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Sample records for elastomeric gasket materials

  1. Fluorinated elastomeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.; Dumitru, Earl T.

    1990-02-13

    This invention relates to a method of making perfluorinated elastomeric materials, and to materials made by such methods. In the full synthetic scheme, a partially fluorinated polymeric compound, with moieties to prevent crystallization, is created. It is then crosslinked to a desired degree, then perfluorinated. Various intermediate materials, such as partially fluorinated crosslinked polymers, have useful properties, and are or may become commercially available. One embodiment of this invention therefore relates to perfluorination of a selected partially fluorinated, crosslinked material, which is one step of the full synthetic scheme.

  2. Fluorinated elastomeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.; Dumitru, Earl T.

    1986-11-04

    This invention relates to a method of making perfluorinated elastomeric materials, and to materials made by such methods. In the full synthetic scheme, a partially fluorinated polymeric compound, with moieties to prevent crystallization, is created. It is then crosslinked to a desired degree, then perfluorinated. Various intermediate materials, such as partially fluorinated crosslinked polymers, have useful properties, and are or may become commercially available. One embodiment of this invention therefore relates to perfluorination of a selected partially fluorinated, crosslinked material, which is one step of the full synthetic scheme.

  3. [Elastomeric impression materials].

    PubMed

    Levartovsky, S; Folkman, M; Alter, E; Pilo, R

    2011-04-01

    Elastomeric impression materials are in common use. The impression taken should be highly precise, thus, requiring specific care when manipulatingthese materials. There are 4 groups of elastomers; polysulfide, condensation silicone, addition silicone and polyether; each differ in their setting mechanism and their physical and chemical properties. This review elaborates the major properties of elastomers and its implications on their use. The impression material is inserted into the patient's mouth in a viscous state and transforms into viscoelastic state, upon withdrawal, influencing the residual deformation. The requirements are minimal residual deformation or maximal elastic recovery. As the mouth is a wet environment a major consideration is hydrophilicity. The wettability which is estimated by measuring either the contact angle of a droplet of water and the substrate post setting or the contact angle of a droplet of impression material and the wet tooth pre setting, determines the interaction of the material with both mouth fluids and gypsum. As the primary end target is to obtain a model depicting accurately the oral details, an attention to the impressions' compatibility with gypsum should also be given. Many studies were conducted to get a thorough understanding of the hydrophilic properties of each material, and the mechanism utilized, such as surfactants in hydrophilic PVS. Polyether is the only material that is truly hydrophilic; it exhibits the lowest contact angle, during and after setting. Recent studies show that during setting the Polyether hydrophilicity is increased compared to the condition after setting. Dimensional stability, a crucial property of the impression, is affected by the physical and chemical attributes of the material, such as its tear strength. Polysulfide has the highest tear strength. Tear Strength is affected by two major parameters, viscosity, a built-in property, and how fast the impression is pulled out of the mouth, the

  4. UV Curable Elastomeric Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    toluene, or xylene at levels as high as 600 g /L. Despite this fact, these coatings are currently exempt from 1998 National Emissions Standards for...resin with solvents and fillers, with a VOC of approximately 432 g /L. Current spray operations at Site 4, Plant 42, have a robotic spray system for...E-mail: dhess@arc-tech.com Material Supplier John Inks Northrop Grumman One Hornet Way El Segundo, CA 90245 Phone: 310-505-1260 E-mail

  5. Comparison of elastomeric impression materials' thixotropic behavior.

    PubMed

    Tolidis, K; Tortopidist, D; Gerasimou, P; Theocharidou, A; Boutsiouki, C

    2013-06-01

    The improved flow characteristics of new elastomeric impression materials are significant factors in the selection ofsuitableproductsfor clinical applications. The aim of this study was to assess the thixotropic behavior and compare the flow characteristics of seven different elastomeric impression materials using a shark fin test. One polyvinylsiloxane showed the highest shark fin height values, while the newly formed vinylsiloxanether material exhibited no significant differences when compared with two polyvinylsiloxanes. One of the five polyvinylosiloxanes presented significantly lower shark fin values than all other materials. It was concluded that flow characteristics for most of the tested materials are acceptable.

  6. Friction and abrasion of elastomeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    An abrasion apparatus is described. Experimental measurements are reported for four representative elastomeric materials, including a typical high-quality tire tread material and a possible replacement material for aircraft tire treads based on transpolypentenamer (TPPR). Measurements are carried out at different levels of frictional work input, corresponding to different severities of wear, and at both ambient temperature and at 100 C. Results indicate the marked superiority in abrasion resistance of the material based on TPPR, especially at 100 C, in comparison with the other materials examined.

  7. The development and testing of asbestos-free gasket materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, W.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Of the 27 vendors contacted, 11 submitted asbestos-free gasket materials for thermal analysis followed by hydrostatic pressure testing, steam pressure testing, and fire testing. Virtually all were acceptable up to 400 C (air-free), and most were stable to 700 C. Several can be used to over 900 C in air or gases, since they are ceramic. Several graphitic gaskets are serviceable to 900 C in absence of air. Several performed well in steam pressure testing to 315 C, requiring a single adjustment in bolt/flange pressure after pressurization. Many acquired a compression set and consequent slight pressure loss, but responded well to bolt tightening. All except one are made of compressed ceramic or graphite fiber with 0-35 wt% binder, hence was inelastic but malleable/compressible. The large number of ceramic-and graphitic-based gasket materials obviated the need for further development; efforts were concentrated on critical evaluation of the off-the-shelf available materials, in comparison with asbestos.

  8. Optimization of Gasket Materials for Metal Packing Containers for Mortar Ammunition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    The current contractor (B-Way Corporation) performed the tests in October 2001 and agreed that the neoprene gasket performs as well or even better...butadinene (SBR) Ethylene propylene diene ( EPDM ) Natural rubber (60) Natural rubber (40) 120-mm metal container 81-mm metal container Gasket materials 16...environment and material testing . Based on successful testing , an engineering change proposal (ECP) will be submitted to implement the best gasket material

  9. NMR Imaging of Elastomeric Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-30

    on ’everse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP nuclear magnetic resonance , imaging, elastomers, tires, composites, porous...correspondence should be addressed 1i ABSTRACT Nuclear magnetic resonance images have been obtained for four porous glass disks of different porosities...INDEX HEADINGS: NMR imaging Porous materials Spin relaxation 2. I0J INTRODUCTION Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has seen increasing use in the

  10. Hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Frank; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jurgen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the initial hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials. Initial water contact angles were studied on thin unset and set films of one polyether and six polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials using high-resolution drop shape analysis at drop ages of 1 and 3 seconds. All unset PVS materials were very hydrophobic initially but showed different kinetics of hydrophilization. In contrast, the unset polyether was more hydrophilic initially but lacked distinct hydrophilization. All impression materials showed statistically significant contact angle differences between unset and set surfaces (P < .05). Dependent on the drop age, two PVS materials reached or exceeded the hydrophilicity of the polyether (P < .05). It can be concluded that studies on the wetting behavior of elastomeric impression materials should consider both the experimental drop age and set and unset material surfaces.

  11. Ultrasonic monitoring of the setting of silicone elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Chie; Murayama, Ryosuke; Furuichi, Tetsuya; Imai, Arisa; Suda, Shunichi; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-01-31

    This study used an ultrasonic measurement device to monitor the setting behavior of silicone elastomeric impression materials, and the influence of temperature on setting behavior was determined. The ultrasonic device consisted of a pulser-receiver, transducers, and an oscilloscope. The two-way transit time through the mixing material was divided by two to account for the down-and-back travel path; then it was multiplied by the sonic velocity. Analysis of variance and the Tukey honest significant difference test were used. In the early stages of the setting process, most of the ultrasonic energy was absorbed by the elastomers and the second echoes were relatively weak. As the elastomers hardened, the sonic velocities increased until they plateaued. The changes in sonic velocities varied among the elastomers tested, and were affected by temperature conditions. The ultrasonic method used in this study has considerable potential for determining the setting processes of elastomeric impression materials.

  12. Evaluation of dimensional stability of autoclavable elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Surendra, G P; Anjum, Ayesha; Satish Babu, C L; Shetty, Shilpa

    2011-03-01

    Impressions are important sources of cross contamination between patients and dental laboratories. As a part of infection control impressions contaminated with variety of micro-organisms via blood and oral secretions should be cleaned and disinfected or sterilized before being handled in dental laboratory. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on dimensional stability of elastomeric impression material (polyvinyl siloxane-Affinis). In this in vitro study standardized stainless steel die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. Polyvinyl siloxane (Affinis) light body and putty viscosity elastomeric impression materials were used. A total of 40 impressions of the stainless steel die were made and numeric coding system was used to identify the samples. Measurements were made using a measuring microscope. Distance between the cross lines CD and C'D' reproduced in the impression were measured before autoclaving, immediately after autoclaving and 24 hours after autoclaving and dimensional change was calculated. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. The mean difference in dimensional change between the three groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). However the results revealed that there was higher mean dimensional change immediately after autoclaving when compared to the other 2 time intervals. It is desirable to delay the casting of an autoclavable elastomeric impression material by about 24 hours. Though disinfection of impression is routinely followed autoclaving of impression is an effective method of sterilization.

  13. Wettability of elastomeric impression materials and voids in gypsum casts.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D R; Mikesell, J W; Sandrik, J L

    1991-08-01

    Numerous factors are involved in making an accurate void-free dental artificial stone cast or die. The relationship of the wettability of an elastomeric impression material and its interaction with the gypsum slurry is an important factor. This study examined the relative "pourability" of several impression materials by counting the number of resultant voids in artificial stone casts containing 48 point angles. Those elastomers that exhibited the lowest contact angle with water produced artificial stone casts with the fewest voids. Surfactants applied to the impression material significantly reduced the number of voids in artificial stone casts, as did modified elastomers designated by the manufacturer as hydrophilic.

  14. Soft hydrogel materials from elastomeric gluten-mimetic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Mehran; Scott, Shane; Wan, Fan; Dick, Scott; Harden, James; Biomolecular Assemblies Team

    2014-03-01

    Elastomeric proteins are ubiquitous in both animal and plant tissues, where they are responsible for the elastic response and mechanical resilience of tissues. In addition to fundamental interest in the molecular origins of their elastic behaviour, this class of proteins has great potential for use in biomaterial applications. The structural and elastomeric properties of these proteins are thought to be controlled by a subtle balance between hydrophobic interactions and entropic effects, and in many cases their characteristic properties can be recapitulated by multi-block protein polymers formed from repeats of short, characteristic polypeptide motifs. We have developed biomimetic multi-block protein polymers based on variants of several elastomeric gluten consensus sequences. These proteins include constituents designed to maximize their solubility in aqueous solution and minimize the formation of extended secondary structure. Thus, they are examples of elastic intrinsically disordered proteins. In addition, the proteins have distributed tyrosine residues which allow for inter-molecular crosslinking to form hydrogel networks. In this talk, we present experimental and simulation studies of the molecular and materials properties of these proteins and their assemblies.

  15. Long-time dynamic compatibility of elastomeric materials with hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.; Cuddihy, E. F.; Fedors, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    The tensile property surfaces for two elastomeric materials, EPT-10 and AF-E-332, were generated in air and in liquid hydrazine environments using constant strain rate tensile tests over a range of temperatures and elongation rates. These results were used to predict the time-to-rupture for these materials in hydrazine as a function of temperature and amount of strain covering a span of operating times from less than a minute to twenty years. The results of limited sheet-folding tests and their relationship to the tensile failure boundary are presented and discussed.

  16. Performance testing of elastomeric seal materials under low and high temperature conditions: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    BRONOWSKI,DAVID R.

    2000-06-01

    The US Department of Energy Offices of Defense Programs and Civilian Radioactive Waste Management jointly sponsored a program to evaluate elastomeric O-ring seal materials for radioactive material shipping containers. The report presents the results of low- and high-temperature tests conducted on 27 common elastomeric compounds.

  17. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracies Using Two Elastomeric Impression Materials in Casting Three-dimensional Tool Marks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two types of impression materials which were frequently used for casting three-dimensional tool marks in China, namely (i) dental impression material and (ii) special elastomeric impression material for tool mark casting. The two different elastomeric impression materials were compared under equal conditions. The parameters measured were dimensional accuracies, the number of air bubbles, the ease of use, and the sharpness and quality of the individual characteristics present on casts. The results showed that dental impression material had the advantage of special elastomeric impression material in casting tool marks in crime scenes; hence, it combined ease of use, dimensional accuracy, sharpness and high quality.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Comparison.

    PubMed

    Re, Dino; De Angelis, Francesco; Augusti, Gabriele; Augusti, Davide; Caputi, Sergio; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although new elastomeric impression materials have been introduced into the market, there are still insufficient data about their mechanical features. The tensile properties of 17 hydrophilic impression materials with different consistencies were compared. Materials and Methods. 12 vinylpolysiloxane, 2 polyether, and 3 hybrid vinylpolyether silicone-based impression materials were tested. For each material, 10 dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated (n = 10), according to the ISO 37:2005 specifications, and loaded in tension until failure. Mean values for tensile strength, yield strength, strain at break, and strain at yield point were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Results. Vinylpolysiloxanes consistently showed higher tensile strength values than polyethers. Heavy-body materials showed higher tensile strength than the light bodies from the same manufacturer. Among the light bodies, the highest yield strength was achieved by the hybrid vinylpolyether silicone (2.70 MPa). Polyethers showed the lowest tensile (1.44 MPa) and yield (0.94 MPa) strengths, regardless of the viscosity. Conclusion. The choice of an impression material should be based on the specific physical behavior of the elastomer. The light-body vinylpolyether silicone showed high tensile strength, yield strength, and adequate strain at yield/brake; those features might help to reduce tearing phenomena in the thin interproximal and crevicular areas.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Comparison

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Francesco; Caputi, Sergio; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although new elastomeric impression materials have been introduced into the market, there are still insufficient data about their mechanical features. The tensile properties of 17 hydrophilic impression materials with different consistencies were compared. Materials and Methods. 12 vinylpolysiloxane, 2 polyether, and 3 hybrid vinylpolyether silicone-based impression materials were tested. For each material, 10 dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated (n = 10), according to the ISO 37:2005 specifications, and loaded in tension until failure. Mean values for tensile strength, yield strength, strain at break, and strain at yield point were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Results. Vinylpolysiloxanes consistently showed higher tensile strength values than polyethers. Heavy-body materials showed higher tensile strength than the light bodies from the same manufacturer. Among the light bodies, the highest yield strength was achieved by the hybrid vinylpolyether silicone (2.70 MPa). Polyethers showed the lowest tensile (1.44 MPa) and yield (0.94 MPa) strengths, regardless of the viscosity. Conclusion. The choice of an impression material should be based on the specific physical behavior of the elastomer. The light-body vinylpolyether silicone showed high tensile strength, yield strength, and adequate strain at yield/brake; those features might help to reduce tearing phenomena in the thin interproximal and crevicular areas. PMID:26693227

  20. 46 CFR 42.15-30 - Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or other equivalent material fitted with gaskets...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of 4.25 shall not exceed the minimum ultimate strength of the material. They shall be so designed as... more than 328 feet in length. (2) The strength and stiffness of covers made of materials other than... other equivalent material fitted with gaskets and clamping devices. 42.15-30 Section 42.15-30...

  1. Recording surface detail on moist surfaces with elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    McCabe, J F; Carrick, T E

    2006-03-01

    The objective was to assess the ability to accurately record detail on moist surfaces for three elastomeric impression materials derived from different polymers. One polyvinylsiloxane, one polyether and one hybrid material containing a copolymer of siloxane and polyether polymers were used. Impressions were recorded of moist gypsum casts having both a shallow (approximately 20 microm) and deep (approximately 180 microm) groove reproduced on their surface. The grooves in the casts and in the impressions were profiled using a non-contacting laser profilometer Comparisons were made between the groove depths in the casts and impressions (paired t-test). The results indicated that all of the tested materials accurately recorded dimensions in the x-y plane. However, there was evidence that the polyether and hybrid materials were more accurate than the polyvinylsiloxane in recording the true depths of the deep grooves (z plane) under moist conditions. It was concluded that the more hydrophilic nature of the polyether and hybrid materials enabled them to record more accurate impressions of moist surfaces, particularly in areas of difficult access as modelled by the deep grooves.

  2. Development and Evaluation of Elastomeric Materials for Geothermal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Kalfayan, S. H.; Reilly, W. W.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Mosesman, I. D.; Ingham, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    A material was formulated having about 250-350 psi tensile strength and 30-80 percent elongation at 260 C for at least 24 hours in simulated brine. The relationship between these laboratory test results and sealing performance in actual or simulated test conditions is not entirely clear; however, it is believed that no conventional formation or casing packer design is likely to perform well using these materials. The synthetic effort focused on high temperature block copolymers and development of curable polystyrene. Procedures were worked out for synthesizing these new materials. Initial results with heat-cured unfilled polystyrene 'gum' at 260 C indicate a tensile strength of about 50 psi. Cast films of the first sample of polyphenyl quinoxaline-polystyrene block copolymer, which has 'graft-block' structure consisting of a polystyrene chain with pendant polyphenyl quinoxaline groups, show elastomeric behavior in the required temperature range. Its tensile strength and elongation at 260 C were 220-350 psi and 18-36 percent, respectively. All of these materials also showed satisfactory hydrolytic stability.

  3. Rheological properties of elastomeric impression materials before and during setting.

    PubMed

    McCabe, J F; Arikawa, H

    1998-11-01

    In this study, we examined the rheological properties of elastomeric impression materials, both before and during setting, to assess the clinical significance of certain key characteristics such as viscosity, pseudoplasticity, and the rate of development of elasticity. The hypothesis to be tested was that monitoring the change in tan delta is the most appropriate means of monitoring the setting characteristics of elastomers. The loss tangent (tan delta) and the dynamic viscosity (eta') for five impression materials (both unmixed pastes and mixed/setting materials) were measured by means of a controlled-stress rheometer in a cone/plate configuration. For unmixed pastes, tests were performed at various frequencies (0.1 to 10 Hz) and torques (from 1 to 50 x 10(-4) Nm), while testing on setting materials was performed at constant frequency (1 Hz) and torque (3 x 10(-3) Nm). Most base and catalyst pastes were pseudoplastic before being mixed. Immediately after being mixed, the polyether (tan delta = 9.85) and polysulfide (tan delta = 9.54) elastomers showed tan delta markedly higher than those of other mixed materials (tan delta = 4.96 to 3.01). The polyvinylsiloxane elastomers showed lower initial tan delta, which rapidly reduced even further with time. This suggests that these materials should be used as soon as possible after being mixed. The polyether elastomer had a comparatively long induction period during which the tan delta remained at a high value. These characteristics are thought to be key factors in controlling clinical efficacy and therefore support the hypothesis that monitoring tan delta is an appropriate method for evaluating the setting characteristics of elastomers. One limitation was that the controlled-stress rheometer was unable to monitor rheological properties through to completion of setting.

  4. Compatibility of elastomeric impression materials for use as soft tissue casts.

    PubMed

    Beyak, B L; Chee, W W

    1996-11-01

    The communication of soft tissue contours from the clinical situation to the laboratory technician through the laboratory phases of the dental implant restoration is enhanced with the use of soft tissue casts. Modern elastomeric impression materials can function well as both the master impression and soft tissue cast materials. The purpose of this study was to test the compatibility of a variety of elastomeric impression materials and commercially available soft tissue cast materials with various matrix impression materials. Chemical interaction between the materials may result in adhesion or inhibition of the set of the soft tissue cast material. The results of this study indicated that consideration must be given to material compatibility if predictably successful results are to be achieved in soft tissue cast fabrication.

  5. Elastomeric Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    van Eldijk, Mark B.; McGann, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Elastomeric polypeptides are very interesting biopolymers and are characterized by rubber-like elasticity, large extensibility before rupture, reversible deformation without loss of energy, and high resilience upon stretching. Their useful properties have motivated their use in a wide variety of materials and biological applications. This chapter focuses on elastin and resilin – two elastomeric biopolymers – and the recombinant polypeptides derived from them (elastin-like polypeptides and resilin-like polypeptides). This chapter also discusses the applications of these recombinant polypeptides in the fields of purification, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:21826606

  6. A laboratory study of dimensional changes for three elastomeric impression materials using custom and stock trays.

    PubMed

    Boulton, J L; Gage, J P; Vincent, P F; Basford, K E

    1996-12-01

    Clinical success of fixed prosthodontic procedures is dependent in part upon the dimensional accuracy of elastomeric impression materials and impression procedures. Three elastomeric impression materials were used in custom and stock trays to determine the accuracy of impressions taken from an experimental stainless steel model representing premolar and molar bridge abutment preparations. Horizontal and vertical individual abutment and interabutment dimensions were measured on die stone replicas, and the measurements compared with those obtained from stainless steel master models. The results of this study demonstrate polysulphide is the least accurate impression material for both vertical and horizontal individual abutment dimensions. However, for interabutment horizontal dimensions, no statistical differences were noted between impression material types when using a custom tray. Stock trays produced unreliable results for all the materials tested.

  7. Preliminary SEM Observations on the Surface of Elastomeric Impression Materials after Immersion or Ozone Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Prombonas, Anthony; Yannikakis, Stavros; Karampotsos, Thanasis; Katsarou, Martha-Spyridoula; Drakoulis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surface integrity of dental elastomeric impression materials that are subjected to disinfection is of major importance for the quality of the final prosthetic restorations. Aim The aim of this qualitative Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) study was to reveal the effects of immersion or ozone disinfection on the surface of four dental elastomeric impression materials. Materials and Methods Four dental elastomeric impression material brands were used (two vinyl polysiloxane silicones, one polyether, and one vinyl polyether silicone). Total of 32 specimens were fabricated, eight from each impression material. Specimens were immersion (0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution or 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution) or ozone disinfected or served as controls and examined with SEM. Results Surface degradation was observed on several speci-mens disinfected with 0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution. Similar wavy-wrinkling surface structures were observed in almost all specimens, when treated either with 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution or ozone. Conclusion The SEM images obtained from this study revealed that both immersion disinfectants and ozone show similar impression material surface alterations. Ozone seems to be non-inferior as compared to immersion disinfectants, but superior as to environmental protection. PMID:28208993

  8. Developments in new aircraft tire tread materials. [fatigue life of elastomeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, T. J.; Mccarty, J. L.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Golub, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    Comparative laboratory and field tests were conducted on experimental and state-of-the-art aircraft tire tread materials in a program aimed at seeking new elastomeric materials which would provide improved aircraft tire tread wear, traction, and blowout resistance in the interests of operational safety and economy. The experimental stock was formulated of natural rubber and amorphous vinyl polybutadiene to provide high thermal-oxidative resistance, a characteristic pursued on the premise that thermal oxidation is involved both in the normal abrasion or wear of tire treads and probably in the chain of events leading to blowout failures. Results from the tests demonstrate that the experimental stock provided better heat buildup (hysteresis) and fatigue properties, at least equal wet and dry traction, and greater wear resistance than the state-of-the-art stock.

  9. Gasket with pushrod retainer

    DOEpatents

    Knudsen, Julian R.; Welch, Christopher B.

    2005-04-26

    In an engine having a rocker member adapted to rock about an axis intermediate the rocker member and a pushrod extending from a lower body to an upper body and engaging an end of the rocker member, a gasket for sealing the lower body to the upper body is provided. The gasket includes a sealing portion adapted to substantially seal at least a portion of the upper body to the lower body, and a pushrod support portion extending outwardly from the sealing portion adapted to engage the pushrod. At least a portion of the pushrod support portion engaging the pushrod is constructed from a material that is softer than the material of the pushrod.

  10. Methodology for Evaluating Raw Material Changes to RSRM Elastomeric Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildenhall, Scott D.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) uses asbestos and silicon dioxide filled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (AS-NBR) as the primary internal insulation to protect the case from heat. During the course of the RSRM Program, several changes have been made to the raw materials and processing of the AS-NBR elastomeric insulation material. These changes have been primarily caused by raw materials becoming obsolete. In addition, some process changes have been implemented that were deemed necessary to improve the quality and consistency of the AS-NBR insulation material. Each change has been evaluated using unique test efforts customized to determine the potential impacts of the specific raw material or process change. Following the evaluations, the various raw material and process changes were successfully implemented with no detectable effect on the performance of the AS-NBR insulation. This paper will discuss some of the raw material and process changes evaluated, the methodology used in designing the unique test plans, and the general evaluation results. A summary of the change history of RSRM AS-NBR internal insulation is also presented.

  11. Effect of relative humidity on the hydrophilicity of unset elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Frank; Axmann, Detlef; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the initial hydrophilicity of unset elastomeric dental impression materials. Initial water contact angles were studied on thin unset films of 1 polyether and 4 polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials at 20%, 50%, and 80% RH by high-resolution drop shape analysis. One of 4 PVS materials reached the polyether's initial hydrophilicity. This PVS showed increased hydrophilicity with increasing RH. The initial hydrophilicity of impression materials can be influenced by the RH level. Accounting for RH will enhance the clinical relevance of hydrophilicity studies.

  12. Characterization of elastomeric materials with application to design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1986-01-01

    Redesign of the Space Shuttle Solid Booster has necessitated re-evaluation of the material used in the field joint O-ring seals. The viscoelastic characteristics of five candidate materials were determined. The five materials are: two fluorocarbon compounds, two nitrile compounds, and a silicon compound. The materials were tested in a uniaxial compression test to determine the characteristic relaxation functions. These tests were performed at five different temperatures. A master material curve was developed for each material from the experimental data. The results are compared to tensile relaxation tests. Application of these results to the design analysis is discussed in detail.

  13. A predictable and accurate technique with elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Barghi, N; Ontiveros, J C

    1999-08-01

    A method for obtaining more predictable and accurate final impressions with polyvinylsiloxane impression materials in conjunction with stock trays is proposed and tested. Heavy impression material is used in advance for construction of a modified custom tray, while extra-light material is used for obtaining a more accurate final impression.

  14. Development and evaluation of elastomeric materials for geothermal applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Kalfayan, S. H.; Reilly, W. W.; Ingham, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A material for a casing packer for service for 24 hours in a geothermal environment was developed by synthesis of new elastomers and formulation of available materials. Formulation included use of commercial elastomer gumstocks and also crosslinking of plastic (high Tg) materials. Fibrous reinforcement of fluorocarbon rubbers was emphasized. Organic fiber reinforcement did not increase hot properties significantly. Glass fiber reinforcement gave significant increase in tensile properties. Elongation was reduced, and the glass-reinforced composition examined so far did not hold up well in the geothermal environment. Colloidal asbestos fibers were also investigated. A few experiments with polyphenyl ether gave material with low tensile and high compression set. Available high styrene SBR compositions were studied. Work to date suggests that new synthetic polymers will be required for service in geothermal environments.

  15. 46 CFR 98.30-8 - Gaskets and lining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gaskets and lining. 98.30-8 Section 98.30-8 Shipping... Gaskets and lining. No person may transfer a hazardous material to or from a portable tank on board a vessel unless each gasket and the lining of the portable tank are made of a material that is—...

  16. Tensile bond strength between custom tray and elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Oka, Morihiko; Minagi, Shogo; Irie, Masao; Suzuki, Kazuomi

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how to achieve sufficient and stable adhesive strength between impression material and tray. Impression materials were molded between autopolymerizing resin columns, and tensile strength was measured as a function of these factors: tray storage time (1, 2, 4, 7, and 10 days), adhesive drying time (0, 1, 5, 10, and 15 minutes), and tray surface roughness (air abrasion, bur-produced roughness, and no treatment). Tensile bond strength was not affected by tray storage time throughout the entire evaluation period of 10 days. As for tray adhesive drying time, Reprosil and Exaimplant yielded extremely low values for drying times of 10 minutes or less (P<0.05), while Imprint II and Impregum were not influenced by drying time. Vinyl polysiloxane achieved the highest adhesive strength with bur-produced roughness, which was significantly higher than with air abrasion or no treatment (P<0.05), whereas polyether achieved the lowest value with bur-produced roughness (P<0.05). It was concluded that surface treatment of custom tray should be adapted to the type of impression material used to achieve optimum bond strength.

  17. Elastomeric impression materials and cleaning systems for residue removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    A materials evaluation program was conducted to characterize castable resin compounds as suitable dimensional inspection aids. A fast curing dimethylsilicone based compound was selected as the best performer of the eleven compounds tested. Evaluation of physical properties revealed an inherent problem of particle adherence to metal surfaces tested. A cleaning study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the solvent systems in removing particulate matter from test surfaces. Silicon residues which can adversely affect bonding characteristics of the metals were identified in cleaning study tests. One solvent system composed of alkylarylsulfonic acids, toluene, and dichloromethane, gave superior results in breaking down and removing these polymerized compounds.

  18. Conductive elastomeric extensometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gause, F. L.; Glenn, C. G.

    1971-01-01

    Bridge circuit, in which conductive elastomeric material is the variable leg, precisely measures surface area changes in the human body. Circuits are used singularly, or in quantity by adding elements and amplifier circuits. Elastomeric strips can be located in a form-fitting garment.

  19. Development and Evaluation of High Temperature Gaskets for Hypersonic and Reentry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah

    2007-01-01

    A wide variety of flexible gasket compositions were developed and tested at high temperatures. The gasket material system has high temperature capability. GRABER sealants were very effective in sealing machined ACC-4 composite surfaces. The gasket composition do not bond strongly with the ACC-4 substrate materials. The density of gasket materials can be tailored to show appropriate compressibility.

  20. Effects of atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation on candidate elastomeric materials for long duration missions. Test series no.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, R. C.; Finckenor, M. M.; Kamenetzky, R. R.; Gray, P.

    1993-01-01

    Research was conducted at MSFC on the behavior of elastomeric materials after exposure to simulated space environment. Silicone S383 and Viton V747 samples were exposed to thermal vacuum, ultraviolet radiation, and atomic oxygen and then evaluated for changes in material properties. Characterization of the elastomeric materials included weight, hardness, optical inspection under normal and black light, spectrofluorescence, solar absorptance and emittance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and permeability. These results indicate a degree of sensitivity to exposure and provided some evidence of UV and atomic oxygen synergism.

  1. The Effect of Disinfectants and a Surface Wetting Agent on the Wettability of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Lad, Pritam P; Gurjar, Minal; Gunda, Sachin; Gurjar, Vivek; Rao, Nandan K

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of two commercially available chemical disinfectants namely sodium hypochlorite and glutaraldehyde and a surface wetting agent on the wettability of three high precision elastomeric impression materials, addition silicone, condensation silicone and polyether. Materials and Methods: Three different types of elastomeric impression materials commonly used in prosthodontic practice were selected. The glutaraldehyde and sodium hypochloride solutions were employed to disinfect the impressions made with the above-mentioned elastomeric impression materials. True Blue surface wetting agent was selected. GBX contact angle analyzer was used to measure advancing and receding contact angle. Results: The results of this study have demonstrated that the polyether impression material was the most hydrophilic of all the materials, followed by hydrophilic addition silicone. Condensation silicone was least hydrophilic. All materials showed improvement in the wettability when a topical surfactant was used. Conclusion: The short term disinfection of the three elastomeric impression materials does not affect the wettability of these impression materials. PMID:26124605

  2. Maxillomandibular relationship record for implant complete mouth rehabilitation with elastomeric material and facial surface index of existing denture

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pravinkumar G.; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The maxillomandibular relationship (MMR) record is a critical step to establish the new occlusion in implant supported complete mouth rehabilitation. Using patients existing denture for recording the MMR requires implant definitive cast to be modified extensively to completely seat the denture (with unaltered flanges) on it. This may influence the correct seating of the denture on the implant definitive cast causing faulty recording of the MMR. Materials and Method: Elastomeric record bases, reinforced with the resin framework, are fabricated and relined with the light body elastomeric material when all the healing abutments are in place. The MMR is recorded with these elastomeric record bases using vacuum formed facial surface index of the occluded existing dentures as a guideline. Results: The elastomeric record bases with facial surface index of the existing dentures can allow clinicians to record MMR records without removing the healing abutments from the mouth with acceptable accuracy. This can save chair-side time of the procedure. The record of facial surfaces of existing complete denture in the form of vacuum formed sheet helps to set the occlusal vertical dimension. Conclusion: Use of facial surface index together with the elastomeric record bases can be the useful alternative technique to record the MMR in patients with implant supported full mouth rehabilitation. Further study is required to prove its routine clinical utility. PMID:26929537

  3. The thermal and mechanical properties of a low density elastomeric ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, W. T.; Robertson, R. W.; Bush, A. L.; Pears, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical properties data were obtained for a low density elastomeric resin based ablation material with phenolic-glass honeycomb reinforcement. Data were obtained for the material in the charred and uncharred state. Ablation material specimens were charred in a laboratory furnace at temperatures in the range from 600 K to 1700 K to obtain char specimens representative of the ablation char layer formed during reentry. These specimens were then used to obtain effective thermal conductivity, heat capacity, porosity, and permeability data at the char formation temperature. This provided a boxing of the data which enables the prediction of the transient response of the material during ablation. Limited comparisons were made between the furnace charred specimens and specimens which had been exposed to simulated reentry conditions.

  4. Utilizing stretch-tunable thermochromic elastomeric opal films as novel reversible switchable photonic materials.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christian G; Lederle, Christina; Zentel, Kristina; Stühn, Bernd; Gallei, Markus

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the preparation of highly thermoresponsive and fully reversible stretch-tunable elastomeric opal films featuring switchable structural colors is reported. Novel particle architectures based on poly(diethylene glycol methylether methacrylate-co-ethyl acrylate) (PDEGMEMA-co-PEA) as shell polymer are synthesized via seeded and stepwise emulsion polymerization protocols. The use of DEGMEMA as comonomer and herein established synthetic strategies leads to monodisperse soft shell particles, which can be directly processed to opal films by using the feasible melt-shear organization technique. Subsequent UV crosslinking strategies open access to mechanically stable and homogeneous elastomeric opal films. The structural colors of the opal films feature mechano- and thermoresponsiveness, which is found to be fully reversible. Optical characterization shows that the combination of both stimuli provokes a photonic bandgap shift of more than 50 nm from 560 nm in the stretched state to 611 nm in the fully swollen state. In addition, versatile colorful patterns onto the colloidal crystal structure are produced by spatial UV-induced crosslinking by using a photomask. This facile approach enables the generation of spatially cross-linked switchable opal films with fascinating optical properties. Herein described strategies for the preparation of PDEGMEMA-containing colloidal architectures, application of the melt-shear ordering technique, and patterned crosslinking of the final opal films open access to novel stimuli-responsive colloidal crystal films, which are expected to be promising materials in the field of security and sensing applications.

  5. An evaluation of elastomeric impression materials based on surface compressive strength.

    PubMed

    Omori, K; Arikawa, H; Inoue, K

    2001-04-01

    The setting times of seven commercially available elastomeric impression materials were determined using Wilson's reciprocating rheometer at temperatures 23 +/- 0.5 or 32 +/- 0.5 degrees C. The surface compressive strength and depression of these materials after setting time were measured using a rheometer (Fudoh). Each material was mixed according to the mixing proportion (base/accelerator or catalyst ratio) recommended by the manufacturer. The surface compressive strength and the depression of each material were measured by using a method which pressed the material to the edge of a sensitive rod (2.0 mm in diameter) connected to a load cell. In the case of silicone impression materials (additional type) at a temperature of 23 +/- 0.5 degrees C, the surface compressive strength and the depression of these materials were extremely stable after the setting time. However, the surface compressive strength of other materials except additional type materials increased markedly after setting time and the depression corresponding to the surface compressive strength decreased. These increased largely with the increase, in pressing speed to the sensitive rod. At 450 s from the setting time of all materials, there was an adequate correlation (r = 0.84) between measured values and theoretical values derived using the theory of elasticity.

  6. Elastomeric optical fiber sensors and method for detecting and measuring events occurring in elastic materials

    DOEpatents

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Capps, Gary J.; Smith, David B.; White, Clifford P.

    1994-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing means for the detection and measurement of events such as dynamic loadings imposed upon elastic materials including cementitious materials, elastomers, and animal body components and/or the attrition of such elastic materials are provided. One or more optical fibers each having a deformable core and cladding formed of an elastomeric material such as silicone rubber are embedded in the elastic material. Changes in light transmission through any of the optical fibers due the deformation of the optical fiber by the application of dynamic loads such as compression, tension, or bending loadings imposed on the elastic material or by the attrition of the elastic material such as by cracking, deterioration, aggregate break-up, and muscle, tendon, or organ atrophy provide a measurement of the dynamic loadings and attrition. The fiber optic sensors can be embedded in elastomers subject to dynamic loadings and attrition such as commonly used automobiles and in shoes for determining the amount and frequency of the dynamic loadings and the extent of attrition. The fiber optic sensors are also useable in cementitious material for determining the maturation thereof.

  7. Application of a new composite cubic-boron nitride gasket assembly for high pressure inelastic x-ray scattering studies of carbon related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin; Yang, Wenge; Xiao, Yuming; Liu, Bingbing; Chow, Paul; Shen, Guoyin; Mao, Wendy L.; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a new composite cubic-boron nitride (c-BN) gasket assembly for high pressurediamond anvil cell studies, and applied it to inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) studies of carbon related materials in order to maintain a larger sample thickness and avoid the interference from the diamond anvils. The gap size between the two diamond anvils remained ~80 μm at 48.0 GPa with this new composite c-BN gasket assembly. The sample can be located at the center of the gap, ~20 μm away from the surface of both diamond anvils, which provides ample distance to separate the sample signal from the diamond anvils. The high pressure IXS of a solvated C₆₀ sample was studied up to 48 GPa, and a pressure induced bonding transition from sp² to sp³ was observed at 27 GPa.

  8. Gaskets for low-energy houses

    SciTech Connect

    Harr, D.

    1986-05-01

    New materials and techniques make it easier to build today's tight, energy-efficient homes. One system that has won many converts recently is the airtight drywall approach (ADA). ADA relies heavily on the use of foam gasketing. In the ADA building system, nearly all joints--sill to foundation, band joist, wall plate to subfloor, and drywall to frame-are gasketed with foam tapes. The combination of gaskets, drywall, and caulk creates an airtight envelope. Foam gasketing tape is well suited from many of these joints because it is clean, economical, and easy to apply. The right gasket will maintain the seal even if the joint moves, and won't squeeze out of the joint under compression. Caulk, on the other hand, is messy, hard to apply, and squeezes out of the joint under compression. Saturated urethanes are elastic sealants that always recover, even after being completely compressed. Some saturated urethanes recover faster than others, depending on what saturant is used, but all exert a force to recover because they are urethanes. In the construction industry, where gaskets are likely to be buried permanently within the framework, saturated urethane foam gaskets really make sense.

  9. Serpentine metal gasket

    DOEpatents

    Rothgeb, Timothy Moore; Reece, Charles Edwin

    2009-06-02

    A metallic seal or gasket for use in the joining of cryogenic fluid conduits, the seal or gasket having a generally planar and serpentine periphery defining a central aperture. According to a preferred embodiment, the periphery has at least two opposing elongated serpentine sides and two opposing arcuate ends joining the opposing elongated serpentine sides and is of a hexagonal cross-section.

  10. Dimensional stability of elastomeric impression materials: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, F S; Popoff, D A V; Castro, C D L; Silva, G C; Magalhães, C S; Moreira, A N

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present paper was to review the literature concerning the dimensional stability of dental elastomeric impression materials, to support recommendations to control the variables that influence the accuracy of these materials. An electronic search of the Scopus and PubMed databases was performed in November 2010. Articles were selected according to the following inclusion criteria: investigation of the dimensional stability of dental elastomers, an experimental study, sample size reported, laboratory tests described, and published in an English language peer-reviewed journal. The search resulted in 47 articles published between 1958 and 2008; of these, 24 were selected for inclusion in the present study. Great variability was discovered in the experimental methodologies used, such as different working times, temperatures and storage mediums for the impressions, impression techniques, material thicknesses, tray types, and methods of evaluation. Despite the lack of standardization among the studies, this review supports the following recommendations to control the dimensional stability: impressions should be stored at temperatures between 21 +/- 2 degrees C; polyether impressions should be stored in an environment with a relative humidity below 50%; time until pouring has been settled for each elastomer material.

  11. The effect of elastomeric impression materials on the growth of micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Tuit, C M; Coogan, M M

    1999-10-01

    The influence of elastomeric impression materials on the growth of micro-organisms was examined in vitro. Bacillus subtilis was inoculated into broth containing impression materials and incubated at 37 degrees C for 72 hours. Express STD Putty, President Putty and Jet-Light Body, Low and Very High Viscosity Permagum and Provil L stimulated growth whereas Impregum-F and Express Light Body inhibited growth. The influence of Impregum-F and Express Light Body on oral micro-organisms was investigated further. Broth extracts were prepared by soaking these materials in Todd Hewitt broth for either 5 or 10 minutes. Thereafter, the extracts were inoculated with oral strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans, incubated at 37 degrees C for 72 hours and plated on blood and Sabourauds agar to test for the presence of viable micro-organisms. The 10-minute broth extracts killed all the test isolates which suggests that impressions taken with Impregum-F and Express Light Body may not require disinfecting.

  12. The effect of immersion disinfection procedures on dimensional stability of two elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Melilli, Dario; Rallo, Antonio; Cassaro, Angelo; Pizzo, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of immersion disinfection procedures on the dimensional stability of two elastomeric impression materials. Impressions of a stainless steel die were made with polyether (PE) and with addition-polymerized silicone rubber (PVS). The test specimens underwent disinfection treatment by immersion in two commercially available solutions containing quaternary ammonium compounds (Sterigum Powder, SP) and glutaraldehyde plus an amino derivative (MD520, MD), respectively. The impressions were measured at 4 different time points: before any disinfection treatment (T0); after the first disinfection (T1); 6 hours after the first disinfection (T2); after the second disinfection, carried out 6 hours after the first one (T3). Impressions which were not disinfected served as controls. When both impression materials were disinfected with SP, significant differences were detected among all measurements (P < 0.0001), with the exception of T2 vs T3 (P > 0.05). On the other hand, when MD was used, significant differences were found when T0 measurement was compared to T1, T2 and T3 measurements (P = 0.0043 for PE, and P = 0.0014 for PVS). The dimensional change of all material/disinfectant combinations was always

  13. Fiber gasket and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bruck, Gerald Joseph; Alvin, Mary Anne; Smeltzer, Eugene E.

    2003-01-01

    A gasket (1) is made by repetitively spirally winding a fiber (3) back on itself in a closed path. The gasket (1) so made has a multi-layer spiral winding (1) formed in a loop (5). The fiber (3) can be wound at a constant wrap rate to form a gasket with a uniform cross-section around the loop. Alternatively, the wrap rate can be varied, increased to increase cross-sectional bulk, and decreased to reduce cross-section bulk around the loop (5). Also, the spiral winding (7) can be applied over a core (13) of either strands of the fiber (3) or a dissimilar material providing a desired property such as resiliency, stiffness or others. For high temperature applications, a ceramic fiber (3) can be used. The gasket (1) can have any of various geometric configurations with or without a core (13).

  14. Effects of material composition on the ablation performance of low density elastomeric ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Kabana, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    The ablation performance of materials composed of various concentrations of nylon, hollow silica spheres, hollow phenolic spheres, and four elastomeric resins was determined. Both blunt-body and flat-panel specimens were used, the cold-wall heating-rate ranges being 0.11 to 0.8 MW/sq m, respectively. The corresponding surface pressure ranges for these tests were 0.017 to 0.037 atmosphere and 0.004 to 0.005 atmosphere. Some of the results show that (1) the addition of nylon significantly improved the ablation performance, but the nylon was not compatible with one resin system; (2) panel and blunt-body specimen data do not show the same effect of phenolic sphere content on ablation effectiveness; and (3) there appears to be an optimum concentration of hollow silica spheres for good ablation performance. The composition of an efficient, nonproprietary ablator for lifting body application is identified and the ablation performance of this ablator is compared with the performance of three commercially available materials.

  15. Biodegradable and elastomeric poly(glycerol sebacate) as a coating material for nitinol bare stent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Ji; Hwang, Moon Young; Kim, JiHeung; Chung, Dong June

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized and evaluated biodegradable and elastomeric polyesters (poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS)) using polycondensation between glycerol and sebacic acid to form a cross-linked network structure without using exogenous catalysts. Synthesized materials possess good mechanical properties, elasticity, and surface erosion biodegradation behavior. The tensile strength of the PGS was as high as 0.28 ± 0.004 MPa, and Young's modulus was 0.122 ± 0.0003 MPa. Elongation was as high as 237.8 ± 0.64%, and repeated elongation behavior was also observed to at least three times the original length without rupture. The water-in-air contact angles of the PGS surfaces were about 60°. We also analyzed the properties of an electrospray coating of biodegradable PGS on a nitinol stent for the purpose of enhancing long-term patency for the therapeutic treatment of varicose veins disease. The surface morphology and thickness of coating layer could be controlled by adjusting the electrospraying conditions and solution parameters.

  16. Linear dimensional changes in plaster die models using different elastomeric materials.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Murata, Karina Yumi; Valle, Accácio Lins do; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Shiratori, Fábio Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Dental impression is an important step in the preparation of prostheses since it provides the reproduction of anatomic and surface details of teeth and adjacent structures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the linear dimensional alterations in gypsum dies obtained with different elastomeric materials, using a resin coping impression technique with individual shells. A master cast made of stainless steel with fixed prosthesis characteristics with two prepared abutment teeth was used to obtain the impressions. References points (A, B, C, D, E and F) were recorded on the occlusal and buccal surfaces of abutments to register the distances. The impressions were obtained using the following materials: polyether, mercaptan-polysulfide, addition silicone, and condensation silicone. The transfer impressions were made with custom trays and an irreversible hydrocolloid material and were poured with type IV gypsum. The distances between identified points in gypsum dies were measured using an optical microscope and the results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA (p < 0.05) and Tukey's test. The mean of the distances were registered as follows: addition silicone (AB = 13.6 µm, CD=15.0 µm, EF = 14.6 µm, GH=15.2 µm), mercaptan-polysulfide (AB = 36.0 µm, CD = 36.0 µm, EF = 39.6 µm, GH = 40.6 µm), polyether (AB = 35.2 µm, CD = 35.6 µm, EF = 39.4 µm, GH = 41.4 µm) and condensation silicone (AB = 69.2 µm, CD = 71.0 µm, EF = 80.6 µm, GH = 81.2 µm). All of the measurements found in gypsum dies were compared to those of a master cast. The results demonstrated that the addition silicone provides the best stability of the compounds tested, followed by polyether, polysulfide and condensation silicone. No statistical differences were obtained between polyether and mercaptan-polysulfide materials.

  17. Thiol-Ene functionalized siloxanes for use as elastomeric dental impression materials

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Megan A.; Jankousky, Katherine C.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Thiol- and allyl-functionalized siloxane oligomers are synthesized and evaluated for use as a radical-mediated, rapid set elastomeric dental impression material. Thiol-ene siloxane formulations are crosslinked using a redox-initiated polymerization scheme, and the mechanical properties of the thiol-ene network are manipulated through the incorporation of varying degrees of plasticizer and kaolin filler. Formulations with medium and light body consistencies are further evaluated for their ability to accurately replicate features on both the gross and microscopic levels. We hypothesize that thiol-ene functionalized siloxane systems will exhibit faster setting times and greater detail reproduction than commercially available polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) materials of comparable consistencies. Methods Thiol-ene functionalized siloxane mixtures formulated with varying levels of redox initiators, plasticizer, and kaolin filler are made and evaluated for their polymerization speed (FTIR), consistency (ISO4823.9.2), and surface energy (goniometer). Feature replication is evaluated quantitatively by SEM. The Tg, storage modulus, and creep behavior are determined by DMA. Results Increasing redox initiation rate increases the polymerization rate but at high levels also limits working time. Combining 0.86 wt% oxidizing agent with up to 5 wt% plasticizer gave a working time of 3 min and a setting time of 2 min. The selected medium and light body thiol-ene formulations also achieved greater qualitative detail reproduction than the commercial material and reproduced micrometer patterns with 98% accuracy. Significance Improving detail reproduction and setting speed is a primary focus of dental impression material design and synthesis. Radical-mediated polymerizations, particularly thiol-ene reactions, are recognized for their speed, reduced shrinkage, and ‘click’ nature. PMID:24553250

  18. The thermal and mechanical properties of a low-density glass-fiber-reinforced elastomeric ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, W. T.; Robertson, R. W.; Bush, A. L.; Pears, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of the thermal and mechanical properties was performed on a molded low-density elastomeric ablation material designated as Material B. Both the virgin and charred states were examined to provide meaningful inputs to the design of a thermal protection system. Chars representative of the flight chars formed during ablation were prepared in a laboratory furnace from 600 K to 1700 K and properties of effective thermal conductivity, heat capacity, porosity and permeability were determined on the furnace chars formed at various temperature levels within the range. This provided a boxing of the data which will enable the prediction of the transient response of the material during flight ablation.

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy of Elastomeric Impression Materials when Treated with Autoclave, Microwave, and Chemical Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Suresh S; Khandeparker, Rakshit Vijay; Somasundaram, P; Raghav, Shweta; Babaji, Rashmi P; Varghese, T Joju

    2015-01-01

    Background: Impression materials during impression procedure often get infected with various infectious diseases. Hence, disinfection of impression materials with various disinfectants is advised to protect the dental team. Disinfection can alter the dimensional accuracy of impression materials. The present study was aimed to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of elastomeric impression materials when treated with different disinfectants; autoclave, chemical, and microwave method. Materials and Methods: The impression materials used for the study were, dentsply aquasil (addition silicone polyvinylsiloxane syringe and putty), zetaplus (condensation silicone putty and light body), and impregum penta soft (polyether). All impressions were made according to manufacturer’s instructions. Dimensional changes were measured before and after different disinfection procedures. Result: Dentsply aquasil showed smallest dimensional change (−0.0046%) and impregum penta soft highest linear dimensional changes (−0.026%). All the tested elastomeric impression materials showed some degree of dimensional changes. Conclusion: The present study showed that all the disinfection procedures produce minor dimensional changes of impression material. However, it was within American Dental Association specification. Hence, steam autoclaving and microwave method can be used as an alternative method to chemical sterilization as an effective method. PMID:26435611

  20. An elastomeric grating coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocabas, Askin; Ay, Feridun; Dâna, Aykutlu; Aydinli, Atilla

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel nondestructive and reversible method for coupling free space light to planar optical waveguides. In this method, an elastomeric grating is used to produce an effective refractive index modulation on the surface of the optical waveguide. The external elastomeric grating binds to the surface of the waveguide with van der Waals forces and makes conformal contact without any applied pressure. As a demonstration of the feasibility of the approach, we use it to measure the refractive index of a silicon oxynitride film. This technique is nondestructive, reversible, low cost and can easily be applied to the characterization of optical materials for integrated optics.

  1. Spiral-wound gasket forms low-temperature seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irick, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    Spiral-wound cryogenic gasket with one component requires no encapsulant and is easily produced with self-locking features. Seal either opens and closes or is fixed. It is made by skiving strip from circumference of disk of glass-filled material. Successive turns of strip are spirally wrapped in groove machined into one flange surface. Closing joint compresses gasket.

  2. Elastomeric member

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1985-07-30

    An energy storage device is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member disposed within a tubular housing, which elastomeric member is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, and transition end sections, attached to rigid end piece assemblies of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing. Each of the transition sections are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond there between. During manufacture, the sleeves are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section to provide the correct profile and helix angle. 12 figs.

  3. Elastomeric member

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16) disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section (74), and transition end sections (76, 78), attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member (16), a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). Each of the transition sections (76, 78) are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve (26, 28) having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve (26, 28) also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle.

  4. A Comparative Evaluation of the Dimensional Stability of Three Different Elastomeric Impression Materials after Autoclaving – An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thota, Kiran Kumar; Ravuri, Rajyalakshmi; Tella, Suchita

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the Study: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on the dimensional stability of three different elastomeric impression materials at three different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Standardized stainless steel master die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. The impression materials used for the study were condensation silicone (GP1), addition silicone (GP2) and polyether (GP3). A total of 45 samples of the stainless steel die were made (n = 45), that is 15 samples for each group. Impression materials were mixed according to the manufacturer’s instructions and were loaded into the mold to make an impression of the die. Impressions were identified with the help of numerical coding system and measurements were made using stereomicroscope (MAGNUS MSZ-Bi) of 0.65x magnification with the help of image analysis software (IMACE PRO-INSIGHT VERSION.The results were subjected to statistical analysis using one way analysis of variance and student t-test for comparison between the groups. Results: Within the limitations of the study statistically significant dimensional changes were observed for all the three impression materials at three different time intervals but this change was not clinically significant. Conclusion: It is well-known fact that all impressions should be disinfected to avoid possible transmission of infectious diseases either by direct contact or cross contamination. Immersion and spray disinfection as well as various disinfection solutions have been tested and proven to be effective for this purpose. But for elastomeric impression materials these methods have proven to be ineffective as they do not prevent cross contamination among the dental team. So autoclaving was one of the most effective sterilization procedure for condensation silicone and addition silicone. Since polyether is hydrophilic it is better to disinfect the impressions as recommended by the manufacturer or by immersion or spray

  5. Thermal performance of 625-kg/cu m elastomeric ablative materials on spherically blunted 0.44-radian cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champman, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Spherically blunted 0.44-radian (25 deg) half-angle conical models coated with elastomeric ablative materials were tested in supersonic arc-heated wind tunnels to evaluate performance of the ablators over a range of conditions typical of lifting entry. Four test conditions were combinations of stagnation point-heat transfer rates of 2.3 and 4.5 MW/m2 and stagnation pressures of 20 and 2kN/m2. Afterbody values of heat transfer rate and pressure were 0.05 to 0.20 of stagnation point values. Stagnation enthalpy varied from 4.4 to 25 MJ/kg (1900 to 11000 Btu/lbm) and free-stream Mach number was in a range from 3.5 to 4. Ablative materials retained the spherical nose shape throughout tests at the lower heat transfer level, but receded, assuming a flattened nose shape, during tests at the high heat transfer level. The residue layer that formed on the conical after-body was weak, friable, and extensively cracked. The reference ablative material, which contained phenolic microspheres, generally retained the conical shape on the model afterbody. However, a modified ablator, in which phenolic microspheres were replaced with silica microspheres, deformed and separated from the undegraded material, and thereby produced a very uneven surface. Substrate temperatures and ablator recession were in good agreement with values computed by a numerical analysis.

  6. 30 CFR 18.27 - Gaskets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING... follows: (a) A gasket of lead, elastomer, or equivalent will be acceptable provided the gasket does not interfere with an acceptable metal-to-metal joint. (b) A lead gasket(s) or equivalent will be...

  7. Elastomeric polypeptide-based biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linqing; Charati, Manoj B.; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2011-01-01

    Elastomeric proteins are characterized by their large extensibility before rupture, reversible deformation without loss of energy, and high resilience upon stretching. Motivated by their unique mechanical properties, there has been tremendous research in understanding and manipulating elastomeric polypeptides, with most work conducted on the elastins but more recent work on an expanded set of polypeptide elastomers. Facilitated by biosynthetic strategies, it has been possible to manipulate the physical properties, conformation, and mechanical properties of these materials. Detailed understanding of the roles and organization of the natural structural proteins has permitted the design of elastomeric materials with engineered properties, and has thus expanded the scope of applications from elucidation of the mechanisms of elasticity to the development of advanced drug delivery systems and tissue engineering substrates. PMID:21637725

  8. A simple aluminum gasket for use with both stainless steel and aluminum flanges

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    A technique has been developed for making aluminum wire seal gaskets of various sizes and shapes for use with both stainless steel and aluminum alloy flanges. The gasket material used is 0.9999 pure aluminum, drawn to a diameter of 3 mm. This material can be easily welded and formed into various shapes. A single gasket has been successfully used up to five times without baking. The largest gasket tested to date is 3.5 m long and was used in the shape of a parallelogram. Previous use of aluminum wire gaskets, including results for bakeout at temperatures from 20 to 660{degree}C, is reviewed. A search of the literature indicates that this is the first reported use of aluminum wire gaskets for aluminum alloy flanges. The technique is described in detail, and the results are summarized. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Embedded Strain Gauges for Condition Monitoring of Silicone Gaskets

    PubMed Central

    Schotzko, Timo; Lang, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A miniaturized strain gauge with a thickness of 5 µm is molded into a silicone O-ring. This is a first step toward embedding sensors in gaskets for structural health monitoring. The signal of the integrated sensor exhibits a linear correlation with the contact pressure of the O-ring. This affords the opportunity to monitor the gasket condition during installation. Thus, damages caused by faulty assembly can be detected instantly, and early failures, with their associated consequences, can be prevented. Through the embedded strain gauge, the contact pressure applied to the gasket can be directly measured. Excessive pressure and incorrect positioning of the gasket can cause structural damage to the material of the gasket, which can lead to an early outage. A platinum strain gauge is fabricated on a thin polyimide layer and is contacted through gold connections. The measured resistance pressure response exhibits hysteresis for the first few strain cycles, followed by a linear behavior. The short-term impact of the embedded sensor on the stability of the gasket is investigated. Pull-tests with O-rings and test specimens have indicated that the integration of the miniaturized sensors has no negative impact on the stability in the short term. PMID:25014099

  10. Embedded strain gauges for condition monitoring of silicone gaskets.

    PubMed

    Schotzko, Timo; Lang, Walter

    2014-07-10

    A miniaturized strain gauge with a thickness of 5 µm is molded into a silicone O-ring. This is a first step toward embedding sensors in gaskets for structural health monitoring. The signal of the integrated sensor exhibits a linear correlation with the contact pressure of the O-ring. This affords the opportunity to monitor the gasket condition during installation. Thus, damages caused by faulty assembly can be detected instantly, and early failures, with their associated consequences, can be prevented. Through the embedded strain gauge, the contact pressure applied to the gasket can be directly measured. Excessive pressure and incorrect positioning of the gasket can cause structural damage to the material of the gasket, which can lead to an early outage. A platinum strain gauge is fabricated on a thin polyimide layer and is contacted through gold connections. The measured resistance pressure response exhibits hysteresis for the first few strain cycles, followed by a linear behavior. The short-term impact of the embedded sensor on the stability of the gasket is investigated. Pull-tests with O-rings and test specimens have indicated that the integration of the miniaturized sensors has no negative impact on the stability in the short term.

