second moments of the pairwise phase coherence distribution are used to characterize the phase randomness. Both theory and synthetic experiments show that, for perfect phase randomness, the theoretical values of the mean and variance are equal to 0 and 1 - 2/π, respectively. As a consequence, any deviation from these values indicates the presence of a redundant phase in the raw continuous signal. Using the ergodicity property of a random signal, we split an initial time-series into a set of synchronous signals. This allows us to detect and to quantify the repetitiveness of any possible temporally persistent and spatially localized source, during a given period of observation. In the case of the detection of a redundant phase, individual coherences (one trace against all others) quantify the contribution of each time-series independently. A previously detected 26 s period microseismic source located near the Gulf of Guinea is used to illustrate one of the possible ways of handling phase coherence statistics. We use the continuous vertical component data recorded during the month of 2004 August by four broad-band stations of the Federation of Digital Seismography Network. To compute coherence statistics among a set composed of a sufficient number of synchronous traces, the raw seismic signal is split into 372 2-hr sliding time windows. Only the basic signal processing steps (including removing the mean, trend and the instrumental response) are applied. After bandpass filtering the data between 23 and 32 s periods, the 2-hr time-series are cross-correlated, leading to a set of 372 synchronous cross-correlations for each station pair. We observe that, for all station pairs, the mean overall coherence value is close

  6. Resonance scattering and radiation force calculations for an elastic cylinder using the translational addition theorem for cylindrical wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-09-15

    The standard Resonance Scattering Theory (RST) of plane waves is extended for the case of any two-dimensional (2D) arbitrarily-shaped monochromatic beam incident upon an elastic cylinder with arbitrary location using an exact methodology based on Graf’s translational addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions. The analysis is exact as it does not require numerical integration procedures. The formulation is valid for any cylinder of finite size and material that is immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) for the incident, internal and scattered linear pressure fields are derived, and the analysis is further extended to obtain generalized expressions for the on-axis and off-axis acoustic radiation force components. The wave-fields are expressed using generalized PWSEs involving the beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) and the scattering coefficients of the cylinder. The off-axial BSCs are expressed analytically in terms of an infinite PWSE with emphasis on the translational offset distance d. Numerical computations are considered for a zeroth-order quasi-Gaussian beam chosen as an example to illustrate the analysis. Acoustic resonance scattering directivity diagrams are calculated by subtracting an appropriate background from the expression of the scattered pressure field. In addition, computations for the radiation force exerted on an elastic cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of the beam, and shifted off-axially are analyzed and discussed.

  7. Computational comparison of tibial diaphyseal fractures fixed with various degrees of prebending of titanium elastic nails and with and without end caps.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Nien; Lee, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Chih-Han; Chang, Chih-Wei; Ho, Yi-Hung; Li, Chun-Ting; Peng, Yao-Te

    2016-10-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) is a treatment strategy for the management of diaphyseal long-bone fractures in adolescents and children, but few studies have investigated the mechanical stability of tibial diaphyseal fractures treated with various degrees of prebending of the elastic nails. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the mechanical stability, including the gap deformation and nail dropping, of a tibia fracture with various fracture sites and fixed with various degrees of prebending of the elastic nails by the finite element method. Furthermore, the contribution of end caps to stability was taken into consideration in the simulation. A tibia model was developed with a transverse fracture at the proximal, middle and distal parts of the diaphysis, and fixed with three degrees of prebending of elastic nails, including those equal to, two times and three times the diameter of the intramedullary canal. The outer diameter of the nail used in the computation was 3.5mm, and the fractured tibia was fixed with two elastic double C-type nails. Furthermore, the proximal end of each nail was set to free or being tied to the surrounding bone by a constraint equation to simulate with or without using end caps. The results indicated that using end caps can prevent the fracture gap from collapsing by stopping the ends of the nails from dropping back in all prebending conditions and fracture patterns, and increasing the prebending of the nails to a degree three times the diameter of the canal reduced the gap shortening and the dropping distance of the nail end in those without using end caps under axial compression and bending. Insufficient prebending of the nails and not using end caps caused the gap to collapse and the nail to drop back at the entry point under loading. Using end caps or increasing the prebending of the nails to three times the diameter of the canal is suggested to stop the nail from dropping back and thus produce a more stable

  8. Computer program: Jet 3 to calculate the large elastic plastic dynamically induced deformations of free and restrained, partial and/or complete structural rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, R. W.; Witmer, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    A user-oriented FORTRAN 4 computer program, called JET 3, is presented. The JET 3 program, which employs the spatial finite-element and timewise finite-difference method, can be used to predict the large two-dimensional elastic-plastic transient Kirchhoff-type deformations of a complete or partial structural ring, with various support conditions and restraints, subjected to a variety of initial velocity distributions and externally-applied transient forcing functions. The geometric shapes of the structural ring can be circular or arbitrarily curved and with variable thickness. Strain-hardening and strain-rate effects of the material are taken into account.

  9. Computational simulation of the bone remodeling using the finite element method: an elastic-damage theory for small displacements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The resistance of the bone against damage by repairing itself and adapting to environmental conditions is its most important property. These adaptive changes are regulated by physiological process commonly called the bone remodeling. Better understanding this process requires that we apply the theory of elastic-damage under the hypothesis of small displacements to a bone structure and see its mechanical behavior. Results The purpose of the present study is to simulate a two dimensional model of a proximal femur by taking into consideration elastic-damage and mechanical stimulus. Here, we present a mathematical model based on a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations and we develop the variational formulation for the mechanical problem. Then, we implement our mathematical model into the finite element method algorithm to investigate the effect of the damage. Conclusion The results are consistent with the existing literature which shows that the bone stiffness drops in damaged bone structure under mechanical loading. PMID:23663260

  10. Boundary element modeling of earthquake site effects including the complete incident wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae

    Numerical modeling of earthquake site effects in realistic, three-dimensional structures, including high frequencies, low surface velocities and surface topography, has not been possible simply because the amount of computer memory constrains the number of grid points available. In principle, this problem is reduced in the Boundary Element Method (BEM) since only the surface of the velocity discontinuity is discretized; wave propagation both inside and outside this boundary is computed analytically. Equivalent body forces are determined on the boundary by solving a matrix equation containing frequency-domain displacement and stress Green's functions from every point on the boundary to every other point. This matrix problem has imposed a practical limit on the size or maximum frequency of previous BEM models. Although the matrix can be quite large, it also seems to be fairly sparse. We have used iterative matrix algorithms of the PETSc package and direct solution algorithms of the ScaLAPACK on the massively parallel supercomputers at Cornell, San Diego and Michigan. Preconditioning has been applied using blockwise ILU decomposition for the iterative approach or LU decomposition for the direct approach. The matrix equation is solved using the GMRES method for the iterative approach and a tri-diagonal solver for the direct approach. Previous BEM applications typically have assumed a single, incident plane wave. However, it is clear that for more realistic ground motion simulations, we need to consider the complete incident wavefield. If we assume that the basin or three-dimensional structure of interest is embedded in a surrounding plane-layered medium, we may use the propagator matrix method to solve for the displacements and stresses at depth on the boundary. This is done in the frequency domain with integration over wavenumber so that all P, S, mode conversions, reverberations and surface waves are included. The Boundary Element Method succeeds in modeling

  11. Successive estimation of a tsunami wavefield without earthquake source data: A data assimilation approach toward real-time tsunami forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Obara, Kazushige; Shinohara, Masanao; Kanazawa, Toshihiko; Uehira, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    We propose a tsunami forecasting method based on a data assimilation technique designed for dense tsunameter networks. Rather than using seismic source parameters or initial sea surface height as the initial condition of for a tsunami forecasting, it estimates the current tsunami wavefield (tsunami height and tsunami velocity) in real time by repeatedly assimilating dense tsunami data into a numerical simulation. Numerical experiments were performed using a simple 1-D station array and the 2-D layout of the new S-net tsunameter network around the Japan Trench. Treating a synthetic tsunami calculated by the finite-difference method as observed data, the data assimilation reproduced the assumed tsunami wavefield before the tsunami struck the coastline. Because the method estimates the full tsunami wavefield, including velocity, these wavefields can be used as initial conditions for other tsunami simulations to calculate inundation or runup for real-time forecasting.

  12. Elastic Velocity Updating through Image-Domain Tomographic Inversion of Passive Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, B.; Shragge, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic monitoring at injection sites (e.g., CO2sequestration, waste water disposal, hydraulic fracturing) has become an increasingly important tool for hazard identification and avoidance. The information obtained from this data is often limited to seismic event properties (e.g., location, approximate time, moment tensor), the accuracy of which greatly depends on the estimated elastic velocity models. However, creating accurate velocity models from passive array data remains a challenging problem. Common techniques rely on picking arrivals or matching waveforms requiring high signal-to-noise data that is often not available for the magnitude earthquakes observed over injection sites. We present a new method for obtaining elastic velocity information from earthquakes though full-wavefield wave-equation imaging and adjoint-state tomography. The technique exploits images of the earthquake source using various imaging conditions based upon the P- and S-wavefield data. We generate image volumes by back propagating data through initial models and then applying a correlation-based imaging condition. We use the P-wavefield autocorrelation, S-wavefield autocorrelation, and P-S wavefield cross-correlation images. Inconsistencies in the images form the residuals, which are used to update the P- and S-wave velocity models through adjoint-state tomography. Because the image volumes are constructed from all trace data, the signal-to-noise in this space is increased when compared to the individual traces. Moreover, it eliminates the need for picking and does not require any estimation of the source location and timing. Initial tests show that with reasonable source distribution and acquisition array, velocity anomalies can be recovered. Future tests will apply this methodology to other scales from laboratory to global.

  13. First seismic shear wave velocity profile of the lunar crust as extracted from the Apollo 17 active seismic data by wavefield gradient analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollberger, David; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Nakamura, Yosio; Khan, Amir

    2016-04-01

    We present a new seismic velocity model of the shallow lunar crust, including, for the first time, shear wave velocity information. So far, the shear wave velocity structure of the lunar near-surface was effectively unconstrained due to the complexity of lunar seismograms. Intense scattering and low attenuation in the lunar crust lead to characteristic long-duration reverberations on the seismograms. The reverberations obscure later arriving shear waves and mode conversions, rendering them impossible to identify and analyze. Additionally, only vertical component data were recorded during the Apollo active seismic experiments, which further compromises the identification of shear waves. We applied a novel processing and analysis technique to the data of the Apollo 17 lunar seismic profiling experiment (LSPE), which involved recording seismic energy generated by several explosive packages on a small areal array of four vertical component geophones. Our approach is based on the analysis of the spatial gradients of the seismic wavefield and yields key parameters such as apparent phase velocity and rotational ground motion as a function of time (depth), which cannot be obtained through conventional seismic data analysis. These new observables significantly enhance the data for interpretation of the recorded seismic wavefield and allow, for example, for the identification of S wave arrivals based on their lower apparent phase velocities and distinct higher amount of generated rotational motion relative to compressional (P-) waves. Using our methodology, we successfully identified pure-mode and mode-converted refracted shear wave arrivals in the complex LSPE data and derived a P- and S-wave velocity model of the shallow lunar crust at the Apollo 17 landing site. The extracted elastic-parameter model supports the current understanding of the lunar near-surface structure, suggesting a thin layer of low-velocity lunar regolith overlying a heavily fractured crust of basaltic

  14. Seismic Reverse Time Migration Using A New Wave-Field Extrapolator and a New Imaging Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradpouri, Farzad; Moradzadeh, Ali; Pestana, Reynam C.; Soleimani Monfared, Mehrdad

    2016-10-01

    Prestack reverse time migration (RTM), as a two way wave-field extrapolation method, can image steeply dipping structures without any dip limitation at the expense of potential increase in imaging artifacts. In this paper, an efficient symplectic scheme, called Leapfrog-Rapid Expansion Method (L-REM), is first introduced to extrapolate the wavefield and its derivative in the same time step with high accuracy and free numerical dispersion using a Ricker wavelet of a maximum frequency of 25 Hz. Afterwards, in order to suppress the artifacts as a characteristic of RTM, a new imaging condition based on Poynting vector and a type of weighting function is presented. The capability of the proposed new imaging condition is then tested on synthetic data. The obtained results indicate that the proposed imaging condition is able to suppress the RTM artifacts effectively. They also show the ability of the proposed approach for improving the amplitude and compensate for illumination.

  15. Spatial coherence of the seismic wavefield continuously recorded by the USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; Rosny, J.; Landès, M.

    2016-09-01

    We use a method based on the array covariance matrix eigenvalues to study the level of spatial coherence and of isotropy of the seismic wavefield continuously recorded during 2010 by the USArray. First, we observe that the raw data are often dominated by local sources. To remove their influence, we apply spectral and temporal normalizations to the input signals. We notice that this widely used preprocessing in ambient-noise seismology does not fully homogenize the seismic wavefield and that some strongly coherent arrivals persist. Among these persistent signals generated by teleseismic sources we detect (1) seismic waves emitted by strong earthquakes, (2) a nearly continuous quasi-monochromatic signal at 26 s period, and (3) multiday coherent wave trends in the spectral band of oceanic microseisms (0.07-0.2 Hz). For the latter, beamforming analysis shows that while most of the signals are composed of surface waves, some are dominated by body waves likely generated in the deep ocean.

  16. Computationally efficient parabolic equation solutions to seismo-acoustic problems involving thin or low-shear elastic layers.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Adam M; Collis, Jon M

    2013-04-01

    Shallow-water environments typically include sediments containing thin or low-shear layers. Numerical treatments of these types of layers require finer depth grid spacing than is needed elsewhere in the domain. Thin layers require finer grids to fully sample effects due to elasticity within the layer. As shear wave speeds approach zero, the governing system becomes singular and fine-grid spacing becomes necessary to obtain converged solutions. In this paper, a seismo-acoustic parabolic equation solution is derived utilizing modified difference formulas using Galerkin's method to allow for variable-grid spacing in depth. Propagation results are shown for environments containing thin layers and low-shear layers.

  17. Appraising the reliability of converted wavefield imaging: application to USArray imaging of the 410-km discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Pavlis, Gary L.

    2013-03-01

    We develop a generic method to appraise the reliability of wavefield imaging methods and use it to validate some novel observations on the 410-km discontinuity. The core concept of the error appraisal method is to produce a simulated data set that replicates the geometry of the real data. Here we implemented two simulation methods: (1) flat layer primary P to S conversions, and (2) a point source scattering model for P to S conversion data based on the Born approximation and ray theory propagators. We show how the approach can be extended for any simulation algorithm. We apply this new approach to appraise recent results using a 3-D, three-component P to S conversion imaging method applied to data collected by the USArray. Multiple metrics show that the amplitude of P to S converted energy scattered from the 410-km discontinuity varies by 18 dB with a systematically lower amplitude in an irregular band running from Idaho through northern Arizona. In addition, we observe strong lateral changes in the ratio of amplitudes recovered on the radial versus the transverse component. We compute point resolution functions and a checkerboard test to demonstrate we can reliably recover relative amplitudes with a lateral scale of the order of 200 km and a vertical scale of approximately 10 km. Irregular coverage locally distorts the amplitudes recovered in the checkerboard, but a 156 km scale checkerboard pattern is recovered. Flat layer simulations show we can recover relative amplitudes to within a range of 1 dB and the reconstructed transverse to radial amplitude is everywhere less than 0.1. A model with north-south oriented ridges with a 3° wavelength and 12.5 km amplitude shows of the order of ±6 dB amplitude variations and small, but clear correlation of the transverse/radial amplitude ratio topography in the model. Finally, we model the 410-km discontinuity as a rough surface characterized by variations in amplitude and depth derived from the USArray data. The rough

  18. Energy-based Location and Wavefield Polarization Analysis of Tectonic Tremors in Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Husker, A. L.; Legrand, D.; Kostoglodov, V.

    2013-05-01

    We have designed a location technique based on non-volcanic tremor (NVT) energy measurements and their spatial derivatives in the three ground motion components. By means of a source-scanning grid search and a large database of theoretical Green's functions (i.e. more than 45,000 functions from rake-variable horizontal point dislocations) accounting for both intrinsic attenuation and layered media, the algorithm looks for the hypocentral locations that minimize an error function between observed and synthetic spatial-energy distributions. However, since the energy has little information about the footprint of the source-radiation-pattern on the wavefield polarization we have introduced, into the location algorithm, a particle-motion polarization analysis. The analysis is based on the eigendecomposition of the covariance matrix determined from the three ground motion components, and provides the algorithm with much better control of both NVT location and source mechanism (i.e. dislocation rake angle). Preliminary locations of the NVT catalogue by Husker et al. (2010) for the Guerrero province confirmed the coastward spreading of the NVT activity during the 2006 Slow Slip Event, recently reported. Although the horizontal NVT-energy distribution changes along the one-dimensional MASE array from downdip to updip locations, our results show that this variation may be explained, for all NVT's, with approximately the same rake angle, which differs from the plate convergence direction by 15 to 20 degrees clockwise. Moreover, although a few NVT foci are located within the deep continental crust (i.e. between 30 and 40 km depth), most of the NVT activity is embedded within the subducted slab, below the 40 km depth Moho. Most of the intraslab activity lies between 200 and 240 km from the trench (region called the 'Sweet Spot' by Husker et al., 2012) with 40 to 50 km depth. By superimposing the NVT hypocentral cross-section locations over the state of pore pressure (Pp

  19. The nature of noise wavefield and its applications for site effects studies: A literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefoy-Claudet, Sylvette; Cotton, Fabrice; Bard, Pierre-Yves

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the existing scientific literature in order to gather all the available information dealing with the origin and the nature of the ambient seismic noise wavefield. This issue is essential as the use of seismic noise is more and more popular for seismic hazard purposes with a growing number of processing techniques based on the assumption that the noise wavefield is predominantly consisting of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves. This survey reveals an overall agreement about the origin of seismic noise and its frequency dependence. At frequencies higher than 1 Hz, seismic noise systematically exhibits daily and weekly variations linked to human activities, whereas at lower frequencies (between 0.005 and 0.3 Hz) the variation of seismic noise is correlated to natural activities (oceanic, meteorological…). Such a surface origin clearly supports the interpretation of seismic noise wavefield consisting primarily of surface waves. However, the further, very common (though hidden) assumption according which almost all the noise energy would be carried by fundamental mode Rayleigh waves is not supported by the few available data: no "average" number can though be given concerning the actual proportion between surface and body waves, Love and Rayleigh waves (horizontal components), fundamental and higher modes (vertical components), since the few available investigations report a significant variability, which might be related with site conditions and noise source properties.

  20. Quantitatively understanding the imprint of fractures in the seismic wave-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vsemirnova, Ekaterina; Roberts, Alan; Long, Jon; Jones, Richard; McCaffrey, Ken; Hobbs, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Understanding fracture connectivity in the shallow crust is of major importance for the development and production of hydrocarbon fields. Fracture datasets collected from wells have limited spatial coverage compared to remote sensing methods such as seismic imaging, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), electromagnetic recording, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles ("drones"). In this study we focus on quantitatively understanding the imprint of several classes of realistic fracture network on the seismic wave-field. The thin, often rough sheet-like form of fractures poses challenges for reliable imaging of fracture networks using seismic methods, and the seismic response can be significantly altered by the highly variable dip of the fractures. A number of studies have been published showing the effect of the presence of simple fracture configurations on the synthetic seismic wave-field. At present, however, due to the inherent complexity of real fracture networks, there is limited understanding regarding the extraction of network characteristics from seismic data. Our work involves forward seismic wave-field simulation of a range of complex fracture networks derived from detailed quantitative characterisation of fractures in outcrop. We aim to build a library of calibrated examples from which to both develop understanding of the information contained in a seismic dataset related to the fracture network, and further research into the quantitative inversion and imaging of such information.

  1. First-principles computation of structural, elastic and magnetic properties of Ni2FeGa across the martensitic transformation.

    PubMed

    Sahariah, Munima B; Ghosh, Subhradip; Singh, Chabungbam S; Gowtham, S; Pandey, Ravindra

    2013-01-16

    The structural stabilities, elastic, electronic and magnetic properties of the Heusler-type shape memory alloy Ni(2)FeGa are calculated using density functional theory. The volume conserving tetragonal distortion of the austenite Ni(2)FeGa find an energy minimum at c/a = 1.33. Metastable behaviour of the high temperature cubic austenite phase is predicted due to elastic softening in the [110] direction. Calculations of the total and partial magnetic moments show a dominant contribution from Fe atoms of the alloy. The calculated density of states shows a depression in the minority spin channel of the cubic Ni(2)FeGa just above the Fermi level which gets partially filled up in the tetragonal phase. In contrast to Ni(2)MnGa, the transition metal spin-down states show partial hybridization in Ni(2)FeGa and there is a relatively high electron density of states near the Fermi level in both phases.

  2. First-principles computation of structural, elastic and magnetic properties of Ni2FeGa across the martensitic transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahariah, Munima B.; Ghosh, Subhradip; Singh, Chabungbam S.; Gowtham, S.; Pandey, Ravindra

    2013-01-01

    The structural stabilities, elastic, electronic and magnetic properties of the Heusler-type shape memory alloy Ni2FeGa are calculated using density functional theory. The volume conserving tetragonal distortion of the austenite Ni2FeGa find an energy minimum at c/a = 1.33. Metastable behaviour of the high temperature cubic austenite phase is predicted due to elastic softening in the [110] direction. Calculations of the total and partial magnetic moments show a dominant contribution from Fe atoms of the alloy. The calculated density of states shows a depression in the minority spin channel of the cubic Ni2FeGa just above the Fermi level which gets partially filled up in the tetragonal phase. In contrast to Ni2MnGa, the transition metal spin-down states show partial hybridization in Ni2FeGa and there is a relatively high electron density of states near the Fermi level in both phases.

  3. Validation and verification of a high-fidelity computational model for a bounding robot's parallel actuated elastic spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusey, Jason L.; Yoo, Jin-Hyeong

    2014-06-01

    We document the design and preliminary numerical simulation study of a high fidelity model of Canid, a recently introduced bounding robot. Canid is a free-standing, power-autonomous quadrupedal machine constructed from standard commercially available electromechanical and structural elements, incorporating compliant C-shaped legs like those of the decade old RHex design, but departing from that standard (and, to the best of our knowledge, from any prior) robot platform in its parallel actuated elastic spine. We have used a commercial modeling package to develop a finite-element model of the actuated, cable-driven, rigid-plate-reinforced harness for the carbon-fiber spring that joins the robot's fore- and hind-quarters. We compare a numerical model of this parallel actuated elastic spine with empirical data from preliminary physical experiments with the most important component of the spine assembly: the composite leaf spring. Specifically, we report our progress in tuning the mechanical properties of a standard modal approximation to a conventional compliant beam model whose boundary conditions represent constraints imposed by the actuated cable driven vertebral plates that comprise the active control affordance over the spine. We conclude with a brief look ahead at near-term future experiments that will compare predictions of this fitted composite spring model with data taken from the physical spine flexed in isolation from the actuated harness.

  4. ESP Toolbox: A Computational Framework for Precise, Scale-Independent Analysis of Bulk Elastic and Seismic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. E.; Vel, S. S.; Cook, A. C.; Song, W. J.; Gerbi, C. C.; Okaya, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Owing to the abundance of highly anisotropic minerals in the crust, the Voigt and Reuss bounds on the seismic velocities can be separated by more than 1 km/s. These bounds are determined by modal mineralogy and crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) of the constituent minerals, but where the true velocities lie between these bounds is determined by other fabric parameters such as the shapes, shape-preferred orientations, and spatial arrangements of grains. Thus, the calculation of accurate bulk stiffness relies on explicitly treating the grain-scale heterogeneity, and the same principle applies at larger scales, for example calculating accurate bulk stiffness for a crustal volume with varying proportions and distributions of folds or shear zones. We have developed stand-alone GUI software - ESP Toolbox - for the calculation of 3D bulk elastic and seismic properties of heterogeneous and polycrystalline materials using image or EBSD data. The GUI includes a number of different homogenization techniques, including Voigt, Reuss, Hill, geometric mean, self-consistent and asymptotic expansion homogenization (AEH) methods. The AEH method, which uses a finite element mesh, is most accurate since it explicitly accounts for elastic interactions of constituent minerals/phases. The user need only specify the microstructure and material properties of the minerals/phases. We use the Toolbox to explore changes in bulk elasticity and related seismic anisotropy caused by specific variables, including: (a) the quartz alpha-beta phase change in rocks with varying proportions of quartz, (b) changes in modal mineralogy and CPO fabric that occur during progressive deformation and metamorphism, and (c) shear zones of varying thickness, abundance and geometry in continental crust. The Toolbox allows rapid sensitivity analysis around these and other variables, and the resulting bulk stiffness matrices can be used to populate volumes for synthetic wave propagation experiments that

  5. Elastic Deformations in 2D van der waals Heterostructures and their Impact on Optoelectronic Properties: Predictions from a Multiscale Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Hemant; Er, Dequan; Dong, Liang; Li, Junwen; Shenoy, Vivek B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances in the isolation and transfer of different 2-dimensional (2D) materials have led to renewed interest in stacked Van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures. Interlayer interactions and lattice mismatch between two different monolayers cause elastic strains, which significantly affects their electronic properties. Using a multiscale computational method, we demonstrate that significant in-plane strains and the out-of-plane displacements are introduced in three different bilayer structures, namely graphene-hBN, MoS2-WS2 and MoSe2-WSe2, due to interlayer interactions which can cause bandgap change of up to ~300 meV. Furthermore, the magnitude of the elastic deformations can be controlled by changing the relative rotation angle between two layers. Magnitude of the out-of-plane displacements in graphene agrees well with those observed in experiments and can explain the experimentally observed bandgap opening in graphene. Upon increasing the relative rotation angle between the two lattices from 0° to 10°, the magnitude of the out-of-plane displacements decrease while in-plane strains peaks when the angle is ~6°. For large misorientation angles (>10°), the out-of-plane displacements become negligible. We further predict the deformation fields for MoS2-WS2 and MoSe2-WSe2 heterostructures that have been recently synthesized experimentally and estimate the effect of these deformation fields on near-gap states. PMID:26076932

  6. A new high-order finite volume method for 3D elastic wave simulation on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zhuang, Yuan; Zhang, Lina

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new efficient high-order finite volume method for 3D elastic wave simulation on unstructured tetrahedral meshes. With the relative coarse tetrahedral meshes, we make subdivision in each tetrahedron to generate a stencil for the high-order polynomial reconstruction. The subdivision algorithm guarantees the number of subelements is greater than the degrees of freedom of a complete polynomial. We perform the reconstruction on this stencil by using cell-averaged quantities based on the hierarchical orthonormal basis functions. Unlike the traditional high-order finite volume method, our new method has a very local property like DG and can be written as an inner-split computational scheme which is beneficial to reducing computational amount. Moreover, the stencil in our method is easy to generate for all tetrahedrons especially in the three-dimensional case. The resulting reconstruction matrix is invertible and remains unchanged for all tetrahedrons and thus it can be pre-computed and stored before time evolution. These special advantages facilitate the parallelization and high-order computations. We show convergence results obtained with the proposed method up to fifth order accuracy in space. The high-order accuracy in time is obtained by the Runge-Kutta method. Comparisons between numerical and analytic solutions show the proposed method can provide accurate wavefield information. Numerical simulation for a realistic model with complex topography demonstrates the effectiveness and potential applications of our method. Though the method is proposed based on the 3D elastic wave equation, it can be extended to other linear hyperbolic system.

  7. Seismic wavefield imaging in the Tokyo metropolitan area, Japan, based on the replica exchange Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Masayuki; Nagao, Hiromichi; Nagata, Kenji; Ito, Shin-ichi; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Hori, Muneo; Hirata, Naoshi

    2017-04-01

    Earthquakes sometimes cause serious disasters not only directly by ground motion itself but also secondarily by infrastructure damage, particularly in densely populated urban areas. To reduce these secondary disasters, it is important to rapidly evaluate seismic hazards by analyzing the seismic responses of individual structures due to the input ground motions. Such input motions are estimated utilizing an array of seismometers that are distributed more sparsely than the structures. We propose a methodology that integrates physics-based and data-driven approaches in order to obtain the seismic wavefield to be input into seismic response analysis. This study adopts the replica exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) method, which is one of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, for the estimation of the seismic wavefield together with one-dimensional local subsurface structure and source information. Numerical tests show that the REMC method is able to search the parameters related to the source and the local subsurface structure in broader parameter space than the Metropolis method, which is an ordinary MCMC method. The REMC method well reproduces the seismic wavefield consistent with the true one. In contrast, the ordinary kriging, which is a classical data-driven interpolation method for spatial data, is hardly able to reproduce the true wavefield even at low frequencies. This indicates that it is essential to take both physics-based and data-driven approaches into consideration for seismic wavefield imaging. Then the REMC method is applied to the actual waveforms observed by a dense seismic array MeSO-net (Metropolitan Seismic Observation network), in which 296 accelerometers are continuously in operation with several kilometer intervals in the Tokyo metropolitan area, Japan. The estimated wavefield within a frequency band of 0.10-0.20 Hz is absolutely consistent with the observed waveforms. Further investigation suggests that the seismic wavefield is successfully

  8. An Elasticity-Based Mesh Scheme Applied to the Computation of Unsteady Three-Dimensional Spoiler and Aeroelastic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a modification of the spring analogy scheme which uses axial linear spring stiffness with selective spring stiffening/relaxation. An alternate approach to solving the geometric conservation law is taken which eliminates the need for storage of metric Jacobians at previous time steps. Efficiency and verification are illustrated with several unsteady 2-D airfoil Euler computations. The method is next applied to the computation of the turbulent flow about a 2-D airfoil and wing with two and three- dimensional moving spoiler surfaces, and the results compared with Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) experimental data. The aeroelastic response at low dynamic pressure of an airfoil to a single large scale oscillation of a spoiler surface is computed. This study confirms that it is possible to achieve accurate solutions with a very large time step for aeroelastic problems using the fluid solver and aeroelastic integrator as discussed in this paper.

  9. Computational Simulation of the Activation Cycle of Gα Subunit in the G Protein Cycle Using an Elastic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Ryung; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Choi, Jae Boong; Chung, Ka Young; Kim, Moon Ki

    2016-01-01

    Agonist-activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) interact with GDP-bound G protein heterotrimers (Gαβγ) promoting GDP/GTP exchange, which results in dissociation of Gα from the receptor and Gβγ. The GTPase activity of Gα hydrolyzes GTP to GDP, and the GDP-bound Gα interacts with Gβγ, forming a GDP-bound G protein heterotrimer. The G protein cycle is allosterically modulated by conformational changes of the Gα subunit. Although biochemical and biophysical methods have elucidated the structure and dynamics of Gα, the precise conformational mechanisms underlying the G protein cycle are not fully understood yet. Simulation methods could help to provide additional details to gain further insight into G protein signal transduction mechanisms. In this study, using the available X-ray crystal structures of Gα, we simulated the entire G protein cycle and described not only the steric features of the Gα structure, but also conformational changes at each step. Each reference structure in the G protein cycle was modeled as an elastic network model and subjected to normal mode analysis. Our simulation data suggests that activated receptors trigger conformational changes of the Gα subunit that are thermodynamically favorable for opening of the nucleotide-binding pocket and GDP release. Furthermore, the effects of GTP binding and hydrolysis on mobility changes of the C and N termini and switch regions are elucidated. In summary, our simulation results enabled us to provide detailed descriptions of the structural and dynamic features of the G protein cycle. PMID:27483005

  10. Estimating and exploiting the outgoing seismic wavefield at the North Korean nuclear test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Steven J.

    2017-04-01

    Between October 2006 and September 2016, 5 declared underground nuclear explosions were carried out at the Punggye-ri test-site in North Korea. All events were detected clearly both at regional and teleseismic distances. Waveform similarity allows us to estimate relative locations of all 5 events using classical double-difference techniques. However, using a simple 1D velocity model, these estimates are quite sensitive to the set of stations used with inter-event distances estimated using regional Pn phases consistently longer than those estimated using teleseismic P-phases; the seismic wavefield leaving the test-site is more complicated than the 1D velocity model description. We seek perturbations to the horizontal slownesses of each of the rays leaving the source region which ultimately reach the sensors at which the correlations are performed. We find spatially consistent perturbations which reduce the double-difference time residuals and provide relative location estimates which are consistent on both regional and teleseismic measurements. The perturbations are almost sinusoidal with azimuth, as is frequently observed with the observation of incoming wavefronts at seismic arrays. The spatial form of the outgoing wavefield can also be estimated using classical array processing methods on a virtual source array. The source-array analysis supports independently the perturbations to the outgoing wavefield obtained previously and, given the number of events now recorded at this site, may allow accurate relative location estimates for subsequent events which are recorded by a less favorable set of stations. One such scenario is a lower magnitude event recorded only at regional distances, with the associated limitations in azimuthal coverage. Another scenario is of a test in a different part of the test site for which the waveform similarity at some stations, a particularly acute problem for regional phases, may be significantly diminished.

  11. Elastic properties of HMX.

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, T. D.; Bedrov, D.; Menikoff, Ralph; Smith, G. D.

    2001-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been used to calculate isothermal elastic properties for {beta}-, {alpha}-, and {delta}-HMX. The complete elastic tensor for each polymorph was determined at room temperature and pressure via analysis of microscopic strain fluctuations using formalism due to Rahman and Parrinello [J. Chem. Phys. 76,2662 (1982)]. Additionally, the isothermal compression curve was computed for {beta}-HMX for 0 {le} p {le} 10.6 GPa; the bulk modulus K and its pressure derivative K{prime} were obtained from two fitting forms employed previously in experimental studies of the {beta}-HMX equation of state. Overall, the results indicate good agreement between the bulk modulus predicted from the measured and calculated compression curves. The bulk modulus determined directly from the elastic tensor of {beta}-HMX is in significant disagreement with the compression curve-based results. The explanation for this discrepancy is an area of current research.

  12. Fast Computation of High Energy Elastic Collision Scattering Angle for Electric Propulsion Plume Simulation (Conference Paper with Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-10

    Table 1 shows the wall time for the collision calculation and its percentage relative to the baseline method. While the baseline method is nearly...for an ion-atom pair, the scattering angle is computed by a table lookup and multiple linear interpolations, given the relative energy and randomly...interpolations, given the relative energy and randomly determined impact parameter. In order to further accelerate the calculations, the number of

  13. Elastic Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The dry granular flowmap can be broken into two broad categories, the Elastic and the Inertial. Elastic flows are dominated by force chains and stresses are generated by the compression of the interparticle contacts within those chains, and thus are proportional to the stiffness of the contacts. The Elastic zone can be subdivided into two regimes, the Elastic-Quasistatic where forces are independent of the shear rate which at high shear rates transitions to Elastic-Inertial where the particle inertia is reflected in the forces and the stresses increase linearly with the shear rate. In the Inertial regime, the stresses vary with the square of the shear rate. It also is divided into two regimes, the Dense-Inertial where the flow is dominated by clusters of particles, and the Inertial-Collisional where the flow is dominated by binary collisions. Appropriately the elastic theory grew out of an old study of landslides. But like most such studies, all of the above depend on idealized computer simulations of uniform sized spherical particles. Real particles are never round, never of uniform size, and the process of flowing changes surface properties and may even shatter the particles. But all indications are that real systems still fit into the pattern drawn out in the last paragraph. A grave problem facing the field is how to incorporate these effects without losing a fundamental understanding of the internal rheological processes. This talk will begin with an overview of the Elastic flowmap and the behaviors associated with each flow regime. It will then discuss early work to include effects of particle shape and size mixtures and perhaps some effects of particle breakage.

  14. On the anisotropic elastic properties of hydroxyapatite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.; Ukraincik, K.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the isotropic elastic moduli on polycrystalline specimens of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite are compared with elastic constants measured directly from single crystals of fluorapatite in order to derive a set of pseudo single crystal elastic constants for hydroxyapatite. The stiffness coefficients thus derived are given. The anisotropic and isotropic elastic properties are then computed and compared with similar properties derived from experimental observations of the anisotropic behavior of bone.

  15. Statistical redundancy of instantaneous phases: theory and application to the seismic ambient wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudot, I.; Beucler, É.; Mocquet, A.; Schimmel, M.; Le Feuvre, M.

    2016-02-01

    In order to detect possible signal redundancies in the ambient seismic wavefield, we develop a new method based on pairwise comparisons among a set of synchronous time-series. This approach is based on instantaneous phase coherence statistics. The first and second moments of the pairwise phase coherence distribution are used to characterize the phase randomness. For perfect phase randomness, the theoretical values of the mean and variance are equal to 0 and √{1-2/π }, respectively. As a consequence, any deviation from these values indicates the presence of a redundant phase in the raw continuous signal. A previously detected microseismic source in the Gulf of Guinea is used to illustrate one of the possible ways of handling phase coherence statistics. The proposed approach allows us to properly localize this persistent source, and to quantify its contribution to the overall seismic ambient wavefield. The strength of the phase coherence statistics relies in its ability to quantify the redundancy of a given phase among a set of time-series with various useful applications in seismic noise-based studies (tomography and/or source characterization).

