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Sample records for elderly high risk

  1. High Risk Situations for Elderly Alcohol Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupree, Larry W.; Schonfeld, Lawrence

    The Gerontology Alcohol Project, a treatment/research program investigating the characteristics of the late-life onset elderly alcohol abuser, was used as a model for a new program which emphasized teaching the elderly abusers how to break down their personal drinking behavior chain and deal with the antecedents of drinking behavior, to use…

  2. Percutaneous cholecystostomy for acute cholecystitis in high-risk elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Chen; Chang, Chen-Wang; Chu, Cheng-Hsin

    2016-10-01

    Emergency cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis (AC) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates in elderly patients with significant comorbidities. The aim of this study was to evaluate percutaneous cholecystostomy for AC in elderly patients with various coexisting diseases. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 4311 patients with AC treated in Mackay Memorial Hospital between the years 2000 and 2015. The clinical course of AC was compared between nonelderly (age ≤70 years) and elderly patients (age>70 years). In total, 67 elderly patients and 32 nonelderly patients received percutaneous cholecystostomy. The rate of percutaneous cholecystostomy increased between the years 2011 and 2015 (from 2.5% to 12.2%) and this procedure was more common in the elderly group (p=0.009). In addition, the comorbidities of ischemic heart disease and chronic kidney disease were higher in elderly than in nonelderly patients (p=0.014 and p=0.015, respectively). The American Society of Anesthesiologists' classification was higher in the elderly patients (p=0.001). The overall survival-free rate of recurrent cholecystitis in patients who did not receive cholecystectomy was not significantly different in the two groups. When compared with emergent cholecystectomy in high-risk elderly patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy resulted in reduced hospital stay and morbidity (p=0.002 and p=0.013, respectively). Our results demonstrate that percutaneous cholecystostomy has become a common and early treatment for AC in high-risk elderly patients with ischemic heart disease or chronic kidney disease. Identifying such patients will possibly improve clinical outcomes, reduce hospital stay and morbidity, and facilitate delayed laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  3. Risk factors for gallbladder contractility after cholecystolithotomy in elderly high-risk surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Luo, Hao; Yan, Hong-tao; Zhang, Guo-hu; Liu, Wei-hui; Tang, Li-jun

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cholecystolithiasis is a common disease in the elderly patient. The routine therapy is open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In the previous study, we designed a minimally invasive cholecystolithotomy based on percutaneous cholecystostomy combined with a choledochoscope (PCCLC) under local anesthesia. Methods To investigate the effect of PCCLC on the gallbladder contractility function, PCCLC and laparoscope combined with a choledochoscope were compared in this study. Results The preoperational age and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores, as well as postoperational lithotrity rate and common biliary duct stone rate in the PCCLC group, were significantly higher than the choledochoscope group. However, the pre- and postoperational gallbladder ejection fraction was not significantly different. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses indicated that the preoperational thickness of gallbladder wall (odds ratio [OR]: 0.540; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.317–0.920; P=0.023) and lithotrity (OR: 0.150; 95% CI: 0.023–0.965; P=0.046) were risk factors for postoperational gallbladder ejection fraction. The area under receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.714 (P=0.016; 95% CI: 0.553–0.854). Conclusion PCCLC strategy should be carried out cautiously. First, restricted by the diameter of the drainage tube, the PCCLC should be used only for small gallstones in high-risk surgical patients. Second, the usage of lithotrity should be strictly limited to avoid undermining the gallbladder contractility and increasing the risk of secondary common bile duct stones. PMID:28138229

  4. Lymphadenectomy in elderly/high risk patients: should it be different?

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Federica; Pappalardo, Vincenzo; Inversini, Davide; Martignoni, Francesco; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Rausei, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The global aging of population will lead a greater number of elderly patients to undergo surgical procedure in a near future. Concerning gastric cancer, the impact of lymphadenectomy on survival has been demonstrated in RCTs, and extended lymphadenectomy is now considered as gold standard of treatment in non-early tumors. However, the role of age as a prognostic factor and the benefit of extended surgery in elderly/high-risk patients are not clearly defined yet. From our revision of literature, it seems that surgery for gastric cancer may have a further tailorization, considering not only the stage of disease, but also patients’ age and comorbidities. PMID:28217755

  5. Predictors of high-risk prescribing among elderly Medicare Advantage beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Alicia L; Dore, David D; Kazis, Lewis E; Mor, Vincent; Trivedi, Amal N

    2014-10-01

    To examine patient, community, and insurance plan predictors of high-risk prescribing in the elderly Medicare Advantage population. Cohort study. Using a sample of 203 Medicare Advantage plans from the 2006-2008 Health Outcomes Survey, we compared patient, community, and insurance plan characteristics of 77,247 respondents with and without new Medicare Part D claims for high-risk medications from June 2006 to May 2007. Of the Medicare Advantage enrollee respondents, 15.6% received a new prescription for a high-risk medication during 12 months of follow-up. In adjusted analyses, new users of high-risk medications were more likely to be women (OR = 1.35; 95% CI,1.28-1.42), and they reported poorer general health (Physical Component Summary score 37.3 vs 40.4, P <.05) than did individuals who never received a high-risk prescription. Being aged ≥ 85 years was protective against receipt of a high-risk medication (OR relative to persons aged 65-69 years = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.64-0.75). Incidence of high-risk prescribing varied by census division, with a 2-fold difference between regions with the lowest and highest rates (9% in New England vs 18% in the West South Central region). Muscle relaxants, antihistamines, and opiates accounted for over 71% of new dispensing of high-risk medications. Approximately 67% of new users of high-risk medications received only 1 dispensing. High-risk prescribing varies widely by geography and drug class in the Medicare Advantage population. Women, persons with poorer self-reported health, and those residing in the Southern regions of the United States more frequently receive high-risk medications. Variations may highlight areas for targeted interventions to reduce high-risk prescribing to the elderly.

  6. Predictors of High-Risk Prescribing among Elderly Medicare Advantage Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Alicia L.; Dore, David D.; Kazis, Lewis E.; Mor, Vincent; Trivedi, Amal N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine patient, community, and insurance plan predictors of high-risk prescribing in the elderly Medicare Advantage population. Study Design Cohort study. Methods We compared patient, community, and insurance plan characteristics of 77,247 respondents to the Health Outcomes Survey in 203 Medicare Advantage plans with and without new Medicare Part D claims for high-risk medications from June 2006–May 2007. Results 15.6% of Medicare Advantage enrollees received a new prescription for a high-risk medication during 12 months of follow-up. In adjusted analyses, new users of high-risk medications were more likely to be women (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.28 to 1.42), and they reported poorer general health (Physical Component Summary score 37.3 vs. 40.4, p<0.05) than did individuals who never received a high-risk prescription. Age ≥85 was protective against receipt of a high-risk medication (OR relative to persons 65–69: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.64 to 0.75). Incidence of high-risk prescribing varied by census division, with a two-fold difference between regions with the lowest and highest rates (9% in New England vs. 18% in the West South Central). Muscle relaxants, antihistamines, and opiates accounted for over two-thirds of new dispensings of high-risk medications. Approximately 67% of new users of high-risk medications received only one dispensing. Conclusions High-risk prescribing varies widely by geography and drug class in the Medicare Advantage population. Women, persons with worse self-reported health, and those residing in the southern regions of the US more frequently receive high-risk medications. Variations may highlight areas for targeted interventions to reduce high-risk prescribing among the elderly. PMID:25414985

  7. Improving Early Identification of the High-Risk Elderly Trauma Patient By Emergency Medical Services

    PubMed Central

    Newgard, Craig D.; Holmes, James F.; Haukoos, Jason S.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Staudenmayer, Kristan; Wittwer, Lynn; Stecker, Eric; Dai, Mengtao; Hsia, Renee Y.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective We sought to (1) define the high-risk elderly trauma patient based on prognostic differences associated with different injury patterns and (2) derive alternative field trauma triage guidelines that mesh with national field triage guidelines to improve identification of high-risk elderly patients. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of injured adults ≥ 65 years transported by 94 EMS agencies to 122 hospitals in 7 regions from 1/1/2006 through 12/31/2008. We tracked current field triage practices by EMS, patient demographics, out-of-hospital physiology, procedures and mechanism of injury. Outcomes included Injury Severity Score ≥ 16 and specific anatomic patterns of serious injury using Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥ 3 and surgical interventions. In-hospital mortality was used as a measure of prognosis for different injury patterns. Results 33,298 injured elderly patients were transported by EMS, including 4.5% with ISS ≥ 16, 4.8% with serious brain injury, 3.4% with serious chest injury, 1.6% with serious abdominal-pelvic injury and 29.2% with serious extremity injury. In-hospital mortality ranged from 18.7% (95% CI 16.7–20.7) for ISS ≥ 16 to 2.9% (95% CI 2.6–3.3) for serious extremity injury. The alternative triage guidelines (any positive criterion from the current guidelines, GCS ≤ 14 or abnormal vital signs) outperformed current field triage practices for identifying patients with ISS ≥ 16: sensitivity (92.1% [95% CI 89.6–94.1%] vs. 75.9% [95% CI 72.3–79.2%]), specificity (41.5% [95% CI 40.6–42.4%] vs. 77.8% [95% CI 77.1–78.5%]). Sensitivity decreased for individual injury patterns, but was higher than current triage practices. Conclusions High-risk elderly trauma patients can be defined by ISS ≥ 16 or specific non-extremity injury patterns. The field triage guidelines could be improved to better identify high-risk elderly trauma patients by EMS, with a reduction in triage specificity. PMID:26477345

  8. Improving early identification of the high-risk elderly trauma patient by emergency medical services.

    PubMed

    Newgard, Craig D; Holmes, James F; Haukoos, Jason S; Bulger, Eileen M; Staudenmayer, Kristan; Wittwer, Lynn; Stecker, Eric; Dai, Mengtao; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-01-01

    We sought to (1) define the high-risk elderly trauma patient based on prognostic differences associated with different injury patterns and (2) derive alternative field trauma triage guidelines that mesh with national field triage guidelines to improve identification of high-risk elderly patients. This was a retrospective cohort study of injured adults ≥65 years transported by 94 EMS agencies to 122 hospitals in 7 regions from 1/1/2006 through 12/31/2008. We tracked current field triage practices by EMS, patient demographics, out-of-hospital physiology, procedures and mechanism of injury. Outcomes included Injury Severity Score≥16 and specific anatomic patterns of serious injury using abbreviated injury scale score ≥3 and surgical interventions. In-hospital mortality was used as a measure of prognosis for different injury patterns. 33,298 injured elderly patients were transported by EMS, including 4.5% with ISS≥16, 4.8% with serious brain injury, 3.4% with serious chest injury, 1.6% with serious abdominal-pelvic injury and 29.2% with serious extremity injury. In-hospital mortality ranged from 18.7% (95% CI 16.7-20.7) for ISS≥16 to 2.9% (95% CI 2.6-3.3) for serious extremity injury. The alternative triage guidelines (any positive criterion from the current guidelines, GCS≤14 or abnormal vital signs) outperformed current field triage practices for identifying patients with ISS≥16: sensitivity (92.1% [95% CI 89.6-94.1%] vs. 75.9% [95% CI 72.3-79.2%]), specificity (41.5% [95% CI 40.6-42.4%] vs. 77.8% [95% CI 77.1-78.5%]). Sensitivity decreased for individual injury patterns, but was higher than current triage practices. High-risk elderly trauma patients can be defined by ISS≥16 or specific non-extremity injury patterns. The field triage guidelines could be improved to better identify high-risk elderly trauma patients by EMS, with a reduction in triage specificity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The challenge of individualised risk assessment and therapy planning in elderly high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients.