  11. Analytical method for distribution of metallic gasket contact stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiu; Gu, Boqing; Wei, Long; Sun, Jianjun

    2008-11-01

    Metallic gasket seals have been widely used in chemical and petrochemical plants. The failure of sealing system will lead to enormous pecuniary loss, serious environment pollution and personal injury accident. The failure of sealing systems is mostly caused not by the strength of flanges or bolts but by the leakage of the connections. The leakage behavior of bolted flanged connections is related to the gasket contact stress. In particular, the non-uniform distribution of this stress in the radial direction caused by the flange rotational flexibility has a major influence on the tightness of bolted flanged connections. In this paper, based on Warters method and considering the operating pressure, the deformation of the flanges is analyzed theoretically, and the formula for calculating the angle of rotation of the flanges is derived, based on which and the mechanical property of the gasket material, the method for calculating the gasket contact stresses is put forward. The maximum stress at the gasket outer flank calculated by the analytical method is lower than that obtained by numerical simulation, but the mean stresses calculated by the two methods are nearly the same. The analytical method presented in this paper can be used as an engineering method for designing the metallic gasket connections.

  12. Elastomeric load sharing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isabelle, Charles J. (Inventor); Kish, Jules G. (Inventor); Stone, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An elastomeric load sharing device, interposed in combination between a driven gear and a central drive shaft to facilitate balanced torque distribution in split power transmission systems, includes a cylindrical elastomeric bearing and a plurality of elastomeric bearing pads. The elastomeric bearing and bearing pads comprise one or more layers, each layer including an elastomer having a metal backing strip secured thereto. The elastomeric bearing is configured to have a high radial stiffness and a low torsional stiffness and is operative to radially center the driven gear and to minimize torque transfer through the elastomeric bearing. The bearing pads are configured to have a low radial and torsional stiffness and a high axial stiffness and are operative to compressively transmit torque from the driven gear to the drive shaft. The elastomeric load sharing device has spring rates that compensate for mechanical deviations in the gear train assembly to provide balanced torque distribution between complementary load paths of split power transmission systems.

  13. Application of gasket performance data for design and operation of low emissions, high-reliability gasketed joints

    SciTech Connect

    Waterland, A.F. III

    1996-07-01

    The MTI project No. 47, Test Methods for Non-Asbestos Gasket Materials, opened everyone`s eyes to the breadth of performance and use information for gasket materials. What the MTI has started has resulted in a quiet revolution in gasketing, and just in time. Today`s emissions and reliability mandates have created a situation whereby gasket materials can no longer be selected and designed into systems simply through practicable experience and personnel judgment. A defined engineering approach is required. Based on the work initiated by the MTI and furthered by groups such as ASME and PVRC, there now exists extensive performance data for all gasketing materials. This presentation addresses the existence and usage of the various MTI and PVRC-type performance data as a tool for initial material selection. With this background, a novel simplification to the future ASME code procedure is introduced which allows for a simple yet accurate means of applying this widely available data to an emissions` control program at the plant level.

  14. An elastomeric material for facial prostheses: synthesis, experimental and numerical testing aspects.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, Kathryn; Limbert, G; Waters, Mark G; Middleton, J

    2003-12-01

    Current materials used for maxillofacial prostheses are far from ideal and there is a need for new improved materials which better simulate the tissues they are replacing. This study was based on a mixed experimental/analytical/numerical approach. A new polymeric material was developed to provide a better alternative to the materials currently used in maxillofacial prosthetics. A series of experimental tensile tests were performed in order to characterise the tensile properties of the material. A Mooney-Rivlin type hyperelastic formulation was chosen to describe the constitutive behaviour of the polymer which operates at the finite strain regime. The material parameters (two) of the constitutive law were identified with the experimental data. The Mooney-Rivlin material was found to be suitable to represent accurately the mechanical behaviour of the polymer up to 50% strain as shown by the excellent agreement between analytical and experimental results. An FE model reproducing all the characteristics of the experimental tensile tests was built and a series of three FE analyses were conducted and has proven the proper finite element implementation of the material model. This preliminary study will serve as a basis to introduce more complex features such as viscoelasticity and wrinkling of the soft polymeric structure in order to optimise the performances of the final prosthetic material.

  15. Sealing Force Increasing of ACM Gasket through Electron Beam Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, D. J.; Batalha, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Rubber is an engineering material largely used as sealing parts, in form of O-rings, solid gaskets and liquid gaskets, materials applied in liquid state with posterior vulcanization and sealing. Stress relaxation is a rubber characteristic which impacts negatively in such industrial applications (rings and solid gaskets). This work has the purpose to investigate the use of electron beam radiation (EB) as a technology able to decrease the stress relaxation in acrylic rubber (ACM), consequently increasing the sealing capability of this material. ACM samples were irradiated with dose of 100 kGy and 250 kGy, its behavior was comparatively investigated using, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and compression stress relaxation (CSR) experiments. The results obtained by DMA shown an increase of Tg and changes in dynamic mechanical behavior.

  16. Elastomeric shutter mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Clifford M.

    1995-05-01

    An elastomeric shutter mechanism for opening and closing a passageway in the wall of a vessel, such as a submarine hull is presented. A single, unitary, retractable shutter member made of an elastomeric material is partially attached to the wall around a portion of a passageway. The single, unitary, retractable shutter member is moveable from a closed position when the unattached portion of the shutter member is abutting the wall around the passageway to an open position when the unattached portion of the shutter member is retracted away from the wall around the passageway. Cables are attached to the inside surface of the shutter member for retracting the shutter member and opening the passageway. Mechanical stops are positioned inside of the vessel for abutting the shutter member when retracted to the open position by the cables. On an underwater vessel such as a submarine, the shutter member is sealed in the closed position by a pressure differential between the inside surface and the outside surface of the shutter member or latched in place in the closed position. Split ribs are included on the inside surface of the shutter member to resist the expansion of the shutter member when maintained in the closed position by the pressure differential.

  17. Evaluation of the precision of three implant transfer impression techniques using two elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Tamer Mohamed Nasr; Elgendy, Mohamed Nabeel Mohamed; Kashef, Nahed Ahmed; Halim, Maha Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    A master cast representing a completely edentulous mandible was fabricated in polyurethane resin and had four implants secured to the anterior interforaminal area. Impressions were made using six technique-material combinations. Ten definitive casts were fabricated for each technique. Linear distances between implants were measured using a traveling microscope. There was no statistically significant difference between the direct unsplinted and splinted techniques (P > .05), while the indirect technique was statistically significantly different from the other two techniques (P < .05). There was no statistically significant difference between the two impression materials.

  18. A summary of laboratory testing performed to characterize and select an elastomeric O-ring material to be used in the redesigned solid rocket motors of the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    An elastomeric O-ring material is used in the joints of the redesigned solid motors (RSRM's) of the National Space Transportation System (NSTS). The selection of the O-ring material used in the RSRM's was a very thorough process that included efforts by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the Langley Research Center, and the Thiokol Corporation. One of the efforts performed at MSFC was an extensive in-house laboratory test regime to screen potential O-ring materials and ultimately to characterize the elastomeric material that was chosen to be used in the RSRM's. The laboratory tests performed at MSFC are summarized.

  19. Evaluation of effectiveness of microwave irradiation for disinfection of silicone elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Abhilasha; Vinod, V; Bhasin, Vinny; Mathew, Xavier; Sajjan, Suresh; Ahmed, Syed Tauqheer

    2013-06-01

    Use of domestic microwave oven has been suggested as a method of disinfecting a number of dental materials used in dental practice. This study was done to analyse the effect of microwave irradiation on vinyl polysiloxane putty impression material (3M ESPE, Express™ STD) contaminated with test organisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans. 180 square shaped specimens of addition silicon putty material were prepared and divided into 3 groups for three test organisms. The 3 groups were subdivided into 4 subgroups (n = 15) for different exposure parameters (control group 5, 6 and 7 min exposure at 650 W. The specimens were contaminated using standard inoculums of test organism and then were irradiated using domestic microwaves. Broth cultures of the control and test group specimens were plated on selective media culture plates. Colonies formed were counted. Data analyses included Kruskal-Walli's ANOVA and Mann-Whitney's tests. Nil values shows complete elimination of C. albicans and P. aeruginosa after 5, 6 and 7 min exposure. Staphylococcus aureus showed colonies with the mean value of 7.6 × 10(3) ± 2.3 × 10(3), 4.6 × 10(3) ± 2.6 × 10(3) after 5 and 6 min respectively and nil values after 7 min exposure. 5 min exposure caused complete elimination of C. albicans and P. aeruginosa strains, while 7 min exposure eliminated S. aureus completely.

  20. Polycarbosilazane passivation on graphite foil used as gasket seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prette, A. L. G.; Haage, T.; Will, A.; Kolb, M.; Flores, O.; Günthner, M.; Motz, G.

    2013-12-01

    Gasket seals are often used in industry and laboratories where a leak-proof installation is needed in order to avoid loss of products or dangerous materials. Many of products transported inside tubes are at relatively high temperatures excluding polymeric gaskets. In the same line, many of transported materials contain solvents which can attack polymer sealings, therefore limiting their use. An alternative is to use graphite joints as sealings. These joints are a sandwich of graphite foil and stainless steel mesh as forming core. The problem that raises using graphite in contact with steel is that at temperatures of about 500 °C an interdiffusion of carbon on the steel structure occurs which produces adhesion of the graphite gasket on the metallic flange. Therefore this adhesion increases the time to change each gasket, since rests of previously adhered graphite has to be removed from the flange. In order to avoid the adhesion of the graphite on the flange, polycarbosilazane precursor was used as protective finishing on the graphite foil surface. After thermal transformation of the polymer into the corresponding PDC finishing, it acts in two manners: It avoids the direct contact between the carbon and the steel and it allows the sealing of liquids and gases. Adhesion tests were done and showed that the foils passivated with PDCs did not adhere to the steel flange. Moreover, the production methods and products are compatible to industrial environment and processes. The results found here show that the time to change the gasket in industry can be clearly reduced by using the PDC finishing on graphite gasket.

  1. Filter holder and gasket assembly for candle or tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, T.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bruck, G.J.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1999-03-02

    A filter holder and gasket assembly are disclosed for holding a candle filter element within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel. The filter holder and gasket assembly includes a filter housing, an annular spacer ring securely attached within the filter housing, a gasket sock, a top gasket, a middle gasket and a cast nut. 9 figs.

  2. Filter holder and gasket assembly for candle or tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, Thomas Edwin; Alvin, Mary Anne; Bruck, Gerald Joseph; Smeltzer, Eugene E.

    1999-03-02

    A filter holder and gasket assembly for holding a candle filter element within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel. The filter holder and gasket assembly includes a filter housing, an annular spacer ring securely attached within the filter housing, a gasket sock, a top gasket, a middle gasket and a cast nut.

  3. Manifold gasket accommodating differential movement of fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Dana A.; Farooque, Mohammad

    2007-11-13

    A gasket for use in a fuel cell system having at least one externally manifolded fuel cell stack, for sealing the manifold edge and the stack face. In accordance with the present invention, the gasket accommodates differential movement between the stack and manifold by promoting slippage at interfaces between the gasket and the dielectric and between the gasket and the stack face.

  4. Integrated-fin gasket for palm cubic-anvil high pressure apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.-G.; Matsubayashi, K.; Nagasaki, S.; Hisada, A.; Hirayama, T.; Uwatoko, Y.; Hedo, M.; Kagi, H.

    2014-09-15

    We described an integrated-fin gasket technique for the palm cubic-anvil apparatus specialized for the high-pressure and low-temperature measurements. By using such a gasket made from the semi-sintered MgO ceramics and the tungsten-carbide anvils of 2.5 mm square top, we successfully generate pressures over 16 GPa at both room and cryogenic temperatures down to 0.5 K. We observed a pressure self-increment for this specific configuration and further characterized the thermally induced pressure variation by monitoring the antiferromagnetic transition temperature of chromium up to 12 GPa. In addition to enlarge the pressure capacity, such a modified gasket also improves greatly the surviving rate of electrical leads hanging the sample inside a Teflon capsule filled with the liquid pressure-transmitting medium. These improvements should be attributed to the reduced extrusion of gasket materials during the initial compression.

  5. Highly tunable elastomeric silk biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Partlow, Benjamin P.; Hanna, Craig W.; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Moreau, Jodie E.; Applegate, Matthew B.; Burke, Kelly A.; Marelli, Benedetto; Mitropoulos, Alexander N.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2014-01-01

    Elastomeric, fully degradable and biocompatible biomaterials are rare, with current options presenting significant limitations in terms of ease of functionalization and tunable mechanical and degradation properties. We report a new method for covalently crosslinking tyrosine residues in silk proteins, via horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide, to generate highly elastic hydrogels with tunable properties. The tunable mechanical properties, gelation kinetics and swelling properties of these new protein polymers, in addition to their ability to withstand shear strains on the order of 100%, compressive strains greater than 70% and display stiffness between 200 – 10,000 Pa, covering a significant portion of the properties of native soft tissues. Molecular weight and solvent composition allowed control of material mechanical properties over several orders of magnitude while maintaining high resilience and resistance to fatigue. Encapsulation of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) showed long term survival and exhibited cell-matrix interactions reflective of both silk concentration and gelation conditions. Further biocompatibility of these materials were demonstrated with in vivo evaluation. These new protein-based elastomeric and degradable hydrogels represent an exciting new biomaterials option, with a unique combination of properties, for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25395921

  6. Elastomeric actuator devices for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Jolesz, Ferenc A. (Inventor); Kacher, Daniel F. (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed to devices and systems used in magnetic imaging environments that include an actuator device having an elastomeric dielectric film with at least two electrodes, and a frame attached to the actuator device. The frame can have a plurality of configurations including, such as, for example, at least two members that can be, but not limited to, curved beams, rods, plates, or parallel beams. These rigid members can be coupled to flexible members such as, for example, links wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. The frame preferably provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The linear actuation force characteristic is defined as .+-.20% and preferably 10% over a displacement range. The actuator further includes a passive element disposed between the flexible members to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. The preferred embodiment actuator includes one or more layers of the elastomeric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of many elastomeric materials such as, for example, but not limited to, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  7. Airborne asbestos exposures associated with gasket and packing replacement: a simulation study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Madl, Amy K; Hollins, Dana M; Devlin, Kathryn D; Donovan, Ellen P; Dopart, Pamela J; Scott, Paul K; Perez, Angela L

    2014-08-01

    Exposures to airborne asbestos during the removal and installation of internal gaskets and packing associated with a valve overhaul were characterized and compared to published data according to different variables (e.g., product, equipment, task, tool, setting, duration). Personal breathing zone and area samples were collected during twelve events simulating gasket and packing replacement, clean-up and clothing handling. These samples were analyzed using PCM and TEM methods and PCM-equivalent (PCME) airborne asbestos concentrations were calculated. A meta-analysis was performed to compare these data with airborne asbestos concentrations measured in other studies involving gaskets and packing. Short-term mechanic and assistant airborne asbestos concentrations during valve work averaged 0.013f/cc and 0.008f/cc (PCME), respectively. Area samples averaged 0.008f/cc, 0.005f/cc, and 0.003f/cc (PCME) for center, bystander, and remote background, respectively. Assuming a tradesman conservatively performs 1-3 gasket and/or packing replacements daily, an average 8-h TWA was estimated to be 0.002-0.010f/cc (PCME). Combining these results in a meta-analysis of the published exposure data showed that the majority of airborne asbestos exposures during work with gaskets and packing fall within a consistent and low range. Significant differences in airborne concentrations were observed between power versus manual tools and removal versus installation tasks. Airborne asbestos concentrations resulting from gasket and packing work during a valve overhaul are consistent with historical exposure data on replacement of asbestos-containing gasket and packing materials involving multiple variables and, in nearly all plausible scenarios, result in average airborne asbestos concentrations below contemporaneous occupational exposure limits for asbestos.

  8. Method for making an elastomeric member with end pieces

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.; McNinch, Jr., Joseph H.; Nowell, Gregory C.

    1984-01-01

    A molding process for molding an elongated elastomeric member (60) with wire mesh sleeves (16) bonded to the ends (14). A molding preform (10) of elastomeric material is positioned within a seamless mold cylinder (26), and the open ends of the wire mesh sleeves (16) are mounted to end plug assemblies (30) slidably received into the mold cylinder (26) and positioned against the ends (14) of the preform (10). A specialized profile is formed into surfaces (44) of the respective end plug assemblies (30) and by heating of the mold (26), the ends (14) of the elastomeric preform (10) are molded to the profile, as well as bonded to the reinforcing wire mesh sleeves (16). Vacuum is applied to the interior of the mold to draw outgassing vapors through relief spaces therethrough. The completed elastomeric member (60) is removed from the mold cylinder (26) by stretching, the consequent reduction in diameter enabling ready separation from the mold cylinder (26) and removal thereof.

  9. Method for making an elastomeric member with end pieces

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, L.O.; McNinch, J.H. Jr.; Nowell, G.C.

    1984-10-23

    A molding process is described for molding an elongated elastomeric member with wire mesh sleeves bonded to the ends. A molding preform of elastomeric material is positioned within a seamless mold cylinder, and the open ends of the wire mesh sleeves are mounted to end plug assemblies slidably received into the mold cylinder and positioned against the ends of the preform. A specialized profile is formed into surfaces of the respective end plug assemblies and by heating of the mold, the ends of the elastomeric preform are molded to the profile, as well as bonded to the reinforcing wire mesh sleeves. Vacuum is applied to the interior of the mold to draw outgassing vapors through relief spaces there through. The completed elastomeric member is removed from the mold cylinder by stretching, the consequent reduction in diameter enabling ready separation from the mold cylinder and removal thereof. 9 figs.

  10. Corrosion-Resistant Materials for Water and Wastewater Treatment Plants at Fort Bragg

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    sections in the following UFGS: • UFGS 0997040 C-200 Coal Tar Epoxy Polyamide Paint • UFGS 08120 Aluminum Doors and Frames • UFGS 08165A Sliding Metal...journal section (Appendix 2). Nitrile or buna-N rubber seals are used more than all the other elastomers combined, since nitrile is the most versatile...material and is not as likely to fail as do most other rub- ber gaskets and seals due to the natural breakdown of the elastomeric mo- lecular bond of

  11. Liquid-Oxygen-Compatible Cement for Gaskets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, N. L.; Neale, B. C.

    1984-01-01

    Fluorelastomer and metal bonded reliably by new procedure. To cure fluoroelastomer cement, metal plate/gasket assembly placed in vacuum bag evacuated to minimum vacuum of 27 inches (69 cm) of mercury. Vacuum maintained throughout heating process and until assembly returns to ambient room temperature. Used to seal gaskets and O-rings or used to splice layers of elastomer to form non-standard sized O-rings. Another possible use is to apply protective, liquid-oxygen-compatible coating to metal parts.

  12. 46 CFR 64.23 - Gasket and lining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gasket and lining. 64.23 Section 64.23 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.23 Gasket and lining. Each gasket and lining must be made...

  13. Properties and degradation of the gasket component of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell--a review.

    PubMed

    Basuli, Utpal; Jose, Jobin; Lee, Ran Hee; Yoo, Yong Hwan; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Nah, Changwoon

    2012-10-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack requires gaskets and seals in each cell to keep the reactant gases within their respective regions. Gasket performance is integral to the successful long-term operation of a fuel cell stack. This review focuses on properties, performance and degradation mechanisms of the different polymer gasket materials used in PEM fuel cell under normal operating conditions. The different degradation mechanisms and their corresponding representative mitigation strategies are also presented here. Summary of various properties of elastomers and their advantages and disadvantages in fuel cell'environment are presented. By considering the level of chemical degradation, mechanical properties and cost effectiveness, it can be proposed that EPDM is one of the best choices for gasket material in PEM fuel cell. Finally, the challenges that remain in using rubber component as in PEM fuel cell, as well as the prospects for exploiting them in the future are discussed.

  14. Influence of Custom Trays, Dual-Arch Passive, Flexed Trays and Viscosities of Elastomeric Impression Materials on Working Dies

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Shivani; Kalsi, Rupali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dual arch impression technique signifies an essential improvement in fixed prosthodontics and has numerous benefits over conventional impression techniques. The accuracy of working dies fabricated from dual arch impression technique remains in question because there is little information available in the literature. Aim This study was conducted to compare the accuracy of working dies fabricated from impressions made from two different viscosities of impression materials using metal, plastic dual arch trays and custom made acrylic trays. Materials and Methods The study samples were grouped into two groups based on the viscosity of impression material used i.e. Group I (monophase), whereas Group II consisted of Dual Mix technique using a combination of light and heavy body material. These were further divided into three subgroups A, B and C depending on the type of impression tray used (metal dual arch tray, plastic dual arch tray and custom made tray). Measurements of the master cast were made using profile projector. Descriptive statistics like mean, Standard Deviation (SD) were calculated for all the groups. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for multiple group comparisons. A p-value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant. Results The gypsum dies obtained with the three types of impression trays using two groups of impression materials were smaller than the master models in dimensions. Conclusion The plastic dual arch trays produced dies which were the least accurate of the three groups. There was no significant difference in the die dimensions obtained using the two viscosities of impression materials. PMID:27437342

  15. Compatibility Study for Plastic, Elastomeric, and Metallic Fueling Infrastructure Materials Exposed to Aggressive Formulations of Ethanol-blended Gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D; Pawel, Steven J; Theiss, Timothy J; Janke, Christopher James

    2012-07-01

    In 2008 Oak Ridge National Laboratory began a series of experiments to evaluate the compatibility of fueling infrastructure materials with intermediate levels of ethanol-blended gasoline. Initially, the focus was elastomers, metals, and sealants, and the test fuels were Fuel C, CE10a, CE17a and CE25a. The results of these studies were published in 2010. Follow-on studies were performed with an emphasis on plastic (thermoplastic and thermoset) materials used in underground storage and dispenser systems. These materials were exposed to test fuels of Fuel C and CE25a. Upon completion of this effort, it was felt that additional compatibility data with higher ethanol blends was needed and another round of experimentation was performed on elastomers, metals, and plastics with CE50a and CE85a test fuels. Compatibility of polymers typically relates to the solubility of the solid polymer with a solvent. It can also mean susceptibility to chemical attack, but the polymers and test fuels evaluated in this study are not considered to be chemically reactive with each other. Solubility in polymers is typically assessed by measuring the volume swell of the polymer exposed to the solvent of interest. Elastomers are a class of polymers that are predominantly used as seals, and most o-ring and seal manufacturers provide compatibility tables of their products with various solvents including ethanol, toluene, and isooctane, which are components of aggressive oxygenated gasoline as described by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J1681. These tables include a ranking based on the level of volume swell in the elastomer associated with exposure to a particular solvent. Swell is usually accompanied by a decrease in hardness (softening) that also affects performance. For seal applications, shrinkage of the elastomer upon drying is also a critical parameter since a contraction of volume can conceivably enable leakage to occur. Shrinkage is also indicative of the removal of one or more

  16. Indium Foil Serves As Thermally Conductive Gasket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, G. Yale; Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    Indium foil found useful as gasket to increase thermal conductance between bodies clamped together. Deforms to fill imperfections on mating surfaces. Used where maximum temperature in joint less than melting temperature of indium. Because of low melting temperature of indium, most useful in cryogenic applications.

  17. O-ring gasket test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, James Eric (Inventor); Mccluney, Donald Scott (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus is presented for testing O-ring gaskets under a variety of temperature, pressure, and dynamic loading conditions. Specifically, this apparatus has the ability to simulate a dynamic loading condition where the sealing surface in contact with the O-ring moves both away from and axially along the face of the O-ring.

  18. 30 CFR 18.27 - Gaskets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gaskets. 18.27 Section 18.27 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements §...

  19. 30 CFR 18.27 - Gaskets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gaskets. 18.27 Section 18.27 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements §...

  20. Adhesiveless Transfer Printing of Ultrathin Microscale Semiconductor Materials by Controlling the Bending Radius of an Elastomeric Stamp.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sungbum; Kim, Namyun; Song, Kwangsun; Lee, Jongho

    2016-08-09

    High-performance electronic devices integrated onto unconventional substrates provide opportunities for use in diverse applications, such as wearable or implantable forms of electronic devices. However, the interlayer adhesives between the electronic devices and substrates often limit processing temperature or cause electrical or thermal resistance at the interface. This paper introduces a very simple but effective transfer printing method that does not require an interlayer adhesive. Controlling the bending radius of a simple flat stamp enables picking up or printing of microscale semiconductor materials onto rigid, curvilinear, or flexible surfaces without the aid of a liquid adhesive. Theoretical and experimental studies reveal the underlying mechanism of the suggested approach. Adhesiveless printing of thin Si plates onto diverse substrates demonstrates the capability of this method.

  1. Evaluation of the effect of elastomeric damping material on the stability of a bearingless main rotor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, M.; Staley, J.; Warmbrodt, W.

    1980-01-01

    The considered investigation was conducted in connection with a contract to design, fabricate, and test a prototype bearingless main rotor (BMR) system. Part of the design process involved an aeroelastic stability investigation in a wind tunnel. Attention is given to a description of model testing, model test results, the description of the full scale wind tunnel configuration, full scale test results, and aspects of correlation with theory. It was found that the complex geometry of the BMR, with 12.5 degrees of nose-up prepitch at the hub and 2.5 degrees of tip-up predroop at the blade attachment clevis, is required to achieve a stable configuration. Subsequent model testing showed that a constrained layer of elastomer material could increase stability at all rotor speeds and collectives tested for a flat strap configuration.

  2. NMR Imaging of Elastomeric Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-31

    1991, 10, 59. (Ill Cory, D.G., Miller, J.B., 7Turner, R., Garroway , A.N., Mol. Phys. 1990, 70, 331-7 [121 Jezzard, P., Carpenter, T.A., Hall, L.D.{Polym...SPE Paper 18272, 63rd Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, Houston, TX, Oct. 2-5, 1988. 9. D.G. Cory, J.B. Miller, R. Turner, and A.N. Garroway ...B.; Turner, R.; Garroway , A. N. Mol. as the cause of the arrowhead artifacts. We thank An- Phys. I", 70, 331. nadell Fowler and John Pearce for

  3. Elastomeric Materials for Acoustical Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-15

    crosslinked polymer that has often been compounded to optimize a certain characteristic, such as aging resistance or water-permeability resistance...applications include hoses, body mounts and pads, O-rings, wire and cable covers, weather stripping, and other areas requiring excellent weather...Chemical Div. of Uniroyal, Inc. It is a relatively fast curing stock used for high-quality molded mechanical goods and wire and cable applications

  4. Flexible ceramic gasket for SOFC generator

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo; Prevish, Thomas

    2009-02-03

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator (10) contains stacks of hollow axially elongated fuel cells (36) having an open top end (37), an oxidant inlet plenum (52), a feed fuel plenum (11), a combustion chamber (94) for combusting reacted oxidant/spent fuel; and, optionally, a fuel recirculation chamber (106) below the combustion chamber (94), where the fuel recirculation chamber (94) is in part defined by semi-porous fuel cell positioning gasket (108), all within an outer generator enclosure (8), wherein the fuel cell gasket (108) has a laminate structure comprising at least a compliant fibrous mat support layer and a strong, yet flexible woven layer, which may contain catalytic particles facing the combustion chamber, where the catalyst, if used, is effective to further oxidize exhaust fuel and protect the open top end (37) of the fuel cells.

  5. Gasket Assembly for Sealing Mating Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Melvin A., III (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A pair of substantially opposed mating surfaces are joined to each other and sealed in place by means of an electrically-conductive member which is placed in proximity to the mating surfaces. The electrically-conductive member has at least one element secured thereto which is positioned to contact the mating surfaces, and which softens when the electrically-conductive member is heated by passing an electric current therethrough. The softened element conforms to the mating surfaces, and upon cooling of the softened element the mating surfaces are joined together in an effective seal. Of particular significance is an embodiment of the electrically-conductive member which is a gasket having an electrically-conductive gasket base and a pair of the elements secured to opposite sides of the gasket base. This embodiment is positioned between the opposed mating surfaces to be joined to each other. Also significant is an embodiment of the electrically-conductive member which is an electrically-conductive sleeve having an element secured to its inner surface. This embodiment surrounds cylindrical members the bases of which are the substantially opposed mating surfaces to be joined, and the element on the inner surface of the sleeve contacts the outer surfaces of the cylindrical members.

  6. Gasket and snap ring installation tool

    DOEpatents

    Southerland, Jr., James M.; Barringer, Jr., Curtis N.

    1994-01-01

    A tool for installing a gasket and a snap ring including a shaft, a first plate attached to the forward end of the shaft, a second plate slidably carried by the shaft, a spring disposed about the shaft between the first and second plates, and a sleeve that is free to slide over the shaft and engage the second plate. The first plate has a loading surface with a loading groove for receiving a snap ring and a shoulder for holding a gasket. A plurality of openings are formed through the first plate, communicating with the loading groove and approximately equally spaced about the groove. A plurality of rods are attached to the second plate, each rod slidable in one of the openings. In use, the loaded tool is inserted into a hollow pipe or pipe fitting having an internal flange and an internal seating groove, such that the gasket is positioned against the flange and the ring is in the approximate plane of the seating groove. The sleeve is pushed against the second plate, sliding the second plate towards the first plate, compressing the spring and sliding the rods forwards in the openings. The rods engage the snap ring and urge the ring from the loading groove into the seating groove.

  7. Sterilizing elastomeric chains without losing mechanical properties. Is it possible?

    PubMed Central

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; Ferraz, Caio Souza; Rosa, Francine Cristina Silva; Rosa, Luciano Pereira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of different sterilization/disinfection methods on the mechanical properties of orthodontic elastomeric chains. METHODS: Segments of elastomeric chains with 5 links each were sent for sterilization by cobalt 60 (Co60) (20 KGy) gamma ray technology. After the procedure, the elastomeric chains were contaminated with clinical samples of Streptococcus mutans. Subsequently, the elastomeric chains were submitted to sterilization/disinfection tests carried out by means of different methods, forming six study groups, as follows: Group 1 (control - without contamination), Group 2 (70°GL alcohol), Group 3 (autoclave), Group 4 (ultraviolet), Group 5 (peracetic acid) and Group 6 (glutaraldehyde). After sterilization/disinfection, the effectiveness of these methods, by Colony forming units per mL (CFU/mL), and the mechanical properties of the material were assessed. Student's t-test was used to assess the number of CFUs while ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to assess elastic strength. RESULTS: Ultraviolet treatment was not completely effective for sterilization. No loss of mechanical properties occurred with the use of the different sterilization methods (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Biological control of elastomeric chains does not affect their mechanical properties. PMID:26154462

  8. Resistance heating of the gasket in a gem-anvil high pressure cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzaretti, N. M.; Gonzalez, E. J.; Piermarini, G. J.; Russell, T. P.

    1999-11-01

    Resistance heating of the gasket strip in a gem-anvil high pressure cell was successful in obtaining sample temperatures up to 1100 °C, under pressures up to 4.0 GPa. The heating capabilities, as well as the mechanical and chemical stability, of several different gasket strips (two Ni-based alloys, Ta, Pt/Rh, and a Re/Mo alloy) with different design shapes, and two different single-crystal anvil materials (diamond and cubic zirconia) were investigated. Two gasket-strip designs were found to provide optimum uniform heating conditions while decreasing the required current needed to achieve 1100 °C. Two anvil systems were investigated to reduce the temperature increase of the pressure cell body. Cubic zirconia anvils reduced the cell-body temperature to 100 °C at sample temperatures up to 1100 °C. However, zirconia anvils often failed during heating and almost always failed during cooling. Diamond anvils with cubic zirconia mounting plates also permitted temperatures up to 1100 °C to be reached without anvil failure. However, the cell-body temperature increased to 300 °C. A sealed vacuum-type chamber was employed to eliminate the problem with gasket and anvil oxidation. The optimized operating parameters reported here provide a routine method for high temperature-high pressure studies. The method was used to densify and sinter nanosize amorphous silicon nitride and γ-alumina powders at high temperatures and high pressures.

  9. Robust and Soft Elastomeric Electronics Tolerant to Our Daily Lives.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Saito, Takeshi; Kuwahara, Yuki; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Futaba, Don N; Yamada, Takeo; Hata, Kenji

    2015-09-09

    Clothes represent a unique textile, as they simultaneously provide robustness against our daily activities and comfort (i.e., softness). For electronic devices to be fully integrated into clothes, the devices themselves must be as robust and soft as the clothes themselves. However, to date, no electronic device has ever possessed these properties, because all contain components fabricated from brittle materials, such as metals. Here, we demonstrate robust and soft elastomeric devices where every component possesses elastomeric characteristics with two types of single-walled carbon nanotubes added to provide the necessary electronic properties. Our elastomeric field effect transistors could tolerate every punishment our clothes experience, such as being stretched (elasticity: ∼ 110%), bent, compressed (>4.0 MPa, by a car and heels), impacted (>6.26 kg m/s, by a hammer), and laundered. Our electronic device provides a novel design principle for electronics and wide range applications even in research fields where devices cannot be used.

  10. Elastomeric Cellular Structure Enhanced by Compressible Liquid Filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yueting; Xu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Chengliang; Qiao, Yu; Li, Yibing

    2016-05-01

    Elastomeric cellular structures provide a promising solution for energy absorption. Their flexible and resilient nature is particularly relevant to protection of human bodies. Herein we develop an elastomeric cellular structure filled with nanoporous material functionalized (NMF) liquid. Due to the nanoscale infiltration in NMF liquid and its interaction with cell walls, the cellular structure has a much enhanced mechanical performance, in terms of loading capacity and energy absorption density. Moreover, it is validated that the structure is highly compressible and self-restoring. Its hyper-viscoelastic characteristics are elucidated.

  11. Actuating dielectric elastomers in pure shear deformation by elastomeric conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yin; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Bai, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hong

    2014-02-10

    Pure shear experiments are commonly used to characterize dielectric elastomer (DE) material properties and to evaluate DE actuator/generator performance. It is increasingly important for many applications to replace conventional carbon grease electrodes with stretchable elastomeric conductors. We formulate a theory for DE with elastomeric conductors, synthesize transparent hydrogel as ionic conductors, and measure actuation of DE in pure shear deformation. Maximum 67% actuation strain is demonstrated. The theory agrees well with our measurement and also correlates well with reported experiments on DE with electronic conductors.

  12. Elastomeric Cellular Structure Enhanced by Compressible Liquid Filler

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yueting; Xu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Chengliang; Qiao, Yu; Li, Yibing

    2016-01-01

    Elastomeric cellular structures provide a promising solution for energy absorption. Their flexible and resilient nature is particularly relevant to protection of human bodies. Herein we develop an elastomeric cellular structure filled with nanoporous material functionalized (NMF) liquid. Due to the nanoscale infiltration in NMF liquid and its interaction with cell walls, the cellular structure has a much enhanced mechanical performance, in terms of loading capacity and energy absorption density. Moreover, it is validated that the structure is highly compressible and self-restoring. Its hyper-viscoelastic characteristics are elucidated. PMID:27221079

  13. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  14. 46 CFR 56.30-35 - Gasketed mechanical couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gasketed mechanical couplings. 56.30-35 Section 56.30-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-35 Gasketed mechanical couplings. (a)...

  15. 46 CFR 56.30-35 - Gasketed mechanical couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gasketed mechanical couplings. 56.30-35 Section 56.30-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-35 Gasketed mechanical couplings. (a)...

  16. 46 CFR 56.30-35 - Gasketed mechanical couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gasketed mechanical couplings. 56.30-35 Section 56.30-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-35 Gasketed mechanical couplings. (a)...

  17. 46 CFR 56.30-35 - Gasketed mechanical couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gasketed mechanical couplings. 56.30-35 Section 56.30-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-35 Gasketed mechanical couplings. (a)...

  18. 46 CFR 56.30-35 - Gasketed mechanical couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gasketed mechanical couplings. 56.30-35 Section 56.30-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-35 Gasketed mechanical couplings. (a)...

  19. Non-flammable elastomeric fiber from a fluorinated elastomer and containing an halogenated flame retardant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S. G.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions are described comprised of either spandex type polyurethane having incorporated into the polymer chain halogen containing polyols, conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture with flame retardant additives, or fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives. Methods are described for preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials and articles of manufacture comprised of the flame retardant clastomeric materials and non elastic materials such as polybenzimidazoles, fiberglass, nylons, etc.

  20. Development of Elastomeric Polypeptide BIomaterials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    set of experimental observations on. a family of elastomeric protein-based polymers , five axiomsTiaye^een deyefoped whiCh , ( govern protein...demonstrated to be competition for hydration between hydrophobic and polar moieties These developments represent the nuts and bolts of amphiphilic polymer ...structure formation, function and engineering by means of hydrophobic folding and assembly. Basically, amphiphilic polymers , including proteins and

  1. Partial-Vacuum-Gasketed Electrochemical Corrosion Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonifas, Andrew P.; Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    An electrochemical cell for making corrosion measurements has been designed to prevent or reduce crevice corrosion, which is a common source of error in prior such cells. The present cell (see figure) includes an electrolyte reservoir with O-ring-edged opening at the bottom. In preparation for a test, the reservoir, while empty, is pressed down against a horizontal specimen surface to form an O-ring seal. A purge of air or other suitable gas is begun in the reservoir, and the pressure in the reservoir is regulated to maintain a partial vacuum. While maintaining the purge and partial vacuum, and without opening the interior of the reservoir to the atmosphere, the electrolyte is pumped into the reservoir. The reservoir is then slowly lifted a short distance off the specimen. The level of the partial vacuum is chosen such that the differential pressure is just sufficient to keep the electrolyte from flowing out of the reservoir through the small O-ring/specimen gap. Electrochemical measurements are then made. Because there is no gasket (and, hence, no crevice between the specimen and the gasket), crevice corrosion is unlikely to occur.

  2. Exposure to airborne asbestos during removal and installation of gaskets and packings: a review of published and unpublished studies.

    PubMed

    Madl, Amy K; Clark, Katherine; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, questions have been raised about the health risks to persons who have been occupationally exposed to asbestos-containing gaskets and packing materials used in pipes, valves, and machinery (pumps, autos, etc.). Up until the late 1970s, these materials were widely used throughout industrial and maritime operations, refineries, chemical plants, naval ships, and energy plants. Seven simulation studies and four work-site industrial hygiene studies of industrial and maritime settings involving the collection of more than 300 air samples were evaluated to determine the likely airborne fiber concentrations to which a worker may have been exposed while working with encapsulated asbestos-containing gaskets and packing materials. Each study was evaluated for the representativeness of work practices, analytical methods, sample size, and potential for asbestos contamination (e.g., insulation on valves or pipes used in the study). Specific activities evaluated included the removal and installation of gaskets and packings, flange cleaning, and gasket formation. In all but one of the studies relating to the replacement of gaskets and packing using hand-held tools, the short-term average exposures were less than the current 30-min OSHA excursion limit of 1 fiber per cubic centimeter (f/cc) and all of the long-term average exposures were less than the current 8-h permissible exposure limit time-weighted average (PEL-TWA) of 0.1 f/cc. The weight of evidence indicates that the use of hand tools and hand-operated power tools to remove or install gaskets or packing as performed by pipefitters or other tradesmen in nearly all plausible situations would not have produced airborne concentrations in excess of contemporaneous regulatory levels.

  3. Process for spinning flame retardant elastomeric compositions. [fabricating synthetic fibers for high oxygen environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions comprised of either spandex type polyurethane having halogen containing polyols incorporated into the polymer chain, conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture with flame retardant additives, or fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives were developed. Methods are described for preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials and manufactured articles as well as nonelastic materials such as polybenzimidazoles, fiberglass, and nylons, for high oxygen environments.

  4. In situ heart valve tissue engineering using a bioresorbable elastomeric implant - From material design to 12 months follow-up in sheep.

    PubMed

    Kluin, Jolanda; Talacua, Hanna; Smits, Anthal I P M; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Brugmans, Marieke C P; Fioretta, Emanuela S; Dijkman, Petra E; Söntjens, Serge H M; Duijvelshoff, Renée; Dekker, Sylvia; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W J T; Lintas, Valentina; Vink, Aryan; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Janssen, Henk M; Dankers, Patricia Y W; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2017-05-01

    The creation of a living heart valve is a much-wanted alternative for current valve prostheses that suffer from limited durability and thromboembolic complications. Current strategies to create such valves, however, require the use of cells for in vitro culture, or decellularized human- or animal-derived donor tissue for in situ engineering. Here, we propose and demonstrate proof-of-concept of in situ heart valve tissue engineering using a synthetic approach, in which a cell-free, slow degrading elastomeric valvular implant is populated by endogenous cells to form new valvular tissue inside the heart. We designed a fibrous valvular scaffold, fabricated from a novel supramolecular elastomer, that enables endogenous cells to enter and produce matrix. Orthotopic implantations as pulmonary valve in sheep demonstrated sustained functionality up to 12 months, while the implant was gradually replaced by a layered collagen and elastic matrix in pace with cell-driven polymer resorption. Our results offer new perspectives for endogenous heart valve replacement starting from a readily-available synthetic graft that is compatible with surgical and transcatheter implantation procedures.

  5. The effect upon friction of the degradation of orthodontic elastomeric modules.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ian Robert; Spary, David John; Rock, William Peter

    2012-10-01

    Orthodontic elastomeric modules are susceptible to degradation and deformation after time in the mouth. The aims of this study were to determine whether degradation of elastomeric modules significantly affects friction during sliding mechanics and to investigate whether there is a difference in the behaviour of elastomeric modules after storage in both in vivo and in vitro environments. An Instron testing machine was used to determine the friction generated by elastomeric modules on 0.019 × 0.025 inch stainless steel archwires at 4 degrees of bracket tip. Four brands of modules were tested straight from the packet (n = 15), after storage in artificial saliva (n = 15), and after being in patients' mouths (n = 32). Modules were tested after 24 hours, 1 week, and 6 weeks after storage in both in vivo and in vitro. Analysis of variance revealed that the degradation of elastomeric modules had a variable affect upon friction and that each storage medium produced a distinct pattern of frictional resistance. Modules stored in artificial saliva experienced a significant reduction in friction (P < 0.001) while modules collected from patients' mouths produced similar friction to modules tested straight from the packet. TP Super Slick® modules under dry test conditions produced significantly greater friction than the other three types of test modules (P < 0.001). The structure and surface characteristics of elastomeric modules may affect frictional resistance when a bracket slides along an archwire. These effects vary according to time, storage medium, and brand of elastomeric material.

  6. Modeling friction phenomena and elastomeric dampers in multibody dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Changkuan

    the behavior of the elastomeric damper based on a continuum mechanics approach: the configuration of the damper is modeled using a finite element approach, and material behavior is represented by a set of nonlinear constitutive laws and material parameters. The validated finite element model of the elastomeric damper is then coupled with a comprehensive, multibody dynamics analysis code to predict the behavior of complex systems featuring elastomeric components, for example, rotorcraft with elastomeric lead-lag dampers.

  7. REVIEW OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER GASKETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of the significance of heat leakage through gaskets in household refrigerator/freezers, explores different design features, and suggests further study if necessary. The report gives results of an extensive literature review, interviews...

  8. Thermomechanical behavior of shape memory elastomeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Qi; Luo, Xiaofan; Rodriguez, Erika D.; Zhang, Xiao; Mather, Patrick T.; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can fix a temporary shape and recover their permanent shape in response to environmental stimuli such as heat, electricity, or irradiation. Most thermally activated SMPs use the macromolecular chain mobility change around the glass transition temperature ( Tg) to achieve the shape memory (SM) effects. During this process, the stiffness of the material typically changes by three orders of magnitude. Recently, a composite materials approach was developed to achieve thermally activated shape memory effect where the material exhibits elastomeric response in both the temporary and the recovered configurations. These shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs) consist of an elastomeric matrix reinforced by a semicrystalline polymer fiber network. The matrix provides background rubber elasticity while the fiber network can transform between solid crystals and melt phases over the operative temperature range. As such it serves as a reversible "switching phase" that enables shape fixing and recovery. Shape memory elastomeric composites provide a new paradigm for the development of a wide array of active polymer composites that utilize the melt-crystal transition to achieve the shape memory effect. This potentially allows for material systems with much simpler chemistries than most shape memory polymers and thus can facilitate more rapid material development and insertion. It is therefore important to understand the thermomechanical behavior and to develop corresponding material models. In this paper, a 3D finite-deformation constitutive modeling framework was developed to describe the thermomechanical behavior of SMEC. The model is phenomenological, although inspired by micromechanical considerations of load transfer between the matrix and fiber phases of a composite system. It treats the matrix as an elastomer and the fibers as a complex solid that itself is an aggregate of melt and crystal phases that evolve from one to the other during a

  9. Comparison of Contamination of Low-Frictional Elastomeric Rings with That of Conventional Elastomeric Rings by Streptococcus mutans - An In-vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Mogra, Subraya; Shetty, V. Surendra; Shetty, Siddarth; Jose, Nidhin Philip

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The presence of brackets and ligatures has been shown to be related to an increase in gingival inflammation and increased risk of decalcification. The various measures were taken to reduce the plaque accumulation and also lot of efforts were made by manufacturers that reduced the binding friction between the ligature rings and arch wire that facilitated easy sliding of the tooth through the wire. The low frictional ligatures rings manufactured by different manufacturers presumed to attract fewer bacteria due to greater reduction in surface roughness. Our study aimed to evaluate whether the low frictional elastomeric rings accumulate fewer bacteria than conventional ligature rings. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients (15 males and 15 females) who underwent fixed appliance therapy were selected. The study was done using split-mouth design. In each volunteer, synergy low frictional elastomeric rings were tied to brackets bonded to the maxillary premolar on the right side and mandibular premolar on the left side. Conventional elastomeric rings that served as control group were tied to the contralateral teeth, with the same design. Samples were collected after four weeks (28 days) and cultured for bacteria Streptococcus mutans. Results: There was no statistical difference between Streptococcus mutans count in low frictional elastomeric rings with that of conventional rings. Conclusion: We concluded that adherence of Streptococcus mutans is similar in both synergy low frictional elastomeric rings and conventional clear elastomeric rings and thus the manufacturer’s claim of minimal bacterial adherence was discarded. PMID:26023638

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF REMOTE HANFORD CONNECTOR GASKET REPLACEMENT TOOLING FOR DWPF

    SciTech Connect

    Krementz, D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey

    2009-05-05

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to develop tooling and equipment to remotely replace gaskets in mechanical Hanford connectors to reduce personnel radiation exposure as compared to the current hands-on method. It is also expected that radiation levels will continually increase with future waste streams. The equipment is operated in the Remote Equipment Decontamination Cell (REDC), which is equipped with compressed air, two master-slave manipulators (MSM's) and an electro-mechanical manipulator (EMM) arm for operation of the remote tools. The REDC does not provide access to electrical power, so the equipment must be manually or pneumatically operated. The MSM's have a load limit at full extension of ten pounds, which limited the weight of the installation tool. In order to remotely replace Hanford connector gaskets several operations must be performed remotely, these include: removal of the spent gasket and retaining ring (retaining ring is also called snap ring), loading the new snap ring and gasket into the installation tool and installation of the new gasket into the Hanford connector. SRNL developed and tested tools that successfully perform all of the necessary tasks. Removal of snap rings from horizontal and vertical connectors is performed by separate air actuated retaining ring removal tools and is manipulated in the cell by the MSM. In order install a new gasket, the snap ring loader is used to load a new snap ring into a groove in the gasket installation tool. A new gasket is placed on the installation tool and retained by custom springs. An MSM lifts the installation tool and presses the mounted gasket against the connector block. Once the installation tool is in position, the gasket and snap ring are installed onto the connector by pneumatic actuation. All of the tools are located on a custom work table with a pneumatic valve station that directs compressed air to the desired tool and

  11. Airborne asbestos exposures associated with gasket and packing replacement: a simulation study of flange and valve repair work and an assessment of exposure variables.

    PubMed

    Madl, Amy K; Devlin, Kathryn D; Perez, Angela L; Hollins, Dana M; Cowan, Dallas M; Scott, Paul K; White, Katherine; Cheng, Thales J; Henshaw, John L

    2015-02-01

    A simulation study was conducted to evaluate worker and area exposure to airborne asbestos associated with the replacement of asbestos-containing gaskets and packing materials from flanges and valves and assess the influence of several variables previously not investigated. Additionally, potential of take home exposures from clothing worn during the study was characterized. Our data showed that product type, ventilation type, gasket location, flange or bonnet size, number of flanges involved, surface characteristics, gasket surface adherence, and even activity type did not have a significant effect on worker exposures. Average worker asbestos exposures during flange gasket work (PCME=0.166 f/cc, 12-59 min) were similar to average worker asbestos exposures during valve overhaul work (PCME=0.165 f/cc, 7-76 min). Average 8-h TWA asbestos exposures were estimated to range from 0.010 to 0.062 f/cc. Handling clothes worn during gasket and packing replacement activities demonstrated exposures that were 0.71% (0.0009 f/cc 40-h TWA) of the airborne asbestos concentration experienced during the 5 days of the study. Despite the many variables considered in this study, exposures during gasket and packing replacement occur within a relatively narrow range, are below current and historical occupational exposure limits for asbestos, and are consistent with previously published data.

  12. Elastomeric Cathode Binder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D. S.; Somoano, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Soluble copolymer binder mixed with cathode material and solvent forms flexible porous cathode used in lithium and Ni/Cd batteries. Cathodes prepared by this process have lower density due to expanding rubbery binder and greater flexibility than conventional cathodes. Fabrication procedure readily adaptable to scaled-up processes.

  13. Engineered elastomeric proteins with dual elasticity can be controlled by a molecular regulator.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Li, Hongbin

    2008-08-01

    Elastomeric proteins are molecular springs that confer excellent mechanical properties to many biological tissues and biomaterials. Depending on the role performed by the tissue or biomaterial, elastomeric proteins can behave as molecular springs or shock absorbers. Here we combine single-molecule atomic force microscopy and protein engineering techniques to create elastomeric proteins that can switch between two distinct types of mechanical behaviour in response to the binding of a molecular regulator. The proteins are mechanically labile by design and behave as entropic springs with an elasticity that is governed by their configurational entropy. However, when a molecular regulator binds to the protein, it switches into a mechanically stable state and can act as a shock absorber. These engineered proteins effectively mimic and combine the two extreme forms of elastic behaviour found in natural elastomeric proteins, and thus represent a new type of smart nanomaterial that will find potential applications in nanomechanics and material sciences.

  14. Elastomeric polyurea nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalini, R.; Roland, C. M.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), nano-layered silicate (nanoclay), and trisilanolphenyl-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) on the rheology and mechanical properties of an oligomeric polydiamine and the polyurea formed by its reaction with isocyanate were measured. The MWCNT and nanoclay increase the viscosity of the polydiamine and form a flocculated filler network at very low concentrations (< 1%). This network imparts a strong strain-dependence to the dynamic modulus. These effects are absent with POSS, which primarily affects the polyurea chemistry. The tensile modulus of the cured polyurea is higher for all three additives, and using POSS significantly tougher material can be obtained, provided adjustments to the stoichiometry are made.

  15. Analysis of the Influence of Food Colorings in Esthetic Orthodontic Elastomeric Ligatures

    PubMed Central

    Dias da Silva, Vanessa; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli S; Dias, Caroline; Osório, Leandro Berni

    2016-01-01

    Proposition: The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the color changes of esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures of different shades when exposed to four food colorings commonly found in the diet of patients. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures in the colors pearl, pearl blue, pearl white and colorless, which were immersed for 72 hours in five different solutions: distilled water (control group), coffee, tea, Coca-Cola ® and wine. The color changes of the esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures were measured with the aid of a spectrophotometer, at T1 - as provided by the manufacturer; and T2 - after colorings process. Results: The results indicated that the esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures of all initial hues are susceptible to pigmentation. Among the evaluated colors, all changed the finished look and the color of the samples tested. In ascending order, the color of the samples was as follows: distilled water, Coca-Cola®, black tea, wine and coffee. Conclusion: The substances that have a greater potential for pigmentation in esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures were black tea, wine and coffee, respectively. All shades of esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures are susceptible to color change. PMID:27733878

  16. 33 CFR 183.536 - Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers. 183.536 Section 183.536 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Standards § 183.536 Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers. (a) (b) Each gasket and each...

  17. 33 CFR 183.536 - Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers. 183.536 Section 183.536 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Standards § 183.536 Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers. (a) (b) Each gasket and each...

  18. 33 CFR 183.536 - Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers. 183.536 Section 183.536 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Standards § 183.536 Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers. (a) (b) Each gasket and each...

  19. 33 CFR 183.536 - Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers. 183.536 Section 183.536 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Standards § 183.536 Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers. (a) (b) Each gasket and each...

  20. 33 CFR 183.536 - Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers. 183.536 Section 183.536 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Standards § 183.536 Seals and gaskets in fuel filters and strainers. (a) (b) Each gasket and each...

  1. Resilin: protein-based elastomeric biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Su, Renay S-C; Kim, Yeji; Liu, Julie C

    2014-04-01

    Resilin is an elastomeric protein found in insect cuticles and is remarkable for its high strain, low stiffness, and high resilience. Since the first resilin sequence was identified in Drosophilia melanogaster (fruit fly), researchers have utilized molecular cloning techniques to construct resilin-based proteins for a number of different applications. In addition to exhibiting the superior mechanical properties of resilin, resilin-based proteins are autofluorescent, display self-assembly properties, and undergo phase transitions in response to temperature. These properties have potential application in designing biosensors or environmentally responsive materials for use in tissue engineering or drug delivery. Furthermore, the capability of resilin-based biomaterials has been expanded by designing proteins that include both resilin-based sequences and bioactive domains such as cell-adhesion or matrix metalloproteinase sequences. These new materials maintain the superior mechanical and physical properties of resilin and also have the added benefit of controlling cell response. Because the mechanical and biological properties can be tuned through protein engineering, a wide range of properties can be achieved for tissue engineering applications including muscles, vocal folds, cardiovascular tissues, and cartilage.

  2. 10. Detail of center hangar doors and canvas gasket, dock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail of center hangar doors and canvas gasket, dock no. 493. View to southwest. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Nose Docks, On either side of Hangar Access Apron at Northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  3. Chemical Stability of Telavancin in Elastomeric Pumps☆

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Patrick; Aladeen, Traci; Kirkegaard, Paul; LaChance, Dennis; Slover, Christine

    2015-01-01

    solutions examined. All decreases in telavancin concentration were ≤2.7%. Comparison of each test sample solution to the corresponding glass control indicated no loss of active drug due to absorption by the elastomeric material of the pumps. The greatest increase in the amount of total degradants observed over the 8-day period was ~0.7 w/w%. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that telavancin remains chemically stable when diluted in the Intermate Infusion System and the Homepump Eclipse elastomeric pumps and stored at 2°C to 8°C for up to 8 days protected from light at the concentration range and dilution schemes evaluated. PMID:26649079

  4. Evaluation of surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability and gypsum compatibility of monophase polyvinyl-siloxane and polyether elastomeric impression materials under dry and moist conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Atluri, Kaleswararao; Putcha, Madhu Sudhan; Kondreddi, Sirisha; Kumar, N. Suman; Tadi, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study was designed to compare polyvinyl-siloxane (PVS) monophase and polyether (PE) monophase materials under dry and moist conditions for properties such as surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability, and gypsum compatibility. Materials and Methods: Surface detail reproduction was evaluated using two criteria. Dimensional stability was evaluated according to American Dental Association (ADA) specification no. 19. Gypsum compatibility was assessed by two criteria. All the samples were evaluated, and the data obtained were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Pearson's Chi-square tests. Results: When surface detail reproduction was evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19, both the groups under the two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. When evaluated macroscopically both the groups showed statistically significant difference. Results for dimensional stability showed that the deviation from standard was significant among the two groups, where Aquasil group showed significantly more deviation compared to Impregum group (P < 0.001). Two conditions also showed significant difference, with moist conditions showing significantly more deviation compared to dry condition (P < 0.001). The results of gypsum compatibility when evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19 and by giving grades to the casts for both the groups and under two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. Conclusion: Regarding dimensional stability, both impregum and aquasil performed better in dry condition than in moist; impregum performed better than aquasil in both the conditions. When tested for surface detail reproduction according to ADA specification, under dry and moist conditions both of them performed almost equally. When tested according to macroscopic evaluation, impregum and aquasil performed significantly better in dry condition compared to moist condition. In dry

  5. Understanding Mechanical Response of Elastomeric Graphene Networks.

    PubMed

    Ni, Na; Barg, Suelen; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Macul Perez, Felipe; Miranda, Miriam; Lu, Cong; Mattevi, Cecilia; Saiz, Eduardo

    2015-09-08

    Ultra-light porous networks based on nano-carbon materials (such as graphene or carbon nanotubes) have attracted increasing interest owing to their applications in wide fields from bioengineering to electrochemical devices. However, it is often difficult to translate the properties of nanomaterials to bulk three-dimensional networks with a control of their mechanical properties. In this work, we constructed elastomeric graphene porous networks with well-defined structures by freeze casting and thermal reduction, and investigated systematically the effect of key microstructural features. The porous networks made of large reduced graphene oxide flakes (>20 μm) are superelastic and exhibit high energy absorption, showing much enhanced mechanical properties than those with small flakes (<2 μm). A better restoration of the graphitic nature also has a considerable effect. In comparison, microstructural differences, such as the foam architecture or the cell size have smaller or negligible effect on the mechanical response. The recoverability and energy adsorption depend on density with the latter exhibiting a minimum due to the interplay between wall fracture and friction during deformation. These findings suggest that an improvement in the mechanical properties of porous graphene networks significantly depend on the engineering of the graphene flake that controls the property of the cell walls.