  16. Incident Wave Removal Through Frequency-Wavenumber Filtering of Full Wavefield Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Thomas E.; Ruzzene, Massimo; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2009-03-01

    Full wavefield measurements of guided waves in a structure provide a wealth of information that can be effectively used for the identification, localization and quantification of damage. Full field measurements can be obtained using an air-coupled transducer mounted on a scanning stage, or via a scanning laser vibrometer. The resulting detailed temporal and spatial information can be transformed to the frequency-wavenumber domain where waves propagating in different directions appear decoupled. Appropriate filtering strategies can be applied to effectively remove the contribution of incident waves while highlighting reflections and scattering associated with structural discontinuities or damage. This paper presents two frequency-wavenumber domain analysis methods. The first method is based upon multiple two-dimensional Fourier Transforms applied to waveform data in spatial polar coordinates, and the second applies the three-dimensional Fourier Transform in Cartesian coordinates. The utility of these methods is demonstrated on full wavefield data recorded on a composite plate before and after the introduction of damage.

  17. Circular synthetic aperture sonar imaging of simple objects illuminated by an evanescent wavefield.

    PubMed

    Plotnick, Daniel S; Marston, Timothy M; Marston, Philip L

    2016-10-01

    This paper is motivated by the case where an underwater object located within the sediment is illuminated by a grazing acoustic beam below the critical angle. The included experimental work uses a liquid-liquid interface and vertically inverted geometry as a stand-in for the water-sediment boundary. In the super-critical regime sound in the water column refracts into the sediment before scattering. However, for sub-critical illumination a rapidly decaying evanescent wavefield is generated in the sediment near the water-sediment interface. For compact objects located in the sediment near the interface this can result in strong backscattering signals suitable for acoustic image reconstruction using synthetic aperture sonar techniques. Certain properties of the evanescent wavefield such as the vertical phase-locking behavior, the rapid amplitude decay with distance from the interface, and the low-pass filter effect have understandable ramifications for the image formation process and for characteristics of the reconstructed image. In particular, circular imaging techniques require correct placement of the imaging plane to properly focus an object; however, for backscattering (monostatic) evanescent image formation the imaging plane may be placed at the interface and the target will remain in focus regardless of burial depth. A laboratory experiment using simple scatterers is presented.

  18. Vortex reconnection rate, and loop birth rate, for a random wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, J. H.

    2017-04-01

    A time dependent, complex scalar wavefield in three dimensions contains curved zero lines, wave ‘vortices’, that move around. From time to time pairs of these lines contact each other and ‘reconnect’ in a well studied manner, and at other times tiny loops of new line appear from nowhere (births) and grow, or the reverse, existing loops shrink and disappear (deaths). These three types are known to be the only generic events. Here the average rate of their occurrences per unit volume is calculated exactly for a Gaussian random wavefield that has isotropic, stationary statistics, arising from a superposition of an infinity of plane waves in different directions. A simplifying ‘axis fixing’ technique is introduced to achieve this. The resulting formulas are proportional to the standard deviation of angular frequencies, and depend in a simple way on the second and fourth moments of the power spectrum of the plane waves. Reconnections turn out to be more common than births and deaths combined. As an expository preliminary, the case of two dimensions, where the vortices are points, is studied and the average rate of pair creation (and likewise destruction) per unit area is calculated.

  19. Theoretical HVSR curves from full wavefield modelling of ambient vibrations in a weakly dissipative layered Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunedei, Enrico; Albarello, Dario

    2010-05-01

    Ambient vibrations generated by anthropic activity in the range of frequencies of engineering interest (0.5-20 Hz) were modelled as the wavefield generated by a continuous distribution of random, independent point-like sources acting at the surface of a weakly dissipative layered Earth. A full wavefield solution was deduced analytically and used to evaluate major properties of Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratios (HVSR) in a representative set of selected cases of observed subsoil configurations. The results obtained confirmed-on a more coherent analytical basis-several statements deduced from empirical observations and numerical simulations, which are of great importance for practical applications. It was confirmed that HVSR cannot be considered representative of the S-wave response function but as concerns the possibility of detecting the presence of 1-D resonance phenomena and of identifying the resonance frequency associated with the shallowest strong impedance contrast in the subsoil. The model enables evaluations of the reliability of HVSR interpretations provided in the surface wave approximation that can be considered valid in the frequency range above the resonance frequency. At the resonance frequency, HVSR values prove sensitive to the strength of sources in the near proximity of the receiver (within a few tens of metres) and this suggests caution in the interpretation of HVSR peaks in terms of subsoil properties only.

  20. Influence of near-source volcano topography on the acoustic wavefield and implication for source modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacanna, G.; Ripepe, M.

    2013-01-01

    In near-source conditions (< 5 km), the atmosphere is often assumed to be fully transparent to acoustic waves and to have a small effect on the acoustic wavefield. As a consequence, the propagation of the acoustic waves in the atmosphere near the source is often neglected and waveform is compensated only in amplitude by the inverse of the distance from the source. However, the amplitude distribution at five infrasonic stations deployed around the active craters of the Stromboli volcano, reveals anomalous decay up to - 11 dB larger than expected, which cannot be explained in terms of energy loss for geometrical spreading. The distribution of amplitude decay changes for different source positions, suggesting a strong relationship with the source-to-receiver path geometry. By using 2D-FDTD modeling, we show that the anomalous amplitude distribution of the acoustic waves at Stromboli is not necessarily due to the source radiation pattern but it is strongly influenced by the topography of the ground-atmosphere interface. Diffraction and reflection of topography contaminate the acoustic wavefield and have a strong effect in reducing the amplitude and altering the waveform. Our work demonstrates that line-of-sight conditions are quite difficult to be achieved in acoustic experiments and that a detailed knowledge of the topography along the crater-receiver path is necessary whenever infrasound waveforms are used to invert for the source process.

  1. Planar stacking effect on elastic stability of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yue; Hector, Louis G.

    2007-02-01

    The elastic stability of five hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) stacking sequences is investigated with density functional theory. All components of the elasticity tensor are computed and used to evaluate the Born stability criteria. Phonon spectra are computed for one elastically stable and one elastically unstable h-BN structure and the normal modes associated with instability are identified. Charge density difference contour plots provide a qualitative connection between elastic stability and charge transfer.

  2. Rotational elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  3. Directional Resonance and Wavefield Polarization in the Damage Zone of the Campo Imperatore Fault Zone (central Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pischiutta, M.; Fondriest, M.; Demurtas, M.; Di Toro, G.; Rovelli, A.

    2014-12-01

    To infer the occurrence of directional amplification effects, we performed ambient noise measurements along a 200m transect crossing the Campo Imperatore fault zone (Central Italy), an exhumed analogue of the faults responsible of the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake sequence, We have recently found in several fault zones that ambient noise is not randomly polarized, but it is amplified on the horizontal plane along a specific site-dependent direction. The analysis repeated using earthquake signals revealed that S-coda waves and surface waves show the same polarization direction, independently of the earthquake backazimuth and focal mechanism. We have explained the observed directional amplifications in terms of fractured rocks in the fault damage zone, polarization being oriented orthogonally to fractures produced by the kinematic stress component. Therefore ground motion directional amplification could be related to the higher compliance of fractured rocks. In the other studies the fracture pattern was derived from numerical-analytical modeling based on the fault geometry and kinematics, or compared with the fast direction of shear wave obtained by seismic anisotropy analysis. The aim of this study is to compare observations with fracture measurements (strike, dip, dip-azimuth, spacing, later continuity, etc.) performed in the selected fault zone. We thus acquired ambient noise using 25 stations installed along a transect where detailed structural geological measurements were carried out. Ambient noise was recorded for around 1 hour, and was processed to compute the horizontal-to-vertical noise spectral ratio as a function of frequency and direction of motion. Wavefield polarization was investigated in the time-frequency domain as well. We found that, in spite of the complexity of the seismic data, the observed polarization pattern is generally oriented orthogonal to the measured dominant fracture system, confirming the existence of a high angle relation between ground

  4. Elastic plate spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oline, L.; Medaglia, J.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic finite element method was used to investigate elastic stress waves in a plate. Strain displacement and stress strain relations are discussed along with the stiffness and mass matrix. The results of studying point load, and distributed load over small, intermediate, and large radii are reported. The derivation of finite element matrices, and the derivation of lumped and consistent matrices for one dimensional problems with Laplace transfer solutions are included. The computer program JMMSPALL is also included.

  5. Dynamics of elastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankovich, Vladimir

    1998-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to build a consistent physical theory of the dynamics of the bat-ball interaction. This requires creating realistic models for both the softball bat and the softball. Some of the features of these models are known phenomenologically, from experiments conducted in our laboratory, others will be introduced and computed from first principles here for the first time. Both interacting objects are treated from the viewpoint of the theory of elasticity, and it is shown how a computer can be used to accurately calculate all the relevant characteristics of batball collisions. It is shown also how the major elastic parameters of the material constituting the interior of a softball can be determined using the existing experimental data. These parameters, such as the Young's modulus, the Poisson ratio and the damping coefficient are vital for the accurate description of the ball's dynamics. We are demonstrating how the existing theories of the elastic behavior of solid bars and hollow shells can be augmented to simplify the resulting equations and make the subsequent computer analysis feasible. The standard system of fourth-order PDE's is reduced to a system of the second order, because of the inclusion of the usually ignored effects of the shear forces in the bat.

  6. Relationship of scattering phase shifts to special radiation force conditions for spheres in axisymmetric wave-fields.

    PubMed

    Marston, Philip L; Zhang, Likun

    2017-05-01

    When investigating the radiation forces on spheres in complicated wave-fields, the interpretation of analytical results can be simplified by retaining the s-function notation and associated phase shifts imported into acoustics from quantum scattering theory. For situations in which dissipation is negligible, as taken to be the case in the present investigation, there is an additional simplification in that partial-wave phase shifts become real numbers that vanish when the partial-wave index becomes large and when the wave-number-sphere-radius product vanishes. By restricting attention to monopole and dipole phase shifts, transitions in the axial radiation force for axisymmetric wave-fields are found to be related to wave-field parameters for traveling and standing Bessel wave-fields by considering the ratio of the phase shifts. For traveling waves, the special force conditions concern negative forces while for standing waves, the special force conditions concern vanishing radiation forces. An intermediate step involves considering the functional dependence on phase shifts. An appendix gives an approximation for zero-force plane standing wave conditions. Connections with early investigations of acoustic levitation are mentioned and some complications associated with viscosity are briefly noted.

  7. Elasticity of crystalline molecular explosives

    DOE PAGES

    Hooks, Daniel E.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Bolme, C. A.; ...

    2015-04-14

    Crystalline molecular explosives are key components of engineered explosive formulations. In precision applications a high degree of consistency and predictability is desired under a range of conditions to a variety of stimuli. Prediction of behaviors from mechanical response and failure to detonation initiation and detonation performance of the material is linked to accurate knowledge of the material structure and first stage of deformation: elasticity. The elastic response of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), including aspects of material and measurement variability, and computational methods are described in detail. Experimental determinations of elastic tensors are compared, andmore » an evaluation of sources of error is presented. Furthermore, computed elastic constants are also compared for these materials and for triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), for which there are no measurements.« less

  8. Elasticity of crystalline molecular explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Daniel E.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Bolme, C. A.; Cawkwell, Marc J.

    2015-04-14

    Crystalline molecular explosives are key components of engineered explosive formulations. In precision applications a high degree of consistency and predictability is desired under a range of conditions to a variety of stimuli. Prediction of behaviors from mechanical response and failure to detonation initiation and detonation performance of the material is linked to accurate knowledge of the material structure and first stage of deformation: elasticity. The elastic response of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), including aspects of material and measurement variability, and computational methods are described in detail. Experimental determinations of elastic tensors are compared, and an evaluation of sources of error is presented. Furthermore, computed elastic constants are also compared for these materials and for triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), for which there are no measurements.

  9. Full Wavefield Recordings of Oklahoma Seismicity from an IRIS-led Community Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.; Woodward, R.; Sweet, J. R.; Bilek, S. L.; Brudzinski, M.; Chen, X.; DeShon, H. R.; Karplus, M. S.; Keranen, K. M.; Langston, C. A.; Lin, F. C.; Magnani, M. B.; Stump, B. W.

    2016-12-01

    In June 2016, a field crew of students, faculty, industry personnel and IRIS staff deployed several hundred stations above an active seismic lineament in north-central Oklahoma, with the goal to advance our understanding of general seismicity and earthquake source processes using arrays designed to capture full wavefield seismic data. In addition, we used this as an educational opportunity to extend the experience with nodal type experiment planning and execution. IRIS selected 30 graduate students from 18 different US and foreign based institutions to participate in the deployment. In addition, IRIS was pleased to have the assistance of several individuals from the Oklahoma Geological Survey. The crew deployed 363 3C 5Hz Generation 2 Fairfield Z-Land nodes along three seismic lines and in a seven-layer nested gradiometer array. The seismic lines spanned a region 13 km long by 5 km wide. The nested gradiometer was designed to measure the full seismic wavefield using standard frequency-wavenumber techniques and spatial wave gradients. A broadband, 18 station "Golay 3x6" array was deployed around the gradiometer and seismic lines with an aperture of approximately 5 km to collect waveform data from local and regional events. In addition, 9 infrasound stations were deployed in order to capture and identify acoustic events that might be recorded by the seismic arrays and to quantify the wind acoustic noise effect on co-located broadband stations. The variety of instrumentation used in this deployment was chosen to capture the full seismic wavefield generated by the local and regional seismicity beneath the array and the surrounding region. A demobilization team returned to the sites in mid-July to recover the nodes, after a full month of deployment. The broadband and infrasound stations will remain in place through September to capture any additional local and regional seismicity. This experiment was designed by and for the seismological community. The experiment was

  10. Wavefield characterization of perforation shot signals in a shale gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanpeng; Wang, Hua; Fehler, Michael; Fu, Yongqiang

    2017-06-01

    Signals of perforation or string shots, which are usually used for calibrating velocity models and estimating the orientation of 3 component down-hole receivers during microseismic monitoring, are occasionally hard to identify due to poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) or confusion with the events induced during fracturing in adjacent wells. A significant feature for distinguishing perforation signals from hydraulic fracturing events is the tube wave, which is generated in the treatment well and received in the monitoring well. We analyze seismic wavefields from perforations during a hydraulic fracturing operation on a pad well (a group of horizontal wells with the wellheads at a same small surface area) in a shale gas reservoir to understand the wave propagation phenomena including attenuation and the identification of tube waves (guided wave in borehole) and their conversions. Since they are dominated by high frequencies and lack energy at low frequencies, the P- and S-wave arrivals of perforation shots decrease much more rapidly with propagation distance than that of induced events. We identify six modes within the wavefields of the perforation or string shots recorded in a nearby well that are related to the tube waves. The six modes include P- & S-waves converted from tube waves in the shot (treatment) well at plugs or the well bottom, an up-going tube wave in the monitoring well generated by the tube wave in the nearby treatment well, a down-going tube wave from the treatment wellhead and the multiple, a scatting body wave activated by tube waves in the treatment well. These wave modes all originate from the waves radiated at the perforation point in the treatment well as tube waves and are then radiated into the formation and received by geophones in the nearby borehole as P, S, or tube waves. If energy from the perforation shot is strong enough, the tube wave will turn back from the surface and be reflected at the well bottom or plugs, which would excite the

  11. Estimating sedimentary and crustal structure using wavefield continuation: theory, techniques and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TAO, K.; Liu, T.; Niu, F.; Ning, J.

    2013-12-01

    Receiver-function techniques are widely used in imaging crustal and mantle structure beneath a seismic station. The weak P-to-S conversions at deep seismic structures are usually masked by strong shallow reverberation when unconsolidated sediments are present below the station, making it is nearly impossible to utilizing these techniques. We developed a method to estimate the sediment and crustal structures based on wavefield downward continuation and decomposition method. The method parameterizes velocity structure beneath the station with a stack of constant velocity layers overlying a homogeneous half space, and approximates the teleseismic P-wave and its coda by the structural response to an incoming plane P wave. Our method is based on the principle that the upgoing S wavefield is absent in the half space, and searches for the optimum velocity and thickness of the layers that give the minimum upgoing S-wave energy from the half space to the layers. An iterative grid-search algorithm from the top to the bottom layers is employed to implement the search. In this study we only use models comprising of either only one crust layer or two layers (sediment + crust) with a half space mantle, although models with more layers are also implementable. The method is especially useful in resolving seismic structure beneath a station sitting on unconsolidated sediments. It not only can be used to determine the sediment thickness and velocity structure, but also provides an effective way to generate subsurface receiver functions, which are formed by deconvolving the upgoing P wavefield from the upgoing S waves at the top of hardrock crust, and thus are free from shallow reverberations. The technique is applied to various synthetic data generated with different types of model and noise levels, and appears to have good capability to recover the input models. We further applied this method to teleseismic data recorded at a station inside the Songliao Basin in northeast China

  12. Estimating sedimentary and crustal structure using wavefield continuation: theory, techniques and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Kai; Liu, Tianze; Ning, Jieyuan; Niu, Fenglin

    2014-04-01

    Receiver function techniques are widely used in imaging crustal and mantle structure beneath a seismic station. The weak P-to-S conversions at deep seismic structures are usually masked by strong shallow reverberations when unconsolidated sediments are present below the station, making it nearly impossible to utilize receiver function techniques. We develop a method to estimate sediment and crustal structures beneath a seismic station based on wavefield downward continuation and decomposition method. The method parametrizes velocity structure beneath the station with a stack of constant velocity layers overlying a homogeneous half-space, and approximates the teleseismic P wave and its coda by the structural response to an incoming plane P wave. Our method is based on the principle that the upgoing S wavefield is absent in the half-space, and searches for the optimum velocity and thickness of the layers that give the minimum S-wave energy flux from the half-space to the layers. An iterative grid-search algorithm from the top to the bottom layers is employed to implement the search. In this study, we only use models comprising either only one crust layer or two layers (sediment + crust) with a half-space mantle, although models with more layers are also implementable. The method is especially useful in resolving seismic structure beneath a station sitting on unconsolidated sediments. It not only can be used to determine the sediment thickness and velocity structure, but also provides an effective way to generate subsurface receiver functions, which are formed by deconvolving the upgoing P wavefield from the upgoing S waves at the top of hardrock crust, and thus are free from shallow reverberations. The technique is applied to various synthetic data generated with different types of velocity model and noise levels, and appears to have good capability in recovering the input models. We further applied this method to teleseismic data recorded at a station inside the

  13. Symplectic partitioned Runge-Kutta method based on the eighth-order nearly analytic discrete operator and its wavefield simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao-Yuan; Ma, Xiao; Yang, Lei; Song, Guo-Jie

    2014-03-01

    We propose a symplectic partitioned Runge-Kutta (SPRK) method with eighth-order spatial accuracy based on the extended Hamiltonian system of the acoustic wave equation. Known as the eighth-order NSPRK method, this technique uses an eighth-order accurate nearly analytic discrete (NAD) operator to discretize high-order spatial differential operators and employs a second-order SPRK method to discretize temporal derivatives. The stability criteria and numerical dispersion relations of the eighth-order NSPRK method are given by a semi-analytical method and are tested by numerical experiments. We also show the differences of the numerical dispersions between the eighth-order NSPRK method and conventional numerical methods such as the fourth-order NSPRK method, the eighth-order Lax-Wendroff correction (LWC) method and the eighth-order staggered-grid (SG) method. The result shows that the ability of the eighth-order NSPRK method to suppress the numerical dispersion is obviously superior to that of the conventional numerical methods. In the same computational environment, to eliminate visible numerical dispersions, the eighth-order NSPRK is approximately 2.5 times faster than the fourth-order NSPRK and 3.4 times faster than the fourth-order SPRK, and the memory requirement is only approximately 47.17% of the fourth-order NSPRK method and 49.41 % of the fourth-order SPRK method, which indicates the highest computational efficiency. Modeling examples for the two-layer models such as the heterogeneous and Marmousi models show that the wavefields generated by the eighth-order NSPRK method are very clear with no visible numerical dispersion. These numerical experiments illustrate that the eighth-order NSPRK method can effectively suppress numerical dispersion when coarse grids are adopted. Therefore, this method can greatly decrease computer memory requirement and accelerate the forward modeling productivity. In general, the eighth-order NSPRK method has tremendous potential

  14. Observations and interpretation of fundamental mode Rayleigh wavefields recorded by the Transportable Array (USArray)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2008-01-01

    Broadband recordings of the dense Transportable Array (TA) in the western United States provide unparalleled detailed images of long-period seismic surface wavefields. With 400 stations spanning most of the western United States, wavefronts of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves may be visualized coherently across the array at periods ???40 s. In order to constrain the Rayleigh wave phase velocity structure in the western United States, I assemble a data set of vertical component seismograms from 53 teleseismic events recorded by the TA from April 2006 to October 2007. Complex amplitude spectra from these recordings at peni ods 27-100 s are interpreted using the multiplane wave tomographic method of Friederich and Wielandt (1995) and Pollitz (1999). This analysis yields detailed surface wave phase velocity and three-dimensional shear wave velocity patterns across the North American plate boundary zone, elucidating the active processes in the highly heterogeneous western U.S. upper mantle.

  15. Acoustic wavefield and Mach wave radiation of flashing arcs in strombolian explosion measured by image luminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genco, Riccardo; Ripepe, Maurizio; Marchetti, Emanuele; Bonadonna, Costanza; Biass, Sebastien

    2014-10-01

    Explosive activity often generates visible flashing arcs in the volcanic plume considered as the evidence of the shock-front propagation induced by supersonic dynamics. High-speed image processing is used to visualize the pressure wavefield associated with flashing arcs observed in strombolian explosions. Image luminance is converted in virtual acoustic signal compatible with the signal recorded by pressure transducer. Luminance variations are moving with a spherical front at a 344.7 m/s velocity. Flashing arcs travel at the sound speed already 14 m above the vent and are not necessarily the evidence of a supersonic explosive dynamics. However, seconds later, the velocity of small fragments increases, and the spherical acousto-luminance wavefront becomes planar recalling the Mach wave radiation generated by large scale turbulence in high-speed jet. This planar wavefront forms a Mach angle of 55° with the explosive jet axis, suggesting an explosive dynamics moving at Mo = 1.22 Mach number.

  16. Development of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Hardage; J. L. Simmons, Jr.; M. DeAngelo

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization. Also described is a 3-D seismic data-processing effort to create images of Rye Patch geothermal reservoir from 3-D sign-bit data recorded over the geothermal prospect. Two seismic sources were developed and tested in this study that can be used to illuminate geothermal reservoirs with S-waves. The first was an explosive package that generates a strong, azimuth-oriented, horizontal force vector when deployed in a conventional shot hole. This vector-explosive source has never been available to industry before. The second source was a dipole formed by operating two vertical vibrators in either a force or phase imbalance. Field data are shown that document the strong S-wave modes generated by these sources.

  17. The hybrid absorbing boundary condition for one-step extrapolation and its application in wavefield decomposition-based reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enjiang; Liu, Yang

    2017-10-01

    Complex traces are popularly used in up/down- and left/right-going wavefield decompositions. The recently developed low-rank one-step method can extrapolate complex wavefields stably and accurately. However, its boundary reflections are difficult to tackle. Traditional perfectly matched layer (PML) or hybrid absorbing boundary conditions (ABCs) cannot be directly applied, and the attenuation ABCs absorb the reflections with low efficiency. We propose novel and efficient hybrid ABCs for the one-step method. A transition area with several layers between the model target area and the boundary edge area is introduced and its wavefields are determined by the weighted combination of the two-way wavefields and Higdon’s first-order one-way wavefields to reach a smooth variation. Both the real and imaginary parts of the complex wavefields are processed in this way and the absorption is highly dependent on the layer number of the transition area. The wavefield extrapolated by the low-rank one-step method is intrinsically analytical. We directly decompose the complex wavefields into up-going, down-going, left-going and right-going parts and achieve four decomposed images (up-down, down-up, left-right and right-left) by applying the wavefield decomposition imaging conditions. Numerical examples validate that our proposed hybrid ABCs achieve nearly perfect absorption of the boundary reflections using about 15 transition absorbing layers. Applications of the numerical data and real data demonstrate that the decomposed images effectively suppress the low-frequency noise and show superiority over a single composite image for interpretation.

  18. Elastic Fluctuations and Rubber Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Goldbart, Paul; Rradzihovsky, Leo

    2006-03-01

    A coarse-grained phenomenological model is constructed to describe both phonon fluctuations and elastic heterogeneities in rubbery materials. It is a nonlocal, spatially heterogeneous generalization of the classical model of rubber elasticity, and with a tunable repulsion interaction. This model can also be derived from the Vulcanization theory. The residual stress and the non-affine deformation field, as well as their correlations, are calculated perturbatively, to the leading order of quenched randomness. It is explicitly shown that the interplay between the repulsive interaction and quenched randomness induces non- affine deformation. The spatial correlations of the non- affine deformation field and residual stress exhibit power-law scaling, with no characteristic length scale. We also calculate the contributions to the elastic free energy from both thermal and quenched fluctuations for arbitrary deformation. We find that they naturally explain the universal features in the Mooney-Rivlin plot of the stress-strain curve for rubbery materials. The (disorder averaged) thermal fluctuation of monomers is shown to depend on deformation, and becomes anisotropic upon shear deformation, as long as the repulsive interaction is finite.

  19. Common conversion point stacking of receiver functions versus passive source reverse time migration and wavefield regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xuefeng; de Hoop, Maarten V.; van der Hilst, Robert D.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate with synthetic and field data that with sufficiently dense sampling wave-equation based methods such as reverse time migration (RTM), implicitly forming array receiver functions (ARFs), perform better resolution-wise than migration of common conversion point (CCP) stacks of traditional receiver functions. However, even with modern array deployments the sampling requirement is typically not met for teleseismic (earthquake) data. To enable RTM imaging with sparsely (and irregularly) sampled wavefields at the surface we use an intermediate reconstruction based on sparsity promoting optimization using a curvelet (or wave packet) representation of the data, as an important and necessary preprocessing step. To suppress artifacts, the curvelet coefficients are constrained to represent the range of known directions present in the data. We show that our proposed preprocessing procedure (which may be viewed as generating 'missing' traces) can produce artifact-free data for RTM even if only 20% of the necessary data is available in the original data set. With synthetic data we also demonstrate that if sampling criteria are not met, CCP can produce results that are superior over wave-equation methods such as RTM. As a proof-of-concept with field data we image the structure of the crust beneath the Himalayas with passive-source RTM of teleseismic data from the Hi-CLIMB project (Nábělek et al., 2005). For Hi-CLIMB data the CCP and RTM results are similar because sampling is still too sparse for RTM and because the structure is simple enough for successful CCP. Both results are both improved by wavefield regularization and reveal that the Moho is continuous beneath most of the array, and not fragmented as suggested by some earlier studies.

  20. Shallow-velocity models at the Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, determined from array analyses of tremor wavefields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccorotti, G.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.

    2003-01-01

    The properties of the surface wavefield at Kilauea Volcano are analysed using data from small-aperture arrays of short-period seismometers deployed in and around the Kilauea caldera. Tremor recordings were obtained during two Japan-US cooperative experiments conducted in 1996 and 1997. The seismometers were deployed in three semi-circular arrays with apertures of 300, 300 and 400 m, and a linear array with length of 1680 m. Data are analysed using a spatio-temporal correlation technique well suited for the study of the stationary stochastic wavefields of Rayleigh and Love waves associated with volcanic activity and scattering sources distributed in and around the summit caldera. Spatial autocorrelation coefficients are obtained as a function of frequency and are inverted for the dispersion characteristics of Rayleigh and Love waves using a grid search that seeks phase velocities for which the L-2 norm between data and forward modelling operators is minimized. Within the caldera, the phase velocities of Rayleigh waves range from 1400 to 1800 m s-1 at 1 Hz down to 300-400 m s-1 at 10 Hz, and the phase velocities of Love waves range from 2600 to 400 m s-1 within the same frequency band. Outside the caldera, Rayleigh wave velocities range from 1800 to 1600 m s-1 at 1 Hz down to 260-360 m s-1 at 10 Hz, and Love wave velocities range from 600 to 150 m s-1 within the same frequency band. The dispersion curves are inverted for velocity structure beneath each array, assuming these dispersions represent the fundamental modes of Rayleigh and Love waves. The velocity structures observed at different array sites are consistent with results from a recent 3-D traveltime tomography of the caldera region, and point to a marked velocity discontinuity associated with the southern caldera boundary.

  1. A parametric study of planform and aeroelastic effects on aerodynamic center, alpha- and q- stability derivatives. Appendix A: A computer program for calculating alpha- and q- stability derivatives and induced drag for thin elastic aeroplanes at subsonic and supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Lan, C.; Mehrotra, S.

    1972-01-01

    The computer program used to determine the rigid and elastic stability derivatives presented in the summary report is listed in this appendix along with instructions for its use, sample input data and answers. This program represents the airplane at subsonic and supersonic speeds as (a) thin surface(s) (without dihedral) composed of discrete panels of constant pressure according to the method of Woodward for the aerodynamic effects and slender beam(s) for the structural effects. Given a set of input data, the computer program calculates an aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix and a structural influence coefficient matrix.

  2. Elastic Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles

    2006-03-01

    There is no fundamental understanding of the mechanics of granular solids. Partially this is because granular flows have historically been divided into two very distinct flow regimes, (1) the slow, quasistatic regime, in which the bulk friction coefficient is taken to be a material constant, and (2) the fast, rapid-flow regime, where the particles interact collisionally. But slow hopper flow simulations indicate that the bulk friction coefficient is not a constant. Rapidly moving large scale landslide simulations never entered the collisional regime and operate in a separate intermediate flow regime. In other words, most realistic granular flows are not described by either the quasistatic or rapid flow models and it is high time that the field look beyond those early models. This talk will discuss computer simulation studies that draw out the entire flowmap of shearing granular materials, spanning the quasistatic, rapid and the intermediate regimes. The key was to include the elastic properties of the solid material in the set of rheological parameters; in effect, this puts solid properties back into the rheology of granular solids. The solid properties were previously unnecessary in the plasticity and kinetic theory formalisms that respectively form the foundations of the quasistatic and rapid-flow theories. Granular flows can now be divided into two broad categories, the Elastic Regimes, in which the particles are locked in force chains and interact elastically over long duration contact with their neighbors and the Inertial regimes, where the particles have broken free of the force chains. The Elastic regimes can be further subdivided into the Elastic-Quasistatic regime (the old quasistatic regime) and the Elastic-Inertial regime. The Elastic-Inertial regime is the ``new'' regime observed in the landslide simulations, in which the inertially induced stresses are significant compared to the elastically induced stresses. The Inertial regime can also be sub

  3. Hilbert complexes of nonlinear elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angoshtari, Arzhang; Yavari, Arash

    2016-12-01

    We introduce some Hilbert complexes involving second-order tensors on flat compact manifolds with boundary that describe the kinematics and the kinetics of motion in nonlinear elasticity. We then use the general framework of Hilbert complexes to write Hodge-type and Helmholtz-type orthogonal decompositions for second-order tensors. As some applications of these decompositions in nonlinear elasticity, we study the strain compatibility equations of linear and nonlinear elasticity in the presence of Dirichlet boundary conditions and the existence of stress functions on non-contractible bodies. As an application of these Hilbert complexes in computational mechanics, we briefly discuss the derivation of a new class of mixed finite element methods for nonlinear elasticity.

  4. Upper-mantle reflectors: modelling of seismic wavefield characteristics and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. M.; Balling, N.

    2004-05-01

    Deep seismic experiments on continental lithosphere generally reveal marked reflectivity from structures in the crust and a significant decrease in reflectivity from the upper mantle. However, reflected and refracted energy from mantle lithosphere are observed in both near-normal incidence and wide-angle data. The origin of the reflective structures is a matter of debate. Hypotheses include remnant subduction zones, shear zones, fluids and seismic anisotropy. Through analytical and numerical modelling studies, including full wavefield modelling, we investigate seismic characteristic signatures generated from a variety of geologically plausible models. We have found that both upper-mantle shear zones of reduced velocity and density and remnant subduction slabs containing high-density eclogites may contain sufficient seismic impedance contrasts to normal mantle peridotites to generate near-normal incidence reflectivity. Wide-angle energy originates from subduction slabs containing either high- or low-velocity eclogites, whereas intermediate-velocity eclogites are unlikely to produce significant wide-angle phases. In general, energy of seismic phases originating from upper-mantle zones of anomalous seismic velocities and densities is significantly increased if homogeneous zones are replaced by zones of inhomogeneous petrophysical properties resulting from constructive interference. Maximum wavefield anomalies are generated from sub Moho dipping slabs of incomplete transformation of low-velocity/low-density crustal material to high-velocity/high-density eclogites. Localized shear zones generated in mantle peridotite generally do not produce significant wide-angle energy. Only if highly inhomogeneous structures containing material of marked (ca 10 per cent) velocity and density reduction are present, may shear zones be observed in wide-angle data. Analyses of two specific deep-seismic data sets (MONA LISA data) from the North Sea and (BABEL data) from the Baltic Sea

  5. One-channel inverse filter: Spatio-temporal control of a complex wave-field from a single point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupin, Matthieu; Roux, Philippe; Catheline, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Can we make good use of the degrees of freedom of a wave-field trapped in a cavity to perform complete spatio-temporal inversion from a single emitter? To answer these questions, we used experiments conducted in the ultrasonic regime to investigate the wave-field in a water cavity where the energy was not homogeneously distributed over all of the degrees of freedom. While the time reversal from a single emitter gives poor results, we show the possibility to recover optimal spatio-temporal focusing by converting the multi-channel focusing technique of the spatio-temporal inverse filter into a single-channel method that we call the one-channel inverse filter. In particular, this method has the advantage of leaving the choice open for the duration of the time window for the inversion of the wave-field. We, thus, demonstrate that the shorter the time window, the better optimized the inversion. We believe that in addition to demonstrating the possibility of controlling the waves in a cavity, this method might have an interesting role in the improvement of solid imaging devices that are based on the exploitation of reverberations in cavities.

  6. Reconstruction of laser ultrasonic wavefield images from reduced sparse measurements using compressed sensing aided super-resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byeongjin; Sohn, Hoon

    2017-02-01

    Laser ultrasonic scanning is attractive for damage detection due to its noncontact nature, sensitivity to local damage, and high spatial resolution. However, its practicality is limited because scanning at a high spatial resolution demands a prohibitively long scanning time. Recently, compressed sensing (CS) and super-resolution (SR) are gaining popularity in the image recovery field. CS estimates unmeasured ultrasonic responses from measured responses, and SR recovers high spatial frequency information from low resolution images. Inspired by these techniques, a laser ultrasonic wavefield reconstruction technique is developed to localize and visualize damage with a reduced number of ultrasonic measurements. First, a low spatial resolution ultrasonic wavefield image for a given inspection region is reconstructed from reduced number of ultrasonic measurements using CS. Here, the ultrasonic waves are generated using a pulsed laser, and measured at a fixed sensing point using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). Then, a high spatial resolution ultrasonic wave image is recovered from the reconstructed low spatial resolution image using SR. The number of measurement points required for ultrasonic wavefield imaging is significantly reduced over 90%. The performance of the proposed technique is validated by an experiment performed on a cracked aluminum plate.

  7. Study of Nonlinear Oscillations of Elastic Membrane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-26

    Nonlinear Elastic Membrane Oscillations by Eigenfunction Expansion, WSEAS Transactions of Systems, 3 (4) (2004), 1430-1435. 2.V. Varlamov, Convolution...proceedings 1. A. Balogh and V. Varlamov, Analysis of Nonlinear Elastic Membrane Oscillations by Eigenfunction Expansion, 6th WSEAS International...Eigenfunction Expansion, 6th WSEAS International Conference on Algorithms, Scientific Computing, Modelling and Simulation, Cancun, Mexico, May 12--15

  8. Effects of water domains on seismic wavefields: A simulation case study at Taal volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yuta; Kumagai, Hiroyuki

    2013-02-01

    We examined the effects of water domains on seismic wavefields at the Taal volcano, Philippines, where there is a summit crater lake on an active volcanic island surrounded by a caldera lake. We conducted forward waveform simulation and synthetic waveform inversion using the 3D finite-difference method for various models with and without the water lakes. Our study demonstrated the existence of both near-and far-field effects of the water domains. The near-field effect is related to source excitation affected by a water domain, and the far-field effect is caused by dispersion of Rayleigh waves propagating through a water domain. Our study also showed that the replacement of water by a vacuum rather than by a solid medium provides a better approximation of a water domain. A water domain has considerable effect on seismic waveforms and must be properly treated when the waveform period is shorter than 2 s, even if recording stations lie in the near field. If the waveform period is longer than 5 s, a water domain has a minor effect on seismic waveforms and may be replaced by a vacuum.