    PubMed

    Stauder, Reinhard

    2012-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent one of the most frequent and serious haematologic diseases of the elderly. Effective therapies exist ranging from best supportive care to haematologic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Decision making, however, is rather complex in this group of patients because ageing is a multidimensional process involving not only physiological changes but also changes in functional, social, emotional and cognitive capacities. All these factors can have a significant impact on the efficacy and tolerability of a potential therapy and therefore have to be thoroughly assessed before deciding on individual treatment regimens. Risk assessment tools are available both to classify the stage and prognosis of MDS and to meet the needs of elderly patients. A tool explicitly focussing on elderly MDS patients, however, is still missing. The current report approached this issue by combining the well established MDS-risk score 'International Prognostic Scoring System' (IPSS) with the 'Multidimensional Geriatric Assessment' (MGA). As decision making is most complex in high-risk MDS patients, the new algorithm is presented exemplarily for this group of patients. In a first step, MDS-related risk is identified using IPSS, in a second step, patients are assigned to one of three risk categories of the MGA (go-go/fit, slow-go/vulnerable, no-go/frail). While go-go patients might be subjected to therapies comparable to those given to younger patients, in no-go patients, a palliative therapy combined with best supportive care will probably be most appropriate. In slow-go patients, age-related life expectancy taken from public age statistics should be compared to the MDS-related life expectancy. Based on this combined assessment procedure and also on treatment tolerance in terms of the expectations/wishes of the patient and his/her family, an individualised therapeutic approach should be developed. Specific treatment recommendations for these three groups of

  10. A Risk Score to Predict Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in an Elderly Spanish Mediterranean Population at High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Bulló, Mònica; Costa, Bernardo; Martínez-Gonzalez, Miguel Ángel; Ibarrola-Jurado, Núria; Estruch, Ramon; Barrio, Francisco; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To develop and test a diabetes risk score to predict incident diabetes in an elderly Spanish Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. Materials and Methods A diabetes risk score was derived from a subset of 1381 nondiabetic individuals from three centres of the PREDIMED study (derivation sample). Multivariate Cox regression model ß-coefficients were used to weigh each risk factor. PREDIMED-personal Score included body-mass-index, smoking status, family history of type 2 diabetes, alcohol consumption and hypertension as categorical variables; PREDIMED-clinical Score included also high blood glucose. We tested the predictive capability of these scores in the DE-PLAN-CAT cohort (validation sample). The discrimination of Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC), German Diabetes Risk Score (GDRS) and our scores was assessed with the area under curve (AUC). Results The PREDIMED-clinical Score varied from 0 to 14 points. In the subset of the PREDIMED study, 155 individuals developed diabetes during the 4.75-years follow-up. The PREDIMED-clinical score at a cutoff of ≥6 had sensitivity of 72.2%, and specificity of 72.5%, whereas AUC was 0.78. The AUC of the PREDIMED-clinical Score was 0.66 in the validation sample (sensitivity = 85.4%; specificity = 26.6%), and was significantly higher than the FINDRISC and the GDRS in both the derivation and validation samples. Discussion We identified classical risk factors for diabetes and developed the PREDIMED-clinical Score to determine those individuals at high risk of developing diabetes in elderly individuals at high cardiovascular risk. The predictive capability of the PREDIMED-clinical Score was significantly higher than the FINDRISC and GDRS, and also used fewer items in the questionnaire. PMID:22442692

  11. Frailty and polypharmacy in elderly patients are associated with a high readmission risk.

    PubMed

    Rosted, Elizabeth; Schultz, Martin; Sanders, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Many acutely ill elderly people are frail and suffer from polypharmacy. They often present with nonspecific symptoms at hospital admission and are therefore often under-triaged and insufficiently treated resulting in adverse health outcomes. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of polypharmacy and frailty and to identify if frailty and polypharmacy may predict adverse health outcomes in elderly patients who are acutely admitted to hospital. The study was a descriptive cohort study including patients ≥ 65 years acutely admitted to hospital during a 14-day period, n = 250. The included patients were assessed for frailty, and the total number of health problems requiring treatment, geriatric problems and medication were registered. Frail patients suffering from polypharmacy had significantly more health problems, 13-fold longer hospital stays, they were more often discharged to nursing homes and had a five times greater risk of readmission than patients without frailty and polypharmacy. Polypharmacy was present in 62% and hyper-polypharmacy in 20% of the patients, and frailty was present in 85% of the patients with polypharmacy and in 40% of those without polypharmacy. Compared with non-frail patients without polypharmacy, frail elderly patients with polypharmacy belong to a high-risk group and should receive an immediate geriatric assessment and treatment including long-term planning by the Mobile Geriatric Team. none. The study was approved and registered with the Danish Data Protection Agency under the Capital Region of Denmark's joint notification of health research (j. no.: 2007-58-0015, AMH-2013-003, I-Suite no: 02495).

  12. Nutritional risk of European elderly.

    PubMed

    de Morais, C; Oliveira, B; Afonso, C; Lumbers, M; Raats, M; de Almeida, M D V

    2013-11-01

    The elderly constitute a population group with a high prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases and high risk of malnutrition. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated to nutritional risk in free-living European elderly. The sample included 644 European citizens, free living in the community, aged 65 years or more. The sample was quota controlled for age groups (65-74, ≥75 years), gender (male/female) and living circumstances (living alone/with others). Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with nutritional risk. Several variables regarding socio-demographic characteristics, food choice, health status and the satisfaction with food-related life were included in the analysis. According to the recoded score of the 'Determine your nutritional health' (NSI checklist), 53% of the elderly were at nutritional risk. Nutritional risk was more likely to occur in elderly who considered that it was more important to choose foods 'easy to chew'; with lower average number of fruit and vegetables (F&V) intake episodes and lower score for general health. It was also found in non-married participants; those that did not identify changes in their appetite; and those that felt changes in health status. In this sample, the lowest nutritional risk was found for body mass index (BMI) around 18.5 kg/m(2). Country of residence, gender and age were not found to have a significant effect on nutritional risk. Attention should be drawn to the living circumstances, changes in appetite or health, the general heath perception, F&V intake, choice of foods easy to chew and having a low or high BMI.

  13. Development of a standardized language for case management among high-risk elderly.

    PubMed

    Maravilla, Vilma; Graves, Maria T; Newcomer, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Consistency and communication remain key barriers to tracking case management outcomes and developing the best practices. A dictionary of case management problems, goals, interventions, and outcomes was developed to support a prevention-oriented case management program targeted on elderly high-risk patients. Case management featured an annual screening questionnaire, appointment monitoring, disease education, self-management support, and ongoing care coordination. The dictionary resulted in a Standardized Language for Case Management (SLED). This has since been reviewed and modified on the basis of comments and recommendations from 5 leading case management organizations and is aligned with Standards of Practice for Case Management. The article provides a description of the standardized language terms, the rationale underlying the documentation, examples of how this dictionary of definitions can be incorporated into the daily practice of case management, and examples of some of the benefits to the field that can be achieved with the use of a common data-recording system.

  14. Safety and Tolerability of Anthracycline-Containing Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Elderly High-Risk Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Karavasilis, Vasilios; Papadimitriou, Christos; Gogas, Helen; Kouvatseas, George; Pentheroudakis, George; Koutras, Angelos; Christodoulou, Christos; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Samantas, Epaminontas; Pisanidis, Nikolaos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Karanikiotis, Charisios; Kosmidis, Paris; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Dimopoulos, Meletios-Athanassios; Fountzilas, George

    2016-08-01

    Intensive chemotherapy confers benefit to patients with high-risk early breast cancer (BC). We characterized the feasibility and toxicity profile of anthracycline-containing adjuvant chemotherapy (ACAC) in older women with early BC. Available data from women who received ACAC for BC in 3 randomized trials were retrieved. We identified women aged >65 years and we examined differences in tolerability and delivery of chemotherapy, toxicity, and treatment outcome. From a total of 2640 patients, we identified 453 patients (17%) as being >65 years old, 89% of whom had tumors that were node-positive, with 77% who were hormone receptor-positive. At least 90% of the planned doses were delivered in 37% of the elderly, compared with 49% in the younger patients (P < .0001). Grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicity was observed in 32% of elderly patients, compared with 21% of the younger (P < .0001). Febrile neutropenia occurred in 4.5% of the elderly patients, as opposed to 2.0% in the younger patients (P < .002). Elderly patients experienced more frequent Grade 3 and 4 fatigue, mucositis, and sensory neuropathy. Relative dose intensities were significantly lower in elderly patients. Treatment discontinuation was not different in the 2 groups. At a median follow-up of 120 months, competing risks analysis showed a significant benefit in disease-free survival for elderly patients. Elderly BC patients treated with ACAC derive clinical benefit comparable to that in younger patients, mainly at the cost of increased risk of hematological toxicity. This should be taken into account in decision-making and treatment individualization in high-risk BC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Angiotensin II receptor blocker-based therapy in Japanese elderly, high-risk, hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Matsui, Kunihiko; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2012-10-01

    It is unknown whether high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy or angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker combination therapy is better in elderly hypertensive patients with high cardiovascular risk. The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of these treatments in elderly, high-risk Japanese hypertensive patients. The OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-end point study of 1164 hypertensive patients aged 65 to 84 years with type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension during treatment with olmesartan 20 mg/d were randomly assigned to receive 40 mg/d olmesartan (high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker) or a calcium channel blocker + 20 mg/d olmesartan (angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker). The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular events and noncardiovascular death. During a 3-year follow-up, blood pressure was significantly lower in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group than in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group. Mean blood pressure at 36 months was 135.0/74.3 mm Hg in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group and 132.6/72.6 mm Hg in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group. More primary end points occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group than in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group (58 vs 48 events, hazard ratio [HR], 1.31, 95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.92; P=.17). In patients with cardiovascular disease at baseline, more primary events occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group (HR, 1.63, P=.03); in contrast, fewer events were observed in the subgroup without cardiovascular disease (HR, 0.52, P=.14). This treatment-by-subgroup interaction was significant (P=.02). The angiotensin II receptor blocker and

  16. Compound risk of high mortality following osteoporotic fracture and refracture in elderly women and men.

    PubMed

    Bliuc, Dana; Nguyen, Nguyen D; Nguyen, Tuan V; Eisman, John A; Center, Jacqueline R

    2013-11-01

    After fracture there is increased risk of refracture and premature mortality. These outcomes, particularly premature mortality following refracture, have not previously been studied together to understand overall mortality risk. This study examined the long-term cumulative incidence of subsequent fracture and total mortality with mortality calculated as a compound risk and separated according to initial and refracture. Community-dwelling participants aged 60+ years from Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study with incident fractures, followed prospectively for further fractures and deaths from 1989 to 2010. Subsequent fracture and mortality ascertained using cumulative incidence competing risk models allowing four possible outcomes: death without refracture; death following refracture; refracture but alive, and event-free. There were 952 women and 343 men with incident fracture. Within 5 years following initial fracture, 24% women and 20% men refractured; and 26% women and 37% men died without refracture. Of those who refractured, a further 50% of women and 75% of men died, so that total 5-year mortality was 39% in women and 51% in men. Excess mortality was 24% in women and 27% in men. Although mortality following refracture occurred predominantly in the first 5 years post-initial fracture, total mortality (post-initial and refracture) was elevated for 10 years. Most of the 5-year to 10-year excess mortality was associated with refracture. The long-term (>10 years) refracture rate was reduced, particularly in the elderly as a result of their high mortality rate. The 30% alive beyond 10 years postfracture were at low risk of further adverse outcomes. Refractures contribute substantially to overall mortality associated with fracture. The majority of the mortality and refractures occurred in the first 5 years following the initial fracture. However, excess mortality was observed for up to 10 years postfracture, predominantly related to that after refracture. © 2013

  17. Performance of the LACE index to identify elderly patients at high risk for hospital readmission in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Low, Lian Leng; Liu, Nan; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Ng, Eileen Yining; Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Thumboo, Julian; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2017-05-01

    Unplanned readmissions may be avoided by accurate risk prediction and appropriate resources could be allocated to high risk patients. The Length of stay, Acuity of admission, Charlson comorbidity index, Emergency department visits in past six months (LACE) index was developed to predict hospital readmissions in Canada. In this study, we assessed the performance of the LACE index in a Singaporean cohort by identifying elderly patients at high risk of 30-day readmissions. We further investigated the use of additional risk factors in improving readmission prediction performance.Data were extracted from the hospital's electronic health records (EHR) for all elderly patients ≥ 65 years, with alive-discharge episodes from Singapore General Hospital in 2014. In addition to LACE, we also collected patients' data during the index admission, including demographics, medical history, laboratory results, and previous medical utilization.Among the 17,006 patients analyzed, 2051 or 12.1% of them were observed 30-day readmissions. The final predictive model was better than the LACE index in terms of discriminative ability; c-statistic of LACE index and final logistic regression model was 0.595 and 0.628, respectively.The LACE index had poor discriminative ability in identifying elderly patients at high risk of 30-day readmission, even if it was augmented with additional risk factors. Further studies should be conducted to discover additional factors that may enable more accurate and timely identification of patients at elevated risk of readmissions, so that necessary preventive actions can be taken.