  6. Understanding Mechanical Response of Elastomeric Graphene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Na; Barg, Suelen; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Macul Perez, Felipe; Miranda, Miriam; Lu, Cong; Mattevi, Cecilia; Saiz, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-light porous networks based on nano-carbon materials (such as graphene or carbon nanotubes) have attracted increasing interest owing to their applications in wide fields from bioengineering to electrochemical devices. However, it is often difficult to translate the properties of nanomaterials to bulk three-dimensional networks with a control of their mechanical properties. In this work, we constructed elastomeric graphene porous networks with well-defined structures by freeze casting and thermal reduction, and investigated systematically the effect of key microstructural features. The porous networks made of large reduced graphene oxide flakes (>20 μm) are superelastic and exhibit high energy absorption, showing much enhanced mechanical properties than those with small flakes (<2 μm). A better restoration of the graphitic nature also has a considerable effect. In comparison, microstructural differences, such as the foam architecture or the cell size have smaller or negligible effect on the mechanical response. The recoverability and energy adsorption depend on density with the latter exhibiting a minimum due to the interplay between wall fracture and friction during deformation. These findings suggest that an improvement in the mechanical properties of porous graphene networks significantly depend on the engineering of the graphene flake that controls the property of the cell walls. PMID:26348898

  7. Understanding Mechanical Response of Elastomeric Graphene Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Na; Barg, Suelen; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Macul Perez, Felipe; Miranda, Miriam; Lu, Cong; Mattevi, Cecilia; Saiz, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Ultra-light porous networks based on nano-carbon materials (such as graphene or carbon nanotubes) have attracted increasing interest owing to their applications in wide fields from bioengineering to electrochemical devices. However, it is often difficult to translate the properties of nanomaterials to bulk three-dimensional networks with a control of their mechanical properties. In this work, we constructed elastomeric graphene porous networks with well-defined structures by freeze casting and thermal reduction, and investigated systematically the effect of key microstructural features. The porous networks made of large reduced graphene oxide flakes (>20 μm) are superelastic and exhibit high energy absorption, showing much enhanced mechanical properties than those with small flakes (<2 μm). A better restoration of the graphitic nature also has a considerable effect. In comparison, microstructural differences, such as the foam architecture or the cell size have smaller or negligible effect on the mechanical response. The recoverability and energy adsorption depend on density with the latter exhibiting a minimum due to the interplay between wall fracture and friction during deformation. These findings suggest that an improvement in the mechanical properties of porous graphene networks significantly depend on the engineering of the graphene flake that controls the property of the cell walls.

  8. Strain-induced crystallization in elastomeric polymer networks prepared in solution and sol-gel derived high-temperature organic-inorganic hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premachandra, Jagath Kumara

    Cross-linking polymer chains in solution should bring about fewer inter-chain entanglements in the resulting network. The subsequent drying of this network should compress the chains into a "super-contracted" state. The opposing effects of these changes on strain-induced crystallization in cis-1,4-polyisoprene networks formed in solution were investigated. Higher elongations were required to achieve strain-induced crystallinity in the networks prepared at higher dilutions, suggesting that in this regard the compressed states of the chains was more important than their reduced entangling. The constrained-junction theory was applied to strain-induced crystallization in the above networks. The stress-strain isotherms generated from this theory were in satisfactory agreement with experiment. It was found that the constraint parameter kappa decreases with increase in dilution during cross-linking mainly due to the fact that cross-linking in solution decreases chain interpenetration. The dependence of hydrolysis and condensation of gamma-ureidopropyltrimethoxysilane on pH in the water-methanol system at 23sp°C was investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of rates of hydrolysis showed that gamma-ureidopropyltrimethoxysilane is most stable in the water-methanol system at pH 7.7. The rate of overall condensation of silanols produced by the hydrolysis was qualitatively analyzed. These silanol groups are relatively more stable around pH 4.87. The mechanical properties, thermal stability and water absorption of high-temperature sulfopolybenzobisthiazole-silica hybrid materials were investigated. The use of a bonding agent N,N-diethylaminopropyltrimethoxysilane facilitated the interfacial bonding between the organic and inorganic phases in these materials prepared through the sol-gel process. Tensile modulus, thermal stability and the resistant to water absorption were increased with increase in silica content in the resulting composites

  9. Effects of gasket on coupled plastic flow and strain-induced phase transformations under high pressure and large torsion in a rotational diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Biao; Levitas, Valery I.

    2016-01-01

    Combined plastic flow and strain-induced phase transformations (PTs) under high pressure in a sample within a gasket subjected to three dimensional compression and torsion in a rotational diamond anvil cell (RDAC) are studied using a finite element approach. The results are obtained for the weaker, equal-strength, and stronger high-pressure phases in comparison with low-pressure phases. It is found that, due to the strong gasket, the pressure in the sample is relatively homogenous and the geometry of the transformed zones is mostly determined by heterogeneity in plastic flow. For the equal-strength phases, the PT rate is higher than for the weaker and stronger high-pressure phases. For the weaker high-pressure phase, transformation softening induces material instability and leads to strain and PT localization. For the stronger high-pressure phase, the PT is suppressed by strain hardening during PT. The effect of the kinetic parameter k that scales the PT rate in the strain-controlled kinetic equation is also examined. In comparison with a traditional diamond anvil cell without torsion, the PT progress is much faster in RDAC under the same maximum pressure in the sample. Finally, the gasket size and strength effects are discussed. For a shorter and weaker gasket, faster plastic flow in radial and thickness directions leads to faster PT kinetics in comparison with a longer and stronger gasket. The rates of PT and plastic flows are not very sensitive to the modest change in a gasket thickness. Multiple experimental results are reproduced and interpreted. Obtained results allow one to design the desired pressure-plastic strain loading program in the experiments for searching new phases, reducing PT pressure by plastic shear, extracting kinetic properties from experiments with heterogeneous fields, and controlling homogeneity of all fields and kinetics of PTs.

  10. Elastomeric member for energy storage device

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.; Chute, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16), disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, transition end sections, and is attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). During manufacture, woven wire mesh sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle. Each sleeve (26, 28) contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween.

  11. Testing the influence of various conditions on the migration of epoxidised soybean oil from polyvinylchloride gaskets.

    PubMed

    Hanušová, Kristýna; Rajchl, Aleš; Votavová, Lenka; Dobiáš, Jaroslav; Steiner, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Epoxidised soybean oil (ESBO) is widely used as a plasticiser and stabiliser mainly in food contact materials on the base of polyvinylchloride (PVC), especially in the gaskets of jar lids. PVC gaskets containing 10-37% of ESBO were prepared by the baking of PVC plastisols at various process temperatures (180-240°C) in the laboratory. ESBO migration into olive oil and 3% acetic acid was studied at various temperatures (4°C, 25°C, 40°C and 60°C) during a storage time up to 12 months. ESBO released into food simulants was transmethylated, derivatised and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The effect of food processing, i.e. pasteurisation (80°C and 100°C) and sterilisation (125°C) on ESBO migration was also evaluated. The results were critically assessed with respect to the test conditions of specific migration in accordance with the current European Union legislation (Regulation (EU) No. 10/2011). The levels of ESBO migration found confirmed that the test conditions (i.e. 40°C or 60°C, 10 days) representing contact in the worst foreseeable use scenario seem to be insufficient for the simulation of ESBO migration during long-term storage and thus do not provide satisfactory objective results.

  12. Gun Liner Emplacement With an Elastomeric Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Include area code) 410 -306-0816 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 iii Contents List of Figures iv  List of Tables v...12  Figure 9. Inner diameter measurements for Stellite liners no. 1 and 2...5  Table 2. Bond strength results for 4-in Stellite 25 liners ................................................................6  Table 3. Bond

  13. Elastomeric organic material for switching application

    SciTech Connect

    Shiju, K. E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com Praveen, T. E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com Preedep, P. E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Organic Electronic devices like OLED, Organic Solar Cells etc are promising as, cost effective alternatives to their inorganic counterparts due to various reasons. However the organic semiconductors currently available are not attractive with respect to their high cost and intricate synthesis protocols. Here we demonstrate that Natural Rubber has the potential to become a cost effective solution to this. Here an attempt has been made to fabricate iodine doped poly isoprene based switching device. In this work Poly methyl methacrylate is used as dielectric layer and Aluminium are employed as electrodes.

  14. Elastomeric PGS scaffolds in arterial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kee-Won; Wang, Yadong

    2011-04-08

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading cause of mortality in the US and especially, coronary artery disease increases with an aging population and increasing obesity. Currently, bypass surgery using autologous vessels, allografts, and synthetic grafts are known as a commonly used for arterial substitutes. However, these grafts have limited applications when an inner diameter of arteries is less than 6 mm due to low availability, thrombotic complications, compliance mismatch, and late intimal hyperplasia. To overcome these limitations, tissue engineering has been successfully applied as a promising alternative to develop small-diameter arterial constructs that are nonthrombogenic, robust, and compliant. Several previous studies have developed small-diameter arterial constructs with tri-lamellar structure, excellent mechanical properties and burst pressure comparable to native arteries. While high tensile strength and burst pressure by increasing collagen production from a rigid material or cell sheet scaffold, these constructs still had low elastin production and compliance, which is a major problem to cause graft failure after implantation. Considering these issues, we hypothesized that an elastometric biomaterial combined with mechanical conditioning would provide elasticity and conduct mechanical signals more efficiently to vascular cells, which increase extracellular matrix production and support cellular orientation. The objective of this report is to introduce a fabrication technique of porous tubular scaffolds and a dynamic mechanical conditioning for applying them to arterial tissue engineering. We used a biodegradable elastomer, poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS) for fabricating porous tubular scaffolds from the salt fusion method. Adult primary baboon smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were seeded on the lumen of scaffolds, which cultured in our designed pulsatile flow bioreactor for 3 weeks. PGS scaffolds had consistent thickness and randomly distributed macro

  15. Elastomeric member and method of manufacture therefor

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1985-12-10

    An energy storage device is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member disposed within a tubular housing, which elastomeric member is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, and transition end sections, attached to rigid end piece assemblies of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing. Each of the transition sections are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section to provide the correct profile and helix angle. 12 figs.

  16. Elastomeric member and method of manufacture therefor

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16) disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section (74), and transition end sections (76, 78), attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member (16), a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). Each of the transition sections (76, 78) are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve (26, 28) having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve (26, 28) also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle.

  17. Experiences with new European standards for calculation of flanged joints including necessary gasket factors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartonicek, J.; Kockelmann, H.; Schoeckle, F.

    1996-12-01

    The correct function of a flanged joint in a given construction (flanges, bolts) and with given loads (pressure, temperature, additional forces) depends on the following: (1) choice of the gasket for the operation environment; (2) determination of the gasket stress for assembly conditions; and (3) gasket stress in operation, i.e., the conditions when leakage has to be minimized. For the correct choice of a gasket it is necessary to have gasket factors available, as given by DIN 28090 (Sept. 95) together with the test procedures. These gasket factors determine the tightening characteristics as well as the deformation capability of the gaskets. Furthermore, these gasket factors must be available for use in calculations. On the basis of calculations a stress analysis (i.e. a limitation of the stresses in flanges and bolts) must be possible as well as the determination of the bolt forces for the assembly state and of the gasket stress for operating conditions. This is one of the goals of the standard pr DIN EN 1591. The paper first introduces the actual European standards. Calculations are reviewed using test data from special test rigs and from real flanged joints. The calculations were made according to DIN 2505 (initial German standard for flanged joints) and pr DIN EN 1591. Additionally, 2D and 3D Finite Element analysis calculations were performed.

  18. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix

    PubMed Central

    Stankus, John J.; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (p < 0.05). Fluorescent imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining further illustrated high cell densities integrated between the elastomeric fibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues. PMID:16095685

  19. Extrusion, slide, and rupture of an elastomeric seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengjin; Chen, Chao; Liu, Qihan; Lou, Yucun; Suo, Zhigang

    2017-02-01

    Elastomeric seals are essential to two great technological advances in oilfields: horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. This paper describes a method to study elastomeric seals by using the pressure-extrusion curve (i.e., the relation between the drop of pressure across a seal and the volume of extrusion of the elastomer). Emphasis is placed on a common mode of failure found in oilfields: leak caused by a crack across the length of a long seal. We obtain an analytical solution of large elastic deformation, which is analogous to the Poiseuille flow of viscous liquids. We further obtain analytical expressions for the energy release rate of a crack and the critical pressure for the onset of its propagation. The theory predicts the pressure-extrusion curve using material parameters (elastic modulus, sliding stress, and fracture energy) and geometric parameters (thickness, length, and precompression). We fabricate seals of various parameters in transparent chambers on a desktop, and watch the seals extrude, slide, rupture and leak. The experimentally measured pressure-extrusion curves agree with theoretical predictions remarkably well.

  20. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix.

    PubMed

    Stankus, John J; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R

    2006-02-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (p<0.05). Fluorescent imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining further illustrated high cell densities integrated between the elastomeric fibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1,700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues.

  1. NCO-5 Technician Cuts Finger while Cutting Gasket Material

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, Stanley; Schreiber, Stephen Bruce; Mcneel, John Worth; Monsalve-Jones, Robert A.; Welsh, Mark; Ortega, Greg N.; Martinez, Xavier Baltazar; Padilla, Ruby A.

    2015-12-10

    As part of the ADPSM Safety Improvement Plan, the WSST has established a subcommittee for a Learning Team. The purpose of a Learning Team is to transfer and communicate the information into operational feedback and improvement. We want to pay attention to the small things that go wrong because they are often early warning signals and may provide insight into the health of the whole system.

  2. Rubber and alumina gaskets retain vacuum seal in high temperature EMF cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesson, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Silicone rubber gasket and an alumina gasket retain a vacuum inside a high temperature EMF cell in which higher and lower density liquid metal electrodes are separated by an intermediate density fused salt electrolyte. This innovation is in use on a sodium bismuth regenerable EMF cell in which the fused salts and metals are at about 500 deg to 600 deg C.

  3. 46 CFR 56.25-15 - Gaskets (modifies 108.4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gaskets (modifies 108.4). 56.25-15 Section 56.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND... operating temperature exceeds -750 °F. (d) The use of metal and nonmetallic gaskets is not limited as...

  4. 46 CFR 56.25-15 - Gaskets (modifies 108.4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gaskets (modifies 108.4). 56.25-15 Section 56.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND... operating temperature exceeds -750 °F. (d) The use of metal and nonmetallic gaskets is not limited as...

  5. 46 CFR 56.25-15 - Gaskets (modifies 108.4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gaskets (modifies 108.4). 56.25-15 Section 56.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND... operating temperature exceeds -750 °F. (d) The use of metal and nonmetallic gaskets is not limited as...

  6. Elastomeric binders for electrodes. [in secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D. H.; Somoano, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    The poor mechanical integrity of the cathode represents an important problem which affects the performance of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells. Repeated charge of a TiS2 cathode may give rise to stresses which disturb the electrode structure and can contribute to capacity loss. An investigation indicates that the use of an inelastic binder material, such as Teflon, aggravates the problem, and can lead to electrode disruption and poor TiS2 particle-particle contact. The feasibility of a use of elastomers as TiS2 binder materials has, therefore, been explored. It was found that elastomeric binders provide an effective approach for simplifying rechargeable cathode fabrication. A pronounced improvement in the mechanical integrity of the cathode structure contributes to a prolonged cycle life.

  7. Pain and distress induced by elastomeric and spring separators in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balbeesi, Hana O.; Bin Huraib, Sahar M.; AlNahas, Nadia W.; AlKawari, Huda M.; Abu-Amara, Abdulrahman B.; Vellappally, Sajith; Anil, Sukumaran

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The objective of the present investigation is to evaluate patients’ pain perception and discomfort, the duration of pain and the level of self-medication over time during tooth separation, and the effectiveness of elastomeric and spring types of orthodontic separators in Saudi population. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 30 female adolescent patients who had elastomeric/spring separators as part of their orthodontic treatment. A self-administrated questionnaire comprising 16 multiple choice questions and another with visual analog scale were used to record the patient's pain perceptions at 4 hours, 24 hours, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days from the time of insertion. The level of pain and discomfort during these time periods were assessed by a visual analog scale. After a separation period of 7 days, the amount of separation was measured with a leaf gauge. Type and frequency of analgesic consumption was also recorded. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20 (IBM SPSS -Chicago, IL: SPSS Inc.,) was used for statistical analysis. Results: The data showed significant increase in the level of pain at 4 hours, 24 hours, and 3 days from separator placement. The elastomeric separators produced significantly more separation than the spring separators and also caused maximum pain during the first 3 days after insertion. However, there was no significant difference between the score of pain between two separators at all time intervals. Conclusion: Both elastomeric and spring separators showed comparative levels of pain and discomfort during the early phase of separation. Elastomeric separators were found to be more effective in tooth separation than spring separators. However, further studies are necessary to substantiate this preliminary observation. PMID:28032047

  8. A Digital Image Steganography using Sierpinski Gasket Fractal and PLSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupa, Ch.

    2013-09-01

    Information attacks are caused due to the weaknesses in the information security. These attacks affect the non-repudiation and integrity of the security services. In this paper, a novel security approach that can defend the message from information attacks is proposed. In this new approach the original message is encrypted by Fractal Sierpinski Gasket (FSG) cryptographic algorithm, that result is hidden into an image using penultimate and least significant bit (PLSB) embedding method. This method makes the security more robust than conventional approach. Important properties of fractals are sensitivity and self similarity. These can be exploited to produce avalanche effect. Stegoanalysis of the proposed method shows that it is resistant to various attacks and stronger than the existed steganographic approaches.

  9. Method of making hollow elastomeric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyles, H. F.; Moacanin, J.; Cuddihy, E. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Annular elastomeric bodies having intricate shapes are cast by dipping a heated, rotating mandrel into a solution of the elastomer, permitting the elastomer to creep into sharp recesses, drying the coated mandrel and repeating the operation until the desired thickness has been achieved. A bladder for a heart assist pump in which a cylindrical body terminating in flat, sharp horizontal flanges fabricated by this procedure has been subjected to over 2,500 hours of simulated life conditions with no visible signs of degradation.

  10. Development of UHV compatible machined diamond profile gaskets for INDUS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, D. P.; Shiroman, R.; Shukla, S. K.; Kotaiah, S.

    2008-05-01

    Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible demountable joints are needed in Indus-2 (2.5 GeV, 300mA) electron storage ring for connecting Al-alloy vacuum chambers (homogeneous joints) as well as Al-alloy vacuum chambers to well proven stainless steel components like beam diagnostic components and RF-shielded bellow assemblies (heterogeneous joints). Bakeable & reliable diamond profile Al-alloy gaskets have been developed for Helium leak rate less than 2×10-10 Std. CC/sec, which eliminated the need of any Al to SS transition pieces onto the Aluminium vacuum chambers. Salient features of these gaskets are: high reliability, low cost, reduced flange thickness, self alignment, ease in installation, less torque requirement, formability to non-circular shape & ultra cleanliness. These diamond profile gaskets were machined from extruded Al-alloy 6061-T5 pipes using specially developed high-speed steel formed cutting tools. Thermal cyclic tests were carried to check the reliability of these gaskets. No leaks were found even after several bakeouts at 150°C. Non-circular metallic gaskets like the one used in UHV gate valve bonnet seal can also be manufactured using specially developed formed toolings. This paper describes basic design philosophy, manufacturing process and testing details of these gaskets.

  11. Multiresidual LC-MS analysis of plasticizers used in PVC gaskets of lids and assessment of their migration into food sauces.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, F; Catellani, D; Vindigni, M; Suman, M

    2016-09-01

    Plasticizers may migrate from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) gaskets into the foodstuffs mainly by direct contact during the packaging and sterilization procedure, but also by means of occasional contacts occurring during shipment and storage. The present work reports a reliable liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method able to quantify the main plasticizers used in the PVC closure gaskets for metal lids to verify their compliance in both food contact materials and foodstuffs. The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in the positive ion mode resulted the best performing interface for the multiresidual detection of the plasticizers taken into account, followed by selected/multiple reaction monitoring, selected ion monitoring or full scan experiments, depending on the compounds to detect. The method was single-laboratory validated, demonstrating to reach a good sensitivity, thus making possible to perform analysis without any preliminary sample purification or concentration step. It proved to be effectively applicable not only for the determination of plasticizers in PVC gaskets but also in complex food matrices. In particular, it was applied for monitoring plasticizer migration into sauces placed in contact with the lids in worst storage conditions, observing therefore their trend during the shelf-life. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Microfabricated elastomeric stencils for micropatterning cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Folch, A; Jo, B H; Hurtado, O; Beebe, D J; Toner, M

    2000-11-01

    Here we present an inexpensive method to fabricate microscopic cellular cultures, which does not require any surface modification of the substrate prior to cell seeding. The method utilizes a reusable elastomeric stencil (i.e., a membrane containing thru holes) which seals spontaneously against the surface. The stencil is applied to the cell-culture substrate before seeding. During seeding, the stencil prevents the substrate from being exposed to the cell suspension except on the hole areas. After cells are allowed to attach and the stencil is peeled off, cellular islands with a shape similar to the holes remain on the cell-culture substrate. This solvent-free method can be combined with a wide range of substrates (including biocompatible polymers, homogeneous or nonplanar surfaces, microelectronic chips, and gels), biomolecules, and virtually any adherent cell type.

  13. Excitation of a surface plasmon with an elastomeric grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocabas, A.; Dâna, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2006-07-01

    We report on a new method to excite surface plasmon polaritons on a thin metal slab surface using an elastomeric grating which is fabricated by replica molding technique. The grating is placed on the metal surface which creates a periodic perturbation on the surface matching the momentum of the incident light to that of the surface plasmon. The conformal contact between the metal surface and the elastomeric grating changes the dielectric medium periodically and allows the observation of an effective surface plasmon polariton at the metal-air and metal-polymer interfaces of the grating. To clarify the nature of the observed plasmon, comparison of the elastomeric grating with elastomeric slabs was performed with the attenuated total reflection method.

  14. The effect of dietary pigmentation on the esthetic appearance of clear orthodontic elastomeric modules

    PubMed Central

    Talic, Nabeel F; Almudhi, Abdullazez A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the stain resistance of three types of clear elastomeric modules exposed to several common dietary substances through the assessment of the perception of a group of dentists to discoloration using visual analog scale (VAS). Materials and Methods: Elastomeric modules from Unitek (AU), Ormco (OR), and dentaurum (DE) were immersed in the following food substances: Coffee, black tea, chocolate, energy drink, ketchup, and Coca-Cola for 72 h. VAS was used to reflect the module staining severity. Results: Significant difference was found among the three types of modules examined in this study. OR modules showed the least mean staining ratings by the examiners. There was no statistical difference in the staining properties between AU and DE modules. Coffee and tea showed higher staining potential as compared to all staining media. Furthermore, there was no difference in the staining characteristics of coffee and black tea. Conclusions: Coffee and tea are strong staining media that should be avoided by patients who opted to have esthetic appliances for their orthodontic treatment. Elastomeric modules manufactured by AU showed higher staining optical properties as compared to the other two companies, which could be related to the manufacturing processing of these modules. PMID:27127754

  15. Ultimate Control of Rate-Dependent Adhesion for Reversible Transfer Process via a Thin Elastomeric Layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan; Yoon, Min-Ah; Jang, Bongkyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Kim, Kwang-Seop

    2017-03-30

    Adhesion between a stamp with an elastomeric layer and various devices or substrates is crucial to successfully fabricate flexible electronics using a transfer process. Although various transfer processes using stamps with different adhesion strengths have been suggested, the controllable range of adhesion is still limited to a narrow range. To precisely transfer devices onto selected substrates, however, the difference in adhesion between the picking and placing processes should be large enough to achieve a high yield. Herein, we report a simple way to extend the controllable adhesion range of stamps, which can be achieved by adjusting the thickness of the elastomeric layer and the separation velocity. The adhesion strength increased with decreasing layer thickness on the stamp due to a magnification of the confinement and rate-dependent effects on the adhesion. This enabled the controllable range of the adhesion strength for a 15 μm-thick elastomeric layer to be extended up to 12 times that of the bulk under the same separation conditions. The strategy of designing stamps using simple adhesion tests is also introduced, and the reversible transfer of thin Si chips was successfully demonstrated. Tuning and optimizing the adhesion strength of a stamp according to the design process suggested here can be applied to various materials for the selective transfer and replacement of individual devices.

  16. Anvil cell gasket design for high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance experiments beyond 30 GPa.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are reported at up to 30.5 GPa of pressure using radiofrequency (RF) micro-coils with anvil cell designs. These are the highest pressures ever reported with NMR, and are made possible through an improved gasket design based on nano-crystalline powders embedded in epoxy resin. Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN), corundum (α-Al2O3), or diamond based composites have been tested, also in NMR experiments. These composite gaskets lose about 1/2 of their initial height up to 30.5 GPa, allowing for larger sample quantities and preventing damages to the RF micro-coils compared to precipitation hardened CuBe gaskets. It is shown that NMR shift and resolution are less affected by the composite gaskets as compared to the more magnetic CuBe. The sensitivity can be as high as at normal pressure. The new, inexpensive, and simple to engineer gaskets are thus superior for NMR experiments at high pressures.

  17. Anvil cell gasket design for high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance experiments beyond 30 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are reported at up to 30.5 GPa of pressure using radiofrequency (RF) micro-coils with anvil cell designs. These are the highest pressures ever reported with NMR, and are made possible through an improved gasket design based on nano-crystalline powders embedded in epoxy resin. Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN), corundum (α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), or diamond based composites have been tested, also in NMR experiments. These composite gaskets lose about 1/2 of their initial height up to 30.5 GPa, allowing for larger sample quantities and preventing damages to the RF micro-coils compared to precipitation hardened CuBe gaskets. It is shown that NMR shift and resolution are less affected by the composite gaskets as compared to the more magnetic CuBe. The sensitivity can be as high as at normal pressure. The new, inexpensive, and simple to engineer gaskets are thus superior for NMR experiments at high pressures.

  18. Magnetron sputtering of metallic coatings onto elastomeric substrates for a decrease in fuel permeation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myntti, Matthew F.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the application of a metallic coating by magnetron sputtering onto elastomeric substrates, as an inhibiting layer to permeation transport. The metallic coatings which were deposited were aluminum, titanium, and copper. The substrates used were NBR, FVMQ, and FKM elastomers. The permeating fluids were ASTM Fuel C, isooctane, and toluene. The magnetron sputtering properties of these metallic elements were unique to each material, with the titanium sputtering rate being very low. The sputtering rates of these materials correlated well with their sublimation temperature. It was found that some of the metallic particles which were sputtered onto the substrates, implanted into the surface of the elastomeric membranes, with the total amount and distance of implantation being related to the density of the substrate material. The permeation of these solvents through the composite materials was reduced by the presence of these coatings with the reduction in permeation rate ranging from 12 to 25% for Fuel C. The pervaporation properties of these substrates were also evaluated. It was found from this analysis that for the FVMQ and NBR substrates, the permeation rate of the permeating solute molecules was proportional to the size of the permeation molecule. The substrate materials were not significantly stiffened by the addition of the thin metallic coatings. The coated materials were cohesive and well adhered, as determined by stretching of the substrate materials with the metallic layer in place. Upon stretching, there was no evidence of damage to the metallic coating.

  19. Elastomeric and soft conducting microwires for implantable neural interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Luebben, Silvia D.; Sapp, Shawn A.; Hanner, Jenna; Snyder, Noah; Kozai, Takashi D.Y.; Chang, Emily; Nabity, James A.; Nabity, Shawn T.; Lagenaur, Carl F.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Current designs for microelectrodes used for interfacing with the nervous system elicit a characteristic inflammatory response that leads to scar tissue encapsulation, electrical insulation of the electrode from the tissue and ultimately failure. Traditionally, relatively stiff materials like tungsten and silicon are employed which have mechanical properties several orders of magnitude different from neural tissue. This mechanical mismatch is thought to be a major cause of chronic inflammation and degeneration around the device. In an effort to minimize the disparity between neural interface devices and the brain, novel soft electrodes consisting of elastomers and intrinsically conducting polymers were fabricated. The physical, mechanical and electrochemical properties of these materials were extensively characterized to identify the formulations with the optimal combination of parameters including Young’s modulus, elongation at break, ultimate tensile strength, conductivity, impedance and surface charge injection. Our final electrode has a Young’s modulus of 974 kPa which is five orders of magnitude lower than tungsten and significantly lower than other polymer-based neural electrode materials. In vitro cell culture experiments demonstrated the favorable interaction between these soft materials and neurons, astrocytes and microglia, with higher neuronal attachment and a two-fold reduction in inflammatory microglia attachment on soft devices compared to stiff controls. Surface immobilization of neuronal adhesion proteins on these microwires further improved the cellular response. Finally, in vivo electrophysiology demonstrated the functionality of the elastomeric electrodes in recording single unit activity in the rodent visual cortex. The results presented provide initial evidence in support of the use of soft materials in neural interface applications. PMID:25993261

  20. Composite Materials for Maxillofacial Prostheses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    necessary and Identify byv block number) MAXILLOFACIAL PROSTHESES; PROSTHETIC MATERIALS: MICROCAPSULES : SOFT FILLERS; ELASTOMER COMPOSITES 2,. ABSTRACT...used as fillers in the fabrication of maxillofacial prostheses. The projected systems are elastomeric-shelled, liquid-filled microcapsules . Improvements...elastomeric-shelled, liquid-filled microcapsules . Experiments continued on the interfacial polymerization process, with spherical, sealed, capsules

  1. A method for nanofluidic device prototyping using elastomeric collapse.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-min; Huh, Yun Suk; Craighead, Harold G; Erickson, David

    2009-09-15

    Nanofluidics represents a promising solution to problems in fields ranging from biomolecular analysis to optical property tuning. Recently a number of simple nanofluidic fabrication techniques have been introduced that exploit the deformability of elastomeric materials like polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These techniques are limited by the complexity of the devices that can be fabricated, which can only create straight or irregular channels normal to the direction of an applied strain. Here, we report a technique for nanofluidic fabrication based on the controlled collapse of microchannel structures. As is demonstrated, this method converts the easy to control vertical dimension of a PDMS mold to the lateral dimension of a nanochannel. We demonstrate here the creation of complex nanochannel structures as small as 60 nm and provide simple design rules for determining the conditions under which nanochannel formation will occur. The applicability of the technique to biomolecular analysis is demonstrated by showing DNA elongation in a nanochannel and a technique for optofluidic surface enhanced Raman detection of nucleic acids.

  2. Effect of disinfecting solutions on accuracy of alginate and elastomeric impressions.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Asmussen, E

    1989-10-01

    The effect of immersion in six disinfecting solutions on the accuracy of 10 impression materials was investigated. Impressions were taken of a truncated steel cone. After setting, the impressions were either stored at room temperature for 24 h, for control, or immediately immersed in a disinfecting agent for 60 min (in one case 10 min), and after 24 h poured with gypsum. A steel ring fitting the steel cone was placed on the resulting dies, and the discrepancy between the top surface of the ring and the die was measured. From these measurements the deviation between the base diameter of the die and of the impression was calculated to express the inaccuracy. All impressions except some in Blueprint exhibited a net shrinkage, giving rise to too large die stones and incomplete seating of the steel ring. Blueprint impressions, however, occasionally swelled and resulted in too small die stones and "overseating" of the steel ring. The disinfecting solutions had no significant impact on two impression materials. For the remaining eight materials the accuracy was decreased, increased, or unaffected by the immersion. Generally, the accuracy of the alginates investigated were more affected by the disinfecting solutions than were the elastomeric impression materials. The accuracy of the three alginates was drastically impaired by immersion in 70% ethanol, whereas the remaining five disinfecting solutions had a smaller, though sometimes statistically significant, effect on the accuracy. For the elastomeric materials only a few specific combinations of impression material and disinfecting solution reduced the accuracy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Elastomeric Heptablock Terpolymers Structured by Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonzo, C.Guillermo; Fleury, Guillaume; Chaffin, Kimberly A.; Bates, Frank S.

    2010-12-07

    We report the synthesis and characterization of fully saturated hydrocarbon block copolymer thermoplastic elastomers with competitive mechanical properties and attractive processing features. Block copolymers containing glassy poly(cyclohexylethylene) (C), elastomeric poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (P), and semicrystalline poly(ethylene) (E) were produced in a CEC-P-CEC heptablock architecture, denoted XPX, by anionic polymerization and catalytic hydrogenation. The X blocks contain equal volume fractions of C and E, totaling 40%-60% of the material overall. All the XPX polymers are disordered above the melt temperature for E (T{sub m,E} {approx_equal} 95 C) as evidenced by SAXS and dynamic mechanical spectroscopy measurements. Cooling below T{sub m,E} results in crystallization of the E blocks, which induces microphase segregation of E, C, and P into a complex morphology with a continuous rubbery domain and randomly arranged hard domains as shown by TEM. This mechanism of segregation decouples the processing temperature from the XPX molecular weight up to a limiting value. Tensile mechanical testing (simple extension and cyclic loading) demonstrates that the tensile strength (ca. 30 MPa) and strain at break (>500%) are comparable to the behavior of CPC triblock thermoplastic elastomers of similar molecular weight and glass content. However, in the CPC materials, processability is constrained by the order-disorder transition temperature, limiting the applications of these materials. Elastic recovery of the XPX materials following seven cycles of tensile deformation is correlated with the fraction of X in the heptablock copolymer, and the residual strain approaches that of CPC when the fraction of hard blocks f{sub X} {le} 0.39.

  4. 40 CFR 427.40 - Applicability; description of the asbestos paper (elastomeric binder) subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... asbestos paper (elastomeric binder) subcategory. 427.40 Section 427.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ASBESTOS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asbestos Paper (Elastomeric Binder) Subcategory § 427.40 Applicability; description...

  5. 40 CFR 427.40 - Applicability; description of the asbestos paper (elastomeric binder) subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... asbestos paper (elastomeric binder) subcategory. 427.40 Section 427.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ASBESTOS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asbestos Paper (Elastomeric Binder) Subcategory § 427.40...

  6. 40 CFR 427.40 - Applicability; description of the asbestos paper (elastomeric binder) subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... asbestos paper (elastomeric binder) subcategory. 427.40 Section 427.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ASBESTOS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asbestos Paper (Elastomeric Binder) Subcategory § 427.40...

  7. 40 CFR 427.40 - Applicability; description of the asbestos paper (elastomeric binder) subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... asbestos paper (elastomeric binder) subcategory. 427.40 Section 427.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ASBESTOS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asbestos Paper (Elastomeric Binder) Subcategory § 427.40...

  8. 40 CFR 427.40 - Applicability; description of the asbestos paper (elastomeric binder) subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... asbestos paper (elastomeric binder) subcategory. 427.40 Section 427.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ASBESTOS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asbestos Paper (Elastomeric Binder) Subcategory § 427.40 Applicability; description...

  9. Thin graphite bipolar plate with associated gaskets and carbon cloth flow-field for use in an ionomer membrane fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Marchetti, George A.

    2003-01-03

    The present invention comprises a thin graphite plate with associated gaskets and pieces of carbon cloth that comprise a flow-field. The plate, gaskets and flow-field comprise a "plate and gasket assembly" for use in an ionomer membrane fuel cell, fuel cell stack or battery.

  10. Testing of elastomeric liners used in limb prosthetics: classification of 15 products by mechanical performance.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Joan E; Nicholson, Brian S; Zachariah, Santosh G; Cassisi, Damon V; Karchin, Ari; Fergason, John R

    2004-03-01

    The mechanical properties of 15 elastomeric liner products used in limb prosthetics were evaluated under compressive, frictional, shear, and tensile loading conditions. All testing was conducted at load levels comparable to interface stress measurements reported on transtibial amputee subjects. For each test configuration, materials were classified into four groups based on the shapes of their response curves. For the 15 liners tested, there were 10 unique classification sets, indicating a wide range of unique materials. In general, silicone gel liners classified within the same groups thus were quite similar to each other. They were of lower compressive, shear, and tensile stiffness than the silicone elastomer products, consistent with their lightly cross-linked, high-fluid content structures. Silicone elastomer products better spanned the response groups than the gel liners, demonstrating a wide range of compressive, shear, and tensile stiffness values. Against a skin-like material, a urethane liner had the highest coefficient of friction of any liner tested, although coefficients of friction values for most of the materials were higher than interface shear:pressure ratios measured on amputee subjects using Pelite liners. The elastomeric liner material property data and response groupings provided here can potentially be useful to prosthetic fitting by providing quantitative information on similarities and differences among products.

  11. Simulated Body Fluid Nucleation of Three-Dimensional Printed Elastomeric Scaffolds for Enhanced Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Tan, Wilhelmina Nanrui; Shen, Charlie; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-07-01

    Osseous tissue defects caused by trauma present a common clinical problem. Although traditional clinical procedures have been successfully employed, several limitations persist with regards to insufficient donor tissue, disease transmission, and inadequate host-implant integration. Therefore, this work aims to address current limitations regarding inadequate host tissue integration through the use of a novel elastomeric material for three-dimensional (3D) printing biomimetic and bioactive scaffolds. A novel thermoplastic polyurethane-based elastomeric composite filament (Gel-Lay) was used to manufacture porous scaffolds. In an effort to render the scaffolds more bioactive, the flexible scaffolds were subsequently incubated in simulated body fluid at various time points and evaluated for enhanced mechanical properties along with the effects on cell adhesion, proliferation, and 3-week osteogenesis. This work is the first reported use of a novel class of flexible elastomeric materials for the manufacture of 3D printed bioactive scaffold fabrication allowing efficient and effective nucleation of hydroxyapatite (HA) leading to increased nanoscale surface roughness while retaining the bulk geometry of the predesigned structure. Scaffolds with interconnected microfibrous filaments of ∼260 μm were created and nucleated in simulated body fluid that facilitated cell adhesion and spreading after only 24 h in culture. The porous structure further allowed efficient nucleation, exchange of nutrients, and metabolic waste removal during new tissue formation. Through the incorporation of osteoconductive HA, human fetal osteoblast adhesion and differentiation were greatly enhanced thus setting the tone for further exploration of this novel material for biomedical and tissue regenerative applications.

  12. A review on the cords & plies reinforcement of elastomeric polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S. S.; Husin, H.; Mat-Shayuti, M. S.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Steel, polyester, nylon and rayon are the main materials of cords & plies that have been reinforced in the natural rubber to produce quality tyres but there is few research reported on cord and plies reinforcement in silicone rubber. Taking the innovation of tyres as inspiration, this review's first objective is to compile the comprehensive studies about the cords & plies reinforcement in elastomeric polymer matrix. The second objective is to gather information about silicone rubber that has a high potential as a matrix phase for cords and plies reinforcement. All the tests and findings are gathered and compiled in sections namely processing preparation, curing, physical and mechanical properties, and adhesion between cords-polymer.

  13. High-refractive-index measurement with an elastomeric grating coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocabas, Askin; Ay, Feridun; Dâna, Aykutlu; Kiyat, Isa; Aydinli, Atilla

    2005-12-01

    An elastomeric grating coupler fabricated by the replica molding technique is used to measure the modal indices of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) planar waveguide structure. Because of the van der Waals interaction between the grating mold and the waveguide, the elastomeric stamp makes conformal contact with the waveguide surface, inducing a periodic index perturbation at the contact region. The phase of the incident light is changed to match the guided modes of the waveguide. The modal and bulk indices are obtained by measuring the coupling angles. This technique serves to measure the high refractive index with a precision better than 10-3 and allows the elastomeric stamp to be removed without damaging the surface of the waveguide.

  14. New elastomeric silicone based networks applicable as electroactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejenariu, Anca G.; Boll, Mads; Lotz, Mikkel R.; Vraa, Christoffer; Skov, Anne L.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial elastomer materials are available for dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) purposes but the applied commercial elastomers have not been developed with the specific application in mind. It is therefore obvious that optimization of the elastomer material should be possible. In this study we focus on optimization of the mechanical properties of the elastomer and show that it is possible to lower the elastic modulus and still not compromise the other required mechanical properties such as fast response, stability, low degree of viscous dissipation and high extensibility. The elastomers are prepared from a vinyl-terminated polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) and a 4-functional crosslinker by a platinum-catalyzed hydrosilylation reaction between the two reactants. Traditionally, elastomers based on hydrosilylation are prepared via a 'one-step two-pot' procedure (with a mix A and a mix B mixed in a given ratio). An alternative network formulation method is adopted in this study in order to obtain an elastomeric system with controlled topology - a so-called bimodal network. Bimodal networks are synthesized using a 'two-step four-pot' mixing procedure which results in a nonhomogeneous network structure which is shown to lead to novel mechanical properties due to the low extensibility of the short chains and the high extensibility of the long chains. The first ensures stability and the last retards the rupture process thereby combining two desired properties for DEAP purposes without necessarily compromising the viscous dissipation. Several elastomers are prepared and tested for the linear viscoelastic behaviour, i.e. behaviour in the small-strain limit (up to approximately 10% strain). The bimodal networks are, however, capable of extensions up to several times their initial length but the focus here is the small-strain limit.

  15. 21 CFR 177.1210 - Closures with sealing gaskets for food containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Closures with sealing gaskets for food containers. 177.1210 Section 177.1210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single...

  16. Assessment of airborne asbestos exposure during the servicing and handling of automobile asbestos-containing gaskets.

    PubMed

    Blake, Charles L; Dotson, G Scott; Harbison, Raymond D

    2006-07-01

    Five test sessions were conducted to assess asbestos exposure during the removal or installation of asbestos-containing gaskets on vehicles. All testing took place within an operative automotive repair facility involving passenger cars and a pickup truck ranging in vintage from late 1960s through 1970s. A professional mechanic performed all shop work including engine disassembly and reassembly, gasket manipulation and parts cleaning. Bulk sample analysis of removed gaskets through polarized light microscopy (PLM) revealed asbestos fiber concentrations ranging between 0 and 75%. Personal and area air samples were collected and analyzed using National Institute of Occupational Safety Health (NIOSH) methods 7400 [phase contrast microscopy (PCM)] and 7402 [transmission electron microscopy (TEM)]. Among all air samples collected, approximately 21% (n = 11) contained chrysotile fibers. The mean PCM and phase contrast microscopy equivalent (PCME) 8-h time weighted average (TWA) concentrations for these samples were 0.0031 fibers/cubic centimeters (f/cc) and 0.0017 f/cc, respectively. Based on these findings, automobile mechanics who worked with asbestos-containing gaskets may have been exposed to concentrations of airborne asbestos concentrations approximately 100 times lower than the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 0.1 f/cc.

  17. Plaque retention on elastomeric ligatures. An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    CONDÒ, R.; CASAGLIA, A.; CONDÒ, S.G.; CERRONI, L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Fixed orthodontic appliances make it difficult to maintain the oral hygiene, resulting in plaque accumulation. Retention of bacterial plaque, represents a risk for white spot lesions and development of periodontal disease. Aim Purpose of this study was to determine in vivo the retention of plaque on three different elastic ligatures, in comparison with stainless steel ligature, to determine a possible association between type of ligatures and accumulation of microorganisms. Material and Methods three elastic ligation systems were analyzed for plaque retention: ring-shape, clear, latex ligatures (Leone® Spa), ring-shape, grey, polyurethane ligatures (Micerium® Spa) and grey, polyurethane, Slide low-friction ligatures (Leone® Spa), compared with stainless steel ligatures (Leone® Spa) used as control. Forthy orthodontic patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy were selected. A sample for each type of ligature were applied inside the oral cavity of each subject. Samples were kept in the oral cavity for 28 days, ligating 0.16 X 0.22 stainless steel archwire to stainless steel orthodontic premolars brackets. The presence of bacterical slime was quantified by spectrophotometric method (crystal violet-Bouin’s fixative) and morphological observations was evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Results From analysis of bacterical slime emerges that all the elastics showed a low plaque retention, especially if compared to the group of steinless steel ligatures, that presented a greater plaque adhesion, statistically significant compared to the Slide group (r<0.0002) and the two elastic groups (r<0.0001). This study reported no significant difference between the Slide ligatures and the traditional elastic ligatures as regards the retention of plaque. SEM images showed presence of cocci, rods and few filamentous organisms and an interbacterial matrix in all observed samples. Conclusion Elastomeric ligatures showed a significant lower susceptibility

  18. Maxillomandibular relationship record for complete arch/mouth implant restorations using putty-elastomeric occlusion rim at healing abutment level

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pravinkumar G.; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Recording of the maxillomandibular relationship (MMR) in implant complete arch restorations usually necessitates removal of the healing abutments to attach the record bases, which makes the procedures tedious and time-consuming. Materials and Methods: This article describes the procedure of recording of MMR for complete mouth rehabilitation with the help of the putty elastomeric record base cum occlusion rim reinforced with the acrylic resin framework. This technique records the MMR without removing the healing abutments from mouth and without attaching the acrylic-resin record base with wax occlusion rim. Results: The use of putty-elastomeric occlusion rim provides stable interocclusal records for implant supported complete arch (or mouth) rehabilitation. Conclusion: Maxillomandibular relationship records made with the present technique is less time-consuming and accurate with less chances of distortion of the MMR records. PMID:26321828

  19. Resilin-PEG Hybrid Hydrogels Yield Degradable Elastomeric Scaffolds with Heterogeneous Microstructure.

    PubMed

    McGann, Christopher L; Akins, Robert E; Kiick, Kristi L

    2016-01-11

    Hydrogels derived from resilin-like polypeptides (RLPs) have shown outstanding mechanical resilience and cytocompatibility; expanding the versatility of RLP-based materials via conjugation with other polypeptides and polymers would offer great promise in the design of a range of materials. Here, we present an investigation of the biochemical and mechanical properties of hybrid hydrogels composed of a recombinant RLP and a multiarm PEG macromer. These hybrid hydrogels can be rapidly cross-linked through a Michael-type addition reaction between the thiols of cysteine residues on the RLP and vinyl sulfone groups on the multiarm PEG. Oscillatory rheology and tensile testing confirmed the formation of elastomeric hydrogels with mechanical resilience comparable to aortic elastin; hydrogel stiffness was easily modulated through the cross-linking ratio. Macromolecular phase separation of the RLP-PEG hydrogels offers the unique advantage of imparting a heterogeneous microstructure, which can be used to localize cells, through simple mixing and cross-linking. Assessment of degradation of the RLP by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) illustrated the specific proteolysis of the polypeptide in both its soluble form and when cross-linked into hydrogels. Finally, the successful encapsulation and viable three-dimensional culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) demonstrated the cytocompatibility of the RLP-PEG gels. Overall, the cytocompatibility, elastomeric mechanical properties, microheterogeneity, and degradability of the RLP-PEG hybrid hydrogels offer a suite of promising properties for the development of cell-instructive, structured tissue engineering scaffolds.

  20. Behavior or Nonmetallic Materials in Shale Oil Derived Jet Fuels and in High Aromatic and High Sulfur Petroleum Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-01

    Sealants (Noncuring Type) 30 6. Elastomeric Marmon Clamp Seals 34 7. Elastomeric O-Ring Materials 38 8. Fuel Cell Baffle Materials 42 9. Internal Fuel Cell...fuel bladder materials, bladder repair adhesives, groove sealants, elastomeric o-ring materials, elasto- meric Marmon clamp seals, fuel tank coatings...a. EC-2216 EC-2216 is a room temperature curing epoxy- polyamide struc- tural adhesive manufactured by 3M Company. The initial test results have

  1. Soft materials with recoverable shape factors from extreme distortion states

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, Jonathan; Sulaiman, Santy; Arkles, Barry; Lewicki, James P.

    2016-01-20

    We present elastomeric polysiloxane nanocomposites with elongations of >5000% (more than 3× greater than any previously reported material) with excellent shape recovery. Highly deformable materials are desirable for the fabrication of stretchable implants and microfluidic devices. No crosslinking or domain formation is observed by a variety of analytical techniques, suggesting that their elastomeric behavior is caused by polymer chain entanglements.

  2. A tale of two fractals: The Hofstadter butterfly and the integral Apollonian gaskets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satija, Indubala I.

    2016-11-01

    This paper unveils a mapping between a quantum fractal that describes a physical phenomena, and an abstract geometrical fractal. The quantum fractal is the Hofstadter butterfly discovered in 1976 in an iconic condensed matter problem of electrons moving in a two-dimensional lattice in a transverse magnetic field. The geometric fractal is the integer Apollonian gasket characterized in terms of a 300 BC problem of mutually tangent circles. Both of these fractals are made up of integers. In the Hofstadter butterfly, these integers encode the topological quantum numbers of quantum Hall conductivity. In the Apollonian gaskets an infinite number of mutually tangent circles are nested inside each other, where each circle has integer curvature. The mapping between these two fractals reveals a hidden D3 symmetry embedded in the kaleidoscopic images that describe the asymptotic scaling properties of the butterfly. This paper also serves as a mini review of these fractals, emphasizing their hierarchical aspects in terms of Farey fractions.

  3. Evaluation of Low Level Laser Therapy on Pain Perception Following Orthodontic Elastomeric Separation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Almallah, Mai M.E.; Almahdi, Wael H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Periodontal pain caused by elastomeric separators is a very common problem in the commencement of orthodontic treatment. Previous studies have shown good results in reducing this pain by Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) and different protocols of application have been suggested in the literature. Aim This trial aimed to evaluate LLLT on managing orthodontic pain caused by elastomeric separators and to compare single versus double irradiation in possible pain reduction. Materials and Methods A clinical randomized compound (parallel-group and split-mouth design) trial was conducted on 36 patients between 12 and 26 years of age. Elastomeric separators were placed at the mesial and distal surfaces of the first molars in one jaw (upper or lower) for each patient and in only one side of the mouth (the other side served as the placebo side). The trial had two groups: the first group received single irradiation of LLLT [Gallium Aluminum Arsenide (GaAlAs): 830 nm, 4J/cm2, 100mW] immediately after separators insertion, where as the second group received double irradiation immediately after separators insertion and after 24hours. All patients were instructed to rate the level of pain at 1, 6, 24, 48, 96 hours on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The student ‘t’ tests, repeated measures ANOVA and LSD post-hoc tests were employed. Results LLLT was successful in reducing post-separation pain when the experimental side was compared to the placebo side at all assessment times in each group (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between single and double irradiation groups in terms of pain reduction (p>0.05). Conclusion GaAlAs LLLT application reduced early orthodontic pain caused by elastomeric separators by single or double irradiation. PMID:28050498

  4. “Pop-slide” patterning: Rapid fabrication of microstructured PDMS gasket slides for biological applications

    PubMed Central

    Ramji, Ramesh; Khan, Nafeesa T; Muñoz-Rojas, Andrés; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    We describe a “pop-slide” patterning approach to easily produce thin film microstructures on the surface of glass with varying feature sizes (3 μm – 250 μm) and aspect ratios (0.066 – 3) within 45 minutes. This low cost method does not require specialized equipment while allowing us to produce micro structured gasket layers for sandwich assays and could be readily applied to many biological applications. PMID:26949529

  5. Z-Pinch Wire-Electrode Contact Resistance Studies Using Weighted and Soft Metal Gasket Contacts*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, M. R.; Zier, J. C.; Thurtell, A. F.; French, D. M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Tang, W.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2008-11-01

    The contact made between z-pinch wires and electrodes has a significant effect on both the energy deposited in the wires and the uniformity of the expansion profile of the wires. We have shown that using soft metal gaskets can improve wire-electrode contact significantly over typical weighted contacts. Images of wire expansion profile and wire plasma emission will be presented for single and double wire shots on a 16 kA, 100 kV 4-stage Marx bank with 150 ns risetime. Bench resistance measurements for aluminum, stainless steel, and tungsten wires with diameters ranging from 7.5 um to 30 um will be presented. These measurements utilized both soft metal gasket contacts (gaskets include: indium, silver, aluminum, tin, and lead) and double-ended wire weight contacts (weights ranged from 0.4 g to 1.9 g). *This research was supported by U. S. DoE through Sandia National Laboratories award document numbers 240985, 768225, 790791 and 805234 to the University of Michigan. MRG supported by NNSA Fellowship and JCZ supported by NPSC Fellowship sponsored by Sandia National Labs.

  6. Hybrid, elastomeric hydrogels crosslinked by multifunctional block copolymer micelles

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Longxi; Liu, Chao; Zhu, Jiahua; Pochan, Darrin J.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2010-01-01

    Amphiphlic block copolymers consisting of hydrophilic, poly(acrylic acid) randomly decorated with acrylate groups and hydrophobic, rubbery poly(n-butyl acrylate) self-assembled into well-defined micelles with an average diameter of ~21 nm. Radical polymerization of acrylamide in the presence of the crosslinkable micelles gave rise to hybrid, elastomeric hydrogels whose mechancial properties can be readily tuned by varying the BCM concentration. PMID:21278815

  7. Interaction of Reinforced Elastomeric Bearings in Bridge Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittmannová, Ľubica; Magura, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the behavior of reinforced elastomeric bearings under various loads. They are made of special types of bearings. The experimental verification of these special bearings has been tested on various types of loading. The results of the experimental measurements are compared with the results of the numerical modeling and calculations according to the standard assumptions in STN EN 1337-3. In the conclusion, the results are summarized for the selected types of bearings.

  8. Reaction Wheel Vibration Isolator with Elastomeric Stoppers for Launch Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carte, Gilles

    2014-06-01

    High resolution earth observation satellites need high pointing stability. This results in the need of isolating the on board vibration sources such as the reaction wheels. To increase the efficiency of a passive isolator, it is common to reduce the natural frequency of the suspension. But a low frequency isolator ( 10 Hz) cannot withstand the qualification nor the launch loads. It is then compulsory to assist the isolator with a complementary device such as a rigid launch lock. An alternative solution to the rigid launch lock is to introduce elastomeric stoppers to limit the dynamic displacements of the suspended reaction wheel and potentially reduce the dynamic loads applied to it. A Reaction Wheel Isolator with elastomeric stoppers has been developed in the course of the MTG program. The basic principles of this isolator will be presented as well as the ones of the elastomeric stoppers. The nonlinear behaviour of the stoppers that work with potentially intermittent contact will be explained. Some tests results will be presented to clearly demonstrate the advantages of this device.

  9. Compressible elastomeric aerogels of hexagonal boron nitride and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo Jeong, Yeon; Islam, Mohammad F.

    2015-07-01

    Lightweight porous ceramic materials that can recover their shapes after mechanical deformation have numerous applications. However, these types of materials tend to be highly fragile and often crack when compressed. Here, we report on the fabrication and characterization of highly porous, freestanding composites of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of density 13-15 mg mL-1, which corresponds to a volume fraction of 0.009, that were mechanically robust and recovered their original shape even after uniaxially compressing them by more than 50%. We made these porous elastomeric composites using a solution based assembly process that involved first shaping SWCNTs into porous networks of density ~7 mg mL-1 (volume fraction ~0.005) followed by coatings of SWCNT networks with 6-8 mg mL-1 of h-BN (volume fraction ~0.003-0.004). The h-BN coating strengthened the underlying SWCNT networks, likely via reinforcement of the nodes between the SWCNTs, resulting in an increase in Young's modulus by ~100% compared to that of SWCNT networks alone. Surprisingly, SWCNT networks, which were initially highly fragile, became elastomeric after h-BN coating, even though porous structures solely from h-BN are very brittle. Our fabrication approach preserves the morphology of the underlying networks, allowing for fabrication of various shapes and sizes of porous composites of h-BN and SWCNTs. Finally, our fabrication scheme is robust and facile for the preparation of porous composites of diverse ceramic materials and SWCNTs using the appropriate ceramic-precursor.Lightweight porous ceramic materials that can recover their shapes after mechanical deformation have numerous applications. However, these types of materials tend to be highly fragile and often crack when compressed. Here, we report on the fabrication and characterization of highly porous, freestanding composites of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of

  10. Development of Improved LOX-Compatible Laminated Gasket Composite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-08-01

    conclusive as desired, a more conventional approach to that prob- lem has also been considered and is presented in the subsequent section. It is anticipated...Program of Testing Nonmetallic Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures, Final Report, Contract AF 04(611)6354, Rocketdyne Division of North American

  11. Response of elastomeric packaging components to a corrosive simulant mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials packaging is to enable these materials to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this aim, regulations in the US have been written establishing general design requirements for such packagings. While no regulations have been written specifically for mixed waste packaging, regulations for the constituents of mixed wastes, i.e., hazardous and radioactive substances, have been codified by the US Department of Transportation and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Based on these national requirements, a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program was developed in the Transportation Systems Department at SNL. In this paper, the authors present the results of Part B of the second phase of this testing program. The first phase screened five liner materials and six seal materials towards four simulant mixed wastes. Part A of the second phase involved the comprehensive testing of five candidate liner materials to an aqueous Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. Part B involved similar testing on elastomeric materials, ethylene-propylene and butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber. The comprehensive testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to a matrix of four gamma radiation doses ({approximately}1, 3, 6, and 40 kGy), three temperatures (18, 50, and 60 C), and four exposure times (7, 14, 28, and 180 days). Following their exposure to these combinations of conditions, the materials were evaluated by measuring six material properties. These properties were specific gravity, dimensional changes, hardness, vapor transport rates, compression set, and mechanical properties.