  9. FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled numerical simulation of wavefields near excavation boundaries in underground mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Cai, M.

    2016-11-01

    A nonlinear velocity model that considers the influence of confinement and rock mass failure on wave velocity is developed. A numerical method, which couples FLAC and SPECFEM2D, is developed for ground motion modeling near excavation boundaries in underground mines. The motivation of developing the FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled approach is to take merits of each code, such as the stress analysis capability in FLAC and the powerful wave propagation analysis capability in SPECFEM2D. Because stress redistribution and failure of the rock mass around an excavation are considered, realistic non-uniform velocity fields for the SPECFEM2D model can be obtained, and this is a notable feature of this study. Very large differences in wavefields and ground motion are observed between the results from the non-uniform and the uniform velocity models. If the non-uniform velocity model is used, the ground motion around a stope can be amplified up to five times larger than that given by the design scaling law. If a uniform velocity model is used, the amplification factor is only about three. Using the FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled modeling approach, accurate velocity models can be constructed and this in turn will assist in predicting ground motions accurately around underground excavations.

  10. Subjective assessment for the number of channel signals to realize sound field based on wavefield synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Kakehi, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Kazuya; Itakura, Fumitada

    2003-10-01

    It is very important to study the affect of the number of channel signals in the sound field reproduction technique based on wavefield synthesis. Though there are many studies of objective affect such as wavefront accuracy, there are not as many studies of the subjective affect such as sound field perception. Therefore, the subjective assessment was designed to evaluate the effect of the number of channel signals, which were synthesized by convolving a sound source to room transfer functions of free field, on the directional perception. In the low-reverberation room, a circle loudspeaker array with a radius of 2 m was set on the horizontal plane. The subjects evaluated the directional perception of the sound image reproduced at distances of 3 and 4 m by playing simultaneous channel signals from the loudspeakers set at intervals of 10, 15, 20, 30, and 45 degrees, respectively. As a result, it was subjectively confirmed that 24 channel signals were enough to reproduce the directional perception of 5 degrees accuracy if the control area was the circle of radius 2 m.

  11. Upper mantle reflectors: Modelling of seismic wavefield characteristics and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. M.; Balling, N.

    2003-04-01

    In recent years a number of deep seismic experiments have demonstrated the existence of seismic reflectors in the mantle lithosphere. The origin of the reflective structures is a matter of debate. Hypothesis and interpretations include remnant subduction zones, shear zones, fluids and seismic anisotropy. Through forward modelling studies including numerical full wavefield modelling, we have found that both upper mantle shear zones of reduced seismic velocity and density and remnant subduction slabs containing high-density eclogites may have sufficient seismic impedance contrasts to normal mantle peridotites to generate near-normal recidence reflectivity. Wide-angle energy may originate from subduction slabs containing high or low velocity eclogites whereas localized shear zones in mantle peridotite may generally not produce significant wide-angle energy. Analysis of two specific deep-seismic data sets from the North Sea (MONA LISA data) and the Baltic Sea (BABEL data) show good agreement between observations and modelling results for dipping remnant subduction slabs containing small-scale inhomogeneities associated with incomplete transformation of low velocity/low density crustal material to high velocity/high density eclogite. Our modelling results improve our possibilities of distinguishing between two often contrasting tectonic interpretations for dipping upper mantle seismic reflectors, the remnant subduction and extensional shear zone models.

  12. A hybrid method for the computation of quasi-3D seismograms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    The development of powerful computer clusters and efficient numerical computation methods, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM) made possible the computation of seismic wave propagation in a heterogeneous 3D earth. However, the cost of theses computations is still problematic for global scale tomography that requires hundreds of such simulations. Part of the ongoing research effort is dedicated to the development of faster modeling methods based on the spectral element method. Capdeville et al. (2002) proposed to couple SEM simulations with normal modes calculation (C-SEM). Nissen-Meyer et al. (2007) used 2D SEM simulations to compute 3D seismograms in a 1D earth model. Thanks to these developments, and for the first time, Lekic et al. (2011) developed a 3D global model of the upper mantle using SEM simulations. At the local and continental scale, adjoint tomography that is using a lot of SEM simulation can be implemented on current computers (Tape, Liu et al. 2009). Due to their smaller size, these models offer higher resolution. They provide us with images of the crust and the upper part of the mantle. In an attempt to teleport such local adjoint tomographic inversions into the deep earth, we are developing a hybrid method where SEM computation are limited to a region of interest within the earth. That region can have an arbitrary shape and size. Outside this region, the seismic wavefield is extrapolated to obtain synthetic data at the Earth's surface. A key feature of the method is the use of a time reversal mirror to inject the wavefield induced by distant seismic source into the region of interest (Robertsson and Chapman 2000). We compute synthetic seismograms as follow: Inside the region of interest, we are using regional spectral element software RegSEM to compute wave propagation in 3D. Outside this region, the wavefield is extrapolated to the surface by convolution with the Green's functions from the mirror to the seismic stations. For now, these

  13. Wide-angle elastic wave one-way propagation in heterogeneous media and an elastic wave complex-screen method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ru-Shan

    1994-01-01

    In this paper a system of equations for wide-angle one-way elastic wave propagation in arbitrarily heterogeneous media is formulated in both the space and wavenumber domains using elastic Rayleigh integrals and local elastic Born scattering theory. The wavenumber domain formulation leads to compact solutions to one-way propagation and scattering problems. It is shown that wide-angle scattering in heterogeneous elastic media cannot be formulated as passage through regular phase-screens, since the interaction between the incident wavefield and the heterogeneities is not local in both the space domain and the wavenumber domain. Our more generally valid formulation is called the 'thin-slap; formulation. After applying the small-angle approximation, the thin slab effect degenerates to that of an elastic complex-screen (or generalized phase-screen). For the complex-screen method the cross-coupling term is neglected because it is higher order small quantity for small-angle scattering. Relative to prior derivations of vector phase-screen method, our method can correctly treat the conversion between P and S waves and the cross-coupling between differently polarized S waves. A comparison with solutions from three-dimensional finite difference and exact solutions using eigenfunctions expansion is made for two special cases. One is for a solid sphere with only P velocity pertubation; the other is with only S velocity perturbation. The Elastic complex-screen method generally agrees well with the three-dimensional finite difference method and the exact solutions. In the limiting case of scalar waves, the derivation in this paper leads to a move generally valid new method, namely, a scaler thin-slab method. When making the small-angle approximation to the interaction term while keeping the propagation term unchanged, the thin-slab method approaches the currently available scalar wide-angle phase screen method.

  14. Full Elastic Waveform Search Engine for Near Surface Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    For processing land seismic data, the near-surface problem is often very complex and may severely affect our capability to image the subsurface. The current state-of-the-art technology for near surface imaging is the early arrival waveform inversion that solves an acoustic wave-equation problem. However, fitting land seismic data with acoustic wavefield is sometimes invalid. On the other hand, performing elastic waveform inversion is very time-consuming. Similar to a web search engine, we develop a full elastic waveform search engine that includes a large database with synthetic elastic waveforms accounting for a wide range of interval velocity models in the CMP domain. With each CMP gather of real data as an entry, the search engine applies Multiple-Randomized K-Dimensional (MRKD) tree method to find approximate best matches to the entry in about a second. Interpolation of the velocity models at CMP positions creates 2D or 3D Vp, Vs, and density models for the near surface area. The method does not just return one solution; it gives a series of best matches in a solution space. Therefore, the results can help us to examine the resolution and nonuniqueness of the final solution. Further, this full waveform search method can avoid the issues of initial model and cycle skipping that the method of full waveform inversion is difficult to deal with.

  15. The Utility of the Extended Images in Ambient Seismic Wavefield Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, A. J.; Shragge, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Active-source 3D seismic migration and migration velocity analysis (MVA) are robust and highly used methods for imaging Earth structure. One class of migration methods uses extended images constructed by incorporating spatial and/or temporal wavefield correlation lags to the imaging conditions. These extended images allow users to directly assess whether images focus better with different parameters, which leads to MVA techniques that are based on the tenets of adjoint-state theory. Under certain conditions (e.g., geographical, cultural or financial), however, active-source methods can prove impractical. Utilizing ambient seismic energy that naturally propagates through the Earth is an alternate method currently used in the scientific community. Thus, an open question is whether extended images are similarly useful for ambient seismic migration processing and verifying subsurface velocity models, and whether one can similarly apply adjoint-state methods to perform ambient migration velocity analysis (AMVA). Herein, we conduct a number of numerical experiments that construct extended images from ambient seismic recordings. We demonstrate that, similar to active-source methods, there is a sensitivity to velocity in ambient seismic recordings in the migrated extended image domain. In synthetic ambient imaging tests with varying degrees of error introduced to the velocity model, the extended images are sensitive to velocity model errors. To determine the extent of this sensitivity, we utilize acoustic wave-equation propagation and cross-correlation-based migration methods to image weak body-wave signals present in the recordings. Importantly, we have also observed scenarios where non-zero correlation lags show signal while zero-lags show none. This may be a valuable missing piece for ambient migration techniques that have yielded largely inconclusive results, and might be an important piece of information for performing AMVA from ambient seismic recordings.

  16. Time-jittered marine seismic data acquisition via compressed sensing and sparsity-promoting wavefield reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wason, H.; Herrmann, F. J.; Kumar, R.

    2016-12-01

    Current efforts towards dense shot (or receiver) sampling and full azimuthal coverage to produce high resolution images have led to the deployment of multiple source vessels (or streamers) across marine survey areas. Densely sampled marine seismic data acquisition, however, is expensive, and hence necessitates the adoption of sampling schemes that save acquisition costs and time. Compressed sensing is a sampling paradigm that aims to reconstruct a signal--that is sparse or compressible in some transform domain--from relatively fewer measurements than required by the Nyquist sampling criteria. Leveraging ideas from the field of compressed sensing, we show how marine seismic acquisition can be setup as a compressed sensing problem. A step ahead from multi-source seismic acquisition is simultaneous source acquisition--an emerging technology that is stimulating both geophysical research and commercial efforts--where multiple source arrays/vessels fire shots simultaneously resulting in better coverage in marine surveys. Following the design principles of compressed sensing, we propose a pragmatic simultaneous time-jittered time-compressed marine acquisition scheme where single or multiple source vessels sail across an ocean-bottom array firing airguns at jittered times and source locations, resulting in better spatial sampling and speedup acquisition. Our acquisition is low cost since our measurements are subsampled. Simultaneous source acquisition generates data with overlapping shot records, which need to be separated for further processing. We can significantly impact the reconstruction quality of conventional seismic data from jittered data and demonstrate successful recovery by sparsity promotion. In contrast to random (sub)sampling, acquisition via jittered (sub)sampling helps in controlling the maximum gap size, which is a practical requirement of wavefield reconstruction with localized sparsifying transforms. We illustrate our results with simulations of

  17. Array analysis of regional Pn and Pg wavefields from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, M.A. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1991-06-01

    Small-aperture high-frequency seismic arrays with dimensions of a few kilometers or less, can improve our ability to seismically monitor compliance with a low-yield Threshold Test Ban Treaty. This work studies the characteristics and effectiveness of array processing of the regional Pn and Pg wavefields generated by underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. Waveform data from the explosion HARDIN (m{sub b} = 5.5) is recorded at a temporary 12-element, 3-component, 1.5 km-aperture array sited in an area of northern Nevada. The explosions VILLE (m{sub b} = 4.4) and SALUT (m{sub b} = 5.5) are recorded at two arrays sited in the Mojave desert, one a 96-element vertical-component 7 km-aperture array and the other a 155-element vertical-component 4 km-aperture array. Among the mean spectra for the m{sub b} = 5.5 events there are significant differences in low-frequency spectral amplitudes between array sites. The spectra become nearly identical beyond about 6 Hz. Spectral ratios are used to examine seismic source properties and the partitioning of energy between Pn and Pg. Frequency-wavenumber analysis at the 12-element array is used to obtain estimates of signal gain, phase velocity, and source azimuth. This analysis reveals frequency-dependent biases in velocity and azimuth of the coherent Pn and Pg arrivals. Signal correlation, the principal factor governing array performance, is examined in terms of spatial coherence estimates. The coherence is found to vary between the three sites. In all cases the coherence of Pn is greater than that for Pg. 81 refs., 92 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Elastic Wave Propagation Mechanisms in Underwater Acoustic Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    navigation under Arctic ice. In Oceans , 2012, pages 1–8. IEEE, October 2012. 10.1109/ OCEANS .2012.6405005. PUBLICATIONS • Published in refereed journal...or elastic ice cover. OBJECTIVES To apply EPE solutions to scenarios that include fluid-elastic boundaries, either at the ocean floor, or at the... ocean surface as an elastic ice layer. Computational tools will be developed or enhanced to characterize the transmission of elastic wave energy to

  19. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  20. Array analysis of the seismic wavefield of long-period events and volcanic tremor at Arenal volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendros, Javier; Abella, Rafael; Mora, Mauricio M.; Lesage, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    We use wavefield decomposition methods (time domain cross correlation and frequency domain multiple-signal classification) to analyze seismic data recorded by a dense, small-aperture array located 2 km West of Arenal volcano, Costa Rica, and operated during 2.5 days. The recorded wavefield is dominated by harmonic tremor and includes also spasmodic tremor and long-period (LP) events. We find that the initial stages of LP events are characterized by three different wave arrivals. These arrivals propagate with similar back azimuths pointing to the volcano summit (˜80°N) and increasing apparent slowness of 0.4, 1.1, and 1.7 s/km. Spasmodic tremors cannot be regarded as coherent signals. On the contrary, harmonic tremors are highly coherent, characterized by the stability of the apparent slowness vector estimates. Apparent slowness lays in the range 1-2 s/km. Back azimuths point in the general direction of the volcano but with a large variability (40-120°N). Nevertheless, there are long-term variations and evidences of multiple simultaneous components in the harmonic tremor wavefield. These observations suggest that LP events and tremor are generated in a shallow source area near the volcano summit, although they do not share exactly the same source region or source processes. The tremor source is located in the shallowest part of the plumbing system, beneath the lava crust. This dynamic region is subject to complex fluctuations of the physical conditions. Degassing events at different locations of this region might generate variable seismic radiation patterns. The effects of topography and heterogeneous shallow structure of the volcano may amplify these variations and produce the wide directional span observed for volcanic tremor. On the other hand, the LP source seems to be more repeatable. LP events are likely triggered by fragmentation of the fluid flow in a slightly deeper portion of the volcanic conduits.

  1. High-resolution P and S-wave Velocity Structures from Elastic Full Waveform Inversion of Multi-Component Ocean Bottom Cable Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, T.; Singh, S. C.; Barton, P.

    2007-12-01

    Full waveform inversion is becoming a realistic option with the advent of modern computing facilities, both in global and exploration seismology. Over the last ten years, we have developed a series of elastic full waveform inversion algorithm and have applied to a variety of acquisition geometry. The forward modelling is based on the finite difference approximation to the full elastic wave equation in the time domain, which can incorporate converted waves, refraction, and attenuation. The inversion algorithm is based on the minimisation of observed data with synthetic data in a least-squares sense, and requires a cross-correlation of the back propagation of residual with forward propagated wavefield in a background media. Starting with the background velocity obtained using travel time inversion, we first invert wide-angle and low frequency data, which provides medium wavelength velocity structure, and then invert near offset and high frequencies that leads to high-resolution P- and S-wave velocity structure. We first invert vertical component data to obtain short wavelength P- and S-wave velocities, which are constrained by amplitude versus offset behaviour of the P-P reflection, and then invert horizontal component data to obtain very-high resolution S-wave velocity structure, which is constrained by P-S reflection. Finally, we invert all the data simultaneously to have consistency over the data and model space. We found that the high-resolution S-wave velocity image is far superior than the P-wave velocity image and provides information that may not be present in the P-wave velocity image. Combined P and S-wave velocity structure could be used to quantify sub-surface lithology and fluid saturation and pressure. In this presentation we will highlight the challenges faced during the development of our waveform inversion and their implication for the global seismology problems.

  2. The use of Poynting vector in wave-field decomposition imaging condition for reverse-time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chiyuan; Song, Guojie; Tian, Xin

    2015-01-01

    An imaging condition based on cross-correlation is developed for prestack reverse-time migration. The imaging condition integrates the advantage of wave-field decomposition and Poynting vector and has powerful ability in artifacts removal. A truncation parameter is employed to balance imaging ability and artifacts removal in the imaging condition. The detail discussion has been done to verify the proposed imaging condition by lots of numerical simulation in a velocity model with vertical velocity gradient and Hess 2004 P-wave velocity model. The results show the proposed imaging condition works well to remove artifacts and improve imaging quality in these tests effectively.

  3. Numerical studies of localized wavefields governed by the Raman-extended derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesthaven, J. S.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Bergé, L.; Wyller, J.

    1997-12-01

    Using a stable pseudospectral multi-domain method we investigate the dynamics of localized wavefields in the extended derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation, with particular emphasis on the critical mass and structure of the initial conditions that promote wave collapse. The results are found to correspond well with theoretical observations based on a Lagrangian approach and through comparison with solutions of the critical nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Inclusion of high-order nonlinear dissipation due to the self-induced Raman effect, leading to the Raman-extended derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation, is found to inhibit finite-time collapse in certain cases.

  4. Multi-component seismic modeling and robust pre-stack seismic waveform inversion for elastic anisotropic media parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao

    Consideration of azimuthal anisotropy, at least to an orthorhombic symmetry is important in exploring the naturally fractured and unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs. Full waveform inversion of multicomponent seismic data can, in principle, provide more robust estimates of subsurface elastic parameters and density than the inversion of single component (P wave) seismic data. In addition, azimuthally dependent anisotropy can only be resolved by carefully studying the multicomponent seismic displacement data acquired and processed along different azimuths. Such an analysis needs an inversion algorithm capable of simultaneously optimizing multiple objectives, one for each data component along each azimuth. In this dissertation, I propose a novel multiobjective methodology using a parallelized version of NSGA II for waveform inversion of multicomponent seismic data along two azimuths. The proposed methodology is also an improvement of the original NSGA II in overall computational efficiency, preservation of population diversity, and rapid sampling of the model space. Next, the proposed methodology is applied on wide azimuth and multicomponent vertical seismic profile (VSP) data to provide reliable estimation of subsurface anisotropy at and near the well location. Prestack waveform inversion was applied to the wide-azimuth multicomponent VSP data acquired at the Wattenberg Field, located in Denver Basin of northeastern Colorado, USA, to characterize the Niobrara formation for azimuthal anisotropy. By comparing the waveform inversion results with an independent study that used a joint slowness-polarization approach to invert the same data, we conclude that the waveform inversion is a reliable tool for inverting the wide-azimuth multicomponent VSP data for anisotropy estimation. Last but not least, an anisotropic elastic three-dimensional scheme for modeling the elastodynamic wavefield is developed in order to go beyond the 1D layering assumption being used in previous

  5. A new hyper-elastic model for predicting multi-axial behaviour of rubber-like materials: formulation and computational aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaya, Kamel; Bechir, Hocine

    2017-08-01

    We propose a new hyper-elastic model that is based on the standard invariants of Green-Cauchy. Experimental data reported by Treloar (Trans. Faraday Soc. 40:59, 1944) are used to identify the model parameters. To this end, the data of uni-axial tension and equi-bi-axial tension are used simultaneously. The new model has four material parameters, their identification leads to linear optimisation problem and it is able to predict multi-axial behaviour of rubber-like materials. We show that the response quality of the new model is equivalent to that of the well-known Ogden six parameters model. Thereafter, the new model is implemented in FE code. Then, we investigate the inflation of a rubber balloon with the new model and Ogden models. We compare both the analytic and numerical solutions derived from these models.

  6. Dislocation core radii near elastic stability limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, C. A.; Morris, J. W., Jr.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies of transition metal alloys with compositions that place them near their limits of elastic stability [e.g., near the body-centered-cubic (BCC) to hexagonal-close-packed (HCP) transition] suggest interesting behavior for the dislocation cores. Specifically, the dislocation core size is predicted to diverge as the stability limit is approached. Here a simple analysis rooted in elasticity theory and the computation of ideal strength is used to analyze this divergence. This analysis indicates that dislocation core radii should diverge as the elastic limits of stability are approached in the BCC, HCP, and face-centered-cubic (FCC) structures. Moreover, external stresses and dislocation-induced stresses also increase the core radii. Density functional theory based total-energy calculations are combined with anisotropic elasticity theory to compute numerical estimates of dislocation core radii.

  7. Simulation and control problems in elastic robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadikonda, S. S. K.; Baruh, H.

    1989-01-01

    Computational issues associated with modeling and control of robots with revolute joints and elastic arms are considered. A manipulator with one arm and pinned at one end is considered to investigate various aspects of the modeling procedure and the model, and the effect of coupling between the rigid-body and the elastic motions. The rigid-body motion of a manipulator arm is described by means of a reference frame attached to the shadow beam, and the linear elastic operator denoting flexibility is defined with respect to this reference frame. The small elastic motion assumption coupled with the method of assumed modes is used to model the elasticity in the arm. It is shown that only terms up to quadratic in these model amplitudes need to be retained. An important aspect of the coupling between the rigid-body and the elastic motion is the centrifugal stiffening effect. This effect stiffens the elastic structure, as to be expected on physical grounds, gives rise to a time-varying inertia term for the rigid-body motion, and, in general, results in an effective inertia term smaller than the rigid-body inertia term. Simulation results are presented for an elastic beam pinned at one end and free at the other, and rotating in a horizontal plane, and control issues such as the order of the model, number of sensors, and modal extraction are examined within this context.

  8. Polycrystalline gamma plutonium's elastic moduli versus temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy was used to measure the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline {sup 239}Pu in the {gamma} phase. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli were measured simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth, linear, and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. They calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519 K to 0.252 at 571 K. These measurements on extremely well characterized pure Pu are in agreement with other reported results where overlap occurs.

  9. Elastic unbalance of composite rim flywheels

    SciTech Connect

    Portnov, G.G.; Barinov, I.N.; Kulakov, V.L.

    1995-01-01

    Elastic unbalance of a composite flywheel is considered to be caused by different strain character of the rotating rim due to the distributed material density homogeneity or the corrective mass balancing it in the static state. An analysis has been carried out on the effect of elasticity of the rim flywheel on the linear elastic unbalance and its magnitude for an actual composite flywheel has been calculated. A procedure has been developed for the elimination of unbalance using two corrective masses. The problem of angular unbalance of a rim flywheel has also been considered. The finite element method has been used for computation.

  10. Elastic Wave Radiation from a Line Source of Finite Length

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, D.F.

    1998-11-04

    Straightforward algebraic expressions describing the elastic wavefield produced by a line source of finite length are derived in circular cylindrical coordinates. The surrounding elastic medium is assumed to be both homogeneous and isotropic, anc[ the source stress distribution is considered axisymmetic. The time- and space-domain formulae are accurate at all distances and directions from the source; no fa-field or long-wavelength assumptions are adopted for the derivation. The mathematics yield a unified treatment of three different types of sources: an axial torque, an axial force, and a radial pressure. The torque source radiates only azirnuthally polarized shear waves, whereas force and pressure sources generate simultaneous compressional and shear radiation polarized in planes containing the line source. The formulae reduce to more familiar expressions in the two limiting cases where the length of the line source approaches zero and infinity. Far-field approximations to the exact equations indicate that waves radiated parallel to the line source axI.s are attenuated relative to those radiated normal to the axis. The attenuation is more severe for higher I?equencies and for lower wavespeeds. Hence, shear waves are affected more than compressional waves. This fi-equency- and directiondependent attenuation is characterized by an extremely simple mathematical formula, and is readily apparent in example synthetic seismograms.

  11. Multidirectional seismo-acoustic wavefield of strombolian explosions at Yasur, Vanuatu using a broadband seismo-acoustic network, infrasound arrays, and infrasonic sensors on tethered balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, R. S.; Jolly, A. D.; Fee, D.; Johnson, R.; Kilgour, G.; Christenson, B. W.; Garaebiti, E.; Iezzi, A. M.; Austin, A.; Kennedy, B.; Fitzgerald, R.; Key, N.

    2016-12-01

    Seismo-acoustic wavefields at volcanoes contain rich information on shallow magma transport and subaerial eruption processes. Acoustic wavefields from eruptions are predicted to be directional, but sampling this wavefield directivity is challenging because infrasound sensors are usually deployed on the ground surface. We attempt to overcome this observational limitation using a novel deployment of infrasound sensors on tethered balloons in tandem with a suite of dense ground-based seismo-acoustic, geochemical, and eruption imaging instrumentation. We present preliminary results from a field experiment at Yasur Volcano, Vanuatu from July 26th to August 4th 2016. Our observations include data from a temporary network of 11 broadband seismometers, 6 single infrasonic microphones, 7 small-aperture 3-element infrasound arrays, 2 infrasound sensor packages on tethered balloons, an FTIR, a FLIR, 2 scanning Flyspecs, and various visual imaging data. An introduction to the dataset and preliminary analysis of the 3D seismo-acoustic wavefield and source process will be presented. This unprecedented dataset should provide a unique window into processes operating in the shallow magma plumbing system and their relation to subaerial eruption dynamics.

  12. Linear elastic fracture mechanics primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1992-01-01

    This primer is intended to remove the blackbox perception of fracture mechanics computer software by structural engineers. The fundamental concepts of linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented with emphasis on the practical application of fracture mechanics to real problems. Numerous rules of thumb are provided. Recommended texts for additional reading, and a discussion of the significance of fracture mechanics in structural design are given. Griffith's criterion for crack extension, Irwin's elastic stress field near the crack tip, and the influence of small-scale plasticity are discussed. Common stress intensities factor solutions and methods for determining them are included. Fracture toughness and subcritical crack growth are discussed. The application of fracture mechanics to damage tolerance and fracture control is discussed. Several example problems and a practice set of problems are given.

  13. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-03

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range.

  14. Wavefield back-propagation in high-resolution X-ray holography with a movable field of view.

    PubMed

    Guehrs, Erik; Günther, Christian M; Pfau, Bastian; Rander, Torbjörn; Schaffert, Stefan; Schlotter, William F; Eisebitt, Stefan

    2010-08-30

    Mask-based Fourier transform holography is used to record images of biological objects with 2.2 nm X-ray wavelength. The holography mask and the object are decoupled from each other which allows us to move the field of view over a large area over the sample. Due to the separation of the mask and the sample on different X-ray windows, a gap between both windows in the micrometer range typically exists. Using standard Fourier transform holography, focussed images of the sample can directly be reconstructed only for gap distances within the setup's depth of field. Here, we image diatoms as function of the gap distance and demonstrate the possibility to recover focussed images via a wavefield back-propagation technique. The limitations of our approach with respect to large separations are mainly associated with deviations from flat-field illumination of the object.

  15. Elastic internal flywheel gimbal

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenhorst, D.W.

    1981-01-13

    An elastic joint mounting and rotatably coupling a rotary inertial energy storage device or flywheel, to a shaft, the present gimbal structure reduces vibration and shock while allowing precession of the flywheel without the need for external gimbal mounts. The present elastic joint usually takes the form of an annular elastic member either integrally formed into the flywheel as a centermost segment thereof or attached to the flywheel or flywheel hub member at the center thereof, the rotary shaft then being mounted centrally to the elastic member.

  16. Estimation of In vivo Cancellous Bone Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Takahiko; Mano, Isao; Tsujimoto, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Tadahito; Teshima, Ryota; Naka, Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    The effect of decreasing bone density (a symptom of osteoporosis) is greater for cancellous bone than for dense cortical bone, because cancellous bone is metabolically more active. Therefore, the bone density or bone mineral density of cancellous bone is generally used to estimate the onset of osteoporosis. Elasticity or elastic constant is a fundamental mechanical parameter and is directly related to the mechanical strength of bone. Accordingly, elasticity is a preferable parameter for assessing fracture risk. A novel ultrasonic bone densitometer LD-100 has been developed to determine the mass density and elasticity of cancellous bone with a spatial resolution comparable to that of peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Bone density and bone elasticity are evaluated using ultrasonic parameters based on fast and slow waves in cancellous bone by modeling the ultrasonic wave propagation path. Elasticity is deduced from the measured bone density and the propagation speed of the fast wave. Thus, the elasticity of cancellous bone is approximately expressed by a cubic equation of bone density.

  17. An efficient Matlab script to calculate heterogeneous anisotropically elastic wave propagation in three dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, O.S.

    2006-01-01

    We have created a second-order finite-difference solution to the anisotropic elastic wave equation in three dimensions and implemented the solution as an efficient Matlab script. This program allows the user to generate synthetic seismograms for three-dimensional anisotropic earth structure. The code was written for teleseismic wave propagation in the 1-0.1 Hz frequency range but is of general utility and can be used at all scales of space and time. This program was created to help distinguish among various types of lithospheric structure given the uneven distribution of sources and receivers commonly utilized in passive source seismology. Several successful implementations have resulted in a better appreciation for subduction zone structure, the fate of a transform fault with depth, lithospheric delamination, and the effects of wavefield focusing and defocusing on attenuation. Companion scripts are provided which help the user prepare input to the finite-difference solution. Boundary conditions including specification of the initial wavefield, absorption and two types of reflection are available. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Leveraging Cloud Technology to Provide a Responsive, Reliable and Scalable Backend for the Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory Using the Ice Sheet System Model and Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, G. L.; Larour, E. Y.; Halkides, D. J.; Cheng, D. L. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory(VISL) is a Cryosphere outreach effort byscientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory(JPL) in Pasadena, CA, Earth and SpaceResearch(ESR) in Seattle, WA, and the University of California at Irvine (UCI), with the goal of providing interactive lessons for K-12 and college level students,while conforming to STEM guidelines. At the core of VISL is the Ice Sheet System Model(ISSM), an open-source project developed jointlyat JPL and UCI whose main purpose is to model the evolution of the polar ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica. By using ISSM, VISL students have access tostate-of-the-art modeling software that is being used to conduct scientificresearch by users all over the world. However, providing this functionality isby no means simple. The modeling of ice sheets in response to sea and atmospheric temperatures, among many other possible parameters, requiressignificant computational resources. Furthermore, this service needs to beresponsive and capable of handling burst requests produced by classrooms ofstudents. Cloud computing providers represent a burgeoning industry. With majorinvestments by tech giants like Amazon, Google and Microsoft, it has never beeneasier or more affordable to deploy computational elements on-demand. This isexactly what VISL needs and ISSM is capable of. Moreover, this is a promisingalternative to investing in expensive and rapidly devaluing hardware.

  19. User's guide to computer programs JET 5A and CIVM-JET 5B to calculate the large elastic-plastic dynamically-induced deformations of multilayer partial and/or complete structural rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, R. W. H.; Stagliano, T. R.; Witmer, E. A.; Spilker, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    These structural ring deflections lie essentially in one plane and, hence, are called two-dimensional (2-d). The structural rings may be complete or partial; the former may be regarded as representing a fragment containment ring while the latter may be viewed as a 2-d fragment-deflector structure. These two types of rings may be either free or supported in various ways (pinned-fixed, locally clamped, elastic-foundation supported, mounting-bracket supported, etc.). The initial geometry of each ring may be circular or arbitrarily curved; uniform-thickness or variable-thickness rings may be analyzed. Strain-hardening and strain-rate effects of initially-isotropic material are taken into account. An approximate analysis utilizing kinetic energy and momentum conservation relations is used to predict the after-impact velocities of each fragment and of the impact-affected region of the ring; this procedure is termed the collision-imparted velocity method (CIVM) and is used in the CIVM-JET 5 B program. This imparted-velocity information is used in conjunction with a finite-element structural response computation code to predict the transient, large-deflection, elastic-plastic responses of the ring. Similarly, the equations of motion of each fragment are solved in small steps in time. Provisions are made in the CIVM-JET 5B code to analyze structural ring response to impact attack by from 1 to 3 fragments, each with its own size, mass, translational velocity components, and rotational velocity. The effects of friction between each fragment and the impacted ring are included.

  20. Elastic properties of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.; Prodaivoda, G.T.

    1993-09-01

    Investigations of the elastic properties of the main rock-forming minerals were begun by T.V. Ryzhova and K.S. Aleksandrov over 30 years ago on the initiative of B.P. Belikov. At the time, information on the elasticity of single crystals in general, and especially of minerals, was very scanty. In the surveys of that time there was information on the elasticity of 20 or 30 minerals. These, as a rule, did not include the main rock-forming minerals; silicates were represented only by garnets, quartz, topaz, tourmaline, zircon, beryl, and staurolite, which are often found in nature in the form of large and fairly high-quality crystals. Then and even much later it was still necessary to prove a supposition which now seems obvious: The elastic properties of rocks, and hence the velocities of elastic (seismic) waves in the earth`s crust, are primarily determined by the elastic characteristics of the minerals composing these rocks. Proof of this assertion, with rare exceptions of mono-mineralic rocks (marble, quartzite, etc.) cannot be obtained without information on the elasticities of a sufficiently large number of minerals, primarily framework, layer, and chain silicates which constitute the basis of most rocks. This also served as the starting point and main problem of the undertakings of Aleksandrov, Ryzhova, and Belikov - systematic investigations of the elastic properties of minerals and then of various rocks. 108 refs., 7 tabs.

  1. Laser-enabled experimental wavefield reconstruction in two-dimensional phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Paolo; Gonella, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    During the past two decades, noteworthy experimental investigations have been conducted on wave propagation in phononic crystals, with special emphasis on crystals for acoustic wave control, consisting of the repetition of cylindrical or spherical elements in a fluid medium. On the other hand, the experimental characterization of the elastic wave phenomena observed in the solid microstructure of phononic crystals designed for elastic wave control has been quite sparse and limited in scope. The related literature focuses mostly on steady-state analyses that aim at highlighting filtering properties, and are limited to out-of-plane measurements. The scope of this work is to address these limitations and provide a detailed experimental characterization of the transient wave phenomena observed in the cores of lattice-like phononic crystals. This is achieved using a 3D Scanning Laser Vibrometer, which allows measuring the in-plane velocity of material points belonging to the lattice topology. This approach is tested against the benchmark case of a regular honeycomb lattice. Specifically, the objective is to demonstrate the directional and dispersive nature of the S-mode at relatively low frequencies and characterize the P-mode below and above its veering frequency. The experimental results are compared against numerical simulations and unit cell Bloch analysis to highlight similarities and differences between the true response of finite crystals and the infinite lattice approximation. This study also intends to highlight the advantages of three-dimensional laser vibrometry as a tool for the characterization of complex structural materials, while carefully exposing some limitations of this methodology.

  2. Elastic reverse-time migration based on amplitude-preserving P- and S-wave separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia-Jia; Luan, Xi-Wu; Fang, Gang; Liu, Xin-Xin; Pan, Jun; Wang, Xiao-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Imaging the PP- and PS-wave for the elastic vector wave reverse-time migration requires separating the P- and S-waves during the wave field extrapolation. The amplitude and phase of the P- and S-waves are distorted when divergence and curl operators are used to separate the P- and S-waves. We present a P- and S-wave amplitude-preserving separation algorithm for the elastic wavefield extrapolation. First, we add the P-wave pressure and P-wave vibration velocity equation to the conventional elastic wave equation to decompose the P- and S-wave vectors. Then, we synthesize the scalar P- and S-wave from the vector Pand S-wave to obtain the scalar P- and S-wave. The amplitude-preserved separated P- and S-waves are imaged based on the vector wave reverse-time migration (RTM). This method ensures that the amplitude and phase of the separated P- and S-wave remain unchanged compared with the divergence and curl operators. In addition, after decomposition, the P-wave pressure and vibration velocity can be used to suppress the interlayer reflection noise and to correct the S-wave polarity. This improves the image quality of P- and S-wave in multicomponent seismic data and the true-amplitude elastic reverse time migration used in prestack inversion.

  3. Phase diagram of elastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulou, L; Ziherl, P

    2017-02-15

    Experiments show that polymeric nanoparticles often self-assemble into several non-close-packed lattices in addition to the face-centered cubic lattice. Here, we explore theoretically the possibility that the observed phase sequences may be associated with the softness of the particles, which are modeled as elastic spheres interacting upon contact. The spheres are described by two finite-deformation theories of elasticity, the modified Saint-Venant-Kirchhoff model and the neo-Hookean model. We determine the range of indentations where the repulsion between the spheres is pairwise additive and agrees with the Hertz theory. By computing the elastic energies of nine trial crystal lattices at densities far beyond the Hertzian range, we construct the phase diagram and find the face- and body-centered cubic lattices as well as the A15 lattice and the simple hexagonal lattice, with the last two being stable at large densities where the spheres are completely faceted. These results are qualitatively consistent with observations, suggesting that deformability may indeed be viewed as a generic property that determines the phase behavior in nanocolloidal suspensions.