  18. Identification of high-risk dementia cohorts in a community sample of Japanese elderly.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Nakamura, Shiori; Iwamoto, Makoto; Tsuno, Norifumi; Shigeta, Masahiro

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple diagnostic procedure for subjects at high risk of developing dementia using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), which is applicable to community-based activities. This study divided 252 community-dwelling elderly with a CDR score of 0.5 into two groups based on the presence or absence of cognitive decline within the previous one year of the baseline, as assessed by a semi-structured interview. One hundred subjects were in the 'previously progressive group' (PP group) and 152 subjects were in the 'previously stable group' (PS group). After 6 years of observation, a total of 111 subjects were assessed in the follow-up investigation. Among the 39 subjects from the PP group (82.9 +/- 6.8 years old, 11 male, 28 female), 34 developed dementia (87%). Among the 72 subjects from the PS group (84.4 +/- 6.0 years old, 22 male, 50 female), 44 developed dementia (61%). The relative risk of developing dementia for the PP group versus the PS group was 1.43. The rate of conversion to dementia was 12.9% per 100 person-years in the PP group, and 9.8% in the PS group. In the PP group, the Mini-Mental State Examination score was significantly lower and the CDR score was significantly higher than in the PS group. Although there have been many attempts to identify subjects with high risk of dementia, this preliminary study suggests that information about temporal changes in cognitive function is useful when performing community-based surveys.

  19. Long-term outcomes of high-risk elderly male patients with multivessel coronary disease: optimal medical therapy versus revascularization.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tao; Wang, Hao; Wang, Shu-Xia; Guo, Yu-Tao; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yu-Tang

    2016-02-01

    Many studies have indicated that medical therapy and percutaneous coronary intervention have similar effects in terms of the long-term prognosis of patients with stable coronary artery disease. This study investigated the effects of optimal medical therapy (OMT) and revascularization-plus-OMT in elderly patients with high-risk angina. In this prospective non-randomized study, 241 consecutive high-risk elderly male patients (65-92 years of age) with angiographically confirmed multivessel disease were enrolled in the registry from January 2004 to April 2005. Of these, 98 patients underwent OMT and 143 underwent revascularization therapy plus OMT. After 6.5 years of follow-up, we found that the rate of long-term cardiac mortality was significantly higher in patients who underwent OMT than in those who underwent revascularization (6.5-year unadjusted mortality rate, 14.3% for OMT vs. 7.0% for revascularization patients; log-rank P = 0.04). However, the overall risks of major adverse cardiac cerebrovascular events (MACCE) were similar among all patients (6.5-year unadjusted mortality rate, 29.6% for OMT vs. 27.3% for revascularization patients; log-rank P = 0.67). OMT was associated with an increase in cardiac death but a similar 6.5-year risk of MACCE compared with revascularization in high-risk elderly male patients with coronary multivessel disease.

  20. Long-term outcomes of high-risk elderly male patients with multivessel coronary disease: optimal medical therapy versus revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Tao; Wang, Hao; Wang, Shu-Xia; Guo, Yu-Tao; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yu-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Background Many studies have indicated that medical therapy and percutaneous coronary intervention have similar effects in terms of the long-term prognosis of patients with stable coronary artery disease. This study investigated the effects of optimal medical therapy (OMT) and revascularization-plus-OMT in elderly patients with high-risk angina. Methods In this prospective non-randomized study, 241 consecutive high-risk elderly male patients (65–92 years of age) with angiographically confirmed multivessel disease were enrolled in the registry from January 2004 to April 2005. Of these, 98 patients underwent OMT and 143 underwent revascularization therapy plus OMT. Results After 6.5 years of follow-up, we found that the rate of long-term cardiac mortality was significantly higher in patients who underwent OMT than in those who underwent revascularization (6.5-year unadjusted mortality rate, 14.3% for OMT vs. 7.0% for revascularization patients; log-rank P = 0.04). However, the overall risks of major adverse cardiac cerebrovascular events (MACCE) were similar among all patients (6.5-year unadjusted mortality rate, 29.6% for OMT vs. 27.3% for revascularization patients; log-rank P = 0.67). Conclusions OMT was associated with an increase in cardiac death but a similar 6.5-year risk of MACCE compared with revascularization in high-risk elderly male patients with coronary multivessel disease. PMID:27168741

  1. Caffeine and cognitive decline in elderly women at high vascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Vercambre, Marie-Noël; Berr, Claudine; Ritchie, Karen; Kang, Jae H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Persons with vascular disorders are at higher risk of cognitive decline. Objective To determine whether caffeine may be associated with cognitive decline reduction in elderly at high vascular risk. Methods We included 2475 women aged 65+ years in the Women’s Antioxidant Cardiovascular Study, a randomized trial of antioxidants and B vitamins for cardiovascular disease secondary prevention. We ascertained regular caffeine intake at baseline (1995–1996) using a validated 116 item-food frequency questionnaire. From 1998–2000 to 2005–2006, we administered four telephone cognitive assessments at two-year intervals evaluating global cognition, verbal memory and category fluency. The primary outcome was the change in global cognitive score, which was the average of the z-scores of all tests. We used generalized linear models for repeated measures that were adjusted for various sociodemographic, health and lifestyle factors to evaluate the difference in cognitive decline rates across quintiles of caffeine intake. Results We observed significantly slower rates of cognitive decline with increasing caffeine intake (p-trend=0.02). The rate difference between the highest and lowest quintiles of usual caffeine intake (> 371 versus < 30 mg/day) was equivalent to that observed between those who were 7 years apart in age (p=0.006). Consumption of caffeinated coffee was significantly related to slower cognitive decline (p-trend=0.05), but not other caffeinated products (e.g., decaf, tea, cola, chocolate). We conducted interaction analyses and observed stronger associations in women assigned to vitamin B supplementation (p-interaction = 0.02). Conclusions Caffeine intake was related to moderately better cognitive maintenance over 5 years in older women with vascular disorders. PMID:23422357

  2. Caffeine and cognitive decline in elderly women at high vascular risk.

    PubMed

    Vercambre, Marie-Noël; Berr, Claudine; Ritchie, Karen; Kang, Jae H

    2013-01-01

    Persons with vascular disorders are at higher risk of cognitive decline. To determine whether caffeine may be associated with cognitive decline reduction in elderly at high vascular risk. We included 2,475 women aged 65+ years in the Women's Antioxidant Cardiovascular Study, a randomized trial of antioxidants and B vitamins for cardiovascular disease secondary prevention. We ascertained regular caffeine intake at baseline (1995-1996) using a validated 116 item-food frequency questionnaire. From 1998-2000 to 2005-2006, we administered four telephone cognitive assessments at two-year intervals evaluating global cognition, verbal memory, and category fluency. The primary outcome was the change in global cognitive score, which was the average of the z-scores of all tests. We used generalized linear models for repeated measures that were adjusted for various sociodemographic, health, and lifestyle factors to evaluate the difference in cognitive decline rates across quintiles of caffeine intake. We observed significantly slower rates of cognitive decline with increasing caffeine intake (p-trend = 0.02). The rate difference between the highest and lowest quintiles of usual caffeine intake (>371 versus <30 mg/day) was equivalent to that observed between those who were 7 years apart in age (p = 0.006). Consumption of caffeinated coffee was significantly related to slower cognitive decline (p-trend = 0.05), but not other caffeinated products (e.g., decaf, tea, cola, chocolate). We conducted interaction analyses and observed stronger associations in women assigned to vitamin B supplementation (p-interaction = 0.02). Caffeine intake was related to moderately better cognitive maintenance over 5 years in older women with vascular disorders.

  3. Obesity Indexes and Total Mortality among Elderly Subjects at High Cardiovascular Risk: The PREDIMED Study

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Miguel A.; García-Arellano, Ana; Toledo, Estefanía; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Bulló, Mónica; Corella, Dolores; Fito, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria; Rekondo, Javier; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Santos-Lozano, Jose Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Martínez, J. Alfredo; Eguaras, Sonia; Sáez-Tormo, Guillermo; Pintó, Xavier; Estruch, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Background Different indexes of regional adiposity have been proposed for identifying persons at higher risk of death. Studies specifically assessing these indexes in large cohorts are scarce. It would also be interesting to know whether a dietary intervention may counterbalance the adverse effects of adiposity on mortality. Methods We assessed the association of four different anthropometric indexes (waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and height) with all-cause mortality in 7447 participants at high cardiovascular risk from the PREDIMED trial. Forty three percent of them were men (55 to 80 years) and 57% were women (60 to 80 years). All of them were initially free of cardiovascular disease. The recruitment took place in 11 recruiting centers between 2003 and 2009. Results After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, intervention group, family history of coronary heart disease, and leisure-time physical activity, WC and WHtR were found to be directly associated with a higher mortality after 4.8 years median follow-up. The multivariable-adjusted HRs for mortality of WHtR (cut-off points: 0.60, 0.65, 0.70) were 1.02 (0.78–1.34), 1.30 (0.97–1.75) and 1.55 (1.06–2.26). When we used WC (cut-off points: 100, 105 and 110 cm), the multivariable adjusted Hazard Ratios (HRs) for mortality were 1.18 (0.88–1.59), 1.02 (0.74–1.41) and 1.57 (1.19–2.08). In all analyses, BMI exhibited weaker associations with mortality than WC or WHtR. The direct association between WHtR and overall mortality was consistent within each of the three intervention arms of the trial. Conclusions Our study adds further support to a stronger association of abdominal obesity than BMI with total mortality among elderly subjects at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We did not find evidence to support that the PREDIMED intervention was able to counterbalance the harmful effects of increased adiposity on total mortality. Trial

  4. Obesity indexes and total mortality among elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk: the PREDIMED study.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Miguel A; García-Arellano, Ana; Toledo, Estefanía; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Bulló, Mónica; Corella, Dolores; Fito, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria; Rekondo, Javier; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Santos-Lozano, Jose Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Martínez, J Alfredo; Eguaras, Sonia; Sáez-Tormo, Guillermo; Pintó, Xavier; Estruch, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Different indexes of regional adiposity have been proposed for identifying persons at higher risk of death. Studies specifically assessing these indexes in large cohorts are scarce. It would also be interesting to know whether a dietary intervention may counterbalance the adverse effects of adiposity on mortality. We assessed the association of four different anthropometric indexes (waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and height) with all-cause mortality in 7447 participants at high cardiovascular risk from the PREDIMED trial. Forty three percent of them were men (55 to 80 years) and 57% were women (60 to 80 years). All of them were initially free of cardiovascular disease. The recruitment took place in 11 recruiting centers between 2003 and 2009. After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, intervention group, family history of coronary heart disease, and leisure-time physical activity, WC and WHtR were found to be directly associated with a higher mortality after 4.8 years median follow-up. The multivariable-adjusted HRs for mortality of WHtR (cut-off points: 0.60, 0.65, 0.70) were 1.02 (0.78-1.34), 1.30 (0.97-1.75) and 1.55 (1.06-2.26). When we used WC (cut-off points: 100, 105 and 110 cm), the multivariable adjusted Hazard Ratios (HRs) for mortality were 1.18 (0.88-1.59), 1.02 (0.74-1.41) and 1.57 (1.19-2.08). In all analyses, BMI exhibited weaker associations with mortality than WC or WHtR. The direct association between WHtR and overall mortality was consistent within each of the three intervention arms of the trial. Our study adds further support to a stronger association of abdominal obesity than BMI with total mortality among elderly subjects at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We did not find evidence to support that the PREDIMED intervention was able to counterbalance the harmful effects of increased adiposity on total mortality. Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN35739639.