  12. Flame resistant elastomeric polymer development. [for use in space shuttle instrument packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S. G.; Sidman, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    Elastomeric products were developed for use in the space shuttle program, and investigations were conducted to improve the properties of elastomers developed in previous programs, and to evaluate the possibility of using lower-cost general purpose polymers. Products were fabricated and processed on conventional processing equipment; these products include: foams based on fluorinated rubber flame-retarded compounds with a density of 20-30 pounds/cubic foot for use as padding and in helmets; foams based on urethane for use in instrument packaging in the space shuttle; flexible and semi-rigid films of fluorinated rubber and neoprene compounds that would not burn in a 70% nitrogen, 30% oxygen atmosphere, and in a 30% nitrogen, 70% oxygen atmosphere, respectively for use in packaging or in laminates; coated fabrics which used both nylon and Kelvar fabric substrates, coated with either fluorinated or neoprene polymer compositions to meet specific levels of flame retardancy; and other flame-resistant materials.

  13. Seismic response analyses of base isolated structures with high damping elastomeric bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Tang, Y.; Chang, Y.W.; Seidensticker, R.W. ); Marchertas, A.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Seismic response analysis of base-isolated structures with high damping elastomeric bearings is described. Emphasis is placed on the adaptation of a nonlinear constitutive model for the isolation bearing together with the treatment of foundation embedment for the soil-structure-interaction analysis. The constitutive model requires six input parameters derived from bearing experimental data under sinusoidal loading. The characteristic behavior of bearing, such as the variation of shear modulus and material damping with the change of maximum shear deformation, can be captured closely by the formulation. In the treatment of soil embedment a spring method is utilized to evaluate the foundation input motion as well as soil stiffness and damping. The above features have been incorporated into a three-dimensional system response program, SISEC, developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Sample problems are presented to illustrate the relative response of isolated and unisolated structures. 11 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Curvilinear electronics formed using silicon membrane circuits and elastomeric transfer elements.

    PubMed

    Ko, Heung Cho; Shin, Gunchul; Wang, Shuodao; Stoykovich, Mark P; Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Dong-Hun; Ha, Jeong Sook; Huang, Yonggang; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A

    2009-12-01

    Materials and methods to achieve electronics intimately integrated on the surfaces of substrates with complex, curvilinear shapes are described. The approach exploits silicon membranes in circuit mesh structures that can be deformed in controlled ways using thin, elastomeric films. Experimental and theoretical studies of the micromechanics of such curvilinear electronics demonstrate the underlying concepts. Electrical measurements illustrate the high yields that can be obtained. The results represent significant experimental and theoretical advances over recently reported concepts for creating hemispherical photodetectors in electronic eye cameras and for using printable silicon nanoribbons/membranes in flexible electronics. The results might provide practical routes to the integration of high performance electronics with biological tissues and other systems of interest for new applications.

  15. Storage containers for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Groh, Edward F.; Cassidy, Dale A.; Dates, Leon R.

    1981-01-01

    A radioactive material storage system for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together, whereby the plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or

  16. Storage containers for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

    1980-07-31

    A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

  17. PRELIMINARY REPORT: EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION AND THERMAL EXPOSURE ON ELASTOMERIC SEALS FOR CASK TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Verst, C.; Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2014-05-30

    A testing and analysis approach to predict the sealing behavior of elastomeric seal materials in dry storage casks and evaluate their ability to maintain a seal under thermal and radiation exposure conditions of extended storage and beyond was developed, and initial tests have been conducted. The initial tests evaluate the aging response of EPDM elastomer O-ring seals. The thermal and radiation exposure conditions of the CASTOR® V/21 casks were selected for testing as this cask design is of interest due to its widespread use, and close proximity of the seals to the fuel compared to other cask designs leading to a relatively high temperature and dose under storage conditions. A novel test fixture was developed to enable compression stress relaxation measurements for the seal material at the thermal and radiation exposure conditions. A loss of compression stress of 90% is suggested as the threshold at which sealing ability of an elastomeric seal would be lost. Previous studies have shown this value to be conservative to actual leakage failure for most aging conditions. These initial results indicate that the seal would be expected to retain sealing ability throughout extended storage at the cask design conditions, though longer exposure times are needed to validate this assumption. The high constant dose rate used in the testing is not prototypic of the decreasingly low dose rate that would occur under extended storage. The primary degradation mechanism of oxidation of polymeric compounds is highly dependent on temperature and time of exposure, and with radiation expected to exacerbate the oxidation.

  18. Elastomer degradation sensor using a piezoelectric material

    DOEpatents

    Olness, Dolores U.; Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B.

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring the degradation of elastomeric materials is provided. Piezoelectric oscillators are placed in contact with the elastomeric material so that a forced harmonic oscillator with damping is formed. The piezoelectric material is connected to an oscillator circuit,. A parameter such as the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q value of the oscillating system is related to the elasticity of the elastomeric material. Degradation of the elastomeric material causes changes in its elasticity which, in turn, causes the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q of the oscillator to change. These changes are monitored with a peak height monitor, frequency counter, Q-meter, spectrum analyzer, or other measurement circuit. Elasticity of elastomers can be monitored in situ, using miniaturized sensors.

  19. Micromechanical damage and fracture in elastomeric polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyden, Stefanie

    This thesis aims at a simple one-parameter macroscopic model of distributed damage and fracture of polymers that is amenable to a straightforward and efficient numerical implementation. The failure model is motivated by post-mortem fractographic observations of void nucleation, growth and coalescence in polyurea stretched to failure, and accounts for the specific fracture energy per unit area attendant to rupture of the material. Furthermore, it is shown that the macroscopic model can be rigorously derived, in the sense of optimal scaling, from a micromechanical model of chain elasticity and failure regularized by means of fractional strain-gradient elasticity. Optimal scaling laws that supply a link between the single parameter of the macroscopic model, namely the critical energy-release rate of the material, and micromechanical parameters pertaining to the elasticity and strength of the polymer chains, and to the strain-gradient elasticity regularization, are derived. Based on optimal scaling laws, it is shown how the critical energy-release rate of specific materials can be determined from test data. In addition, the scope and fidelity of the model is demonstrated by means of an example of application, namely Taylor-impact experiments of polyurea rods. Hereby, optimal transportation meshfree approximation schemes using maximum-entropy interpolation functions are employed. Finally, a different crazing model using full derivatives of the deformation gradient and a core cut-off is presented, along with a numerical non-local regularization model. The numerical model takes into account higher-order deformation gradients in a finite element framework. It is shown how the introduction of non-locality into the model stabilizes the effect of strain localization to small volumes in materials undergoing softening. From an investigation of craze formation in the limit of large deformations, convergence studies verifying scaling properties of both local- and non-local energy

  20. Mechanically durable and highly conductive elastomeric composites from long single-walled carbon nanotubes mimicking the chain structure of polymers.

    PubMed

    Ata, Seisuke; Kobashi, Kazufumi; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2012-06-13

    By using long single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a filler possessing the highest aspect ratio and small diameter, we mimicked the chain structure of polymers in the matrix and realized a highly conductive elastomeric composite (30 S/cm) with an excellent mechanical durability (4500 strain cycles until failure), far superior to any other reported conductive elastomers. This exceptional mechanical durability was explained by the ability of long and traversing SWNTs to deform in concert with the elastomer with minimum stress concentration at their interfaces. The conductivity was sufficient to operate many active electronics components, and thus this material would be useful for practical stretchable electronic devices.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF REMOTE HANFORD CONNECTOR GASKET REPLACEMENT TOOLING FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Krementz, D

    2007-11-27

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested development of tooling for remote replacement of gaskets in mechanical Hanford connectors. The facility has compressed air supply, two master-slave manipulators (MSM's) and a lightweight robotic arm for operation of the remote tools. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed and tested multiple tools to perform the gasket replacement tasks. Separate pneumatic snap-ring removal tools that use the connector skirt as a reaction surface were developed for removal of the snap ring and spent gasket on both vertical and horizontal Hanford connectors. A pneumatic tool that clamps and centers on the jumper pipe ID was developed to simultaneously install the new gasket and snap ring. A pneumatic snap-ring-loading tool was developed that compresses the snap ring and places it in a groove in the installation tool. All of the tools are located on a custom work table with a pneumatic valve station that directs compressed air to the desired tool and vents the tools as needed. The entire system has been successfully tested using MSM's to manipulate the various tools. Deployment of the entire system is expected during FY08. The Hanford connector gasket replacement tooling has been successfully tested using MSM's to manipulate the various tools. Nitric acid is used in many of the decontamination processes performed in the REDC, where the tooling will be deployed. Although most of the tool components were fabricated/purchased with nitric acid and radioactive service in mind, some of the prototype parts must be replaced with parts that are more compatible with nitric acid/radioactive service. Several modifications to the various tools are needed to facilitate maintenance and replacement of failed components. Development of installation tools for replacement of 1-inch, 2-inch and multi-hole gaskets is being considered. Deployment of the existing system in the DWPF REDC is expected during FY

  2. Mechanics of precisely controlled thin film buckling on Elastomeric substrate.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Jiang, H.; Rogers, J.; Huang, Y.; Arizone State Univ.; Beckman Inst.; University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

    2007-01-01

    Stretchable electronics has many important and emerging applications. Sun et al. [Nature Nanotech. 1, 201 (2006)] recently demonstrated stretchable electronics based on precisely controlled buckle geometries in GaAs and Si nanoribbons on elastomeric substrates. A nonlinear buckling model is presented in this letter to study the mechanics of this type of thin film/substrate system. An analytical solution is obtained for the buckling geometry (wavelength and amplitude) and the maximum strain in buckled thin film. This solution agrees very well with the experiments, and shows explicitly how buckling can significantly reduce the thin film strain to achieve the system stretchability.

  3. Hierarchically UVO patterned elastomeric and thermoplastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Kulkarni, Manish; Marshall, Allan; Karim, Alamgir

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a simple yet versatile method to fabricate tunable hierarchical micro-nanostructures on flexible Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer and thermoplastic polymer surface by a two-step process. Nanoscale patterned PDMS was obtained by imprinting compact disc (CD)/digital video disc (DVD) patterns. The second micro pattern was superposed by selective densification of PDMS by exposing to ultraviolet-ozone radiation (UVO) through micro-patterned TEM grid as a mask. The nanoscale patterns are preserved through UVO exposure step leading to formation of deep hierarchical patterns, so that for a 19 um square mesh, the micro pattern has a depth of 600nm with 6h PDMS UVO exposure time. This simple method can be promoted to fabricate hierarchical structures of thermoplastic materials (such as polystyrene), from which the mechanism of capillary imprinting and thermal stability of hierarchical patterns are investigated. This study is potentially important to various applications ranging from biomimetic scaffolds to solar cell.

  4. The mechanical characteristics and in vitro biocompatibility of poly(glycerol sebacate)-bioglass elastomeric composites.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shu-Ling; Cook, Wayne D; Thouas, George A; Chen, Qi-Zhi

    2010-11-01

    Biodegradable elastomeric materials have gained much recent attention in the field of soft tissue engineering. Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) is one of a new family of elastomers which are promising candidates used for soft tissue engineering. However, PGS has a limited range of mechanical properties and has drawbacks, such as cytotoxicity caused by the acidic degradation products of very soft PGS and degradation kinetics that are too fast in vivo to provide sufficient mechanical support to the tissue. However, the development of PGS/based elastomeric composites containing alkaline bioactive fillers could be a method for addressing these drawbacks and thus may pave the way towards wide clinical applications. In this study, we synthesized a new PGS composite system consisting of a micron-sized Bioglass filler. In addition to much improved cytocompatibility, the PGS/Bioglass composites demonstrated three remarkable mechanical properties. First, contrary to previous reports, the addition of microsized Bioglass increases the elongation at break from 160 to 550%, while enhancing the Young's modulus of the composites by up to a factor of four. Second, the modulus of the PGS/Bioglass composites drops abruptly in a physiological environment (culture medium), and the level of drop can be tuned such that the addition of Bioglass does not harden the composite in vivo and thus the desired compliance required for soft tissue engineering are maintained. Third, after the abrupt drop in modulus, the composites exhibited mechanical stability over an extended period. This latter observation is an important feature of the new composites, because they can provide reliable mechanical support to damaged tissues during the lag phase of the healing process. These mechanical properties, together with improved biocompatibility, make this family of composites better candidates than plastic and related composite biomaterials for the applications of tissue engineering.

  5. Effect of disinfecting solutions on surface texture of alginate and elastomeric impressions.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Asmussen, E

    1990-02-01

    The effect of immersion in six disinfecting solutions on the surface texture of 10 impression materials was investigated. Assessment of the surface texture was based on measurement of the ability to reproduce fine detail. Impressions were taken of a roughness standard, i.e. a steel block with known roughness. After setting, the impressions were either stored at room temperature for 24 h, for control, or immediately immersed in a disinfecting agent for 60 min (in one case 10 min), and after 24 h poured with gypsum. After another 24 h, the roughness of the dies was recorded with a profilometer. Three addition-curing silicones were left unaltered by disinfection. For the remaining seven materials, the ability of detail reproduction was changed for some of the combinations of impression material and disinfecting solution. In general, this meant a reduction of detail reproduction, but occasionally an improvement of the surface texture resulted from disinfection. Changes in surface texture were most often brought about by a solution of chlorinated trisodium phosphate. It was concluded that elastomeric impression materials reproduced fine detail better than did alginates and that both types of impression material may be immersed in specific disinfecting solutions for as long as 1 h without the surface texture being impaired.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of heparin-grafted poly-L-lactic acid-chitosan core-shell nanofibers scaffold for vascular gasket.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Ji, Xuyuan; Jin, Lin; Feng, Zhangqi; Wu, Jinghang; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Hongyin; Xu, Zhe-Wu; Guo, Lingling; He, Nongyue

    2013-05-01

    Electrospun nanofibers were widely studied to be applied as potential materials for tissue engineering. A new technology to make poly-l-lactic acid/chitosan core/shell nanofibers from heterologous solution by coaxial electrospinning technique was designed for vascular gasket. Chitosan surface was cross-linked by genipin and modified by heparin. Different ratios of PLA/CS in heterologous solution were studied to optimize the surface morphology of fibers. Clean core-shell structures formed with a PLA/CS ratio at 1:3. Superior biocompatibility and mechanical properties were obtained by optimizing the core-shell structure morphology and surface cross-linking of chitosan. UE7T-13 cells grew well on the core-shell structure fibers as indicated by methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) results and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Compared with the pure PLA fiber meshes and commercial vascular patch, PLA/CS core-shell fibers had better mechanical strength. The elastic modulus was as high as 117.18 MPa, even though the yield stress of the fibers was lower than that of the commercial vascular patch. Attachment of red blood cell on the fibers was evaluated by blood anticoagulation experiments and in vitro blood flow experiments. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and prothrombin time (PT) value from PLA/CS nanofibers were significantly longer than that of pure PLA fibers. SEM images indicated there were hardly any red blood cells attached to the fibers with chitosan coating and heparin modification. This type of fiber mesh could potentially be used as vascular gasket.

  7. From single fiber to macro-level mechanics: A structural finite-element model for elastomeric fibrous biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    D'Amore, Antonio; Amoroso, Nicholas; Gottardi, Riccardo; Hobson, Christopher; Carruthers, Christopher; Watkins, Simon; Wagner, William R.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate that the mesoscopic in-plane mechanical behavior of membrane elastomeric scaffolds can be simulated by replication of actual quantified fibrous geometries. Elastomeric electrospun polyurethane (ES-PEUU) scaffolds, with and without particulate inclusions, were utilized. Simulations were developed from experimentally-derived fiber network geometries, based on a range of scaffold isotropic and anisotropic behaviors. These were chosen to evaluate the effects on macro-mechanics based on measurable geometric parameters such as fiber intersections, connectivity, orientation, and diameter. Simulations were conducted with only the fiber material model parameters adjusted to match the macro-level mechanical test data. Fiber model validation was performed at the microscopic level by individual fiber mechanical tests using AFM. Results demonstrated very good agreement to the experimental data, and revealed the formation of extended preferential fiber orientations spanning the entire model space. We speculate that these emergent structures may be responsible for the tissue-like macroscale behaviors observed in electrospun scaffolds. To conclude, the modeling approach has implications for (1) gaining insight on the intricate relationship between fabrication variables, structure, and mechanics to manufacture more functional devices/materials, (2) elucidating the effects of cell or particulate inclusions on global construct mechanics, and (3) fabricating better performing tissue surrogates that could recapitulate native tissue mechanics. PMID:25128869

  8. Experimental and numerical investigation of energy dissipation in elastomeric rotational joint under harmonic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jrad, Hanen; Dion, Jean Luc; Renaud, Franck; Tawfiq, Imad; Haddar, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    This paper focuses on energy losses caused by inner damping and friction in an elastomeric rotational joint. A description of the design of a new experimental device intended to characterize dynamic stiffness in rotational elastomeric joint is presented. An original method based on Lagrange's equations, which allows accurately measuring forces and torques only with accelerometers, is proposed in order to identify dissipated energy in the rotational elastomeric joint. A rheological model developed taking into account dependence of the torque and the angular displacement (rotation). Experimental results and simulations used to quantify the dissipated energy in order to evaluate the damping ratio are presented and discussed.

  9. Elastomeric microvalves as tunable nanochannels for concentration polarization.

    PubMed

    Quist, Jos; Trietsch, Sebastiaan J; Vulto, Paul; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2013-12-21

    Elastomeric microvalves in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) devices are today's paradigm for massively parallel microfluidic operations. Here, we report that such valves can act as nanochannels upon closure. When tuning nanospace heights between ~55 nm and ~7 nm, the nanofluidic phenomenon of concentration polarization could be induced. A wide range of concentration polarization regimes (anodic and cathodic analyte focusing and stacking) was achieved simply by valve pressure actuation. Electro-osmotic flow generated a counterpressure which also could be used to actuate between concentration polarization regimes. 1000-fold preconcentration of fluorescein was achieved in just 100 s in the anodic focusing regime. After valve opening, a concentrated sample plug could be transported through the valve, though at the cost of some defocusing. Reversible nanochannels open new avenues for integrating electrokinetic operations and assays in large scale integrated microfluidics.

  10. Seismic isolation of nuclear power plants using elastomeric bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manish

    Seismic isolation using low damping rubber (LDR) and lead-rubber (LR) bearings is a viable strategy for mitigating the effects of extreme earthquake shaking on safety-related nuclear structures. Although seismic isolation has been deployed in nuclear structures in France and South Africa, it has not seen widespread use because of limited new build nuclear construction in the past 30 years and a lack of guidelines, codes and standards for the analysis, design and construction of isolation systems specific to nuclear structures. The nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi in March 2011 has led the nuclear community to consider seismic isolation for new large light water and small modular reactors to withstand the effects of extreme earthquakes. The mechanical properties of LDR and LR bearings are not expected to change substantially in design basis shaking. However, under shaking more intense than design basis, the properties of the lead cores in lead-rubber bearings may degrade due to heating associated with energy dissipation, some bearings in an isolation system may experience net tension, and the compression and tension stiffness may be affected by the horizontal displacement of the isolation system. The effects of intra-earthquake changes in mechanical properties on the response of base-isolated nuclear power plants (NPPs) were investigated using an advanced numerical model of a lead-rubber bearing that has been verified and validated, and implemented in OpenSees and ABAQUS. A series of experiments were conducted at University at Buffalo to characterize the behavior of elastomeric bearings in tension. The test data was used to validate a phenomenological model of an elastomeric bearing in tension. The value of three times the shear modulus of rubber in elastomeric bearing was found to be a reasonable estimate of the cavitation stress of a bearing. The sequence of loading did not change the behavior of an elastomeric bearing under cyclic tension, and there was no

  11. Shape-Memory Polymers Based on Fatty Acid-Filled Elastomeric Ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Elise; Weiss, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) have applications as medical devices, actuators, sensors, artificial muscles, switches, smart textiles, and self-deployable structures. All previous design of SMPs has involved synthesizing new polymers or modifying existing polymers. This paper describes a new type of SMP based on blends of an elastomeric ionomer and low molar mass fatty acids or their salts (FAS). Shape memory elastomers were prepared from mixtures of a sulfonated EPDM ionomer and various amounts of a FAS (e.g., zinc stearate, zinc oleate, and various aliphalic acids). Nanophase separation of the metal sulfonate groups provided the ``permanent'' crosslinks, while sub-microscopic crystals of the low molecular weight FAS provided a physical crosslink needed for the temporary shape. The material was deformed above the melting point of the FAS and the new shape was fixed by cooling the material while under stress to below the melting point of the FAS. Polar interactions between the ionomer and the FAS stabilized the dispersion of the FAS in the polymer and provided the continuity between the phases that allowed the crystals of the FAS to provide a second network of physical crosslinks. The temporary shape was erased and the material returned to the primary shape by heating above the melting point of the FAS.

  12. Optimal elastomeric scaffold leaflet shape for pulmonary heart valve leaflet replacement.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Bayoumi, Ahmed S; Chen, Peter; Hobson, Christopher M; Wagner, William R; Mayer, John E; Sacks, Michael S

    2013-02-22

    Surgical replacement of the pulmonary valve (PV) is a common treatment option for congenital pulmonary valve defects. Engineered tissue approaches to develop novel PV replacements are intrinsically complex, and will require methodical approaches for their development. Single leaflet replacement utilizing an ovine model is an attractive approach in that candidate materials can be evaluated under valve level stresses in blood contact without the confounding effects of a particular valve design. In the present study an approach for optimal leaflet shape design based on finite element (FE) simulation of a mechanically anisotropic, elastomeric scaffold for PV replacement is presented. The scaffold was modeled as an orthotropic hyperelastic material using a generalized Fung-type constitutive model. The optimal shape of the fully loaded PV replacement leaflet was systematically determined by minimizing the difference between the deformed shape obtained from FE simulation and an ex-vivo microCT scan of a native ovine PV leaflet. Effects of material anisotropy, dimensional changes of PV root, and fiber orientation on the resulting leaflet deformation were investigated. In-situ validation demonstrated that the approach could guide the design of the leaflet shape for PV replacement surgery.

  13. Damage of Elastomeric Matrix Composites (EMC-rubbers) Under Static Loading Conditions: Experimental and Numerical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ayari, F.

    2011-01-17

    Elastomeric matrix composites (EMC-rubbers) are considered as isotropic hyper elastic incompressible materials under static loading conditions. As a rubber material element cannot be extended to an infinite stretch ratio, a damage mechanism at large strain is considered. The phenomenon of cavitation plays an important role in the damage of EMCs and influences the toughening mechanism of rubber-modified plastics. Indeed, cavitation in elastomers is thought to be initiated from flaws, which grow primarily due to a hydrostatic tensile stress and ahead of the crack; there will not only be a high stress perpendicular to the plane of the crack but also significant stress components in the other direction. However, there exists historically much discussion on the evolution of the cavitation in elastomers under monotonic and/or static solicitation. Mainly, cavitation instability occurs when the stress levels are sufficiently high so that the void expansion rate becomes infinitely large. Many research works have been performed to understand the effects of rubber cavitation on toughening of plastics. In fact, the cavitation phenomenon is not well known in detail. The most popular idea states that the cavitation is related to the existence of the gas bubbles trapped in the material during the production stage and the growing of the cavities would then be the result of the growing gas bubbles. Further, instable failure mechanism at the end of the cavitation is not well known too.

  14. Optimal Elastomeric Scaffold Leaflet Shape for Pulmonary Heart Valve Leaflet Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rong; Bayoumi, Ahmed S.; Chen, Peter; Hobson, Christopher M.; Wagner, William R.; Mayer, John E.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Surgical replacement of the pulmonary valve (PV) is a common treatment option for congenital pulmonary valve defects. Engineered tissue approaches to develop novel PV replacements are intrinsically complex, and will require methodical approaches for their development. Single leaflet replacement utilizing an ovine model is an attractive approach in that candidate materials can be evaluated under valve level stresses in blood contact without the confounding effects of a particular valve design. In the present study an approach for optimal leaflet shape design based on finite element (FE) simulation of a mechanically anisotropic, elastomeric scaffold for PV replacement is presented. The scaffold was modeled as an orthotropic hyperelastic material using a generalized Fung-type constitutive model. The optimal shape of the fully loaded PV replacement leaflet was systematically determined by minimizing the difference between the deformed shape obtained from FE simulation and an ex-vivo microCT scan of a native ovine PV leaflet. Effects of material anisotropy, dimensional changes of PV root, and fiber orientation on the resulting leaflet deformation were investigated. In-situ validation demonstrated that the approach could guide the design of the leaflet shape for PV replacement surgery. PMID:23294966

  15. Damage of Elastomeric Matrix Composites (EMC-rubbers) Under Static Loading Conditions: Experimental and Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayari, F.; Bayraktar, E.; Zghal, A.

    2011-01-01

    Elastomeric matrix composites (EMC-rubbers) are considered as isotropic hyper elastic incompressible materials under static loading conditions. As a rubber material element cannot be extended to an infinite stretch ratio, a damage mechanism at large strain is considered. The phenomenon of cavitation plays an important role in the damage of EMCs and influences the toughening mechanism of rubber-modified plastics. Indeed, cavitation in elastomers is thought to be initiated from flaws, which grow primarily due to a hydrostatic tensile stress and ahead of the crack; there will not only be a high stress perpendicular to the plane of the crack but also significant stress components in the other direction. However, there exists historically much discussion on the evolution of the cavitation in elastomers under monotonic and/or static solicitation. Mainly, cavitation instability occurs when the stress levels are sufficiently high so that the void expansion rate becomes infinitely large. Many research works have been performed to understand the effects of rubber cavitation on toughening of plastics. In fact, the cavitation phenomenon is not well known in detail. The most popular idea states that the cavitation is related to the existence of the gas bubbles trapped in the material during the production stage and the growing of the cavities would then be the result of the growing gas bubbles. Further, instable failure mechanism at the end of the cavitation is not well known too.

  16. Using "click-e-bricks" to make 3D elastomeric structures.

    PubMed

    Morin, Stephen A; Shevchenko, Yanina; Lessing, Joshua; Kwok, Sen Wai; Shepherd, Robert F; Stokes, Adam A; Whitesides, George M

    2014-09-10

    Soft, 3D elastomeric structures and composite structures are easy to fabricate using click-e-bricks, and the internal architecture of these structures together with the capabilities built into the bricks themselves provide mechanical, optical, electrical, and fluidic functions.

  17. Amorphous linear aliphatic polyesters for the facile preparation of tunable rapidly degrading elastomeric devices and delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Olson, David A; Gratton, Stephanie E A; DeSimone, Joseph M; Sheares, Valerie V

    2006-10-18

    A versatile method for preparing amorphous degradable elastomers with tunable properties that can be easily fabricated into a wide variety of shape-specific devices was investigated. Completely amorphous, liquid poly(ester ether) prepolymers with number-average molecular weights between 4 and 6 x 10(3) g/mol were prepared via condensation polymerization. These liquid prepolymers were then thermally cross-linked to form degradable elastomeric structures. The ability to vary the composition of these liquid prepolymers allows for easy control of the mechanical and degradation properties of the resulting elastomeric structures. Materials can be designed to completely degrade in vitro over a range of 30 days to 6 months, while the Young's modulus can be varied over 3 orders of magnitude (G = 0.02-20 MPa). Also, the liquid nature of these prepolymers makes them amenable to a wide variety of fabrication techniques. Using traditional and modified imprint lithography techniques, we have fabricated devices that demonstrate a wide variety of biologically applicable topologies, which could easily be extended to fabricate devices with more complex geometries. Until now, no method has combined this ease and speed of fabrication with the ability to control the mechanical and degradation properties of the resulting elastomers over such a broad range.

  18. Biodegradable, Elastomeric, and Intrinsically Photoluminescent Poly(Silicon-Citrates) with high Photostability and Biocompatibility for Tissue Regeneration and Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuzhang; Xue, Yumeng; Ma, Peter X; Chen, Xiaofeng; Lei, Bo

    2016-02-04

    Biodegradable polymer biomaterials with intrinsical photoluminescent properties have attracted much interest, due to their potential advantages for tissue regeneration and noninvasive bioimaging. However, few of current biodegradable polymers possess tunable intrinsically fluorescent properties, such as high photostability, fluorescent lifetime, and quantum field, and strong mechanical properties for meeting the requirements of biomedical applications. Here, by a facile one-step thermal polymerization, elastomeric poly(silicone-citrate) (PSC) hybrid polymers are developed with controlled biodegradability and mechanical properties, tunable inherent fluorescent emission (up to 600 nm), high photostability (beyond 180 min for UV and six months for natural light), fluorescent lifetime (near 10 ns) and quantum yield (16%-35%), high cellular biocompatibility, and minimal inflammatory response in vivo, which provide advantages over conventional fluorescent dyes, quantum dots, and current fluorescent polymers. The promising applications of PSC hybrids for cell and implants imaging in vitro and in vivo are successfully demonstrated. The development of elastomeric PSC polymer may provide a new strategy in synthesizing new inorganic-organic hybrid photo-luminescent materials for tissue regeneration and bioimaging applications.

  19. Elastomeric Structural Attachment Concepts for Aircraft Flap Noise Reduction - Challenges and Approaches to Hyperelastic Structural Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Turner, Travis L.; Moore, James B.; Su, Ji

    2014-01-01

    Airframe noise is a significant part of the overall noise of transport aircraft during the approach and landing phases of flight. Airframe noise reduction is currently emphasized under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) and Fixed Wing (FW) Project goals of NASA. A promising concept for trailing-edge-flap noise reduction is a flexible structural element or link that connects the side edges of the deployable flap to the adjacent main-wing structure. The proposed solution is distinguished by minimization of the span-wise extent of the structural link, thereby minimizing the aerodynamic load on the link structure at the expense of increased deformation requirement. Development of such a flexible structural link necessitated application of hyperelastic materials, atypical structural configurations and novel interface hardware. The resulting highly-deformable structural concept was termed the FLEXible Side Edge Link (FLEXSEL) concept. Prediction of atypical elastomeric deformation responses from detailed structural analysis was essential for evaluating feasible concepts that met the design constraints. The focus of this paper is to describe the many challenges encountered with hyperelastic finite element modeling and the nonlinear structural analysis of evolving FLEXSEL concepts. Detailed herein is the nonlinear analysis of FLEXSEL concepts that emerged during the project which include solid-section, foamcore, hollow, extended-span and pre-stressed concepts. Coupon-level analysis performed on elastomeric interface joints, which form a part of the FLEXSEL topology development, are also presented.

  20. Creep- and fatigue-resistant, rapid piezoresistive responses of elastomeric graphene-coated carbon nanotube aerogels over a wide pressure range.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Michelle N; Islam, Mohammad F

    2017-01-19

    Lightweight, flexible piezoresistive materials with wide operational pressure ranges are in demand for applications such as human physical activity and health monitoring, robotics, and for functional interfacing between living systems and wearable electronics. Piezoresistivity of many elastomeric foams of polymers and carbon allotropes satisfies much of the required characteristics for these applications except creep and fatigue resistance due to their viscoelasticity, critically limiting the reliability and lifetime of integrated devices. We report the piezoresistive responses from aerogels of graphene-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), made using a facile and versatile sol-gel method. Graphene crosslinks the junctions of the underlying random network of SWCNTs, generating lightweight elastomeric aerogels with a mass density of ≈11 mg mL(-1) (volume fraction ≈7.7 × 10(-3)) and a Young's modulus of ≈0.4 MPa. The piezoresistivity of these aerogels spans wide compressive pressures up to at least 120 kPa with sensitivity that exhibit ultrafast temporal responses of <27 ms and <3% delay ratio over 10(4) compressive loading-unloading cycles at rates between 0.1-10 Hz. Most importantly, the piezoresistive responses do not show any creep at least for 1 hour and 80 kPa of compressive static loading. We suggest that the fatigue- and creep-resistant, ultrafast piezoresistive responses of these elastomeric aerogels are highly attractive for use in dynamic and static lightweight, pressure sensing applications such as human activity monitoring and soft robotics.

  1. Influence of elastomeric seal plate surface chemistry on interface integrity in biofouling-prone systems: Evaluation of a hydrophobic "easy-release" silicone-epoxy coating for maintaining water seal integrity of a sliding neoprene/steel interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andolina, Vincent L.

    The scientific hypothesis of this work is that modulation of the properties of hard materials to exhibit abrasion-reducing and low-energy surfaces will extend the functional lifetimes of elastomeric seals pressed against them in abrasive underwater systems. The initial motivation of this work was to correct a problem noted in the leaking of seals at major hydropower generating facilities subject to fouling by abrasive zebra mussel shells and extensive corrosion. Similar biofouling-influenced problems can develop at seals in medical devices and appliances from regulators in anesthetic machines and SCUBA diving oxygen supply units to autoclave door seals, injection syringe gaskets, medical pumps, drug delivery components, and feeding devices, as well as in food handling equipment like pasteurizers and transfer lines. Maritime and many other heavy industrial seal interfaces could also benefit from this coating system. Little prior work has been done to elucidate the relationship of seal plate surface properties to the friction and wear of elastomeric seals during sliding contacts of these articulating materials, or to examine the secondary influence of mineralized debris within the contacting interfaces. This investigation utilized the seal materials relevant to the hydropower application---neoprene elastomer against carbon steel---with and without the application of a silicone-epoxy coating (WearlonRTM 2020.98) selected for its wear-resistance, hydrophobicity, and "easy-release" capabilities against biological fouling debris present in actual field use. Analytical techniques applied to these materials before and after wear-producing processes included comprehensive Contact Angle measurements for Critical Surface Tension (CA-CST) determination, Scanning Electron Microscopic inspections, together with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) measurements for determination of surface texture and inorganic composition, Multiple

  2. Microengineered Conductive Elastomeric Electrodes for Long-Term Electrophysiological Measurements with Consistent Impedance under Stretch.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dinglong; Cheng, Tin Kei; Xie, Kai; Lam, Raymond H W

    2015-10-23

    In this research, we develop a micro-engineered conductive elastomeric electrode for measurements of human bio-potentials with the absence of conductive pastes. Mixing the biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone with other biocompatible conductive nano-particles further provides the material with an electrical conductivity. We apply micro-replica mold casting for the micro-structures, which are arrays of micro-pillars embedded between two bulk conductive-PDMS layers. These micro-structures can reduce the micro-structural deformations along the direction of signal transmission; therefore the corresponding electrical impedance under the physical stretch by the movement of the human body can be maintained. Additionally, we conduct experiments to compare the electrical properties between the bulk conductive-PDMS material and the microengineered electrodes under stretch. We also demonstrate the working performance of these micro-engineered electrodes in the acquisition of the 12-lead electrocardiographs (ECG) of a healthy subject. Together, the presented gel-less microengineered electrodes can provide a more convenient and stable bio-potential measurement platform, making tele-medical care more achievable with reduced technical barriers for instrument installation performed by patients/users themselves.

  3. Microengineered Conductive Elastomeric Electrodes for Long-Term Electrophysiological Measurements with Consistent Impedance under Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dinglong; Cheng, Tin Kei; Xie, Kai; Lam, Raymond H. W.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, we develop a micro-engineered conductive elastomeric electrode for measurements of human bio-potentials with the absence of conductive pastes. Mixing the biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone with other biocompatible conductive nano-particles further provides the material with an electrical conductivity. We apply micro-replica mold casting for the micro-structures, which are arrays of micro-pillars embedded between two bulk conductive-PDMS layers. These micro-structures can reduce the micro-structural deformations along the direction of signal transmission; therefore the corresponding electrical impedance under the physical stretch by the movement of the human body can be maintained. Additionally, we conduct experiments to compare the electrical properties between the bulk conductive-PDMS material and the microengineered electrodes under stretch. We also demonstrate the working performance of these micro-engineered electrodes in the acquisition of the 12-lead electrocardiographs (ECG) of a healthy subject. Together, the presented gel-less microengineered electrodes can provide a more convenient and stable bio-potential measurement platform, making tele-medical care more achievable with reduced technical barriers for instrument installation performed by patients/users themselves. PMID:26512662

  4. The Mixing Time of a Random Walk on a Long-Range Percolation Cluster in Pre-Sierpinski Gasket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misumi, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We consider a random graph created by the long-range percolation on the nth stage finite subset of a fractal lattice called the pre-Sierpinski gasket. The long-range percolation is a stochastic model in which any pair of two points is connected by a random bond independently. On the random graph obtained as above, we consider a discrete-time random walk. We show that the mixing time of the random walk is of order 2^{(s-d)n} if dgasket.

  5. Compositional GC-FID analysis of the additives to PVC, focusing on the gaskets of lids for glass jars.

    PubMed

    Biedermann-Brem, Sandra; Biedermann, Maurus; Fiselier, Katell; Grob, Koni

    2005-12-01

    A gas chromatographic (FID) method is described which aims at the quantitative compositional analysis of the additives in plasticized PVC, particularly the plastisols used as gaskets for lids of glass jars. An extract of the PVC is analysed directly as well as after transesterification to ethyl esters. Transesterification enables the analysis of epoxidized soya bean and linseed oil (ESBO and ELO) as well as polyadipates. For most other additives, the shifts in the chromatogram resulting from transesterification is used to confirm the identifications made by direct analysis. In the gaskets of 69 lids from the European market used for packaging oily foods, a broad variety of plastisol compositions was found, many or possibly all of which do not comply with legal requirements. In 62% of these lids, ESBO was the principal plasticizer, whereas in 25% a phthalate had been used.

  6. Moldable elastomeric polyester-carbon nanotube scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Davenport Huyer, Locke; Estili, Mehdi; Yee, Bess; Smith, Nathaniel; Xu, Zhensong; Sun, Yu; Radisic, Milica

    2017-04-01

    Polymer biomaterials are used to construct scaffolds in tissue engineering applications to assist in mechanical support, organization, and maturation of tissues. Given the flexibility, electrical conductance, and contractility of native cardiac tissues, it is desirable that polymeric scaffolds for cardiac tissue regeneration exhibit elasticity and high electrical conductivity. Herein, we developed a facile approach to introduce carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into poly(octamethylene maleate (anhydride) 1,2,4-butanetricarboxylate) (124 polymer), and developed an elastomeric scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering that provides electrical conductivity and structural integrity to 124 polymer. 124 polymer-CNT materials were developed by first dispersing CNTs in poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether porogen and mixing with 124 prepolymer for molding into shapes and crosslinking under ultraviolet light. 124 polymers with 0.5% and 0.1% CNT content (wt) exhibited improved conductivity against pristine 124 polymer. With increasing the CNT content, surface moduli of hybrid polymers were increased, while their bulk moduli were decreased. Furthermore, increased swelling of hybrid 124 polymer-CNT materials was observed, suggesting their improved structural support in an aqueous environment. Finally, functional characterization of engineered cardiac tissues using the 124 polymer-CNT scaffolds demonstrated improved excitation threshold in materials with 0.5% CNT content (3.6±0.8V/cm) compared to materials with 0% (5.1±0.8V/cm) and 0.1% (5.0±0.7V/cm), suggesting greater tissue maturity. 124 polymer-CNT materials build on the advantages of 124 polymer elastomer to give a versatile biomaterial for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

  7. Design and Fabrication of an Elastomeric Unit for Soft Modular Robots in Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    PubMed

    De Falco, Iris; Gerboni, Giada; Cianchetti, Matteo; Menciassi, Arianna

    2015-11-14

    In recent years, soft robotics technologies have aroused increasing interest in the medical field due to their intrinsically safe interaction in unstructured environments. At the same time, new procedures and techniques have been developed to reduce the invasiveness of surgical operations. Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) has been successfully employed for abdominal interventions, however standard MIS procedures are mainly based on rigid or semi-rigid tools that limit the dexterity of the clinician. This paper presents a soft and high dexterous manipulator for MIS. The manipulator was inspired by the biological capabilities of the octopus arm, and is designed with a modular approach. Each module presents the same functional characteristics, thus achieving high dexterity and versatility when more modules are integrated. The paper details the design, fabrication process and the materials necessary for the development of a single unit, which is fabricated by casting silicone inside specific molds. The result consists in an elastomeric cylinder including three flexible pneumatic actuators that enable elongation and omni-directional bending of the unit. An external braided sheath improves the motion of the module. In the center of each module a granular jamming-based mechanism varies the stiffness of the structure during the tasks. Tests demonstrate that the module is able to bend up to 120° and to elongate up to 66% of the initial length. The module generates a maximum force of 47 N, and its stiffness can increase up to 36%.

  8. Elastomeric fluorescent POF for partial discharge detection: recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebler, Daniel; Hohberg, Michaela; Rohwetter, Philipp; Brusenbach, Roy; Plath, Ronald

    2015-09-01

    We present recent progress in our development of fibre-optic sensors for the detection of partial discharge (PD) in silicone cable accessories, based on detecting related low-level optical emission. We experimentally show that the sensitive optical detection of PD can dramatically enhance the performance of conventional electrical PD measurement in electromagnetically noisy environments, and that it can yield high sensitivity and specificity even when no synchronous electrical PD measurement is conducted. This is demonstrated using a real-scale model of a high voltage cable accessory with a surface-attached conventional thermoplastic fluorescent polymer optical fibre (F-POF) sensor. In order to increase light collection efficiency, as a prerequisite for a commercially competitive implementation using cost-efficient detectors, sensing fibres will have to be integrated into the silicone rubber insulation, close to the potential origin of PD-induced damage. This is the rationale for our efforts to develop elastomeric fluorescent sensing fibres, tailored to the requirements of the application. We discuss specific challenges to be tackled and report on the successful implementation of all-silicone rubber fluorescent POF, to our best knowledge for the first time.

  9. Nanoscale Structure of Urethane/Urea Elastomeric Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Dennys; Trindade, Ana C.; Godinho, Maria Helena; Silva, Laura C.; do Carmo Gonçalves, Maria; Neto, Antônio M. Figueiredo

    2017-02-01

    The nanostructure of urethane/urea elastomeric membranes was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in order to establish relationships between their structure and mechanical properties. The networks were made up of polypropylene oxide (PPO) and polybutadiene (PB) segments. The structural differences were investigated in two types of membranes with the same composition but with different thermal treatment after casting. Type I was cured at 70-80 °C and type II at 20 °C. Both membranes showed similar phase separation by TEM, with nanodomains rich in PB or PPO and 25 nm dimensions. The main difference between type I and type II membranes was found by SAXS. The type I membrane spectra showed, besides a broad band at a 27-nm q value (modulus of the scattering vector), an extra band at 6 nm, which was not observed in the type II membrane. The SAXS spectra were interpreted in terms of PPO, PB soft segments, and urethane/urea links, as well as hard moiety segregation in the reaction medium. This additional segregation ( q = 7 nm), although subtle, results in diverse mechanical behavior of in both membranes.

  10. Fabrication of biodegradable elastomeric scaffolds with sub-micron morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Stankus, John J.; Guan, Jianjun; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) of elastic tissues is strong and flexible and supports cell adhesion and enzymatic matrix remodeling. In an attempt to convey these ECM properties to a synthetic scaffold appropriate for soft tissue engineering applications, a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) was combined with type I collagen at various ratios (2.5, 5, 10, 20, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 wt% collagen) and electrospun to construct elastic matrices. Randomly orientated fibers in the electrospun matrices ranged in diameter from 100–900 nm, dependent on initial polymer concentration. Picrosirius red staining of matrices and CD spectroscopy of released collagen confirmed collagen incorporation and preservation of collagen structure at the higher collagen mass fractions. Matrices were strong and distensible possessing strengths of 2–13 MPa with breaking strains of 160–280% even with low PEUU content. Collagen incorporation significantly enhanced smooth muscle cell adhesion onto electrospun scaffolds. An approach has been demonstrated that mimics elastic extracellular matrices by using a synthetic component to provide mechanical function together with a biomacromolecule, collagen. Such matrices may find application in engineering soft tissue. PMID:15307165

  11. Optimising patient safety when using elastomeric pumps to administer outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gemma

    2016-10-27

    Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) is a growing area of practice that has numerous benefits for both patients and the healthcare system. In order for OPAT services to be successful, strategies need to be in place to maximise efficiency while providing safe, high-quality care. The use of elastomeric pumps to deliver intravenous (IV) antibiotics can have many benefits for OPAT services; they are cost-effective, easy to use and allow the patient to be fully ambulant. However, plans need to be put in place to make sure their use is safe and effective. This article discusses the use of elastomeric pumps by a UK-based OPAT team and the governance processes the team put in place to optimise patient safety when using elastomeric pumps to deliver IV antibiotics. Furthermore, with experience of using elastomeric pumps for more than 4 years the OPAT team was asked to evaluate an elastomeric pump new to the UK market: the Accufuser pump (Vygon (UK) Limited). By collecting data on its use it was found to be safe and easy to use. The team felt that the Accufuser pump ran to time in 96% of completed evaluations and considered it to be clinically acceptable in all responses.

  12. 76 FR 13434 - In the Matter of Certain Devices Having Elastomeric Gel and Components Thereof; Notice of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Devices Having Elastomeric Gel and Components Thereof; Notice of a... States after importation of certain devices having elastomeric gel and components thereof by reason of... Polydigitech, have been terminated from the investigation based upon consent order stipulations and...

  13. 75 FR 47027 - In the Matter of: Certain Devices Having Elastomeric Gel and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of: Certain Devices Having Elastomeric Gel and Components Thereof; Notice of... States after importation of certain devices having elastomeric gel and components thereof by reason of... CFR 210.10 (2010). Scope of Investigation: Having considered the complaint, the U.S....

  14. Actuation of elastomeric microvalves in point-of-care settings using handheld, battery-powered instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Addae-Mensah, Kweku A; Cheung, Yuk Kee; Fekete, Veronika; Rendely, Matthew S; Sia, Samuel K

    2010-06-21

    Although advanced fluid handling using elastomeric valves is useful for a variety of lab-on-a-chip procedures, their operation has traditionally relied on external laboratory infrastructure (such as gas tanks, computers, and ground electricity). This dependence has held back the use of elastomeric microvalves for point-of-care settings. Here, we demonstrate that microfabricated microvalves, via liquid-filled control channels, can be actuated using only a handheld instrument powered by a 9 V battery. This setup can achieve on-off fluid control with fast response times, coordinated switching of multiple valves, and operation of a biological assay. In the future, this technique may enable the widely used elastomeric microvalves (made by multilayer soft lithography) to be increasingly adopted for portable sensors and lab-on-a-chip systems.

  15. Elastomeric Seal Performance after Terrestrial Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Oravec, Heather A.; Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.; Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation was evaluated to determine its negative effects on the performance of elastomeric gas pressure seals. The leak rates of the silicone elastomer S0383-70 O-ring test articles were used to quantify the degradation of the seals after exposure to vacuum-ultraviolet and/or middle-to-near-ultraviolet wavelength radiation. Three groups of seals were exposed in terrestrial facilities to 115-165 nm wavelength radiation, 230-500 nm wavelength radiation, or both spectrums, for an orbital spaceflight equivalent of 125 hours. The leak rates of the silicone elastomer S0383-70 seals were quantified and compared to samples that received no radiation. Each lot contained six samples and statistical t-tests were used to determine the separate and combined influences of exposure to the two wavelength ranges. A comparison of the mean leak rates of samples exposed to 115-165 nm wavelength radiation to the control specimens showed no difference, suggesting that spectrum was not damaging. The 230-500 nm wavelength appeared to be damaging, as the mean leak rates of the specimens exposed to that range of wavelengths, and those exposed to the combined 115-165 nm and 230-500 nm spectrums, were significantly different from the leak rates of the control specimens. Most importantly, the test articles exposed to both wavelength spectrums exhibited mean leak rates two orders of magnitude larger than any other exposed specimens, which suggested that both wavelength spectrums are important when simulating the orbital environment.

  16. Baxter elastomeric pumps: Weighing as an alternative to visual inspection.

    PubMed

    Cusano, Ellen L; Ali, Raafi; Sawyer, Michael B; Chambers, Carole R; Tang, Patricia A

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Elastomeric pumps are used to administer 46-hour infusions of 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Baxter suggests patients visually monitor their pumps to ensure that infusions are proceeding correctly. This can be confusing and lead to concerns about under- or over-dosing. Baxter has not considered weighing pumps as a validated method for monitoring. This study aims to validate weighing as a more accurate method for patients and healthcare professionals, and describe real life Baxter Infusor™ variability. Methods Patients who had been started on a 46-hour 5FU infusion returned to the clinic approximately 24 h after starting treatment. The pump was weighed on a StarFrit kitchen scale, and date, time, and weights recorded. Patients were asked if they had a preference for weighing or visually inspecting their pump. Results Pumps ( n = 103) were weighed between 17.25 and 27.5 h after connection. The average weight of a pump was 189 g. Of 103 pumps weighed, 99 weighed less than expected, corresponding to average flow rates of 5.69 mL/h over the elapsed time. The expected flow rate is 5 mL/h with 10% variability. Average flow rates within the 17.25- to 27.5-hour window were 4.561 mL/h, which is 8.78% slower than expected, but within the 10% known variability. Forty-seven percent of patients didn't have a preference for either method, but for those who did have a preference, more than twice as many preferred weighing. Conclusion With proper education, weighing Baxter Infusors at home with kitchen scales can be an accepted and objective alternative to the current recommendation of visual inspection.

  17. Search for a more adequate test to predict the long-term migration from the PVC gaskets of metal lids into oily foods in glass jars.

    PubMed

    Graubardt, Nadine; Biedermann, Maurus; Fiselier, Katell; Bolzoni, Luciana; Pedrelli, Turno; Cavalieri, Chiara; Simoneau, Cathérine; Grob, Koni

    2009-07-01

    As shown previously, the conventional testing procedure for simulating long-term migration from the gaskets of metal closures into oily foods does not adequately reflect reality. It appears to be impossible to accelerate migration to the extent that the situation at the end of the shelf life of a product can be anticipated in a few days or weeks. Therefore, we investigated whether long-term migration could be extrapolated from migration rates determined for new lids. Jars were kept in the normal upright position. Since heat treatment may have a strong temporary impact, migration during the initial heating for pasteurization or sterilization and storage at ambient temperature were determined using different lids. Commercial products were recalled from sales points throughout Europe to determine the real migration over extended periods of time and for jars with differing histories. This migration was compared with data from the short-term testing to investigate whether an empirical relationship could be derived. The results show that the short-term test enables the comparison of lids and plasticizers in the initial phase of migration, but that long-term extrapolation presupposes more complex kinetic modeling. The results also demonstrate that the legal relevance of "official" testing methods should be reconsidered to avoid conflict when food contact materials comply with migration limits in the test but not in actual application.

  18. Locally auxetic behavior of elastomeric polypropylene on the 100 nm length scale.

    PubMed

    Franke, Mechthild; Magerle, Robert

    2011-06-28

    We observe unexpected locally auxetic behavior in elastomeric polypropylene, a semicrystalline polymer with a natural microstructure and a low degree of crystallinity. Our series of scanning force microscopy images show the nanomechanical deformation processes that occur upon stretching a thin film of elastomeric polypropylene. Upon uniaxial stretching, the angle between epitaxially grown lamella branches remains constant and the lamellae elongate, resulting in locally auxetic behavior (negative Poisson's ratio) on the 100-nanometer scale. This mechanism causing auxetic behavior, which was previously proposed on the basis of geometric arguments, appears to be an intrinsic property of certain semicrystalline polymers.

  19. Territory covered by N random walkers on fractal media: the Sierpinski gasket and the percolation aggregate.

    PubMed

    Acedo, L; Yuste, S B

    2001-01-01

    We address the problem of evaluating the number S(N)(t) of distinct sites visited up to time t by N noninteracting random walkers all starting from the same origin in fractal media. For a wide class of fractals (of which the percolation cluster at criticality and the Sierpinski gasket are typical examples) we propose, for large N and after the short-time compact regime, an asymptotic series for S(N)(t) analogous to that found for Euclidean media: S(N)(t) approximately S(N)(t)(1-Delta). Here S(N)(t) is the number of sites (volume) inside a hypersphere of radius L[ln(N)/c]1/v where L is the root-mean-square chemical displacement of a single random walker, and v and c determine how fast 1-Gamma(t)(l) (the probability that a given site at chemical distance l from the origin is visited by a single random walker by time t) decays for large values of l/L: 1-Gamma(t)(l) approximately exp[-c(l/L)(v)]. For the fractals considered in this paper, v=d(l)w/((d(l)w)-1), d(l)w being the chemical-diffusion exponent. The corrective term Delta is expressed as a series in ln(-n)(N)ln(m) ln(N) (with n> or =1 and 0< or =m< or =n), which is given explicitly up to n=2. This corrective term contributes substantially to the final value of S(N)(t) even for relatively large values of N.

  20. Inflatable Elastomeric Macroporous Polymers Synthesized from Medium Internal Phase Emulsion Templates.

    PubMed

    Tebboth, Michael; Jiang, Qixiang; Kogelbauer, Andreas; Bismarck, Alexander

    2015-09-02

    Closed cell elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based polymerized medium internal phase emulsions (polyMIPEs) containing an aqueous solution of sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaHCO3) have been produced. Via thermal decomposition of NaHCO3, carbon dioxide was released into the polyMIPE structure to act as a blowing agent. When placed into an atmosphere with reduced pressure, these macroporous elastomers expanded to many times their original size, with a maximum expansion of 30 times. This expansion was found to be repeatable and reproducible. The extent of volume expansion was determined primarily by the dispersed phase volume ratio of the emulsion template; polyMIPEs with 60% dispersed phase content produced greater volume expansion ratios than polyMIPEs with 50% dispersed phase. Increasing the concentration of NaHCO3 in the dispersed phase also led to increased expansion due to the greater volume of gas forming within the porous structure of the silicone elastomer. The expansion ratio could be increased by doubling the agitation time during the emulsification process to form the MIPEs, as this decreased the pore wall thickness and hence the elastic restoring force of the porous silicone elastomer. Although MIPEs with 70% dispersed phase could be stabilized and successfully cured, the resultant polyMIPE was mechanically too weak and expanded less than polyMIPEs with a dispersed phase of 60%. It was also possible to cast the liquid emulsion into thin polyMIPE films, which could be expanded in vacuum, demonstrating that these materials have potential for use in self-sealing containers.

  1. Elasto-Plastic FEM Stress Analysis and Mechanical Characteristics of Pipe Flange Connections with Non-Asbestos Gaskets under Internal Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yoshio; Omiya, Yuya; Kobayashi, Takashi; Sawa, Toshiyuki

    The effects of the nominal diameter of pipe flange connections with non-asbestos spiral wound gaskets(SWG) under internal pressure on the mechanical characteristics such as the contact gasket stress distribution which governs the sealing performance, the load factor and the hub stress of the connections were evaluated. The stresses in the connections with the nominal diameters from 3” to 24” under internal pressure are analyzed using the elasto-plastic(EP) FEM analysis taking account the hysteresis and non-linearity of deformation behavior of the non-asbestos SWG. As a result, it is found that the variations in the contact gasket stress distributions are substantial due to the flange rotation in the connections with the larger nominal diameter. Leakage tests were conducted to measure the axial bolt forces (the load factor) and the hub stress. The results obtained from the EP-FEM analyses are fairly consistent with the experimental results concerning the variation in the axial bolt forces (the load factor) and the hub stress. Using the obtained contact gasket stress distributions and the fundamental relationship between the amount of leakage and the contact gasket stress, the amount of the leakage of the connections is estimated. It is observed that the sealing performance of the connections with larger nominal diameter is worse than that of the connection with smaller nominal diameter because of the flange rotation. The estimated results are in a fairly good agreement with the measured results. The difference in the hub stress between the EP-FEM and ASME code is demonstrated and the differences in the load factor and the sealing performance of the connections are shown between the asbestos and non-asbestos gaskets.

  2. Containment of fluid samples in the hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell without the use of metal gaskets: performance and advantages for in situ analysis.

    PubMed

    Chou, I-Ming; Bassett, William A; Anderson, Alan J; Mayanovic, Robert A; Shang, Linbo

    2008-11-01

    Metal gaskets (Re, Ir, Inconel, or stainless steel) normally used to contain fluid samples in the hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) are sometimes undesirable due to possible contamination and to gasket deformation at high pressures and temperatures resulting in nonisochoric behavior. Furthermore, in x-ray spectroscopic experiments, metal gaskets may attenuate the incident x-ray beam and emitted fluorescence x-rays, and the interaction of scattered radiation with the gasket may produce fluorescence that interferes with the x-ray spectrum of the sample. New arrangements and procedures were tested for the operation of the HDAC without using the metal gaskets. Distilled, de-ionized water was loaded into the sample chamber, a laser-milled recess 300 microm in diameter and approximately 50 microm deep centered in the 1.0 mm face of the lower diamond anvil, and sealed by pressing the top diamond anvil face directly against the lower one without a metal gasket in between. A maximum sample pressure of 202 MPa at 617 degrees C was maintained for a duration of 10 min without evidence of leakage. A small change in fluid density was observed in one experiment where the sample was held at 266 MPa at 708 degrees C for 10 min. The gasketless HDAC was also employed in x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments, where, in addition to the sample chamber in the lower diamond, two grooves were milled at a 90 degrees angle to each other around the sample chamber to minimize the attenuation of incident and fluorescent x rays. With a minimum distance between the sample chamber and the grooves of 80 microm, a pressure of 76 MPa at 500 degrees C was maintained for 2 h with no change in the original fluid density.