  4. Variable Joint Elasticities in Running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Stephan; Grimmer, Sten; Lipfert, Susanne W.; Seyfarth, Andre

    In this paper we investigate how spring-like leg behavior in human running is represented at joint level. We assume linear torsion springs in the joints and between the knee and the ankle joint. Using experimental data of the leg dynamics we compute how the spring parameters (stiffness and rest angles) change during gait cycle. We found that during contact the joints reveal elasticity with strongly changing parameters and compare the changes of different parameters for different spring arrangements. The results may help to design and improve biologically inspired spring mechanisms with adjustable parameters.

  5. Computing dispersion curves of elastic/viscoelastic transversely-isotropic bone plates coupled with soft tissue and marrow using semi-analytical finite element (SAFE) method.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Tran, Tho N H T; Sacchi, Mauricio D; Naili, Salah; Le, Lawrence H

    2017-08-01

    We present a semi-analytical finite element (SAFE) scheme for accurately computing the velocity dispersion and attenuation in a trilayered system consisting of a transversely-isotropic (TI) cortical bone plate sandwiched between the soft tissue and marrow layers. The soft tissue and marrow are mimicked by two fluid layers of finite thickness. A Kelvin-Voigt model accounts for the absorption of all three biological domains. The simulated dispersion curves are validated by the results from the commercial software DISPERSE and published literature. Finally, the algorithm is applied to a viscoelastic trilayered TI bone model to interpret the guided modes of an ex-vivo experimental data set from a bone phantom. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. On granular elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qicheng; Jin, Feng; Wang, Guangqian; Song, Shixiong; Zhang, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures form in dense granular materials due to the self-organisation of the constituent particles. These structures have internal structural degrees of freedom in addition to the translational degree of freedom. The resultant granular elasticity, which exhibits intrinsic variations and inevitable relaxation, is a key quantity that accounts for macroscopic solid- or fluid-like properties and the transitions between them. In this work, we propose a potential energy landscape (PEL) with local stable basins and low elastic energy barriers to analyse the nature of granular elasticity. A function for the elastic energy density is proposed for stable states and is further calibrated with ultrasonic measurements. Fluctuations in the elastic energy due to the evolution of internal structures are proposed to describe a so-called configuration temperature Tc as a counterpart of the classical kinetic granular temperature Tk that is attributed to the translational degrees of freedom. The two granular temperatures are chosen as the state variables, and a fundamental equation is established to develop non-equilibrium thermodynamics for granular materials. Due to the relatively low elastic energy barrier in the PEL, granular elasticity relaxes more under common mechanical loadings, and a simple model based on mean-field theory is developed to account for this behaviour. PMID:25951049

  7. Elastic membranes in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  8. Elastic scattering phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackintosh, R. S.

    2017-04-01

    We argue that, in many situations, fits to elastic scattering data that were historically, and frequently still are, considered "good", are not justifiably so describable. Information about the dynamics of nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus scattering is lost when elastic scattering phenomenology is insufficiently ambitious. It is argued that in many situations, an alternative approach is appropriate for the phenomenology of nuclear elastic scattering of nucleons and other light nuclei. The approach affords an appropriate means of evaluating folding models, one that fully exploits available empirical data. It is particularly applicable for nucleons and other light ions.

  9. Cloud Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-12

    Eucalyptus Systems • Provides an open-source application that can be used to implement a cloud computing environment on a datacenter • Trying to establish an...edgeplatform.html • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2): http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/ • Amazon Simple Storage Solution (S3): http://aws.amazon.com/s3/ • Eucalyptus

  10. Time-domain seismic modeling in viscoelastic media for full waveform inversion on heterogeneous computing platforms with OpenCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabien-Ouellet, Gabriel; Gloaguen, Erwan; Giroux, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) aims at recovering the elastic parameters of the Earth by matching recordings of the ground motion with the direct solution of the wave equation. Modeling the wave propagation for realistic scenarios is computationally intensive, which limits the applicability of FWI. The current hardware evolution brings increasing parallel computing power that can speed up the computations in FWI. However, to take advantage of the diversity of parallel architectures presently available, new programming approaches are required. In this work, we explore the use of OpenCL to develop a portable code that can take advantage of the many parallel processor architectures now available. We present a program called SeisCL for 2D and 3D viscoelastic FWI in the time domain. The code computes the forward and adjoint wavefields using finite-difference and outputs the gradient of the misfit function given by the adjoint state method. To demonstrate the code portability on different architectures, the performance of SeisCL is tested on three different devices: Intel CPUs, NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon PHI. Results show that the use of GPUs with OpenCL can speed up the computations by nearly two orders of magnitudes over a single threaded application on the CPU. Although OpenCL allows code portability, we show that some device-specific optimization is still required to get the best performance out of a specific architecture. Using OpenCL in conjunction with MPI allows the domain decomposition of large models on several devices located on different nodes of a cluster. For large enough models, the speedup of the domain decomposition varies quasi-linearly with the number of devices. Finally, we investigate two different approaches to compute the gradient by the adjoint state method and show the significant advantages of using OpenCL for FWI.

  11. Sub-wavelength energy trapping of elastic waves in a metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Andrea; Roux, Philippe; Rupin, Matthieu

    2014-08-01

    Deep sub-wavelength focusing has been demonstrated for locally resonant metamaterials using electromagnetic and acoustic waves. The elastic equivalents of such objects are made of sub-wavelength resonating beams fixed to a two-dimensional plate, as presented here. Independent of a random or regular arrangement of the resonators, the metamaterial shows large bandgaps that are independent of the incident wave direction. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the insertion of a defect in the layout, as a shorter resonator, creates strong amplification of the wave-field on the defect. This energy trapping, which is localized on a spatial scale that is much smaller than the wavelength in the two-dimensional plate, leads to a >1 factor in terms of the local density of energy.

  12. Auger Intensity from Si(001)2×2-Al Surface Excited by Wave-Field in Medium-Energy Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horio, Yoshimi; Sakai, Daisuke

    2009-06-01

    From dynamical analysis of rocking curves from both reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and medium-energy electron diffraction (MEED), the surface of Si(001)2×2-Al was confirmed to have a parallel-dimer structure. Furthermore, dynamical calculation, usually used to determine RHEED intensity, was confirmed to also be effective for the calculation of MEED intensity. The incident electron density distribution, or “wave-field”, was calculated for MEED conditions on the basis of the surface structure model. The wave-field at the surface is very sensitive to changes in diffraction conditions, such as the incident glancing angle. The Al(LMM) Auger electron intensity emitted from the Si(001)2×2-Al surface during MEED correlated to the wave-field intensity on the Al atomic rows relatively well.

  13. Wavefield Inversion of Surface Waves for Delineating Seismic Structure in Saline Permafrost: A Case History from the Barrow Peninsula, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.; Dreger, D. S.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic investigations of permafrost are essential in cold-region applications including static corrections for seismic exploration and site characterization for infrastructure development. Surface-wave methods are advantageous because their applicability does not require regular velocity gradients. But distinct challenges also exist: The irregular velocity variations in permafrost, combined with the marked velocity contrasts between frozen and unfrozen ground, often yield complicated dispersion spectra in which higher-order and leaky modes are dominant. Owing to the difficulties in retrieving dispersion curves from such spectra, dispersion-curved-based inversion methods become inapplicable. Here we present a case study of using wavefield inversion of surface waves to infer the permafrost structure on the Barrow Peninsula of the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain. In May of 2014, we conducted an active multichannel surface-wave survey along a 4300-m (2.7-mi) NE-SW trending transect that extended from the coastal to the interior areas of the peninsula. We acquired surface-wave supergathers—each covering a distance of 147 meters—from four nearly equidistantly distributed subsections of the transect. The dispersion spectra show dominant higher-order and leaky modes, as well as inversely dispersive trends (i.e., phase velocities increase with increasing frequencies). Preliminary results reveal a "sandwich" velocity structure, in which a pronounced low-velocity layer (with S-wave velocity reductions up to ~45%-60%; tens of meters thick; overlain by 3-4 m of high-velocity strata) is embedded within high-velocity strata, and the low-velocity layer itself contains irregular velocity gradients. Considering the low ground temperatures of -10 °C to -8 °C, this low-velocity feature is likely to be an embedded saline layer that is only partially frozen due to freezing-point depression of dissolved salts. Because saline permafrost is particularly sensitive to thermal

  14. Achieving control of in-plane elastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, M.; Guenneau, S.; Movchan, A. B.

    2009-02-01

    We derive the elastic properties of a cylindrical cloak for in-plane coupled shear and pressure waves. The cloak is characterized by a rank 4 elasticity tensor with spatially varying entries, which are deduced from a geometric transform. Remarkably, the Navier equations retain their form under this transform, which is generally untrue [G. W. Milton et al., N. J. Phys. 8, 248 (2006)]. The validity of our approach is confirmed by comparison of the analytic Green's function in homogeneous isotropic elastic space against full-wave finite element computations in a heterogeneous anisotropic elastic region surrounded by perfectly matched layers.

  15. Coupling of elasticity to capillarity in soft aerated materials.

    PubMed

    Ducloué, Lucie; Pitois, Olivier; Goyon, Julie; Chateau, Xavier; Ovarlez, Guillaume

    2014-07-28

    We study the elastic properties of soft solids containing air bubbles. Contrary to standard porous materials, the softness of the matrix allows for a coupling of the matrix elasticity to surface tension forces acting on the bubble surface. Thanks to appropriate experiments on model systems, we demonstrate how the elastic response of the soft porous solid is governed by two dimensionless parameters: the gas volume fraction and a capillary number comparing the elasticity of the matrix with the stiffness of the bubbles. Furthermore, we show that our experimental results are accurately predicted by computations of the shear modulus through a micro-mechanical approach.

  16. Mechanism of Resilin Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guokui; Hu, Xiao; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Resilin is critical in the flight and jumping systems of insects as a polymeric rubber-like protein with outstanding elasticity. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. Here we report the structure and function of resilin from Drosophila CG15920. A reversible beta-turn transition was identified in the peptide encoded by exon III and for full length resilin during energy input and release, features that correlate to the rapid deformation of resilin during functions in vivo. Micellar structures and nano-porous patterns formed after beta-turn structures were present via changes in either the thermal or mechanical inputs. A model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for this protein. Further, this model offers a view of elastomeric proteins in general where beta-turn related structures serve as fundamental units of the structure and elasticity. PMID:22893127

  17. Deflation of elastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilliet, Catherine; Quemeneur, François; Marmottant, Philippe; Imhof, Arnout; Pépin-Donat, Brigitte; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2010-03-01

    The deflation of elastic spherical surfaces has been numerically investigated, and show very different types of deformations according the range of elastic parameters, some of them being quantitatively explained through simple calculations. This allows to retrieve various shapes observed on hollow shells (from colloidal to centimeter scale), on lipid vesicles, or on some biological objects. The extension of this process to other geometries allows to modelize vegetal objects such as the ultrafast trap of carnivorous plants.

  18. Iterative Multiparameter Elastic Waveform Inversion Using Prestack Time Imaging and Kirchhoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaniani, Hassan

    boundary condition of the wave equation is set up along reflection surfaces. Hence, the surface integral Kirchhoff approximation is used as a mathematical framework instead of the volume integral of the Born approximation. In addition, I study the feasibility of iterative coupling of ray theory with the Kirchhoff approximation for inversion. For the amplitude considerations, the direct relationship between the scattering potential of the Born approximation with the reflectivity function of the asymptotic Kirchhoff approximation for elastic waves is used. Therefore, I use the linearized Zoeppritz approximation of Aki and Richards (1980) for computation of the forward modeling and migration operators as well as gradient function from Amplitude vs Offset (AVO) inversion. The multiparameter elastic inversion approach is applicable to all types of reflected wavefields such as P-to-P, P-to-S, S-to-S and S-to-P. Traveltime estimation of forward modeling and migration/inversion operators are based on the DSR equation. All operators involved in inversion, including the background model for DSR and AVO are updated at each iteration. The migration/inversion procedure maps the mode converted waves to the traveltime of incident waves which fixes the registration problem of events that travel from source to scatter point. The inversion of the reflected P-to-P and P-to-S synthetic and field data are provided for the numerical examples. This approach is applicable for complex structures however, to estimate the traveltime of scatterpoints, ray tracing can be added to the algorithm. For such a medium, the scatterpoint traveltime approximations from the PSTM, is compared to the PSDM approach using numerical analysis of ray- and FDTD-based modeling. In part of this thesis, I further improve the conventional velocity analysis of Common Scatter Point (CSP) gathers by including the tilt effects. I show that travel time response of scatter points beneath a dipping interface experiences an

  19. Trade-off of Elastic Structure and Q in Interpretations of Seismic Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wubing; Morozov, Igor B.

    2017-06-01

    The quality factor Q is an important phenomenological parameter measured from seismic or laboratory seismic data and representing wave-energy dissipation rate. However, depending on the types of measurements and models or assumptions about the elastic structure, several types of Qs exist, such as intrinsic and scattering Qs, coda Q, and apparent Qs observed from wavefield fluctuations. We consider three general types of elastic structures that are commonly encountered in seismology: (1) shapes and dimensions of rock specimens in laboratory studies, (2) geometric spreading or scattering in body-, surface- and coda-wave studies, and (3) reflectivity on fine layering in reflection seismic studies. For each of these types, the measured Q strongly trades off with the (inherently limited) knowledge about the respective elastic structure. For the third of the above types, the trade-off is examined quantitatively in this paper. For a layered sequence of reflectors (e.g., an oil or gas reservoir or a hydrothermal zone), reflection amplitudes and phases vary with frequency, which is analogous to a reflection from a contrast in attenuation. We demonstrate a quantitative equivalence between phase-shifted reflections from anelastic zones and reflections from elastic layering. Reflections from the top of an elastic layer followed by weaker reflections from its bottom can appear as resulting from a low Q within or above this layer. This apparent Q can be frequency-independent or -dependent, according to the pattern of thin layering. Due to the layering, the interpreted Q can be positive or negative, and it can depend on source-receiver offsets. Therefore, estimating Q values from frequency-dependent or phase-shifted reflection amplitudes always requires additional geologic or rock-physics constraints, such as sparseness and/or randomness of reflectors, the absence of attenuation in certain layers, or specific physical mechanisms of attenuation. Similar conclusions about the

  20. Surface elasticity effect on the size-dependent elastic property of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haiyan; Yun, Guohong; Bai, Narsu; Li, Jiangang

    2012-04-01

    A modified core-shell (MC-S) model is proposed to investigate the effect of surface elasticity on the elastic properties of nanowires under bending and tension loading modes. The continuous exponential function based on bulk elasticity is applied to the surface region of nanowires to better describe the elasticity in the surface layer. Two parameters related to the surface, namely, the inhomogeneous degree constant α˜, and the transition region of this inhomogeneous state rs (i.e., surface layer thickness), are introduced for examining the size effects of the elastic modulus of the overall nanowires. A strong size dependence of elasticity is revealed under both bending and tension loads. Furthermore, the theoretical solution for an effective Young's modulus with relevant experiments, as well as the results of a molecular statistical thermodynamics (MST) method for zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, and a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for silicon (Si) nanowires, are compared. It is shown that the theoretical curves not only agree well with the experimental data, but also fit the computational results (MST or MD) approximately below 20 nm. As a result, our model can predict the behavior of surface elasticity, with respect to the lateral size of nanostructures at a relatively small scale, no matter how stiff or soft the surface of the nanomaterials.

  1. Elastic and thermal expansion asymmetry in dense molecular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Joseph A.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-09-01

    The elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion are fundamental properties of elastically stiff molecular materials and are assumed to be the same (symmetric) under both tension and compression loading. We show that molecular materials can have a marked asymmetric elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion that are inherently related to terminal chemical groups that limit molecular network connectivity. In compression, terminal groups sterically interact to stiffen the network, whereas in tension they interact less and disconnect the network. The existence of asymmetric elastic and thermal expansion behaviour has fundamental implications for computational approaches to molecular materials modelling and practical implications on the thermomechanical strains and associated elastic stresses. We develop a design space to control the degree of elastic asymmetry in molecular materials, a vital step towards understanding their integration into device technologies.

  2. Elastic and thermal expansion asymmetry in dense molecular materials.

    PubMed

    Burg, Joseph A; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2016-09-01

    The elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion are fundamental properties of elastically stiff molecular materials and are assumed to be the same (symmetric) under both tension and compression loading. We show that molecular materials can have a marked asymmetric elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion that are inherently related to terminal chemical groups that limit molecular network connectivity. In compression, terminal groups sterically interact to stiffen the network, whereas in tension they interact less and disconnect the network. The existence of asymmetric elastic and thermal expansion behaviour has fundamental implications for computational approaches to molecular materials modelling and practical implications on the thermomechanical strains and associated elastic stresses. We develop a design space to control the degree of elastic asymmetry in molecular materials, a vital step towards understanding their integration into device technologies.

  3. Bubbles attenuate elastic waves at seismic frequencies: First experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Chapman, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yury; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The migration of gases from deep to shallow reservoirs can cause damageable events. For instance, some gases can pollute the biosphere or trigger explosions and eruptions. Seismic tomography may be employed to map the accumulation of subsurface bubble-bearing fluids to help mitigating such hazards. Nevertheless, how gas bubbles modify seismic waves is still unclear. We show that saturated rocks strongly attenuate seismic waves when gas bubbles occupy part of the pore space. Laboratory measurements of elastic wave attenuation at frequencies <100 Hz are modeled with a dynamic gas dissolution theory demonstrating that the observed frequency-dependent attenuation is caused by wave-induced-gas-exsolution-dissolution (WIGED). This result is incorporated into a numerical model simulating the propagation of seismic waves in a subsurface domain containing CO2-gas bubbles. This simulation shows that WIGED can significantly modify the wavefield and illustrates how accounting for this physical mechanism can potentially improve the monitoring and surveying of gas bubble-bearing fluids in the subsurface.

  4. Fast wavefield decomposition of volcano-tectonic earthquakes into polarized P and S waves by Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lauro, E.; De Martino, S.; Falanga, M.; Petrosino, S.

    2016-10-01

    In the present work a new approach for the analysis of polarization of seismic signals is proposed. The method is based on Independent Component Analysis and allows the identification and separation of the basic sources, which are naturally polarized into the vertical and horizontal planes. The results from the case study of a swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes occurred at Campi Flegrei in October 2015 are impressive: a clear separation of the P- and S-wave seismic phases in the time domain is obtained. In addition, the efficiency of the method in retrieving the polarization parameters is demonstrated by the comparison with other standard techniques. The presented approach provides wavefield decomposition and polarization analysis in a single step, thus avoiding a priori cumbersome filtering procedures and segmentation of the signals. It is useful for discriminating and analysing different seismic phases and can be applied to a variety of volcanic and tectonic signals, therefore it can strongly support all the studies on propagation and source mechanism. Moreover, due to its fastness and robustness this stand-alone tool can be routinely used in the volcano monitoring practice.

  5. Climate elasticity of streamflow revisited - an elasticity index based on long-term hydrometeorological records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andréassian, Vazken; Coron, Laurent; Lerat, Julien; Le Moine, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    We present a new method to derive the empirical (i.e., data-based) elasticity of streamflow to precipitation and potential evaporation. This method, which uses long-term hydrometeorological records, is tested on a set of 519 French catchments. We compare a total of five different ways to compute elasticity: the reference method first proposed by Sankarasubramanian et al. (2001) and four alternatives differing in the type of regression model chosen (OLS or GLS, univariate or bivariate). We show that the bivariate GLS and OLS regressions provide the most robust solution, because they account for the co-variation of precipitation and potential evaporation anomalies. We also compare empirical elasticity estimates with theoretical estimates derived analytically from the Turc-Mezentsev formula. Empirical elasticity offers a powerful means to test the extrapolation capacity of those hydrological models that are to be used to predict the impact of climatic changes.

  6. Influence of global heterogeneities on regional imaging based upon full waveform inversion of teleseismic wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, Vadim; Beller, Stephen; Operto, Stephane; Virieux, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The current development of dense seismic arrays and high performance computing make feasible today application of full-waveform inversion (FWI) on teleseismic data for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. In teleseismic configuration, the source is often considered to first order as a planar wave that impinges the base of the lithospheric target located below the receiver array. Recently, injection methods coupling global propagation in 1D or axisymmetric earth model with regional 3D methods (Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods, Spectral elements methods or finite differences) allow us to consider more realistic teleseismic phases. Those teleseismic phases can be propagated inside 3D regional model in order to exploit not only the forward-scattered waves propagating up to the receiver but also second-order arrivals that are back-scattered from the free-surface and the reflectors before their recordings on the surface. However, those computation are performed assuming simple global model. In this presentation, we review some key specifications that might be considered for mitigating the effect on FWI of heterogeneities situated outside the regional domain. We consider synthetic models and data computed using our recently developed hybrid method AxiSEM/SEM. The global simulation is done by AxiSEM code which allows us to consider axisymmetric anomalies. The 3D regional computation is performed by Spectral Element Method. We investigate the effect of external anomalies on the regional model obtained by FWI when one neglects them by considering only 1D global propagation. We also investigate the effect of the source time function and the focal mechanism on results of the FWI approach.

  7. Elasticity of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Angel, Ross J.; Ross, Nancy L.

    2016-02-01

    Elastic properties are reported for eight plagioclase feldspars that span compositions from albite (NaSi3AlO8) to anorthite (CaSi2Al2O8). Surface acoustic wave velocities measured using Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering and compliance sums from high-pressure X-ray compression studies accurately determine all 21 components of the elasticity tensor for these triclinic minerals. The overall pattern of elasticity and the changes in individual elastic components with composition can be rationalized on the basis of the evolution of crystal structures and chemistry across this solid-solution join. All plagioclase feldspars have high elastic anisotropy; a* (the direction perpendicular to the b and c axes) is the softest direction by a factor of 3 in albite. From albite to anorthite the stiffness of this direction undergoes the greatest change, increasing twofold. Small discontinuities in the elastic components, inferred to occur between the three plagioclase phases with distinct symmetry (C1>¯, I1>¯, and P1>¯), appear consistent with the nature of the underlying conformation of the framework-linked tetrahedra and the associated structural changes. Measured body wave velocities of plagioclase-rich rocks, reported over the last five decades, are consistent with calculated Hill-averaged velocities using the current moduli. This confirms long-standing speculation that previously reported elastic moduli for plagioclase feldspars are systematically in error. The current results provide greater assurance that the seismic structure of the middle and lower crusts can be accurately estimated on the basis of specified mineral modes, chemistry, and fabric.

  8. Wavefield Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chong

    2011-12-01

    Shear (S)-wave velocity is a key property of near-surface materials and is the fundamental parameter for many environmental and engineering geophysical studies. Directly acquiring accurate S-wave velocities from a seismic shot gather is usually difficult due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio. The relationship between Rayleigh-wave phase velocity and frequency has been widely utilized to estimate the S-wave velocities in shallow layers using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) technique. Hence, Rayleigh wave is a main focus of most near-surface seismic studies. Conventional dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves assumes that the earth is laterally homogeneous and the free surface is horizontally flat, which limits the application of surface-wave methods to only 1D earth models or very smooth 2D models. In this study I extend the analysis of Rayleigh waves to a 2D domain by employing the 2D full elastic wave equation so as to address the lateral heterogeneity problem. I first discuss the accurate simulation of Rayleigh waves through finite-difference method and the boundary absorbing problems in the numerical modeling with a high Poisson's ratio (> 0.4), which is a unique near-surface problem. Then I develop an improved vacuum formulation to generate accurate synthetic seismograms focusing on Rayleigh waves in presence of surface topography and internal discontinuities. With these solutions to forward modeling of Rayleigh waves, I evaluate the influence of surface topography to conventional dispersion analysis in 2D and 3D domains by numerical investigations. At last I examine the feasibility of inverting waveforms of Rayleigh waves for shallow S-wave velocities using a genetic algorithm. Results of the study show that Rayleigh waves can be accurately simulated in near surface using the improved vacuum formulation. Spurious reflections during the numerical modeling can be efficiently suppressed by the simplified multiaxial perfectly matched layers. The

  9. Locating the Origin of Scattered Waves By Simulating Time Reversal of the Seismic Wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S. C.; Pitarka, A.; Sjogreen, B.; Petersson, A.; Simmons, N. A.; Johannesson, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is a series of underground chemical explosions at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) that are improving our physical understanding how explosion sources generate seismic waves. Better understanding the origin of S-waves from explosions is a primary goal of the SPE. Even at distances of a few kilometers from the SPE sources, seismic recordings include arrivals of unknown origin that could originate as S-waves at the explosive source or from topographic and subsurface scatterers. Back propagation of time reversed seismograms has been used to determine the location of seismic events (e.g. Tromp et al., 2005; Larmat et al., 2006), and Myers et al. (2007) demonstrated that the time-reversal method can be used to determine the origin of direct and scattered waves in seismic simulations. In this study we identify the origin of distinct features in synthetic seismograms that are generated by elastic, finite-difference simulation of seismic propagation from SPE explosions through a model that has been developed specifically for the SPE. The SPE model includes 3-dimensional velocity discontinuities at geologic boundaries, as well as free-surface topography. Although the largest arrivals in the synthetic seismograms are expected to originate at the explosion source, other prominent features are likely to originate as scattered energy from model discontinuities. Scattering sources in the SPE model that are needed in order to match synthetic seismograms to field recordings of SPE shots will be identified. Conversely, model structures may be removed if they result in disagreement between synthetic seismograms and field recordings. Ultimately, we plan to constrain the origin of prominent features in field recordings of SPE shots by directly using the field recordings as inputs to time reversal simulations. Direct use of field recordings will require development of methods that account for the uncertainty of the seismic model through which

  10. ElaStic: A tool for calculating second-order elastic constants from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golesorkhtabar, Rostam; Pavone, Pasquale; Spitaler, Jürgen; Puschnig, Peter; Draxl, Claudia

    2013-08-01

    Elastic properties play a key role in materials science and technology. The elastic tensors at any order are defined by the Taylor expansion of the elastic energy or stress in terms of the applied strain. In this paper, we present ElaStic, a tool that is able to calculate the full second-order elastic stiffness tensor for any crystal structure from ab initio total-energy and/or stress calculations. This tool also provides the elastic compliances tensor and applies the Voigt and Reuss averaging procedure in order to obtain an evaluation of the bulk, shear, and Young moduli as well as the Poisson ratio of poly-crystalline samples. In a first step, the space-group is determined. Then, a set of deformation matrices is selected, and the corresponding structure files are produced. In a next step, total-energy or stress calculations for each deformed structure are performed by a chosen density-functional theory code. The computed energies/stresses are fitted as polynomial functions of the applied strain in order to get derivatives at zero strain. The knowledge of these derivatives allows for the determination of all independent components of the elastic tensor. In this context, the accuracy of the elastic constants critically depends on the polynomial fit. Therefore, we carefully study how the order of the polynomial fit and the deformation range influence the numerical derivatives, and we propose a new approach to obtain the most reliable results. We have applied ElaStic to representative materials for each crystal system, using total energies and stresses calculated with the full-potential all-electron codes exciting and WIEN2k as well as the pseudo-potential code Quantum ESPRESSO.

  11. Elastic properties of pyrope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Bridget; Bass, Jay D.; Rossman, George R.; Geiger, Charles A.; Langer, Klaus

    1991-03-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy was used to measure the single crystal elastic properties of a pure synthetic pyrope and a natural garnet containing 89.9 mol% of the pyrope end member (Mg3Al2Si3O12). The elastic moduli, c ij , of the two samples are entirely consistent and agree with previous estimates of the elastic properties of pyrope based upon the moduli of solid solutions. Our results indicate that the elastic moduli of pyrope end-member are c 11=296.2±0.5, c 12=111.1±0.6, c 44=91.6±0.3, Ks=172.8±0.3, μ=92.0±0.2, all in units of GPa. These results differ by several percent from those reported previously for synthetic pyrope, but are based upon a much larger data set. Although the hydrous components of the two samples from the present study are substantially different, representing both ‘dry’ and ‘saturated’ samples, we find no discernable effect of structurally bound water on the elastic properties. This is due to the small absolute solubility of water in pyrope, as compared with other garnets such as grossular.

  12. Seamless elastic boundaries for atomistic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastewka, Lars; Sharp, Tristan A.; Robbins, Mark O.

    2012-08-01

    Modeling interfacial phenomena often requires both a detailed atomistic description of surface interactions and accurate calculations of long-range deformations in the substrate. The latter can be efficiently obtained using an elastic Green's function if substrate deformations are small. We present a general formulation for rapidly computing the Green's function for a planar surface given the interatomic interactions, and then coupling the Green's function to explicit atoms. The approach is fast, avoids ghost forces, and is not limited to nearest-neighbor interactions. The full system comprising explicit interfacial atoms and an elastic substrate is described by a single Hamiltonian and interactions in the substrate are treated exactly up to harmonic order. This concurrent multiscale coupling provides simple, seamless elastic boundary conditions for atomistic simulations where near-surface deformations occur, such as nanoindentation, contact, friction, or fracture. Applications to surface relaxation and contact are used to test and illustrate the approach.

  13. Approximate nonlinear multi-parameter inversion with single and double scattering seismic wavefields in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Wuqun; Zhang, Pan

    2016-11-01

    An approach for approximate direct quadratic nonlinear inversion in two-parameter (density and bulk modulus) heterogeneous acoustic media is being presented and discussed in this paper. The approach consists of two parts: the first is a linear generalized Radon transform (GRT) migration procedure based on the weighted true-amplitude summation of pre-stack seismic scattered data that is adapted to a virtually arbitrary observing system, and the second is a non-iterative quadratic inversion operation, produced from the explicit expression of amplitude radiation pattern that is acting on the migrated data. This ensures the asymptotic inversion can continue to simultaneously locate the discontinuities and reconstruct the size of the discontinuities in the perturbation parameters describing the acoustic media. We identify that the amplitude radiation pattern is the binary quadratic combination of the parameters in the process of formulating nonlinear inverse scattering problems based on second-order Born approximation. The coefficients of the quadratic terms are computed by appropriately handling the double scattering effects. These added quadratic terms provide a better amplitude correction for the parameters inversion. Through numerical tests, we show that for strong perturbations, the errors of the linear inversion are significant and unacceptable. In contrast, the quadratic nonlinear inversion can give fairly accurate inversion results and keep almost the same computational complexity as conventional GRT liner inversion.

  14. Approximate non-linear multiparameter inversion with single and double scattering seismic wavefields in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Wuqun; Zhang, Pan

    2017-02-01

    An approach for approximate direct quadratic non-linear inversion in two-parameter (density and bulk modulus) heterogeneous acoustic media is being presented and discussed in this paper. The approach consists of two parts: the first is a linear generalized Radon transform (GRT) migration procedure based on the weighted true-amplitude summation of pre-stack seismic scattered data that is adapted to a virtually arbitrary observing system, and the second is a non-iterative quadratic inversion operation, produced from the explicit expression of amplitude radiation pattern that is acting on the migrated data. This ensures the asymptotic inversion can continue to simultaneously locate the discontinuities and reconstruct the size of the discontinuities in the perturbation parameters describing the acoustic media. We identify that the amplitude radiation pattern is the binary quadratic combination of the parameters in the process of formulating non-linear inverse scattering problems based on second-order Born approximation. The coefficients of the quadratic terms are computed by appropriately handling the double scattering effects. These added quadratic terms provide a better amplitude correction for the parameters inversion. Through numerical tests, we show that for strong perturbations, the errors of the linear inversion are significant and unacceptable. In contrast, the quadratic non-linear inversion can give fairly accurate inversion results and keep almost the same computational complexity as conventional GRT liner inversion.

  15. Preconditioning Strategies in Elastic Full Waveform Inversion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matharu, G.; Sacchi, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    Elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) is inherently more non-linear than its acoustic counterpart, a property that stems from the increased model space of the problem. Whereas acoustic media can be parametrized by density and P-wave velocity, visco-elastic media are parametrized by density, attenuation and 21 independent coefficients of the elastic tensor. Imposing assumptions of isotropy and perfect elasticity to simplify the physics, reduces the number of independent parameters required to characterize a medium. Isotropic, elastic media can be parametrized in terms of density and the Lamé parameters. The different parameters can exhibit trade-off that manifest as attributes in the data. In the context of FWI, this means that certain parameters cannot be uniquely resolved. An ideal model update in full waveform inversion is equivalent to a Newton step. Explicit computation of the Hessian and its inverse is not computationally feasible in elastic FWI. The inverse Hessian scales the gradients to account for trade-off between parameters as well as compensating for inadequate illumination related to source-receiver coverage. Gradient preconditioners can be applied to mimic the action of the inverse Hessian and partially correct for inaccuracies in the gradient. In this study, we investigate the effects of model reparametrization by recasting a regularized form of the least-squares waveform misfit into a preconditioned formulation. New model parameters are obtained by applying invertible weighting matrices to the model vector. The weighting matrices are related to estimates of the prior model covariance matrix and incorporate information about spatially variant correlations of model parameters as well as correlations between independent parameters. We compare the convergence of conventional FWI to FWI after model reparametrization.

  16. An elastic second skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.; Anderson, R. Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (<40%), and that withstands elongations exceeding 250%, elastically recoiling with minimal strain-energy loss on repeated deformation. The application of XPL to the herniated lower eyelid fat pads of 12 subjects resulted in an average 2-grade decrease in herniation appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  17. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  18. Vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of vascular elasticity can help detect thrombosis and prevent life-threatening conditions such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Here, we propose vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography (VE-PAT) to measure vascular elasticity in humans. VE-PAT was developed by incorporating a linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography system with a customized compression stage. By measuring the deformation of blood vessels under uniaxial loading, VE-PAT was able to quantify the vascular compliance. We first demonstrated the feasibility of VE-PAT in blood vessel phantoms. In large vessel phantoms, VE-PAT detected a decrease in vascular compliance due to simulated thrombosis, which was validated by a standard compression test. In small blood vessel phantoms embedded 3 mm deep in gelatin, VE-PAT detected elasticity changes at depths that are difficult to image using other elasticity imaging techniques. We then applied VE-PAT to assess vascular compliance in a human subject and detected a decrease in vascular compliance when an occlusion occurred downstream from the measurement point, demonstrating the potential of VE-PAT in clinical applications such as detection of deep venous thrombosis.

  19. Dynamic Elasticity Model of Resilin Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Duki, Solomon

    2013-03-01

    Resilin proteins are `super elastic rubbers' in the flight and jumping systems of most insects, and can extend and retract millions of times. Natural resilin exhibits high resilience (> 95%) under high-frequency conditions, and could be stretched to over 300% of its original length with a low elastic modulus of 0.1-3 MPa. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. We report on the dynamic structure transitions and functions of full length resilin from fruit fly (D. melanogaster CG15920) and its different functional domains. A dynamic computational model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for resilins, as well as other elastomeric proteins. A strong beta-turn transition was experimentally identified in the full length resilin and its non-elastic domains (Exon III). Changes in periodic long-range order were demonstrated during this transition, induced either by thermal or mechanical inputs, to confirm the universality of proposed mechanism. Further, this model offers new options for designing protein-based biopolymers with tunable material applications.

  20. Dynamic elasticity of microbedded and fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazer, L. Neil

    1990-04-01

    Microbedded rocks have an anisotropic frequency-dependent sound speed which depends on the intrinsic sound speeds of the individual microbeds and on the O'Doherty-Anstey effect. Fractured rocks have an anisotropic frequency-dependent sound speed which depends on the intrinsic sound speed of the unfractured rock, the frequency-dependent phase shift that occurs during reflection or transmission across a fracture, and the interfracture O'Doherty-Anstey effect. These effects are neglected by the quasistatic methods presently used to generate elastic constants. Here I introduce a new method for generating elastic constants that contain all the above effects. First, a statistical description of the rock is used to generate a sample of the rock. Then an exact two-way method is used to propagate just a few plane waves, of frequency ƒ, a distance of several wavelengths from the source. If an equivalent homogeneous medium exists at frequency ƒ, then the computed motions must also satisfy a one-way elastic wave equation for that equivalent medium. This one-way wave equation is used to invert for the elastic coefficients. When no equivalent medium exists, perhaps because ƒ is too large, this is indicated by the inversion. Possible applications of the method are prediction of seismic sound speeds from measurements of bed thicknesses in cores; analysis of laboratory data for fracture constitutive relations; and inversion of multioffset vertical seismic profiling data for elastic coefficients comparable with those predicted from cores.

  1. Elastic model of supercoiling.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, C J

    1977-01-01

    An elastic model for the supercoiling of duplex DNA is developed. The simplest assumptions regarding the elastic properties of double-helical DNA (homogeneous, isotropic, of circular cross section, and remaining straight when unstressed) will generate two orders of superhelicity when stressed. Recent experimental results [Brady, G.W., Fein, D.B. & Brumberger, H. (1976) Nature 264, 231-234] suggest that in supercoiled DNA molecules there are regions where two distinct orders of supercoiling arise, as predicted by this model. PMID:267934

  2. Deflation of elastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilliet, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    The deflation of elastic spherical surfaces has been numerically investigated, and show very different types of deformations according the range of elastic parameters, some of them being quantitatively understood through simple theoretical considerations. In particular, the role of the Poisson ratio is closely investigated. This work allowed to retrieve various shapes observed on hollow deformable shells (from colloidal to centimeter scale), on lipid vesicles, or on some simple biological objects. Conversely, it shows how high deformations can tell observers about mechanical properties of a body. Such investigations have been extended to other geometries, in order to provide clues to understand deformations of vegetal or animal tissues.