  5. Biological correlates of blood pressure variability in elderly at high risk of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Poortvliet, Rosalinde K E; Lloyd, Suzanne M; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; de Craen, Anton J M; Wijsman, Liselotte W; Mooijaart, Simon P; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Jukema, J Wouter; de Ruijter, Wouter; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Stott, David J

    2015-04-01

    Visit-to-visit variability in blood pressure is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease. This study investigates biological correlates of intra-individual variability in blood pressure in older persons. Nested observational study within the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) among 3,794 male and female participants (range 70-82 years) with a history of, or risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Individual visit-to-visit variability in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse pressure (expressed as 1 SD in mm Hg) was assessed using nine measurements over 2 years. Correlates of higher visit-to-visit variability were examined at baseline, including markers of inflammation, endothelial function, renal function and glucose homeostasis. Over the first 2 years, the mean intra-individual variability (1 SD) was 14.4mm Hg for systolic blood pressure, 7.7mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure, and 12.6mm Hg for pulse pressure. After multivariate adjustment a higher level of interleukin-6 at baseline was consistently associated with higher intra-individual variability of blood pressure, including systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure. Markers of endothelial function (Von Willebrand factor, tissue plasminogen activator), renal function (glomerular filtration rate) and glucose homeostasis (blood glucose, homeostatic model assessment index) were not or to a minor extent associated with blood pressure variability. In an elderly population at risk of cardiovascular disease, inflammation (as evidenced by higher levels of interleukin-6) is associated with higher intra-individual variability in systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Physical distress is associated with cardiovascular events in a high risk population of elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Einvik, Gunnar; Ekeberg, Øivind; Klemsdal, Tor O; Sandvik, Leiv; Hjerkinn, Elsa M

    2009-01-01

    Background Self-reported health perceptions such as physical distress and quality of life are suggested independent predictors of mortality and morbidity in patients with established cardiovascular disease. This study examined the associations between these factors and three years incidence of cardiovascular events in a population of elderly men with long term hyperlipidemia. Methods We studied observational data in a cohort of 433 men aged 64–76 years from a prospective, 2 × 2 factorial designed, three-year interventional trial. Information of classical risk factors was obtained and the following questionnaires were administered at baseline: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Physical Symptom Distress Index and Life Satisfaction Index. The occurrence of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular incidences and peripheral arterial disease were registered throughout the study period. Continuous data with skewed distribution was split into tertiles. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated from Cox regression analyses to assess the associations between physical distress, quality of life and cardiovascular events. Results After three years, 49 cardiovascular events were registered, with similar incidence among subjects with and without established cardiovascular disease. In multivariate analyses adjusted for age, smoking, systolic blood pressure, serum glucose, HADS-anxiety and treatment-intervention, physical distress was positively associated (HR 3.1, 95% CI 1.2 – 7.9 for 3rd versus 1st tertile) and quality of life negatively associated (HR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1–5.8 for 3rd versus 1st tertile) with cardiovascular events. The association remained statistically significant only for physical distress (hazard ratio 2.8 95% CI 1.2 – 6.8, p < 0.05) when both variables were evaluated in the same model. Conclusion Physical distress, but not quality of life, was independently associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events in an observational study

  7. Nerve Transfer for Facial Paralysis Under Intravenous Sedation and Local Analgesia for the High Surgical Risk Elderly Patient.

    PubMed

    Rubi, Carlos; Cardenas Mejia, Alexander; Cavadas, Pedro Carlos; Thione, Alessandro; Aramburo Garcia, Rigoberto; Rozen, Shai

    2016-07-01

    This case report describes an 86-year-old woman with complete peripheral right-sided facial paralysis resulting from resection of a cervical lipoma 14 months before surgery. Because of the high anesthetic risk, a masseter to facial nerve transfer was performed under combined light sedation and local anesthetic. Good functional and aesthetic outcomes were noted without complications. To our knowledge, nerve transfers under light sedation and local anesthesia have not been described in the literature and may be useful in elderly patients with significant comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Alternative Medications for Medications in the Use of High-Risk Medications in the Elderly and Potentially Harmful Drug-Disease Interactions in the Elderly Quality Measures.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Joseph T; Semla, Todd P; Schmader, Kenneth E

    2015-12-01

    The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) and the Pharmacy Quality Alliance (PQA) use the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers Criteria to designate the quality measure Use of High-Risk Medications in the Elderly (HRM). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) use the HRM measure to monitor and evaluate the quality of care provided to Medicare beneficiaries. NCQA additionally uses the AGS Beers Criteria to designate the quality measure Potentially Harmful Drug-Disease Interactions in the Elderly. Medications included in these measures may be harmful to elderly adults and negatively affect a healthcare plan's quality ratings. Prescribers, pharmacists, patients, and healthcare plans may benefit from evidence-based alternative medication treatments to avoid these problems. Therefore the goal of this work was to develop a list of alternative medications to those included in the two measures. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review from 2000 to 2015 and a search of their personal files. From the evidence, they prepared a list of drug-therapy alternatives with supporting references. A reference list of nonpharmacological approaches was also provided when appropriate. NCQA, PQA, the 2015 AGS Beers Criteria panel, and the Executive Committee of the AGS reviewed the drug therapy alternatives and nonpharmacological approaches. Recommendations by these groups were incorporated into the final list of alternatives. The final product of drug-therapy alternatives to medications included in the two quality measures and some nonpharmacological resources will be useful to health professionals, consumers, payers, and health systems that care for older adults. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. Alternative Medications for Medications Included in the Use of High-Risk Medications in the Elderly and Potentially Harmful Drug–Disease Interactions in the Elderly Quality Measures

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Joseph T.; Semla, Todd P.; Schmader, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) and the Pharmacy Quality Alliance (PQA) use the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers Criteria to designate the quality measure Use of High-Risk Medications in the Elderly (HRM). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) use the HRM measure to monitor and evaluate the quality of care provided to Medicare beneficiaries. NCQA additionally uses the AGS Beers Criteria to designate the quality measure Potentially Harmful Drug–Disease Interactions in the Elderly. Medications included in these measures may be harmful to elderly adults, negatively affect a health care plan’s quality ratings, and be denied as a health care plan drug benefit. Prescribers, pharmacists, patients, and health care plans may benefit from evidence-based alternative medication treatments to avoid these problems. Therefore the goal of this work was to develop a list of alternative medications to those included in the two measures. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review for 2000 to 2014 and a search of their personal files. From the evidence, they prepared a list of drug-therapy alternatives with supporting references. A reference list of non-pharmacological approaches was also provided when appropriate. NCQA, PQA, the 2015 AGS Beers Criteria panel, and the Executive Committee of the AGS reviewed the drug therapy alternatives and nonpharmacological approaches. Recommendations by these groups were incorporated into the final list of alternatives. The final product of drug-therapy alternatives to medications included in the two quality measures and some nonpharmacological resources will be useful to health professionals, consumers, payers, and health systems that care for older adults. PMID:26447889

  10. [Suicide risk factors among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Pérez Barrero, Sergio Andrés

    2012-08-01

    The author offers a brief overview of suicide risk factors among the elderly such as depression, all manner of abuse of the elderly, as well as medical, psychological and social risk factors, etc. By way of conclusion, a practical guide to evaluate suicide risk among the elderly is provided.

  11. A Theoretically Based Behavioral Nutrition Intervention for Community Elders at High Risk: The B-NICE Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    LOCHER, JULIE L.; BALES, CONNIE W.; ELLIS, AMY C.; LAWRENCE, JEANNINE C.; NEWTON, LAURA; RITCHIE, CHRISTINE S.; ROTH, DAVID L.; BUYS, DAVID L.; VICKERS, KRISTIN S.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a study designed to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a multilevel self-management intervention to improve nutritional intake in a group of older adults receiving Medicare home health services who were at especially high risk for experiencing undernutrition. The Behavioral Nutrition Intervention for Community Elders (B-NICE) trial used a prospective randomized controlled design to determine whether individually tailored counseling focused on social and behavioral aspects of eating resulted in increased caloric intake and improved nutrition-related health outcomes in a high-risk population of older adults. The study was guided by the theoretical approaches of the Ecological Model and Social Cognitive Theory. The development and implementation of the B-NICE protocol, including the theoretical framework, methodology, specific elements of the behavioral intervention, and assurances of the treatment fidelity, as well as the health policy implications of the trial results, are presented in this article. PMID:22098180

  12. A theoretically based Behavioral Nutrition Intervention for Community Elders at high risk: the B-NICE randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Locher, Julie L; Bales, Connie W; Ellis, Amy C; Lawrence, Jeannine C; Newton, Laura; Ritchie, Christine S; Roth, David L; Buys, David L; Vickers, Kristin S

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a study designed to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a multilevel self-management intervention to improve nutritional intake in a group of older adults receiving Medicare home health services who were at especially high risk for experiencing undernutrition. The Behavioral Nutrition Intervention for Community Elders (B-NICE) trial used a prospective randomized controlled design to determine whether individually tailored counseling focused on social and behavioral aspects of eating resulted in increased caloric intake and improved nutrition-related health outcomes in a high-risk population of older adults. The study was guided by the theoretical approaches of the Ecological Model and Social Cognitive Theory. The development and implementation of the B-NICE protocol, including the theoretical framework, methodology, specific elements of the behavioral intervention, and assurances of the treatment fidelity, as well as the health policy implications of the trial results, are presented in this article.

  13. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a revolution in the therapy of elderly and high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Teoman; Yilmaz, Irem

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) represents a real revolution in the field of interventional cardiology for the treatment of elderly or high-risk surgical patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Today, TAVI seems to play a key and a reliable role in the treatment of intermediate and maybe low-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. TAVI has also evolved from a complex and hazardous procedure into an effective and safe therapy by the development of new generation devices. This article aims to review the background and future of TAVI, clinical trials and registries with old and new generation TAVI devices and to focus on some open issues related to post-procedural outcomes. PMID:28408919

  14. Elderly patients are at high risk of night-time admission to the intensive care unit following a rapid response team call.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, K; Flabouris, A; Thompson, C; Seppelt, I

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that elderly patients (age ≥65 years) are less likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit following a rapid response team call and have high hospital mortality rates. This study has shown that elderly patients have a significantly higher probability of being admitted to an intensive care unit following a rapid response team call at night than during the day. However, at no time are they at greater risk than younger patients of incomplete vital sign recording, a failure to escalate care for acute deterioration or mortality.

  15. A risk profile for identifying community-dwelling elderly with a high risk of recurrent falling: results of a 3-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Pluijm, S M F; Smit, J H; Tromp, E A M; Stel, V S; Deeg, D J H; Bouter, L M; Lips, P

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the prospective study reported here was to develop a risk profile that can be used to identify community-dwelling elderly at a high risk of recurrent falling. The study was designed as a 3-year prospective cohort study. A total of 1365 community-dwelling persons, aged 65 years and older, of the population-based Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam participated in the study. During an interview in 1995/1996, physical, cognitive, emotional and social aspects of functioning were assessed. A follow-up on the number of falls and fractures was conducted during a 3-year period using fall calendars that participants filled out weekly. Recurrent fallers were identified as those who fell at least twice within a 6-month period during the 3-year follow-up. The incidence of recurrent falls at the 3-year follow-up point was 24.9% in women and 24.4% in men. Of the respondents, 5.5% reported a total of 87 fractures that resulted from a fall, including 20 hip fractures, 21 wrist fractures and seven humerus fractures. Recurrent fallers were more prone to have a fall-related fracture than those who were not defined as recurrent fallers (11.9% vs. 3.4%; OR: 3.8; 95% CI: 2.3-6.1). Backward logistic regression analysis identified the following predictors in the risk profile for recurrent falling: two or more previous falls, dizziness, functional limitations, weak grip strength, low body weight, fear of falling, the presence of dogs/cats in the household, a high educational level, drinking 18 or more alcoholic consumptions per week and two interaction terms (high education x 18 or more alcohol consumptions per week and two or more previous falls x fear of falling) (AUC=0.71). At a cut-off point of 5 on the total risk score (range 0-30), the model predicted recurrent falling with a sensitivity of 59% and a specificity of 71%. At a cut-off point of 10, the sensitivity and specificity were 31% and 92%, respectively. A risk profile including nine predictors that can easily be

  16. Low all-cause mortality despite high cardiovascular risk in elderly Greek-born Australians: attenuating potential of diet?