  3. Containment of fluid samples in the hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell without the use of metal gaskets: Performance and advantages for in situ analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Bassett, William A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Shang, L.

    2008-01-01

    Metal gaskets (Re, Ir, Inconel, or stainless steel) normally used to contain fluid samples in the hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) are sometimes undesirable due to possible contamination and to gasket deformation at high pressures and temperatures resulting in nonisochoric behavior. Furthermore, in x-ray spectroscopic experiments, metal gaskets may attenuate the incident x-ray beam and emitted fluorescence x-rays, and the interaction of scattered radiation with the gasket may produce fluorescence that interferes with the x-ray spectrum of the sample. New arrangements and procedures were tested for the operation of the HDAC without using the metal gaskets. Distilled, de-ionized water was loaded into the sample chamber, a laser-milled recess 300 ??m in diameter and ???50 ??m deep centered in the 1.0 mm face of the lower diamond anvil, and sealed by pressing the top diamond anvil face directly against the lower one without a metal gasket in between. A maximum sample pressure of 202 MPa at 617 ??C was maintained for a duration of 10 min without evidence of leakage. A small change in fluid density was observed in one experiment where the sample was held at 266 MPa at 708 ??C for 10 min. The gasketless HDAC was also employed in x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments, where, in addition to the sample chamber in the lower diamond, two grooves were milled at a 90?? angle to each other around the sample chamber to minimize the attenuation of incident and fluorescent x rays. With a minimum distance between the sample chamber and the grooves of 80 ??m, a pressure of 76 MPa at 500 ??C was maintained for 2 h with no change in the original fluid density. ?? 2008 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Elastomeric and mechanically stiff nanocomposites from poly(glycerol sebacate) and bioactive nanosilicates.

    PubMed

    Kerativitayanan, Punyavee; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2015-10-01

    Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) has been proposed for tissue engineering applications owing to its tough elastomeric mechanical properties, biocompatibility and controllable degradation. However, PGS shows limited bioactivity and thus constraining its utilization for musculoskeletal tissue engineering. To address this issue, we developed bioactive, highly elastomeric, and mechanically stiff nanocomposites by covalently reinforcing PGS network with two-dimensional (2D) nanosilicates. Nanosilicates are ultrathin nanomaterials and can induce osteogenic differentiation of human stem cells in the absence of any osteogenic factors such as dexamethasone or bone morphogenetic proteins-2 (BMP2). The addition of nanosilicate to PGS matrix significantly enhances the mechanical stiffness without affecting the elastomeric properties. Moreover, nanocomposites with higher amount of nanosilicates have higher in vitro stability as determined by degradation kinetics. The increase in mechanical stiffness and in vitro stability is mainly attributed to enhanced interactions between nanosilicates and PGS. We evaluated the in vitro bioactivity of nanocomposite using preosteoblast cells. The addition of nanosilicates significantly enhances the cell adhesion, support cell proliferation, upregulate alkaline phosphates and mineralized matrix production. Overall, the combination of high mechanically stiffness and elastomericity, tailorable degradation profile, and the ability to promote osteogenic differentiation of PGS-nanosilicate can be used for regeneration of bone.

  5. A fiber-optic powered wireless sensor module made on elastomeric substrate for wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Lien, V; Lin, H; Chuang, J; Sailor, M; Lo, Y

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate an integrated sensor module that combines a photonic nano-porous sensor and a bias-free optical powered RF transducer. The sensor signal is encoded in the RF frequency ready for transmission. The entire sensor module does not include battery and is constructed with the flexible and biocompatible elastomeric polymer, PDMS. This technology holds promise for wearable sensors.

  6. Enhanced wet adhesion and shear of elastomeric micro-fiber arrays with mushroom tip geometry and a photopolymerized p(DMA-co-MEA) tip coating.

    PubMed

    Glass, Paul; Chung, Hoyong; Washburn, Newell R; Sitti, Metin

    2010-11-16

    Using principles inspired by the study of naturally occurring sticky systems such as the micro- and nanoscale fibers on the toes of geckos and the adhesive proteins secreted by marine animals such as mussels, this study describes the development and evaluation of a novel patterned and coated elastomeric microfibrillar material for enhanced repeatable adhesion and shear in wet environments. A multistep fabrication process consisting of optical lithography, micromolding, polymer synthesis, dipping, stamping, and photopolymerization is described to produce uniform arrays of polyurethane elastomeric microfibers with mushroom-shaped tips coated with a thin layer of lightly cross-linked p(DMA-co-MEA), an intrinsically adhesive synthetic polymer. Adhesion and shear force characterization of these arrays in contact with a glass hemisphere is demonstrated, and significant pull-off force, overall work of adhesion, and shear force enhancements in submerged aqueous environments are shown when compared to both unpatterned and uncoated samples, as well as previously evaluated patterned and coated arrays with differing geometry. Such materials may have potential value as repeatable adhesives for wet environments, such as for medical devices.

  7. Leakage Through a Channel Formed by a Gasket, a Sealing Surface, and a Filament Trapped Between Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John; Adams, Frederick

    1996-01-01

    Plumbing for the transport of liquid Hydrogen or liquid Oxygen at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is very critical. Every piece of hardware for handling such a hazardous cryogen is subject to testing prior to installation and use. Safe, realistic testing of all such hardware is prohibitively expensive, which leads, perforce, to expidients such as: (1) lead testing with non-flammable tracer fluids (e.g, liquid nitrogen) and (2) leak testing with room temperature tracer fluids (e.g. liquid helium). Such expedients undermine the realism of the tests. If however, one could apply rational fluid dynamics methods to derive a general analytical expression with which one could relate the throughput of gaseous Helium through a given leak channel to the throughput of liquid Hydrogen through the same channel, then one could recover much of the information that one would otherwise forfeit through these expedients. These facts lead to the following questions: (1) What would be an example of a generic flaw in a gasket?; and (2) How can one calculate the flow of fluid in it? The report addresses these questions. It considers a particular leak geometry, namely one formed by a gasket, a sealing surface, and a filament trapped between them (so that the cross section of the leak channel is a flat bottomed curvilinear triangle, two sides of which are circular arcs and which has cusps on all three corners).

  8. Composite Materials for Maxillofacial Prostheses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    block number) MAXILLOFACIAL PROSTHESES; PROSTHETIC MATERIALS; MICROCAPSULES ; SOFT FILLERS; ELASTuMER COMPOSITES 20,_ ABSTRACT ’Continue on reverse side...approaches were pursued toward making such microcapsules . One approach involves coaxial extrusion of a catalyzed elastomer precursor and core liquid into a...fabrication of maxillofacial prostheses. The projected composite systems are elastomeric-shelled, liquid-filled microcapsules . Two experimental approaches were

  9. Composite Materials for Maxillofacial Prostheses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    the most promise for producing elastomeric-shelled microcapsules containing an inert liquid. While much of the diverse field of microencapsulation is...Processes and Applications, Chicago, 28 August 1973. 11. Gutchko, M. H., Microcapsules and Microencapsulation Techniques. Noyes Data Corporation, Park Ridge...necesaryv and identify by block number) * MAXILLOFACIAL PROSTHESES; PROSTHETIC MATERIALS: MICROCAPSULES : * SOFT FILLERS; ELASTOMER COMPOSITES 2L

  10. Impact of Different Standard Type A7A Drum Closure-Ring Practices on Gasket Contraction and Bolt Closure Distance– 15621

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, Edward; Blanton, Paul; Bobbitt, John H.

    2015-03-11

    The Department of Energy, the Savannah River National Laboratory, several manufacturers of specification drums, and the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) are collaborating in the development of a guidance document for DOE contractors and vendors who wish to qualify containers to DOT 7A Type A requirements. Currently, the effort is focused on DOT 7A Type A 208-liter (55-gallons) drums with a standard 12-gauge bolted closure ring. The U.S. requirements, contained in Title 49, Part 178.350 “Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A specifies a competent authority review of the packaging is not required for the transport of (Class 7) radioactive material containing less than Type A quantities of radioactive material. For Type AF drums, a 4 ft. regulatory free drop must be performed, such that the drum “suffers maximum damage.” Although the actual orientation is not defined by the specification, recent studies suggest that maximum damage would result from a shallow angle top impact, where kinetic energy is transferred to the lid, ultimately causing heavy damage to the lid, or even worse, causing the lid to come off. Since each vendor develops closure recommendations/procedures for the drums they manufacture, key parameters applied to drums during closing vary based on vendor. As part of the initial phase of the collaboration, the impact of the closure variants on the ability of the drum to suffer maximum damage is investigated. Specifically, closure testing is performed varying: 1) the amount of torque applied to the closure ring bolt; and, 2) stress relief protocol, including: a) weight of hammer; and, b) orientation that the hammer hits the closure ring. After closure, the amount of drum lid gasket contraction and the distance that the closure bolt moves through the closure ring is measured.

  11. Increasing pumping efficiency in a micro throttle pump by enhancing displacement amplification in an elastomeric substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, T.; Johnston, I. D.; Tracey, M. C.; Tan, C. K. L.

    2010-06-01

    Fluid transport is accomplished in a micro throttle pump (MTP) by alternating deformation of a micro channel cast into a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomeric substrate. The active deformation is achieved using a bimorph PZT piezoelectric disc actuator bonded to a glass diaphragm. The bimorph PZT deflects the diaphragm as well as alternately pushing and pulling the elastomer layer providing displacement amplification in the PDMS directly surrounding the micro channel. In order to improve pumping rates we have embedded a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) ring into the PMDS substrate which increases the magnitude of the displacement amplification achieved. FEM simulation of the elastomeric substrate deformation predicts that the inclusion of the PMMA ring should increase the channel deformation. We experimentally demonstrate that inclusion of a PMMA ring, having a diameter equal to that of the circular node of the PZT/glass/PDMS composite, increases in the throttle resistance ratio by 40% and the maximum pumping rate by 90% compared to an MTP with no ring.

  12. Pattern transfer printing by kinetic control of adhesion to an elastomeric stamp

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2011-05-17

    The present invention provides methods, systems and system components for transferring, assembling and integrating features and arrays of features having selected nanosized and/or microsized physical dimensions, shapes and spatial orientations. Methods of the present invention utilize principles of `soft adhesion` to guide the transfer, assembly and/or integration of features, such as printable semiconductor elements or other components of electronic devices. Methods of the present invention are useful for transferring features from a donor substrate to the transfer surface of an elastomeric transfer device and, optionally, from the transfer surface of an elastomeric transfer device to the receiving surface of a receiving substrate. The present methods and systems provide highly efficient, registered transfer of features and arrays of features, such as printable semiconductor element, in a concerted manner that maintains the relative spatial orientations of transferred features.

  13. A simple scanning spectrometer based on a stretchable elastomeric reflective grating

    SciTech Connect

    Ghisleri, C.; Milani, P.; Potenza, M. A. C.; Bellacicca, A.; Ravagnan, L.

    2014-02-10

    We report a scanning optical spectrometer based on the use of a stretchable elastomeric reflective grating. The grating is obtained by supersonic cluster beam implantation of silver nanoparticles on polydimethylsiloxane previously grooved by molding to create a replica of a commercial digital versatile disk grating. The use of a stretchable grating allows the spectrometer spanning the whole optical wavelength range by solely extending the diffraction element by more than 100% of its original dimensions. The stretchable reflective optical grating shows excellent performances and stability upon thousands of stretching cycles. The use of this elastomeric element makes the optical layout and the mechanics of the spectrometer extremely simple and advantageous for those applications where spectral resolution is not a major requirement. As a proof of principle, we present the absorption spectrum of Rhodamine B in solution obtained by our spectrometer and compared to commercial instruments.

  14. The Effects of Cylinder Head Gasket Opening on Engine Temperature Distribution for a Water-Cooled Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J. Y.; Chi, G. X.

    2017-02-01

    In a liquid-cooled engine, coolant is pumped throughout the water jacket of the engine, drawing heat from the cylinder head, pistons, combustion chambers, cylinder walls, and valves, etc. If the engine temperature is too high or too low, various problems will occur. These include overheating of the lubricating oil and engine parts, excessive stresses between engine parts, loss of power, incomplete burning of fuel, etc. Thus, the engine should be maintained at the proper operating temperature. This study investigated the effects of different cylinder head gasket opening on the engine temperature distributions in a water-cooled motorcycle engine. The numerical predictions for the temperature distribution are in good agreement with the experimental data within 20%.

  15. Process for the preparation of fluorine containing crosslinked elastomeric polytriazine and product so produced

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Korus, R. A. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Crosslinking elastomeric polytriazines are prepared by a 4 step procedure which consists of (1) forming a poly(imidoylamidine) by the reaction, under reflux conditions, of anhydrous ammonia with certain perfluorinated alkyl or alkylether dinitriles; (2) forming a linear polytriazine by cyclizing the imidoylamidine linkages by reaction with certain perfluorinated alkyl or alkylether acid anhydrides or halides; (3) extending the linear polytriazine chain by further refluxing in anhydrous ammonia; and (4) heating to cyclize the new imidoylamidine and thereby crosslink the polymer.

  16. Cytotoxicity of latex and non-latex orthodontic elastomeric ligatures on L929 mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rogério Lacerda dos; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Martins, Fernanda Otaviano; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela; Ruellas, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the cytotoxicity exists between latex and non-latex Orthodontic elastomeric ligatures. Six elastomeric ligatures (1 latex, 2 latex-free and 3 polyurethane) from different manufacturers were divided into 6 groups of 15 elastics each: A (Latex-free, American Orthodontics), M (Polyurethane, Morelli), G (Polyurethane,GAC International), Te (Polyurethane, Tecnident), TP (Natural latex,TP Orthodontics) and U (Latex-free,3M Unitek). The cytotoxicity assay was performed using cell cultures (L929 mouse fibroblast cell line), which were subjected to the cell viability test with neutral red ("dye-uptake") at 1, 2, 3, 7 and 28 days. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were observed between Groups M and Te in all experimental periods, except at 2 days. No significant differences (p>0.05) in cell viability were found either among Groups A, G, TP and U or between Groups M and Te at 24 h or among Groups CC, A, G, TP and U at 2 and 28 days. It may be concluded that latex-free elastomeric ligatures from American Orthodontics and Unitek trademarks induced less cell lysis compared to latex and polyurethane ligatures.

  17. Comparison of frictional resistance between self-ligating and conventional brackets tied with elastomeric and metal ligature in orthodontic archwires

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Vanessa Vieira; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; de Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues; Moura, Sandra Kiss; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the frictional resistance between self-ligating and conventional brackets tied to different types of wire. Material and Methods Abzil Kirium Capelozza (Pattern I) and Easy Clip (Roth prescription) incisor brackets were used. An elastomeric ligature or a ligating wire 0.10-in was used to ligate the wire to the Abzil bracket. Three types of orthodontic archwire alloys were assessed: 0.016-in NiTi wire, 0.016 x 0.021-in NiTi wire and 0.019 x 0.025-in steel wire. Ten observations were carried out for each bracket-archwire angulation combination. Brackets were mounted in a special appliance, positioned at 90 degrees in relation to the wire and tested in two angulations. Frictional test was performed in a Universal Testing Machine at 5 mm/min and 10 mm of displacement. The means (MPa) were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test set at 5% of significance. The surfaces of wires and brackets were observed at SEM. Results Steel-tied brackets (16.48 ± 8.31) showed higher means of frictional resistance than elastomeric-tied brackets (4.29 ± 2.16 ) and self-ligating brackets (1.66 ± 1.57) (P < 0.05), which also differed from each other (P < 0.05). As for the type of wire, 0.019 x 0.025-in steel wire (5.67 ± 3.97) showed lower means (P < 0.05) than 0.16-in NiTi wire (8.26 ± 10.92) and 0.016 x 0.021-in NiTi wire (8.51 ± 7.95), which did not differ from each other (P > 0.05). No statistical differences (P > 0.05) were found between zero (7.76 ± 8.46) and five-degree (7.19 ± 7.93) angulations. Conclusions Friction was influenced not only by the type of bracket, but also by the ligating systems. Different morphological aspects were observed for the brackets and wires studied PMID:25162575

  18. To improve the flame resistance of spandex elastic elastomeric fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Strength characteristics of fibers were improved to pass the 70% oxygen/30% nitrogen specification. Spinning techniques and information about incorporating these fibers in fabric structures using wrapping materials of Beta Fiberglas, Nomex, and PBI were developed.

  19. Evaluation of the Performance of O-rings Made with Different Elastomeric Polymers in Simulated Geothermal Environments at 300°C

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Pyatina, Tatiana; Redline, Erica Marie; McElhanon, James R.; Blankenship, Douglas A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the survival of O-rings made with six different elastomeric polymers, EPDM, type I- and II-FKM, FEPM, FFKM, and FSR, in five different simulated geothermal environments at 300°C. It further defines the relative strengths and weaknesses of the materials in each environment. The environments tested were: 1) non-aerated steam-cooling cycles, 2) aerated steam-cooling cycles, 3) water-based drilling fluid, 4) CO2-rich geo-brine fluid, and, 5) heat-cool water quenching cycles. Following exposure, the extent of oxidation, oxidationinduced degradation, thermal behaviors, micro-defects, permeation depths of ionic species present in environments throughout the O-ring, silicate-related scale-deposition, and changes in mechanical properties were assessed.

  20. The efficacy of elastomeric patient-control module when connected to a balloon pump for postoperative epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung Hwa; Shim, Yon Hee; Kim, Min-Soo; Shin, Yang-Sik; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Jeong Soo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract When considering the principles of a pain control strategy by patients, reliable administration of additional bolus doses is important for providing the adequate analgesia and improving patient satisfaction. We compared the efficacy of elastomeric patient-control module (PCM) with conventional PCM providing epidural analgesia postoperatively. A noninferiority comparison was used. Eighty-six patients scheduled for open upper abdominal surgery were randomized to use either an elastomeric or conventional PCM connected to balloon pump. After successful epidural catheter insertion at T6–8 level, fentanyl (15–20 μg/kg) in 0.3% ropivacaine 100 mL was administered at basal rate 2 mL/h with bolus 2 mL and lock-out time 15 minutes. The primary outcome was the verbal numerical rating score for pain. The 95% confidence intervals for differences in pain scores during the first 48 hours postoperatively were <1, indicating noninferiority of the elastomeric PCM. The duration of pump reservoir exhaustion was shorter for the elastomeric PCM (mean [SD], 33 hours [8 hours] vs 40 hours [8 hours], P = 0.0003). There were no differences in the frequency of PCM use, additional analgesics, or adverse events between groups. The elastomeric PCM was as effective as conventional PCM with and exhibited a similar safety profile. PMID:28079812

  1. Predictable elastomeric impressions in advanced fixed prosthodontics: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lee, E A

    1999-05-01

    Despite advances in dental material technology, the predictable procurement of accurate impressions for the fabrication of complex fixed prosthodontic restorations remains an elusive objective. The technical challenges and potential negative sequelae are exponentially magnified in advanced applications that involve multiple abutments and preparatory phases. A protocol for consistently achieving accurate impressions with the use of polyether impression materials and automatic instrumentation is presented and illustrated with multiple clinical examples. The technique is capable of yielding reliable results in extensive cases and requires minimal support from auxiliary personnel.

  2. Predictable elastomeric impressions in advanced fixed prosthodontics: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ernesto A

    2007-10-01

    Despite advances in dental material technology, the predictable procurement of accurate impressions for the fabrication of complex fixed prosthodontic restorations remains an elusive objective. The technical challenges and potential negative sequelae are exponentially magnified in advanced applications that involve multiple abutments and preparatory phases. A protocol for consistently achieving accurate impressions with the use of various impression materials and automatic instrumentation is presented and illustrated with multiple clinical examples. The technique is capable of yielding reliable results in extensive cases and requires minimal support from auxiliary personnel.

  3. Recycling of waste gasket rubber granules by bulk CuCl2 and nano CuCl2: removal of Hg(II) ions by recycled rubber granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deivasigamani, Kalpana; Nanjan, Jayakumar; Mani, Hari Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Environmental problems arise due to the millions of tons of waste rubber that are thrown away in the natural environment. Management of this waste rubber is a big environmental challenge. So, a new, simple and cost-effective recycling method for obtaining recycled waste rubber should be developed. In this study, we found that waste gasket rubber can be desulfurized by means of bulk and nano-sized transition metal halides in the presence of solvents. The recycled product of desulfurized waste gasket rubber granules that is obtained can be used as the cheapest adsorbent in the removal of mercury(II) ions from aqueous solution. Comparative batch studies have been conducted to elucidate the adsorption efficiency of desulfurized rubber using bulk copper chloride and also using nano-sized copper chloride under optimum conditions with commercial activated carbon.

  4. New injectable elastomeric biomaterials for hernia repair and their biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Skrobot, J; Zair, L; Ostrowski, M; El Fray, M

    2016-01-01

    Complications associated with implantation of polymeric hernia meshes remain a difficult surgical challenge. We report here on our work, developing for the first time, an injectable viscous material that can be converted to a solid and elastic implant in vivo, thus successfully closing herniated tissue. In this study, long-chain fatty acids were used for the preparation of telechelic macromonomers end-capped with methacrylic functionalities to provide UV curable systems possessing high biocompatibility, good mechanical strength and flexibility. Two different systems, comprising urethane and ester bonds, were synthesized from non-toxic raw materials and then subjected to UV curing after injection of viscous material into the cavity at the abdominal wall during hernioplasty in a rabbit hernia model. No additional fixation or sutures were required. The control group of animals was treated with commercially available polypropylene hernia mesh. The observation period lasted for 28 days. We show here that artificially fabricated defect was healed and no reherniation was observed in the case of the fatty acid derived materials. Importantly, the number of inflammatory cells found in the surrounding tissue was comparable to these found around the standard polypropylene mesh. No inflammatory cells were detected in connective tissues and no sign of necrosis has been observed. Collectively, our results demonstrated that new injectable and photocurable systems can be used for minimally invasive surgical protocols in repair of small hernia defects.

  5. Long Life Elastomeric Aircraft Hydraulic Seals. Part I2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    extruded material would be too small to cause an unacceptable reduction or deformation of the plastic back-up rinp /s cross section. The extrusion was to...reduce the imbalanced force causing the lateral shift of the cast-iron back-up ring. A small indentation which the intermediate rinp would cause

  6. Determination of polyadipates migrating from lid gaskets of glass jars. Hydrolysis to adipic acid and measurement by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Driffield, M; Bradley, E L; Harmer, N; Castle, L; Klump, S; Mottier, P

    2010-10-01

    Polyadipate plasticizers can be present in the polyvinylchloride (PVC) gaskets used to seal the lids of glass jars. As the gaskets can come into direct contact with the foodstuffs inside the jar, the potential exists for polyadipate migration into the food. The procedure and performance characteristics of a test method for the analysis of polyadipates in food simulants (3% aqueous acetic acid and 10% aqueous ethanol) and the volatile test media used in substitute fat tests (isooctane and 95% aqueous ethanol) are described. The PVC gaskets were exposed to the food simulants or their substitutes under standard test conditions. Studies were initially carried out using direct measurement of the polyadipate oligomers by liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection (LC-TOF-MS) but this was not practical due to the number of peaks detected. Instead, the migrating polyadipates were hydrolysed to adipic acid and measured by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection (LC-MS/MS). The amount of polyadipate that this measurement of adipic acid represents was then calculated. Method performance was assessed by analysis of gaskets from two types of jar lids by single-laboratory validation. Linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, intermediate reproducibility and recovery were determined to be suitable for checking compliance with the 30 mg/kg specific migration limits for polyesters of 1,2-propane diol and/or 1,3- and/or 1,4-butanediol and/or polypropylene-glycol with adipic acid, which may be end-capped with acetic acid or fatty acids C(12)-C(18) or n-octanol and/or n-decanol. The method was found to be much quicker than previous methods involving extraction, clean-up, hydrolysis, esterification, derivatisation and GC measurement, consequently saving time and money.

  7. 46 CFR 42.15-30 - Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or other equivalent material fitted with gaskets...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or... Conditions of Assignment of Freeboard § 42.15-30 Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or other... height above the deck of hatchway coamings fitted with weathertight hatch covers of steel or...

  8. 46 CFR 42.15-30 - Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or other equivalent material fitted with gaskets...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or... Conditions of Assignment of Freeboard § 42.15-30 Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or other... height above the deck of hatchway coamings fitted with weathertight hatch covers of steel or...

  9. 46 CFR 42.15-30 - Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or other equivalent material fitted with gaskets...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or... Conditions of Assignment of Freeboard § 42.15-30 Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or other... height above the deck of hatchway coamings fitted with weathertight hatch covers of steel or...

  10. 46 CFR 42.15-30 - Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or other equivalent material fitted with gaskets...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or... Conditions of Assignment of Freeboard § 42.15-30 Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or other... height above the deck of hatchway coamings fitted with weathertight hatch covers of steel or...

  11. Baseline and Lifetime Assessments for DC745U Elastomeric Components

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R S; Chinn, S C; Herberg, J; Harvey, C; Alviso, C; Vance, A; Cohenour, R; Wilson, M; Solyom, D

    2004-12-20

    The silicone elastomer Dow Corning DC 745U is used in two major components in the W80. We have investigated a number of issues concerning this material. Our studies have accomplished a baseline study of the chemical composition of DC745 and LLNL now has a good understanding of the chemical composition of this material. DC745 crystallizes within the system STS. Two potential means identified to mitigate the risk associated with this phenomenon are to (1) change material formulation and (2) predose the parts to {approx} 25 MRad {gamma}-radiation. A candidate material identified by Gordon Spellman has been studied for composition and the lack of crystallization within the STS has been verified. A sensitivity study of the effects of relevant aging mechanisms also has been performed. The extent of aging due to radiation exposure or elevated temperatures is minimal over the expected course of the LEP. In addition, since the DC745 parts are expected to be replaced at rebuild, the aging clock is essentially being reset. No significant aging issues seem likely to develop for these parts. DC745 parts are also subject to permanent deformation in service. Our studies have shown that the deformation is likely due to incomplete mixing of the raw gum stock and the curing agent at production. This results in areas of low crosslink density that are subject to a higher degree of compression set in service. We have identified two production diagnostic tools based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to prescreen the parts at production at KCP. These studies are concluded with specific recommendation for changes to core surveillance for this part based on the chemical knowledge we have gained from this study.

  12. Fatigue Damage Analysis of an Elastomeric Tank Track Component

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-22

    hyperelastic law has been selected to represent the rubber’s stress-strain behavior on first extension (i.e. the primary stress-strain curve), and the Ogden...precursor that exists in this material prior to any damage accumulation. The crack precursor size depends on the microstructure of the polymer /filler... Polymer Science 8, 707, 1964. 2. Mars W. V., Cracking Energy Density as a predictor of fatigue life under multiaxial conditions, Rubber Chemistry

  13. Elastomeric microposts integrated into microfluidics for flow-mediated endothelial mechanotransduction analysis.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond H W; Sun, Yubing; Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2012-04-24

    Mechanotransduction is known as the cellular mechanism converting insoluble biophysical signals in the local cellular microenvironment (e.g. matrix rigidity, external mechanical forces, and fluid shear) into intracellular signalling to regulate cellular behaviours. While microfluidic technologies support a precise and independent control of soluble factors in the cellular microenvironment (e.g. growth factors, nutrients, and dissolved gases), the regulation of insoluble biophysical signals in microfluidics, especially matrix rigidity and adhesive pattern, has not yet been achieved. Here we reported an integrated soft lithography-compatible microfluidic methodology that could enable independent controls and modulations of fluid shear, substrate rigidity, and adhesive pattern in a microfluidic environment, by integrating micromolded elastomeric micropost arrays and microcontact printing with microfluidics. The geometry of the elastomeric micropost array could be regulated to mediate substrate rigidity and adhesive pattern, and further the elastomeric microposts could be utilized as force sensors to map live-cell subcellular contractile forces. To illustrate the general application of our methodology, we investigated the flow-mediated endothelial mechanotransduction process and examined specifically the involvement of subcellular contractile forces in the morphological realignment process of endothelial cells under a sustained directional fluid shear. Our results showed that the cytoskeletal contractile forces of endothelial cells were spatiotemporally regulated and coordinated to facilitate their morphology elongation process along the direction of flow. Together, our study provided an integrated microfluidic strategy to modulate the in vitro cellular microenvironment with both defined soluble and insoluble signals, and we demonstrated its application to investigate quantitatively the involvement of cytoskeletal contractile forces in the flow

  14. Elastomeric microposts integrated into microfluidics for flow-mediated endothelial mechanotransduction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Raymond H. W.; Sun, Yubing; Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is known as the cellular mechanism converting insoluble biophysical signals in the local cellular microenvironment (e.g. matrix rigidity, external mechanical forces, and fluid shear) into intracellular signalling to regulate cellular behaviours. While microfluidic technologies support a precise and independent control of soluble factors in the cellular microenvironment (e.g. growth factors, nutrients, and dissolved gases), the regulation of insoluble biophysical signals in microfluidics, especially matrix rigidity and adhesive pattern, has not yet been achieved. Here we reported an integrated soft lithography-compatible microfluidic methodology that could enable independent controls and modulations of fluid shear, substrate rigidity, and adhesive pattern in a microfluidic environment, by integrating micromolded elastomeric micropost arrays and microcontact printing with microfluidics. The geometry of the elastomeric micropost array could be regulated to mediate substrate rigidity and adhesive pattern, and further the elastomeric micropost could be utilized as force sensors to map live-cell subcellular contractile forces. To illustrate the general application of our methodology, we investigated the flow-mediated endothelial mechanotransduction process and examined specifically the involvement of subcellular contractile forces in the morphological realignment process of endothelial cells under a sustained directional fluid shear. Our results showed that the cytoskeletal contractile forces of endothelial cells were spatiotemporally regulated and coordinated to facilitate their morphology elongation process along the direction of flow. Together, our study provided an integrated microfluidic strategy to modulate the in vitro cellular microenvironment with both defined soluble and insoluble signals, and we demonstrated its application to investigate quantitatively the involvement of cytoskeletal contractile forces in the flow

  15. Optical Manipulation of Shape-Morphing Elastomeric Liquid Crystal Microparticles Doped with Gold Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y. R.; Evans, J. S.; Lee, T.; Senyuk, B.; Keller, P.; He, S. L.; Smalyukh, I. I.

    2012-06-11

    We demonstrate facile optical manipulation of shape of birefringent colloidal microparticles made from liquid crystal elastomers. Using soft lithography and polymerization, we fabricate elastomeric microcylinders with weakly undulating director oriented on average along their long axes. These particles are infiltrated with gold nanospheres acting as heat transducers that allow for an efficient localized transfer of heat from a focused infrared laser beam to a submicrometer region within a microparticle. Photothermal control of ordering in the liquid crystal elastomer using scanned beams allows for a robust control of colloidal particles, enabling both reversible and irreversible changes of shape. Possible applications include optomechanics, microfluidics, and reconfigurable colloidal composites with shape-dependent self-assembly.

  16. Effect of Physical Aging on Mechanical Behavior of an Elastomeric Glass under Combined Pressure and Temperature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER Technical Report No. 7 C.- 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S . TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Effect of Physical Aging on...Mechanical Behavior of an Elastomeric Glass Under Combined Pressure and Temperature G. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) S . CONTRACT OR GRANT...NUMBER( s ) K. Vijayan and K. D. Pae NOOO14-82-K-0608 9. PERFORMING r" GANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK High PrE 3,ure

  17. Roofing: Workbook and Tests. Common Roofing and Waterproofing Materials and Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Publications.

    This workbook on materials and equipment is one of a series of nine individual units of instruction for roofing apprenticeship classes in California. The workbook covers eight topics: production of bitumens and asphaltic roofing materials; built-up roofing materials and adhesives; asphaltic products and rigid roofing materials; elastomeric and…

  18. Biodegradabilite et proprietes energetiques d'elastomeres azotures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Jonathan

    The interest for polymer materials has steadily increased in the last decades and the use of polymer materials has been increasing ever since. These polymers are used in a vast range of applications from civil to military (Colclough et al., 1994; Nair & Laurencin, 2007; Sansone et al., 2012). This demand for polymer materials resulted in the development of various polymers with a wide range of properties depending on the desired application. In the field of propellants, this interest led to the development of glycidyl azide polymer (GAP) and other similar materials. Growing environmental concerns has led to a demand for more environmentally friendly polymers. This demand so far has been increasing and shows no sign of following a different trend for the next years. This demand is in part due to the presence of non-recyclable polymers, for which end of life can be problematic. At the same time, another problematic arose: the soil contamination originating from repeated military training as well as the subsequent contamination of water supplies by rain water seeping into the ground absorbing part of the contaminants (Dontsova, Pennington, Hayes, imunek, & Williford, 2009; M. R. Walsh, Thiboutot, Walsh, & Ampleman, 2012). This phenomenon incurs large decontamination costs and can result in the abandonment of training grounds due to contamination (Michael R. Walsh, Walsh, & Hewitt, 2010). The compounds responsible for the contamination of military training grounds are in part present in elastomers used as binders for propellants. The binders are non-biodegradable as well. In order to make greener propellants, it is not only necessary to replace the contaminants by non-contaminant materials, but also necessary to replace the binder by using new biodegradable materials. Glycidyl azide polymer, a commonly used energetic polymer in binders is non-biodebradable and as such unburned residue will accumulate in the environment. The main objective of this work is to develop new

  19. Encoding Gaussian curvature in glassy and elastomeric liquid crystal solids

    PubMed Central

    Mostajeran, Cyrus; Ware, Taylor H.; White, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe shape transitions of thin, solid nematic sheets with smooth, preprogrammed, in-plane director fields patterned across the surface causing spatially inhomogeneous local deformations. A metric description of the local deformations is used to study the intrinsic geometry of the resulting surfaces upon exposure to stimuli such as light and heat. We highlight specific patterns that encode constant Gaussian curvature of prescribed sign and magnitude. We present the first experimental results for such programmed solids, and they qualitatively support theory for both positive and negative Gaussian curvature morphing from flat sheets on stimulation by light or heat. We review logarithmic spiral patterns that generate cone/anti-cone surfaces, and introduce spiral director fields that encode non-localized positive and negative Gaussian curvature on punctured discs, including spherical caps and spherical spindles. Conditions are derived where these cap-like, photomechanically responsive regions can be anchored in inert substrates by designing solutions that ensure compatibility with the geometric constraints imposed by the surrounding media. This integration of such materials is a precondition for their exploitation in new devices. Finally, we consider the radial extension of such director fields to larger sheets using nematic textures defined on annular domains. PMID:27279777

  20. Transient dynamic mechanical properties of resilin-based elastomeric hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linqing; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding high-frequency properties of emerging resilin-like polypeptides (RLPs) have motivated their development for vocal fold tissue regeneration and other applications. Recombinant RLP hydrogels show efficient gelation, tunable mechanical properties, and display excellent extensibility, but little has been reported about their transient mechanical properties. In this manuscript, we describe the transient mechanical behavior of new RLP hydrogels investigated via both sinusoidal oscillatory shear deformation and uniaxial tensile testing. Oscillatory stress relaxation and creep experiments confirm that RLP-based hydrogels display significantly reduced stress relaxation and improved strain recovery compared to PEG-based control hydrogels. Uniaxial tensile testing confirms the negligible hysteresis, reversible elasticity and superior resilience (up to 98%) of hydrated RLP hydrogels, with Young's modulus values that compare favorably with those previously reported for resilin and that mimic the tensile properties of the vocal fold ligament at low strain (<15%). These studies expand our understanding of the properties of these RLP materials under a variety of conditions, and confirm the unique applicability, for mechanically demanding tissue engineering applications, of a range of RLP hydrogels. PMID:24809044

  1. Multi-stimuli-responsive elastomeric opal films: processing, optics, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Christian G.; Gallei, Markus; Hellmann, Götz P.; Biesalski, Markus; Rehahn, Matthias

    2013-09-01

    A new strategy to build large-scale solvent-responsive elastomeric opal films that are candidates for a wide range of optical sensor applications is reported. Hard-soft core-interlayer-shell (CIS) beads were used to prepare paper-supported elastomeric opal films with remarkably distinct iridescent reflection colors. Extrusion and compression molding of the CIS beads directly on the top of a highly porous paper sheet followed by UV cross-linking led to polymer-paper composite films with a high tensile strength and an outstanding solvent resistivity. Due to the high porosity of the paper sheets used, these composites could be easily swollen by various solvents. The swelling changed the crystalline lattice of the opals which provoked a tremendous photonic band gap shift and also enhanced the brilliance of these colors. After deswelling, the original opal structure was totally restored which means that the shift of the photonic band gap was completely reversible. This approach can become the basis for a whole family of polymer-based soft sensors with a fascinating optical response.

  2. Elastomeric nanocomposite scaffolds made from poly(glycerol sebacate) chemically crosslinked with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Patel, Alpesh; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Zhang, Hongbin; Rangarajan, Kaushik; Iviglia, Giorgio; Shin, Su-Ryon; Hussain, Mohammad Asif; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based nanocomposites often possess properties such as high stiffness, electrical conductivity, and thermal stability and have been studied for various biomedical and biotechnological applications. However, the current design approaches utilize CNTs as physical fillers, and thus, the true potential of CNT-based nanocomposites has not been realized. Here, we introduce a general approach to fabricating stiff, elastomeric nanocomposites from poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and CNTs. The covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes and polymer chains resulted in novel property combinations that are not observed in conventional nanocomposites. The addition of 1% CNTs resulted in a five-fold increase in the tensile modulus and a six-fold increase in compression modulus compared with PGS alone, which is far superior to the previously reported studies for CNT-based nanocomposites. Despite a significant increase in mechanical stiffness, the elasticity of the network was not compromised and the resulting nanocomposites showed more than 94% recovery. This study demonstrates that the chemical conjugation of CNTs to a PGS backbone results in stiff and elastomeric nanocomposites. Additionally, in vitro studies using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) indicated that the incorporation of CNTs into the PGS network significantly enhanced the differentiation potential of the seeded hMSCs, rendering them potentially suitable for applications ranging from scaffolding in musculoskeletal tissue engineering to biosensors in biomedical devices.

  3. Microrobotic tentacles with spiral bending capability based on shape-engineered elastomeric microtubes

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Jungwook; Cho, Inho; Kim, Jaeyoun

    2015-01-01

    Microscale soft-robots hold great promise as safe handlers of delicate micro-objects but their wider adoption requires micro-actuators with greater efficiency and ease-of-fabrication. Here we present an elastomeric microtube-based pneumatic actuator that can be extended into a microrobotic tentacle. We establish a new, direct peeling-based technique for building long and thin, highly deformable microtubes and a semi-analytical model for their shape-engineering. Using them in combination, we amplify the microtube’s pneumatically-driven bending into multi-turn inward spiraling. The resulting micro-tentacle exhibit spiraling with the final radius as small as ~185 μm and grabbing force of ~0.78 mN, rendering itself ideal for non-damaging manipulation of soft, fragile micro-objects. This spiraling tentacle-based grabbing modality, the direct peeling-enabled elastomeric microtube fabrication technique, and the concept of microtube shape-engineering are all unprecedented and will enrich the field of soft-robotics. PMID:26066664

  4. Stability and compatibility of reconstituted caspofungin in select elastomeric infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Tsiouris, Maria; Ulmer, Marisa; Yurcho, James F; Hooper, Kevin L; Gui, Min

    2010-01-01

    The stability and compatibility of caspofungin acetate reconstituted in 0.9% sodium chloride injection was studied in select elastomeric infusion devices. Caspofungin acetate solutions at three different concentrations, 0.2, 0.28, and 0.5 mg/mL, were stored in three commonly used elastomeric infusion devices at 5 degrees Celsius +/- 3 degrees Celsius and at room temperature. Sample mixtures of the drug were tested for stability every 12 hours (60 hours maximum) at room temperature, every 24 hours (72 hours maximum), and at 8, 9, and 14 days under refrigerated conditions (5 degrees Celsius +/- 3 degrees Celsius). Samples were assayed by using a high-performance liquid chromatographic method. The reconstituted caspofungin solutions maintained (greater than or equal to 90%) of the original active concentration for the duration of this study under both storage conditions. Degradation product levels remained within historical limits throughout the course of this study. Furthermore, the initial concentration of the caspofungin solutions was found to have no effect on the study results.

  5. Locally-tailored structure of an elastomeric substrate for stretchable circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan Woo; Jung, Soon Won; Na, Bock Soon; Oh, Ji-Young; Park, Nae-Man; Lee, Sang Seok; Bon Koo, Jae

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a new process for fabricating a hybrid elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, which can provide a high ratio (as large as ∼50) of the elastic modulus between the active device region and the interconnect area, as well as a locally tailored surface profile for each region. For this process, a Si master mold with a dual surface profile is prepared, where locally flat regions are distributed within a wavy-surfaced area. The stiffer elastomeric islands for active devices are formed on the flat regions by photolithography of a photo-patternable and hard PDMS layer (E ∼ 160 MPa), over which a soft PDMS layer (E ∼ 2 to 3 MPa) is casted. By releasing the whole PDMS layer from the mold, a hybrid silicone substrate with stiff and flat islands embedded within a soft and wavy matrix is obtained. In this hybrid structure, active devices located on the stiff regions can provide high reliability under stretched conditions, while most strain is accommodated by wavy interconnects within the soft area. Such beneficial effects are demonstrated by organic thin film transistors produced on the hybrid substrate.

  6. A highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor with electrodes and elastomeric interlayer containing silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Jiu, Jinting; Nogi, Masaya; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Koga, Hirotaka; He, Peng; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-02-21

    The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present study a simple printing process without complex patterning has been used for constructing the sensor, and an interlayer is employed comprising elastomeric composites filled with silver nanowires. By increasing the relative permittivity, εr, of the composite interlayer induced by compression at high nanowire concentration, it has been possible to achieve a maximum sensitivity of 5.54 kPa(-1). The improvement in sensitivity did not sacrifice or undermine the other features of the sensor. Thanks to the silver nanowire electrodes, the sensor is flexible and stable after 200 cycles at a bending radius of 2 mm, and exhibits outstanding reproducibility without hysteresis under similar pressure pulses. The sensor has been readily integrated onto an adhesive bandage and has been successful in detecting human movements. In addition to measuring pressure in direct contact, non-contact pressures such as air flow can also be detected.

  7. Artificial niche combining elastomeric substrate and platelets guides vascular differentiation of bone marrow mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Allen, Robert; Gao, Jin; Wang, Yadong

    2011-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells are promising cell sources for vascular tissue engineering. However, conventional bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell expansion and induction strategies require plating on tissue culture plastic, a stiff substrate that may itself influence cell differentiation. Direct scaffold seeding avoids plating on plastic; to the best of our knowledge, there is no report of any scaffold that induces the differentiation of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs) to vascular cells in vitro. In this study, we hypothesize that an elastomeric scaffold with adsorbed plasma proteins and platelets will induce differentiation of BMNCs to vascular cells and promote vascular tissue formation by combining soft tissue mechanical properties with platelet-mediated tissue repairing signals. To test our hypothesis, we directly seeded rat primary BMNCs in four types of scaffolds: poly(lactide-co-glycolide), elastomeric poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS), platelet-poor plasma-coated PGS, and PGS coated by plasma supplemented with platelets. After 21 days of culture, osteochondral differentiation of cells in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) was detected, but most of the adhered cells on the surface of all PGS scaffolds expressed calponin-I and α-smooth muscle actin, suggesting smooth muscle differentiation. Cells in PGS scaffolds also produced significant amount of collagen and elastin. Further, plasma coating improves seeding efficiency, and platelet increases proliferation, the number of differentiated cells, and extracellular matrix content. Thus, the artificial niche composed of platelets, plasma, and PGS is promising for artery tissue engineering using BMNCs.

  8. Triblock copolymers of ε-caprolactone, L-lactide, and trimethylene carbonate: biodegradability and elastomeric behavior.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Leonardus Kresna; Kong, Jen Fong; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Lipik, Vitali T; Liow, Sing Shy; Abadie, Marc J M; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2011-10-01

    For the triblock copolymer of ε-caprolactone, trimethylene carbonate, and L-lactide, where L-lactide blocks form the two ends, there is a range of compositions over which elastomeric behavior is obtained. Within this composition range, these polymers show good creep and recovery at ambient temperature, and exhibit high elongations to break. Additionally, we demonstrate that the recovery is independent of stress and strain for the elastomer compositions. The range of compositions that yield elastomeric character is rationalized based on the structure; specifically, there must be a minimum crystallinity of the end blocks and no crystallinity in the midblock, in addition to molar mass requirements. These polymers degrade by simple hydrolysis, and the rate of degradation is potentially programmable by manipulation of the molar ratio of hard segment to soft segment. Compared to biodegradable polyurethane, these polymers are expected to yield less harmful degradation products, and offer more variables for manipulation of properties. These polymers are also processable from the melt at temperatures exceeding about 130 °C. We expect to use these polymers in a variety of applications, including stent coatings, fully-degradable stents, and atrial septal defect occluders.

  9. Degradation of different elastomeric polymers in simulated geothermal environments at 300°C

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Pyatina, Tatiana; Redline, Erica Marie; McElhanon, James R.; Blankenship, Douglas A.

    2015-07-17

    This study evaluates the degradation of six different elastomeric polymers used for O-rings: EPDM, FEPM, type I- and II-FKM, FFKM, and FSR, in five different simulated geothermal environments at 300 °C: 1) non-aerated steam/cooling cycles, 2) aerated steam/cooling cycles, 3) water-based drilling fluid, 4) CO2-rich geo-brine fluid, and, 5) heat–cool water quenching cycles. The factors assessed included the extent of oxidation, changes in thermal behavior, micro-defects, permeation of ionic species from the test environments into the O-rings, silicate-related scale-deposition, and changes in the O-rings' elastic modulus. The reliability of the O-rings to maintain their integrity depended on the elastomeric polymer composition and the exposure environment. FSR disintegrated while EPDM was oxidized only to some degree in all the environments, FKM withstood heat-water quenching but underwent chemical degradation, FEPM survived in all the environments with the exception of heat-water quenching where it underwent severe oxidation-induced degradation, and FFKM displayed outstanding compatibility with all the tested environments. This study discusses the degradation mechanisms of the polymers under the aforementioned conditions.

  10. Estimation of the transient response of a tuned, fractionally damped elastomeric isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredette, Luke; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-11-01

    This article addresses the frequency dependent properties of elastomeric vibration isolators in the context of lumped parameter models with fractional damping elements. A mass is placed between two fractional calculus Kelvin-Voigt elements to develop a minimal order system for the example case of a conventional elastomeric bushing typical of automotive suspension systems. Model parameters are acquired from measured dynamic stiffness spectra and a finite element model. The minimal order system model accurately predicts dynamic stiffness in both broadband resonant behavior as well as the lower-frequency regime that is controlled by damping. For transient response analysis, an inverse Laplace transform of the dynamic stiffness spectrum is taken via the Residue Theorem. Since the fractional calculus based solution is given in terms of problematic integrals, a new time-frequency domain estimation technique is proposed which approximates time-domain responses for a class of transient excitation functions. The approximation error is quantified and found to be reasonably small, and tractable closed-form transient response functions are provided along with a discussion of numerical issues.

  11. A new UV-curing elastomeric substrate for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2012-03-01

    Rapid prototyping in the design cycle of new microfluidic devices is very important for shortening time-to-market. Researchers are facing the challenge to explore new and suitable substrates with simple and efficient microfabrication techniques. In this paper, we introduce and characterize a UV-curing elastomeric polyurethane methacrylate (PUMA) for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. The swelling and solubility of PUMA in different chemicals is determined. Time-dependent measurements of water contact angle show that the native PUMA is hydrophilic without surface treatment. The current monitoring method is used for measurement of the electroosmotic flow mobility in the microchannels made from PUMA. The optical, physical, thermal and mechanical properties of PUMA are evaluated. The UV-lithography and molding process is used for making micropillars and deep channel microfluidic structures integrated to the supporting base layer. Spin coating is characterized for producing different layer thicknesses of PUMA resin. A device is fabricated and tested for examining the strength of different bonding techniques such as conformal, corona treating and semi-curing of two PUMA layers in microfluidic application and the results show that the bonding strengths are comparable to that of PDMS. We also report fabrication and testing of a three-layer multi inlet/outlet microfluidic device including a very effective fluidic interconnect for application demonstration of PUMA as a promising new substrate. A simple micro-device is developed and employed for observing the pressure deflection of membrane made from PUMA as a very effective elastomeric valve in microfluidic devices.

  12. Degradation of different elastomeric polymers in simulated geothermal environments at 300°C

    DOE PAGES

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Pyatina, Tatiana; Redline, Erica Marie; ...

    2015-07-17

    This study evaluates the degradation of six different elastomeric polymers used for O-rings: EPDM, FEPM, type I- and II-FKM, FFKM, and FSR, in five different simulated geothermal environments at 300 °C: 1) non-aerated steam/cooling cycles, 2) aerated steam/cooling cycles, 3) water-based drilling fluid, 4) CO2-rich geo-brine fluid, and, 5) heat–cool water quenching cycles. The factors assessed included the extent of oxidation, changes in thermal behavior, micro-defects, permeation of ionic species from the test environments into the O-rings, silicate-related scale-deposition, and changes in the O-rings' elastic modulus. The reliability of the O-rings to maintain their integrity depended on the elastomeric polymermore » composition and the exposure environment. FSR disintegrated while EPDM was oxidized only to some degree in all the environments, FKM withstood heat-water quenching but underwent chemical degradation, FEPM survived in all the environments with the exception of heat-water quenching where it underwent severe oxidation-induced degradation, and FFKM displayed outstanding compatibility with all the tested environments. This study discusses the degradation mechanisms of the polymers under the aforementioned conditions.« less

  13. Elastomeric nanocomposite scaffolds made from poly (glycerol sebacate) chemically crosslinked with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Alpesh; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Zhang, Hongbin; Rangarajan, Kaushik; Iviglia, Giorgio; Shin, Su-Ryon; Hussain, Mohammad Asif

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based nanocomposites often possess properties such as high stiffness, electrical conductivity, and thermal stability and have been studied for various biomedical and biotechnological applications. However, the current design approaches utilize CNTs as physical filler, and thus, the true potential of CNT-based nanocomposites has not been achieved. Here, we introduce a general approach of fabricating stiff, elastomeric nanocomposites from poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and CNTs. The covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes and polymer chains resulted in novel property combinations that are not observed in conventional nanocomposites. The addition of 1% CNTs resulted a five-fold increase in the tensile modulus and a six-fold increase in compression modulus compared with PGS alone, which is far superior to the previously reported studies for CNT-based nanocomposites. Despite significant increase in mechanical stiffness, the elasticity of the network was not compromised and the resulting nanocomposites showed more than 94% recovery. This study demonstrates that the chemical conjugation of CNTs to a PGS backbone results in stiff and elastomeric nanocomposites. Additionally, in vitro studies using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) indicated that the incorporation of CNTs to PGS network significantly enhanced the differentiation potential of the seeded hMSCs rendering them potentially suitable for applications ranging from scaffolding in musculoskeletal tissue engineering to biosensors in biomedical devices. PMID:26146547

  14. Hemocompatibility evaluation of small elastomeric hollow fiber membranes as vascular substitutes.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Pagán, Ángel E; Ker, Dai Fei Elmer; Yang, Yunzhi

    2014-10-01

    One of the main challenges for clinical implementation of small diameter vascular grafts (SDVGs) is their limited hemocompatibility. Important design specifications for such grafts include features that minimize the long-term risks of restenosis, fouling, and thrombus formation. In our lab, we have developed elastomeric hollow fiber membranes (HFMs), using a phase inversion method, as candidates for SDVGs. Here, we present our results for in vitro hemocompatibility testing of our HFM under flow and static conditions. Our results showed that the polymer-based HFMs do not damage the integrity of human red blood cells (RBCs) as shown by their low hemolytic extent (less than 2%). When analyzed for blood cell lysis using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity as an indicator, no significant differences were observed between blood exposed to our HFMs and uncoagulated blood. Analysis of protein adsorption showed a low concentration of proteins deposited on the surfaces of HFM after 24 h. Platelet adhesion profiles using human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) showed that a low level of platelets adhered to the HFMs after 24 h, indicating minimal thrombotic potential. Under the majority of conditions, no significant differences were observed between medical-grade polymers and our HFMs. Eventual optimization of hemocompatible elastomeric HFM vessel grafts could lead to improved tissue vascularization as well as vascularized, tissue-engineered scaffolds for organ repair.

  15. In situ crosslinkable elastomeric hydrogel for long-term cell encapsulation for cardiac applications.

    PubMed

    Komeri, Remya; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2016-12-01

    The regenerative therapy of tissues relays on successful cell transplantation and engraftment. Soft hydrogel carriers are employed to protect transplanted cells from harmful microenvironment in soft tissue regeneration. Herein an injectable, porous, biodegradable, bioresorbable, and elastomeric hydrogel fabricated from poly(propylene fumarate-co-sebacate-co-ethylene glycol) crosslinked with PEGDA for cardiomyoblast encapsulation was reported. The hydrogel retains adequate mechanical property in the range of native myocardium even after 30 days of degradation (49 ± 0.008 kPa). The hydrogel shows maximum extensibility without collapsing even under 60% compression. The hydrogel retains 70.58% equilibrium water content, wide internal porosity, and slow bulk degradation favorable for cell carriers. The cardiomyoblast cells encapsulated in hydrogel retains viability even after 30 days of culture. The long-term viability and proliferation studies of encapsulated cells in the hydrogel substantiate the suitability of hydrogel microenvironment for cell survival. The present hydrogel is a potential cell carrier with favorable physical and biological properties for cell encapsulation for cardiac applications. The candidate hydrogels perform better than the other reported elastomeric hydrogels fabricated for cell therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2936-2944, 2016.

  16. Novel Elastomeric Closed Cell Foam - Nonwoven Fabric Composite Material (Phase III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    of AF07-B foams ..................................................... 10 Figure 8 TGA Analysis of AF07-A, -B and –B2B type foams...synergist to the intumescent flame retardant 5. Hybrids of the FY07-B2B and FY07-B formulas TGA analysis of AF07-A, -B and –B2B foams are shown in...Figure 8 TGA Analysis of AF07-A, -B and –B2B type foams Figure 9 shows tensile and elongation results for AF07-B2B type foams during optimization

  17. Highly stretchable electric circuits from a composite material of silver nanoparticles and elastomeric fibres.

    PubMed

    Park, Minwoo; Im, Jungkyun; Shin, Minkwan; Min, Yuho; Park, Jaeyoon; Cho, Heesook; Park, Soojin; Shim, Mun-Bo; Jeon, Sanghun; Chung, Dae-Young; Bae, Jihyun; Park, Jongjin; Jeong, Unyong; Kim, Kinam

    2012-12-01

    Conductive electrodes and electric circuits that can remain active and electrically stable under large mechanical deformations are highly desirable for applications such as flexible displays, field-effect transistors, energy-related devices, smart clothing and actuators. However, high conductivity and stretchability seem to be mutually exclusive parameters. The most promising solution to this problem has been to use one-dimensional nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes and metal nanowires coated on a stretchable fabric, metal stripes with a wavy geometry, composite elastomers embedding conductive fillers and interpenetrating networks of a liquid metal and rubber. At present, the conductivity values at large strains remain too low to satisfy requirements for practical applications. Moreover, the ability to make arbitrary patterns over large areas is also desirable. Here, we introduce a conductive composite mat of silver nanoparticles and rubber fibres that allows the formation of highly stretchable circuits through a fabrication process that is compatible with any substrate and scalable for large-area applications. A silver nanoparticle precursor is absorbed in electrospun poly (styrene-block-butadiene-block-styrene) (SBS) rubber fibres and then converted into silver nanoparticles directly in the fibre mat. Percolation of the silver nanoparticles inside the fibres leads to a high bulk conductivity, which is preserved at large deformations (σ ≈ 2,200 S cm(-1) at 100% strain for a 150-µm-thick mat). We design electric circuits directly on the electrospun fibre mat by nozzle printing, inkjet printing and spray printing of the precursor solution and fabricate a highly stretchable antenna, a strain sensor and a highly stretchable light-emitting diode as examples of applications.

  18. Composite Materials for Maxillofacial Prostheses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    1(AXILLOFACIAL PROSTHESES; PROSTHETIC MATERIALS: MICROCAPSULES : SOFT FILLERS; ELASTOMER COMPOSITES *ASTRAC7 lCofIflU Ir F*vsda Side It neceOaeen anud...composite systems are elastomeric-shelled, liquid-filled microcapsules . Experiments continued on the interfacial polymerization process, with spherical...sealed, capsules achieved. The diamine bath has been E] improved and an automatic system has been developed for producing the microcapsules . The one

  19. Properties of aircraft tire materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Richard N.; Clark, Samuel K.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is presented of measured elastomeric composite response suitable for linear structural and thermoelastic analysis in aircraft tires. Both real and loss properties are presented for a variety of operating conditions including the effects of temperature and frequency. Suitable micro-mechanics models are used for predictions of these properties for other material combinations and the applicability of laminate theory is discussed relative to measured values.

  20. Radiation data definitions and compilation for equipment qualification data bank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Winslow, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Dose definitions, physical properties, mechanical properties, electrical properties, and particle definitions are listed for insulators and dielectrics, elastomeric seals and gaskets, lubricants, adhesives, and coatings.