  3. Accuracy and efficiency considerations for wide-angle wavefield extrapolators and scattering operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C. J.

    2005-10-01

    Several observations are made concerning the numerical implementation of wide-angle one-way wave equations, using for illustration scalar waves obeying the Helmholtz equation in two space dimensions. This simple case permits clear identification of a sequence of physically motivated approximations of use when the mathematically exact pseudo-differential operator (PSDO) one-way method is applied. As intuition suggests, these approximations largely depend on the medium gradients in the direction transverse to the main propagation direction. A key point is that narrow-angle approximations are to be avoided in the interests of accuracy. Another key consideration stems from the fact that the so-called `standard-ordering' PSDO indicates how lateral interpolation of the velocity structure can significantly reduce computational costs associated with the Fourier or plane-wave synthesis lying at the heart of the calculations. A third important point is that the PSDO theory shows what approximations are necessary in order to generate an exponential one-way propagator for the laterally varying case, representing the intuitive extension of classical integral-transform solutions for a laterally homogeneous medium. This exponential propagator permits larger forward stepsizes. Numerical comparisons with Helmholtz (i.e. full) wave-equation finite-difference solutions are presented for various canonical problems. These include propagation along an interfacial gradient, the effects of a compact inclusion and the formation of extended transmitted and backscattered wave trains by model roughness. The ideas extend to the 3-D, generally anisotropic case and to multiple scattering by invariant embedding. It is concluded that the method is very competitive, striking a new balance between simplifying approximations and computational labour. Complicated wave-scattering effects are retained without the need for expensive global solutions, providing a robust and flexible modelling tool.

  4. Microscopic theory of rubber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Oyerokun, Folusho T; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2004-05-15

    A microscopic integral equation theory of elasticity in polymer liquids and networks is developed which addresses the nonclassical problem of the consequences of interchain repulsive interactions and packing correlations on mechanical response. The theory predicts strain induced softening, and a nonclassical intermolecular contribution to the linear modulus. The latter is of the same magnitude as the classical single chain entropy contribution at low polymer concentrations, but becomes much more important in the melt state, and dominant as the isotropic-nematic liquid crystal phase transition is approached. Comparison of the calculated stress-strain curve and induced nematic order parameter with computer simulations show good agreement. A nearly quadratic dependence of the linear elastic modulus on segmental concentration is found, as well as a novel fractional power law dependence on degree of polymerization. Quantitative comparison of the theory with experiments on polydimethylsiloxane networks are presented and good agreement is found. However, a nonzero modulus in the long chain limit is not predicted since quenched chemical crosslinks and trapped entanglements are not explicitly taken into account. The theory is generalizable to treat the structure, thermodynamics and mechanical response of nematic elastomers.

  5. Fast computation of synthetic seismograms within a medium containing remote localized perturbations: A numerical solution to the scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    We derive a fast discrete solution to the scattering problem. This solution allows us to compute accurate synthetic seismograms or waveforms for arbitrary locations of sources and receivers within a medium containing localized perturbations. The key to efficiency is that wave propagation modeling does not need to be carried out in the entire volume that encompasses the sources and the receivers but only within the sub-volume containing the perturbations or scatterers. The proposed solution has important applications, for example, it permits the imaging of remote targets located in regions where no sources or receivers are present. Our solution relies on domain decomposition: within a small volume that contains the scatterers, wave propagation is modeled numerically, while in the surrounding volume, where the medium isn't perturbed, the response is obtained through wavefield extrapolation. The originality of this work is the derivation of discrete formulas for representation theorems and Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integrals that naturally adapt to the numerical scheme employed for modeling wave propagation. Our solution applies, for example, to finite difference methods or finite/spectral elements methods. The synthetic seismograms obtained with our solution can be considered "exact" as the total numerical error is comparable to that of the method employed for modeling wave propagation. We detail a basic implementation of our solution in the acoustic case using the finite difference method and present numerical examples that demonstrate the accuracy of the method. We show that ignoring some terms accounting for higher order scattering effects in our solution has a limited effect on the computed seismograms and significantly reduces the computational effort. Finally, we show that our solution can be used to compute localised sensitivity kernels and we discuss applications to target oriented imaging. Extension to the elastic case is straightforward and summarised in a

  6. Passive and active ventricular elastances of the left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Liang; Ghista, Dhanjoo N; Ng, Eddie YK; Lim, Soo T

    2005-01-01

    Background Description of the heart as a pump has been dominated by models based on elastance and compliance. Here, we are presenting a somewhat new concept of time-varying passive and active elastance. The mathematical basis of time-varying elastance of the ventricle is presented. We have defined elastance in terms of the relationship between ventricular pressure and volume, as: dP = EdV + VdE, where E includes passive (Ep) and active (Ea) elastance. By incorporating this concept in left ventricular (LV) models to simulate filling and systolic phases, we have obtained the time-varying expression for Ea and the LV-volume dependent expression for Ep. Methods and Results Using the patient's catheterization-ventriculogram data, the values of passive and active elastance are computed. Ea is expressed as: ; Epis represented as: . Ea is deemed to represent a measure of LV contractility. Hence, Peak dP/dt and ejection fraction (EF) are computed from the monitored data and used as the traditional measures of LV contractility. When our computed peak active elastance (Ea,max) is compared against these traditional indices by linear regression, a high degree of correlation is obtained. As regards Ep, it constitutes a volume-dependent stiffness property of the LV, and is deemed to represent resistance-to-filling. Conclusions Passive and active ventricular elastance formulae can be evaluated from a single-beat P-V data by means of a simple-to-apply LV model. The active elastance (Ea) can be used to characterize the ventricle's contractile state, while passive elastance (Ep) can represent a measure of resistance-to-filling. PMID:15707494

  7. Waveform Inversion of OBS Data and Illumination/Resolution Analyses on Marine Seismic Data Acquisitions by the Adjoint Wavefield Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Li, K.

    2012-12-01

    We applied a wave-equation based adjoint wavefield method for seismic illumination/resolution analyses and full waveform inversion. A two-way wave-equation is used to calculate directional and diffracted energy fluxes for waves propagating between sources and receivers to the subsurface target. The first-order staggered-grid pressure-velocity formulation, which lacks the characteristic of being self-adjoint is further validated and corrected to render the modeling operator before its practical application. Despite most published papers on synthetic kernel research, realistic applications to two field experiments are demonstrated and emphasize its practical needs. The Fréchet sensitivity kernels are used to quantify the target illumination conditions. For realistic illumination measurements and resolution analyses, two completely different survey geometries and nontrivial pre-conditioning strategies based on seismic data type are demonstrated and compared. From illumination studies, particle velocity responses are more sensitive to lateral velocity variations than pressure records. For waveform inversion, the more accurately estimated velocity model obtained the deeper the depth of investigation would be reached. To achieve better resolution and illumination, closely spaced OBS receiver interval is preferred. Based on the results, waveform inversion is applied for a gas hydrate site in Taiwan for shallow structure and BSR detection. Full waveform approach potentially provides better depth resolution than ray approach. The quantitative analyses, a by-product of full waveform inversion, are useful for quantifying seismic processing and depth migration strategies.llumination/resolution analysis for a 3D MCS/OBS survey in 2008. Analysis of OBS data shows that pressure (top), horizontal (middle) and vertical (bottom) velocity records produce different resolving power for gas hydrate exploration. ull waveform inversion of 8 OBS data along Yuan-An Ridge in SW Taiwan

  8. Higher-order triangular spectral element method with optimized cubature points for seismic wavefield modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Youshan; Teng, Jiwen; Xu, Tao; Badal, José

    2017-05-01

    The mass-lumped method avoids the cost of inverting the mass matrix and simultaneously maintains spatial accuracy by adopting additional interior integration points, known as cubature points. To date, such points are only known analytically in tensor domains, such as quadrilateral or hexahedral elements. Thus, the diagonal-mass-matrix spectral element method (SEM) in non-tensor domains always relies on numerically computed interpolation points or quadrature points. However, only the cubature points for degrees 1 to 6 are known, which is the reason that we have developed a p-norm-based optimization algorithm to obtain higher-order cubature points. In this way, we obtain and tabulate new cubature points with all positive integration weights for degrees 7 to 9. The dispersion analysis illustrates that the dispersion relation determined from the new optimized cubature points is comparable to that of the mass and stiffness matrices obtained by exact integration. Simultaneously, the Lebesgue constant for the new optimized cubature points indicates its surprisingly good interpolation properties. As a result, such points provide both good interpolation properties and integration accuracy. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) numbers are tabulated for the conventional Fekete-based triangular spectral element (TSEM), the TSEM with exact integration, and the optimized cubature-based TSEM (OTSEM). A complementary study demonstrates the spectral convergence of the OTSEM. A numerical example conducted on a half-space model demonstrates that the OTSEM improves the accuracy by approximately one order of magnitude compared to the conventional Fekete-based TSEM. In particular, the accuracy of the 7th-order OTSEM is even higher than that of the 14th-order Fekete-based TSEM. Furthermore, the OTSEM produces a result that can compete in accuracy with the quadrilateral SEM (QSEM). The high accuracy of the OTSEM is also tested with a non-flat topography model. In terms of computational

  9. Documentation of programs that compute 1) quasi-static tilts produced by an expanding dislocation loop in an elastic and viscoelastic material, and 2) surface shear stresses, strains, and shear displacements produced by screw dislocations in a vertical slab with modulus contrast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, Stuart

    1976-01-01

    The material in this report can be grouped into two categories: 1) programs that compute tilts produced by a vertically oriented expanding rectangular dislocation loop in an elastic or viscoelastic material and 2) programs that compute the shear stresses, strains, and shear displacements in a three-phase half-space (i.e. a half-space containing a vertical slab). Each section describes the relevant theory, and provides a detailed guide to the operation of the programs. A series of examples is provided at the end of each section.

  10. Seismic wavefield simulation by a modified finite element method with a perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Weijuan; Fu, Li-Yun

    2017-08-01

    The finite element method is a very important tool for modeling seismic wave propagation in complex media, but it usually consumes a large amount of memory which significantly decreases computational efficiency when solving large-scale seismic problems. Here, a modified finite element method (MFEM) is proposed to improve efficiency. Triangular elements are employed to mesh the topography and the discontinuous interface more flexibly. In the two-dimensional case, the Jacobian matrix is obtained by using three controlling points instead of all nodes in each element with MFEM, which separates the Jacobian matrix from the stiffness matrix. The kernel matrices of the stiffness matrix rather than the global matrix are stored, and memory requirements are thus reduced significantly. Meanwhile, the element-by-element scheme is adopted to spare large sparse matrices and make the program easily parallelized. A second-order perfectly matched layer (PML) is also implemented to eliminate artificial reflections. Finally, the accuracy and efficiency of our algorithm are validated by numerical tests.

  11. The Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocco, Alberto; Masin, Sergio Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight--a cognitive law analogous to Hooke's law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined…

  12. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  13. The Calculus of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Warren B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the elasticity of demand, and shows that geometrically, it may be interpreted as the ratio of two simple distances along the tangent line: the distance from the point on the curve to the x-intercept to the distance from the point on the curve to the y-intercept. It also shows that total revenue is maximized at the transition…

  14. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M. L.; Levatin, J. A.

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  15. Elastic swimming I: Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Yu, Tony; Hosoi, Anette

    2006-03-01

    We consider the problem of swimming at low Reynolds number by oscillating an elastic filament in a viscous liquid, as investigated by Wiggins and Goldstein (1998, Phys Rev Lett). In this first part of the study, we characterize the optimal forcing conditions of the swimming strategy and its optimal geometrical characteristics.

  16. Elastic swimming II: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tony; Lauga, Eric; Hosoi, Anette

    2006-03-01

    We consider the problem of swimming at low Reynolds number by oscillating an elastic filament in a viscous liquid, as investigated by Wiggins and Goldstein (1998, Phys Rev Lett). In this second part of the study, we present results of a series of experiments characterizing the performance of the propulsive mechanism.

  17. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  18. A comparison between different finite elements for elastic and aero-elastic analyses.

    PubMed

    Mahran, Mohamed; ELsabbagh, Adel; Negm, Hani

    2017-11-01

    In the present paper, a comparison between five different shell finite elements, including the Linear Triangular Element, Linear Quadrilateral Element, Linear Quadrilateral Element based on deformation modes, 8-node Quadrilateral Element, and 9-Node Quadrilateral Element was presented. The shape functions and the element equations related to each element were presented through a detailed mathematical formulation. Additionally, the Jacobian matrix for the second order derivatives was simplified and used to derive each element's strain-displacement matrix in bending. The elements were compared using carefully selected elastic and aero-elastic bench mark problems, regarding the number of elements needed to reach convergence, the resulting accuracy, and the needed computation time. The best suitable element for elastic free vibration analysis was found to be the Linear Quadrilateral Element with deformation-based shape functions, whereas the most suitable element for stress analysis was the 8-Node Quadrilateral Element, and the most suitable element for aero-elastic analysis was the 9-Node Quadrilateral Element. Although the linear triangular element was the last choice for modal and stress analyses, it establishes more accurate results in aero-elastic analyses, however, with much longer computation time. Additionally, the nine-node quadrilateral element was found to be the best choice for laminated composite plates analysis.

  19. Observation and Modeling of the SVdiff-SHdiff splitting induced by elastic anisotropy and finite-frequency effects in D"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, S. H.; Liao, T. Y.; Sales de Andrade, E.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    comparing the observed SVdiff-SHdiff split times with those predicted by their distinct finite-frequency sensitivity kernels constructed with the interactions of forward and adjoint wavefields computed by a spectral element method.

  20. Biomechanical implications of cortical elastic properties of the macaque mandible.

    PubMed

    Dechow, Paul C; Panagiotopoulou, Olga; Gharpure, Poorva

    2017-06-17

    Knowledge of the variation in the elastic properties of mandibular cortical bone is essential for modeling bone function. Our aim was to characterize the elastic properties of rhesus macaque mandibular cortical bone and compare these to the elastic properties from mandibles of dentate humans and baboons. Thirty cylindrical samples were harvested from each of six adult female rhesus monkey mandibles. Assuming orthotropy, axes of maximum stiffness in the plane of the cortical plate were derived from ultrasound velocity measurements. Further velocity measurements with longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic transducers along with measurements of bone density were used to compute three-dimensional cortical elastic properties using equations based on Hooke's law. Results showed regional variations in the elastic properties of macaque mandibular cortical bone that have both similarities and differences with that of humans and baboons. So far, the biological and structural basis of these differences is poorly understood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Elastic modulus varies along the bovine femur.

    PubMed

    Nobakhti, Sabah; Katsamenis, Orestis L; Zaarour, Nizar; Limbert, Georges; Thurner, Philipp J

    2017-07-01

    Bone is a heterogeneous material and its mechanical properties vary within the body. Variations in the mechanical response of different bone samples taken from the body cannot be fully explained by only looking at local compositional information at the tissue level. Due to different states of the stress within bones, one might expect that mechanical properties change over the length of a bone; this has not been a matter of systematic research in previous studies. In this study, the distribution of the tissue elastic modulus along the bovine femur is investigated using three-point bending tests. Two bovine femora were split to seven and eight blocks from proximal to distal metaphysis, respectively and twenty beam shaped bone samples were extracted and tested from each block. Based on our findings, the longitudinal elastic modulus follows a gradient pattern along the bovine femur as it increases along the bone from the proximal metaphysis to mid-diaphysis and then decreases toward the distal metaphysis again. Considering long bones to be subjected to bending loads, this mechanism alters the bone structure to support load in the regions where it is needed; similar as outlined by Wolff's law. In another part of this study, microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT) was found unable to predict the same trend of changes for the elastic modulus via image-based or density-based elastic moduli calculations. This is insofar important as conventional finite element models of bone are often directly shaped from μCT data. Based on our findings, it seems that current computed tomography based finite element models generated in this manner may not adequately capture the local variation of material behavior of bone tissue, but this may be improved by considering the changes of the elastic modulus along the femur. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Series elastic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Matthew M.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, construction, control and evaluation of a novel for controlled actuator. Traditional force controlled actuators are designed from the premise that 'Stiffer is better'. This approach gives a high bandwidth system, prone to problems of contact instability, noise, and low power density. The actuator presented in this thesis is designed from the premise that 'Stiffness isn't everything'. The actuator, which incorporates a series elastic element, trades off achievable bandwidth for gains in stable, low noise force control, and protection against shock loads. This thesis reviews related work in robot force control, presents theoretical descriptions of the control and expected performance from a series elastic actuator, and describes the design of a test actuator constructed to gather performance data. Finally the performance of the system is evaluated by comparing the performance data to theoretical predictions.

  3. Linear Elastic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revenough, Justin

    Elastic waves propagating in simple media manifest a surprisingly rich collection of phenomena. Although some can't withstand the complexities of Earth's structure, the majority only grow more interesting and more important as remote sensing probes for seismologists studying the planet's interior. To fully mine the information carried to the surface by seismic waves, seismologists must produce accurate models of the waves. Great strides have been made in this regard. Problems that were entirely intractable a decade ago are now routinely solved on inexpensive workstations. The mathematical representations of waves coded into algorithms have grown vastly more sophisticated and are troubled by many fewer approximations, enforced symmetries, and limitations. They are far from straightforward, and seismologists using them need a firm grasp on wave propagation in simple media. Linear Elastic Waves, by applied mathematician John G. Harris, responds to this need.

  4. The Optimal Elastic Flagellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolie, Saverio; Lauga, Eric

    2009-11-01

    We address the question of optimality for slender swimming bodies or flagella in viscous fluid environments. Our novel approach is to define an energy which includes not only the work performed against the surrounding fluid, but also the energy stored elastically in the bending of the body, the energy stored elastically in internal shearing (such as the relative sliding of microtubules internal to a flagellum), and viscous dissipation due to the presence of an internal fluid. The shape of the optimal periodic planar wave is determined numerically and in some cases analytically which maximizes a related efficiency measure. We find that bending or internal dissipation costs regularize the optimal shape, but elastic shearing costs do not. For bodies of finite length, we show that the number of wavelengths expressed by the body is determined by a competition between bending costs and the work done on the fluid associated with body rotations. The hydrodynamic efficiency is shown to be less sensitive to the morphology than the bending costs, which may help us to better understand the locomotory forms observed in nature.

  5. Nonlinear theoretical formulation of elastic stability criterion of crystal solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Li, Mo

    2012-03-01

    An elastic stability criterion is generally formulated based on local elasticity, where the second-order elastic constants of a crystalline system in an arbitrary deformed state are required. While simple in formalism, such a formulation demands extensive computational effort in either an ab initio calculation or an atomistic simulation and often lacks clear physical interpretation. Here, we present a nonlinear theoretical formulation employing higher-order elastic constants beyond the second-order ones; the elastic constants needed in the theory are those at a zero stress state or in any arbitrary deformed state, many of which are now available. We use the published second- and higher-order elastic constants of several cubic crystals, including Au, Al, and Cu, as well as diamond-structure Si, with transcription under different coordinate frames, to test the stability conditions of these crystals under uniaxial and hydrostatic loading. The stability region, ideal strength, and potential bifurcation mode of those cubic crystals under loading are obtained using this theory. The results obtained are in good agreement with the results from the ab initio calculation or embedded atom method. The overall good quality of the results confirms the desired utility of this new approach to predict elastic stability and related properties of crystalline materials without involving intense computation.

  6. Geometry of the Farallon Slab Revealed by Joint Interpretation of Wavefield Imaging and Tomography Results from the Earthscope Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, G. L.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A significant number of P and S wave tomography models have been produced in the past decade using various subsets of data from the Earthscope USArray and different inversion algorithms. We focus here on published tomography results that span large portions of the final footprint of the USArray. We use 3D visualization techniques to search for common features in different tomography models. We also compare tomography results to features seen in our current generation wavefield images. Recent innovations of our plane wave migration method have yielded what is arguably the highest resolution image ever produced of the mantle in the vicinity of the transition zone. The new results reveal a rich collection of coherent, dipping structures seen throughout the upper mantle and transition zone. These dipping interfaces are judged significant according to a coherence metric. We treat these surfaces as strain markers to assess proposed models for geometry of the 3D geometry of the Farallon Slab under North America. We find the following geologic interpretations are well supported by independent results: 1. The old Farallon under eastern North America and below the base of transition zone is universally seen as a high velocity anomaly. 2. All results support a simple, 3D kinematic model of the updip limit of the Farallon slab window that follows a track from Cape Mendocino, across Nevada, and northern Arizona and New Mexico. 3. All models show a strong low-velocity mantle under the southwestern U.S. 4. A low-velocity features is universally seen related to the Yellowstone-Snake River system. Shorter wavelength features observed in different tomography models are inconsistent showing that the theme of this session is very important to understand what features are in current results are real. Isopach maps of the thickness of the transition show a systematic difference in transition zone thickness in the western and eastern US. The transition zone thickens in the eastern US in

  7. Upper mantle low-velocity layers beneath the High Lava Plains imaged by scattered-wavefield migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; James, D. E.; Wagner, L. S.

    2011-12-01

    The High Lava Plains (HLP) in eastern Oregon represents one of the most active intraplate magmatic provinces on Earth. This region's recent tectonic history is dominated by voluminous mid-Miocene outpourings of the Steens and Columbia River flood basalts, followed by a period of bimodal volcanic activities, generating two roughly orthogonal time-progressive rhyolitic hotspot tracks: the northeastern-trending Snake River Plain and the northwestern-trending High Lava Plains. The causes of this complex tectonomagmatic evolution are not well understood, and geophysical constraints have been lacking regarding the detailed crustal and upper mantle structure in this region. From 2006 to 2009, a passive seismic experiment with the deployment of 118 broadband seismic stations was carried out as part of the multidisciplinary High Lava Plains project, which aims to investigate the causes of continental intraplate tectonomagmatism. These stations covered central and eastern Oregon, northern Nevada, and southwestern Idaho, with average spacing of 15-20 km, yielding unprecedented data density in the HLP region. A number of tomographic and receiver function studies has revealed complex structures beneath HLP. These include irregular Moho topography across the HLP, and concentrated low velocity anomalies in the uppermost mantle beneath regions of Holocene volcanism in southeastern Oregon (including areas of the Owyhee Plateau), as well as beneath volcanic centers near Steens Mountain and Newberry volcano. We complement these previous studies by generating high-resolution seismic images from scattered wavefield to detect seismic discontinuities beneath the HLP. We process 80 high-quality teleseismic events with good azimuthal coverage using a 2-D teleseismic migration algorithm based on the Generalized Radon Transform. The resulting migration images indicate the presence of several main features: 1) a prominent and varying Moho topography: the Moho is at ~40 km depth east of the

  8. Quantitative analysis of tremor wavefield at Mt. Etna during 2012 eruptive activity of Bocca Nuova Crater (Mt. Etna).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, Luciano; Carbone, Daniele; Almendros Gonzales, Javier; Corsaro, Rosa Anna

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic tremor is difficult to interpret, due to the lack of clear body-wave phase arrivals, and the rapid loss of signal coherence with increasing station spacing. This characteristic makes impossible to retrieve the tremor source location by means of the hypocenter determination techniques. Nevertheless, location of the tremor source is important to improve our knowledge in the source processes leading to the volcanic tremor generation and to enhance our ability in reconstructing the geometry of the plumbing system. During the summer of 2012, the Bocca Nuova Crater produced discontinuous Strombolian activity and intra-crateric lava flows. We temporally augmented the permanent monitoring system in the summit area of Etna with a small-aperture broadband seismic array. This array was composed by six digital broadband stations, distributed with an aperture of about 400 m. It was deployed about 1 km SW of the summit craters, at an altitude of about 3000 m. This array operated continuously for 102 days, between July 10 and October 19. During the analyzed period, we observed that the tremor behavior follows two different patterns. During periods of scarce/absent eruptive activity, the tremor amplitude is small and the frequency content spans the 1-5 Hz band, with a main peak at about 1-2 Hz.When explosive/effusive activity occurs, the volcanic tremor shows higher energy that is distributed on a wider frequency band, with a main peak at 3 Hz. Our results suggested that multiple sources are present in the wavefield. The most representative values of ray parameter are in the 0.5-1.2 s/km range, corresponding to apparent velocities between 0.8 and 2 km/s. Propagation azimuths cluster around two main back-azimuths of 60° and 30°, which matches the direction of the South-East and of the Bocca Nuova Crater respectively. We found a clear correlation between the behavior of the apparent slowness vectors and the tremor amplitude, suggesting the existence of a link between two

  9. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  10. Identifying the inhomogeneous properties of an orthotropic elastic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatul'yan, A. O.; Yavruyan, O. V.; Bogachev, I. V.

    2013-11-01

    A scheme is proposed for reconstructing inhomogeneously thick elasticity modules of an orthotropic layer from acoustic sounding data. The problem of reconstruction has been reduced to stepwise reconstruction of the functions characterizing the elasticity modules, based on iteration regularization and A.N. Tikhonov's regularization method, which utilize analysis of the averaged characteristics. A computer experiment is performed for different inhomogeneity layers, the effective frequency sounding regions for identification are revealed, and various aspects of numerical realization are discussed.

  11. Elastic-plastic response charts for nuclear overpressures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Guice, L.K.; Kiger, S.A.

    1984-06-01

    The single-degree-of-freedom equation of motion for an elastic-plastic system with forcing functions that are representative of nuclear weapon simulations is nondimensionalized and solved. Numerical solutions are calculated by the Newmark Beta method, and response charts incorporating nondimensionalized structural and loading parameters for the Speicher-Brode nuclear pressure history description are provided. A computer code is presented for solving the elastic-plastic problem for Speicher-Brode overpressure as well as triangular-shaped overpressures.

  12. The characteristics of the lower stratospheric gravity wavefield above Halley (75°S, 26°W), Antarctica, from radiosonde observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat-Griffin, T.; Colwell, S. R.

    2017-09-01

    Daily radiosonde observations between 2003 and 2013 from Halley research station, Antarctica (75°S, 26°W), are used to determine climatologies of gravity wave properties in the lower stratosphere (between 15 km and 22 km altitude). Individual waves are extracted from the radiosonde profile using wavelet analysis and separated into upward and downward propagating waves. An increase in the percentage of downward propagating waves ( 30% of the waves) is seen during the winter months. For the upward and downward propagating waves, their horizontal and vertical wavelength, intrinsic frequency, energy density, pseudomomentum flux, and direction of propagation are determined. The upward propagating wavefield is found to be dominated by waves with short vertical wavelength ( 1 km) and low intrinsic frequency (ω f). The downward propagating wavefield is composed of a wider distribution of vertical wavelength waves and has a larger proportion of higher-frequency waves present. The upward propagating waves show an increase in total energy density in autumn and spring; the larger increase occurs during spring (up to 1.7 J kg-1 in September). The downward propagating waves increase in total energy density occurs during wintertime (up to 0.7 J kg-1 in June). During winter the contributions of the upward and downward propagating waves to the total energy density and pseudomomentum flux are almost equal. This paper details the first study of individual gravity wave properties combined into upward and downward propagating wave climatologies in the lower stratosphere above Halley.

  13. Simulation and Measurement of Ultrasonic Waves in Elastic Plates Using Laser Vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzzene, M.; Jeong, S. M.; Michaels, T. E.; Michaels, J. E.; Mi, B.

    2005-04-01

    The propagation of Lamb waves in elastic plates is analyzed both numerically and experimentally. A Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) is here used to detect and visualize transient waveforms propagating in an elastic plate at low ultrasonic frequencies. The waves are excited by a piezoelectric crystal glued to the plate surface and actuated by sinusoidal pulses of varying frequency. The pulse sequence is triggered by the SLDV internal controller so that phase and delay information are preserved. Such information allows visualization of the waveform pattern as it propagates over the plate surface. The experiment produces animated displacement maps where the interaction with discontinuities in the plate such as defects becomes apparent. This capability suggests application of the SLDV technique as part of an overall damage detection methodology which combines the recognized sensitivity of ultrasonic waves with the localization of damage via wavefield visualization. The interpretation of the experimental results is aided by numerical simulations of ultrasonic waves in plate structures. The simulations are performed using a Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA), which represents a simple and effective tool for simulating and visualizing waveforms in isotropic or orthotropic plate-like structures.

  14. Probabilistic Elastography: Estimating Lung Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Risholm, Petter; Ross, James; Washko, George R.; Wells, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We formulate registration-based elastography in a probabilistic framework and apply it to study lung elasticity in the presence of emphysematous and fibrotic tissue. The elasticity calculations are based on a Finite Element discretization of a linear elastic biomechanical model. We marginalize over the boundary conditions (deformation) of the biomechanical model to determine the posterior distribution over elasticity parameters. Image similarity is included in the likelihood, an elastic prior is included to constrain the boundary conditions, while a Markov model is used to spatially smooth the inhomogeneous elasticity. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique to characterize the posterior distribution over elasticity from which we extract the most probable elasticity as well as the uncertainty of this estimate. Even though registration-based lung elastography with inhomogeneous elasticity is challenging due the problem's highly underdetermined nature and the sparse image information available in lung CT, we show promising preliminary results on estimating lung elasticity contrast in the presence of emphysematous and fibrotic tissue. PMID:21761697

  15. Probabilistic elastography: estimating lung elasticity.

    PubMed

    Risholm, Petter; Ross, James; Washko, George R; Wells, William M

    2011-01-01

    We formulate registration-based elastography in a probabilistic framework and apply it to study lung elasticity in the presence of emphysematous and fibrotic tissue. The elasticity calculations are based on a Finite Element discretization of a linear elastic biomechanical model. We marginalize over the boundary conditions (deformation) of the biomechanical model to determine the posterior distribution over elasticity parameters. Image similarity is included in the likelihood, an elastic prior is included to constrain the boundary conditions, while a Markov model is used to spatially smooth the inhomogeneous elasticity. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique to characterize the posterior distribution over elasticity from which we extract the most probable elasticity as well as the uncertainty of this estimate. Even though registration-based lung elastography with inhomogeneous elasticity is challenging due the problem's highly underdetermined nature and the sparse image information available in lung CT, we show promising preliminary results on estimating lung elasticity contrast in the presence of emphysematous and fibrotic tissue.

  16. Elastic pion Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, R.V.; Berg, D.; Chandlee, C.; Cihangir, S.; Ferbel, T.; Huston, J.; Jensen, T.; Kornberg, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Ohshima, T.

    1984-03-01

    We present evidence for elastic pion Compton scattering as observed via the Primakoff process on nulcear targets. We find production cross sections for ..pi../sup -/A..--> pi../sup -/..gamma..A on lead and copper of 0.249 +- 0.027 and 0.029 +- 0.006 mb, respectively, in agreement with the values expected from the one-photon-exchange mechanism of 0.268 +- 0.018 and 0.035 +- 0.004 mb in the region of our experimental acceptance. This reaction provides a clean test of the Primakoff formalism.

  17. Elastic Rock Heterogeneity Controls Brittle Rock Failure during Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenbruch, C.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    For interpretation and inversion of microseismic data it is important to understand, which properties of the reservoir rock control the occurrence probability of brittle rock failure and associated seismicity during hydraulic stimulation. This is especially important, when inverting for key properties like permeability and fracture conductivity. Although it became accepted that seismic events are triggered by fluid flow and the resulting perturbation of the stress field in the reservoir rock, the magnitude of stress perturbations, capable of triggering failure in rocks, can be highly variable. The controlling physical mechanism of this variability is still under discussion. We compare the occurrence of microseismic events at the Cotton Valley gas field to elastic rock heterogeneity, obtained from measurements along the treatment wells. The heterogeneity is characterized by scale invariant fluctuations of elastic properties. We observe that the elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation controls the occurrence of brittle failure. In particular, we find that the density of events is increasing with the Brittleness Index (BI) of the rock, which is defined as a combination of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. We evaluate the physical meaning of the BI. By applying geomechanical investigations we characterize the influence of fluctuating elastic properties in rocks on the probability of brittle rock failure. Our analysis is based on the computation of stress fluctuations caused by elastic heterogeneity of rocks. We find that elastic rock heterogeneity causes stress fluctuations of significant magnitude. Moreover, the stress changes necessary to open and reactivate fractures in rocks are strongly related to fluctuations of elastic moduli. Our analysis gives a physical explanation to the observed relation between elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation and the occurrence of brittle failure during hydraulic reservoir stimulations. A crucial factor for understanding

  18. Non-affine elasticity in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Symmetry dictates that perfect crystals should deform homogeneously, or affinely, under external load, and computing the elastic moduli from the underlying interaction potential is then straightforward. For disordered materials no such simple procedure exists, and recent numerical works have demonstrated that non-affine corrections can dramatically reduce the naive expectation for the shear modulus in a broad class of disordered systems and may control rigidity loss in the zero pressure limit in purely repulsive systems, i.e. the unjamming transition (c.f. [O'Hern et. al. PRE 68, 011306 (2003)]). We present numerical results and an analytical framework for the study of these non-affine corrections to the elastic response of disordered packings.

  19. Edge mode amplification in disordered elastic networks.

    PubMed

    Yan, Le; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Wyart, Matthieu

    2017-08-30

    Understanding how mechanical systems can be designed to efficiently transport elastic information is important in a variety of fields, including in materials science and biology. Recently, it has been discovered that certain crystalline lattices present "topologically-protected" edge modes that can amplify elastic signals. Several observations suggest that edge modes are important in disordered systems as well, an effect not well understood presently. Here we build a theory of edge modes in disordered isostatic materials and compute the distribution g(κ) of Lyapunov exponents κ characterizing how modes penetrate in the bulk, and find good agreement with numerical results. We show that disordered isostatic materials generically act as levers with amplification of an order L(L) where L is the system size, whereas more connected materials amplify signals only close to free surfaces. Our approach, which is based on recent results in "free" random matrix theory, makes an analogy with electronic transport in a disordered conductor.

  20. Design guidance for elastic followup

    SciTech Connect

    Naugle, F.V.

    1983-01-01

    The basic mechanism of elastic followup is discussed in relation to piping design. It is shown how mechanistic insight gained from solutions for a two-bar problem can be used to identify dominant design parameters and to determine appropriate modifications where elastic followup is a potential problem. It is generally recognized that quantitative criteria are needed for elastic followup in the creep range where badly unbalanced lines can pose potential problems. Approaches for criteria development are discussed.

  1. Theory of epithelial elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnc, Matej; Ziherl, Primož

    2015-11-01

    We propose an elastic theory of epithelial monolayers based on a two-dimensional discrete model of dropletlike cells characterized by differential surface tensions of their apical, basal, and lateral sides. We show that the effective tissue bending modulus depends on the apicobasal differential tension and changes sign at the transition from the flat to the fold morphology. We discuss three mechanisms that stabilize the finite-wavelength fold structures: Physical constraint on cell geometry, hard-core interaction between non-neighboring cells, and bending elasticity of the basement membrane. We show that the thickness of the monolayer changes along the waveform and thus needs to be considered as a variable rather than a parameter. Next we show that the coupling between the curvature and the thickness is governed by the apicobasal polarity and that the amplitude of thickness modulation along the waveform is proportional to the apicobasal differential tension. This suggests that intracellular stresses can be measured indirectly by observing easily measurable morphometric parameters. We also study the mechanics of three-dimensional structures with cylindrical symmetry.

  2. Towards Cloud-based Asynchronous Elasticity for Iterative HPC Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Rosa Righi, Rodrigo; Facco Rodrigues, Vinicius; André da Costa, Cristiano; Kreutz, Diego; Heiss, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Elasticity is one of the key features of cloud computing. It allows applications to dynamically scale computing and storage resources, avoiding over- and under-provisioning. In high performance computing (HPC), initiatives are normally modeled to handle bag-of-tasks or key-value applications through a load balancer and a loosely-coupled set of virtual machine (VM) instances. In the joint-field of Message Passing Interface (MPI) and tightly-coupled HPC applications, we observe the need of rewriting source codes, previous knowledge of the application and/or stop-reconfigure-and-go approaches to address cloud elasticity. Besides, there are problems related to how profit this new feature in the HPC scope, since in MPI 2.0 applications the programmers need to handle communicators by themselves, and a sudden consolidation of a VM, together with a process, can compromise the entire execution. To address these issues, we propose a PaaS-based elasticity model, named AutoElastic. It acts as a middleware that allows iterative HPC applications to take advantage of dynamic resource provisioning of cloud infrastructures without any major modification. AutoElastic provides a new concept denoted here as asynchronous elasticity, i.e., it provides a framework to allow applications to either increase or decrease their computing resources without blocking the current execution. The feasibility of AutoElastic is demonstrated through a prototype that runs a CPU-bound numerical integration application on top of the OpenNebula middleware. The results showed the saving of about 3 min at each scaling out operations, emphasizing the contribution of the new concept on contexts where seconds are precious.