    PubMed

    Kouris-Blazos, Antigone; Itsiopoulos, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Elderly Greek-born Australians (GA) consistently show lower rates of all-cause and CVD mortality compared with Australian-born. Paradoxically, however, this is in spite of a higher prevalence of CVD risk factors. This paper reviews the findings from the Food Habits in Later Life (FHILL) study, other studies on Greek migrants to Australia and clinical studies investigating dietary mechanisms which may explain the "morbidity mortality paradox". The FHILL study collected data between 1988 and 1991 on diet, health and psycho-social variables on 818 people aged 70 and over from Sweden, Greece, Australia (Greeks and Anglo-Celts), Japan and were followed up for 5-7 years to determine survival status. The FHILL study was the first to develop a score which captured the key features of a traditional plant-based Mediterranean diet pattern (MDPS). A higher score improved overall survival in both Greek and non-Greek elderly reducing the risk of death by 50% after 5-7 years. Of the 5 cohorts studied, elderly GA had the lowest risk of death, even though they had the highest rates of obesity and other CVD risk factors (developed in the early years of migration with the introduction of energy dense foods). GA appeared to be "getting away" with these CVD risk factors because of their continued adherence in old age to a Mediterranean diet, especially legumes. We propose that the Mediterranean diet may, in part, be operating to reduce the risk of death and attenuate established CVD risk factors in GA by beneficially altering the gut microbiome and its metabolites.

  17. Applying PRIM (Patient Rule Induction Method) and logistic regression for selecting high-risk subgroups in very elderly ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Nannings, Barry; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; de Jonge, Evert

    2008-04-01

    To apply the Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) to identify very elderly Intensive Care (IC) patients at high risk of mortality, and compare the results with those of a conventional logistic regression model. A database containing all 12,993 consecutive admissions of patients aged at least 80 between January 1997 and October 2005 from intensive care units (n=33) of mixed type taking part in the National Intensive Care Evaluation (NICE) registry. Demographic, diagnostic, physiologic, laboratory, discharge and prognostic score data were collected. After application of the SAPS II inclusion criteria 6617 patients remained. In these data we searched PRIM subgroups requiring at least 85% mortality and coverage of at least 3% of the patients. Equally sized subgroups were derived from a recalibrated (second level customization) Simplified Acute Physiology Score II model, where new coefficients were fitted. Subgroups were compared on an independent validation set using the positive predictive value (PPV), here equaling the subgroup mortality. We identified four subgroups with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 92%, 90%, 87% and 87%, covering, respectively, 3%, 3.5%, 7% and 10% of the patients in the validation set. Urine production, lowest pH, lowest systolic blood pressure, mechanical ventilation, all measured within 24 h after admission, and admission type and Glasgow Coma Score were used to define these subgroups. SAPS and PRIM subgroups had equal PPVs. PRIM successfully identified high-risk subgroups. The subgroups compare in performance to SAPS II, but require less data to collect, result in more homogenous groups and are likely to be more useful for decision makers.

  18. The Impacts of Early Hip Surgery in High-Risk Elderly Taking Antithrombotic Agents and Afflicted with Intertrochanteric Fracture.

    PubMed

    Kulachote, Noratep; Sa-Ngasoongsong, Paphon; Sirisreetreerux, Norachart; Wongsak, Siwadol; Suphachatwong, Chanyut; Wajanavisit, Wiwat; Kawinwonggowit, Viroj

    2015-09-01

    To compare the outcome of early hip surgery in intertrochanteric fracture between high surgical risk patients receiving antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs and those who did not. Retrospective study. One hundred and four elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture and having American Society of Anesthesiologist grade III-IV who underwent early hip surgery (within 72 hours after admission) with proximalfemoral nail anti-rotation (PFNA), were recruited and allocated into two group: antiplatelet and anticoagulant (AA-AC) group (n = 65), and no drug group (n = 39). Perioperative and postoperative outcomes were recorded and analyzed. The mean age was 81?8 years. The overall 1-year mortality was 6.7% (7 patients: 5 AA-AC group, and 2 no drug group, p = 0.7). Intra-operative blood loss in AA-AC group and No drug group were 87 ± 70 and 91 ± 65 ml, respectively (p = 0.74). There was no significant difference in blood transfusion, postoperative complications, and 1-year ambulatory status between both groups (p > 0.05 all). However, AA-AC group showed significant longer in duration of hospital stay compared with no drug group (p = 0.02). Early hip fracture surgery with PFNA in patients who received antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications is safe and does not significantly increase perioperative blood loss, blood transfusion, and postoperative mortality and morbidity.

  19. Cortical Modulation of Motor Control Biofeedback among the Elderly with High Fall Risk during a Posture Perturbation Task with Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Tsui-Fen; Yang, Sai-Wei; Chern, Jen-Suh

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex provides sensorimotor integration and coordination during motor control of daily functional activities. Power spectrum density based on electroencephalography (EEG) has been employed as an approach that allows an investigation of the spatial-temporal characteristics of neuromuscular modulation; however, the biofeedback mechanism associated with cortical activation during motor control remains unclear among elderly individuals. Thirty one community-dwelling elderly participants were divided into low fall-risk potential (LF) and high fall-risk potential (HF) groups based upon the results obtained from a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the ellipse area of the center of pressure. Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed while the participants stood on a 6-degree-of-freedom Stewart platform, which generated continuous perturbations and done either with or without the virtual reality scene. The present study showed that when there was visual stimulation and poor somatosensory coordination, a higher level of cortical response was activated in order to keep postural balance. The elderly participants in the LF group demonstrated a significant and strong correlation between postural-related cortical regions; however, the elderly individuals in the HF group did not show such a relationship. Moreover, we were able to clarify the roles of various brainwave bands functioning in motor control. Specifically, the gamma and beta bands in the parietal-occipital region facilitate the high-level cortical modulation and sensorimotor integration, whereas the theta band in the frontal-central region is responsible for mediating error detection during perceptual motor tasks. Finally, the alpha band is associated with processing visual challenges in the occipital lobe.With a variety of motor control demands, increment in brainwave band coordination is required to maintain postural stability. These investigations shed light on the cortical modulation of

  20. Cortical Modulation of Motor Control Biofeedback among the Elderly with High Fall Risk during a Posture Perturbation Task with Augmented Reality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Tsui-Fen; Yang, Sai-Wei; Chern, Jen-Suh

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex provides sensorimotor integration and coordination during motor control of daily functional activities. Power spectrum density based on electroencephalography (EEG) has been employed as an approach that allows an investigation of the spatial–temporal characteristics of neuromuscular modulation; however, the biofeedback mechanism associated with cortical activation during motor control remains unclear among elderly individuals. Thirty one community-dwelling elderly participants were divided into low fall-risk potential (LF) and high fall-risk potential (HF) groups based upon the results obtained from a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the ellipse area of the center of pressure. Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed while the participants stood on a 6-degree-of-freedom Stewart platform, which generated continuous perturbations and done either with or without the virtual reality scene. The present study showed that when there was visual stimulation and poor somatosensory coordination, a higher level of cortical response was activated in order to keep postural balance. The elderly participants in the LF group demonstrated a significant and strong correlation between postural-related cortical regions; however, the elderly individuals in the HF group did not show such a relationship. Moreover, we were able to clarify the roles of various brainwave bands functioning in motor control. Specifically, the gamma and beta bands in the parietal–occipital region facilitate the high-level cortical modulation and sensorimotor integration, whereas the theta band in the frontal–central region is responsible for mediating error detection during perceptual motor tasks. Finally, the alpha band is associated with processing visual challenges in the occipital lobe.With a variety of motor control demands, increment in brainwave band coordination is required to maintain postural stability. These investigations shed light on the cortical modulation

  1. Safety and efficacy of azacitidine in elderly patients with intermediate to high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Navada, Shyamala C.; Silverman, Lewis R.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by morphologic features of dyspoiesis, a hyperproliferative bone marrow, and one or more peripheral blood cytopenias. In patients classified according to the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (R-IPSS) with intermediate or higher-risk disease, there is an increased risk of death due to progressive bone marrow failure or transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Azacitidine was the first DNA hypomethylating agent approved by the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of MDS and the only therapy that has demonstrated a significant survival benefit over conventional care regimens (CCRs) in patients with intermediate or higher-risk disease. Prolonged survival is independent of achieving a complete remission. Azacitidine has been used in older patients with both clinical and hematological improvement as well as an acceptable side effect profile. The most common adverse effect is myelosuppression. These findings support the use of azacitidine as an effective treatment in older patients with higher-risk MDS. PMID:28042456

  2. High risk of early periprosthetic fractures after primary hip arthroplasty in elderly patients using a cemented, tapered, polished stem

    PubMed Central

    Brodén, Cyrus; Mukka, Sebastian; Muren, Olle; Eisler, Thomas; Boden, Henrik; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Postoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture (PPF) after hip arthroplasty is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We assessed the incidence and characteristics of periprosthetic fractures in a consecutive cohort of elderly patients treated with a cemented, collarless, polished and tapered femoral stem (CPT). Patients and methods In this single-center prospective cohort study, we included 1,403 hips in 1,357 patients (mean age 82 (range 52–102) years, 72% women) with primary osteoarthritis (OA) or a femoral neck fracture (FNF) as indication for surgery (367 hips and 1,036 hips, respectively). 64% of patients were ASA class 3 or 4. Hip-related complications and need for repeat surgery were assessed at a mean follow-up time of 4 (1–7) years. A Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate risk factors associated with PPF. Results 47 hips (3.3%) sustained a periprosthetic fracture at median 7 (2–79) months postoperatively; 41 were comminute Vancouver B2 or complex C-type fractures. The fracture rate was 3.8% for FNF patients and 2.2% for OA patients (hazard ratio (HR) = 4; 95% CI: 1.3–12). Patients > 80 years of age also had a higher risk of fracture (HR = 2; 95% CI: 1.1–4.5). Interpretation We found a high incidence of early PPF associated with the CPT stem in this old and frail patient group. A possible explanation may be that the polished tapered stem acts as a wedge, splitting the femur after a direct hip contusion. Our results should be confirmed in larger, registry-based studies, but we advise caution when using this stem for this particular patient group. PMID:25280133

  3. Iatrogenic disease in the elderly: risk factors, consequences, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Permpongkosol, Sompol

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of iatrogenic disease in the elderly has not been extensively reported. Risk factors of iatrogenic disease in the elderly are drug-induced iatrogenic disease, multiple chronic diseases, multiple physicians, hospitalization, and medical or surgical procedures. Iatrogenic disease can have a great psychomotor impact and important social consequences. To identify patients at high risk is the first step in prevention as most of the iatrogenic diseases are preventable. Interventions that can prevent iatrogenic complications include specific interventions, the use of a geriatric interdisciplinary team, pharmacist consultation and acute care for the elderly units. PMID:21472095

  4. Evaluation of a Japanese "Prevention of long-term care" project for the improvement in oral function in the high-risk elderly.