  1. Hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane impression materials.

    PubMed

    Sadan, Avishai

    2005-06-01

    VPS impression materials that contain a surfactant cannot be considered as hydrophilic, rather they are probably less hydrophobic. More VPS products that contain surfactants are expected to be introduced to the market. It is yet to be proven that surfactant-containing VPS materials have a better wettability than polyether-based impression materials. The current data still indicates that polyethers are more hydrophilic. The less hydrophobic behavior of the surfactant-containing VPS may provide a significant advantage in clinical practice. Due to this advantage, the author suggests that clinicians using VPS as their preferred elastomeric impression material should consider switching to surfactant-containing VPS impression materials.

  2. Molecular modeling of the elastomeric properties of repeating units and building blocks of resilin, a disordered elastic protein.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Md Shahriar K; Dudek, Daniel M; Beers, Eric P; Dillard, David A; Bevan, David R

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the properties of disordered elastomeric proteins are not well known. To better understand the relationship between elastomeric behavior and amino acid sequence, we investigated resilin, a disordered rubber-like protein, found in specialized regions of the cuticle of insects. Resilin of Drosophila melanogaster contains Gly-rich repetitive motifs comprised of the amino acids, PSSSYGAPGGGNGGR, which confer elastic properties to resilin. The repetitive motifs of insect resilin can be divided into smaller partially conserved building blocks: PSS, SYGAP, GGGN and GGR. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the relative roles of SYGAP, and its less common variants SYSAP and TYGAP, on the elastomeric properties of resilin. Results showed that SYGAP adopts a bent structure that is one-half to one-third the end-to-end length of the other motifs having an equal number of amino acids but containing SYSAP or TYGAP substituted for SYGAP. The bent structure of SYGAP forms due to conformational freedom of glycine, and hydrogen bonding within the motif apparently plays a role in maintaining this conformation. These structural features of SYGAP result in higher extensibility compared to other motifs, which may contribute to elastic properties at the macroscopic level. Overall, the results are consistent with a role for the SYGAP building block in the elastomeric properties of these disordered proteins. What we learned from simulating the repetitive motifs of resilin may be applicable to the biology and mechanics of other elastomeric biomaterials, and may provide us the deeper understanding of their unique properties.

  3. Caracterisation de l'effet du vieillissement en milieu aqueux sur les proprietes mecaniques de composites a matrice elastomere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre, Audrey

    Rubber composites are widely used in several engineering fields, such as automotive, and more recently for inflatable dams and other innovative underwater applications. These rubber materials are composed by an elastomeric matrix while the reinforcing phase is a synthetic fabric. Since these components are expected to operate several years in water environment, their durability must be guaranteed. The use of rubber materials immersed in water is not new, in fact, these materials have been studied for almost one century. However, the knowledge on reinforced rubber composites immersed several years in water is still limited. In this work, investigations on reinforced rubbers were carried out in the framework of a research project in partnership with Alstom and Hydro-Quebec. The objective of this study was to identify rubber composites that could be used under water for long periods. Various rubber composites with ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), silicone, EPDM/silicone and polychloroprene (Neoprene) matrices reinforced with E-glass fabric were studied. Thus, these materials were exposed to an accelerated ageing at 85 °C underwater for periods varying from 14 to 365 days. For comparison purposes, they were also immersed and aged one year at room temperature (21 °C). The impact of accelerated aging was estimated through three different characterization methods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was first used to assess the quality of fiber-matrix interface. Then, water absorption tests were performed to quantify the rate of water absorption during immersion. Finally the evolution of the mechanical properties was followed by the determination of Young's modulus (E) and ultimate stress (sigmau) using a dedicated traction test. This analysis allowed to point out that the quality of the fiber-matrix interface was the main factor influencing the drop of the mechanical properties and their durability. Moreover, it was noticed that this interface could be improved

  4. Elastomeric Capture Microparticles (ECmuPs) and Their use with Acoustophoresis to Perform Affinity Capture Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Kevin Wallace

    This dissertation describes the development of elastomeric capture microparticles (ECmicroPs) and their use with acoustophoresis to perform affinity capture assays. ECμPs that function as negative acoustic contrast particles were developed by crosslinking emulsion-based droplets composed of commercially available silicone precursors followed by functionalization with avidin/biotin reagents. The size distribution of the ECμPs was very broad or narrow depending on the emulsion system that was used during the synthesis process. Elastomeric particles exhibited a very broad size distribution when a bulk-emulsion process was used; however, when microfluidic systems were utilized, their size distribution became comparatively narrow. The functionalization of elastomeric particles was accomplished by the non-specific adsorption of avidin protein followed by bovine serum albumin (BSA) blocking and bio-specific adsorption of a biotinylated-capture antibody. Polydisperse ECμPs were functionalized to bind prostate specific antigen (PSA) or IgG-phycoerythrin (PE) in aqueous media (buffer, plasma, blood); whereas monodisperse ECμPs were functionalized to bind a high density lipoprotein in the aqueous media. Polydisperse ECμPs functionalized to bind PSA in a physiological buffer (PBS pH 7.4) demonstrated nanomolar detection using flow cytometry analysis; whereas ECμPs functionalized to bind IgG-PE demonstrated picomolar detection in 10% porcine plasma. ECμPs have a specific density of ~1.03 and are more compressible than their surrounding aqueous media; which allowed the ECμPs to exhibit negative acoustic contrast properties under an ultrasonic acoustic standing wave field. The negative acoustic contrast property of ECμPs was advantageously utilized in an IgG-PE assay conducted in 0.1% whole porcine blood. The ligand-bound ECμPs suspended in the diluted blood sample were flowed through an acoustofluidic device where the application of an ultrasonic acoustic standing wave

  5. Analyzing the photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure based on the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional plasma-dielectric photonic crystals (2D PPCs) under a transverse-magnetic (TM) wave are theoretically investigated by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method where Monte Carlo method is introduced. The proposed PWE method can be used to calculate the band structures of 2D PPCs which possess arbitrary-shaped filler and any lattice. The efficiency and convergence of the present method are discussed by a numerical example. The configuration of 2D PPCs is the square lattices with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure whose constituents are homogeneous and isotropic. The type-1 PPCs is filled with the dielectric cylinders in the plasma background, while its complementary structure is called type-2 PPCs, in which plasma cylinders behave as the fillers in the dielectric background. The calculated results reveal that the enough accuracy and good convergence can be obtained, if the number of random sampling points of Monte Carlo method is large enough. The band structures of two types of PPCs with different fractal orders of Sierpinski gasket structure also are theoretically computed for a comparison. It is demonstrate that the PBGs in higher frequency region are more easily produced in the type-1 PPCs rather than in the type-2 PPCs. Sierpinski gasket structure introduced in the 2D PPCs leads to a larger cutoff frequency, enhances and induces more PBGs in high frequency region. The effects of configurational parameters of two types of PPCs on the PBGs are also investigated in detail. The results show that the PBGs of the PPCs can be easily manipulated by tuning those parameters. The present type-1 PPCs are more suitable to design the tunable compacted devices.

  6. Compilation of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings

    SciTech Connect

    Warrant, M.M.; Ottinger, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the features that affect the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings currently certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report is based on a review of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings. Federal regulations that relate to the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings, as well as basic equations for leakage calculations and some of the available leakage test procedures are presented. The factors which affect the sealing capability of a closure, including the properties of the sealing surfaces, the gasket material, the closure method and the contents are discussed in qualitative terms. Information on the general properties of both elastomer and metal gasket materials and some specific designs are presented. A summary of the seal material, closure method, and leakage tests for currently certified packagings with large diameter seals is provided. 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Printing transferable components using microstructured elastomeric surfaces with pressure modulated reversible adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Menard, Etienne; Rogers, John A.; Kim, Seok; Carlson, Andrew

    2016-08-09

    In a method of printing a transferable component, a stamp including an elastomeric post having three-dimensional relief features protruding from a surface thereof is pressed against a component on a donor substrate with a first pressure that is sufficient to mechanically deform the relief features and a region of the post between the relief features to contact the component over a first contact area. The stamp is retracted from the donor substrate such that the component is adhered to the stamp. The stamp including the component adhered thereto is pressed against a receiving substrate with a second pressure that is less than the first pressure to contact the component over a second contact area that is smaller than the first contact area. The stamp is then retracted from the receiving substrate to delaminate the component from the stamp and print the component onto the receiving substrate. Related apparatus and stamps are also discussed.

  8. A highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor with electrodes and elastomeric interlayer containing silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Jiu, Jinting; Nogi, Masaya; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Koga, Hirotaka; He, Peng; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-02-01

    The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present study a simple printing process without complex patterning has been used for constructing the sensor, and an interlayer is employed comprising elastomeric composites filled with silver nanowires. By increasing the relative permittivity, εr, of the composite interlayer induced by compression at high nanowire concentration, it has been possible to achieve a maximum sensitivity of 5.54 kPa-1. The improvement in sensitivity did not sacrifice or undermine the other features of the sensor. Thanks to the silver nanowire electrodes, the sensor is flexible and stable after 200 cycles at a bending radius of 2 mm, and exhibits outstanding reproducibility without hysteresis under similar pressure pulses. The sensor has been readily integrated onto an adhesive bandage and has been successful in detecting human movements. In addition to measuring pressure in direct contact, non-contact pressures such as air flow can also be detected.The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present

  9. Post-buckling analysis for the precisely controlled buckling of thin film encapsulated by elastomeric subsrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, H.; Sun, Y.; Rogers, J. A.; Huang, Y.; Arizona State Univ.; Univ. of Illinois; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-04-01

    The precisely controlled buckling of stiff thin films (e.g., Si or GaAs nano ribbons) on the patterned surface of elastomeric substrate (e.g., poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)) with periodic inactivated and activated regions was designed by Sun et al. [Sun, Y., Choi, W.M., Jiang, H., Huang, Y.Y., Rogers, J.A., 2006. Controlled buckling of semiconductor nanoribbons for stretchable electronics. Nature Nanotechnology 1, 201-207] for important applications of stretchable electronics. We have developed a post-buckling model based on the energy method for the precisely controlled buckling to study the system stretchability. The results agree with Sun et al.'s (2006) experiments without any parameter fitting, and the system can reach 120% stretchability.

  10. Highly elastomeric poly(glycerol sebacate)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) amphiphilic block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpesh; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Iviglia, Giorgio; Zhang, Hongbin; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Mihaila, Silvia M; Demarchi, Danilo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-05-01

    Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS), a tough elastomer, has been proposed for tissue engineering applications due to its desired mechanical properties, biocompatibility and controlled degradation. Despite interesting physical and chemical properties, PGS shows limited water uptake capacity (∼2%), thus constraining its utility for soft tissue engineering. Therefore, a modification of PGS that would mimic the water uptake and water retention characteristics of natural extracellular matrix is beneficial for enhancing its utility for biomedical applications. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of highly elastomeric poly(glycerol sebacate)-co-polyethylene glycol (PGS-co-PEG) block copolymers with controlled water uptake characteristics. By tailoring the water uptake property, it is possible to engineer scaffolds with customized degradation and mechanical properties. The addition of PEG results in almost 15-fold increase in water uptake capacity of PGS, and improves its mechanical stability under dynamic loading conditions. PGS-co-PEG polymers show elastomeric properties and can be subjected to serve deformation such as bending and stretching. The Young's modulus of PGS-co-PEG can be tuned from 13 kPa to 2.2 MPa by altering the amount of PEG within the copolymer network. Compared to PGS, more than six-fold increase in elongation was observed upon PEG incorporation. In addition, the rate of degradation increases with an increase in PEG concentration, indicating that degradation rate of PGS can be regulated. PGS-co-PEG polymers also support cell proliferation, and thus can be used for a range of tissue engineering applications.

  11. Correlation of elastomer material properties from small specimen tests and scale-size bearing tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1994-06-01

    Tests were performed on small-size elastomer specimens and scale-size laminated elastomeric bearings to correlate the material properties in shear between the two types of tests. An objective of the tests was to see how well the material properties that were determined from specimen tests could predict the response of scale-size laminated elastomeric bearings. Another objective was to compare the results of specimen test and scale-size bearing test conducted by different testing organizations. A comparison between the test results from different organizations on small specimens showed very good agreement. In contrast, the correlation of scale-size bearing tests showed differences in bearing stiffness.

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and domain/splice variants modulate assembly and elastomeric properties of human elastin. Implications for tissue specificity and durability of elastic tissue.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ming; Reichheld, Sean E; Muiznieks, Lisa D; Sitarz, Eva E; Sharpe, Simon; Keeley, Fred W

    2017-05-01

    Polymeric elastin provides the physiologically essential properties of extensibility and elastic recoil to large arteries, heart valves, lungs, skin and other tissues. Although the detailed relationship between sequence, structure and mechanical properties of elastin remains a matter of investigation, data from both the full-length monomer, tropoelastin, and smaller elastin-like polypeptides have demonstrated that variations in protein sequence can affect both polymeric assembly and tensile mechanical properties. Here we model known splice variants of human tropoelastin (hTE), assessing effects on shape, polymeric assembly and mechanical properties. Additionally we investigate effects of known single nucleotide polymorphisms in hTE, some of which have been associated with later-onset loss of structural integrity of elastic tissues and others predicted to affect material properties of elastin matrices on the basis of their location in evolutionarily conserved sites in amniote tropoelastins. Results of these studies show that such sequence variations can significantly alter both the assembly of tropoelastin monomers into a polymeric network and the tensile mechanical properties of that network. Such variations could provide a temporal- or tissue-specific means to customize material properties of elastic tissues to different functional requirements. Conversely, aberrant splicing inappropriate for a tissue or developmental stage or polymorphisms affecting polymeric assembly could compromise the functionality and durability of elastic tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a study that assesses the consequences of known polymorphisms and domain/splice variants in tropoelastin on assembly and detailed elastomeric properties of polymeric elastin.

  13. Stretchable array of metal nanodisks on a 3D sinusoidal wavy elastomeric substrate for frequency tunable plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Di; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Siyi; Tian, Limei; Song, Ningfang

    2017-03-01

    Metal nanostructures integrated with soft, elastomeric substrates provide an unusual platform with capabilities in plasmonic frequency tuning of mechanical strain. In this paper, we have prepared a tunable optical device, dense arrays of plasmonic nanodisks on a low-modulus, and high-elongation elastomeric substrate with a three-dimensional (3D) sinusoidal wavy, and their optical characteristics have been measured and analyzed in detail. Since surface plasmon is located and propagates along metal surfaces with sub-wavelength structures, and those dispersive properties are determined by the coupling strength between the individual structures, in this study, a 3D sinusoidal curve elastomeric substrate is used to mechanically control the inter-nanodisk spacing by applying straining and creating a frequency tunable plasmonic device. Here we study the optical resonance peak shifting generated by stretching this type of flexible device, and the role that 3D sinusoidal curve surface configuration plays in determining the tunable properties. Since only the hybrid dipolar mode has been observed in experiments, the coupled dipole approximation (CDA) method is employed to simulate the optical response of these devices, and the experimental and simulation results show that these devices have high tunability to shift optical resonance peaks at near-infrared wavelengths, which will provide strong potential for new soft optical sensors and wearable plasmonic sensors.

  14. Stretchable array of metal nanodisks on a 3D sinusoidal wavy elastomeric substrate for frequency tunable plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Feng, Di; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Siyi; Tian, Limei; Song, Ningfang

    2017-03-17

    Metal nanostructures integrated with soft, elastomeric substrates provide an unusual platform with capabilities in plasmonic frequency tuning of mechanical strain. In this paper, we have prepared a tunable optical device, dense arrays of plasmonic nanodisks on a low-modulus, and high-elongation elastomeric substrate with a three-dimensional (3D) sinusoidal wavy, and their optical characteristics have been measured and analyzed in detail. Since surface plasmon is located and propagates along metal surfaces with sub-wavelength structures, and those dispersive properties are determined by the coupling strength between the individual structures, in this study, a 3D sinusoidal curve elastomeric substrate is used to mechanically control the inter-nanodisk spacing by applying straining and creating a frequency tunable plasmonic device. Here we study the optical resonance peak shifting generated by stretching this type of flexible device, and the role that 3D sinusoidal curve surface configuration plays in determining the tunable properties. Since only the hybrid dipolar mode has been observed in experiments, the coupled dipole approximation (CDA) method is employed to simulate the optical response of these devices, and the experimental and simulation results show that these devices have high tunability to shift optical resonance peaks at near-infrared wavelengths, which will provide strong potential for new soft optical sensors and wearable plasmonic sensors.

  15. Highly Sensitive, Flexible, and Wearable Pressure Sensor Based on a Giant Piezocapacitive Effect of Three-Dimensional Microporous Elastomeric Dielectric Layer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Donguk; Lee, Tae-Ik; Shim, Jongmin; Ryu, Seunghwa; Kim, Min Seong; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Taek-Soo; Park, Inkyu

    2016-07-06

    We report a flexible and wearable pressure sensor based on the giant piezocapacitive effect of a three-dimensional (3-D) microporous dielectric elastomer, which is capable of highly sensitive and stable pressure sensing over a large tactile pressure range. Due to the presence of micropores within the elastomeric dielectric layer, our piezocapacitive pressure sensor is highly deformable by even very small amounts of pressure, leading to a dramatic increase in its sensitivity. Moreover, the gradual closure of micropores under compression increases the effective dielectric constant, thereby further enhancing the sensitivity of the sensor. The 3-D microporous dielectric layer with serially stacked springs of elastomer bridges can cover a much wider pressure range than those of previously reported micro-/nanostructured sensing materials. We also investigate the applicability of our sensor to wearable pressure-sensing devices as an electronic pressure-sensing skin in robotic fingers as well as a bandage-type pressure-sensing device for pulse monitoring at the human wrist. Finally, we demonstrate a pressure sensor array pad for the recognition of spatially distributed pressure information on a plane. Our sensor, with its excellent pressure-sensing performance, marks the realization of a true tactile pressure sensor presenting highly sensitive responses to the entire tactile pressure range, from ultralow-force detection to high weights generated by human activity.

  16. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on full-scale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to 662 F (-150 to 350 C), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each type of test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  17. Caterpillar locomotion-inspired valveless pneumatic micropump using a single teardrop-shaped elastomeric membrane.

    PubMed

    So, Hongyun; Pisano, Albert P; Seo, Young Ho

    2014-07-07

    This paper presents a microfluidic pump operated by an asymmetrically deformed membrane, which was inspired by caterpillar locomotion. Almost all mechanical micropumps consist of two major components of fluid halting and fluid pushing parts, whereas the proposed caterpillar locomotion-inspired micropump has only a single, bilaterally symmetric membrane-like teardrop shape. A teardrop-shaped elastomeric membrane was asymmetrically deformed and then consecutively touched down to the bottom of the chamber in response to pneumatic pressure, thus achieving fluid pushing. Consecutive touchdown motions of the teardrop-shaped membrane mimicked the propagation of a caterpillar's hump during its locomotory gait. The initial touchdown motion of the teardrop-shaped membrane at the centroid worked as a valve that blocked the inlet channel, and then, the consecutive touchdown motions pushed fluid in the chamber toward the tail of the chamber connected to the outlet channel. The propagation of the touchdown motion of the teardrop-shaped membrane was investigated using computational analysis as well as experimental studies. This caterpillar locomotion-inspired micropump composed of only a single membrane can provide new opportunities for simple integration of microfluidic systems.

  18. Probing Mechanoregulation of Neuronal Differentiation by Plasma Lithography Patterned Elastomeric Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Jamilpour, Nima; Mfoumou, Etienne; Wang, Fei-Yue; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Cells sense and interpret mechanical cues, including cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, in the microenvironment to collectively regulate various physiological functions. Understanding the influences of these mechanical factors on cell behavior is critical for fundamental cell biology and for the development of novel strategies in regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate plasma lithography patterning on elastomeric substrates for elucidating the influences of mechanical cues on neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis. The neuroblastoma cells form neuronal spheres on plasma-treated regions, which geometrically confine the cells over two weeks. The elastic modulus of the elastomer is controlled simultaneously by the crosslinker concentration. The cell-substrate mechanical interactions are also investigated by controlling the size of neuronal spheres with different cell seeding densities. These physical cues are shown to modulate with the formation of focal adhesions, neurite outgrowth, and the morphology of neuroblastoma. By systematic adjustment of these cues, along with computational biomechanical analysis, we demonstrate the interrelated mechanoregulatory effects of substrate elasticity and cell size. Taken together, our results reveal that the neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis of neuroblastoma cells are collectively regulated via the cell-substrate mechanical interactions.

  19. Static characterization of a soft elastomeric capacitor for non destructive evaluation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, Hussam; Laflamme, Simon; Zhang, Huanhuan; Geiger, Randall; Kessler, Michael; Rajan, Krishna

    2014-02-18

    A large and flexible strain transducer consisting of a soft elastomeric capacitor (SEC) has been proposed by the authors. Arranged in a network setup, the sensing strategy offers tremendous potential at conducting non-destructive evaluation of large-scale surfaces. In prior work, the authors have demonstrated the performance of the sensor at tracking strain history, localizing cracks, and detecting vibration signatures. In this paper, we characterize the static performance of the proposed SEC. The characterization includes sensitivity of the signal, and temperature and humidity dependences. Tests are conducted on a simply supported aluminum beam subjected to bending as well as on a free standing sensor. The performance of the SEC is compared against off-the-shelf resistance-based strain gauges with resolution of 1 με. A sensitivity of 1190 pF/ε is obtained experimentally, in agreement with theory. Results also show the sensor linearity over the given level of strain, showing the promise of the SEC at monitoring of surface strain.

  20. Biodegradable, elastomeric coatings with controlled anti-proliferative agent release for magnesium-based cardiovascular stents.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xinzhu; Mao, Zhongwei; Ye, Sang-Ho; Koo, Youngmi; Yun, Yeoheung; Tiasha, Tarannum R; Shanov, Vesselin; Wagner, William R

    2016-08-01

    Vascular stent design continues to evolve to further improve the efficacy and minimize the risks associated with these devices. Drug-eluting coatings have been widely adopted and, more recently, biodegradable stents have been the focus of extensive evaluation. In this report, biodegradable elastomeric polyurethanes were synthesized and applied as drug-eluting coatings for a relatively new class of degradable vascular stents based on Mg. The dynamic degradation behavior, hemocompatibility and drug release were investigated for poly(carbonate urethane) urea (PCUU) and poly(ester urethane) urea (PEUU) coated magnesium alloy (AZ31) stents. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coated and bare stents were employed as control groups. The PCUU coating effectively slowed the Mg alloy corrosion in dynamic degradation testing compared to PEUU-coated, PLGA-coated and bare Mg alloy stents. This was confirmed by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and magnesium ion release experiments. PCUU-coating of AZ31 was also associated with significantly reduced platelet adhesion in acute blood contact testing. Rat vascular smooth muscle cell (rSMC) proliferation was successfully inhibited when paclitaxel was released from pre-loaded PCUU coatings. The corrosion retardation, low thrombogenicity, drug loading capacity, and high elasticity make PCUU an attractive option for drug eluting coating on biodegradable metallic cardiovascular stents.

  1. TISSUE-TO-CELLULAR LEVEL DEFORMATION COUPLING IN CELL-MICROINTEGRATED ELASTOMERIC SCAFFOLDS

    PubMed Central

    Stella, John A.; Liao, Jun; Hong, Yi; Merryman, W. David; Wagner, William R.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    In engineered tissues we are challenged to reproduce extracellular matrix and cellular deformation coupling that occurs within native tissues, which is a meso-micro scale phenomenon that profoundly affects tissue growth and remodeling. With our ability to electrospin polymer fiber scaffolds while simultaneously electrospraying viable cells, we are provided with a unique platform to investigate cellular deformations within a three dimensional elastomeric fibrous scaffold. Scaffold specimens micro-integrated with vascular smooth muscle cells were subjected to controlled biaxial stretch with 3D cellular deformations and local fiber micro-architecture simultaneously quantified. We demonstrated that the local fiber geometry followed an affine behavior, so that it could be predicted by macro scaffold deformations. However, local cellular deformations depended non-linearly on changes in fiber microarchitecture and ceased at large strains where the scaffold fibers completely straightened. Thus, local scaffold microstructural changes induced by macro-level applied strain dominated cellular deformations, so that monotonic increases in scaffold strain do not necessitate similar levels of cellular deformation. This result has fundamental implications when attempting to elucidate the events of de-novo tissue development and remodeling in engineered tissues, which are thought to depend substantially on cellular deformations. PMID:18472154

  2. Characterization of a soft elastomeric capacitive strain sensor for fatigue crack monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangxiong; Li, Jian; Laflamme, Simon; Bennett, Caroline; Matamoros, Adolfo

    2015-04-01

    Fatigue cracks have been one of the major factors for the deterioration of steel bridges. In order to maintain structural integrity, monitoring fatigue crack activities such as crack initiation and propagation is critical to prevent catastrophic failure of steel bridges due to the accumulation of fatigue damage. Measuring the strain change under cracking is an effective way of monitoring fatigue cracks. However, traditional strain sensors such as metal foil gauges are not able to capture crack development due to their small size, limited measurement range, and high failure rate under harsh environmental conditions. Recently, a newly developed soft elastomeric capacitive sensor has great promise to overcome these limitations. In this paper, crack detection capability of the capacitive sensor is demonstrated through Finite Element (FE) analysis. A nonlinear FE model of a standard ASTM compact tension specimen is created which is calibrated to experimental data to simulate its response under fatigue loading, with the goal to 1) depict the strain distribution of the specimen under the large area covered by the capacitive sensor due to cracking; 2) characterize the relationship between capacitance change and crack width; 3) quantify the minimum required resolution of data acquisition system for detecting the fatigue cracks. The minimum resolution serves as a basis for the development of a dedicated wireless data acquisition system for the capacitive strain sensor.

  3. Analysis of longitudinal seismic response of bridge with magneto-rheological elastomeric bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Li, Xi; Wu, Yueyuan; Chen, Shiwei; Wang, Xiaojie

    2016-04-01

    As the weakest part in the bridge system, traditional bridge bearing is incapable of isolating the impact load such as earthquake. A magneto-rheological elastomeric bearing (MRB) with adjustable stiffness and damping parameters is designed, tested and modeled. The developed Bouc-Wen model is adopted to represent the constitutive relation and force-displacement behavior of an MRB. Then, the lead rubber bearing (LRB), passive MRB and controllable MRB are modeled by finite element method (FEM). Furthermore, two typical seismic waves are adopted as inputs for the isolation system of bridge seismic response. The experiments are carried out to investigate the different response along the bridge with on-off controlled MRBs. The results show that the isolating performance of MRB is similar to that of traditional LRB, which ensures the fail-safe capability of bridge with MRBs under seismic excitation. In addition, the controllable bridge with MRBs demonstrated the advantage of isolating capacity and energy dissipation, because it restrains the acceleration peak of bridge beam by 33.3%, and the displacement of bearing decrease by 34.1%. The shear force of the pier top is also alleviated.

  4. Rapid micropatterning of cell lines and human pluripotent stem cells on elastomeric membranes.

    PubMed

    Paik, Isha; Scurr, David J; Morris, Bryan; Hall, Graham; Denning, Chris; Alexander, Morgan R; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Dixon, James E

    2012-10-01

    Tissue function during development and in regenerative medicine completely relies on correct cell organization and patterning at micro and macro scales. We describe a rapid method for patterning mammalian cells including human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) on elastomeric membranes such that micron-scale control of cell position can be achieved over centimeter-length scales. Our method employs surface engineering of hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes by plasma polymerization of allylamine. Deposition of plasma polymerized allylamine (ppAAm) using our methods may be spatially restricted using a micro-stencil leaving faithful hydrophilic ppAAm patterns. We employed airbrushing to create aerosols which deposit extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (such as fibronectin and Matrigel™) onto the same patterned ppAAm rich regions. Cell patterns were created with a variety of well characterized cell lines (e.g., NIH-3T3, C2C12, HL1, BJ6, HESC line HUES7, and HiPSC line IPS2). Individual and multiple cell line patterning were also achieved. Patterning remains faithful for several days and cells are viable and proliferate. To demonstrate the utility of our technique we have patterned cells in a variety of configurations. The ability to rapidly pattern cells at high resolution over macro scales should aid future tissue engineering efforts for regenerative medicine applications and in creating in vitro stem cell niches.

  5. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on full-scale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to +662F (-150 to +350C), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  6. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on fullscale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to 662degF (-150 to 350degC), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each type of test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  7. Mechanics and optics of stretchable elastomeric microlens array for artificial compound eye camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengwei; Xiao, Jianliang

    2015-01-01

    Compound eye-inspired imaging devices can find vast applications due to their remarkable imaging characteristics, such as extremely large field of view angle, low aberrations, high acuity to motion, and infinite depth of field. Recently, researchers have successfully developed a digital camera that resembles the structure and functions of apposition compound eyes of arthropod, by combining an elastic array of microlenses with a stretchable array of photodetectors in their planar form and then transforming into a hemispherical shape. Designing an elastomeric microlens array that can be mechanically stretched to very large extent without deteriorating the optical performance is critical to this development. In this study, mechanics and optics of the stretchable microlens array, in which each hemispherical microlens sits on top of a supporting post connected to a base membrane, are studied. The results show that proper designs of the microlenses, supporting posts and base membrane are critically important to meet both mechanical and optical requirements simultaneously. This study can have important implications in not only the design of artificial compound eye cameras, but also other developments that require stretchable optical elements.

  8. Elastomeric PDMS Planoconvex Lenses Fabricated by a Confined Sessile Drop Technique.

    PubMed

    Ekgasit, S; Kaewmanee, N; Jangtawee, P; Thammacharoen, C; Donphoongpri, M

    2016-08-10

    The ubiquity of high quality smartphones at affordable prices not only accelerated the social penetration in the global population but also promoted nontraditional usage of smartphones as point-of-care medical diagnostic devices, sensors, and portable digital microscopes. This paper reveals a simple, rapid, cost-effective, and template-free technique for mass-scale production of an elastomeric PDMS (ePDMS) planoconvex lens capable of converting a smartphone into a portable digital microscope. By taking advantage of the resistance to spreading of liquid by a sharp edge, highly stable spherical cap of viscous liquid PDMS (lPDMS) on a smooth PMMA circular disk was fabricated. The axisymmetric spreading of lPDMS under the gravitational force and interfacial tension force enable the formation of spherical cap with a certain radius of curvature. A thermal treatment at 80 °C for 30 min cured the spherical cap lPDMS into a bubble-free ePDMS planoconvex lens. Lenses with focal lengths of 55.2-3.4 mm could be reproducibly fabricated by adjusting the volume of dispensed lPDMSs and diameter of PMMA disks. High-resolution panoramic microscope images without a distortion of small cylindrical object could be constructed on-the-fly using the imbedded smartphone app. Applications of the smartphone digital microscope equipped with an ePDMS planoconvex lens for imaging of micro printings, gun shot residues, cylindrical objects, and bullet toolmarks were explored.

  9. Scale-dependent fiber kinematics of elastomeric electrospun scaffolds for soft tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Stella, John A.; Wagner, William R.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospun poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) scaffolds contain complex multiscale hierarchical structures that work simultaneously to produce unique macrolevel mechanical behaviors. In this study, we focused on quantifying key multiscale scaffold structural features to elucidate the mechanisms by which these scaffolds function to emulate native tissue tensile behavior. Fiber alignment was modulated via increasing rotational velocity of the collecting mandrel, and the resultant specimens were imaged using SEM under controlled biaxial strain. From the SEM images, fiber splay, tortuosity, and diameter were quantified in the unstrained and deformed configurations. Results indicated that not only fiber alignment increased with mandrel velocity but also, paradoxically, tortuosity increased concurrently with mandrel velocity and was highly correlated with fiber orientation. At microlevel scales (1–10 μm), local scaffold deformation behavior was observed to be highly heterogeneous, while increasing the scale resulted in an increasingly homogenous strain field. From our comprehensive measurements, we determined that the transition scale from heterogenous to homogeneous-like behavior to be ~1 mm. Moreover, while electrospun PEUU scaffolds exhibit complex deformations at the microscale, the larger scale structural features of the fibrous network allow them to behave as long-fiber composites that deform in an affine-like manner. This study underscores the importance of understanding the structure–function relationships in elastomeric fibrous scaffolds, and in particular allowed us to link microscale deformations with mechanisms that allow them to successfully simulate soft tissue mechanical behavior. PMID:19753623

  10. Development and evaluation of elastomeric hollow fiber membranes as small diameter vascular graft substitutes.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Pagán, Ángel E; Kang, Yunqing; Findlay, Michael W; Yang, Yunzhi

    2015-04-01

    Engineering of small diameter (<6mm) vascular grafts (SDVGs) for clinical use remains a significant challenge. Here, elastomeric polyester urethane (PEU)-based hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) are presented as an SDVG candidate to target the limitations of current technologies and improve tissue engineering designs. HFMs are fabricated by a simple phase inversion method. HFM dimensions are tailored through adjustments to fabrication parameters. The walls of HFMs are highly porous. The HFMs are very elastic, with moduli ranging from 1-4MPa, strengths from 1-5MPa, and max strains from 300-500%. Permeability of the HFMs varies from 0.5-3.5×10(-6)cm/s, while burst pressure varies from 25 to 35psi. The suture retention forces of HFMs are in the range of 0.8 to 1.2N. These properties match those of blood vessels. A slow degradation profile is observed for all HFMs, with 71 to 78% of the original mass remaining after 8weeks, providing a suitable profile for potential cellular incorporation and tissue replacement. Both human endothelial cells and human mesenchymal stem cells proliferate well in the presence of HFMs up to 7days. These results demonstrate a promising customizable PEU HFMs for small diameter vascular repair and tissue engineering applications.

  11. Biodegradable and biomimetic elastomeric scaffolds for tissue-engineered heart valves.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yingfei; Sant, Vinayak; Phillippi, Julie; Sant, Shilpa

    2017-01-15

    Valvular heart diseases are the third leading cause of cardiovascular disease, resulting in more than 25,000 deaths annually in the United States. Heart valve tissue engineering (HVTE) has emerged as a putative treatment strategy such that the designed construct would ideally withstand native dynamic mechanical environment, guide regeneration of the diseased tissue and more importantly, have the ability to grow with the patient. These desired functions could be achieved by biomimetic design of tissue-engineered constructs that recapitulate in vivo heart valve microenvironment with biomimetic architecture, optimal mechanical properties and possess suitable biodegradability and biocompatibility. Synthetic biodegradable elastomers have gained interest in HVTE due to their excellent mechanical compliance, controllable chemical structure and tunable degradability. This review focuses on the state-of-art strategies to engineer biomimetic elastomeric scaffolds for HVTE. We first discuss the various types of biodegradable synthetic elastomers and their key properties. We then highlight tissue engineering approaches to recreate some of the features in the heart valve microenvironment such as anisotropic and hierarchical tri-layered architecture, mechanical anisotropy and biocompatibility.

  12. The efficacy of elastomeric patient-control module when connected to a balloon pump for postoperative epidural analgesia: A randomized, noninferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Hwa; Shim, Yon Hee; Kim, Min-Soo; Shin, Yang-Sik; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Jeong Soo

    2017-01-01

    When considering the principles of a pain control strategy by patients, reliable administration of additional bolus doses is important for providing the adequate analgesia and improving patient satisfaction. We compared the efficacy of elastomeric patient-control module (PCM) with conventional PCM providing epidural analgesia postoperatively.A noninferiority comparison was used. Eighty-six patients scheduled for open upper abdominal surgery were randomized to use either an elastomeric or conventional PCM connected to balloon pump. After successful epidural catheter insertion at T6-8 level, fentanyl (15-20 μg/kg) in 0.3% ropivacaine 100 mL was administered at basal rate 2 mL/h with bolus 2 mL and lock-out time 15 minutes. The primary outcome was the verbal numerical rating score for pain.The 95% confidence intervals for differences in pain scores during the first 48 hours postoperatively were <1, indicating noninferiority of the elastomeric PCM. The duration of pump reservoir exhaustion was shorter for the elastomeric PCM (mean [SD], 33 hours [8 hours] vs 40 hours [8 hours], P = 0.0003). There were no differences in the frequency of PCM use, additional analgesics, or adverse events between groups.The elastomeric PCM was as effective as conventional PCM with and exhibited a similar safety profile.

  13. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  14. Summary of experimental tests of elastomeric seismic isolation bearings for use in nuclear reactor plants

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, R.W.; Chang, Y.W.; Kulak, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental test program for isolator bearings which was developed to help establish the viability of using laminated elastomer bearings for base isolation of nuclear reactor plants. The goal of the test program is to determine the performance characteristics of laminated seismic isolation bearings under a wide range of loadings. Tests were performed on scale-size laminated seismic isolators both within the design shear strain range to determine the response of the bearing under expected earthquake loading conditions, and beyond the design range to determine failure modes and to establish safety margins. Three types of bearings, each produced from a different manufacturer, have been tested: (1) high shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; (2) medium shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; and (3) medium shape factor-high damping-low shear modulus bearings. All of these tests described in this report were performed at the Earthquake Engineering Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, with technical assistance from ANL. The tests performed on the three types of bearings have confirmed the high performance characteristics of the high damping-high and low shear modulus elastomeric bearings. The bearings have shown that they are capable of having extremely large shear strains before failure occurs. The most common failure mechanism was the debonding of the top steel plate from the isolators. This failure mechanism can be virtually eliminated by improved manufacturing quality control. The most important result of the failure test of the isolators is the fact that bearings can sustain large horizontal displacement, several times larger than the design value, with failure. Their performance in moderate and strong earthquakes will be far superior to conventional structures.

  15. Summary of experimental tests of elastomeric seismic isolation bearings for use in nuclear reactor plants

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, R.W.; Chang, Y.W.; Kulak, R.F.

    1992-05-01

    This paper describes an experimental test program for isolator bearings which was developed to help establish the viability of using laminated elastomer bearings for base isolation of nuclear reactor plants. The goal of the test program is to determine the performance characteristics of laminated seismic isolation bearings under a wide range of loadings. Tests were performed on scale-size laminated seismic isolators both within the design shear strain range to determine the response of the bearing under expected earthquake loading conditions, and beyond the design range to determine failure modes and to establish safety margins. Three types of bearings, each produced from a different manufacturer, have been tested: (1) high shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; (2) medium shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; and (3) medium shape factor-high damping-low shear modulus bearings. All of these tests described in this report were performed at the Earthquake Engineering Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, with technical assistance from ANL. The tests performed on the three types of bearings have confirmed the high performance characteristics of the high damping-high and low shear modulus elastomeric bearings. The bearings have shown that they are capable of having extremely large shear strains before failure occurs. The most common failure mechanism was the debonding of the top steel plate from the isolators. This failure mechanism can be virtually eliminated by improved manufacturing quality control. The most important result of the failure test of the isolators is the fact that bearings can sustain large horizontal displacement, several times larger than the design value, with failure. Their performance in moderate and strong earthquakes will be far superior to conventional structures.

  16. Elastomeric high-mineral content hydrogel-hydroxyapatite composites for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Xu, Jianwen; Filion, Tera; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S; Ayers, David C; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2009-06-15

    The design of synthetic bone grafts that mimic the structure and composition of bone and possess good surgical handling characteristics remains a major challenge. We report the development of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA)-hydroxyapatite (HA) composites termed "FlexBone" that possess osteoconductive mineral content approximating that of human bone yet exhibit elastomeric properties enabling the press-fitting into a defect site. The approach involves crosslinking pHEMA hydrogel in the presence of HA using viscous ethylene glycol as a solvent. The composites exhibit excellent structural integration between the apatite mineral component and the hydroxylated hydrogel matrix. The stiffness of the composite and the ability to withstand compressive stress correlate with the microstructure and content of the mineral component. The incorporation of porous aggregates of HA nanocrystals rather than compact micrometer-sized calcined HA effectively improved the resistance of the composite to crack propagation under compression. Freeze-dried FlexBone containing 50 wt % porous HA nanocrystals could withstand hundreds-of-megapascals compressive stress and >80% compressive strain without exhibiting brittle fractures. Upon equilibration with water, FlexBone retained good structural integration and withstood repetitive moderate (megapascals) compressive stress at body temperature. When subcutaneously implanted in rats, FlexBone supported osteoblastic differentiation of the bone marrow stromal cells pre-seeded on FlexBone. Taken together, the combination of high osteoconductive mineral content, excellent organic-inorganic structural integration, elasticity, and the ability to support osteoblastic differentiation in vivo makes FlexBone a promising candidate for orthopedic applications.

  17. Model calibration for a soft elastomeric capacitor sensor considering slippage under fatigue cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangxiong; Li, Jian; Bennett, Caroline; Collins, William; Laflamme, Simon

    2016-04-01

    A newly-developed soft elastomeric capacitor (SEC) strain sensor has shown promise in fatigue crack monitoring. The SECs exhibit high levels of ductility and hence do not break under excessive strain when the substrate cracks due to slippage or de-bonding between the sensor and epoxy. The actual strain experienced by a SEC depends on the amount of slippage, which is difficult to simulate numerically, making it challenging to accurately predict the response of a SEC near a crack. In this paper, a two-step approach is proposed to simulate the capacitance response of a SEC. First, a finite element (FE) model of a steel compact tension specimen was analyzed under cyclic loading while the cracking process was simulated based on an element removal technique. Second, a rectangular boundary was defined near the crack region. The SEC outside the boundary was assumed to have perfect bond with the specimen, while that inside the boundary was assumed to deform freely due to slippage. A second FE model was then established to simulate the response of the SEC within the boundary subject to displacements at the boundary from the first FE model. The total simulated capacitance was computed from the model results by combining the computed capacitance inside and outside the boundary. The performance of the simulation incorporating slippage was evaluated by comparing the model results with the experimental data from the test performed on a compact tension specimen. The FE model considering slippage showed results that matched the experimental findings more closely than the FE model that did not consider slippage.

  18. On the mobility of iron particles embedded in elastomeric silicone matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabindranath, R.; Böse, H.

    2013-02-01

    In this contribution the rheological and magnetorheological properties of different polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based magnetorheological elastomers (MRE) are presented and discussed. In order to investigate the mobility of the iron particles with respect to the rheological characteristics, the iron particles were silanized with vinyltrimethoxysilane to enable a reaction between the modified particle and the cross-linking agent of the silicone elastomer. In addition, the vinyl-functionalized particles were further modified by the coupling of the superficial vinyl groups with a long-chain hydride terminated PDMS, which enables a reaction pathway with the vinyl terminated PDMS. On the other hand, the iron particles were treated with surfactants such as fatty acids, calcium and aluminum soaps, respectively, prior to vulcanization in order to increase the mobility of the iron particles in the elastomeric matrix. It was found, that both, the modification with the long-chain hydride terminated PDMS as well as the treatment with surfactants lead to an increase of the storage modulus G', the loss modulus G" and the loss factor tan δ in the magnetic field. It is concluded that both modifications, the coupling with long-chain hydride terminated PDMS as well as the treatment with surfactants, provide a greater mobility of the iron particles and hence a greater friction represented by the increase of the loss factor tan δ. Consequently it is assumed that untreated iron particles are less mobile in the rubber matrix due to covalent bonding with the silicone components, most likely due to the reaction of the hydroxyl groups on the metal surface with the silane groups of the cross-linking agent.

  19. An air-pressure-free elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wooseok; Barrett, Matthew; Brooks, Carla; Rivera, Andrew; Birdsell, Dawn N.; Wagner, David M.; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2015-12-01

    We present a new elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The valve functions include metering to capture a designated volume of biological sample into a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber, sealing to preserve the sample during PCR cycling, and transfer of the PCR-products and on-chip formamide post-processing for the analysis of DNA fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis. This new valve differs from prior art polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) valves in that the valve is not actuated externally by air-pressure or vacuum so that it simplifies a DNA analysis system by eliminating the need for an air-pressure or vacuum source, and off-cartridge solenoid valves, control circuit boards and software. Instead, the new valve is actuated by a thermal cycling peltier assembly integrated within the hardware instrument that tightly comes in contact with a microfluidic cartridge for thermal activation during PCR, so that it spontaneously closes the valve without an additional actuator system. The valve has bumps in the designated locations so that it has a self-alignment that does not require precise alignment of a valve actuator. Moreover, the thickness of the new valve is around 600 μm with an additional bump height of 400 μm so that it is easy to handle and very feasible to fabricate by injection molding compared to other PDMS valves whose thicknesses are around 30-100 μm. The new valve provided over 95% of metering performance in filling the fixed volume of the PCR chamber, preserved over 97% of the sample volume during PCR, and showed very comparable capillary electrophoresis peak heights to the benchtop assay tube controls with very consistent transfer volume of the PCR-product and on-chip formamide. The new valve can perform a core function for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

  20. Elastomeric high-mineral content hydrogel-hydroxyapatite composites for orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Xu, Jianwen; Filion, Tera; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Gary S.; Ayers, David C.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2009-01-01

    The design of synthetic bone grafts that mimic the structure and composition of bone and possess good surgical handling characteristics remains a major challenge. We report the development of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA)-hydroxyapatite (HA) composites termed “FlexBone” that possess osteoconductive mineral content approximating that of human bone yet exhibit elastomeric properties enabling the press-fitting into a defect site. The approach involves crosslinking pHEMA hydrogel in the presence of HA using viscous ethylene glycol as a solvent. The composites exhibit excellent structural integration between the apatite mineral component and the hydroxylated hydrogel matrix. The stiffness of the composite and the ability to withstand compressive stress correlate with the microstructure and content of the mineral component. The incorporation of porous aggregates of HA nanocrystals rather than compact micrometer-sized calcined HA effectively improved the resistance of the composite to crack propagation under compression. Freeze-dried FlexBone containing 50 wt % porous HA nanocrystals could withstand hundreds-of-megapascals compressive stress and >80% compressive strain without exhibiting brittle fractures. Upon equilibration with water, FlexBone retained good structural integration and withstood repetitive moderate (megapascals) compressive stress at body temperature. When subcutaneously implanted in rats, FlexBone supported osteoblastic differentiation of the bone marrow stromal cells pre-seeded on FlexBone. Taken together, the combination of high osteoconductive mineral content, excellent organic-inorganic structural integration, elasticity, and the ability to support osteoblastic differentiation in vivo makes FlexBone a promising candidate for orthopedic applications. PMID:18546185

  1. Stretching-tunable metal gratings fabricated on an elastomeric substrate using a water-soluble sacrificial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ronghua; Ji, Min; Xuan, Yan; Cui, Yushuang; Yuan, Changsheng; Li, Wen-Di; Ge, Haixiong; Chen, Yanfeng

    2015-11-01

    We report a new method to fabricate stretching-tunable metal gratings on elastomeric substrates by combining nanoimprint lithography and metal transfer using a patterned sacrificial layer. Fabrication of metal lines with a period of 550 nm and a linewidth of 270 nm was demonstrated on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes using this process. Optical diffraction characterization was used to measure the period of stretched gratings on the PDMS membrane and demonstrates tuning of the grating period by deforming the carrying PDMS substrate. The pattern transfer process using a water-soluble sacrificial layer can also be applied to fabrication of other deformable micro- and nano-devices.

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, and Paclitaxel Release from a Biodegradable, Elastomeric, Poly(ester urethane)urea Bearing Phosphorylcholine Groups for Reduced Thrombogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yi; Ye, Sang-Ho; Pelinescu, Anca L.; Wagner, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers with high elasticity, low thrombogenicity, and drug loading capacity continue to be pursued for vascular engineering applications, including vascular grafts and stents. A biodegradable elastomeric polyurethane was designed as a candidate material for use as a drug-eluting stent coating, such that it was nonthrombogenic and could provide antiproliferative drug release to inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation. A phosphorylcholine containing poly(ester urethane) urea (PEUU-PC) was synthesized by grafting aminated phosphorylcholine onto backbone carboxyl groups of a polyurethane (PEUU-COOH) synthesized from a soft segment blend of polycaprolactone and dimethylolpropionic acid, a hard segment of diisocyanatobutane and a putrescine chain extender. Poly(ester urethane) urea (PEUU) from a soft segment of polycaprolactone alone was employed as a control material. All of the synthesized polyurethanes showed high distensibility (>600%) and tensile strengths in the 20–35 MPa range. PEUUPC experienced greater degradation than PEUU or PEUU-COOH in either a saline or lipase enzyme solution. PEUU-PC also exhibited markedly inhibited ovine blood platelet deposition compared with PEUU-COOH and PEUU. Paclitaxel loaded in all of the polymers during solvent casting continued to release for 5 d after a burst release in a 10% ethanol/PBS solution, which was utilized to increase the solubility of the releasate. Rat smooth muscle cell proliferation was significantly inhibited in 1 wk cell culture when releasate from the paclitaxel-loaded films was present. Based on these results, the synthesized PEUU-PC has promising functionality for use as a nonthrombogenic, drug eluting coating on metallic vascular stents and grafts. PMID:23035885

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and paclitaxel release from a biodegradable, elastomeric, poly(ester urethane)urea bearing phosphorylcholine groups for reduced thrombogenicity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi; Ye, Sang-Ho; Pelinescu, Anca L; Wagner, William R

    2012-11-12

    Biodegradable polymers with high elasticity, low thrombogenicity, and drug loading capacity continue to be pursued for vascular engineering applications, including vascular grafts and stents. A biodegradable elastomeric polyurethane was designed as a candidate material for use as a drug-eluting stent coating, such that it was nonthrombogenic and could provide antiproliferative drug release to inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation. A phosphorylcholine containing poly(ester urethane) urea (PEUU-PC) was synthesized by grafting aminated phosphorylcholine onto backbone carboxyl groups of a polyurethane (PEUU-COOH) synthesized from a soft segment blend of polycaprolactone and dimethylolpropionic acid, a hard segment of diisocyanatobutane and a putrescine chain extender. Poly(ester urethane) urea (PEUU) from a soft segment of polycaprolactone alone was employed as a control material. All of the synthesized polyurethanes showed high distensibility (>600%) and tensile strengths in the 20-35 MPa range. PEUU-PC experienced greater degradation than PEUU or PEUU-COOH in either a saline or lipase enzyme solution. PEUU-PC also exhibited markedly inhibited ovine blood platelet deposition compared with PEUU-COOH and PEUU. Paclitaxel loaded in all of the polymers during solvent casting continued to release for 5 d after a burst release in a 10% ethanol/PBS solution, which was utilized to increase the solubility of the releasate. Rat smooth muscle cell proliferation was significantly inhibited in 1 wk cell culture when releasate from the paclitaxel-loaded films was present. Based on these results, the synthesized PEUU-PC has promising functionality for use as a nonthrombogenic, drug eluting coating on metallic vascular stents and grafts.

  4. A design of backing seat and gasket assembly in diamond anvil cell for accurate single crystal x-ray diffraction to 5 GPa.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, K; Kagi, H; Yasuzuka, T; Koizumi, T; Iizuka, R; Sugiyama, K; Yokoyama, Y

    2011-10-01

    We designed a new cell assembly of diamond anvil cells for single crystal x-ray diffraction under pressure and demonstrate the application of the cell to the crystallographic studies for ice VI and ethanol high-pressure (HP) phase at 0.95(5) GPa and 1.95(2) GPa, respectively. The features of the assembly are: (1) the platy anvil and unique-shaped backing seat (called as "Wing seat") allowing the extremely wide opening angle up to ±65°, (2) the PFA-bulk metallic glass composite gasket allowing the easy attenuation correction and less background. Thanks to the designed assembly, the R(int) values after attenuation corrections are fairly good (0.0125 and 0.0460 for ice VI and ethanol HP phase, respectively), and the errors of the refined parameters are satisfactory small even for hydrogen positions, those are comparable to the results which obtained at ambient conditions. The result for ice VI is in excellent agreement with the previous study, and that for ethanol HP phase has remarkable contributions to the revision to its structure; the H12 site, which makes gauche molecules with O1, C2, and C3 sites, may not exist so that only trans conformers are present at least at 1.95(2) GPa. The accurate intensities using the cell assembly allow us to extract the electron density for ethanol HP phase by the maximum entropy method.

  5. NASA Materials Research for Extreme Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, R. J.; Wright, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum briefly covers various innovations in materials science and development throughout the course of the American Space program. It details each innovation s discovery and development, explains its significance, and describes the applications of this material either in the time period discovered or today. Topics of research include silazane polymers, solvent-resistant elastomeric polymers (polyurethanes and polyisocyanurates), siloxanes, the Space Shuttle thermal protection system, phenolic-impregnated carbon ablator, and carbon nanotubes. Significance of these developments includes the Space Shuttle, Apollo programs, and the Constellation program.

  6. The use of colored elastomeric "O"s as a motivational instrument for patients with anodontia: report of case.

    PubMed

    Mussa, R; Esposito, S J; Cowper, T R

    1999-01-01

    Complete and/or removable partial dentures are the most commonly selected treatment for the prosthodontic management of young patients who present with oligodontia or anodontia such as in the case of patients with ectodermal dysplasia. Bakri, Belanger and Nowak have reported on the different ways that these prostheses can be modified to ease the child's burden of growing up with missing teeth and having to wear prostheses that make them different from their peers. Some of their suggestions include the placement of diastemas, the use of artificial "baby" teeth and their subsequent replacement with permanent teeth to simulate the primary and mixed dentition stages. They have also recommended deleting primary teeth to mimic the normal exfoliation pattern. The purpose of this article is to report the attitude change and improvement in self-esteem experienced by two young girls from the simple addition of colored elastomeric molded "O"s to the orthodontic appliances placed on their prostheses.

  7. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  8. Elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting process characterization for the fabrication of arrays of concave refractive microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, L.; Van Overmeire, S.; Van Erps, J.; Ottevaere, H.; Debaes, C.; Thienpont, H.

    2007-01-01

    We present a complete and precise quantitative characterization of the different process steps used in an elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting technique. We use the latter replication technique to fabricate concave replicas from an array of convex thermal reflow microlenses. During the inverse elastomeric moulding we obtain a secondary silicone mould of the original silicone mould in which the master component is embedded. Using vacuum casting, we are then able to cast out of the second mould several optical transparent poly-urethane arrays of concave refractive microlenses. We select ten particular representative microlenses on the original, the silicone moulds and replica sample and quantitatively characterize and statistically compare them during the various fabrication steps. For this purpose, we use several state-of-the-art and ultra-precise characterization tools such as a stereo microscope, a stylus surface profilometer, a non-contact optical profilometer, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a Twyman-Green interferometer and an atomic force microscope to compare various microlens parameters such as the lens height, the diameter, the paraxial focal length, the radius of curvature, the Strehl ratio, the peak-to-valley and the root-mean-square wave aberrations and the surface roughness. When appropriate, the microlens parameter under test is measured with several different measuring tools to check for consistency in the measurement data. Although none of the lens samples shows diffraction-limited performance, we prove that the obtained replicated arrays of concave microlenses exhibit sufficiently low surface roughness and sufficiently high lens quality for various imaging applications.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Elastin-Mimetic Hybrid Polymers with Multiblock, Alternating Molecular Architecture and Elastomeric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Grieshaber, Sarah E.; Farran, Alexandra J. E.; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Kiick, Kristi L.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2009-01-01

    We are interested in developing elastin–mimetic hybrid polymers (EMHPs) that capture the multiblock molecular architecture of tropoelastin as well as the remarkable elasticity of mature elastin. In this study, multiblock EMHPs containing flexible synthetic segments based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) alternating with alanine-rich, lysine-containing peptides were synthesized by step-growth polymerization using α,ω-azido-PEG and alkyne-terminated AKA3KA (K = lysine, A = alanine) peptide, employing orthogonal click chemistry. The resulting EMHPs contain an estimated three to five repeats of PEG and AKA3KA and have an average molecular weight of 34 kDa. While the peptide alone exhibited α-helical structures at high pH, the fractional helicity for EMHPs was reduced. Covalent cross-linking of EMHPs with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) through the lysine residue in the peptide domain afforded an elastomeric hydrogel (xEMHP) with a compressive modulus of 0.12 MPa when hydrated. The mechanical properties of xEMHP are comparable to a commercial polyurethane elastomer (Tecoflex SG80A) under the same conditions. In vitro toxicity studies showed that while the soluble EMHPs inhibited the growth of primary porcine vocal fold fibroblasts (PVFFs) at concentrations ≥0.2 mg/mL, the cross-linked hybrid elastomers did not leach out any toxic reagents and allowed PVFFs to grow and proliferate normally. The hybrid and modular approach provides a new strategy for developing elastomeric scaffolds for tissue engineering. PMID:19763157

  10. Controle sismique d'un batiment en acier de 1 etage par amortisseurs elastomeres et contreventements en Chevron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Olivier

    Actuellement, le principe de dimensionnement a la capacite est fortement utilise dans le domaine du genie parasismique. De maniere simplifiee, cette methode de dimensionnement consiste a dissiper l'energie injectee a une structure lors d'une secousse sismique par la deformation inelastique d'un element structural sacrificiel. Cette methode de dimensionne-ment permet d'obtenir des structures economiques, car cette dissipation d'energie permet de reduire substantiellement les efforts qui se retrouvent a l'interieur de la structure. Or, la consequence de ce dimensionnement est la presence de degats importants a la structure qui suivent a la secousse sismique. Ces degats peuvent engendrer des couts superieurs aux couts d'erection de la structure. Bien entendu, sachant que les secousses sismiques d'importances sont des phenomenes rares, l'ingenieur est pret a accepter ce risque afin de diminuer les couts initiaux de construction. Malgre que cette methode ait permis d'obtenir des constructions economiques et securitaires, il serait interessant de developper un systeme qui permettrait d'obtenir des performances de controle des efforts sismiques comparables a un systeme dimensionne selon un principe de dimensionnement a la capacite sans les consequences negatives de ces systemes. En utilisant les principes d'isolation a la base, il a ete possible de developper un systeme de reprise des forces sismiques (SRFS). qui permet d'obtenir un controle des efforts sismiques concurrentiels tout en gardant une structure completement elastique. Ce systeme consiste u inserer un materiel elastomere entre l'assemblage de la poutre et des contreventements a l'interieur d'un cadre contrevente conventionnel. Cette insertion permet de diminuer substantiellement la rigidite laterale du batiment, ce qui a pour consequence d'augmenter la valeur de la periode fondamentale du batiment dans lequel ces cadres sont inseres. Ce phenomene est appele le saut de periode. Ce saut de periode permet de

  11. From 1 → 3 dendritic designs to fractal supramacromolecular constructs: understanding the pathway to the Sierpiński gasket.