  3. Numerical solution of acoustic scattering by finite perforated elastic plates.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, A V G; Wolf, W R; Jaworski, J W

    2016-04-01

    We present a numerical method to compute the acoustic field scattered by finite perforated elastic plates. A boundary element method is developed to solve the Helmholtz equation subjected to boundary conditions related to the plate vibration. These boundary conditions are recast in terms of the vibration modes of the plate and its porosity, which enables a direct solution procedure. A parametric study is performed for a two-dimensional problem whereby a cantilevered perforated elastic plate scatters sound from a point quadrupole near the free edge. Both elasticity and porosity tend to diminish the scattered sound, in agreement with previous work considering semi-infinite plates. Finite elastic plates are shown to reduce acoustic scattering when excited at high Helmholtz numbers k0 based on the plate length. However, at low k0, finite elastic plates produce only modest reductions or, in cases related to structural resonance, an increase to the scattered sound level relative to the rigid case. Porosity, on the other hand, is shown to be more effective in reducing the radiated sound for low k0. The combined beneficial effects of elasticity and porosity are shown to be effective in reducing the scattered sound for a broader range of k0 for perforated elastic plates.

  4. Elastic energy storage in the mantis shrimp's fast predatory strike.

    PubMed

    Zack, T I; Claverie, T; Patek, S N

    2009-12-01

    Storage of elastic energy is key to increasing the power output of many biological systems. Mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) must store considerable elastic energy prior to their rapid raptorial strikes; however, little is known about the dynamics and location of elastic energy storage structures in this system. We used computed tomography (CT) to visualize the mineralization patterns in Gonodactylaceus falcatus and high speed videography of Odontodactylus scyllarus to observe the dynamics of spring loading. Using a materials testing apparatus, we measured the force and work required to contract the elastic structures in G. falcatus. There was a positive linear correlation between contraction force and contraction distance; alternative model tests further supported the use of a linear model. Therefore, we modeled the system as a Hookean spring. The force required to fully compress the spring was positively correlated with body mass and appendage size, but the spring constant did not scale with body size, suggesting a possible role of muscle constraints in the scaling of this system. One hypothesized elastic storage structure, the saddle, only contributed approximately 11% of the total measured force, thus suggesting that primary site of elastic energy storage is in the mineralized ventral bars found in the merus segment of the raptorial appendages. Furthermore, the intact system exhibited 81% resilience and severing the saddle resulted in a non-significant reduction to 77% resilience. The remarkable shapes and mineralization patterns that characterize the mantis shrimp's raptorial appendage further reveal a highly integrated mechanical power amplification system based on exoskeletal elastic energy storage.

  5. Numerical solution of acoustic scattering by finite perforated elastic plates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical method to compute the acoustic field scattered by finite perforated elastic plates. A boundary element method is developed to solve the Helmholtz equation subjected to boundary conditions related to the plate vibration. These boundary conditions are recast in terms of the vibration modes of the plate and its porosity, which enables a direct solution procedure. A parametric study is performed for a two-dimensional problem whereby a cantilevered perforated elastic plate scatters sound from a point quadrupole near the free edge. Both elasticity and porosity tend to diminish the scattered sound, in agreement with previous work considering semi-infinite plates. Finite elastic plates are shown to reduce acoustic scattering when excited at high Helmholtz numbers k0 based on the plate length. However, at low k0, finite elastic plates produce only modest reductions or, in cases related to structural resonance, an increase to the scattered sound level relative to the rigid case. Porosity, on the other hand, is shown to be more effective in reducing the radiated sound for low k0. The combined beneficial effects of elasticity and porosity are shown to be effective in reducing the scattered sound for a broader range of k0 for perforated elastic plates. PMID:27274685

  6. Numerical solution of acoustic scattering by finite perforated elastic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalieri, A. V. G.; Wolf, W. R.; Jaworski, J. W.

    2016-04-01

    We present a numerical method to compute the acoustic field scattered by finite perforated elastic plates. A boundary element method is developed to solve the Helmholtz equation subjected to boundary conditions related to the plate vibration. These boundary conditions are recast in terms of the vibration modes of the plate and its porosity, which enables a direct solution procedure. A parametric study is performed for a two-dimensional problem whereby a cantilevered perforated elastic plate scatters sound from a point quadrupole near the free edge. Both elasticity and porosity tend to diminish the scattered sound, in agreement with previous work considering semi-infinite plates. Finite elastic plates are shown to reduce acoustic scattering when excited at high Helmholtz numbers k0 based on the plate length. However, at low k0, finite elastic plates produce only modest reductions or, in cases related to structural resonance, an increase to the scattered sound level relative to the rigid case. Porosity, on the other hand, is shown to be more effective in reducing the radiated sound for low k0. The combined beneficial effects of elasticity and porosity are shown to be effective in reducing the scattered sound for a broader range of k0 for perforated elastic plates.

  7. Scaling, elasticity, and CLPT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunelle, Eugene J.

    1994-01-01

    The first few viewgraphs describe the general solution properties of linear elasticity theory which are given by the following two statements: (1) for stress B.C. on S(sub sigma) and zero displacement B.C. on S(sub u) the altered displacements u(sub i)(*) and the actual stresses tau(sub ij) are elastically dependent on Poisson's ratio nu alone: thus the actual displacements are given by u(sub i) = mu(exp -1)u(sub i)(*); and (2) for zero stress B.C. on S(sub sigma) and displacement B.C. on S(sub u) the actual displacements u(sub i) and the altered stresses tau(sub ij)(*) are elastically dependent on Poisson's ratio nu alone: thus the actual stresses are given by tau(sub ij) = E tau(sub ij)(*). The remaining viewgraphs describe the minimum parameter formulation of the general classical laminate theory plate problem as follows: The general CLT plate problem is expressed as a 3 x 3 system of differential equations in the displacements u, v, and w. The eighteen (six each) A(sub ij), B(sub ij), and D(sub ij) system coefficients are ply-weighted sums of the transformed reduced stiffnesses (bar-Q(sub ij))(sub k); the (bar-Q(sub ij))(sub k) in turn depend on six reduced stiffnesses (Q(sub ij))(sub k) and the material and geometry properties of the k(sup th) layer. This paper develops a method for redefining the system coefficients, the displacement components (u,v,w), and the position components (x,y) such that a minimum parameter formulation is possible. The pivotal steps in this method are (1) the reduction of (bar-Q(sub ij))(sub k) dependencies to just two constants Q(*) = (Q(12) + 2Q(66))/(Q(11)Q(22))(exp 1/2) and F(*) - (Q(22)/Q(11))(exp 1/2) in terms of ply-independent reference values Q(sub ij); (2) the reduction of the remaining portions of the A, B, and D coefficients to nondimensional ply-weighted sums (with 0 to 1 ranges) that are independent of Q(*) and F(*); and (3) the introduction of simple coordinate stretchings for u, v, w and x,y such that the process is

  8. Error analysis for matrix elastic-net regularization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Chen, Na; Li, Luoqing

    2012-05-01

    Elastic-net regularization is a successful approach in statistical modeling. It can avoid large variations which occur in estimating complex models. In this paper, elastic-net regularization is extended to a more general setting, the matrix recovery (matrix completion) setting. Based on a combination of the nuclear-norm minimization and the Frobenius-norm minimization, we consider the matrix elastic-net (MEN) regularization algorithm, which is an analog to the elastic-net regularization scheme from compressive sensing. Some properties of the estimator are characterized by the singular value shrinkage operator. We estimate the error bounds of the MEN regularization algorithm in the framework of statistical learning theory. We compute the learning rate by estimates of the Hilbert-Schmidt operators. In addition, an adaptive scheme for selecting the regularization parameter is presented. Numerical experiments demonstrate the superiority of the MEN regularization algorithm.

  9. Elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of thermally cycled double-edge wedge specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Hunt, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    Elastic-plastic stress-strain analyses were performed for double-edge wedge specimens subjected to thermal cycling in fluidized beds at 316 and 1088 C. Four cases involving different nickel-base alloys (IN 100, Mar M-200, NASA TAZ-8A, and Rene 80) were analyzed by using the MARC nonlinear, finite element computer program. Elastic solutions from MARC showed good agreement with previously reported solutions obtained by using the NASTRAN and ISO3DQ computer programs. Equivalent total strain ranges at the critical locations calculated by elastic analyses agreed within 3 percent with those calculated from elastic-plastic analyses. The elastic analyses always resulted in compressive mean stresses at the critical locations. However, elastic-plastic analyses showed tensile mean stresses for two of the four alloys and an increase in the compressive mean stress for the highest plastic strain case.

  10. Elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of thermally cycled single-edge wedge specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1982-01-01

    Elastic-plastic stress-strain analyses were performed for single-edge wedge alloys subjected to thermal cycling in fluidized beds. Three cases (NASA TAZ-8A alloy under one cycling condition and 316 stainless steel alloy under two cycling conditions) were analyzed by using the MARC nonlinear, finite-element computer program. Elastic solutions from MARC showed good agreement with previously reported solutions that used the NASTRAN and ISO3DQ computer programs. The NASA TAZ-8A case exhibited no plastic strains, and the elastic and elastic-plastic analyses gave identical results. Elastic-plastic analyses of the 316 stainless steel alloy showed plastic strain reversal with a shift of the mean stresses in the compressive direction. The maximum equivalent total strain ranges for these cases were 13 to 22 percent greater than that calculated from elastic analyses.

  11. Elastic Shapes of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, Boris; Rudnick, Joseph

    1997-03-01

    Short segments of DNA assume shapes that minimize their elastic energy. Modeling of the various mechanisms involving the molecule - replication, transcription, packaging, etc. - requires a description of the conformations of DNA under constraints. We develop a formalism that obtains analytic expressions for shape, link, twist and extension of a segment subject to sufficient number of constraints. We apply our technique to two particular cases: a) Stretched twisted linear DNA. This is an interesting test for our formalism, especially in light of recent experiments(Strick T.R., Allemand J.-F., Bensimon A., Croquette V. Science) 271 1835-1837, (1996). The molecule remains extended until a critical twist is reached, at which point it undergoes a plectonemic transition. b) Closed circular DNA. Describing the shapes of such molecules has been an outstanding problem for some time. We obtain a family of curves classified by their deviation in link from the plain circle.

  12. The optimal elastic flagellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolie, Saverio E.; Lauga, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Motile eukaryotic cells propel themselves in viscous fluids by passing waves of bending deformation down their flagella. An infinitely long flagellum achieves a hydrodynamically optimal low-Reynolds number locomotion when the angle between its local tangent and the swimming direction remains constant along its length. Optimal flagella therefore adopt the shape of a helix in three dimensions (smooth) and that of a sawtooth in two dimensions (nonsmooth). Physically, biological organisms (or engineered microswimmers) must expend internal energy in order to produce the waves of deformation responsible for the motion. Here we propose a physically motivated derivation of the optimal flagellum shape. We determine analytically and numerically the shape of the flagellar wave which leads to the fastest swimming for a given appropriately defined energetic expenditure. Our novel approach is to define an energy which includes not only the work against the surrounding fluid, but also (1) the energy stored elastically in the bending of the flagellum, (2) the energy stored elastically in the internal sliding of the polymeric filaments which are responsible for the generation of the bending waves (microtubules), and (3) the viscous dissipation due to the presence of an internal fluid. This approach regularizes the optimal sawtooth shape for two-dimensional deformation at the expense of a small loss in hydrodynamic efficiency. The optimal waveforms of finite-size flagella are shown to depend on a competition between rotational motions and bending costs, and we observe a surprising bias toward half-integer wave numbers. Their final hydrodynamic efficiencies are above 6%, significantly larger than those of swimming cells, therefore indicating available room for further biological tuning.

  13. Elastic model of dry friction

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E.

    2013-09-15

    Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

  14. The First Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girill, T. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Boyle-Mariotte gas law was formulated in terms of pneumatic springs," subsumed by Hooke under his own stress-strain relation, and generally regarded as a law of elasticity. The subsequent development of Boyle's principle and elasticity provide thought-provoking test cases for Kuhn's notations of paradigm and puzzle solving in physics.…

  15. Valve designed with elastic seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Glashan, W. F., Jr.

    1965-01-01

    Absolute valve closure is accomplished by a machined valve with an axially annular channel which changes the outlet passage into a thin tubular elastic seat member with a retainer backup ring. The elasticity of the seat provides tight conformity to ball irregularity.

  16. PAGOSA Sample Problem. Elastic Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Weseloh, Wayne N.; Clancy, Sean Patrick

    2016-02-03

    A PAGOSA simulation of a flyer plate impact which produces an elastic precursor wave is examined. The simulation is compared to an analytic theory for the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state and an elastic-perfectly-plastic strength model.

  17. The First Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girill, T. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Boyle-Mariotte gas law was formulated in terms of pneumatic springs," subsumed by Hooke under his own stress-strain relation, and generally regarded as a law of elasticity. The subsequent development of Boyle's principle and elasticity provide thought-provoking test cases for Kuhn's notations of paradigm and puzzle solving in physics.…

  18. Least-squares reverse time migration in elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhiming; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2017-02-01

    Elastic reverse time migration (RTM) can yield accurate subsurface information (e.g. PP and PS reflectivity) by imaging the multicomponent seismic data. However, the existing RTM methods are still insufficient to provide satisfactory results because of the finite recording aperture, limited bandwidth and imperfect illumination. Besides, the P- and S-wave separation and the polarity reversal correction are indispensable in conventional elastic RTM. Here, we propose an iterative elastic least-squares RTM (LSRTM) method, in which the imaging accuracy is improved gradually with iteration. We first use the Born approximation to formulate the elastic de-migration operator, and employ the Lagrange multiplier method to derive the adjoint equations and gradients with respect to reflectivity. Then, an efficient inversion workflow (only four forward computations needed in each iteration) is introduced to update the reflectivity. Synthetic and field data examples reveal that the proposed LSRTM method can obtain higher-quality images than the conventional elastic RTM. We also analyse the influence of model parametrizations and misfit functions in elastic LSRTM. We observe that Lamé parameters, velocity and impedance parametrizations have similar and plausible migration results when the structures of different models are correlated. For an uncorrelated subsurface model, velocity and impedance parametrizations produce fewer artefacts caused by parameter crosstalk than the Lamé coefficient parametrization. Correlation- and convolution-type misfit functions are effective when amplitude errors are involved and the source wavelet is unknown, respectively. Finally, we discuss the dependence of elastic LSRTM on migration velocities and its antinoise ability. Imaging results determine that the new elastic LSRTM method performs well as long as the low-frequency components of migration velocities are correct. The quality of images of elastic LSRTM degrades with increasing noise.

  19. Least-squares reverse time migration in elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhiming; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-11-01

    Elastic reverse time migration (RTM) can yield more subsurface information (e.g. PP and PS reflectivity) by imaging the multi-component seismic data. However, the existing RTM methods are still insufficient to provide satisfactory results because of the finite recording aperture, limited bandwidth and imperfect illumination. Besides, the P- and S-wave separation and the polarity reversal correction are indispensable in conventional elastic RTM. Here, we propose an iterative elastic least-squares RTM (LSRTM) method, in which the imaging accuracy is improved gradually with iteration. We first use the Born approximation to formulate the elastic de-migration operator, and employ the Lagrange multiplier method to derive the adjoint equations and gradients with respect to reflectivity. Then, an efficient inversion workflow (only four forward computations needed in each iteration) is introduced to update the reflectivity. Synthetic and field data examples reveal that the proposed LSRTM method can obtain higher-quality images than the conventional elastic RTM. We also analyze the influence of model parameterizations and misfit functions in elastic LSRTM. We observe that Lamé parameters, velocity and impedance parameterizations have similar and plausible migration results when the structures of different models are correlated. For an uncorrelated subsurface model, velocity and impedance parameterizations produce fewer artifacts caused by parameter crosstalk than the Lamé coefficient parameterization. Correlation- and convolution-type misfit functions are effective when amplitude errors are involved and the source wavelet is unknown, respectively. Finally, we discuss the dependence of elastic LSRTM on migration velocities and its anti-noise ability. Imaging results determine that the new elastic LSRTM method performs well as long as the low-frequency components of migration velocities are correct. The quality of images of elastic LSRTM degrades with increasing noise.

  20. Elasticity of Flowing Soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas

    2016-11-01

    The robustness of soap films and bubbles manifests their mechanical stability. The single most important factor underlying the mechanical stability of soap films is its elasticity. Non-destructive measurement of the elasticity in these films has been cumbersome, because of its flowing nature. Here we provide a convenient, reproducible, and non-destructive method for measuring the elasticity by generating and inspecting Marangoni waves. Our method is based on generating an oblique shock by inserting a thin cylindrical obstacle in the flowing film, and converting the measured the shock angle to elasticity. Using this method, we find a constant value for the elasticity of 22 dyne/cm in the commonly used range of film widths, thicknesses or flow rates, implying that the surface of the film is chemically saturated with soap molecules.

  1. Preferred orientation and elastic anisotropy in shales.

    SciTech Connect

    Lonardelli, I.; Wenk, H.-R.; Ren, Y.; Univ. of California at Berkeley

    2007-03-01

    Anisotropy in shales is becoming an important issue in exploration and reservoir geophysics. In this study, the crystallographic preferred orientation of clay platelets that contributes to elastic anisotropy was determined quantitatively by hard monochromatic X-ray synchrotron diffraction in two different shales from drillholes off the coast of Nigeria. To analyze complicated diffraction images with five different phases (illite/smectite, kaolinite, quartz, siderite, feldspar) and many overlapping peaks, we applied a methodology based on the crystallographic Rietveld method. The goal was to describe the intrinsic physical properties of the sample (phase composition, crystallographic preferred orientation, crystal structure, and microstructure) and compute macroscopic elastic properties by averaging single crystal properties over the orientation distribution for each phase. Our results show that elastic anisotropy resulting from crystallographic preferred orientation of the clay particles can be determined quantitatively. This provides a possible way to compare measured seismic anisotropy and texture-derived anisotropy and to estimate the contribution of the low-aspect ratio pores aligned with bedding.

  2. Singularity computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swedlow, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    An approach is described for singularity computations based on a numerical method for elastoplastic flow to delineate radial and angular distribution of field quantities and measure the intensity of the singularity. The method is applicable to problems in solid mechanics and lends itself to certain types of heat flow and fluid motion studies. Its use is not limited to linear, elastic, small strain, or two-dimensional situations.

  3. Geometrically nonlinear analysis of laminated elastic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    Laminated composite plates and shells that can be used to model automobile bodies, aircraft wings and fuselages, and pressure vessels among many other were analyzed. The finite element method, a numerical technique for engineering analysis of structures, is used to model the geometry and approximate the solution. Various alternative formulations for analyzing laminated plates and shells are developed and their finite element models are tested for accuracy and economy in computation. These include the shear deformation laminate theory and degenerated 3-D elasticity theory for laminates.

  4. Constant-Elasticity-of-Substitution Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, G.

    1986-01-01

    Program simulates constant elasticity-of-substitution (CES) production function. CES function used by economic analysts to examine production costs as well as uncertainties in production. User provides such input parameters as price of labor, price of capital, and dispersion levels. CES minimizes expected cost to produce capital-uncertainty pair. By varying capital-value input, one obtains series of capital-uncertainty pairs. Capital-uncertainty pairs then used to generate several cost curves. CES program menu driven and features specific print menu for examining selected output curves. Program written in BASIC for interactive execution and implemented on IBM PC-series computer.

  5. Covariance Matrix of a Double-Differential Doppler-broadened Elastic Scattering Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Arbanas, Goran; Becker, B.; Dagan, R; Dunn, Michael E; Larson, Nancy M; Leal, Luiz C; Williams, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    Legendre moments of a double-differential Doppler-broadened elastic neutron scattering cross section on {sup 238}U are computed near the 6.67 eV resonance at temperature T = 10{sup 3} K up to angular order 14. A covariance matrix of these Legendre moments is computed as a functional of the covariance matrix of the elastic scattering cross section. A variance of double-differential Doppler-broadened elastic scattering cross section is computed from the covariance of Legendre moments.

  6. Analysis of finite deformations of elastic solids by the finite element method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Key, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Finite element applications, particularly to analyses of finite deformations in elastic solids, are reviewed, along with the difficulties encountered in the formulation of certain problems and in their numerical solution. Various approaches are discussed for overcoming these and other difficulties. A computer program designed for finite elasticity problems is described, and several numerical examples are presented.

  7. The elastic constants of rubrene determined by Brillouin scattering and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaqi; Manke, David R.; Sharifzadeh, Sahar; Briseno, Alejandro L.; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Koski, Kristie J.

    2017-02-01

    The linear elastic stiffness tensor of the crystalline organic semiconductor, rubrene, is measured using Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy and computed from first-principles van der Waals density functional theory calculations. Results are compared with recent measurements of in-plane reduced elastic constants c¯ 22, c¯ 33 , and c¯ 23 determined through anisotropic buckling experiments.

  8. Least-squares reverse-time migration with cost-effective computation and memory storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuejian; Liu, Yike; Huang, Xiaogang; Li, Peng

    2016-06-01

    Least-squares reverse-time migration (LSRTM), which involves several iterations of reverse-time migration (RTM) and Born modeling procedures, can provide subsurface images with better balanced amplitudes, higher resolution and fewer artifacts than standard migration. However, the same source wavefield is repetitively computed during the Born modeling and RTM procedures of different iterations. We developed a new LSRTM method with modified excitation-amplitude imaging conditions, where the source wavefield for RTM is forward propagated only once while the maximum amplitude and its excitation-time at each grid are stored. Then, the RTM procedure of different iterations only involves: (1) backward propagation of the residual between Born modeled and acquired data, and (2) implementation of the modified excitation-amplitude imaging condition by multiplying the maximum amplitude by the back propagated data residuals only at the grids that satisfy the imaging time at each time-step. For a complex model, 2 or 3 local peak-amplitudes and corresponding traveltimes should be confirmed and stored for all the grids so that multiarrival information of the source wavefield can be utilized for imaging. Numerical experiments on a three-layer and the Marmousi2 model demonstrate that the proposed LSRTM method saves huge computation and memory cost.

  9. Temperature effect on elastic modulus of thin films and nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lihong; Li, Meizhi; Qin, Fuqi; Wei, Yueguang

    2013-02-01

    The stability of nanoscale devices is directly related to elasticity and the effect of temperature on the elasticity of thin films and nanocrystals. The elastic instability induced by rising temperature will cause the failure of integrated circuits and other microelectronic devices in service. The temperature effect on the elastic modulus of thin films and nanocrystals is unclear although the temperature dependence of the modulus of bulk materials has been studied for over half a century. In this paper, a theoretical model of the temperature-dependent elastic modulus of thin films and nanocrystals is developed based on the physical definition of the modulus by considering the size effect of the related cohesive energy and the thermal expansion coefficient. Moreover, the temperature effect on the modulus of Cu thin films is simulated by the molecular dynamics method. The results indicate that the elastic modulus decreases with increasing temperature and the rate of the modulus decrease increases with reducing thickness of thin films. The theoretical predictions based on the model are consistent with the results of computational simulations, semi-continuum calculations and the experimental measurements for Cu, Si thin films and Pd nanocrystals.

  10. Improved Optics For Quasi-Elastic Light Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Harry Michael

    1995-01-01

    Improved optical train devised for use in light-scattering measurements of quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and laser spectroscopy. Measurements performed on solutions, microemulsions, micellular solutions, and colloidal dispersions. Simultaneous measurements of total intensity and fluctuations in total intensity of light scattered from sample at various angles provides data used, in conjunction with diffusion coefficients, to compute sizes of particles in sample.

  11. Using FRED Data to Teach Price Elasticity of Demand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Méndez-Carbajo, Diego; Asarta, Carlos J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the use of Federal Reserve Economic Data (FRED) statistics to teach the concept of price elasticity of demand in an introduction to economics course. By using real data in its computation, they argue that instructors can create a value-adding context for illustrating and applying a foundational concept in…

  12. Unconstrained periodic boundary conditions for solid state elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linna, R. P.; Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a method to implement dynamics on an elastic lattice without imposing constraints via boundary or loading conditions. Using this method we are able to examine fracture processes in two-dimensional systems previously inaccessible for reliable computer simulations. We show the validity of the method by benchmarking and report a few preliminary results.

  13. Linear elastic behavior of dry soap foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1996-08-10

    Linear elastic constants are computed for three dry foams that have crystal symmetry, bubbles with equal volume V, and films with uniform surface tension T. The Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams contain one, two, and eight bubbles in the unit cell, respectively. All three foams have 14-sided bubbles, but these tetrakaidecahedra have different topology; the Weaire-Phelan foam also contains pentagonal dodecahedra. In addition to the bulk modulus for volume compression, the authors calculate two shear moduli for the Kelvin and Weaire-Phelan foams, which have cubic symmetry, and four shear moduli for the Williams foam, which has tetragonal symmetry. The Williams foam has five elastic constants, not six, because the stress remains isotropic for uniform expansion; this is not guaranteed by symmetry alone. The two shear moduli for the Weaire-Phelan foam differ by less than 5%. The other two foams exhibit much greater elastic anisotropy; their shear moduli differ by a factor of 2. An effective isotropic shear modulus {bar G}, which represents the response averaged over all orientations, is evaluated for each foam. Scaled by T/V{sup 1/3}, {bar G} is 0.8070, 0.7955, and 0.8684 for the Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams, respectively. When extrapolated to the dry limit, the shear modulus data of Princen and Kiss (for concentrated oil-in-water emulsions with polydisperse drop-size distributions) fall within the range of the calculations. The Surface Evolver program, developed by Brakke, was used to compute minimal surfaces for the dry foams. Also reported for each undeformed foam are various geometric constants relating to interfacial energy density, cell edge length, and bubble pressure.

  14. Topology optimization of anisotropic broadband double-negative elastic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hao-Wen; Zhao, Sheng-Dong; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2017-08-01

    As the counterpart of electromagnetic and acoustic metamaterials, elastic metamaterials are artificial periodic elastic composite materials offering the possibility to manipulate elastic wave propagation in the subwavelength scale through different mechanisms. For the promising superlensing in the medical ultrasonic detection, double-negative metamaterials possessing the negative effective mass density and elastic modulus simultaneously can be utilized as the ideal superlens for breaking the diffraction limit. In this paper, we present a topology optimization scheme to design the two-dimensional (2D) single-phase anisotropic elastic metamaterials with broadband double-negative effective material properties and demonstrate the superlensing effect at the deep-subwavelength scale. We also discuss the impact of several design parameters adopted in the objective function and constraints on the optimized results. Unlike all previously reported mechanisms, the present optimized structures exhibit the novel quadrupolar or multipolar resonances for the negative effective mass density and negative effective elastic modulus. In addition, negative refraction of the transverse waves in a single-phase material is observed. Most optimized structures in this paper can serve as the anisotropic zero-index metamaterials for the longitudinal or transverse waves at a certain frequency. The cloaking effect is demonstrated for both the longitudinal and transverse waves. Moreover, with the particular constraints in the optimization procedure, a super-anisotropic metamaterial exhibiting the double-negative and hyperbolic dispersions in two principal directions within two different frequency ranges is obtained. The developed optimization scheme provides a robust computational tool for negative-index engineering of elastic metamaterials and may guide the design and optimization of other types of metamaterials, including the electromagnetic and acoustic metamaterials. The unusual properties

  15. The atomistic representation of first strain-gradient elastic tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Admal, Nikhil Chandra; Marian, Jaime; Po, Giacomo

    2017-02-01

    We derive the atomistic representations of the elastic tensors appearing in the linearized theory of first strain-gradient elasticity for an arbitrary multi-lattice. In addition to the classical second-Piola) stress and elastic moduli tensors, these include the rank-three double-stress tensor, the rank-five tensor of mixed elastic moduli, and the rank-six tensor of strain-gradient elastic moduli. The atomistic representations are closed-form analytical expressions in terms of the first and second derivatives of the interatomic potential with respect to interatomic distances, and dyadic products of relative atomic positions. Moreover, all expressions are local, in the sense that they depend only on the atomic neighborhood of a lattice site. Our results emanate from the condition of energetic equivalence between continuum and atomistic representations of a crystal, when the kinematics of the latter is governed by the Cauchy-Born rule. Using the derived expressions, we prove that the odd-order tensors vanish if the lattice basis admits central-symmetry. The analytical expressions are implemented as a KIM compliant algorithm to compute the strain gradient elastic tensors for various materials. Numerical results are presented to compare representative interatomic potentials used in the literature for cubic crystals, including simple lattices (fcc Al and Cu and bcc Fe and W) and multi-lattices (diamond-cubic Si). We observe that central potentials exhibit generalized Cauchy relations for the rank-six tensor of strain-gradient elastic moduli. In addition, this tensor is found to be indefinite for many potentials. We discuss the relationship between indefiniteness and material stability. Finally, the atomistic representations are specialized to central potentials in simple lattices. These expressions are used with analytical potentials to study the sensitivity of the elastic tensors to the choice of the cutoff radius.

  16. Elastic-plastic mixed-iterative finite element analysis: Implementation and performance assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    An elastic-plastic algorithm based on Von Mises and associative flow criteria is implemented in MHOST-a mixed iterative finite element analysis computer program developed by NASA Lewis Research Center. The performance of the resulting elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is examined through a set of convergence studies. Membrane and bending behaviors of 4-node quadrilateral shell finite elements are tested for elastic-plastic performance. Generally, the membrane results are excellent, indicating the implementation of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is appropriate.

  17. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  18. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  19. Elastic protectors for ultrasound injection

    SciTech Connect

    Barkhatov, V.A.; Nesterova, L.A.

    1995-07-01

    A new material has been developed for elastic protectors on ultrasonic probes: sonar rubber. This combines low ultrasonic absorption, high strength, and wear resistance, and so the rubber can be used in sensor designs.

  20. Flame resistant elastic elastomeric fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Massucco, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of materials to improve flame resistance of elastic elastomeric fibers is discussed. Two approaches, synthesis of polyether based urethanes and modification of synthesized urethanes with flame ratardant additives, are described. Specific applications of both techniques are presented.

  1. Elastic waves in quasiperiodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, V. R.; Zárate, J. E.

    2001-08-01

    We study the transverse and sagittal elastic waves in different quasiperiodic structures by means of the full transfer-matrix technique and surface Green-function matching method. The quasiperiodic structures follow Fibonacci, Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences, respectively. We consider finite structures having stress-free bounding surfaces and different generation orders, including up to more than 1000 interfaces. We obtain the dispersion relations for elastic waves and spatial localization of the different modes. The fragmentation of the spectrum for different sequences is evident for intermediate generation orders, in the case of transverse elastic waves, whereas, for sagittal elastic waves, higher generation orders are needed to show clearly the spectrum fragmentation. The results of Fibonacci and Thue-Morse sequences exhibit similarities not present in the results of Rudin-Shapiro sequences.

  2. Elastic Properties of Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.; Stan, C. V.

    2012-12-01

    The most direct information about the interior structure of the Earth comes from seismic wave velocities. Interpretation of seismic data requires an understanding of how sound velocities and elastic properties of minerals vary with pressure, temperature, crystal structure, and composition as well as the role of anelasticity, melts, etc. More generally, elastic moduli are important for understanding many solid-state phenomena including mechanical stability, interatomic interactions, material strength, compressibility, and phase transition mechanisms. The database of mineral elasticity measurements has been growing rapidly in recent years. In this work, we report initial results of an ongoing survey of our current knowledge of mineral elasticity at both ambient conditions and high pressures and temperatures. The analysis is selective, emphasizing single crystal measurements but also incorporating polycrystalline measurements and volume compression data as appropriate. The goal is to synthesize our current understanding of mineral elasticity in terms of structure and composition, and to identify the major remaining needs for experimental and theoretical work. Clinopyroxenes (Cpx) provide an example of our approach. A wide range of clinopyroxene compositions are found geologically and Mg-, Ca-, and Na-rich clinopyroxenes are expected to be important components in the upper mantle. The single-crystal elastic properties of a number of endmember Cpx compositions have been measured and these exhibit a range of ~25% in shear velocity. Those with monovalent cations (spodumene, jadeite) in the M2 site exhibit the highest velocities while Fe-rich (hendenbergit, acmite) compositions have the lowest velocities. The effects on velocity due to a wide range of chemical substitutions can be defined, but there are important discrepancies and omissions in the database. New measurements of omphacites, intermediate diopside-hedenbergite compositions, aegerine/acmite, augite, etc. are

  3. Positron elastic scattering from alkaline earth targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Luis A.; Assafrão, Denise; Mohallem, José R.

    2016-07-01

    A previously reported model potential approach [Poveda et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 052702 (2013)] was extended to study low energy positron elastic scattering from beryllium and magnesium. The cross sections were computed for energies ranging from 10-5 eV up to well above the positronium formation threshold. The present results are in good agreement with previous reports, including the prediction of a p-wave resonance in the cross section for magnesium. The emergence of this shape resonance is connected to a trend observed in the evolution of the partial wave cross section in going from Be to Mg target. This trend lead us to speculate that a sharp d-wave resonance should be observed in positron elastic scattering from calcium. The positron-target binding energies are investigated in detail, both using the scattering information and by direct computation of the bound state energies using the model potentials. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-70120-y

  4. Lattice thermal conductivity evaluated using elastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Tiantian; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Yongsheng

    2017-04-01

    Lattice thermal conductivity is one of the most important thermoelectric parameters in determining the energy conversion efficiency of thermoelectric materials. However, the lattice thermal conductivity evaluation requires time-consuming first-principles (quasi)phonon calculations, which limits seeking high-performance thermoelectric materials through high-throughput computations. Here, we establish a methodology to determine the Debye temperature Θ , Grüneisen parameter γ , and lattice thermal conductivity κ using computationally feasible elastic properties (the bulk and shear moduli). For 39 compounds with three different prototypes (the cubic isotropic rocksalt and zinc blende, and the noncubic anisotropic wurtzite), the theoretically calculated Θ ,γ , and κ are in reasonable agreement with those determined using (quasi)harmonic phonon calculations or experimental measurements. Our results show that the methodology is an efficient tool to predict the anharmonicity and the lattice thermal conductivity.

  5. Ab initio calculations of the lattice parameter and elastic stiffness coefficients of bcc Fe with solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, Michael R.; Hector, Louis G.; Trinkle, Dallas R.

    2016-10-28

    Here, we present an efficient methodology for computing solute-induced changes in lattice parameters and elastic stiffness coefficients Cij of single crystals using density functional theory. We also introduce a solute strain misfit tensor that quantifies how solutes change lattice parameters due to the stress they induce in the host crystal. Solutes modify the elastic stiffness coefficients through volumetric changes and by altering chemical bonds. We compute each of these contributions to the elastic stiffness coefficients separately, and verify that their sum agrees with changes in the elastic stiffness coefficients computed directly using fully optimized supercells containing solutes. Computing the two elastic stiffness contributions separately is more computationally efficient and provides more information on solute effects than the direct calculations. We compute the solute dependence of polycrystalline averaged shear and Young's moduli from the solute dependence of the single-crystal Cij. We then apply this methodology to substitutional Al, B, Cu, Mn, Si solutes and octahedral interstitial C and N solutes in bcc Fe. Comparison with experimental data indicates that our approach accurately predicts solute-induced changes in the lattice parameter and elastic coefficients. The computed data can be used to quantify solute-induced changes in mechanical properties such as strength and ductility, and can be incorporated into mesoscale models to improve their predictive capabilities.

  6. Ab initio calculations of the lattice parameter and elastic stiffness coefficients of bcc Fe with solutes

    DOE PAGES

    Fellinger, Michael R.; Hector, Louis G.; Trinkle, Dallas R.

    2016-10-28

    Here, we present an efficient methodology for computing solute-induced changes in lattice parameters and elastic stiffness coefficients Cij of single crystals using density functional theory. We also introduce a solute strain misfit tensor that quantifies how solutes change lattice parameters due to the stress they induce in the host crystal. Solutes modify the elastic stiffness coefficients through volumetric changes and by altering chemical bonds. We compute each of these contributions to the elastic stiffness coefficients separately, and verify that their sum agrees with changes in the elastic stiffness coefficients computed directly using fully optimized supercells containing solutes. Computing the twomore » elastic stiffness contributions separately is more computationally efficient and provides more information on solute effects than the direct calculations. We compute the solute dependence of polycrystalline averaged shear and Young's moduli from the solute dependence of the single-crystal Cij. We then apply this methodology to substitutional Al, B, Cu, Mn, Si solutes and octahedral interstitial C and N solutes in bcc Fe. Comparison with experimental data indicates that our approach accurately predicts solute-induced changes in the lattice parameter and elastic coefficients. The computed data can be used to quantify solute-induced changes in mechanical properties such as strength and ductility, and can be incorporated into mesoscale models to improve their predictive capabilities.« less

  7. Elasticity Theory of Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    given by 22 ~ S1 A (4.10) This result was first given by Kneer (1965). The case for which P is the ellipsoid Tfl- <I (4.11) can be reduced to the one...spherical grains and applied the prescription (5.9). Anisotropic polycrystals require a computation. Kneer (1965) studied textured polycrystals, in which...Some questions concerning the theory of phase transformations in solids, Soviet Phys., Solid St. (English trans.) 8, 2163-2168. Kneer , G. (1965

  8. 3-D elastic wave propagation on regional to global scales using an ADER-DG method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenk, S.; Pelties, C.; Igel, H.