    PubMed

    Sakayori, Takaharu; Maki, Yoshinobu; Hirata, Soichiro; Okada, Mahito; Ishii, Takuo

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the improvement in oral function and environment in high-risk elderly persons participating in a program to improve oral function organized by their local government. Participants comprised 36 high-risk elderly and the mean age was 77.11 ± 7.24 years. The program involved training sessions carried out five or six times every 2-3 weeks for 3 months. Oral function and environment was evaluated before and after the program. The research period extended from 2008 to 2010. The effects of intervention were clearly observed in oral diadochokinesis score in the high-risk elderly. Persons with a lower repetitive saliva swallowing test (RSST) and oral diadochokinesis score before intervention showed a tendency toward even greater improvement. No significant changes were observed in saliva secretion or total amounts of Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacilli, Candida or total microorganisms. The effects of intervention were clearly recognized in regards to oral diadochokinesis. Improvement in RSST and oral diadochokinesis scores was marked in those persons showing a lower number of articulations before intervention. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Higher prevalence of elevated LDL-C than non-HDL-C and low statin treatment rate in elderly community-dwelling Chinese with high cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Kuang, YaShu; Li, Xiaolin; Chen, Xiaoli; Sun, Huimin; Tomlinson, Brian; Chan, Paul; Zheng, Liang; Pi, Jinjiang; Peng, Sheng; Wu, Hong; Ding, Xugang; Qian, Dingguang; Shen, Yixin; Yu, Zuoren; Fan, Lieying; Chen, Ming; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; Zhang, Yuzhen

    2016-09-30

    Lipid levels are increasing in all age groups in the Chinese population, but the use of statin treatment in the elderly is not well documented. We examined serum lipids, statin usage and achievement of lipid goals in 3950 subjects aged ≥65 years. Established CVD was present in 7.77% of participants and increased CVD risk was common. Elevated LDL-C according to CVD risk level was present in 46.70% of all subjects and was more frequent (p < 0.01) than elevated non-HDL-C at 32.58%. With increasing age, LDL-C was unchanged but triglycerides and non-HDL-C decreased and HDL-C increased. Individuals at moderate risk for CVD had higher TC, LDL-C, and non-HDL-C than low-risk subjects, but the values were lower in high- and very-high-risk individuals, probably because of the use of statin which was 28.57% in high-risk subjects with established CVD and 37.60% in very-high-risk individuals, but only 2.62% in those with estimated high-risk and 3.75% in those with high-risk from diabetes. More subjects in each risk group reached the non-HDL-C goal than the LDL-C goal because of the relatively low triglycerides and VLDL-C levels. These findings demonstrate a high prevalence of elevated LDL-C but low rate of statin treatment in elderly community-dwelling Chinese.

  6. Higher prevalence of elevated LDL-C than non-HDL-C and low statin treatment rate in elderly community-dwelling Chinese with high cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, YaShu; Li, Xiaolin; Chen, Xiaoli; Sun, Huimin; Tomlinson, Brian; Chan, Paul; Zheng, Liang; Pi, Jinjiang; Peng, Sheng; Wu, Hong; Ding, Xugang; Qian, Dingguang; Shen, Yixin; Yu, Zuoren; Fan, Lieying; Chen, Ming; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; Zhang, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Lipid levels are increasing in all age groups in the Chinese population, but the use of statin treatment in the elderly is not well documented. We examined serum lipids, statin usage and achievement of lipid goals in 3950 subjects aged ≥65 years. Established CVD was present in 7.77% of participants and increased CVD risk was common. Elevated LDL-C according to CVD risk level was present in 46.70% of all subjects and was more frequent (p < 0.01) than elevated non-HDL-C at 32.58%. With increasing age, LDL-C was unchanged but triglycerides and non-HDL-C decreased and HDL-C increased. Individuals at moderate risk for CVD had higher TC, LDL-C, and non-HDL-C than low-risk subjects, but the values were lower in high- and very-high-risk individuals, probably because of the use of statin which was 28.57% in high-risk subjects with established CVD and 37.60% in very-high-risk individuals, but only 2.62% in those with estimated high-risk and 3.75% in those with high-risk from diabetes. More subjects in each risk group reached the non-HDL-C goal than the LDL-C goal because of the relatively low triglycerides and VLDL-C levels. These findings demonstrate a high prevalence of elevated LDL-C but low rate of statin treatment in elderly community-dwelling Chinese. PMID:27686151

  7. Rationale, study design and implementation of the COLM study: the combination of OLMesartan and calcium channel blocker or diuretic in high-risk elderly hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Toshio; Saruta, Takao; Rakugi, Hiromi; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Ito, Sadayoshi; Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Takishita, Shuichi; Higaki, Jitsuo; Katayama, Shigehiro; Saito, Ikuo; Shimada, Kazuyuki

    2009-02-01

    The COLM study is an investigator-initiated trial comparing the combination therapy using an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), olmesartan, and a calcium channel blocker (CCB) with that using an ARB and a diuretic in high-risk elderly hypertensive patients. Here we describe the rationale and study design. Olmesartan was administered concomitantly with a long-acting dihydropyridine CCB (ARB/CCB group) or with a low-dose diuretic (ARB/diuretic group) to elderly hypertensive patients with a history of or risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as a primary end point were compared between the two groups, with the target blood pressure (BP) being <140 mm Hg for systolic BP and <90 mm Hg for diastolic BP. Safety and tolerability will also be investigated. A total of more than 4000 patients were recruited and will be followed up for at least 3 years.

  8. Walking speed and high blood pressure mortality risk in a Spanish elderly population.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Misis, A; Sánchez-Santos, M T; Banegas, J R; Castell, M V; González-Montalvo, J I; Otero, A

    2015-09-01

    This study analyzed the relationship between blood pressure and all-cause mortality according to objectively measured walking speed in a Mediterranean population-based sample of older persons. We used data from the longitudinal 'Peñagrande' Cohort Study, initiated in 2008 in a sex- and age-stratified random sample of 1250 people aged ⩾65 years living in Madrid (Spain). A total of 814 individuals participated in the first study wave. The average of two standardized blood pressure readings was used. Walking speed was measured over a 3-m walk and classified as faster (⩾0.8 m s(-1)) or slower. A total of 314 individuals were slower walkers, 475 were faster walkers and 25 did not complete the walk test. Cox proportional hazards models stratified by walking speed were used to assess the association between blood pressure and all-cause death. Non-linear relationship between BP and mortality was explored by a restricted cubic spline analysis. There were 171 deaths from study entry through 31 March 2013. Systolic blood pressure <140 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure <90 mmHg were associated with higher mortality than blood pressure values above 140 and 90 mm Hg, respectively, but this association reached statistical significance only for systolic blood pressure and only in the slower walkers. In conclusion, systolic blood pressure levels <140 mm Hg were found associated with higher risk of total mortality among slower walkers in an old Spaniard population cohort.

  9. High serum interleukin-6 level is associated with increased risk of delirium in elderly patients after noncardiac surgery: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Li, Ya-wei; Wang, Xiao-shan; Zou, Xi; Zhang, Da-zhi; Wang, Dong-xin; Li, Shi-zhong

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between inflammation and delirium remains to be determined. The purposes of this study were to investigate the association between serum interleukin-6 levels and the occurrence of delirium in elderly patients after major noncardiac surgery. A total of 338 elderly patients (60 years of age and over) undergoing major noncardiac surgery were enrolled. Blood samples were obtained before anesthesia and in the first postoperative morning and serum interleukin-6 concentrations were measured. Delirium was assessed twice daily by the confusion assessment method for the Intensive Care Unit during the first three postoperative days. Survival analyses were performed to assess the relationship between the serum IL-6 level and the occurrence of postoperative delirium. Postoperative delirium occurred in 14.8% (50 of 338) of patients. High serum interleukin-6 levelsafter surgery were significantly associated with increased risk of the occurrence of postoperative delirium (hazard ratio 1.514, 95% confidence interval 1.155-1.985, P = 0.003). Other independent predictors of delirium included increasing age, poor preoperative New York Heart Association classification, low preoperative Mini-Mental State Examination score, and high total postoperative Visual Analogue Scale pain score. Patients who developed delirium had a prolonged hospital stay after surgery. Delirium is a frequent complication in elderly patients after noncardiac surgery. High serum interleukin-6 level after surgery is associated with increased risk of the occurrence of postoperative delirium.

  10. Analysis of dysphagia risk using the modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The elderly are susceptible to dysphagia, and complications can be minimized if high-risk groups are screened in early stages and properly rehabilitated. This study provides basic material for the early detection and prevention of dysphagia by investigating the risks of dysphagia and related factors in community-dwelling elders. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 325 community-dwelling elderly people aged 65 or older. The modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly was used to assess dysphagia risk. [Results] Approximately 52.6% (n=171) of participants belonged to the high-risk group for dysphagia. After adjusting for confounding variables, people aged 75+, who used dentures, and who needed partial help in daily living had a significantly higher risk of dysphagia. [Conclusion] It is necessary to develop guidelines for dysphagia for early detection and rehabilitation. PMID:27799680

  11. Association of Higher Levels of High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Elderly Individuals and Lower Risk of Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane; Tang, Ming-Xin; Schupf, Nicole; Manly, Jennifer J.; Mayeux, Richard; Luchsinger, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To reexamine the association of lipid levels with Alzheimer disease (AD) using Cox proportional hazards models. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Northern Manhattan, New York. Participants One thousand one hundred thirty elderly individuals free of cognitive impairment at baseline. Main Outcome Measure High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Results Higher levels of HDL-C (>55 mg/dL) were associated with a decreased risk of both probable and possible AD and probable AD compared with lower HDL-C levels (hazard ratio, 0.4; 95% confidence interval, 0.2–0.9; P=.03 and hazard ratio, 0.4; 95% confidence interval, 0.2–0.9; P=.03). In addition, higher levels of total and non–HDL-C were associated with a decreased risk of AD in analyses adjusting for age, sex, education, ethnic group, and APOEe4 genotype. Conclusion High HDL-C levels in elderly individuals may be associated with a decreased risk of AD. PMID:21149810

  12. Differential effectiveness of ARB plus CCB therapy and high-dose ARB therapy in high-risk elderly hypertensive patients: subanalysis of the OSCAR study.

    PubMed

    Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Ogawa, Hisao; Matsui, Kunihiko; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2015-03-01

    The OSCAR study was a multicenter prospective randomized study that examined the relative benefit of combined ARB (olmesartan 20 mg per day) plus calcium channel blocker (CCB) therapy vs. high-dose ARB monotherapy (olmesartan 40 mg per day) for prevention of cardiovascular events in elderly Japanese hypertensive patients. The present subanalysis of patients enrolled in the OSCAR study (n = 1078) was performed to assess whether baseline eGFR coupled with cardiovascular disease (CVD) could predict the relative benefit of these two treatments. Patients with baseline CVD (n = 769) and patients without baseline CVD (n = 309) were divided into two groups based on baseline eGFR; (i) patients with eGFR of < 60 ml min(-1) 1.73 m(-)(2) and (ii) those with eGFR of ⩾ 60 ml min(-1) 1.73 m(-2). There was a significant treatment-subgroup interaction among these four subgroups in relation to the incidence of primary outcome events(P = 0.007 for interaction). In patients with CVD and with eGFR of <60 ml min(-1) 1.73 m(-2), ARB plus CCB therapy was associated with a lower incidence of primary events than high-dose ARB therapy and the difference of the relative risk was statistically significant (hazard ratio: 3.525, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.676-7.412, P < 0.001). The greater benefit of ARB plus CCB therapy vs. high-dose ARB therapy in this subgroup was associated with less visit-to-visit variability of systolic BP and diastolic BP. In conclusion, baseline eGFR coupled with baseline CVD seems to be a predictor of the relative efficacy of ARB plus CCB therapy vs. high-dose ARB therapy in the elderly hypertensive patients. ARB plus CCB therapy appears to be superior to high-dose ARB therapy for preventing cardiovascular events in the patients with CVD and with eGFR of <60 ml min(-1) 1.73 m(-2).

  13. Eliciting change in at-risk elders (ECARE): evaluation of an elder abuse intervention program.

    PubMed

    Mariam, Lydia Morris; McClure, Regina; Robinson, J B; Yang, Janet A

    2015-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effectiveness of a community-based elder abuse intervention program that assists suspected victims of elder abuse and self-neglect through a partnership with local law enforcement. This program, Eliciting Change in At-Risk Elders, involves building alliances with the elder and family members, connecting the elder to supportive services that reduce risk of further abuse, and utilizing motivational interviewing-type skills to help elders overcome ambivalence regarding making difficult life changes. Risk factors of elder abuse decreased over the course of the intervention and nearly three-quarters of participants made progress on their treatment goal, advancing at least one of Prochaska and DiClemente's (1983) stages of change (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance). Forty-three percent of elders moved into the stages of action and maintenance regarding their goal. The usefulness of eliciting change via longer-term relationships with vulnerable elders in entrenched elder abuse situations is discussed.