    PubMed

    Newkome, George R; Moorefield, Charles N

    2015-06-21

    The iterative synthetic protocols used for dendrimer construction were developed based on the desire to easily craft highly branched macromolecules with ideally an exact mass and tailored functionality. Inspired by arboreal design and precursors of the utilitarian macromolecules known as dendrimers today, our first examples employed predesigned, 1 → 3 or 1 → (1 + 2) C-branched, building blocks. Physical characteristics of the dendrimers, including their globular shapes, excellent solubility, and demonstrated aggregation, revealed the inherent supramolecular potential. The architecture that is characteristic of dendritic materials also exhibits obvious fractal qualities based on self-similar, repetitive, branched frameworks. Thus, both the fractal design and supramolecular aspects of these constructs are suggestive of a larger field of fractal materials that incorporate repeating geometries and are derived by complementary building block recognition and assembly. Use of 〈terpyridine-M(2+)-terpyridine〉 connectivity for the sides and tuned directed organic vertices has opened the door to other types of novel materials. This approach also circumvents the nonideality of dendrimers, since the heteroleptic, one-step, spontaneous self-assembly process facilitates quantitative outcomes.

  12. Rapid identification of additives in poly(vinyl chloride) lid gaskets by direct analysis in real time ionisation and single-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rothenbacher, Thorsten; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Gaskets for lids of glass jars usually consist of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) containing plasticisers and additional additives, which may migrate into packed foodstuffs. To conform to legal regulations, any such migration has to be determined analytically, which is a big challenge due to the huge chemical variety of additives in use. Therefore, a rapid screening method by means of direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS), using a single-quadrupole mass spectrometer, was developed. On introducing a plastisol sample into the DART interface, protonated molecules and ammonium adducts were obtained as the typical ionisation products of any additives present, and cleavages of ester bonds as typical fragmentation processes. Generally, additives present in the 1% range could be directly and easily identified if ion suppressive effects deriving from specific molecules did not occur. These effects could be avoided by analysing toluene extracts of plastisol samples, and this also improved the sensitivity. Using this method, it was possible to identify phthalates, fatty acid amides, tributyl O-acetylcitrate, dibutyl sebacate, bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, 1,2-diisononyl 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylate, and even more complex additives like acetylated mono- and diacylglycerides, epoxidised soybean oil, and polyadipates, with a limit of detection of < or = 1% in PVC plastisols. Only in the case of epoxidised linseed oil were levels of > or = 5% required for identification. The detection of azodicarbonamide, used as a foaming agent within the manufacturing process, was possible in principle, but was not highly reproducible due to the very low concentrations in plastisols.

  13. Low-cost encapsulation materials for terrestrial solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Baum, B.; Willis, P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents the findings of material surveys intended to identify low cost materials which could be functional as encapsulants (by 1986) for terrestrial solar cell modules. Economic analyses have indicated that in order to meet the low cost goal of $2.70 per sq m, some or all of the following material technologies must be developed or advanced: (1) UV screening outer covers; (2) elastomeric acrylics; (3) weatherproofing and waterproofing of structural wood and paper products; (4) transparent UV stabilizers for the UV-sensitive transparent pottants; and (5) cost-effective utilization of silicone and fluorocarbon materials.

  14. Survey of Impression Materials and Techniques in Fixed Partial Dentures among the Practitioners in India.

    PubMed

    Moldi, Arvind; Gala, Vimal; Puranik, Shivakumar; Karan, Smita; Deshpande, Sumit; Neela, Neelima

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Anecdotal evidence suggests that impression materials and techniques used in general dental practice for fixed partial dentures vary from those taught in dental schools. The aim of this survey was to integrate impression techniques evolved all over the years for fixed partial dentures and to know the techniques and materials which are used in the present day by the practitioners. Materials and Methods. A total of 1000 questionnaires were sent to various practitioners in India, out of which 807 questionnaires were filled. Results. The results showed that 84.8% of prosthodontists (65.56%, urban areas) use elastomeric impression materials as well as irreversible hydrocolloids and 15.2% use irreversible hydrocolloid only. Amongst other practitioners, 55.46% use irreversible hydrocolloid (45%, rural and semiurban areas) and 44.54% use elastomeric impression materials. Elastomeric impression technique practiced most commonly is putty reline with/without spacer (77.2%); other techniques are multiple-mix and monophase techniques. Conclusion. The ideal materials, technique, and armamentarium are required for the long-term success of the treatment for fixed partial denture. Also, if the ideal procedure is not followed, it will lead to a compromised fit of the final prosthesis and failure of the treatment.

  15. Nonlinear analysis of r.c. framed buildings retrofitted with elastomeric and friction bearings under near-fault earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Mirko

    2015-12-01

    Reinforced concrete (r.c.) framed buildings designed in compliance with inadequate seismic classifications and code provisions present in many cases a high vulnerability and need to be retrofitted. To this end, the insertion of a base isolation system allows a considerable reduction of the seismic loads transmitted to the superstructure. However, strong near-fault ground motions, which are characterised by long-duration horizontal pulses, may amplify the inelastic response of the superstructure and induce a failure of the isolation system. The above considerations point out the importance of checking the effectiveness of different isolation systems for retrofitting a r.c. framed structure. For this purpose, a numerical investigation is carried out with reference to a six-storey r.c. framed building, which, primarily designed (as to be a fixed-base one) in compliance with the previous Italian code (DM96) for a medium-risk seismic zone, has to be retrofitted by insertion of an isolation system at the base for attaining performance levels imposed by the current Italian code (NTC08) in a high-risk seismic zone. Besides the (fixed-base) original structure, three cases of base isolation are studied: elastomeric bearings acting alone (e.g. HDLRBs); in-parallel combination of elastomeric and friction bearings (e.g. high-damping-laminated-rubber bearings, HDLRBs and steel-PTFE sliding bearings, SBs); friction bearings acting alone (e.g. friction pendulum bearings, FPBs). The nonlinear analysis of the fixed-base and base-isolated structures subjected to horizontal components of near-fault ground motions is performed for checking plastic conditions at the potential critical (end) sections of the girders and columns as well as critical conditions of the isolation systems. Unexpected high values of ductility demand are highlighted at the lower floors of all base-isolated structures, while re-centring problems of the base isolation systems under near-fault earthquakes are

  16. NR/EPDM elastomeric rubber blend miscibility evaluation by two-level fractional factorial design of experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, Jeefferie Abd; Ahmad, Sahrim Haji; Ratnam, Chantara Thevy; Mahamood, Mazlin Aida; Yaakub, Juliana; Mohamad, Noraiham

    2014-09-01

    Fractional 25 two-level factorial design of experiment (DOE) was applied to systematically prepare the NR/EPDM blend using Haake internal mixer set-up. The process model of rubber blend preparation that correlates the relationships between the mixer process input parameters and the output response of blend compatibility was developed. Model analysis of variance (ANOVA) and model fitting through curve evaluation finalized the R2 of 99.60% with proposed parametric combination of A = 30/70 NR/EPDM blend ratio; B = 70°C mixing temperature; C = 70 rpm of rotor speed; D = 5 minutes of mixing period and E = 1.30 phr EPDM-g-MAH compatibilizer addition, with overall 0.966 desirability. Model validation with small deviation at +2.09% confirmed the repeatability of the mixing strategy with valid maximum tensile strength output representing the blend miscibility. Theoretical calculation of NR/EPDM blend compatibility is also included and compared. In short, this study provides a brief insight on the utilization of DOE for experimental simplification and parameter inter-correlation studies, especially when dealing with multiple variables during elastomeric rubber blend preparation.

  17. Morphology of elastase-induced cerebral aneurysm model in rabbit and rapid prototyping of elastomeric transparent replicas.

    PubMed

    Seong, Jaehoon; Sadasivan, Chander; Onizuka, Masanari; Gounis, Matthew J; Christian, Fletcher; Miskolczi, Laszlo; Wakhloo, Ajay K; Lieber, Baruch B

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we describe a methodology to fabricate transparent elastomeric vascular replicas using rapid prototyping techniques. First, the three-dimensional morphology of an elastase-induced aneurysm model in rabbit is acquired. The morphology is reconstructed from in vivo rotational angiography and it is compared with three-dimensional reconstructions obtained by computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of an intraluminal arterial cast that was obtained from the same animal at sacrifice. Results show that resolution of the imaging modality strongly influences the level of detail, such as small side branches, in the final reconstruction. We developed an average morphology model for elastase-induced aneurysms in rabbits including the surrounding vasculature and describe a method for rapid prototyping of vascular models from the three-dimensional morphology. Our replicas can be manufactured in a short period of time and the final product is optically clear. In addition, the elasticity of the models can be controlled to represent arterial elasticity, which makes them ideal for optical investigations of detailed flow dynamics using measurement tools such as particle image velocimetry.

  18. Seismic vulnerability assessment of a steel-girder highway bridge equipped with different SMA wire-based smart elastomeric isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayati Dezfuli, Farshad; Shahria Alam, M.

    2016-07-01

    Shape memory alloy wire-based rubber bearings (SMA-RBs) possess enhanced energy dissipation capacity and self-centering property compared to conventional RBs. The performance of different types of SMA-RBs with different wire configurations has been studied in detail. However, their reliability in isolating structures has not been thoroughly investigated. The objective of this study is to analytically explore the effect of SMA-RBs on the seismic fragility of a highway bridge. Steel-reinforced elastomeric isolators are equipped with SMA wires and used to isolate the bridge. Results revealed that SMA wires with a superelastic behavior and re-centering capability can increase the reliability of the bearing and the bridge structure. It was observed that at the collapse level of damage, the bridge isolated by SMA-HDRB has the lowest fragility. Findings also showed that equipping NRB with SMA wires decreases the possibility of damage in the bridge while, replacing HDRB with SMA-HDRB; or LRB with SMA-LRB increases the failure probability of the system at slight, moderate, and extensive limit states.

  19. Load and stability measurements on a soft-inplane rotor system incorporating elastomeric lead-lag dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted of the dynamic response and inplane stability associated with a new soft-inplane helicopter rotor. The unique feature of this rotor was the use of an internal elastomeric damper to restrain the blade inplane motion about the lead-lag hinge. The properties of the elastomer were selected to provide both a nominal first inplane frequency ratio of 0.65 and sufficient damping to eliminate the need for additional external damping sources to prevent ground resonance on a typical fuselage structure. For this investigation a 1/5-scale aeroelastic model was used to represent the rotor. The four-blade model had a diameter of 3.05 m (10 ft) and a solidity of 0.103. The first out-of-plane frequency ratio was 1.06. The model was tested in hover and in forward flight up to an advance ratio of 0.45. At each forward speed the rotor lift was varied up to simulated maneuver conditions. The measured rotor loads and response were within acceptable limits, and no adverse response qualities were observed. Moderate out-of-plane hub moments were measured, even for zero lift, to indicate the beneficial control power available for this design. Blade inplane stability testing indicated that the rotor system damping remained at moderate levels throughout the operating envelope.

  20. High frequency, multi-axis dynamic stiffness analysis of a fractionally damped elastomeric isolator using continuous system theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredette, Luke; Singh, Rajendra

    2017-02-01

    A spectral element approach is proposed to determine the multi-axis dynamic stiffness terms of elastomeric isolators with fractional damping over a broad range of frequencies. The dynamic properties of a class of cylindrical isolators are modeled by using the continuous system theory in terms of homogeneous rods or Timoshenko beams. The transfer matrix type dynamic stiffness expressions are developed from exact harmonic solutions given translational or rotational displacement excitations. Broadband dynamic stiffness magnitudes (say up to 5 kHz) are computationally verified for axial, torsional, shear, flexural, and coupled stiffness terms using a finite element model. Some discrepancies are found between finite element and spectral element models for the axial and flexural motions, illustrating certain limitations of each method. Experimental validation is provided for an isolator with two cylindrical elements (that work primarily in the shear mode) using dynamic measurements, as reported in the prior literature, up to 600 Hz. Superiority of the fractional damping formulation over structural or viscous damping models is illustrated via experimental validation. Finally, the strengths and limitations of the spectral element approach are briefly discussed.

  1. Heat shrinkability of electron-beam-modified thermoplastic elastomeric films from blends of ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer and polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Chaki, T. K.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2000-11-01

    The heat shrinkability of electron-beam-irradiated thermoplastic elastomeric films from blends of ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer (EVA) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) has been investigated in this paper. The effects of temperature, time and extent of stretching and shrinkage temperature and time have been reported. Based on the above data, the optimized conditions in terms of high heat shrinkage and low amnesia rating have been evaluated. Influence of radiation doses (0-500 kGy), multifunctional sensitizer levels (ditrimethylol propane tetraacrylate, DTMPTA), and blend proportions on heat shrinkability has been explained with the help of gel fraction and X-ray data. With the increase in radiation dose, gel fraction increases, which in turn gives rise to low values of heat shrinkage and amnesia rating. At a constant radiation dose and blend ratio, percent heat shrinkage is found to decrease with increase in DTMPTA level. Gel content increases with the increase in EVA content of the blend at a constant radiation dose and monomer level, giving rise to decrease in heat shrinkability. Heat shrinkage increases with the increase in percent crystallinity, although the amnesia rating follows the reverse trend.

  2. Quantification of prosthetic outcomes: elastomeric gel liner with locking pin suspension versus polyethylene foam liner with neoprene sleeve suspension.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Kim L; Boone, David A; Laing, Linda S; Mathews, David E; Smith, Douglas G

    2004-07-01

    For this randomized crossover trial, we compared two common transtibial socket suspension systems: the Alpha liner with distal locking pin and the Pe-Lite liner with neoprene suspension sleeve. Our original hypotheses asserted that increased ambulatory activity, wear time, comfort, and satisfaction would be found with the elastomeric suspension system. Thirteen subjects completed the study. Following 2.5-month accommodation to each condition, ambulatory activity was recorded (steps/minute for 2 weeks), and subjects completed three questionnaires specific to prosthesis use and pain: the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ), a Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) excerpt, and the Socket Comfort Score (SCS). Upon completion, subjects selected their favored system for continued use. Ten subjects preferred the Pe-Lite and three the Alpha. Subjects spent 82% more time wearing the Pe-Lite and took 83% more steps per day. Ambulatory intensity distribution did not differ between systems. No statistically significant differences were found in questionnaire results. Subject feedback for each system was both positive and negative.

  3. Immediate effect of an elastomeric oral appliance on the neuromuscular coordination of masticatory muscles: a pilot study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sforza, C; Montagna, S; Rosati, R; DE Menezes, M

    2010-11-01

    To compare the electromyographic characteristics of masticatory muscles with and without a new elastomeric oral device proposed for masticatory muscle training, 10 healthy subjects aged 23 to 32 were examined. Surface electromyography of masseter and temporal muscles was performed during maximum teeth clenching without and with the device and during unilateral chewing with either gum or the device. During clenching, a significant increment of the overall muscular activity was promoted by the occlusal device in comparison with the intercuspal teeth clenching (P=0·05). Muscular standardised activity during device chewing was significantly higher than that during gum chewing (P=0·005), and it was more evenly distributed between working and balancing sides (P=0·023 right side, P=0·039 left side), and between masseter and temporal muscles (right side test, P=0·014). No significant differences were found for the global neuromuscular co-ordination, the masticatory symmetry and the chewing frequency. Clenching and chewing with the analysed occlusal prostheses was performed with a relative increment of muscular activity. These findings may be the basis for the training effect proposed for this device.

  4. Flow-Enhanced Crystallization and Morphology Development of Blends of Isotactic Polypropylene and Elastomeric Polyolefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Ballester, Lucia; Thurman, Derek W.; Korfield, Julia A.

    2002-03-01

    Studies on flow-induced crystallization and morphology were conducted on impact polyolefin materials by in situ rheo-optical measurements and ex situ microscopic observations. An homologous series of materials consisting of an isotactic polypropylene base resin (PP), that resin with nucleant added (PPN), and the nucleated resin with elastomer blended as a minor component (PPNB) was examined. All materials were subjected to a short shear pulse, after which enhanced crystallization kinetics was observed. The influence on crystallization and structure of the heterogeneous nucleant on these samples was studied for different shear wall stresses and shearing times. Their effect decreased at higher shear stresses, which suggests that at such conditions the amount of homogeneous flow-induced nuclei dominates. Also, the role of melt rheology was investigated by shearing samples near the nominal melting point and allowing to relax before cooling to crystallization.

  5. Better Methods for Predicting Lifetimes of Seal Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Celina, M.; Gillen, K.T.; Keenan, M.R.

    1999-03-16

    We have been working for many years to develop better methods for predicting the lifetimes of polymer materials. Because of the recent interest in extending the lifetimes of nuclear weapons and the importance of environmental seals (o-rings, gaskets) for protecting weapon interiors against oxygen and water vapor, we have recently turned our attention to seal materials. Perhaps the most important environmental o-ring material is butyl rubber, used in various military applications. Although it is the optimum choice from a water permeability perspective, butyl can be marginal from an aging point-of-view. The purpose of the present work was to derive better methods for predicting seal lifetimes and applying these methods to an important butyl material, Parker compound B6 12-70.

  6. An investigation into UV light exposure as an experimental model for artificial aging on tensile strength and force delivery of elastomeric chain.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Siti Waznah; Bister, Dirk; Sherriff, Martyn

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of ultraviolet type A light (UVA) exposure on the tensile properties of elastomeric chain. UVA light exposure was used as model for artificial aging, simulating prolonged storage of elastomeric chain. Tensile strength (n = 60) was measured after exposing Ormco, Forestadent and 3M chains to UVA light for 0, 2, 3, and 4 weeks. Force decay was measured (n = 60) using chain exposed for 5, 10, and 14 days. The chains were subsequently stretched at a constant distance and the resulting forces measured at 0, 1, 24 hours and 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. This test simulated a clinical scenario of pre-stretching and subsequent shortening of elastomeric chain. Tensile strength had statistically significant difference and was directly related to the duration of ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. Forestadent chain, which had the second highest value for the 'as received' product, showed the most consistent values over time with the lowest degradation. Ormco showed the lowest values for 'as received' as well as after UV exposure; 3M chain had the highest loss of tensile strength. Force decay was also significantly different. UV light exposure of 10 days or more appears to mark a 'watershed' between products: 3M had most survivors, Forestadent chain had some survivors, depending on the time the chain was stretched for. None of the Ormco product survived UV light exposure for more than 5 days. UVA light exposure may be used as a model for artificial aging as it reduces force delivery and tensile strength of exposed chains.

  7. Self-standing elastomeric composites based on lithium ferrites and their dielectric behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Soreto Teixeira, S.; Graça, M. P. F.; Costa, L. C.; Dionisio, M.; Ilcíkova, M.; Mosnacek, J.; Spitalsky, Z.; Krupa, I.

    2014-12-14

    Lithium ferrite (LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}) is an attractive material for technological applications due to its physical properties, which are significantly dependent on the preparation method and raw materials. In this work, LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8} crystallites were obtained by controlled heat-treatment process at 1100 °C, of a homogeneous mixture of Li{sub 2}O-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders, prepared by wet ball-milling and using lithium and iron nitrates as raw materials. The main goal was the preparation of a flexible and self-standing tick composite film by embedding lithium ferrite particles in a polymeric matrix, taking advantage of the good mechanical properties of the polymer and of the electrical and dielectric properties of the ferrite. The selected polymer matrix was styrene-b-isoprene-b-styrene copolymer. To prepare the composites, the lithium ferrite particles were chemically modified in order to functionalize their surface. To analyse the influence of the particles surface modification, different composites were made, with modified and unmodified particles. The structure of the obtained composites was studied by FTIR, XRD, TGA, and DSC techniques. The dielectric properties were analysed, in the frequency range between 10 Hz and 1 MHz and in function of temperature in the range between −73 °C and 127 °C. These properties were related with the structure and concentration of the particles in the matrix network. The composites with the modified particles present higher dielectric constant, maintaining values of loss tangent sufficiently low (<10{sup −2}) that can be considered interesting for technological applications.

  8. Self-standing elastomeric composites based on lithium ferrites and their dielectric behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soreto Teixeira, S.; Graça, M. P. F.; Dionisio, M.; Ilcíkova, M.; Mosnacek, J.; Spitalsky, Z.; Krupa, I.; Costa, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    Lithium ferrite (LiFe5O8) is an attractive material for technological applications due to its physical properties, which are significantly dependent on the preparation method and raw materials. In this work, LiFe5O8 crystallites were obtained by controlled heat-treatment process at 1100 °C, of a homogeneous mixture of Li2O-Fe2O3 powders, prepared by wet ball-milling and using lithium and iron nitrates as raw materials. The main goal was the preparation of a flexible and self-standing tick composite film by embedding lithium ferrite particles in a polymeric matrix, taking advantage of the good mechanical properties of the polymer and of the electrical and dielectric properties of the ferrite. The selected polymer matrix was styrene-b-isoprene-b-styrene copolymer. To prepare the composites, the lithium ferrite particles were chemically modified in order to functionalize their surface. To analyse the influence of the particles surface modification, different composites were made, with modified and unmodified particles. The structure of the obtained composites was studied by FTIR, XRD, TGA, and DSC techniques. The dielectric properties were analysed, in the frequency range between 10 Hz and 1 MHz and in function of temperature in the range between -73 °C and 127 °C. These properties were related with the structure and concentration of the particles in the matrix network. The composites with the modified particles present higher dielectric constant, maintaining values of loss tangent sufficiently low (<10-2) that can be considered interesting for technological applications.

  9. Resistance to disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of elastomeric dental impressions.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Giovanni M; Melilli, Dario; Rallo, Antonio; Pecorella, Sonia; Mammina, Caterina; Pizzo, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to resist disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of dental impressions obtained with two different elastomers: a polyether (Impregum) and an addition-polymerized silicone (Elite). Impressions were contaminated with a mixture of three biofilm-forming microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans) and disinfected immediately after contamination, or after microbial layers were allowed to develop during a six-hour storage. Two commercial disinfectants were tested: MD 520 containing 0.5% glutaraldehyde and Sterigum Powder without glutaraldehyde. Residual contamination was recovered by mechanical rinsing immediately after disinfection and after a six-hour storage of disinfected impressions, and assessed by colony counting. Both disinfectants tested were shown to be effective in reducing the microbial presence on the impression materials, achieving at least a 102 reduction of microbial counts compared to water rinsing. However, Sterigum was generally less effective on the Elite elastomer and could not grant disinfection on six-hour aged P. aeruginosa and C. albicans microbial layers. The results of this study suggest that the materials used for the impressions influence the efficacy of disinfection. Disinfectants should be tested according to conditions encountered in everyday clinical practice and the need for immediate disinfection of impressions should be clearly indicated by manufacturers.

  10. Structure and Mechanical Behavior of Elastomeric Multiblock Terpolymers Containing Glassy, Rubbery, and Semicrystalline Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Feng; Alfonzo, C. Guillermo; Bates, Frank S.

    2012-11-14

    Multiblock copolymers containing glassy poly(cyclohexylethylene) (C), rubbery poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (P), and semicrystalline poly(ethylene) (E) were synthesized by sequential anionic polymerization of styrene, isoprene, and butadiene followed by catalytic hydrogenation. The resulting CECPCEC (denoted XPX) and CECP (XP) multiblock copolymers each contain 50 vol % of P and equal amounts of C and E. These materials have been studied by dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile deformation to characterize the morphology, phase behavior, and mechanical properties. Microphase separation in these compounds is induced by crystallization of E and/or chemical incompatibility between the three blocks, leading to a new type of morphology which contains continuous region of P and continuous region of microphase-separated X, resulting in mechanically resilient materials. High molecular weight block copolymers microphase separate with two different length scales associated with segregation between C and E and X and P. These structural features produce a nonclassical scaling relationship for the C-E domain spacing, d {approx} N{sup 0.31}, where N is the degree of polymerization of CEC portion. The role of semicrystalline E domains during uniaxial deformation has been exposed with WAXS experiments, which support a two-step mechanism involving recoverable and nonrecoverable deformation to different extents. Strain hardening is observed in double-anchored XPX, but not in single-anchored XP, at large tensile strains.

  11. Cryogenic loading of large volume presses for high-pressure experimentation and synthesis of novel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Yoo, C S

    2005-01-21

    We present an efficient easily implemented method for loading cryogenic fluids in a large volume press. We specifically apply this method to the high-pressure synthesis of an extended solid derived from CO using a Paris-Edinburgh cell. This method employs cryogenic cooling of Bridgman type WC anvils well insulated from other press components, condensation of the load gas within a brass annulus surrounding the gasket between the Bridgman anvils. We demonstrate the viability of the described approach by synthesizing macroscopic amounts (several milligrams) of polymeric CO-derived material, which were recovered to ambient conditions after compression of pure CO to 5 GPa or above.

  12. Composite Materials for Maxillofacial Prostheses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    projected composite systems are elastomeric-shelled, liquid-filled * microcapsules . Experiments continued on the interfacial polymerization process with...filled microcapsules . Experiments continued on the interfacial polymerization process, with spherical, sealed, capsules achieved. Needs identified are...consists of liquid-filled, elastomeric-shelled microcapsules held together to form a deformable mass; this is to simulate the semi-liquid cellular structure

  13. Bio-inspired structural bistability employing elastomeric origami for morphing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daynes, Stephen; Trask, Richard S.; Weaver, Paul M.

    2014-12-01

    A structural concept based upon the principles of adaptive morphing cells is presented whereby controlled bistability from a flat configuration into a textured arrangement is shown. The material consists of multiple cells made from silicone rubber with locally reinforced regions based upon kirigami principles. On pneumatic actuation these cells fold or unfold based on the fold lines created by the interaction of the geometry with the reinforced regions. Each cell is able to maintain its shape in either a retracted or deployed state, without the aid of mechanisms or sustained actuation, due to the existence of structural bistability. Mathematical quantification of the surface texture is introduced, based on out-of-plane deviations of a deployed structure compared to a reference plane. Additionally, finite element analysis is employed to characterize the geometry and stability of an individual cell during actuation and retraction. This investigation highlights the critical role that angular rotation, at the center of each cell, plays on the deployment angle as it transitions through the elastically deployed configuration. The analysis of this novel concept is presented and a pneumatically actuated proof-of-concept demonstrator is fabricated.

  14. Mechanically tunable aspheric lenses via additive manufacture of hanging elastomeric droplets for microscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Chen, Pin-Wen; Lai, Zheng-Hong

    2016-07-01

    Mechanically deformable lenses with dynamically tunable focal lengths have been developed in this work. The fabricated five types of aspheric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) lenses presented here have an initial focal length of 7.0, 7.8, 9.0, 10.0 and 10.2 mm. Incorporating two modes of operation in biconvex and concave-convex configurations, the focal lengths can be tuned dynamically as 5.2-10.2, 5.5-9.9, 6.6-11.9, 6.1-13.5 and 6.6-13.5 mm respectively. Additive manufacturing was utilized to fabricate these five types of aspheric lenses (APLs) via sequential layering of PDMS materials. Complex structures with three-dimensional features and shorter focal lengths can be successfully produced by repeatedly depositing, inverting and curing controlled PDMS volume onto previously cured PDMS droplets. From our experiments, we empirically found a direct dependence of the focal length of the lenses with the amount (volume) of deposited PDMS droplets. This new mouldless, low-cost, and flexible lens fabrication method is able to transform an ordinary commercial smartphone camera into a low-cost portable microscope. A few microscopic features can be readily visualized, such as wrinkles of ladybird pupa and printed circuit board. The fabrication technique by successively applying hanging droplet and facile mechanical focal-length-tuning set-up can be easily adopted in the development of high-performance optical lenses.

  15. High friction on ice provided by elastomeric fiber composites with textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, R.; Naguib, H.; Fernie, G.; Dutta, T.

    2015-03-01

    Two main applications requiring high friction on ice are automobile tires and footwear. The main motivation behind the use of soft rubbers in these applications is the relatively high friction force generated between a smooth rubber contacting smooth ice. Unfortunately, the friction force between rubber and ice is very low at temperatures near the melting point of ice and as a result we still experience automobile accidents and pedestrian slips and falls in the winter. Here, we report on a class of compliant fiber-composite materials with textured surfaces that provide outstanding coefficients of friction on wet ice. The fibrous composites consist of a hard glass-fiber phase reinforcing a compliant thermoplastic polyurethane matrix. The glass-fiber phase is textured such that it is aligned transversally and protruding out of the elastomer surface. Our analysis indicates that the exposed fiber phase exhibits a "micro-cleat" effect, allowing for it to fracture the ice and increase the interfacial contact area thereby requiring a high force to shear the interface.

  16. Rumen metabolism and absorption of a /sup 14/C-labelled elastomeric copolymer and its value as a roughage substitute for cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, E.E.; Meyer, R.M.; Call, E.P.

    1981-05-01

    Several synthetic elastomeric and plastomeric polymers were tested for suitability as artificial roughages. They were fed to rumenfistulated cattle fed grain only. Several of the polymers were regurgitated, remasticated and reswallowed, and they formed thin strands of intermeshed fiber that produced a large, loosely woven hay-like mass that floated on the rumen contents. An elastomeric polymer consisting of copolymers of 80 to 90% ethylene and 10 to 20% propylene, with a tensile strength at yield of 45.7 kg/cm2, a hardness of 30 units (Shore D hardness scale) and a tensile strength at 300% elongation of 51.0 kg/cm2, was selected for further testing. The copolymer was fed at about 90 g/head daily for 127 days to cattle fed grain only. At slaughter, rumens contained an average of 8.0 kg copolymer (dry basis). Cattle fed the copolymer had healthier rumen papillae and epithelia of the abomasum and small intestines than did control animals fed grain only. Using /sup 14/C-labeled copolymer, we found that the copolymer was not degraded by rumen microorganisms or acid-pepsin solution. When /sup 14/C-labeled copolymer was fed to milking cows, no /sup 14/C activity was found in milk, blood or urine. Upon slaughter, about 100% of the /sup 14/C activity was recovered from digesta and feces. We concluded that the copolymer was not absorbed from the digestive tract.

  17. Advanced materials and biochemical processes for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.; van Rooyen, D.; Premuzic, E.T.

    1987-04-01

    Two Geothermal Technology Division (GTD)-sponsored programs: (1) Geothermal Materials Development, and (2) Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines, are described. In the former, work in the following tasks is in progress: (1) high temperature elastomeric materials for dynamic sealing applications, (2) advanced high temperature (300/sup 0/C) lightweight (1.1 g/cc) well cementing materials, (3) thermally conductive composites for heat exchanger tubing, (4) corrosion rates for metals in brine-contaminated binary plant working fluids, and (5) elastomeric liners for well casing. Methods for the utilization and/or the low cost environmentally acceptable disposal of toxic geothermal residues are being developed in the second program. This work is performed in two tasks. In one, microorganisms that can interact with toxic metals found in geothermal residues to convert them into soluble species for subsequent reinjection back into the reservoir or to concentrate them for removal by conventional processes are being identified. In the second task, process conditions are being defined for the encapsulation of untreated or partially biochemically treated residues in Portland cement-based formulations and the subsequent utilization of the waste fractions in building materials. Both processing methods yield materials which appear to meet disposal criteria for non-toxic solid waste, and their technical and economic feasibilities have been established.

  18. Time-related degradation, a key issue in nuclear plant safety evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L.L.; Bustard, L.D.; Clough, R.L.; Gillen, K.T.

    1982-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a number of programs under NRC sponsorship which deal with safety-related equipment qualification issues, including the important aspect of aging. Among these is the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) program which was probably the first to devote significant effort towards aging research and was one of the primary motivators leading to the Workshop. The thrust of the QTE aging efforts has been on elastomeric materials, typically used in electrical cables, seals, gaskets, and the like; currently, efforts are being pursued on plant ambient environments measurements, aging of electronics, and aging of motors. A brief status report is presented in this paper.

  19. The effect of configuration on strength, durability, and handle of Kevlar fabric-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, L. L.; Munson, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Five Kevlar based laminates and three Kevlar based coated materials were designed, hand made, and tested against comparative conventional Dacron based materials for strength, peel, tear, puncture, creases, and handle. Emphasis was placed on evaluating geometric orientation of constituents, use of elastomeric film in place of high modulus films, and the use of flying thread loom bias reinforcement of Kevlar yarns. Whereas, the performance of the Kevlar laminates was severely degraded by crease effects, significant gains in overall performance factors were shown for the coated Kevlar materials.

  20. Advantages of Using Soft Materials in Scanning Probe Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Keith A.; Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Wang, Mary X.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2014-03-01

    Scanning probes based upon soft materials provide new capabilities and insights into the science of scanning probe lithography. Specifically, we have explored a cantilever-free architecture that consists of an array of sharp probes on an elastomeric film on a glass slide. This architecture allows every probe in an array to be in simultaneous, gentle contact with a surface, allowing one to perform lithography with millions of probes in parallel. Here, we describe three recent developments in cantilever-free scanning probe lithography that were enabled by the elastomeric material. 1) As the mechanical properties of elastomers can be readily tuned, it is possible to tailor the spring constant of the probes.1 2) The high coefficient of thermal expansion of elastomers means that local heating can be used to physically actuate individual probes allowing for arbitrary patterning.2 3) Solvents retained in the elastomer can mediate molecular printing and allow a user to pattern hydrophilic and hydrophobic materials in totally dry environments. 1D. J. Eichelsdoerfer, et al., Nano Lett. 13, 664 (2013). 2K. A. Brown, et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 12921 (2013).

  1. Advanced process control and novel test methods for PVD silicon and elastomeric silicone coatings utilized on ion implant disks, heatsinks and selected platens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, J.; Allen, B.; Wriggins, W.; Kuzbyt, R.; Sinclair, R.

    2012-11-01

    Coatings play multiple key roles in the proper functioning of mature and current ion implanters. Batch and serial implanters require strategic control of elemental and particulate contamination which often includes scrutiny of the silicon surface coatings encountering direct beam contact. Elastomeric Silicone Coatings must accommodate wafer loading and unloading as well as direct backside contact during implant plus must maintain rigid elemental and particulate specifications. The semiconductor industry has had a significant and continuous effort to obtain ultra-pure silicon coatings with sustained process performance and long life. Low particles and reduced elemental levels for silicon coatings are a major requirement for process engineers, OEM manufacturers, and second source suppliers. Relevant data will be presented. Some emphasis and detail will be placed on the structure and characteristics of a relatively new PVD Silicon Coating process that is very dense and homogeneous. Wear rate under typical ion beam test conditions will be discussed. The PVD Silicon Coating that will be presented here is used on disk shields, wafer handling fingers/fences, exclusion zones of heat sinks, beam dumps and other beamline components. Older, legacy implanters can now provide extended process capability using this new generation PVD silicon - even on implanter systems that were shipped long before the advent of silicon coating for contamination control. Low particles and reduced elemental levels are critical performance criteria for the silicone elastomers used on disk heatsinks and serial implanter platens. Novel evaluation techniques and custom engineered tools are used to investigate the surface interaction characteristics of multiple Elastomeric Silicone Coatings currently in use by the industry - specifically, friction and perpendicular stiction. These parameters are presented as methods to investigate the critical wafer load and unload function. Unique tools and test

  2. Advanced process control and novel test methods for PVD silicon and elastomeric silicone coatings utilized on ion implant disks, heatsinks and selected platens

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, J.; Allen, B.; Wriggins, W.; Kuzbyt, R.; Sinclair, R.

    2012-11-06

    Coatings play multiple key roles in the proper functioning of mature and current ion implanters. Batch and serial implanters require strategic control of elemental and particulate contamination which often includes scrutiny of the silicon surface coatings encountering direct beam contact. Elastomeric Silicone Coatings must accommodate wafer loading and unloading as well as direct backside contact during implant plus must maintain rigid elemental and particulate specifications. The semiconductor industry has had a significant and continuous effort to obtain ultra-pure silicon coatings with sustained process performance and long life. Low particles and reduced elemental levels for silicon coatings are a major requirement for process engineers, OEM manufacturers, and second source suppliers. Relevant data will be presented. Some emphasis and detail will be placed on the structure and characteristics of a relatively new PVD Silicon Coating process that is very dense and homogeneous. Wear rate under typical ion beam test conditions will be discussed. The PVD Silicon Coating that will be presented here is used on disk shields, wafer handling fingers/fences, exclusion zones of heat sinks, beam dumps and other beamline components. Older, legacy implanters can now provide extended process capability using this new generation PVD silicon - even on implanter systems that were shipped long before the advent of silicon coating for contamination control. Low particles and reduced elemental levels are critical performance criteria for the silicone elastomers used on disk heatsinks and serial implanter platens. Novel evaluation techniques and custom engineered tools are used to investigate the surface interaction characteristics of multiple Elastomeric Silicone Coatings currently in use by the industry - specifically, friction and perpendicular stiction. These parameters are presented as methods to investigate the critical wafer load and unload function. Unique tools and test

  3. Controlling cell-material interactions with polymer nanocomposites by use of surface modifying additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole-Warren, L. A.; Farrugia, B.; Fong, N.; Hume, E.; Simmons, A.

    2008-11-01

    Polymer nanocomposites (NC) are fabricated by incorporating well dispersed nanoscale particles within a polymer matrix. This study focuses on elastomeric polyurethane (PU) based nanocomposites, containing organically modified silicates (OMS), as bioactive materials. Nanocomposites incorporating chlorhexidine diacetate as an organic modifier (OM) were demonstrated to be antibacterial with a dose dependence related to both the silicate loading and the loading of OM. When the non-antibacterial OM dodecylamine was used, both cell and platelet adhesion were decreased on the nanocomposite surface. These results suggest that OM is released from the polymer and can impact on cell behaviour at the interface. Nanocomposites have potential use as bioactive materials in a range of biomedical applications.

  4. Use of a sub-gasket and soft gas diffusion layer to mitigate mechanical degradation of a hydrocarbon membrane for polymer electrolyte fuel cells in wet-dry cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Teramoto, Takeshi; Ueyama, Yasuhiro; Sugawara, Yasushi; Sakiyama, Yoko; Kusakabe, Masato; Miyatake, Kenji; Uchida, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    The mechanical durability of hydrocarbon (HC) membranes, used for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), was evaluated by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) stress protocol involving wet-dry cycling, and the degradation mechanism is discussed. The HC membrane ruptured in the edge region of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) after 300 cycles due to a concentration of the mechanical stress. Post-test analysis of stress-strain measurements revealed that the membrane mechanical strain decreased more than 80% in the edge region of the MEA and about 50% in the electrode region, compared with the pristine condition. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) indicated that the average molecular weight of the HC polymer increased slightly, indicating some cross-linking, while the IEC decreased slightly, indicating ionomer degradation. As a result of two types of modifications, a sub-gasket (SG) and a soft gas diffusion layer (GDL) in the MEA edge region, the mechanical stress decreased, and the durability increased, the membrane lasting more than 30,000 cycles without mechanical failure.

  5. Outgassing tests on materials used in the DIII-D magnetic fusion tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Holtrop, K.L.; Hansink, M.; Kellman, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    In order to achieve high performance plasma discharges in the DIII-D magnetic fusion tokamak, impurity levels must be carefully controlled. Since first wall materials can desorb volatile impurities during these discharges, it is important to characterize and control the outgassing of these materials. An outgassing chamber was built to measure the outgassing properties of various materials used in the DIII-D vessel. The results of pump-down tests performed on ATJ graphite, thin Grafoil {reg_sign} gaskets, and MgO coaxial cables will be presented. In addition to pumpdown tests it was desired to study the behavior of the materials at temperatures up to 400 C, which is the maximum temperature to which the DIII-D vessel is baked. The station was modified to include independent heating control of the sample and a simple load-lock chamber.

  6. A study of the surface hardness and dimensional stability of several intermaxillary registration materials.

    PubMed

    Chai, J; Tan, E; Pang, I C

    1994-01-01

    This study compared the surface hardness, the effect of time on surface hardness, and the dimensional stability of various intermaxillary relationship registration materials. The Shore hardness values of one zinc oxide-eugenol material, one polyether, and seven poly(vinyl siloxane) materials were obtained at 30 minutes and 24 hours after the start of mixing. The dimensional stability of one polyether and seven poly(vinyl siloxane) materials was measured using a standard mold as described in American Dental Association (ADA) Specification No. 19. All materials exhibited relatively high surface hardness despite some statistical differences among them. Four materials possessed higher surface hardness at 24 hours than at 30 minutes. Although the polyether showed significantly lower dimensional stability than the other materials, all materials satisfied the minimum requirement for Type I elastomeric impression material.

  7. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Eighteenth quarterly progress report, August 12-November 12, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Davis, M.

    1980-12-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. A survey was made of elastomers for use as gaskets for the photovoltaic module. Of the wide variety of materials examined EPDM offered the optimum combination of low compression set and low cost. The preference for EPDM is borne out by its long history of use as an automobile gasket. The commercial availability of materials that would be useful for sealants between the edge of the module and the gasket was investigated. Butyl sealants have the best combination of physical properties, low cost and a well-documented history of performance. A preferred composition has not yet been identified. One laminating type pottant ethylene/methyl acrylate copolymer (EMA), and two casting polymers, polybutyl acrylate and polyurethane, have been under investigation this past quarter. An EMA formulation has been developed which is easily extrudable and cures to a high gel content. So far only one commercial US source (Quinn) of aliphatic polyurethane has been located. Work is continuing to improve reaction rate as well as to eliminate source(s) of bubble formation during module fabrication. Considerable effort was spent in developing an improved polybutyl acrylate casting formulation providing high gel. Many viable curing systems are now available: however, the best formulation considering physical properties, freedom from bubbles as well as cure time utilizes Lupersol II (aliphatic peroxide) initiator. This initiator gives the desired gel after 20 minute cure at 45/sup 0/C or 12 minute cure at 55/sup 0/C.

  8. 46 CFR 162.018-3 - Materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to the general operation of the valve. Flange gaskets shall be metal or spiral wound asbestos. (c... best quality spring steel consistent with the design of the valve and the service requirement....

  9. Survey of materials for hydrazine propulsion systems in multicycle extended life applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.; Yankura, G.

    1972-01-01

    An assessment is presented of materials compatibility data for hydrazine monopropellant propulsion systems applicable to the Space Shuttle vehicle missions. Materials were evaluated for application over a 10-yr/100-mission operational lifetime with minimum refurbishment. A general materials compatibility rating for a broad range of materials and several propellants based primarily on static liquid propellant immersion testing and an in-depth evaluation of hydrazine decomposition as a function of purity, temperature, material, surface conditions, etc., are presented. The most promising polymeric material candidates for propellant diaphragms and seals appear to have little effect on increasing hydrazine decomposition rates, but the materials themselves do undergo changes in physical properties which can affect their 10-yr performance in multicycle applications. The available data on these physical properties of elastomeric materials as affected by exposure to hydrazine or related environments are presented.

  10. Materials aspects of solar energy use in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.W.; McFarland, R.D.

    1984-05-01

    Advances in materials for solar energy utilization have the potential to produce large performance improvements (both present and future concepts) in use of solar energy or conservation. Because approximately 26 quads of the total national energy budget of 75 quads is consumed by buildings, solar and conservation improvements can have a large effect on our overall energy consumption. There have been a large number of materials research programs funded through the Department of Energy (DOE) in an attempt to expand the use of solar energy. These materials programs have covered the areas of sealants and gaskets, insulations, glazings, glazing-surface treatments, polymers, selective absorber surfaces, phase-change storage, and heat mirrors. In addition to developing the materials, a large effort has been directed toward determining the reliability and durability of solar materials. The present state of the art and status of these solar materials are discussed. Although much progress has been made in recent years, many improvements are still needed. For many of the more routine materials, simple cost reductions or durability improvements would suffice. For the more advanced concepts of controlling energy flow into or out of buildings, basic materials research remains a necessity. There are a large number of potentially viable concepts that appear promising but have not yet been developed into usable materials.

  11. Mechanically Active Electrospun Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jaimee M.

    Electrospinning, a technique used to fabricate small diameter polymer fibers, has been employed to develop unique, active materials falling under two categories: (1) shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs) and (2) water responsive fiber mats. (1) Previous work has characterized in detail the properties and behavior of traditional SMECs with isotropic fibers embedded in an elastomer matrix. The current work has two goals: (i) characterize laminated anisotropic SMECs and (ii) develop a fabrication process that is scalable for commercial SMEC manufacturing. The former ((i)) requires electrospinning aligned polymer fibers. The aligned fibers are similarly embedded in an elastomer matrix and stacked at various fiber orientations. The resulting laminated composite has a unique response to tensile deformation: after stretching and releasing, the composite curls. This curling response was characterized based on fiber orientation. The latter goal ((ii)) required use of a dual-electrospinning process to simultaneously electrospin two polymers. This fabrication approach incorporated only industrially relevant processing techniques, enabling the possibility of commercial application of a shape memory rubber. Furthermore, the approach had the added benefit of increased control over composition and material properties. (2) The strong elongational forces experienced by polymer chains during the electrospinning process induce molecular alignment along the length of electrospun fibers. Such orientation is maintained in the fibers as the polymer vitrifies. Consequently, residual stress is stored in electrospun fiber mats and can be recovered by heating through the polymer's glass transition temperature. Alternatively, the glass transition temperature can be depressed by introducing a plasticizing agent. Poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) is plasticized by water, and its glass transition temperature is lowered below room temperature. Therefore, the residual stress can be relaxed at room

  12. UltraForm finishing process for optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, E.; Schoen, J.; Bechtold, M.; Mohring, D.; Bouvier, C.

    2005-09-01

    A new compliant sub-aperture optical finishing technique is being investigated for the removal of mid-spatial frequency artifacts and smoothing of hard polycrystalline infrared ceramics for aspheric applications and conformal shaped optics. The UltraForm concept was developed by OptiPro Systems, Ontario, NY, and is a joint process development effort with the Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM). The latest version of the UltraForm tool "V3" is of a belted design whereby a belt of finishing material is passed over a toroidal elastomeric wheel. Finishing materials used include a wide variety of pad materials and abrasive selections. Experimentation has been conducted using both slurry mixes and fixed abrasive bands. The toroidal wheel is rotated while the compliant tool is compressed into contact with the optical surface. Presented will be the current results in optical glasses and crystalline ceramics such as ALON, Spinel and Polycrystalline Alumina.

  13. Polyurethanes: versatile materials and sustainable problem solvers for today's challenges.

    PubMed

    Engels, Hans-Wilhelm; Pirkl, Hans-Georg; Albers, Reinhard; Albach, Rolf W; Krause, Jens; Hoffmann, Andreas; Casselmann, Holger; Dormish, Jeff

    2013-09-02

    Polyurethanes are the only class of polymers that display thermoplastic, elastomeric, and thermoset behavior depending on their chemical and morphological makeup. In addition to compact polyurethanes, foamed variations in particular are very widespread, and they achieve their targeted properties at very low weights. The simple production of sandwich structures and material composites in a single processing step is a key advantage of polyurethane technology. The requirement of energy and resource efficiency increasingly demands lightweight structures. Polyurethanes can serve this requirement by acting as matrix materials or as flexible adhesives for composites. Polyurethanes are indispensable when it comes to high-quality decorative coatings or maintaining the value of numerous objects. They are extremely adaptable and sustainable problem solvers for today's challenges facing our society, all of which impose special demands on materials.

  14. Ultra-high-precision alignment of the elastomerically mounted elements of the science camera lenses for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaemi, F. Tony

    2011-09-10

    Cameras built for space exploration are required to meet stringent environmental conditions, such as thermal and dynamic loads for both the optics (camera lens) and imaging electronics. On a multitude of spaceborne imaging instruments, optical elements are supported in their mounts via an elastomeric bonding approach using a room temperature vulcanizing silicone as the bonding agent. Employing this integration method, we achieved element-to-element alignment, measured as the total indicated runout, using a high-precision contact probe to be on the order of half a wavelength of He-Ne laser light, or 0.3 {mu}m, on the Malin Space Science Systems lenses for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) cameras. This is a higher precision than the current industry state-of-the-art, and it was achieved for the very challenging small diameter lens elements. This paper describes the design philosophy, implementation, and integration method that resulted in achieving this level of precision for interelement alignment. The results are based on actual measurements that were made during the process of building the MSL rover's science camera lenses, namely Mastcams, the Mars Hand Lens Imager, and the Mars Descent Imager. The optical designs of these cameras lenses are described in detail in [Opt. Eng.48, 103002 (2009)10.1117/1.3251343], while further information on the four science cameras can be found at http://www.msss.com.

  15. Micromechanics and constitutive models for soft active materials with phase evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binglian

    Soft active materials, such as shape memory polymers, liquid crystal elastomers, soft tissues, gels etc., are materials that can deform largely in response to external stimuli. Micromechanics analysis of heterogeneous materials based on finite element method is a typically numerical way to study the thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft active materials with phase evolution. While the constitutive models that can precisely describe the stress and strain fields of materials in the process of phase evolution can not be found in the databases of some commercial finite element analysis (FEA) tools such as ANSYS or Abaqus, even the specific constitutive behavior for each individual phase either the new formed one or the original one has already been well-known. So developing a computationally efficient and general three dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical constitutive model for soft active materials with phase evolution which can be implemented into FEA is eagerly demanded. This paper first solved this problem theoretically by recording the deformation history of each individual phase in the phase evolution process, and adopted the idea of effectiveness by regarding all the new formed phase as an effective phase with an effective deformation to make this theory computationally efficient. A user material subroutine (UMAT) code based on this theoretical constitutive model has been finished in this work which can be added into the material database in Abaqus or ANSYS and can be easily used for most soft active materials with phase evolution. Model validation also has been done through comparison between micromechanical FEA and experiments on a particular composite material, shape memory elastomeric composite (SMEC) which consisted of an elastomeric matrix and the crystallizable fibre. Results show that the micromechanics and the constitutive models developed in this paper for soft active materials with phase evolution are completely relied on.

  16. 78 FR 42929 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 41-Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ..., label materials, logo materials, packaging materials, plastic packing, plastic bags, plastic trim pieces and switch covers, rubber spacers, plastic items, rubber gaskets, gaskets, rubber washers, rubber stoppers, rubber grommets, other rubber articles, cartons, bags, corrugated boxes with fillers,...

  17. 49 CFR 178.360-4 - Closure devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... torque of no more than twice the force necessary to seal the selected gasket. Gasket material must be... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR...

  18. Comparison of Raman spectroscopy vs. high performance liquid chromatography for quality control of complex therapeutic objects: model of elastomeric portable pumps filled with a fluorouracil solution.

    PubMed

    Bourget, Philippe; Amin, Alexandre; Vidal, Fabrice; Merlette, Christophe; Lagarce, Frédéric

    2014-03-01

    This study compares the performance of a reference method of HPLC to Raman spectroscopy (RS) for the analytical quality control (AQC) of complex therapeutic objects. We assessed a model consisting of a widely used anticancer drug, i.e., 5-fluorouracil, which was compounded in a complex medical device, i.e., an elastomeric portable infusion pump. In view of the main objective, the two methods provided excellent results for the analytical validation key criteria, i.e., trueness, precision and accuracy, ranging from 7.5 to 50mg/mL and in either isotonic sodium or 5% dextrose. The Spearman and Kendall correlation tests (p-value<1×10(-15)) and the statistical studies performed on the graphs confirm a strong correlation in the results between RS and the standard HPLC under the experimental conditions. The selection of a spectral interval between 700 and 1400cm(-1) for both the characterization and quantification by RS was the result of a gradual process optimization, combining matrix and packaging responses. In this new application, we demonstrate at least eight benefits of RS: (a) operator safety, (b) elimination of disposables, (c) elimination of analysis waste, which contributes to the protection of the environment, (d) a fast analytical response of less than 2min, (e) the ability to identify the solubilizing phase, (f) reduction of the risk of errors because no intrusion or dilution are needed, (g) negligible maintenance costs and (h) a reduction in the budget dedicated to technician training. Overall, we indicate the potential of non-intrusive AQC performed by RS, especially when the analysis is not possible using the usual techniques, and the technique's high potential as a contributor to the safety of medication.

  19. Model peptide studies of sequence regions in the elastomeric biomineralization protein, Lustrin A. I. The C-domain consensus-PG-, -NVNCT-motif.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wustman, Brandon A; Morse, Daniel; Evans, John Spencer

    2002-05-01

    The lustrin superfamily represents a unique group of biomineralization proteins localized between layered aragonite mineral plates (i.e., nacre layer) in mollusk shell. Recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) pulling studies have demonstrated that the lustrin-containing organic nacre layer in the abalone, Haliotis rufescens, exhibits a typical sawtooth force-extension curve with hysteretic recovery. This force extension behavior is reminiscent of reversible unfolding and refolding in elastomeric proteins such as titin and tenascin. Since secondary structure plays an important role in force-induced protein unfolding and refolding, the question is, What secondary structure(s) exist within the major domains of Lustrin A? Using a model peptide (FPGKNVNCTSGE) representing the 12-residue consensus sequence found near the N-termini of the first eight cysteine-rich domains (C-domains) within the Lustrin A protein, we employed CD, NMR spectroscopy, and simulated annealing/minimization to determine the secondary structure preferences for this sequence. At pH 7.4, we find that the 12-mer sequence adopts a loop conformation, consisting of a "bend" or "turn" involving residues G3-K4 and N7-C8-T9, with extended conformations arising at F1-G3; K4-V6; T9-S10-G11 in the sequence. Minor pH-dependent conformational effects were noted for this peptide; however, there is no evidence for a salt-bridge interaction between the K4 and E12 side chains. The presence of a loop conformation within the highly conserved -PG-, -NVNCT- sequence of C1-C8 domains may have important structural and mechanistic implications for the Lustrin A protein with regard to elastic behavior.

  20. An Analysis of the Macroscopic Tensile Behavior of a Nonlinear Nylon Reinforced Elastomeric Composite System Using MAC/GMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assaad, Mahmoud; Arnold, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A special class of composite laminates composed of soft rubbery matrices and stiff reinforcements made of steel wires or synthetic fibers is examined, where each constituent behaves in a nonlinear fashion even in the small strain domain. Composite laminates made of piles stacked at alternating small orientation angles with respect to the applied axial strain are primarily dominated by the nonlinear behavior of the reinforcing fibers. However; composites with large ply orientations or those perpendicular to the loading axis, will approximate the behavior of the matrix phase and respond in even a more complex fashion for arbitrarily stacked piles. The geometric nonlinearity due to small cord rotations during loading was deemed here to have a second order effect and consequently dropped from any consideration. The user subroutine USRMAT within the Micromechanics Analysis Code with the Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), was utilized to introduce the constituent material nonlinear behavior. Stress-strain behavior at the macro level was experimentally generated for single and multi ply composites comprised of continuous Nylon-66 reinforcements embedded in a carbon black loaded rubbery matrix. Comparisons between the predicted macro composite behavior and experimental results are excellent when material nonlinearity is included in the analysis. In this paper, a brief review of GMC is provided, along with a description of the nonlinear behavior of the constituents and associated constituent constitutive relations, and the improved macro (or composite) behavior predictions are documented and illustrated.

  1. Laser 3D printing with sub-microscale resolution of porous elastomeric scaffolds for supporting human bone stem cells.

    PubMed

    Petrochenko, Peter E; Torgersen, Jan; Gruber, Peter; Hicks, Lucas A; Zheng, Jiwen; Kumar, Girish; Narayan, Roger J; Goering, Peter L; Liska, Robert; Stampfl, Jürgen; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2015-04-02

    A reproducible method is needed to fabricate 3D scaffold constructs that results in periodic and uniform structures with precise control at sub-micrometer and micrometer length scales. In this study, fabrication of scaffolds by two-photon polymerization (2PP) of a biodegradable urethane and acrylate-based photoelastomer is demonstrated. This material supports 2PP processing with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. The high photoreactivity of the biophotoelastomer permits 2PP processing at a scanning speed of 1000 mm s(-1), facilitating rapid fabrication of relatively large structures (>5 mm(3)). These structures are custom printed for in vitro assay screening in 96-well plates and are sufficiently flexible to enable facile handling and transplantation. These results indicate that stable scaffolds with porosities of greater than 60% can be produced using 2PP. Human bone marrow stromal cells grown on 3D scaffolds exhibit increased growth and proliferation compared to smooth 2D scaffold controls. 3D scaffolds adsorb larger amounts of protein than smooth 2D scaffolds due to their larger surface area; the scaffolds also allow cells to attach in multiple planes and to completely infiltrate the porous scaffolds. The flexible photoelastomer material is biocompatible in vitro and is associated with facile handling, making it a viable candidate for further study of complex 3D-printed scaffolds.

  2. Physics-Based Simulation and Experiment on Blast Protection of Infill Walls and Sandwich Composites Using New Generation of Nano Particle Reinforced Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshidat, Mohammad

    A critical issue for the development of nanotechnology is our ability to understand, model, and simulate the behavior of small structures and to make the connection between nano structure properties and their macroscopic functions. Material modeling and simulation helps to understand the process, to set the objectives that could guide laboratory efforts, and to control material structures, properties, and processes at physical implementation. These capabilities are vital to engineering design at the component and systems level. In this research, experimental-computational-analytical program was employed to investigate the performance of the new generation of polymeric nano-composite materials, like nano-particle reinforced elastomeric materials (NPREM), for the protection of masonry structures against blast loads. New design tools for using these kinds of materials to protect Infill Walls (e.g. masonry walls) against blast loading were established. These tools were also extended to cover other type of panels like sandwich composites. This investigation revealed that polymeric nano composite materials are strain rate sensitive and have large amount of voids distributed randomly inside the materials. Results from blast experiments showed increase in ultimate flexural resistance achieved by both unreinforced and nano reinforced polyurea retrofit systems applied to infill masonry walls. It was also observed that a thin elastomeric coating on the interior face of the walls could be effective at minimizing the fragmentation resulting from blast. More conclusions are provided with recommended future research.