    2012-04-01

    The complex 3-D material property distributions inside the Earth and detailed information on the physical dynamics of an earthquake require robust numerical methods to generate accurate results in form of seismograms. Furthermore, these simulations must be highly scalable on HPC infrastructures for realistic simulations. Possible applications are regional forward modeling studies for hazard assessment or seismic tomography on a global scale to illuminate the deep Earth's interior. The Arbitrary high-order DERivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method is well suited to simulate 3-D elastic wave propagation to capture the high frequency content of the wavefield over long propagation distances. It is able to incorporate fine-scale Earth structures on a regional to global scale using flexible tetrahedral meshing and features like h-p adaptivity and local time stepping (Dumbser et al. 2007). We were able to successfully benchmark seismograms originating from simpler 1-D layered Earth models with synthetics of the well-tested spectral-element method. The verification towards 3-D models is carried out on a regional model of Europe taking the topography of the Earth's surface and Mohorovicic discontinuity into account using the EPcrust model of Molinari et al. (2011) on top of the AK135 model of Kennett et al. (1995). For the L'Aquila earthquake (Italy) in 2009 we compare synthetic seismograms of our ADER-DG solver with real data up to 20s period and can show a very good fit between the signals.

  9. Stability of the Wave Bearing on an Elastic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin; Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical computation predicts that an elastic support can substantially improve the stability of the wave bearing if the dynamic stiffness and damping of this support are in a specific range of values. To experimentally validate this prediction, the housing of a gas bearing was mounted on elastic O-rings and the threshold of sub-synchronous whirl motion was experimentally observed when the bearing runs unloaded with a rotating speed up to 30,000 RPM. The O-ring system was also dynamically characterized by measuring its stiffness and damping at various frequencies up to 500 Hz. Good correlation exists between the experimental data and numerical prediction.

  10. A Minimal Integrity Basis for the Elasticity Tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive, M.; Kolev, B.; Auffray, N.

    2017-10-01

    We definitively solve the old problem of finding a minimal integrity basis of polynomial invariants of the fourth-order elasticity tensor C. Decomposing C into its SO(3)-irreducible components we reduce this problem to finding joint invariants of a triplet ( a, b, D), where a and b are second-order harmonic tensors, and D is a fourth-order harmonic tensor. Combining theorems of classical invariant theory and formal computations, a minimal integrity basis of 297 polynomial invariants for the elasticity tensor is obtained for the first time.

  11. Anisotropic linear elastic properties of fractal-like composites.

    PubMed

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Cornetti, Pietro; Pugno, Nicola; Sapora, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    In this work, the anisotropic linear elastic properties of two-phase composite materials, made up of square inclusions embedded in a matrix, are investigated. The inclusions present a fractal hierarchical distribution and are supposed to have the same Poisson's ratio as the matrix but a different Young's modulus. The effective elastic moduli of the medium are computed at each fractal iteration by coupling a position-space renormalization-group technique with a finite element analysis. The study allows to obtain and generalize some fundamental properties of fractal composite materials.

  12. Anisotropic linear elastic properties of fractal-like composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Cornetti, Pietro; Pugno, Nicola; Sapora, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    In this work, the anisotropic linear elastic properties of two-phase composite materials, made up of square inclusions embedded in a matrix, are investigated. The inclusions present a fractal hierarchical distribution and are supposed to have the same Poisson’s ratio as the matrix but a different Young’s modulus. The effective elastic moduli of the medium are computed at each fractal iteration by coupling a position-space renormalization-group technique with a finite element analysis. The study allows to obtain and generalize some fundamental properties of fractal composite materials.

  13. Computer simulation of martensitic transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ping

    1993-11-01

    The characteristics of martensitic transformations in solids are largely determined by the elastic strain that develops as martensite particles grow and interact. To study the development of microstructure, a finite-element computer simulation model was constructed to mimic the transformation process. The transformation is athermal and simulated at each incremental step by transforming the cell which maximizes the decrease in the free energy. To determine the free energy change, the elastic energy developed during martensite growth is calculated from the theory of linear elasticity for elastically homogeneous media, and updated as the transformation proceeds.

  14. Eulerian Formulation of Spatially Constrained Elastic Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynen, Alexandre

    Slender elastic rods are ubiquitous in nature and technology. For a vast majority of applications, the rod deflection is restricted by an external constraint and a significant part of the elastic body is in contact with a stiff constraining surface. The research work presented in this doctoral dissertation formulates a computational model for the solution of elastic rods constrained inside or around frictionless tube-like surfaces. The segmentation strategy adopted to cope with this complex class of problems consists in sequencing the global problem into, comparatively simpler, elementary problems either in continuous contact with the constraint or contact-free between their extremities. Within the conventional Lagrangian formulation of elastic rods, this approach is however associated with two major drawbacks. First, the boundary conditions specifying the locations of the rod centerline at both extremities of each elementary problem lead to the establishment of isoperimetric constraints, i.e., integral constraints on the unknown length of the rod. Second, the assessment of the unilateral contact condition requires, in principle, the comparison of two curves parametrized by distinct curvilinear coordinates, viz. the rod centerline and the constraint axis. Both conspire to burden the computations associated with the method. To streamline the solution along the elementary problems and rationalize the assessment of the unilateral contact condition, the rod governing equations are reformulated within the Eulerian framework of the constraint. The methodical exploration of both types of elementary problems leads to specific formulations of the rod governing equations that stress the profound connection between the mechanics of the rod and the geometry of the constraint surface. The proposed Eulerian reformulation, which restates the rod local equilibrium in terms of the curvilinear coordinate associated with the constraint axis, describes the rod deformed configuration

  15. Elasticity of semiflexible polymers.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Supurna

    2002-11-01

    We present a method for solving the wormlike chain model for semiflexible polymers to any desired accuracy over the entire range of polymer lengths. Our results are in excellent agreement with recent computer simulations and reproduce important qualitatively interesting features observed in simulations of polymers of intermediate lengths. We also make a number of predictions that can be tested in a variety of concrete experimental realizations. The expected level of finite size fluctuations in force-extension curves is also estimated. This study is relevant to mechanical properties of biological molecules.

  16. Analysis and Modeling of the Wavefield Generated by Explosions at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    of seismic stations, creating an extensive set of reciprocity observations. Shallow crustal earthquakes have also been extensively observed by the...recording networks. We compare these observations with synthetic seismograms generated using published 3-D crustal models for SAFOD to test...compute high-frequency synthetic seismograms in 3-D laterally heterogeneous structure using a new approach based on coupled normal modes. Applying

  17. Scattering of high-frequency P wavefield derived by dense Hi-net array observations in Japan and computer simulations of seismic wave propagations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Furumura, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    We studied the scattering properties of high-frequency seismic waves due to the distribution of small-scale velocity fluctuations in the crust and upper mantle beneath Japan based on an analysis of three-component short-period seismograms and comparison with finite difference method (FDM) simulation of seismic wave propagation using various stochastic random velocity fluctuation models. Using a large number of dense High-Sensitivity Seismograph network waveform data of 310 shallow crustal earthquakes, we examined the P-wave energy partition of transverse component (PEPT), which is caused by scattering of the seismic wave in heterogeneous structure, as a function of frequency and hypocentral distances. At distance of less than D = 150 km, the PEPT increases with increasing frequency and is approximately constant in the range of from D = 50 to 150 km. The PEPT was found to increase suddenly at a distance of over D = 150 km and was larger in the high-frequency band (f > 4 Hz). Therefore, strong scattering of P wave may occur around the propagation path (upper crust, lower crust and around Moho discontinuity) of the P-wave first arrival phase at distances of larger than D = 150 km. We also found a regional difference in the PEPT value, whereby the PEPT value is large at the backarc side of northeastern Japan compared with southwestern Japan and the forearc side of northeastern Japan. These PEPT results, which were derived from shallow earthquakes, indicate that the shallow structure of heterogeneity at the backarc side of northeastern Japan is stronger and more complex compared with other areas. These hypotheses, that is, the depth and regional change of small-scale velocity fluctuations, are examined by 3-D FDM simulation using various heterogeneous structure models. By comparing the observed feature of the PEPT with simulation results, we found that strong seismic wave scattering occurs in the lower crust due to relatively higher velocity and stronger heterogeneities compared with that in the upper crust. To explain the observed regional difference, the velocity fluctuation model with 3-4 per cent stronger fluctuation and smaller κ is required at the backarc side of northeastern Japan.

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in soft elastic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccobelli, D.; Ciarletta, P.

    2017-04-01

    This work investigates the morphological stability of a soft body composed of two heavy elastic layers attached to a rigid surface and subjected only to the bulk gravity force. Using theoretical and computational tools, we characterize the selection of different patterns as well as their nonlinear evolution, unveiling the interplay between elastic and geometric effects for their formation. Unlike similar gravity-induced shape transitions in fluids, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, we prove that the nonlinear elastic effects saturate the dynamic instability of the bifurcated solutions, displaying a rich morphological diagram where both digitations and stable wrinkling can emerge. The results of this work provide important guidelines for the design of novel soft systems with tunable shapes, with several applications in engineering sciences. This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications.'

  19. Study of Silicon Cantilevers by the Photoacoustic Elastic Bending Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovic, D. M.; Rabasovic, M. D.; Markushev, D. D.; Jovic, V.; Radulovic, K. T.

    2017-03-01

    Rectangular silicon cantilevers are studied by the photoacoustic (PA) elastic bending method. Experimental signals versus modulation frequency of the excitation optical beam are measured and analyzed in a frequency range from 20 Hz to 50 000 Hz. The procedure for experimental signal correction to eliminate the frequency characteristics of the measuring system is given. The corrected experimental signal shows a good correlation with theoretically calculated PA signal at frequencies below 32 000 Hz. The corrected experimental PA elastic bending signals for cantilevers with different thicknesses are analyzed. The experimental results allow identifying the resonant frequency (the first resonant mode) of the cantilever vibrations. These values are in good agreement with the theoretically computed values. A theoretical model of the optically excited Si cantilever is derived, taking into account plasmaelastic, thermoelastic, and thermodiffusion mechanisms. Dynamic relations for the amplitude and phase of electronic and thermal elastic vibrations in optically excited cantilevers are derived. The theoretical model is compared to the experimental results.

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in soft elastic layers.

    PubMed

    Riccobelli, D; Ciarletta, P

    2017-05-13

    This work investigates the morphological stability of a soft body composed of two heavy elastic layers attached to a rigid surface and subjected only to the bulk gravity force. Using theoretical and computational tools, we characterize the selection of different patterns as well as their nonlinear evolution, unveiling the interplay between elastic and geometric effects for their formation. Unlike similar gravity-induced shape transitions in fluids, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, we prove that the nonlinear elastic effects saturate the dynamic instability of the bifurcated solutions, displaying a rich morphological diagram where both digitations and stable wrinkling can emerge. The results of this work provide important guidelines for the design of novel soft systems with tunable shapes, with several applications in engineering sciences.This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications.' © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. A FRAME-INVARIANT FORMULATION OF FUNG ELASTICITY

    PubMed Central

    ATESHIAN, GERARD A.; COSTA, KEVIN D.

    2011-01-01

    Fung elasticity refers to the hyperelasticity constitutive relation proposed by Y.C. Fung and co-workers for describing the pseudo-elastic behavior of biological soft tissues undergoing finite deformation. A frame-invariant formulation of Fung elasticity is provided for material symmetries ranging from orthotropy to isotropy, which uses Lamé-like material constants. In the orthotropic case, three orthonormal vectors are used to defined mutually orthogonal planes of symmetry and associated texture tensors. The strain energy density is then formulated as an isotropic function of the Lagrangian strain and texture tensors. The cases of isotropy and transverse isotropy are derived from the orthotropic case. Formulations are provided for both material and spatial frames. These formulations are suitable for implementation into finite element codes. It is also shown that the strain energy function can be naturally uncoupled into a dilatational and a distortional part, to facilitate the computational implementation of incompressibility. PMID:19281991

  2. A frame-invariant formulation of Fung elasticity.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Costa, Kevin D

    2009-04-16

    Fung elasticity refers to the hyperelasticity constitutive relation proposed by Fung and co-workers for describing the pseudo-elastic behavior of biological soft tissues undergoing finite deformation. A frame-invariant formulation of Fung elasticity is provided for material symmetries ranging from orthotropy to isotropy, which uses Lamé-like material constants. In the orthotropic case, three orthonormal vectors are used to define mutually orthogonal planes of symmetry and associated texture tensors. The strain energy density is then formulated as an isotropic function of the Lagrangian strain and texture tensors. The cases of isotropy and transverse isotropy are derived from the orthotropic case. Formulations are provided for both material and spatial frames. These formulations are suitable for implementation into finite element codes. It is also shown that the strain energy function can be naturally uncoupled into a dilatational and a distortional part, to facilitate the computational implementation of incompressibility.

  3. Spectral filtering of gradient for l2-norm frequency-domain elastic waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ju-Won; Min, Dong-Joo

    2013-05-01

    To enhance the robustness of the l2-norm elastic full-waveform inversion (FWI), we propose a denoise function that is incorporated into single-frequency gradients. Because field data are noisy and modelled data are noise-free, the denoise function is designed based on the ratio of modelled data to field data summed over shots and receivers. We first take the sums of the modelled data and field data over shots, then take the sums of the absolute values of the resultant modelled data and field data over the receivers. Due to the monochromatic property of wavefields at each frequency, signals in both modelled and field data tend to be cancelled out or maintained, whereas certain types of noise, particularly random noise, can be amplified in field data. As a result, the spectral distribution of the denoise function is inversely proportional to the ratio of noise to signal at each frequency, which helps prevent the noise-dominant gradients from contributing to model parameter updates. Numerical examples show that the spectral distribution of the denoise function resembles a frequency filter that is determined by the spectrum of the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio during the inversion process, with little human intervention. The denoise function is applied to the elastic FWI of synthetic data, with three types of random noise generated by the modified version of the Marmousi-2 model: white, low-frequency and high-frequency random noises. Based on the spectrum of S/N ratios at each frequency, the denoise function mainly suppresses noise-dominant single-frequency gradients, which improves the inversion results at the cost of spatial resolution.

  4. Elegent—An elastic event generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kašpar, J.

    2014-03-01

    Although elastic scattering of nucleons may look like a simple process, it presents a long-lasting challenge for theory. Due to missing hard energy scale, the perturbative QCD cannot be applied. Instead, many phenomenological/theoretical models have emerged. In this paper we present a unified implementation of some of the most prominent models in a C++ library, moreover extended to account for effects of the electromagnetic interaction. The library is complemented with a number of utilities. For instance, programs to sample many distributions of interest in four-momentum transfer squared, t, impact parameter, b, and collision energy √{s}. These distributions at ISR, Spp¯S, RHIC, Tevatron and LHC energies are available for download from the project web site. Both in the form of ROOT files and PDF figures providing comparisons among the models. The package includes also a tool for Monte-Carlo generation of elastic scattering events, which can easily be embedded in any other program framework. Catalogue identifier: AERT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 10551 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 126316 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any in principle, tested on x86-64 architecture. Operating system: Any in principle, tested on GNU/Linux. RAM: Strongly depends on the task, but typically below 20MB Classification: 11.6. External routines: ROOT, HepMC Nature of problem: Monte-Carlo simulation of elastic nucleon-nucleon collisions Solution method: Implementation of some of the most prominent phenomenological/theoretical models providing cumulative distribution function that is used for random event generation. Running time: Strongly depends on the task, but

  5. Integrated elastic microscope device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. M.; Wright, D.; Watkins, R.; Cen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    The growing power of imaging and computing power of smartphones is creating the possibility of converting your smartphone into a high power pocket microscopy system. High quality miniature microscopy lenses attached to smartphone are typically made with glass or plastics that can only be produce at low cost with high volume. To revise the paradigm of microscope lenses, we devised a simple droplet lens fabrication technique that which produces low cost and high performance lens. Each lens is integrated into thin 3-D printed holder with complimentary light emitted diode (LEDs) that clips onto majority of smartphones. The integrated device converts a smartphone into a high power optical microscope/dermatoscope at around $2. This low cost device has wide application in a multitude of practical uses such as material inspection, dermascope and educational microscope.

  6. Unsupervised feature selection and general pattern discovery using Self-Organizing Maps for gaining insights into the nature of seismic wavefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Andreas; Ohrnberger, Matthias; Scherbaum, Frank

    2009-09-01

    This study presents an unsupervised feature selection and learning approach for the discovery and intuitive imaging of significant temporal patterns in seismic single-station or network recordings. For this purpose, the data are parametrized by real-valued feature vectors for short time windows using standard analysis tools for seismic data, such as frequency-wavenumber, polarization, and spectral analysis. We use Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) for a data-driven feature selection, visualization and clustering procedure, which is in particular suitable for high-dimensional data sets. Our feature selection method is based on significance testing using the Wald-Wolfowitz runs test for individual features and on correlation hunting with SOMs in feature subsets. Using synthetics composed of Rayleigh and Love waves and real-world data, we show the robustness and the improved discriminative power of that approach compared to feature subsets manually selected from individual wavefield parametrization methods. Furthermore, the capability of the clustering and visualization techniques to investigate the discrimination of wave phases is shown by means of synthetic waveforms and regional earthquake recordings.

  7. An investigation into the remote triggering of the Oita earthquake by the 2016 Mw 7.0 Kumamoto earthquake using full wavefield simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Masatoshi

    2016-12-01

    High-amplitude seismic waves from the Mw 7.0 Kumamoto earthquake of April 16, 2016, triggered another large earthquake 80 km to the NE roughly 30 s later. The source was located at shallow depths beneath the Yufuin geothermal field, Oita Prefecture, Japan, and the event magnitude was approximately 5.9. To date, this is one of the clearest known examples of a remotely triggered large earthquake. The triggered Oita event was followed by significant seismicity, which was distinct from the aftershocks of the Kumamoto earthquake. The Coulomb failure stress change around the hypocenter, calculated for the passing waves of the Kumamoto earthquake by full wavefield simulation, was about 0.7 MPa when the Oita earthquake was triggered, with the static stress change being an order of magnitude smaller. The dynamic stress changes likely played an important role in triggering. A return to low seismicity levels 1 month after the triggered earthquake may have important implications for seismic hazard due to dynamic triggering.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Chemical-shift X-ray standing wavefield determination of the local structure of methanethiolate phases on Ni( 1 1 1 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. J.; Woodruff, D. P.; Jones, R. G.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Formoso, V.

    2002-01-01

    By monitoring the X-ray absorption through the chemically-shifted components of the S 1s photoemission signal, normal-incidence X-ray standing wavefield absorption at the (1 1 1) and ( 1¯ 1 1) scatterer planes has been used to determine the local adsorption geometry of the two distinct methanethiolate (CH 3S-) species which occur on Ni(1 1 1) following exposure to methanethiol. The species which is favoured at low temperatures is found to occupy either mixed hollow or bridge sites on a non-reconstructed Ni(1 1 1) surface, whereas that seen at higher temperatures is shown to involve Ni surface layer reconstruction and the data are consistent with hollow site adsorption on a reduced density outermost Ni layer. The relative merits of alternative reconstruction models based on that which occurs due to methanethiolate adsorption on Cu(1 1 1), or the (5√3×2)rect. phase formed by atomic S on Ni(1 1 1), are discussed. Both of these models are based on local square or `pseudo-(1 0 0)' outermost Ni layers. Co-adsorbed atomic sulphur, to which the methanethiolate species decompose at higher temperatures, appears to occupy mainly fcc hollow sites at low temperatures, but is partially converted to the local geometry of the ordered reconstructed (5√3×2)rect.-S phase after higher temperature annealing.

  9. Elastic actuation for legged locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chongjing; Conn, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The inherent elasticity of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) gives this technology great potential in energy efficient locomotion applications. In this work, a modular double cone DEA is developed with reduced manufacturing and maintenance time costs. This actuator can lift 45 g of mass (5 times its own weight) while producing a stroke of 10.4 mm (23.6% its height). The contribution of the elastic energy stored in antagonistic DEA membranes to the mechanical work output is experimentally investigated by adding delay into the DEA driving voltage. Increasing the delay time in actuation voltage and hence reducing the duty cycle is found to increase the amount of elastic energy being recovered but an upper limit is also noticed. The DEA is then applied to a three-segment leg that is able to move up and down by 17.9 mm (9% its initial height), which demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing this DEA design in legged locomotion.

  10. Photoacoustic elastic oscillation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2015-08-10

    Photoacoustic imaging and sensing have been studied extensively to probe the optical absorption of biological tissue in multiple scales ranging from large organs to small molecules. However, its elastic oscillation characterization is rarely studied and has been an untapped area to be explored. In literature, photoacoustic signal induced by pulsed laser is commonly modelled as a bipolar "N-shape" pulse from an optical absorber. In this paper, the photoacoustic damped oscillation is predicted and modelled by an equivalent mass-spring system by treating the optical absorber as an elastic oscillator. The photoacoustic simulation incorporating the proposed oscillation model shows better agreement with the measured signal from an elastic phantom, than conventional photoacoustic simulation model. More interestingly, the photoacoustic damping oscillation effect could potentially be a useful characterization approach to evaluate biological tissue's mechanical properties in terms of relaxation time, peak number and ratio beyond optical absorption only, which is experimentally demonstrated in this paper.

  11. Elastic-plastic models for multi-site damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Actis, Ricardo L.; Szabo, Barna A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments in advanced analysis methods for the computation of stress site damage. The method of solution is based on the p-version of the finite element method. Its implementation was designed to permit extraction of linear stress intensity factors using a superconvergent extraction method (known as the contour integral method) and evaluation of the J-integral following an elastic-plastic analysis. Coarse meshes are adequate for obtaining accurate results supported by p-convergence data. The elastic-plastic analysis is based on the deformation theory of plasticity and the von Mises yield criterion. The model problem consists of an aluminum plate with six equally spaced holes and a crack emanating from each hole. The cracks are of different sizes. The panel is subjected to a remote tensile load. Experimental results are available for the panel. The plasticity analysis provided the same limit load as the experimentally determined load. The results of elastic-plastic analysis were compared with the results of linear elastic analysis in an effort to evaluate how plastic zone sizes influence the crack growth rates. The onset of net-section yielding was determined also. The results show that crack growth rate is accelerated by the presence of adjacent damage, and the critical crack size is shorter when the effects of plasticity are taken into consideration. This work also addresses the effects of alternative stress-strain laws: The elastic-ideally-plastic material model is compared against the Ramberg-Osgood model.

  12. Local elastic constants in thin films of an fcc crystal.

    PubMed

    van Workum, Kevin; de Pablo, Juan J

    2003-03-01

    In this work we present a formalism for the calculation of the local elastic constants in inhomogeneous systems based on a method of planes. Unlike previous work, this formalism does not require the partitioning of the system into a set of finite volumes over which average elastic constants are calculated. Results for the calculation of the local elastic constants of a nearest-neighbor Lennard-Jones fcc crystal in the bulk and in a thin film are presented. The local constants are calculated at exact planes of the (001) face of the crystal. The average elastic constants of the bulk system are also computed and are consistent with the local constants. Additionally we present the local stress profiles in the thin film when a small uniaxial strain is applied. The resulting stress profile compares favorably with the stress profile predicted via the local elastic constants. The surface melting of a model for argon for which experimental and simulation data are available is also studied within the framework of this formalism.

  13. Thermal Fluctuations and Rubber Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Goldbart, Paul M.; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2007-02-01

    The effects of thermal elastic fluctuations in rubbery materials are examined. It is shown that, due to their interplay with the incompressibility constraint, these fluctuations qualitatively modify the large-deformation stress-strain relation, compared to that of classical rubber elasticity. To leading order, this mechanism provides a simple and generic explanation for the peak structure of Mooney-Rivlin stress-strain relation and shows good agreement with experiments. It also leads to the prediction of a phonon correlation function that depends on the external deformation.

  14. Thermal fluctuations and rubber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiangjun; Goldbart, Paul M; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2007-02-16

    The effects of thermal elastic fluctuations in rubbery materials are examined. It is shown that, due to their interplay with the incompressibility constraint, these fluctuations qualitatively modify the large-deformation stress-strain relation, compared to that of classical rubber elasticity. To leading order, this mechanism provides a simple and generic explanation for the peak structure of Mooney-Rivlin stress-strain relation and shows good agreement with experiments. It also leads to the prediction of a phonon correlation function that depends on the external deformation.

  15. Electron-H Elastic Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    Precision calculations for e^{-}-H and e^{-}-He^{+} for S-wave scattering in the elastic region have been carried out using the optical potential approach. This formalism is now extended to e^{-}-H P-wave scattering in the elastic region. The scattering equations are solved by the non-iterative method. Phase shifts are calculated using Hylleraas-type correlation functions up to 84 terms. Results are rigorous lower bounds to the exact phase shifts and they are compared to those obtained in previous calculations.

  16. Cellular Uptake of Elastic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xin; Shi, Xinghua; Gao, Huajian

    2011-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of cell-nanomaterial interaction is of essential importance to nanomedicine and safe applications of nanotechnology. Here we investigate the adhesive wrapping of a soft elastic vesicle by a lipid membrane. We show that there exist a maximum of five distinct wrapping phases based on the stability of full wrapping, partial wrapping, and no wrapping states. The wrapping phases depend on the vesicle size, adhesion energy, surface tension of membrane, and bending rigidity ratio between vesicle and membrane. These results are of immediate interest to the study of vesicular transport and endocytosis or phagocytosis of elastic particles into cells.

  17. Reflectance and fluorescence hyperspectral elastic image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Holger; Baker, Ross; Hakansson, Johan; Gustafsson, Ulf P.

    2004-05-01

    Science and Technology International (STI) presents a novel multi-modal elastic image registration approach for a new hyperspectral medical imaging modality. STI's HyperSpectral Diagnostic Imaging (HSDI) cervical instrument is used for the early detection of uterine cervical cancer. A Computer-Aided-Diagnostic (CAD) system is being developed to aid the physician with the diagnosis of pre-cancerous and cancerous tissue regions. The CAD system uses the fusion of multiple data sources to optimize its performance. The key enabling technology for the data fusion is image registration. The difficulty lies in the image registration of fluorescence and reflectance hyperspectral data due to the occurrence of soft tissue movement and the limited resemblance of these types of imagery. The presented approach is based on embedding a reflectance image in the fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. Having a reflectance image in both data sets resolves the resemblance problem and thereby enables the use of elastic image registration algorithms required to compensate for soft tissue movements. Several methods of embedding the reflectance image in the fluorescence hyperspectral imagery are described. Initial experiments with human subject data are presented where a reflectance image is embedded in the fluorescence hyperspectral imagery.

  18. Swimming performance of biomimetic trapezoidal elastic fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spadaro, Michael; Yeh, Peter; Alexeev, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Using three-dimensional computer simulations, we probe the biomimetic free-swimming of trapezoidal elastic plates plunging sinusoidally in a viscous fluid, varying the frequency of oscillations and plate geometry. We choose the elastic trapezoidal plate geometry because it more closely approximates the shape of real caudal fish fins. Indeed, caudal fins are found in nature in a variety of trapezoidal shapes with different aspect ratios. Because of this, we perform our simulations using plates with aspect ratios varying from the cases where the plate has a longer leading edge and to plates with a longer trailing edge. We find that the trapezoidal fins with the longer trailing edge are less efficient than the rectangular fins at the equivalent oscillation frequencies. This is surprising because many fish found in nature have a widening tail. We relate this to the fact that our model considers fins with uniform thickness whereas fish uses tapered fins. Our results will be useful for the design of biomimetic swimming devices as well as understanding more closely the physics of fish swimming.

  19. Large strain elastic-plastic theory and nonlinear finite element analysis based on metric transformation tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünig, M.

    The present paper is concerned with an efficient framework for a nonlinear finite element procedure for the rate-independent finite strain analysis of solids undergoing large elastic-plastic deformations. The formulation relies on the introduction of a mixed-variant metric transformation tensor which will be multiplicatively decomposed into a plastic and an elastic part. This leads to the definition of an appropriate logarithmic strain measure whose rate is shown to be additively decomposed into elastic and plastic strain rate tensors. The mixed-variant logarithmic elastic strain tensor provides a basis for the definition of a local isotropic hyperelastic stress response in the elastic-plastic solid. Additionally, the plastic material behavior is assumed to be governed by a generalized J2 yield criterion and rate-independent isochoric plastic strain rates are computed using an associated flow rule. On the numerical side, the computation of the logarithmic strain tensors is based on 1st and higher order Padé approximations. Estimates of the stress and strain histories are obtained via a highly stable and accurate explicit scalar integration procedure which employs a plastic predictor followed by an elastic corrector step. The development of a consistent elastic-plastic tangent operator as well as its implementation into a nonlinear finite element program will also be discussed. Finally, the numerical solution of finite strain elastic-plastic problems is presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the algorithm.

  20. Numerical computation of the sensitivity kernel for monitoring weak changes with multiply scattered acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanu, Chinaemerem; Snieder, Roel

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring of weak localized changes within a medium using coda waves, we can either use the decorrelation and/or the phase shift of the coda waves. The formulation for both the decorrelation and the phase shift of the coda waves due to weak changes contain a common sensitivity kernel that is needed to image the weak localized changes. We provide a novel approach to compute the sensitivity kernel which uses finite difference modelling of the wavefields from the source and the receiver with an a priori scattering model. These wavefields give the intensities needed to compute the sensitivity kernels. This approach unlike methods that computes the sensitivity kernel with analytical approximations of the scattered intensity computes the numerical solution of the scattered intensity with a prior scattering model. The numerical solution of the sensitivity kernel allows us to use an arbitrary earth model that includes a free surface without simplifying the property of the scattering model. We demonstrate the computation of the numerical sensitivity kernel within statistically heterogeneous models and models with irregular topography. The statistically heterogeneous models we explore include a simple model for vertically fractured and horizontally layered shale reservoirs. We compare the impact of either the horizontal or the vertical source-receiver configuration on the characteristics of the sensitivity kernel. All computations of the numerical kernel we present in this study use 2-D heterogeneous scattering models, however, the kernel computation is easily extended to 3-D scattering models.

  1. Elastic dipole response of spherical nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bastrukov, S.I.

    1992-10-01

    Within the framework of the nuclear fluid-dynamics the isoscalar dipole response of spherical nuclei is studied. Two kinds of elastic-like transverse oscillations of incompressible nucleus are found to be result in E1, T = 0 and M1, T = 0 spin-independent resonances. The isoscalar electric mode is accompanied by excitation in the nucleus volume of the torus-like current structure, known in the continuum theory as a poloidal dipole or spherical vortex of Hill. The dipole magnetic resonance belongs to the excitation of axially symmetric differential rotations. These motions are described by the toroidal dipole field harmonic in time. The estimates of energies and PWBA-computed form-factors for these modes are presented. 28 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Elasticity tensors symmetry analysis using R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danek, Tomasz; Slawinski, Michael

    2017-04-01

    In this contribution we present orientation and class classification analysis of few full elasticity tensors obtained form seismic measurements. All computations were performed in R environment using both regular and custom made modules. All necessary tensor rotations were performed using qaterions and all optimzation procedures were done using global optimization methods. First of all distances to all symmetry classes were optimized and compared using many different norms (e.g. Forbenius, operator etc.). Than we used MC method to analyse measurement errors impact on obtained results. In the last step of this project we presented some consideration regarding the possible methods of most probable symmetry class determination. This research was supported by the Polish National Science Center under contract No. DEC-2013/11/B/ST10/0472.

  3. Solitary waves in a peridynamic elastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silling, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The propagation of large amplitude nonlinear waves in a peridynamic solid is analyzed. With an elastic material model that hardens in compression, sufficiently large wave pulses propagate as solitary waves whose velocity can far exceed the linear wave speed. In spite of their large velocity and amplitude, these waves leave the material they pass through with no net change in velocity and stress. They are nondissipative and nondispersive, and they travel unchanged over large distances. An approximate solution for solitary waves is derived that reproduces the main features of these waves observed in computational simulations. It is demonstrated by numerical studies that the waves interact only weakly with each other when they collide. Wavetrains composed of many non-interacting solitary waves are found to form and propagate under certain boundary and initial conditions.

  4. Solitary waves in a peridynamic elastic solid

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart A.

    2016-06-23

    The propagation of large amplitude nonlinear waves in a peridynamic solid is ana- lyzed. With an elastic material model that hardens in compression, sufficiently large wave pulses propagate as solitary waves whose velocity can far exceed the linear wave speed. In spite of their large velocity and amplitude, these waves leave the material they pass through with no net change in velocity and stress. They are nondissipative and nondispersive, and they travel unchanged over large distances. An approximate solution for solitary waves is derived that reproduces the main features of these waves observed in computational simulations. We demonstrate, by numerical studies, that waves interact only weakly with each other when they collide. Finally, we found that wavetrains composed of many non-interacting solitary waves form and propagate under certain boundary and initial conditions.

  5. Solitary waves in a peridynamic elastic solid

    DOE PAGES

    Silling, Stewart A.

    2016-06-23

    The propagation of large amplitude nonlinear waves in a peridynamic solid is ana- lyzed. With an elastic material model that hardens in compression, sufficiently large wave pulses propagate as solitary waves whose velocity can far exceed the linear wave speed. In spite of their large velocity and amplitude, these waves leave the material they pass through with no net change in velocity and stress. They are nondissipative and nondispersive, and they travel unchanged over large distances. An approximate solution for solitary waves is derived that reproduces the main features of these waves observed in computational simulations. We demonstrate, by numericalmore » studies, that waves interact only weakly with each other when they collide. Finally, we found that wavetrains composed of many non-interacting solitary waves form and propagate under certain boundary and initial conditions.« less

  6. Solitary waves in a peridynamic elastic solid

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart A.

    2016-06-23

    The propagation of large amplitude nonlinear waves in a peridynamic solid is ana- lyzed. With an elastic material model that hardens in compression, sufficiently large wave pulses propagate as solitary waves whose velocity can far exceed the linear wave speed. In spite of their large velocity and amplitude, these waves leave the material they pass through with no net change in velocity and stress. They are nondissipative and nondispersive, and they travel unchanged over large distances. An approximate solution for solitary waves is derived that reproduces the main features of these waves observed in computational simulations. We demonstrate, by numerical studies, that waves interact only weakly with each other when they collide. Finally, we found that wavetrains composed of many non-interacting solitary waves form and propagate under certain boundary and initial conditions.

  7. Nonlinear dynamic analysis for elastic robotic arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, M. H.; Rahimi, H. N.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyze the nonlinear dynamics of robotic arms with elastic links and joints. The main contribution of the paper is the comparative assessment of assumed modes and finite element methods as more convenient approaches for computing the nonlinear dynamic of robotic systems. Numerical simulations comprising both methods are carried out and results are discussed. Hence, advantages and disadvantages of each method are illustrated. Then, adding the joint flexibility to the system is dealt with and the obtained model is demonstrated. Finally, a brief description of the optimal motion generation is presented and the simulation is carried out to investigate the role of robot dynamic modeling in the control of robots.

  8. Robustness Elasticity in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Matisziw, Timothy C.; Grubesic, Tony H.; Guo, Junyu

    2012-01-01

    Network robustness refers to a network’s resilience to stress or damage. Given that most networks are inherently dynamic, with changing topology, loads, and operational states, their robustness is also likely subject to change. However, in most analyses of network structure, it is assumed that interaction among nodes has no effect on robustness. To investigate the hypothesis that network robustness is not sensitive or elastic to the level of interaction (or flow) among network nodes, this paper explores the impacts of network disruption, namely arc deletion, over a temporal sequence of observed nodal interactions for a large Internet backbone system. In particular, a mathematical programming approach is used to identify exact bounds on robustness to arc deletion for each epoch of nodal interaction. Elasticity of the identified bounds relative to the magnitude of arc deletion is assessed. Results indicate that system robustness can be highly elastic to spatial and temporal variations in nodal interactions within complex systems. Further, the presence of this elasticity provides evidence that a failure to account for nodal interaction can confound characterizations of complex networked systems. PMID:22808060

  9. Duration of an Elastic Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding…

  10. [Use of elastic compression stockings].

    PubMed

    Kallestrup, Lisbeth; Søgaard, Tine; Schjødt, Inge; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2014-08-04

    Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) is caused by venous insufficiency and is a frequent complication of deep venous thrombosis. Patients with PTS have reduced quality of life and an increased risk of recurrent deep venous thrombosis. Importantly, the risk of PTS is halved by the use of elastic compression stockings. This review outlines important practical aspects related to correct clinical use of these stockings.