  14. Serum antibody response to respiratory syncytial virus F and N proteins in two populations at high risk of infection: children and elderly.

    PubMed

    Sastre, P; Cusi, M G; Manoha, C; Schildgen, O; Ruiz, T; Vela, C; Rueda, P

    2010-09-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the main viral cause of severe respiratory infections in children and a common cause of morbidity in the elderly. The nucleocapsid (N) and fusion (F) proteins of hRSV were expressed in insect cells and used as antigens in two independent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to measure the serum antibody response in two populations at high risk of hRSV infection, children and the elderly. Fifty-seven serum specimens from children aged from 1 to 10 years old and 91 sera from adults over 60 years old were tested. The ELISA results were compared with those obtained by an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) based on hRSV-infected cells, which was considered as the reference technique. Sensitivity and specificity were 94% and 85% for the N-ELISA and 86% and 81% for the F-ELISA, respectively. When the immune responses of the two groups of individuals were compared, it appeared that almost 100% of the elderly had antibodies against the N or F protein whereas only 50% of the sera from children had antibodies against either of the two viral proteins. In conclusion, the F and N ELISAs can be used successfully for detecting a specific antibody response to hRSV. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Management and risk factor control of coronary artery disease in elderly versus nonelderly: a multicenter registry.

    PubMed

    Phrommintikul, Arintaya; Krittayaphong, Rungroj; Wongcharoen, Wanwarang; Boonyaratavej, Smonporn; Wongvipaporn, Chaiyasith; Tiyanon, Woraporn; Dinchuthai, Pakaphan; Kunjara-Na-Ayudhya, Rapeephon; Tatsanavivat, Pyatat; Sritara, Piyamitr

    2016-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death in elderly because aging is the important non-modifiable risk factors of atherosclerosis and also a predictor of poor outcomes. Underuse of guideline directed therapy may contribute to suboptimal risk factor control and worse outcomes in the elderly. We aimed to explore the management of CAD, risk factors control as well as goal attainment in elderly compared to nonelderly CAD patients. The CORE-Thailand is an ongoing multicenter, prospective, observational registry of patients with high atherosclerotic risk in Thailand. The data of 4120 CAD patients enrolled in this cohort was analyzed comparing between the elderly (age ≥ 65 years) vs. nonelderly (age < 65 years). There were 2172 elderly and 1948 nonelderly patients. The elderly CAD patients had higher prevalence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease. The proportion of patients who received coronary revascularization was not different between the elderly and nonelderly CAD patients. Antiplatelets were prescribed less in the elderly while statin was prescribed in the similar proportion. Goal attainments of risk factor control of glycemic control, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smoking cessation except the blood pressure goal were higher in the elderly CAD patients. The CORE-Thailand registry showed the equity in the treatment of CAD between elderly and non-elderly. Elderly CAD patients had higher rate of goal attainment in risk factor control except blood pressure goal. The effects of goal attainment on cardiovascular outcomes will be demonstrated from ongoing cohort.

  16. Aliskiren/amlodipine as a single-pill combination in hypertensive patients: subgroup analysis of elderly patients, with metabolic risk factors or high body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Axthelm, Christoph; Sieder, Christian; Meister, Franziska; Pittrow, David; Kaiser, Edelgard

    2013-01-01

    Aims Blood pressure (BP) reduction in hypertensive patients is more difficult to achieve in the elderly or in the presence of comorbidities. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of the single-pill combination (SPC) aliskiren/amlodipine in hypertensive elderly patients, patients with high body mass index (BMI), with at least one metabolic risk factor, and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods In an open-label non-randomized study, patients not adequately controlled by previous treatment with the SPC olmesarten 40/amlodipine 10 (phase 1) were switched to the SPC aliskiren 300/amlodipine 10 (phase 2). The present post-hoc analysis investigated BP reduction in phase 2 in the named subgroups. The EudraCT identifier was 2009-016693-33, ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01113047. Results Of the 187 patients not adequately controlled in phase 1 and thus treated with the SPC aliskiren 300/amlodipine 10 in phase 2, 69 were of advanced age (≥65 years), 74 or 89 were overweight or obese (BMI 25.0–29.9 kg/m2 or ≥30 kg/m2, respectively), 91 had metabolic risk factors (without DM) and 41 had DM. At the beginning of phase 2, depending on the subgroup, baseline SBP was 168–169 mmHg and DBP 103–104 mmHg. After 4 weeks of treatment with aliskiren 300/amlodipine 10, SBP/DBP was lowered by −5.1/−4.8 mmHg in the total cohort, by −5.5/−5.1 mmHg in elderly patients, by −6.7/−5.5 in overweight and by −4.2/−4.5 mmHg in obese patients, by −6.4/−4.7 mmHg in patients with metabolic risk factors without DM, and by −3.3/−5.0 mmHg in DM patients. Limitations include low sample size, limited treatment duration and the fact that the post-hoc defined groups were not mutually exclusive. Conclusions In this study reflecting clinical practice, the aliskiren/amlodipine combination achieved effective BP reduction in elderly patients or with metabolic comorbidities, including DM that might be more difficult to treat. This consistent BP lowering

  17. Comparison of Wells and Revised Geneva Rule to Assess Pretest Probability of Pulmonary Embolism in High-Risk Hospitalized Elderly Adults.

    PubMed

    Di Marca, Salvatore; Cilia, Chiara; Campagna, Andrea; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Abd ElHafeez, Samar; Tripepi, Giovanni; Puccia, Giuseppe; Pisano, Marcella; Mastrosimone, Gianluca; Terranova, Valentina; Cardella, Antonella; Buonacera, Agata; Stancanelli, Benedetta; Zoccali, Carmine; Malatino, Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    To assess and compare the diagnostic power for pulmonary embolism (PE) of Wells and revised Geneva scores in two independent cohorts (training and validation groups) of elderly adults hospitalized in a non-emergency department. Prospective clinical study, January 2011 to January 2013. Unit of Internal Medicine inpatients, University of Catania, Italy. Elderly adults (mean age 76 ± 12), presenting with dyspnea or chest pain and with high clinical probability of PE or D-dimer values greater than 500 ng/mL (N = 203), were enrolled and consecutively assigned to a training (n = 101) or a validation (n = 102) group. The clinical probability of PE was assessed using Wells and revised Geneva scores. Clinical examination, D-dimer test, and multidetector computed angiotomography were performed in all participants. The accuracy of the scores was assessed using receiver operating characteristic analyses. PE was confirmed in 46 participants (23%) (24 training group, 22 validation group). In the training group, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.85-0.98) for the Wells score and 0.69 (95% CI = 0.56-0.82) for the revised Geneva score (P < .001). These results were confirmed in the validation group (P < .05). The positive (LR+) and negative likelihood ratios (LR-) (two indices combining sensitivity and specificity) of the Wells score were superior to those of the revised Geneva score in the training (LR+, 7.90 vs 1.34; LR-, 0.23 vs 0.66) and validation (LR+, 13.5 vs 1.46; LR-, 0.47 vs 0.54) groups. In high-risk elderly hospitalized adults, the Wells score is more accurate than the revised Geneva score for diagnosing PE. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Polyphenol-rich foods in the Mediterranean diet are associated with better cognitive function in elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Valls-Pedret, Cinta; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria; Medina-Remón, Alexander; Quintana, Melibea; Corella, Dolores; Pintó, Xavier; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Estruch, Ramon; Ros, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Brain oxidative processes play a major role in age-related cognitive decline, thus consumption of antioxidant-rich foods might help preserve cognition. Our aim was to assess whether consumption of antioxidant-rich foods in the Mediterranean diet relates to cognitive function in the elderly. In asymptomatic subjects at high cardiovascular risk (n = 447; 52% women; age 55-80 y) enrolled in the PREDIMED study, a primary prevention dietary-intervention trial, we assessed food intake and cardiovascular risk profile, determined apolipoprotein E genotype, and used neuropsychological tests to evaluate cognitive function. We also measured urinary polyphenols as an objective biomarker of intake. Associations between energy-adjusted food consumption, urinary polyphenols, and cognitive scores were assessed by multiple linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Consumption of some foods was independently related to better cognitive function. The specific associations [regression coefficients (95% confidence intervals)] were: total olive oil with immediate verbal memory [0.755 (0.151-1.358)]; virgin olive oil and coffee with delayed verbal memory [0.163 (0.010-0.316) and 0.294 (0.055-0.534), respectively]; walnuts with working memory [1.191 (0.061-2.322)]; and wine with Mini-Mental State Examination scores [0.252 (0.006-0.496)]. Urinary polyphenols were associated with better scores in immediate verbal memory [1.208 (0.236-2.180)]. Increased consumption of antioxidant-rich foods in general and of polyphenols in particular is associated with better cognitive performance in elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk. The results reinforce the notion that Mediterranean diet components might counteract age-related cognitive decline.

  19. Risk reduction of falls and fractures, reduction of back pain and safety in elderly high risk patients receiving combined therapy with alfacalcidol and alendronate: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Schacht, Erich; Ringe, Johann D

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy and safety of a new combination package containing 4 or 12 self-explanatory one-week blisters, each with one tablet of 70 mg alendronate (CAS 260055-05-8) and 7 capsules of 1 microg alfacalcidol (CAS 41294-56-8) (Tevabone) on muscle power, muscle function, balance and back pain was investigated in an open, multi-centered, uncontrolled, prospective study on a cohort of elderly patients with a high risk of falls and fractures. 818 practicing physicians all over Germany recruited 2579 patients for a 3-month observational trial being treated with the above combination package. 92.4% were women [89.7% of the women had postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO)]. Their average age was 74.1 years and the mean body mass index 26.4 kg/m2. 55.4% had a history of falls. Prevalent vertebral and non-vertebral fractures were documented in 62.9% and 61.4% of the patients, respectively, and a creatinine clearance below 65 ml/min was documented in 65.5%. Main outcome parameters were the Chair Rising Test (CRT), Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), back pain and safety at onset and after 3 months. In addition an evaluation of the package design was done at the end of the study. The percentage of patients able to perform the CRT within 10 sec increased from 26.3% to 42.9% after 3 months (increase 63%, p < 0.0001), while successful performance within 10 sec of TUG increased by 54% (p < 0.0001) from 30.6% at onset to 47.1% after 3 months. The average overall improvement of CRT was 2.3 sec (p < 0.0001) and of TUG amounted to 2.4 sec (p < 0.0001). It was shown in another recently published study that a mean increase of 2.6 sec in the performance of TUG results in a 24% increased risk for non-vertebral fractures. Mean back pain measured by a 0-10 visual analogue scale decreased significantly by 41% from 5.9 to 3.5 (p < 0.0001). Throughout the study, 178 adverse events (AE) were reported in 85 of the 2579 patients (incidence: 3.3 %). Only 3 patients experienced serious AE, 2 without causal

  20. Intake of Total Polyphenols and Some Classes of Polyphenols Is Inversely Associated with Diabetes in Elderly People at High Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Tresserra-Rimbau, Anna; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Toledo, Estefanía; Corella, Dolores; Castañer, Olga; Guo, Xiaohui; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Lapetra, José; Arós, Fernando; Fiol, Miquel; Ros, Emili; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Pintó, Xavier; Fitó, Montserrat; Babio, Nancy; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Sorli, Jose V; López-Sabater, M Carmen; Estruch, Ramón; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M