  3. Grant Writing without Blowing a Gasket

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenbroek, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    In today's economic downturn budget cut is becoming more and more common. Even libraries seen as a vital part of the educational process are subject to reductions because districts are suffering financially. The answer? Grants. They aren't a perfect solution, but there is a lot of financial support available for those who ask. Besides the monetary…

  4. A new generation of sterile and radiopaque impression materials: an in vitro cytotoxicity study.

    PubMed

    Coppi, Chiara; Paolinelli Devincenzi, Chiara; Bortolini, Sergio; Consolo, Ugo; Tiozzo, Roberta

    2007-07-01

    Impression materials are largely used to record the geometry of dental tissue. Hence, the assessment of their possible cytotoxicity is a necessary step in the evaluation of their biocompatibility. The present study is carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of a new elastomeric sterile and radiopaque impression material. Human gingival fibroblasts, cultured in vitro are exposed directly to Elite Implant in three different viscosities, heavy, medium, and light. At 3, 9, 24, 48, and 72 h, the cellular proliferation is evaluated. In parallel, human gingival fibroblasts are exposed indirectly by means of fluid extracts of Elite Implant. The cellular viability is evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, (MTT) assay (Sigma, St Louis, Mo). The gingival fibroblasts proliferation and viability are unaffected by the presence of Elite Implant. This new impression material may represent a safe medical device for clinical and surgical applications. In addition, this material is radiopaque and, thus, can be identified radiographically.

  5. Correlation of electrical reactor cable failure with materials degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Stuetzer, O.M.

    1986-03-01

    Complete circuit failure (shortout) of electrical cables typically used in nuclear power plant containments is investigated. Failure modes are correlated with the mechanical deterioration of the elastomeric cable materials. It is found that for normal reactor operation, electrical cables are reliable and safe over very long periods. During high temperature excursions, however, cables pulled across corners under high stress may short out due to conductor creep. Severe cracking will occur in short times during high temperatures (>150/sup 0/C) and in times of the order of years at elevated temperatures (100/sup 0/C to 140/sup 0/C). A theoretical treatment of stress distribution responsible for creep and for cracking by J.E. Reaugh of Science Applications, Inc. is contained in the Appendix. 29 refs., 32 figs.

  6. Intrinsically stretchable and transparent thin-film transistors based on printable silver nanowires, carbon nanotubes and an elastomeric dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jiajie; Li, Lu; Chen, Dustin; Hajagos, Tibor; Ren, Zhi; Chou, Shu-Yu; Hu, Wei; Pei, Qibing

    2015-01-01

    Thin-film field-effect transistor is a fundamental component behind various mordern electronics. The development of stretchable electronics poses fundamental challenges in developing new electronic materials for stretchable thin-film transistors that are mechanically compliant and solution processable. Here we report the fabrication of transparent thin-film transistors that behave like an elastomer film. The entire fabrication is carried out by solution-based techniques, and the resulting devices exhibit a mobility of ∼30 cm2 V−1 s−1, on/off ratio of 103–104, switching current >100 μA, transconductance >50 μS and relative low operating voltages. The devices can be stretched by up to 50% strain and subjected to 500 cycles of repeated stretching to 20% strain without significant loss in electrical property. The thin-film transistors are also used to drive organic light-emitting diodes. The approach and results represent an important progress toward the development of stretchable active-matrix displays. PMID:26173436

  7. Manipulation of mechanical compliance of elastomeric PGS by incorporation of halloysite nanotubes for soft tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi-Zhi; Liang, Shu-Ling; Wang, Jiang; Simon, George P

    2011-11-01

    Poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS) is a promising elastomer for use in soft tissue engineering. However, it is difficult to achieve with PGS a satisfactory balance of mechanical compliance and degradation rate that meet the requirements of soft tissue engineering. In this work, we have synthesised a new PGS nanocomposite system filled with halloysite nanotubes, and mechanical properties, as well as related chemical characters, of the nanocomposites were investigated. It was found that the addition of nanotubular halloysite did not compromise the extensibility of material, compared with the pure PGS counterpart; instead the elongation at rupture was increased from 110 (in the pure PGS) to 225% (in the 20 wt% composite). Second, Young's modulus and resilience of 3-5 wt% composites were ∼0.8 MPa and >94% respectively, remaining close to the level of pure PGS which is desired for applications in soft tissue engineering. Third, an important feature of the 1-5 wt% composites was their stable mechanical properties over an extended period, which could allow the provision of reliable mechanical support to damaged tissues during the lag phase of the healing process. Finally, the in vitro study indicated that the addition of halloysite slowed down the degradation rate of the composites. In conclusion, the good compliance, enhanced stretchability, stable mechanical behavior over an extended period, and reduced degradation rates make the 3-5 wt% composites promising candidates for application in soft tissue engineering.

  8. Frictional force released during sliding mechanics in nonconventional elastomerics and self-ligation: An in vitro comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Davender; Dua, Vinay; Mangla, Rajat; Solanki, Ravinder; Solanki, Monika; Sharma, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the frictional forces generated by five different orthodontic brackets when used in combination with stainless steel (SS), titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA), and nickel-titanium (NiTi) archwires in dry conditions at physiological temperature. Materials and Methods: Five different types of maxillary upper right side self-ligating brackets (SLBs) (Damon 3MX, Smart Clip and Carriere LX) and conventional SS brackets (Mini 2000, Optimum Series and Victory Series) with a slot size 0.022 inch were coupled with 0.016” NiTi and 0.019 × 0.025” SS/titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) archwires. Tests were carried out for each group of the bracket-wire combination at physiological temperature and in the dry state. Frictional forces were measured by Instron universal testing machine. Results: SLB showed lower fictional values in comparison with elastic ligatures. Frictional force increased proportionally to the wire size; TMA and NiTi archwires presented higher frictional resistance than SS archwires. Conclusion: SS brackets tied with conventional ligatures produced high and low friction when ligated with SLBs with passive clip. PMID:27433047

  9. Lateral-crack-free, buckled, inkjet-printed silver electrodes on highly pre-stretched elastomeric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaemyon; Chung, Seungjun; Song, Hyunsoo; Kim, Sangwoo; Hong, Yongtaek

    2013-03-01

    We report the formation of lateral-crack-free silver electrodes on highly pre-stretched poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrates using the inkjet-printing method followed by an annealing process under the pre-stretched state. Due to Poisson's effect, cracks are easily obtained in the direction lateral to the pre-stretching and releasing directions when the highly pre-stretched substrate is released after the electrode formation. In our method, however, Poisson's effect is suppressed significantly from the PDMS thermal expansion perpendicular to the pre-stretched direction during the annealing process. In order to prevent the formation of a lateral crack, the annealing temperature needs to be optimized for each pre-stretching condition. We modelled their relationship using Poisson's ratios and thermal expansion coefficients of the substrate and silver materials. Our measurement results showed consistent result with the simulation. The resistance of the fabricated silver electrodes negligibly changes under up to 17% strain and even after 1000 time stretching cycle tests.

  10. Intrinsically stretchable and transparent thin-film transistors based on printable silver nanowires, carbon nanotubes and an elastomeric dielectric.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiajie; Li, Lu; Chen, Dustin; Hajagos, Tibor; Ren, Zhi; Chou, Shu-Yu; Hu, Wei; Pei, Qibing

    2015-07-15

    Thin-film field-effect transistor is a fundamental component behind various mordern electronics. The development of stretchable electronics poses fundamental challenges in developing new electronic materials for stretchable thin-film transistors that are mechanically compliant and solution processable. Here we report the fabrication of transparent thin-film transistors that behave like an elastomer film. The entire fabrication is carried out by solution-based techniques, and the resulting devices exhibit a mobility of ∼30 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), on/off ratio of 10(3)-10(4), switching current >100 μA, transconductance >50 μS and relative low operating voltages. The devices can be stretched by up to 50% strain and subjected to 500 cycles of repeated stretching to 20% strain without significant loss in electrical property. The thin-film transistors are also used to drive organic light-emitting diodes. The approach and results represent an important progress toward the development of stretchable active-matrix displays.

  11. Open-access dielectric elastomer material database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertechy, R.; Fontana, M.; Stiubianu, G.; Cazacu, M.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric Elastomer Transducers (DETs) are deformable capacitors that can be used as sensors, actuators and generators. The design of effective and optimized DETs requires the knowledge of a set of relevant properties of the employed Dielectric Elastomer (DE) material, which make it possible to accurately predict their electromechanical dynamic behavior. In this context, an open-access database for DE materials has been created with the aim of providing the practicing engineer with the essential information for the design and optimization of new kinds of DET. Among the electrical properties, dielectric susceptibility, dielectric strength and conductivity are considered along with their dependence on mechanical strain. As regards mechanical behavior, experimental stress-strain curves are provided to predict hyperelasticity, plasticity, viscosity, Mullins effect and mechanical rupture. Properties of commercial elastomeric membranes have been entered in the database and made available to the research community. This paper describes the instrumentations, experimental setups and procedures that have been employed for the characterization of the considered DE materials. To provide an example, the experimental data acquired for a commercially available natural rubber membrane (OPPO Band Red 8012) are presented.

  12. An elastomeric patch derived from poly(glycerol sebacate) for delivery of embryonic stem cells to the heart.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi-Zhi; Ishii, Hikaru; Thouas, George A; Lyon, Alexander R; Wright, Jamie S; Blaker, Jonny J; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Ali, Nadire N; Knowles, Jonathan C; Harding, Siân E

    2010-05-01

    We hypothesize that a combinatorial approach of ventricle constraint and stem cell therapy would offer a greater benefit for the treatment of heart failure than either strategy alone. A heart patch would serve two therapeutic purposes: biomechanical support and cell delivery. In this study, we describe a hybrid heart patch engineered from a synthetic elastomer, poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS), supplemented with cardiomyocytes differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). In line with two therapeutically relevant considerations, i.e. biocompatibility and cell delivery efficiency, the PGS was (a) pre-conditioned in culture medium for 6 days, and (b) prepared without gelatin coatings to facilitate detachment and delivery of cardiomyocytes following patch implantation. Following pre-conditioning under physiological conditions, the PGS patch material without gelatin coating was found to satisfactorily support cardiomyocyte viability and attachment, with active cell beating for periods of longer than 3 months until interrupted. Dynamic culture studies revealed that cells detached more efficiently from the uncoated surface of PGS than from gelatin-coated PGS. No significant differences were detected between the beating rates of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes on tissue culture plate and the pre-conditioned and gelatin-uncoated PGS. PGS patches sutured over the left ventricle of rats in vivo remained intact over a 2 week period without any deleterious effects on ventricular function. We conclude that PGS is a suitable biomaterial for stem cell-based regeneration strategies to restore cardiomyocyte function, and the hybrid heart patch engineered under optimal conditions would be a promising support device for the cardiac repair.

  13. Engineered bi-histidine metal chelation sites map the structure of the mechanical unfolding transition state of an elastomeric protein domain GB1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Cao, Yi; Zhuang, Shulin; Li, Hongbin

    2012-08-22

    during the mechanical unfolding process, offering a potentially powerful new method for investigating the design of novel elastomeric proteins.

  14. Novel methods and self-reinforced composite materials for assessment and prevention of mechanically assisted corrosion in modular implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, Eric S.

    effectively insulate CoCrMo/Ti6Al4V alloy interfaces during cyclic fretting motion at contact stresses similar to those that might be experienced in modular taper junctions. SRC-PEEK and SRC-PE reduced fretting currents by approximately two orders of magnitude as compared to metal-metal interfaces, and sliding mechanics for SRC-PEEK lined samples were similar to metal-metal interfaces, while SRC-PE samples created a much lower COF at the interface. Finally, SRC-PEEK and SRC-PE gaskets were created to sleeve the trunnions of modular tapers and insulate the head from the trunnion. Cyclic fretting corrosion techniques were employed to assess the ability of SRCs to reduce or prevent the onset of fretting corrosion in the modular taper junction. In a set of three short-term tests assessing the effects of incremented cyclic loads, frequencies, and working electrode potential, SRC lined samples prevented the onset of fretting corrosion and had significantly lower currents than severely corroding metal-metal samples. In long-term million cycle cyclic fretting corrosion testing, the SRC gaskets did not experience failure at any point throughout the test and did not allow for the onset of corrosion currents. Inspection of the gaskets following all testing confirmed that the SRC gaskets withstood the high contact stresses and abrasive fretting motion experienced during the cyclic tests performed, indicating that SRC-PEEK and SRC-PE may be suitable candidates as new materials to prevent the onset of fretting corrosion in modular taper junctions.

  15. An in vitro study of the bond strength of five adhesives used for vinyl polysiloxane impression materials and tray materials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Surender; Gandhi, Udey Vir; Banerjee, Saurav

    2014-03-01

    Although stock trays often provide mechanical retention for elastomeric impression materials, manufacturers typically recommend the use of an adhesive, whether a stock or custom tray is used. The mention of the bond strength on the adhesive packaging is not available, therefore the clinician has no idea whatsoever of the ideal adhesive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of three vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) materials, one with a poly(methyl methacrylate) autopolymerizing (PMMA) specimen and another with a light-polymerizing tray material (VLC), using the adhesive recommended by the manufacturer of the impression material, and two universal adhesives. A total of ninety specimens (15 × 15 × 20 mm) were used, 45 specimens were made in PMMA and rest 45 was made in VLC. Five paint-on adhesives (Coltene, Caulk, 3M, universal Zhermack and universal GC) were applied. Three impression materials, Affinis, Reprosil, and 3M, were mixed and injected into a perforated poly vinyl chloride cylinder. Tray specimens were positioned against the open cylinder end in contact with the VPS material. Tensile strength tests were conducted until adhesive separation failure. Mean values and standard errors of the adhesive strength were recorded in MPa for each material combination. GC paint-on universal adhesive provided significantly higher adhesive strength values.

  16. Sealing Materials for Use in Vacuum at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Donald R.; Camarda, Charles J.; Lee Vaughn, Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Sealing materials that can be applied and left in place in vacuum over a wide range of temperatures (especially temperatures of a few thousand degrees Celsius) have been conceived and investigated for potential utility in repairing thermal-protection tiles on the space shuttles in orbit before returning to Earth. These materials are also adaptable to numerous terrestrial applications that involve vacuum processing and/or repair of structures that must withstand high temperatures. These materials can be formulated to have mechanical handling characteristics ranging from almost freely flowing liquid-like consistency through paste-like consistency to stiff puttylike consistency, and to retain these characteristics in vacuum until heated to high curing temperatures. A sealing material of this type can be formulated to be used in any of several different ways for example, to be impregnated into a high-temperature-fabric patch, impregnated into a high-temperature-fabric gasket for sealing a patch, applied under a patch, or applied alone in the manner of putty or wallboard compound. The sealing material must be formulated to be compatible with, and adhere to, the structural material(s) to be repaired. In general, the material consists of a vacuum-compatible liquid containing one or more dissolved compound(s) and/or mixed with suspended solid particles. Depending on the intended application, the liquid can be chosen to be of a compound that can remain in place in vacuum for a time long enough to be useful, and/or to evaporate or decompose in a controlled way to leave a useful solid residue behind. The evaporation rate is determined by proper choice of vapor pressure, application of heat, and/or application of ultraviolet light or other optical radiation. The liquid chosen for the original space shuttle application is a commercial silicone vacuum-pump oil.

  17. Continuous self-locking spiral wound seal. [for maintaining pressure between chambers in cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irick, S. C. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A spiral wound seal for effecting a seal between two surfaces is described. The seal consists of a strip of gasket material wound into a groove machined into one of the surfaces. The gasket strip is wider than the groove is deep so that a portion of the gasket material protrudes from the groove. The seal is effected by clamping the second surface onto the first surface and compressing the protruding gasket material.

  18. Evaluation of Ion Exchange Materials in K Basin Floor Sludge and Potential Solvents for PCB Extraction from Ion Exchange Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.J.; Klinger, G.S.; Bredt, P.R.

    1999-04-10

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. These small amounts are significant from a regulatory standpoint. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). Chemical pretreatment is required to address criticality issues and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Eleven technologies have been evaluated (Papp 1997) as potential pretreatment methods. Based on the evaluations and engineering studies and limited testing, Fluor Daniel Hanford recommended solvent washing of the K Basin sludge, followed by nitric acid dissolution and, potentially, peroxide addition (FDH 1997). The solvent washing (extraction) and peroxide addition would be used to facilitate PCB removal and destruction. Following solvent extraction, the PCBs could be distilled and concentrated for disposal as a low-level waste. The purpose of the work reported here was to continue investigating solvent extraction, first by better identifying the ion exchange materials in the actual sludge samples and then evaluating various solvents for removing the PCBs or possibly dissolving the resins. This report documents some of the process knowledge on ion exchange materials used and spilled in the K Basins and describes the materials identified from wet sieving KE Basin floor and canister sludge and the results of other analyses. Several photographs are included to compare materials and illustrate material behavior. A summary of previous tests on

  19. Accuracy of stone casts obtained by different impression materials.

    PubMed

    Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Macedo, Ana Paula; Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello de; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria

    2008-01-01

    Several impression materials are available in the Brazilian marketplace to be used in oral rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different impression materials used for fixed partial dentures following the manufacturers' instructions. A master model representing a partially edentulous mandibular right hemi-arch segment whose teeth were prepared to receive full crowns was used. Custom trays were prepared with auto-polymerizing acrylic resin and impressions were performed with a dental surveyor, standardizing the path of insertion and removal of the tray. Alginate and elastomeric materials were used and stone casts were obtained after the impressions. For the silicones, impression techniques were also compared. To determine the impression materials' accuracy, digital photographs of the master model and of the stone casts were taken and the discrepancies between them were measured. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and Duncan's complementary test. Polyether and addition silicone following the single-phase technique were statistically different from alginate, condensation silicone and addition silicone following the double-mix technique (p < or = .05), presenting smaller discrepancies. However, condensation silicone was similar (p > or = .05) to alginate and addition silicone following the double-mix technique, but different from polysulfide. The results led to the conclusion that different impression materials and techniques influenced the stone casts' accuracy in a way that polyether, polysulfide and addition silicone following the single-phase technique were more accurate than the other materials.

  20. Predicting diffusion coefficients of chemicals in and through packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaoyi; Vitrac, Olivier

    2017-01-22

    Most of the physicochemical properties in polymers such as activity and partition coefficients, diffusion coefficients, and their activation with temperature are accessible to direct calculations from first principles. Such predictions are particularly relevant for food packaging as they can be used (1) to demonstrate the compliance or safety of numerous polymer materials and of their constitutive substances (e.g. additives, residues…), when they are used: as containers, coatings, sealants, gaskets, printing inks, etc. (2) or to predict the indirect contamination of food by pollutants (e.g. from recycled polymers, storage ambiance…) (3) or to assess the plasticization of materials in contact by food constituents (e.g. fat matter, aroma…). This review article summarizes the classical and last mechanistic descriptions of diffusion in polymers and discusses the reliability of semi-empirical approaches used for compliance testing both in EU and US. It is concluded that simulation of diffusion in or through polymers is not limited to worst-case assumptions but could also be applied to real cases for risk assessment, designing packaging with low leaching risk or to synthesize plastic additives with low diffusion rates.

  1. Development of Elastomeric Polypeptide Biomaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-25

    Vieland. Th., Hcinke. B. and Vogeler. J.. Justus Liebigs Ann. Cheni.. 655(1961) 189. 403 Inth American Peptide Symposium Washington Universit. In...relyophilized. 1915, 25, 403-413. (26) Wieland, Th.; Heinke. B.; Vogeler, J. Justus Liebiqs Ann. Chem. Dielectric Relaxation Measurements. The dielectric

  2. Development of Elastomeric Polypeptide Biomaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    Wieland, T., Heinke, B., and Vogeler, K. (1962). Justus Liebigs Ann. Chem. 655, 189-194. Yeh, H., Ornstein-Goldstein, N., Indik, Z., Sheppard, P...TssueAnalogues, (Williams, D.F., ed.) CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Florida 89 (1985). 14. Weiland, Th., Heinke, B. and Vogeler, J., Justus Liebiqs Ann

  3. Electrostrictive Response of Elastomeric Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    measurement was based on the BBN design used for the initial measurements and is shown schematically in Fig. 3 . The data obtained is shown in Fig. 4 , with dr...B AI Pform Approved AD-A277 983 IMENTATION PAGE oMBsNo. 070-010 S’ e a.itIUtt 4 o die’.e I nogr "f reMOM. inct the tome tot reviewing •lstruCtIOns...kliinageqment and Budget. Paipetwotk PO~ W • rotect (0704-01K). W4asington. OC 205J 1. AUtN.T U .t UNLI eLLivv u.,,aj i2. REPORT DATE ] 3 . REPORT TYPE AND DATES

  4. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1992-07-01

    Information contained in this reporters designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. Swell measurements have been made on approximately 50% of the proposed elastomers (94 total)in both the lubricant (7 total) and refrigerant (10 total) materials. Swell behavior in the these fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  5. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers. Quarterly report, 1 April 1992--30 June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1992-07-01

    Information contained in this reporters designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. Swell measurements have been made on approximately 50% of the proposed elastomers (94 total)in both the lubricant (7 total) and refrigerant (10 total) materials. Swell behavior in the these fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  6. Poly(glycerol sebacate) elastomer: a novel material for mechanically loaded bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zaky, Samer Helal; Lee, Kee-Won; Gao, Jin; Jensen, Adrianna; Close, John; Wang, Yadong; Almarza, Alejandro J; Sfeir, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The selection criteria for potential bone engineering scaffolds are based chiefly on their relative mechanical comparability to mature bone. In this study, we challenge this notion by obtaining full regeneration of a rabbit ulna critical size defect by employing the elastomeric polymer, poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS). We tested the regeneration facilitated by PGS alone, PGS in combination with hydroxyapatite particles, or PGS seeded with bone marrow stromal cells. We investigated the quantity and quality of the regenerated bone histologically, by microcomputed tomography and by four-point bending flexural mechanical testing at 8 weeks postimplantation. We conclude that the relatively lower stiffness of this biocompatible elastomer allows a load-transducing milieu in which osteogenesis, matrix deposition, and eventual bone maturation can take place. This study's results suggest that PGS elastomer is an auspicious osteoconductive material for the regeneration of bony defects. These results call for an innovative reassessment of the current art of selection for novel bone scaffold materials.

  7. Enabling Desktop Nanofabrication with the Targeted Use of Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel James

    This thesis focuses on the application of soft materials to scanning probe-based molecular printing techniques, such as dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The selective incorporation of soft materials in place of hard materials in traditional cantilever-based scanning probe lithography (SPL) systems not only enables the deposition of a broader range of materials, but also dramatically lowers the cost while simultaneously increasing the throughput of SPL. Chapter 1 introduces SPL and DPN, and highlights a few recent advances in using DPN to control surface chemical functionality at the nanoscale. In addition to introducing the material deposition capabilities of DPN, Chapter 1 introduces the development of the cantilever-free architecture, a relatively recent paradigm shift in high-throughput SPL. Furthermore, an in-depth synthetic methodology for making the most widely used cantilever-free tip arrays, consisting of elastomeric nanoscale pens adhered to an elastomeric backing layer on a glass slide, is included as an appendix. Chapter 2 discusses the synthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles at specified locations by using DPN to deposit the precursors dispersed in a polymer matrix; after deposition, the precursors are annealed to form single nanoparticles. This work builds on previous soft material-based advances in DPN by utilizing the polymer as a "nanoreactor" to synthesize the desired nanoparticles, where the precursors can diffuse and coalesce into a single nanoparticle within each spot. The process of precursor aggregation and single nanoparticle formation is studied, and it is found that metal precursors follow one of three pathways based upon their reduction potential. Chapter 3 is the first of three chapters that highlights the power of soft materials in the cantilever-free architecture. In particular, Chapter 3 examines the role of the elastomeric backing layer as a compliant spring whose stiffness (as measured by the spring constant, k) can be tuned

  8. Space Environment Effects on Silicone Seal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Daniels, Christopher C.; Dever, Joyce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    A docking system is being developed by the NASA to support future space missions. It is expected to use redundant elastomer seals to help contain cabin air during dockings between two spacecraft. The sealing surfaces are exposed to the space environment when vehicles are not docked. In space, the seals will be exposed to temperatures between 125 to -75 C, vacuum, atomic oxygen, particle and ultraviolet radiation, and micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD). Silicone rubber is the only class of space flight-qualified elastomeric seal material that functions across the expected temperature range. NASA Glenn has tested three silicone elastomers for such seal applications: two provided by Parker (S0899-50 and S0383-70) and one from Esterline (ELA-SA-401). The effects of atomic oxygen (AO), UV and electron particle radiation, and vacuum on the properties of these three elastomers were examined. Critical seal properties such as leakage, adhesion, and compression set were measured before and after simulated space exposures. The S0899-50 silicone was determined to be inadequate for extended space seal applications due to high adhesion and intolerance to UV, but both S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 seals were adequate.

  9. High-resolution PFPE-based molding techniques for nanofabrication of high-pattern density, sub-20 nm features: a fundamental materials approach.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stuart S; Retterer, Scott; Lopez, Rene; Ruiz, Ricardo; Samulski, Edward T; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2010-04-14

    Several perfluoropolyether (PFPE)-based elastomers for high-resolution replica molding applications are explored. The modulus of the elastomeric materials was increased through synthetic and additive approaches while maintaining relatively low surface tension values (<25 mN/m). Using large area (>4 in.(2)) master templates, we experimentally show the relationship between mold resolution and material properties such as modulus and surface tension for materials used in this study. A composite mold approach was used to form flexible molds out of stiff, high modulus materials that allow for replication of sub-20 nm post structures. Sub-100 nm line grating master templates, formed using e-beam lithography, were used to determine the experimental stability of the molding materials. It was observed that as the feature spacing decreased, high modulus PFPE tetramethacrylate (TMA) composite molds were able to effectively replicate the nanograting structures without cracking or tear-out defects that typically occur with high modulus elastomers.

  10. Fuel and Fuel System Materials Compatibility Test Program for A JP-8+100 Fuel Additive. Volume 1: Thermal Stability Additive Package BetzDearborn Spec Aid(Registered) 8Q462

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    W W W II.G.2 Gasket “O” Ring MIL-R-25988 Fluorosi l icone OT W W II.G.3 Gasket “O” Ring MIL-R-83485 Fluorosi l icone...O W W II.G.7 Gasket “O” Ring MIL-R-25988 Fluorosi l icone OT OT W ¹ Tested as a coating (tape adhesion and pencil) 73

  11. Mechanics of Re-Torquing in Bolted Flange Connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Ali P.; Drilling Brian; Weichman, Kyle; Kammerer, Catherine; Baldwin, Frank

    2010-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that the phenomenon of time-dependent loosening of flange connections is a strong consequence of the viscous nature of the compression seal material. Characterizing the coupled interaction between gasket creep and elastic bolt stiffness has been useful in predicting conditions that facilitate leakage. Prior advances on this sub-class of bolted joints has lead to the development of (1) constitutive models for elastomerics, (2) initial tightening strategies, (3) etc. The effect of re-torque, which is a major consideration for typical bolted flange seals used on the Space Shuttle fleet, has not been fully characterized, however. The current study presents a systematic approach to characterizing bolted joint behavior as the consequence of sequentially applied torques. Based on exprimenta1 and numerical results, the optimal re-torquing parameters have been identified that allow for the negligible load loss after pre-load application

  12. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.; Taikum, Orawan

    1994-01-01

    The information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. In part I of the program the swell behavior in the test fluids has been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 and 24 hours for samples removed fro the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants. Part II of the testing program includes the evaluation of tensile strength, hardness, weight, and dimensional changes after immersion aging in refrigerant/lubricant mixtures of selected elastomer formulations at elevated temperature and pressure.

  13. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1992-10-01

    Information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on the availability of additional quantities of R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  14. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers. Quarterly report, 1 July 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1992-10-01

    Information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on the availability of additional quantities of R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  15. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on availability of additional R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  16. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers. Quarterly report, 1 October 1992--30 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on availability of additional R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  17. Photo-actuating materials based on elastomers and modified carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaniková, Klaudia; Krupa, Igor; Ilčíková, Markéta; Kasák, Peter; Chorvát, , Dušan; Valentin, Marian; Šlouf, Miroslav; Mosnáček, Jaroslav; Mičušík, Matej; Omastová, Mária

    2012-01-01

    The photo-actuating behavior of new polymeric nanocomposite materials based on a commercial elastomer, an ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer (EVA), filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was investigated. A good dispersion of the MWCNT within the elastomeric matrix was ensured by using a novel, specific compatibilizer consisting of pyrenyl and cholesteryl groups. A uniaxial orientation of the MWCNT within the matrix was induced with shear forces by employing a special custom-made punch/die system. Good dispergation and alignment of the MWCNT within the matrix were demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy showed a good dispersion of the MWCNT within the composite. Photo-actuation was qualitatively characterized by atomic force microscopy and quantitatively characterized by nanoindentation. The samples prepared in the form of Braille element showed expansion upon illumination by light diodes. The maximal height deformation changes about 15% was detected when a blue diode was used.

  18. Materials for Stretchable Electronics: Electronic Eyeballs, Brain Monitors, and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John A.

    2009-02-04

    Electronic circuits that involve transistors and related components on thin plastic sheets or rubber slabs offer mechanical properties (e.g. bendability, stretchability) and other features (e.g. lightweight, rugged construction) which cannot be easily achieved with technologies that use rigid, fragile semiconductor wafer or glass substrates. Device examples include personal or structural health monitors and electronic eye imagers, in which the electronics must conform to complex curvilinear shapes or flex/stretch during use. Our recent work accomplishes these technology outcomes by use of single crystal inorganic nanomaterials in 'wavy' buckled configurations on elastomeric supports. This talk will describe key fundamental materials and mechanics aspects of these approaches, as well as engineering features of their use in individual transistors, photodiodes and integrated circuits. Cardiac and brain monitoring devices provide examples of application in biomedicine; hemispherical electronic eye cameras illustrate new capacities for bio-inspired device design.

  19. Materials for Stretchable Electronics - Electronic Eyeballs, Brain Monitors and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John A.

    2009-02-04

    Electronic circuits that involve transistors and related components on thin plastic sheets or rubber slabs offer mechanical properties (e.g. bendability, stretchability) and other features (e.g. lightweight, rugged construction) which cannot be easily achieved with technologies that use rigid, fragile semiconductor wafer or glass substrates.  Device examples include personal or structural health monitors and electronic eye imagers, in which the electronics must conform to complex curvilinear shapes or flex/stretch during use.  Our recent work accomplishes these technology outcomes by use of single crystal inorganic nanomaterials in ‘wavy’ buckled configurations on elastomeric supports.  This talk will describe key fundamental materials and mechanics aspects of these approaches, as well as engineering features of their use in individual transistors, photodiodes and integrated circuits.  Cardiac and brain monitoring devices provide examples of application in biomedicine; hemispherical electronic eye cameras illustrate new capacities for bio-inspired device design.

  20. Effect of reactive adhesives on the tensile bond strength of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials to methyl methacrylate tray material.

    PubMed

    Ona, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sato, Masayuki; Igarashi, Yoshimasa; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    The effect of new adhesives on the bond strength of elastomeric impression materials to acrylic trays was evaluated. Two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials (Fusion and Imprinsis) with reactive adhesives and one (Examix) with a conventional adhesive were tested. Flat, double-sided plates of auto-polymerizing methyl methacrylate (10 x 10 x 2.5 mm) were prepared with one of the adhesives. Five specimens were prepared by injecting each impression material into a 2-mm gap between the two plates. Tensile tests were conducted until separation failure occurred. The mean bond strengths of Fusion (1.0 MPa) and Imprinsis (0.8 MPa) were significantly greater than that of Examix (0.2 MPa). On the contrary, one of five Fusion showed adhesive failure mode while all the Imprinsis exhibited mixed failure. The conflicting results were presumably attributed to the mean tear strength of Fusion (0.8 N/mm) being higher than that of Imprinsis (0.5 N/mm).

  1. The use of GRP materials in piping systems: The experience of Total

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, C.F.P.

    1993-12-31

    The first use of GRP materials by Total took place in 1975 on one of the authors off-shore oil production facilities in the Middle-East. After only 8 months of operation, the fire water and the cooling water systems, which were made of galvanized carbon steel materials, happened to be heavily corroded, and, consequently, had to be changed. Corrosion experts had the evidence that this corrosion was caused by the use of sea water, and, accordingly, had to select an appropriate corrosion resistant material for the replacement of the existing systems which turned to the advantage of GRP materials for several reasons: good corrosion resistance, light weight, no need for hot work permits. As many other end-users, because it was found that the overall level of standardization of GRP materials was not as comprehensive as what it is for metallic materials, Total had to specify to some details what to use, where and how to use it. This led to the issue of several technical specifications, and, among them, one for the supply of GRP piping materials. This document is mainly based on ASTM standards, with additional guidelines in the following areas: type of resins, manufacturing processes, types of joints, gaskets, pipes supporting, inspection, testing of finished products (destructive tests and tightness tests). As an end-user, they also had to set-up a policy for the use of GRP piping materials with regards to its advantages, but also taking into account some disadvantages such as its poor fire resistance. This policy (which is based on several fire tests which have been carried-out) has been, for essential services such as Fire Water Systems, to use GRP materials only on lines which are permanently kept full of water; down-stream the block valves, where piping is normally dry (for instance, on deluge systems), they would only use metallic materials.

  2. Effects of atomic oxygen on polymeric materials flown on EOIM-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Linton, Roger C.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Vaughn, Jason A.

    1995-01-01

    Diverse polymeric materials, including several variations of Kapton, were flown on STS-46 as part of the Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials Experiment (EOIM-3). These materials were flown in the cargo bay and exposed to the space environment July 31 - August 8, 1992, including 40 hours of direct atomic oxygen impingement. The atomic oxygen exposure was approximately 2.2 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm. Polymeric materials flown on EOIM-3 include coated and uncoated Kapton, Tefzel ETFE, Lexan, FEP and TFE Teflon, bulk Halar and PEEK, S383 silicone and Viton elastomeric seal material. Analyses performed included thickness measurements using Dektak and eddy current methods, mass loss, resistance, permeability, hardness, and FTIR. The effects of stress and the space environment on Kapton were also evaluated. Previous EOIM missions on STS-5 and STS-8 and the Long Duration Exposure Facility also contained polymeric material samples. Data from these previous flights are shown for comparison, as well as ground simulation of space environment effects using both thermal energy flow tubes and 5 eV neutral atomic oxygen beam facilities. Reaction efficiencies for the various atomic oxygen exposure conditions are discussed.

  3. Space shuttle seal material and design development for earth storable propellant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The results of a program to investigate and characterize seal materials suitable for space shuttle storable propellant systems are given. Two new elastomeric materials were identified as being potentially superior to existing state-of-the art materials for specific sealing applications. These materials were AF-E-124D and AF-E-411. AF-E-124D is a cured perfluorinated polymer suitable for use with dinitrogen tetroxide oxidizer, and hydrazine base fuels. AF-E-411 is an ethylene propylene terpolymer material for hydrazine base fuel service. Data are presented relative to low and high temperature characteristics as well as propellant exposure effects. Types of data included are: mechanical properties, stress strain curves, friction and wear characteristics, compression set and permeability. Sealing tests with a flat poppet-seal valve were conducted for verification of sealing capability. A bibliography includes over 200 references relating to seal design or materials and presents a concise tabulation of the more useful seal design data sources.

  4. Understanding Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Almost everything people have ever done has involved materials. Historical evidence indicates that "engineered materials" have been available and utilized for the benefit of humankind since the Neolithic period, beginning about 10,000 BC. Some of these materials have been in existence for thousands of years. At first, materials consisted of wood,…

  5. Moldable setting time evaluation between sodium alginate and bovine gelatine of glutinous rice mixture as dental putty materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takarini, V.; Hasratiningsih, Z.; Karlina, E.; Febrida, R.; Asri, L. A. T. W.; Purwasasmita, BS

    2017-02-01

    Putty elastomeric material is a viscous, moldable material that can be used as a dental impression to record and duplicate the tooth structure. Commercially available putty materials are hardly found in the Indonesian market. The aim of this work is to develop an alternative putty dental material from glutinous rice with two different gelling agents; sodium alginate and bovine gelatine. A commercially putty material was used as a control. The length of time required for the putty materials to set (setting time) was evaluated with compression set test. The result showed that sodium alginate and bovine gelatine gelling agents resulted in moldable putty materials that comparable to the commercial product. Glutinous rice mixed with sodium alginate gelling agent demonstrated longer setting time (more than 1 hours) compared to bovine gelatine (6 minutes). These may occur due to heat treatment applied to the bovine gelatine, while sodium alginate mixture has a chemical reaction since CaCl2 crosslink agent had been added to the mixture. Glutinous rice with bovine gelatine mixture is a promising candidate to be used as a dental putty material.

  6. Structural and Chemical Properties of the Nitrogen-Rich Energetic Material Triaminoguanidinium 1-methyl-5-nitriminotetrazolate under Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    diffraction peaks of solid neon. Samples were mechanically crushed into a fine poly- crystalline powder and loaded into the diamond anvil cell ( rhenium ...labeled with reciprocal lattice planes. Small contributions from the Rhenium gasket are identified with a star. Le Bail fitting improvements not...locations; le Bail fit improvements not included. Black dashed line is the location of the first nonsample peak ( Rhenium from gasket); to its right are

  7. Direct Fabrication of Micro/Nano-Patterned Surfaces by Vertical-Directional Photofluidization of Azobenzene Materials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeho; Cho, Wonhee; Jung, Yeon Sik; Kang, Hong Suk; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2017-02-28

    Anisotropic movement of azobenzene materials (i.e., azobenzene molecules incorporated in polymer, glass, or supramolecules) has provided significant opportunities for the fabrication of micro/nanoarchitectures. The examples include circular holes, line gaps, ellipsoidal holes, and nanofunnels. However, all of the previous studies have only focused on the lateral directional movement for the structural shaping of azobenzene materials. Herein, we propose structural shaping based on a vertical directional movement of azobenzene materials. To do this, light with oblique incidence, containing normal direction light polarization, was illuminated onto azobenzene materials film contact with patterned elastomeric molds (i.e., PDMS) so that the resulting vertical directional movement of azobenzene materials fills in the cavities of the molds and results in pattern formation. As a result, a range of patterns with sizes of features from micro- to sub-100 nm scale was successfully fabricated in a large area (few cm(2)), and the structural height was deterministically controlled by simply adjusting irradiation time. In addition to the notable capability of fabricating the single-scale structures, the technique provides a facile way to fabricate complex hierarchical multiscale structures, ensuring its versatility and wide applicability to various applications. As a selected exemplary application of the multiscale structures, a superhydrophobic surface has been successfully demonstrated.

  8. Stretchable Materials for Robust Soft Actuators towards Assistive Wearable Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Gunjan; Besuchet, Nicolas; Audergon, Basile; Paik, Jamie

    2016-09-01

    Soft actuators made from elastomeric active materials can find widespread potential implementation in a variety of applications ranging from assistive wearable technologies targeted at biomedical rehabilitation or assistance with activities of daily living, bioinspired and biomimetic systems, to gripping and manipulating fragile objects, and adaptable locomotion. In this manuscript, we propose a novel two-component soft actuator design and design tool that produces actuators targeted towards these applications with enhanced mechanical performance and manufacturability. Our numerical models developed using the finite element method can predict the actuator behavior at large mechanical strains to allow efficient design iterations for system optimization. Based on two distinctive actuator prototypes’ (linear and bending actuators) experimental results that include free displacement and blocked-forces, we have validated the efficacy of the numerical models. The presented extensive investigation of mechanical performance for soft actuators with varying geometric parameters demonstrates the practical application of the design tool, and the robustness of the actuator hardware design, towards diverse soft robotic systems for a wide set of assistive wearable technologies, including replicating the motion of several parts of the human body.

  9. Stretchable Materials for Robust Soft Actuators towards Assistive Wearable Devices.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Gunjan; Besuchet, Nicolas; Audergon, Basile; Paik, Jamie

    2016-09-27

    Soft actuators made from elastomeric active materials can find widespread potential implementation in a variety of applications ranging from assistive wearable technologies targeted at biomedical rehabilitation or assistance with activities of daily living, bioinspired and biomimetic systems, to gripping and manipulating fragile objects, and adaptable locomotion. In this manuscript, we propose a novel two-component soft actuator design and design tool that produces actuators targeted towards these applications with enhanced mechanical performance and manufacturability. Our numerical models developed using the finite element method can predict the actuator behavior at large mechanical strains to allow efficient design iterations for system optimization. Based on two distinctive actuator prototypes' (linear and bending actuators) experimental results that include free displacement and blocked-forces, we have validated the efficacy of the numerical models. The presented extensive investigation of mechanical performance for soft actuators with varying geometric parameters demonstrates the practical application of the design tool, and the robustness of the actuator hardware design, towards diverse soft robotic systems for a wide set of assistive wearable technologies, including replicating the motion of several parts of the human body.

  10. Stretchable Materials for Robust Soft Actuators towards Assistive Wearable Devices

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Gunjan; Besuchet, Nicolas; Audergon, Basile; Paik, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Soft actuators made from elastomeric active materials can find widespread potential implementation in a variety of applications ranging from assistive wearable technologies targeted at biomedical rehabilitation or assistance with activities of daily living, bioinspired and biomimetic systems, to gripping and manipulating fragile objects, and adaptable locomotion. In this manuscript, we propose a novel two-component soft actuator design and design tool that produces actuators targeted towards these applications with enhanced mechanical performance and manufacturability. Our numerical models developed using the finite element method can predict the actuator behavior at large mechanical strains to allow efficient design iterations for system optimization. Based on two distinctive actuator prototypes’ (linear and bending actuators) experimental results that include free displacement and blocked-forces, we have validated the efficacy of the numerical models. The presented extensive investigation of mechanical performance for soft actuators with varying geometric parameters demonstrates the practical application of the design tool, and the robustness of the actuator hardware design, towards diverse soft robotic systems for a wide set of assistive wearable technologies, including replicating the motion of several parts of the human body. PMID:27670953

  11. Electrospinning and crosslinking of low-molecular-weight poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-(L)-lactide) as an elastomeric scaffold for vascular engineering.

    PubMed

    Dargaville, Bronwin L; Vaquette, Cédryck; Rasoul, Firas; Cooper-White, Justin J; Campbell, Julie H; Whittaker, Andrew K

    2013-06-01

    The growth of suitable tissue to replace natural blood vessels requires a degradable scaffold material that is processable into porous structures with appropriate mechanical and cell growth properties. This study investigates the fabrication of degradable, crosslinkable prepolymers of l-lactide-co-trimethylene carbonate into porous scaffolds by electrospinning. After crosslinking by γ-radiation, dimensionally stable scaffolds were obtained with up to 56% trimethylene carbonate incorporation. The fibrous mats showed Young's moduli closely matching human arteries (0.4-0.8MPa). Repeated cyclic extension yielded negligible change in mechanical properties, demonstrating the potential for use under dynamic physiological conditions. The scaffolds remained elastic and resilient at 30% strain after 84days of degradation in phosphate buffer, while the modulus and ultimate stress and strain progressively decreased. The electrospun mats are mechanically superior to solid films of the same materials. In vitro, human mesenchymal stem cells adhered to and readily proliferated on the three-dimensional fiber network, demonstrating that these polymers may find use in growing artificial blood vessels in vivo.

  12. Analytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Graeme W.

    2016-11-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer p. If p takes its maximum value, then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise, it is incomplete analytic material of rank p. For two-dimensional materials, further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a 90° rotation applied to a divergence-free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  13. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... veins of the body, including vessels in the brain, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and legs soft tissues of the body, including the muscles, fat and skin brain breast Microbubble Contrast Materials Microbubble contrast materials are ...

  14. Analytic materials.

    PubMed

    Milton, Graeme W

    2016-11-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer p. If p takes its maximum value, then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise, it is incomplete analytic material of rank p. For two-dimensional materials, further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a 90(°) rotation applied to a divergence-free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  15. The interaction of surfactants with plastic and copper plumbing materials during decontamination.

    PubMed

    Casteloes, Karen S; Mendis, Gamini P; Avins, Holly K; Howarter, John A; Whelton, Andrew J

    2017-03-05

    The study goal was to examine the effectiveness of surfactants to decontaminate plastic and copper potable water plumbing components. Several common potable water pipe and gasket plastics were examined as well as Alconox(®) detergent, Dawn(®) soap, and MAGIT-DG 100 surfactants. Results showed that the MAGIT-DG 100 solutions permeated all plastics within 3days, effectively compromising tensile strength (-82%), physical dimension (+43% volume, +45% weight), and oxidative resistance (-15%). A variety of MAGIT-DG 100 solution compounds permeated plastic samples, not just the declared major ingredient. PVC and cPVC pipes sorbed the least amount of this solution's components of all the plastic pipes tested. Alconox(®) and Dawn(®) solutions caused minimal changes to the physical and mechanical properties of all plastics examined. Crosslinked polyethylene type A (PEX-a) pipe was more susceptible to crude oil contamination than copper pipe. Flushing with a pure water Alconox(®) solution mixture removed all benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylenes (BTEX) from copper pipe. No decontamination method affected BTEX removal from PEX pipe. Under certain conditions surfactant solutions have the potential to alter material integrity and may not be a viable option in removing hydrophobic organic compounds from plastic pipe.

  16. Controle sismique d'un batiment en acier de 3 etages a l'echelle 1/3 par amortisseurs elastomeres et contreventements en chevron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauron, Olivier

    This study develops an innovative configuration of seismic natural rubber dampers for multistory low- and medium-rise steel braced frames. The dampers are directly integrated in an horizontal position in the seismic force resisting system of the structure. They are connected in a series with typical chevron brace systems. This control system provides not only additional structural damping to the structure but also a period shift, acting in the same way as a base isolation system. First, the fiber reinforced natural rubber used in the application was tested. It exhibited strong non linear dependance of its equivalent viscoelastic properties related to the shear strain. Then, a 1/3-scale 3-story chevron braced steel frame with and without dampers was considered. The structure was build and placed on the shaking table of the University of Sherbrooke Structures Laboratory. Numerical studies show that the efficiency of the control system reduces strongly the seismic induced forces of the undamped structure without any amplification of displacement or drift. Obtained seismic response reduction levels represent significant safety and economical benefits for the proposed application. Finally, the control system viability is experimentally demonstrated by shaking table tests at different reduced seismic intensities. Non linear behavior of the structure due to non linear behavior of the damping material is highlighted, and the dependance of seismic control performances is shown to be related to seismic intensities. Results allow an extrapolation of the experimental control peformances tending to the numerical results at higher intensities. Key-words : chevron braces, damper, multistory building, natural rubber, seismic control, shaking table.

  17. Nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Philip

    2001-03-01

    Nanostructured materials may be defined as those materials whose structural elements - clusters, crystallites or molecules - have dimensions in the 1 to 100 nm range. The explosion in both academic and industrial interest in these materials over the past decade arises from the remarkable variations in fundamental electrical, optical and magnetic properties that occur as one progresses from an `infinitely extended' solid to a particle of material consisting of a countable number of atoms. This review details recent advances in the synthesis and investigation of functional nanostructured materials, focusing on the novel size-dependent physics and chemistry that results when electrons are confined within nanoscale semiconductor and metal clusters and colloids. Carbon-based nanomaterials and nanostructures including fullerenes and nanotubes play an increasingly pervasive role in nanoscale science and technology and are thus described in some depth. Current nanodevice fabrication methods and the future prospects for nanostructured materials and nanodevices are discussed.

  18. Moisture transport into chlorofluorocarbon-free metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Williams, G

    1999-12-01

    Moisture is known to affect the stability of some metered dose inhalers (MDIs). Hydrofluoroalkanes such as tetrafluoroethane (134a) and heptafluoropropane (227) are known to have higher affinity for moisture than the currently used chlorofluorocarbon propellents. An initial study was conducted to determine the water vapor transmission rates of various elastomers that may be used as gaskets in MDIs. A further study was conducted to measure the moisture ingress rates of various chlorofluorocarbon-free MDIs. The data indicate that moisture transport into chlorofluorocarbon-free MDIs is influenced by the elastomeric nature of the gaskets used and the type of hydrofluoroalkane formulation and storage conditions used.

  19. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  20. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  1. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  2. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  3. Nano Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Nano Materials Henne van Heeren enablingMNT Drakensteynlaan 34 3319 RG Dordrecht The Netherlands Henne@enablingMNT.com Introduction... micro sized particles. Nanotubes From a Mancef patent investigation it was learned that carbon nanotechnology (mainly nanotubes, but also...for high purity nanotubes. RTO-EN-AVT-129bis 3 - 1 van Heeren, H. (2007) Nano Materials. In Nanotechnology Aerospace Applications

  4. Materials Repurposed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Orvil L.; Townsend, J. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Few teachers find themselves with the support to purchase all of the materials they ideally need to supply their classrooms. Buying one or two simple, ready-made items can put a serious strain on anyone's budget. However, materials for science in the classroom need not be prefabricated or expensive. By looking at the function and purpose of any…

  5. Bioresponsive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yue; Aimetti, Alex A.; Langer, Robert; Gu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    'Smart' bioresponsive materials that are sensitive to biological signals or to pathological abnormalities, and interact with or are actuated by them, are appealing therapeutic platforms for the development of next-generation precision medications. Armed with a better understanding of various biologically responsive mechanisms, researchers have made innovations in the areas of materials chemistry, biomolecular engineering, pharmaceutical science, and micro- and nanofabrication to develop bioresponsive materials for a range of applications, including controlled drug delivery, diagnostics, tissue engineering and biomedical devices. This Review highlights recent advances in the design of smart materials capable of responding to the physiological environment, to biomarkers and to biological particulates. Key design principles, challenges and future directions, including clinical translation, of bioresponsive materials are also discussed.

  6. Composite material

    DOEpatents

    Hutchens, Stacy A [Knoxville, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Solihull, GB; Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  7. Periodontal materials.

    PubMed

    Darby, I

    2011-06-01

    Periodontics is more associated with debridement of periodontal pockets and not generally thought of as using dental materials in the treatment of patients. However, the last 30 years have seen the development of materials used in regeneration of the periodontal tissues following periodontal disease, guided tissue regeneration, and the use of these materials in bone regeneration more recently, guided bone regeneration. The materials used include bone grafts and membranes, but also growth factors and cells-based therapies. This review provides an overview of the materials currently used and looks at contemporary research with a view to what may be used in the future. It also looks at the clinical effectiveness of these regenerative therapies with an emphasis on what is available in Australia.

  8. Container lid gasket protective strip for double door transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Jr., Burgess M

    2013-02-19

    An apparatus and a process for forming a protective barrier seal along a "ring of concern" of a transfer container used with double door systems is provided. A protective substrate is supplied between a "ring of concern" and a safety cover in which an adhesive layer of the substrate engages the "ring of concern". A compressive foam strip along an opposite side of the substrate engages a safety cover such that a compressive force is maintained between the "ring of concern" and the adhesive layer of the substrate.

  9. Insulation Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Manufactured by Hitco Materials Division of Armco, Inc. a ceramic fiber insulation material known as Refrasil has been used extensively as a heat-absorbing ablative reinforcement for such space systems as rocket motor nozzles, combustion chambers, and re-entry shields. Refrasil fibers are highly porous and do not melt or vaporize until fibers exceed 3,100 degrees Fahrenheit. Due to these and other properties, Refrasil has found utility in a number of industrial high temperature applications where glass, asbestos and other materials fail. Hitco used this insulation to assist Richardson Co., Inc. in the manufacturing of hard rubber and plastic molded battery cases.

  10. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Cooper, Valentino

    2016-07-12

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  11. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other medical conditions history of asthma and hay fever history of heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, thyroid ... materials if: you have a history of asthma, hay fever, or other allergies, which will increase your risk ...

  12. Hazardous materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... for words like: Acid Alkali Carcinogenic Caution Corrosive Danger Explosive Flammable Irritant Radioactive Unstable Warning A label ... leak occurs What to do if there is danger from the material mixing with other substances How ...

  13. CURRICULUM MATERIALS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton.

    MATERIALS ARE LISTED BY 36 TOPICS ARRANGED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER. TOPICS INCLUDE APPRENTICE TRAINING, BAKING, DRAFTING, ENGLISH, GLASSBLOWING, HOME ECONOMICS, INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY, MACHINE SHOP, NEEDLE TRADES, REFRIGERATION, AND UPHOLSTERY. PRICES ARE GIVEN FOR EACH ITEM. (EL)

  14. Causes and Control of Corrosion in Buried-Conduit Heat Distribution Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    pressure ratings. A maximum P X T limitation exists for all gasket materials. For example, the maximum temperature and pressure ratings for an EPDM ...are satisfactory for steam and IITfIW system gaskets are summariZed in Trable 4. Synthetic fiber-SRF3 binder and synthetic fiber- EPDM binder products... gaskets . 28 Table 5 Typical Physical Properties for Nonasbestos Materials ASTM Test Physical Method Properties F37 Sealability Milliliters/Hour Leakage

  15. Propulsion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Edward J.; Sullivan, Rogelio A.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    spectroscopic methods to weight or filter the spin signals represents the core of the book. This is a subject where Blümich is deeply involved with substantial contributions. The chapter includes a lot of ideas to provide MR contrast between different regions based on their mobility, diffusion, spin couplings or NMR spectra. After describing NMR imaging methods for solids with broad lines, Blümich spends time on applications in the last two chapters of the book. This part is really fun to read. It underlines the effort to bring NMR into many kinds of manufacturing. Car tyres and high-voltage cables are just two such areas. Elastomeric materials, green-state ceramics and food science represent other interesting fields of applications. This part of the book represents a personal but nevertheless extensive compilation of modern applications. As a matter of course the MOUSE is presented, a portable permanent-magnet based NMR developed by Blümich and his co-workers. Thus the book is not only of interest to NMR spectroscopists but also to people in material science and chemical engineering. The bibliography and indexing are excellent and may serve as an attractive reference source for NMR spectroscopists. The book is the first on the subject and likely to become the standard text for NMR imaging of materials as the books by Abragam, Slicher and Ernst et al are for NMR spectroscopy. The purchase of this beautiful book for people dealing with NMR spectroscopy or medical MRI is highly recommended. Ralf Ludwig

  17. Elastomeric silicone substrates for terahertz fishnet metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodasevych, I. E.; Shah, C. M.; Sriram, S.; Bhaskaran, M.; Withayachumnankul, W.; Ung, B. S. Y.; Lin, H.; Rowe, W. S. T.; Abbott, D.; Mitchell, A.

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we characterize the electromagnetic properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and use this as a free-standing substrate for the realization of flexible fishnet metamaterials at terahertz frequencies. Across the 0.2-2.5 THz band, the refractive index and absorption coefficient of PDMS are estimated as 1.55 and 0-22 cm-1, respectively. Electromagnetic modeling, multi-layer flexible electronics microfabrication, and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy are used in the design, fabrication, and characterization of the metamaterials, respectively. The properties of PDMS add a degree of freedom to terahertz metamaterials, with the potential for tuning by elastic deformation or integrated microfluidics.

  18. Elastomeric contractile actuators for hand rehabilitation splints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Mannini, Andrea; De Rossi, Danilo

    2008-03-01

    The significant electromechanical performances typically shown by dielectric elastomer actuators make this polymer technology particularly attractive for possible active orthoses for rehabilitation. Folded contractile actuators made of dielectric elastomers were recently described as a simple configuration, suitable to easily implement linear contractile devices. This paper describes an application of folded actuators for so-called hand splints: they consist of orthotic systems for hand rehabilitation. The dynamic versions of the state-of-the-art splints typically include elastic bands, which exert a passive elastic resistance to voluntary elongations of one or more fingers. In order to provide such splints with the possibility of electrically modulating the compliance of the resistive elements, the substitution of the passive elastic bands with the contractile actuators is here described. The electrical activation of the actuators is used to vary the compliance of the system; this enables modulations of the force that acts as an antagonist to voluntary finger movements, according to programmable rehabilitation exercises. The paper reports results obtained from the first prototype implementations of such a type of system.

  19. Improved Chemical Protective Gloves Using Elastomeric Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-14

    available with 25-30 mil thick butyl rubber gloves. Neoprene nanocomposites were developed in Phase 1 and will be combined with Neoprene substrate in...protection currently available with 25-30 mil thick butyl rubber gloves. Neoprene nanocomposites were developed in Phase 1 and will be combined with... nanocomposite coated substrates or multilayer structures can have better flame resistance than butyl rubber as measured by vertical flame testing

  20. Improved Chemical Protective Gloves Using Elastomeric Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-06

    Nanocomposite Coatings of neoprene and nitrile Rubber based on InMat’s environmentally friendly, water based , Nanolok coating technology have... nanocomposites . One of the initial problems they encountered was with the butyl based nanocomposite , Air D-Fense 2000R (AD2000R). There was no adhesion with... butyl based nanocomposite , Air D-Fense 2000R. Once InMat was able to provide Best with the neoprene based nanocomposite (Nanolok NP), they