  11. Duration of an Elastic Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding…

  12. HEMP. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.L.; Levatin, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  13. Pilot Study of Debt Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiner, Keith; Girardi, Tony

    2006-01-01

    This report examines the relationship between student loan debt and the manner in which that debt is described. It focuses on three forms of description: (1) monthly payments, (2) total debt, and (3) income after graduation. The authors used the term elasticity to describe the relationship between consumers' college choices and the retention…

  14. Ultrasonic wavefield inversion and migration in complex heterogeneous structures: 2D numerical imaging and nondestructive testing experiments.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Luan T; Modrak, Ryan T

    2017-09-21

    Delaminations, cracks and other defects in engineered structures often lie close to the theoretical resolution limit for ultrasonic waves. While ultrasonic waveform tomography has succeeded in detecting such features, recovery is difficult because it requires computationally expensive high-frequency numerical wave simulations and an accurate understanding of large-scale background variations of the engineered structure. Without such knowledge, small defects may be incorrectly imaged or go undetected altogether. To reduce computational cost and improve detection of small defects, a useful approach is to divide the waveform tomography procedure into two steps: first, a low-frequency model-building step aimed at recovering background structure, and second, a high-frequency imaging step targeting defects. The first is naturally formulated as waveform inversion for wavespeed parameters and the second as time reversal migration for reflectivity. Through synthetic test cases, we show that the two-step workflow appears more promising in most cases than a single-step inversion. In particular, we find that new workflow succeeds in the challenging scenario where the defect lies along preexisting layer interface in a composite bridge deck and in related experiments involving noisy data or inaccurate source parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe3C) and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G.

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe3C) and its alloyed counterparts (M3C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr2FeC and CrFe2C) having the crystal structure of Fe3C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT), all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA). Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i) single-crystal elastic constants, Cij, of above M3Cs; (ii) anisotropies of bulk, Young's and shear moduli, and Poisson's ratio based on calculated Cijs, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii) isotropic (polycrystalline) elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young's moduli and Poisson's ratio) of M3Cs by homogenization of calculated Cijs; and (iv) acoustic Debye temperature, θD, of M3Cs based on calculated Cijs. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  16. More on Estimations of Lunar Elastic Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, S.; Schubert, G.; Nimmo, F.

    2003-05-01

    Utilizing the gravity and topography data in the spectral domain to compute the admittance function can lead to estimates of the effective thickness of the part of the lithosphere that can support elastic stresses over long time scales. Data from the Lunar Prospector mission provide for a very high-resolution gravity field, especially for the near side of the Moon. Lunar topography from the Clementine lidar was augmented by radio occultations in the Polar Regions to provide a global field. In the Cartesian admittance approach, the gravity data for certain regions of interest, such as South Pole Aitken, are identified as rectangular sections and the data are derived from either the spherical harmonic expansion or the line-of-sight accelerations. The computations require assumptions about the properties of the moon and various signal processing techniques of windowing the data, to which the results are highly sensitive. Comparisons of these parameters will be presented along with applicable results. Geophysical interpretations will also be presented of the elastic thickness for selected regions of the moon. This research has been conducted at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, under contract for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. References: McKenzie, D. (1994) Icarus, 112, 55-88 Konopliv, A. S., S. W. Asmar, E. Carranza, D. N. Yuan, and W. L. Sjogren, (2001) Icarus, 150, 1-18 Asmar, S., G. Schubert, W. Moore, A. Konopliv, D. Smith, & M. Zuber (2000) EOS Trans. AGU 81 (48), Fall Meet Suppl., Abstract G71A-04 Asmar, S and G. Schubert, In Heather D. J. (ed) New Views of the Moon, Europe: Future Lunar Exploration, Science Objectives, and Integration of Datasets. ESTEC RSSD, Noordwijk.

  17. Traveltime dispersion in an isotropic elastic mantle: strong lower-mantle signal in differential-frequency residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, Bernhard; Zaroli, Christophe; Nolet, Guust

    2016-04-01

    Recently, we developed a joint forward modelling approach to test geodynamic hypotheses directly against seismic observations. By computing 3-D global wave propagation in seismic models derived from simulations of mantle flow, synthetic seismograms are generated independent of any seismic data. Here, we now show that this is also an excellent tool to study wavefield effects in a consistent manner, as length scales and magnitudes of seismic heterogeneity in the models are constrained by the dynamics of the flow. In this study, we quantify the traveltime dispersion of P- and S-waves caused by diffraction in our elastic and isotropic 3-D synthetic seismic structures. Intrinsic attenuation (i.e. dissipation of seismic energy) is deliberately neglected, so that any variation of traveltimes with frequency can be attributed to structural effects. Traveltime residuals are measured at 15, 22.5, 34 and 51 s dominant periods by cross-correlation of 3-D and 1-D synthetic waveforms. Additional simulations are performed for a model in which 3-D structure is removed in the upper 800 km to isolate the dispersion signal of the lower mantle. We find that the structural length scales inherent to a vigorously convecting mantle give rise to significant diffraction-induced body-wave traveltime dispersion. For both P- and S-waves, the difference between long-period and short-period residuals for a given source-receiver pair can reach up to several seconds for the period bands considered here. In general, these 'differential-frequency' residuals tend to increase in magnitude with increasing short-period delay. Furthermore, the long-period signal typically is smaller in magnitude than the short-period one; that is, wave-front healing is efficient independent of the sign of the residuals. Unlike the single-frequency residuals, the differential-frequency residuals are surprisingly similar between the 'lower-mantle' and the 'whole-mantle' model for corresponding source-receiver pairs. The

  18. Topological rubber elasticity theory. II. SCL networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Kazuyoshi

    1982-06-01

    The theory presented in part I [Iwata, J. Chem. Phys. 76, 6363 (1982)] is applied to networks having a simple-cubic-lattice (SCL) regular connection pattern, for which the projection matrix Γ* is computed easily. Derivatives of elastic free energies in regard to parameter λ for macroscopic deformation ∂F˜e/∂λ are computed numerically for isotropic deformations (swelling or deswelling) and for simple deformations (extension or contraction under swelling by α times). The initial arrangement of junction points r0 is assumed to be exactly SCL, and δ = d0/√νb is chosen as one of parameters in the calculation, where d0 is an end-to-end distance of the strands at the time of network formation, ν is a degree of polymerization in regard to the strands, and b is a statistical length per monomer. A repeating cell is chosen as a cube composed of 3×3×3 ( = 27) junction points and 3×27 ( = 81) strands. The following are found in this work. (1) Among four terms ∂F0,ph/∂λ, ∂F˜0,top/∂λ, ∂F˜1/∂λ, and ∂F˜2/∂λ of the derivative of the elastic free energy, the principal term is ∂F˜0,top/∂λ, which comes from the topological interaction among the strands; the phantom network term ∂F0,ph/∂λ is only a small correction to the net stress. (2) In isotropic deformations, the elastic free energy takes a minimum at λ0, a little below λ = 1; for compression below λ0, a strong postitive inner pressure, which comes from the topological repulsive forces among the strands, arises. (3) In simple deformations, the Mooney-Rivlin term appears for unswollen systems and it disappears as swelling of the network proceeds. Experimental plans are proposed which will reveal the existence of the topological repulsive interactions in the networks.

  19. Aacoustic and elastic waveform inversion best practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modrak, Ryan T.

    Reaching the global minimum of a waveform misfit function requires careful choices about the nonlinear optimization, preconditioning and regularization methods underlying an inversion. Because waveform inversion problems are susceptible to erratic convergence, one or two test cases are not enough to reliably inform such decisions. We identify best practices instead using two global, one regional and four near-surface acoustic test problems. To obtain meaningful quantitative comparisons, we carry out hundreds acoustic inversions, varying one aspect of the implementation at a time. Comparing nonlinear optimization algorithms, we find that L-BFGS provides computational savings over nonlinear conjugate gradient methods in a wide variety of test cases. Comparing preconditioners, we show that a new diagonal scaling derived from the adjoint of the forward operator provides better performance than two conventional preconditioning schemes. Comparing regularization strategies, we find that projection, convolution, Tikhonov regularization, and total variation regularization are effective in different contexts. Besides these issues, reliability and efficiency in waveform inversion depend on close numerical attention and care. Implementation details have a strong effect on computational cost, regardless of the chosen material parameterization or nonlinear optimization algorithm. Building on the acoustic inversion results, we carry out elastic experiments with four test problems, three objective functions, and four material parameterizations. The choice of parameterization for isotropic elastic media is found to be more complicated than previous studies suggests, with "wavespeed-like'' parameters performing well with phase-based objective functions and Lame parameters performing well with amplitude-based objective functions. Reliability and efficiency can be even harder to achieve in transversely isotropic elastic inversions because rotation angle parameters describing fast

  20. Elastic And Plastic Deformations In Butt Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents study of mathematical modeling of stresses and strains, reaching beyond limits of elasticity, in bars and plates. Study oriented toward development of capability to predict stresses and resulting elastic and plastic strains in butt welds.

  1. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: The case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erba, A.; Mahmoud, A.; Belmonte, D.; Dovesi, R.

    2014-03-01

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed.

  2. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: The case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Erba, A. Mahmoud, A.; Dovesi, R.; Belmonte, D.

    2014-03-28

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed.

  3. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: the case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets.

    PubMed

    Erba, A; Mahmoud, A; Belmonte, D; Dovesi, R

    2014-03-28

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed.

  4. 21 CFR 880.5075 - Elastic bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Elastic bandage. 880.5075 Section 880.5075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5075 Elastic bandage. (a) Identification. An elastic bandage is a device consisting of either a...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5075 - Elastic bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Elastic bandage. 880.5075 Section 880.5075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5075 Elastic bandage. (a) Identification. An elastic bandage is a device consisting of either a...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5075 - Elastic bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Elastic bandage. 880.5075 Section 880.5075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5075 Elastic bandage. (a) Identification. An elastic bandage is a device consisting of either a...

  7. A strain-consistent elastic plate model with surface elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, C. Q.

    2016-03-01

    A strain-consistent elastic plate model is formulated in which both initial surface tension and the induced residual stress are treated as finite values, and the exactly same strain expressions are consistently employed for both the surface and the bulk plate. Different than most of previous related models which follow the original Gurtin-Murdoch model and include some non-strain displacement gradient terms (which cannot be expressed in terms of the surface infinitesimal strains or the von Karman-type strains) in the surface stress-strain relations, the present model does not include any non-strain displacement gradient terms in the surface stress-strain relations. For a free elastic plate with in-plane movable edges, the present model predicts that initial surface tension exactly cancels out the induced residual compressive stress. On the other hand, if all edges are in-plane immovable, residual stress cannot develop in the plate and the initial surface tension causes a tensile net membrane force. In addition, the present model predicts that initial surface tension reduces the effective bending rigidity of the plate, while this reduction does not depend on Poisson ratio. In particular, self-buckling of a free elastic plate under tensile surface tension cannot occur unless the effective bending rigidity of plate vanishes or becomes negative.

  8. Analysis of rotation sensor data from the SINAPS@ Kefalonia (Greece) post-seismic experiment—link to surface geology and wavefield characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbaa, Sarah; Hollender, Fabrice; Perron, Vincent; Imtiaz, Afifa; Bard, Pierre-Yves; Mariscal, Armand; Cochard, Alain; Dujardin, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Although rotational seismology has progressed in recent decades, the links between rotational ground motion and site soil conditions are poorly documented. New experiments were performed on Kefalonia Island (Greece) following two large earthquakes ( M W = 6.0, M W = 5.9) in early 2014 on two well-characterized sites (soft soil, V S30 250 m/s; rock, V S30 830 m/s, V S30 being harmonic average shear-wave velocity between 0 and 30 m depth). These earthquakes led to large six-component (three translations and three rotations) datasets of hundreds of well-recorded events. The relationship between peak translational acceleration versus peak rotational velocity is found sensitive to the site conditions mainly for the rotation around the vertical axis (torsion; dominated by Love waves): the stiffer the soil, the lower the torsion, for a given level of translational acceleration. For rotation around the horizontal axes (rocking; dominated by Rayleigh waves), this acceleration/rotation relationship exhibits much weaker differences between soft and rock sites. Using only the rotation sensor, an estimate of the Love-to-Rayleigh energy ratios could be carried out and provided the same results as previous studies that have analyzed the Love- and Rayleigh-wave energy proportions using data from translational arrays deployed at the same two sites. The coupling of translational and rotational measurements appears to be useful, not only for direct applications of engineering seismology, but also to investigate the composition of the wavefield, while avoiding deployment of dense arrays. The availability of new, low-noise rotation sensors that are easy to deploy in the field is of great interest and should extend the use of rotation sensors and expand their possible applications.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Wavefield decomposition and phase space dynamics of the seismic noise at Volcàn de Colima, Mexico: evidence of a two-state source process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, M.; Cusano, P.

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the seismic noise recorded at the Colima Volcano (Mexico) in the period December 2005-May 2006 by four broadband three-component seismic stations. Specifically, we characterize the spectral content of the signal and follow its time evolution along all the data set. Moreover, we infer the properties of the attractor in the phase space by false nearest neighbours analysis and Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm, and adopt a time-domain decomposition method (independent component analysis) to find the basic constituents (independent components) of the system. Constraints on the seismic wavefield are inferred by the polarization analysis. We find two states of the background seismicity visible in different time-intervals that are Phase A and Phase B. Phase A has a spectrum with two peaks at 0.15 Hz and 0.3 Hz, with the latter dominating, an attractor of correlation dimension close to 3, three quasi-monochromatic independent components, and a relevant fraction of crater-pointing polarization solutions in the near-field. In Phase B, the spectrum is preserved but with the highest peak at 0.15 Hz, the attractor has a correlation dimension close to 2, two independent components are extracted, and the polarization solutions are dominated by Rayleigh waves incoming from the southwest direction. We depict two sources acting on the background seismicity that are the microseismic noise loading on the Pacific coastline and a low-energy volcanic tremor. A change in the amplitude of the microseismic noise can induce the switching from a state of the system to the other.

  10. Three-dimensional full waveform inversion of short-period teleseismic wavefields based upon the SEM-DSM hybrid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, Vadim; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Wang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    We present a method for high-resolution imaging of lithospheric structures based on full waveform inversion of teleseismic waveforms. We model the propagation of seismic waves using our recently developed direct solution method/spectral-element method hybrid technique, which allows us to simulate the propagation of short-period teleseismic waves through a regional 3-D model. We implement an iterative quasi-Newton method based upon the L-BFGS algorithm, where the gradient of the misfit function is computed using the adjoint-state method. Compared to gradient or conjugate-gradient methods, the L-BFGS algorithm has a much faster convergence rate. We illustrate the potential of this method on a synthetic test case that consists of a crustal model with a crustal discontinuity at 25 km depth and a sharp Moho jump. This model contains short- and long-wavelength heterogeneities along the lateral and vertical directions. The iterative inversion starts from a smooth 1-D model derived from the IASP91 reference Earth model. We invert both radial and vertical component waveforms, starting from long-period signals filtered at 10 s and gradually decreasing the cut-off period down to 1.25 s. This multiscale algorithm quickly converges towards a model that is very close to the true model, in contrast to inversions involving short-period waveforms only, which always get trapped into a local minimum of the cost function.

  11. Downscaling wind and wavefields for 21st century coastal flood hazard projections in a region of complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, A. C.; Erikson, L. H.; Barnard, P. L.

    2017-05-01

    While global climate models (GCMs) provide useful projections of near-surface wind vectors into the 21st century, resolution is not sufficient enough for use in regional wave modeling. Statistically downscaled GCM projections from Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogues provide daily averaged near-surface winds at an appropriate spatial resolution for wave modeling within the orographically complex region of San Francisco Bay, but greater resolution in time is needed to capture the peak of storm events. Short-duration high wind speeds, on the order of hours, are usually excluded in statistically downscaled climate models and are of key importance in wave and subsequent coastal flood modeling. Here we present a temporal downscaling approach, similar to constructed analogues, for near-surface winds suitable for use in local wave models and evaluate changes in wind and wave conditions for the 21st century. Reconstructed hindcast winds (1975-2004) recreate important extreme wind values within San Francisco Bay. A computationally efficient method for simulating wave heights over long time periods was used to screen for extreme events. Wave hindcasts show resultant maximum wave heights of 2.2 m possible within the Bay. Changes in extreme over-water wind speeds suggest contrasting trends within the different regions of San Francisco Bay, but 21th century projections show little change in the overall magnitude of extreme winds and locally generated waves

  12. Downscaling wind and wavefields for 21st century coastal flood hazard projections in a region of complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, Andrea; Erikson, Li; Barnard, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    While global climate models (GCMs) provide useful projections of near-surface wind vectors into the 21st century, resolution is not sufficient enough for use in regional wave modeling. Statistically downscaled GCM projections from Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogues provide daily averaged near-surface winds at an appropriate spatial resolution for wave modeling within the orographically complex region of San Francisco Bay, but greater resolution in time is needed to capture the peak of storm events. Short-duration high wind speeds, on the order of hours, are usually excluded in statistically downscaled climate models and are of key importance in wave and subsequent coastal flood modeling. Here we present a temporal downscaling approach, similar to constructed analogues, for near-surface winds suitable for use in local wave models and evaluate changes in wind and wave conditions for the 21st century. Reconstructed hindcast winds (1975–2004) recreate important extreme wind values within San Francisco Bay. A computationally efficient method for simulating wave heights over long time periods was used to screen for extreme events. Wave hindcasts show resultant maximum wave heights of 2.2 m possible within the Bay. Changes in extreme over-water wind speeds suggest contrasting trends within the different regions of San Francisco Bay, but 21th century projections show little change in the overall magnitude of extreme winds and locally generated waves.

  13. The asymptotic homogenization elasticity tensor properties for composites with material discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penta, Raimondo; Gerisch, Alf

    2017-01-01

    The classical asymptotic homogenization approach for linear elastic composites with discontinuous material properties is considered as a starting point. The sharp length scale separation between the fine periodic structure and the whole material formally leads to anisotropic elastic-type balance equations on the coarse scale, where the arising fourth rank operator is to be computed solving single periodic cell problems on the fine scale. After revisiting the derivation of the problem, which here explicitly points out how the discontinuity in the individual constituents' elastic coefficients translates into stress jump interface conditions for the cell problems, we prove that the gradient of the cell problem solution is minor symmetric and that its cell average is zero. This property holds for perfect interfaces only (i.e., when the elastic displacement is continuous across the composite's interface) and can be used to assess the accuracy of the computed numerical solutions. These facts are further exploited, together with the individual constituents' elastic coefficients and the specific form of the cell problems, to prove a theorem that characterizes the fourth rank operator appearing in the coarse-scale elastic-type balance equations as a composite material effective elasticity tensor. We both recover known facts, such as minor and major symmetries and positive definiteness, and establish new facts concerning the Voigt and Reuss bounds. The latter are shown for the first time without assuming any equivalence between coarse and fine-scale energies ( Hill's condition), which, in contrast to the case of representative volume elements, does not identically hold in the context of asymptotic homogenization. We conclude with instructive three-dimensional numerical simulations of a soft elastic matrix with an embedded cubic stiffer inclusion to show the profile of the physically relevant elastic moduli (Young's and shear moduli) and Poisson's ratio at increasing (up to

  14. Hulthén potential models for α-α and α-He 3 elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BHOI, J.; LAHA, U.

    2017-03-01

    Simple Hulthén-type potential models are proposed to treat the α- α and α {-} {He}3 elastic scattering. The merit of our approach is examined by computing elastic scattering phases through the judicious use of the phase function method. Reasonable agreements in scattering phase shifts are obtained with the standard data.

  15. Study of the elastic behavior of synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Na

    Synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLAs), composed of coal fly ash and recycled plastics, represent a resilient construction material that could be a key aspect to future sustainable development. This research focuses on a prediction of the elastic modulus of SLA, assumed as a homogenous and isotropic composite of particulates of high carbon fly ash (HCFA) and a matrix of plastics (HDPE, LDPE, PS and mixture of plastics), with the emphasis on SLAs made of HCFA and PS. The elastic moduli of SLA with variable fly ash volume fractions are predicted based on finite element analyses (FEA) performed using the computer programs ABAQUS and PLAXIS. The effect of interface friction (roughness) between phases and other computation parameters; e.g., loading strain, stiffness of component, element type and boundary conditions, are included in these analyses. Analytical models and laboratory tests provide a baseline for comparison. Overall, results indicate ABAQUS generates elastic moduli closer to those predicted by well-established analytical models than moduli predicted from PLAXIS, especially for SLAs with lower fly ash content. In addition, an increase in roughness, loading strain indicated increase of SLAs stiffness, especially as fly ash content increases. The elastic moduli obtained from unconfined compression generally showed less elastic moduli than those obtained from analytical and ABAQUS 3D predictions. This may be caused by possible existence of pre-failure surface in specimen and the directly interaction between HCFA particles. Recommendations for the future work include laboratory measurements of SLAs moduli and FEM modeling that considers various sizes and random distribution of HCFA particles in SLAs.

  16. Elastic heterogeneity in metallic glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, , W.; Iwashita, T.; Chuang, C.-P.; Almer, J. D; Egami, T.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Tennessee; ORNL

    2010-01-01

    When a stress is applied on a metallic glass it deforms following Hook's law. Therefore it may appear obvious that a metallic glass deforms elastically. Using x-ray diffraction and anisotropic pair-density function analysis we show that only about 3/4 in volume fraction of metallic glasses deforms elastically, whereas the rest of the volume is anelastic and in the experimental time scale deform without resistance. We suggest that this anelastic portion represents residual liquidity in the glassy state. Many theories, such as the free-volume theory, assume the density of defects in the glassy state to be of the order of 1%, but this result shows that it is as much as a quarter.

  17. Vibrations of elastically restrained frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, Carlos Marcelo; Grossi, Ricardo Oscar

    2005-07-01

    This paper deals with the determination of eigenfrequencies of a frame which consists of a beam supported by a column and is submitted to intermediate elastic constraints. The ends of the frame are elastically restrained against rotation and translation. The individual members of the frame are assumed to be governed by the transverse and axial vibration theory of an Euler-Bernoulli beam. The boundary and eigenvalue problem which governs the dynamical behavior of the frame structure is derived using the techniques of calculus of variations. Exact values of eigenfrequencies are determined by the application of the separation of variables method. Also, results are obtained by the use of the finite element method. The natural frequencies and mode shapes are presented for a wide range of values of the restraint parameters. Several particular cases are presented and some of these have been compared with those available in the literature.

  18. Elastic modulus of viral nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ge, Zhibin; Fang, Jiyu

    2008-09-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the radial elasticity of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanotubes. An atomic force microscope tip is used to apply small radial indentations to deform TMV nanotubes. The initial elastic response of TMV nanotubes can be described by finite-element analysis in 5nm indentation depths and Hertz theory in 1.5nm indentation depths. The derived radial Young’s modulus of TMV nanotubes is 0.92±0.15GPa from finite-element analysis and 1.0±0.2GPa from the Hertz model, which are comparable with the reported axial Young’s modulus of 1.1GPa [Falvo , Biophys. J. 72, 1396 (1997)].

  19. Elastic Heterogeneity in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowski, W.; Iwashita, T.; Chuang, C.-P.; Almer, J.; Egami, T.

    2010-11-01

    When a stress is applied on a metallic glass it deforms following Hook’s law. Therefore it may appear obvious that a metallic glass deforms elastically. Using x-ray diffraction and anisotropic pair-density function analysis we show that only about (3)/(4) in volume fraction of metallic glasses deforms elastically, whereas the rest of the volume is anelastic and in the experimental time scale deform without resistance. We suggest that this anelastic portion represents residual liquidity in the glassy state. Many theories, such as the free-volume theory, assume the density of defects in the glassy state to be of the order of 1%, but this result shows that it is as much as a quarter.

  20. Elastic cone for Chinese calligraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Fenglei; Li, Haisheng

    2014-01-01

    The brush plays an important role in creating Chinese calligraphy. We regard a single bristle of a writing brush as an elastic rod and the brush tuft absorbing ink as an elastic cone, which naturally deforms according to the force exerted on it when painting on a paper, and the brush footprint is formed by the intersection region between the deformed tuft and the paper plane. To efficiently generate brush strokes, this paper introduces interpolation and texture mapping approach between two adjacent footprints, and automatically applies bristle-splitting texture to the stroke after long-time painting. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is effective and reliable. Users can create realistic calligraphy in real time.

  1. Structure and elasticity of glaucophane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezacier, L.; Mookherjee, M.

    2012-12-01

    We report equation of state and elasticity of glaucophane amphibole [Na2Mg3Al2Si8O22(OH)2] up to 9 GPa, which encompasses its experimentally observed stability field. The full elastic constant tensor reveals significantly larger stiffness along (100) plane. The [100] direction is relatively softer. This anisotropy is related to the stacking of the stiffer tetrahedral units along [010] and [001] directions within the crystal structure. Glaucophane is a dominant mineral constituent of blueschist facies rock, and has significantly lower velocities compared to garnet bearing eclogites. In addition, glaucophane is anisotropic and could account for the observed low velocity layer (LVL) in the subducting slabs at depth range within the thermodynamic stability of glaucophane.

  2. Elastic sealants for surgical applications.

    PubMed

    Annabi, Nasim; Yue, Kan; Tamayol, Ali; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Sealants have emerged as promising candidates for replacing sutures and staples to prevent air and liquid leakages during and after the surgeries. Their physical properties and adhesion strength to seal the wound area without limiting the tissue movement and function are key factors in their successful implementation in clinical practice. In this contribution, the advances in the development of elastic sealants formed from synthetic and natural materials are critically reviewed and their shortcomings are pointed out. In addition, we highlight the applications in which elasticity of the sealant is critical and outline the limitations of the currently available sealants. This review will provide insights for the development of novel bioadhesives with advanced functionality for surgical applications.

  3. Stability of elastically supported columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Alfred S; Viscovich, Steven J

    1942-01-01

    A criterion is developed for the stiffness required of elastic lateral supports at the ends of a compression member to provide stability. A method based on this criterion is then developed for checking the stability of a continuous beam-column. A related method is also developed for checking the stability of a member of a pin-jointed truss against rotation in the plane of the truss.

  4. Elastic Curves on the Sphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-16

    12 = (K,, + )- (29) K 2 (see [3]). The parameter KM represents the amplitude of the periodic curva - ture function and sm denotes the value at which K...Additamentum De curvis elasticis. Methodus Inveniendi Lineas Curvas Maximi Minimive Proprietate Gaudentes, Ser. 1., Vol. 24, Lausanne 1744. 17 [10...Mathematical Theory of Elasticity. 4th. ed., Cambridge University Press, 1927. [12] G. Nielson. Bernstein/ Bezier Curves and Splines on Spheres based upon

  5. Improved Indentation Test for Measuring Nonlinear Elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2004-01-01

    A cylindrical-punch indentation technique has been developed as a means of measuring the nonlinear elastic responses of materials -- more specifically, for measuring the moduli of elasticity of materials in cases in which these moduli vary with applied loads. This technique offers no advantage for characterizing materials that exhibit purely linear elastic responses (constant moduli of elasticity, independent of applied loads). However, the technique offers a significant advantage for characterizing such important materials as plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coatings, which, in cyclic loading, exhibit nonlinear elasticity with hysteresis related to compaction and sliding within their microstructures.

  6. Teaching nonlinear dynamics through elastic cords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, R.; Galán, C. A.; Sánchez-Bajo, F.

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally studied the restoring force of a length of stretched elastic cord. A simple analytical expression for the restoring force was found to fit all the experimental results for different elastic materials. Remarkably, this analytical expression depends upon an elastic-cord characteristic parameter which exhibits two limiting values corresponding to two nonlinear springs with different Hooke's elastic constants. Additionally, the simplest model of elastic cord dynamics is capable of exhibiting a great diversity of nonlinear phenomena, including bifurcations and chaos, thus providing a suitable alternative model system for discussing the basic essentials of nonlinear dynamics in the context of intermediate physics courses at university level.

  7. Rational design of soft mechanical metamaterials: Independent tailoring of elastic properties with randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaali, M. J.; Hedayati, R.; Vena, P.; Vergani, L.; Strano, M.; Zadpoor, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    The elastic properties of mechanical metamaterials are direct functions of their topological designs. Rational design approaches based on computational models could, therefore, be used to devise topological designs that result in the desired properties. It is of particular importance to independently tailor the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of metamaterials. Here, we present patterned randomness as a strategy for independent tailoring of both properties. Soft mechanical metamaterials incorporating various types of patterned randomness were fabricated using an indirect additive manufacturing technique and mechanically tested. Computational models were also developed to predict the topology-property relationship in a wide range of proposed topologies. The results of this study show that patterned randomness allows for independent tailoring of the elastic properties and covering a broad area of the elastic modulus-Poisson's ratio plane. The uniform and homogenous topologies constitute the boundaries of the covered area, while topological designs with patterned randomness fill the enclosed area.

  8. Normal stresses in elastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioroianu, Adrian R.; Storm, Cornelis

    2013-11-01

    When loaded in simple shear deformation, polymeric materials may develop so-called normal stresses: stresses perpendicular to the direction of the applied shear. These normal stresses are intrinsically nonlinear: basic symmetry considerations dictate they may only enter at O(γ2), with γ the dimensionless shear strain. There is no fundamental restriction on their sign, and normal stresses may be positive (pushing outward) or negative (pulling inward). Most materials tend to dilate in the normal direction, but a wide variety of biopolymer networks including fibrin and actin gels have been reported to present anomalously large, negative normal stresses—a feature which has been ascribed to the intrinsic elastic nonlinearity of semiflexible fibers. In this work, we present analytical results on a model nonlinear network, which we expand to the required nonlinear order to show that due to geometric, rather than elastic, nonlinearities (negative) normal stresses generically arise in filamentous networks—even in networks composed of linear, Hookean springs. We investigate analytically and numerically how the subsequent addition of elastic nonlinearities, nonaffine deformations, and filament persistence through cross-linkers augment this basic behavior.

  9. Impact of particle elasticity on particle-based drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Mitragotri, Samir

    2017-01-01

    Modification of nano/micro-particle physical parameters (e.g. size, shape, surface charge) has proven to be an effective method to enhance their delivery abilities. Recently, advances in particle synthesis have facilitated investigations into the role that particle elasticity plays in modulating drug delivery processes. This review will highlight: (i) methods to tune particle elasticity, (ii) the role particle elasticity plays in cellular internalization, (iii) the role of particle elasticity in modulating circulation times, (iv) the effect of particle elasticity on altering biodistribution and tissue targeting, and (v) the application of computational methods to explain the differences in cellular internalization of particles of different elasticities. Overall, literature reports suggest a complex relationship between particle elasticity and drug delivery processes. Despite this complex relationship, it is clear from numerous in vitro and in vivo studies that particle elasticity is an important parameter that can be leveraged to improve blood circulation, tissue targeting, and specific interactions with cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Elastic proteins: biological roles and mechanical properties.

    PubMed Central

    Gosline, John; Lillie, Margo; Carrington, Emily; Guerette, Paul; Ortlepp, Christine; Savage, Ken

    2002-01-01

    The term 'elastic protein' applies to many structural proteins with diverse functions and mechanical properties so there is room for confusion about its meaning. Elastic implies the property of elasticity, or the ability to deform reversibly without loss of energy; so elastic proteins should have high resilience. Another meaning for elastic is 'stretchy', or the ability to be deformed to large strains with little force. Thus, elastic proteins should have low stiffness. The combination of high resilience, large strains and low stiffness is characteristic of rubber-like proteins (e.g. resilin and elastin) that function in the storage of elastic-strain energy. Other elastic proteins play very different roles and have very different properties. Collagen fibres provide exceptional energy storage capacity but are not very stretchy. Mussel byssus threads and spider dragline silks are also elastic proteins because, in spite of their considerable strength and stiffness, they are remarkably stretchy. The combination of strength and extensibility, together with low resilience, gives these materials an impressive resistance to fracture (i.e. toughness), a property that allows mussels to survive crashing waves and spiders to build exquisite aerial filters. Given this range of properties and functions, it is probable that elastic proteins will provide a wealth of chemical structures and elastic mechanisms that can be exploited in novel structural materials through biotechnology. PMID:11911769

  11. Variation of the energy release rate as a crack approaches and passes through an elastic inclusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Rongshun; Chudnovsky, A.

    1993-01-01

    The variation of the energy release rate (ERP) at the tip of a crack penetrating an elastic inclusion is analyzed using an approach involving modeling the random array of microcracks or other defects by an elastic inclusion with effective elastic properties. Computations are carried out using a finite element procedure. The eight-noded isoparametric serendipity element with the shift of the midpoint to the quarter-point is used to simulate the singularity at the crack tip, and the crack growth is accommodated by implementing a mesh regeneration technique. The ERP values were calculated for various crack tip positions which simulate the process of the crack approaching and penetrating the inclusion.

  12. A Novel Representation for Riemannian Analysis of Elastic Curves in ℝn

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shantanu H.; Klassen, Eric; Srivastava, Anuj; Jermyn, Ian

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel representation of continuous, closed curves in ℝn that is quite efficient for analyzing their shapes. We combine the strengths of two important ideas - elastic shape metric and path-straightening methods -in shape analysis and present a fast algorithm for finding geodesics in shape spaces. The elastic metric allows for optimal matching of features while path-straightening provides geodesics between curves. Efficiency results from the fact that the elastic metric becomes the simple 2 metric in the proposed representation. We present step-by-step algorithms for computing geodesics in this framework, and demonstrate them with 2-D as well as 3-D examples. PMID:21311729

  13. Accurate modelling of the elastic behavior of a continuum with the Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celigueta, M. A.; Latorre, S.; Arrufat, F.; Oñate, E.

    2017-08-01

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) has been used for modelling continua, like concrete or rocks. However, it requires a big calibration effort, even to capture just the linear elastic behavior of a continuum modelled via the classical force-displacement relationships at the contact interfaces between particles. In this work we propose a new way for computing the contact forces between discrete particles. The newly proposed forces take into account the surroundings of the contact, not just the contact itself. This brings in the missing terms that provide an accurate approximation to an elastic continuum, and avoids calibration of the DEM parameters for the purely linear elastic range.

  14. Variation of the energy release rate as a crack approaches and passes through an elastic inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rongshun; Chudnovsky, A.

    1993-02-01

    The variation of the energy release rate (ERP) at the tip of a crack penetrating an elastic inclusion is analyzed using an approach involving modeling the random array of microcracks or other defects by an elastic inclusion with effective elastic properties. Computations are carried out using a finite element procedure. The eight-noded isoparametric serendipity element with the shift of the midpoint to the quarter-point is used to simulate the singularity at the crack tip, and the crack growth is accommodated by implementing a mesh regeneration technique. The ERP values were calculated for various crack tip positions which simulate the process of the crack approaching and penetrating the inclusion.

  15. Elastic constants of a Laves phase compound: C15 NbCr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ormeci, A. |; Chu, F.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.P.; Albers, R.C.; Thoma, D.J.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1997-04-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of C15 NbCr{sub 2} have been computed by using a first-principles, self-consistent, full-potential total energy method. From these single-crystal elastic constants the isotropic elastic moduli are calculated using the Voigt and Reuss averages. The calculated values are in fair agreement with the experimental values. The implications of the results are discussed with regards to Poisson`s ratio and the direction dependence of Young`s modulus.

  16. Variation of the energy release rate as a crack approaches and passes through an elastic inclusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Rongshun; Chudnovsky, A.

    1993-01-01

    The variation of the energy release rate (ERP) at the tip of a crack penetrating an elastic inclusion is analyzed using an approach involving modeling the random array of microcracks or other defects by an elastic inclusion with effective elastic properties. Computations are carried out using a finite element procedure. The eight-noded isoparametric serendipity element with the shift of the midpoint to the quarter-point is used to simulate the singularity at the crack tip, and the crack growth is accommodated by implementing a mesh regeneration technique. The ERP values were calculated for various crack tip positions which simulate the process of the crack approaching and penetrating the inclusion.

  17. Elastic fingering patterns in confined lifting flows.

    PubMed

    Fontana, João V; Miranda, José A

    2016-09-01

    The elastic fingering phenomenon occurs when two confined fluids are brought into contact, and due to a chemical reaction, the interface separating them becomes elastic. We study elastic fingering pattern formation in Newtonian fluids flowing in a lifting (time-dependent gap) Hele-Shaw cell. Using a mode-coupling approach, nonlinear effects induced by the interplay between viscous and elastic forces are investigated and the weakly nonlinear behavior of the fluid-fluid interfacial patterns is analyzed. Our results indicate that the existence of the elastic interface allows the development of unexpected morphological behaviors in such Newtonian fluid flow systems. More specifically, we show that depending on the values of the governing physical parameters, the observed elastic fingering structures are characterized by the occurrence of either finger tip splitting or side branching. The impact of the elastic interface on finger-competition events is also discussed.

  18. Elastic Anisotro