    2016-03-09

    Higher consumption of some polyphenols has been associated with a reduced risk of diabetes. However, no studies have evaluated the relation between all polyphenol subclasses and the incidence of diabetes. We aimed to prospectively examine the associations between the intake of total polyphenols and different groups of polyphenols (flavonoids, phenolic acids, stilbenes, lignans, and others) on the risk of incident diabetes in the PREDIMED (Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea) trial. This was an observational cohort analysis of the nondiabetic participants in the PREDIMED trial. This study was a multicenter, controlled, randomized, parallel-group feeding trial to assess the effects of either a Mediterranean diet that was supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts or advice to adhere to a low-fat control diet on cardiovascular outcomes in elderly men and women at high cardiovascular disease risk. From the 7447 randomly assigned participants, 3430 were selected because they were free of diabetes at baseline and filled out the food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs). Polyphenol intake was calculated by matching food consumption data from repeated FFQs with the Phenol-Explorer database on the polyphenol content of each reported food. HRs and 95% CIs for diabetes according to tertiles of polyphenol intake were estimated with the use of time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models. Over a mean of 5.51 y of follow-up (18,900 person-years), there were 314 new cases of diabetes. After multivariable adjustment, we observed a 28% reduction in new-onset diabetes in the highest compared with the lowest tertile of total polyphenol intake (HR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.99; P-trend = 0.05). The intake of subclasses of polyphenols also was inversely associated with diabetes risk, including for total flavonoids (HR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.93; P-trend = 0.02), stilbenes (HR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.38, 0.84; P-trend = 0.003), dihydroflavonols (HR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.88; P-trend = 0

  1. The effects of self-directed home exercise with serial telephone contacts on physical functions and quality of life in elderly people at high risk of locomotor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kana; Sakuma, Mayumi; Ogisho, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kozo; Chosa, Etsuo; Endo, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is essential for maintaining quality of life (QOL) in elderly individuals. However, adherence to exercise programs is low. Here, we assessed the effectiveness of a self-directed home exercise program with serial telephone contacts to encourage exercise adherence among elderly individuals at high risk of locomotor dysfunction. We recruited community-dwelling adults (ァ65 years) in Niigata, Japan, who were targets of the long-term care prevention project for locomotor dysfunction but did not participate in the government-sponsored prevention programs. The study was conducted from November 2011 to October 2012. Participants received exercise instruction and performed exercises independently for 3 months with serial telephone contacts. The single-leg stance and five-times sit-to-stand tests were used to assess physical function. The SF-8 was used to measure health-related QOL. Ninety-seven participants were enrolled in the study, representing 2.5% of eligible people;87 completed the intervention. Scores from physical function tests were significantly improved by the intervention, as were 7 of eight SF-8 subscales. Adherence was 85.4% for the single-leg standing exercise and 82.1% for squatting. Thus, self-directed home exercise with serial telephone contacts improved physical function and health-related QOL, representing a promising model for preventing the need for long-term care due to locomotor dysfunction.

  2. Long-term Outcomes of Thoracoscopic Anatomic Resections and Systematic Lymphadenectomy for Elderly High-risk Patients with Stage IB Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ziwen; He, Jianxing; Fang, Wanqiang; Ruan, Lingling; Fang, Fang

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and long-term survival outcomes of complete video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (C-VATS) for the resection of anatomic pulmonary segments and systematic lymphadenectomy in the treatment of elderly and high-risk patients with stage IB for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 242 elderly patients (≥65 years), who were operated on by the same operational team, were divided into high-risk group and conventional risk group from August 2008 to December 2010. All patients were diagnosed in stage IB (pT status: >2 to ≤3) NSCLC by biopsy and examination of PET-CT before operation. The high-risk patients were identified with severe cardiopulmonary and other system dysfunctions as follow-up criteria. They were treated with VATS anatomic pulmonary segments and systematic lymphadenectomy. The conventional risk patients with adequate cardiopulmonary reserve were treated with VATS radical lobectomy and systematic lymphadenectomy. The clinical and pathological data were recorded. The total survival, tumour-free survival, recurrence time and character of patients were followed-up. Appropriate statistical analyses involved the χ(2) test and Kaplan-Meier estimates of total survival and tumour-free survival. A total of 242 patients underwent surgical resection during our study period: Anatomic pulmonary segments in 116 patients and lobectomy in 126. The operative time and blood loss of the VATS anatomic pulmonary segments group (78.0±35.0 min, 95.6±30.4 ml) were significantly less than those of the VATS radical resection group (108.0±25.0 min, 165.6±58.4 ml). Neither group experienced post-operative death. The overall and tumour-free survival rate of the VATS anatomic pulmonary segments group within five years were 62.07% and 29.31%, and those of the VATS radical resection group were 63.49% and 33.33%,%; there was no significant difference (P>0.5). The recurrence rates of the VATS anatomic pulmonary segment group and VATS radical resection group were

  3. Adjuvant chemoradiation does not improve survival in elderly patients with high-risk resected head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Nicholas J; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Mak, Kimberley S; Kirke, Diana; Patel, Sagar A; Shah, Bhartesh A; Salama, Andrew R; Jalisi, Scharukh; Truong, Minh Tam

    2017-08-21

    Randomized trials have demonstrated that adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) confers an overall survival (OS) benefit over adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) alone in patients with resected head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adverse pathologic features (positive surgical margins [SM+] and/or extracapsular extension [ECE]). Whether this OS benefit exists in an elderly population remains unknown. Retrospective database study. Using the National Cancer Database, we identified 1,686 elderly patients (age ≥70 years) with resected HNSCC with SM+ and/or ECE, who received adjuvant CRT (491 patients, 29%) or adjuvant RT alone (1,195 patients, 71%) between 1998 and 2011. Three-year survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method both before and after propensity score matching (PSM). Crude and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using Cox regression modeling. Median follow-up was 23.5 and 42.8 months for all and surviving patients, respectively. Three-year OS was 50.7% and 44.4% among patients receiving adjuvant CRT and RT alone, respectively (P = .002). On multivariate analysis, there was no significant improvement in OS with adjuvant CRT relative to adjuvant RT alone (HR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.73-1.06). Similarly, a PSM cohort showed no significant difference in the 3-year OS for patients receiving adjuvant CRT versus adjuvant RT alone (48.8% and 50.9%, respectively; P = .839). Although the addition of chemotherapy to adjuvant RT has been proven effective in randomized trials of patients with resected HNSCC with SM+ or ECE, it may be less efficacious in an elderly patient population treated outside of a controlled trial setting. 2c Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Quality of life after transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical replacement in high-risk elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Kala, Petr; Tretina, Martin; Poloczek, Martin; Ondrasek, Jiri; Malik, Petr; Pokorny, Petr; Parenica, Jiri; Spinar, Jindrich; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Littnerova, Simona; Nemec, Petr

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the quality of life after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and surgical replacement (SAVR) at one year. The study included 45 consecutive high-risk patients (average age 82.0 years; logistic Euroscore 22.3%) with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis allocated to TAVI transfemoral, TAVI transapical using the Edwards-Sapien valve or SAVR with the Edwards Perimount bioprosthesis (n=15 in each). The pre-operative characteristics were similar except for more myocardial infarctions in TAVI. The quality of life was assessed using the standardized EQ-5D questionnaire at baseline and on days 30, 90 and 360. The protocol was approved by the local ethics committee and an informed consent was signed. A total of 7 patients (15.5%) died during follow-up. At baseline no significant differences in any of the quality-of-life parameters were found except for usual activities described as "best" (46.7% in SAVR vs. 10.0% in TAVI; P=0.002). At 30 and 90 days surviving patients were similar and at 360 days only the anxiety/depression score was "best" in 83.3% SAVR vs. 59.1% (P=0.046). Functional status improved in all patients (NYHA class I-II in 13.3% at baseline vs. 78.9% at 360-days) and the general health median significantly improved in TAVI patients (from 50 to 67; P=0.001) with a positive trend in SAVR patients (P=0.060). At one year, the general quality of life of high-risk patients had significantly improved after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with a positive trend in surgically treated patients.

  5. A Mediterranean Diet Enriched with Olive Oil Is Associated with Higher Serum Total Osteocalcin Levels in Elderly Men at High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Navarrete, José Maria; Ricart, Wifredo; Ros, Emilio; Estruch, Ramon; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The intake of olive oil has been related to the prevention of osteoporosis in experimental and in in vitro models. Very few prospective studies have evaluated the effects of olive oil intake on circulating osteocalcin (OC) in humans. Objective: The objective of the study was to examine the longitudinal effects of a low-fat control diet (n = 34), a Mediterranean diet enriched with nuts (MedDiet+nuts, n = 51), or a Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil (MedDiet+VOO, n = 42) on circulating forms of OC and bone formation markers in elderly men at high cardiovascular risk. Design: Longitudinal associations between baseline and follow-up (2 yr) measurements of total OC, undercarboxylated osteocalcin, C-telopeptide of type I collagen, and procollagen I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) concentrations were examined in 127 elderly men randomized to three healthy dietary interventions. Results: Baseline characteristics (age, body mass index, waist circumference, lipid profile, fasting insulin levels, and bone formation and resorption markers) were similar in all intervention groups. The total osteocalcin concentration increased robustly in the MedDiet+VOO group (P = 0.007) in parallel to increased P1NP levels (P = 0.01) and homeostasis model assessment-β-cell function (P = 0.01) but not in subjects on the MedDiet+nuts (P = 0.32) or after the control diet (P = 0.74). Interestingly, the consumption of olives was associated positively with both baseline total osteocalcin (r = 0.23, P = 0.02) and the 2-yr osteocalcin concentrations (r = 0.21, P = 0.04) in the total cohort. Conclusions: Consumption of a Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil for 2 years is associated with increased serum osteocalcin and P1NP concentrations, suggesting protective effects on bone. PMID:22855341

  6. Management and risk factor control of coronary artery disease in elderly versus nonelderly: a multicenter registry

    PubMed Central

    Phrommintikul, Arintaya; Krittayaphong, Rungroj; Wongcharoen, Wanwarang; Boonyaratavej, Smonporn; Wongvipaporn, Chaiyasith; Tiyanon, Woraporn; Dinchuthai, Pakaphan; Kunjara-Na-Ayudhya, Rapeephon; Tatsanavivat, Pyatat; Sritara, Piyamitr

    2016-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death in elderly because aging is the important non-modifiable risk factors of atherosclerosis and also a predictor of poor outcomes. Underuse of guideline directed therapy may contribute to suboptimal risk factor control and worse outcomes in the elderly. We aimed to explore the management of CAD, risk factors control as well as goal attainment in elderly compared to nonelderly CAD patients. Methods The CORE-Thailand is an ongoing multicenter, prospective, observational registry of patients with high atherosclerotic risk in Thailand. The data of 4120 CAD patients enrolled in this cohort was analyzed comparing between the elderly (age ≥ 65 years) vs. nonelderly (age < 65 years). Results There were 2172 elderly and 1948 nonelderly patients. The elderly CAD patients had higher prevalence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease. The proportion of patients who received coronary revascularization was not different between the elderly and nonelderly CAD patients. Antiplatelets were prescribed less in the elderly while statin was prescribed in the similar proportion. Goal attainments of risk factor control of glycemic control, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smoking cessation except the blood pressure goal were higher in the elderly CAD patients. Conclusions The CORE-Thailand registry showed the equity in the treatment of CAD between elderly and non-elderly. Elderly CAD patients had higher rate of goal attainment in risk factor control except blood pressure goal. The effects of goal attainment on cardiovascular outcomes will be demonstrated from ongoing cohort. PMID:28321237

  7. High-sensitivity CRP is an independent risk factor for all fractures and vertebral fractures in elderly men: the MrOS Sweden study.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Anna L; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Ljunggren, Östen; Karlsson, Magnus; Mellström, Dan; Ohlsson, Claes

    2014-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown low-grade inflammation measured by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to be associated with fracture risk in women. However, it is still unclear whether hs-CRP is also associated with fracture risk in men. We therefore measured serum levels of hs-CRP in 2910 men, mean age 75 years, included in the prospective population-based MrOS Sweden cohort. Study participants were divided into tertile groups based on hs-CRP level. Fractures occurring after the baseline visit were validated (average follow-up 5.4 years). The incidence for having at least one fracture after baseline was 23.9 per 1000 person-years. In Cox proportional hazard regression analyses adjusted for age, hs-CRP was related to fracture risk. The hazard ratio (HR) of fracture for the highest tertile of hs-CRP, compared with the lowest and the medium tertiles combined, was 1.48 (95% CI, 1.20-1.82). Multivariate adjustment for other risk factors for fractures had no major effect on the associations between hs-CRP and fracture. Results were essentially unchanged after exclusion of subjects with hs-CRP levels greater than 7.5 mg/L, as well as after exclusion of subjects with a first fracture within 3 years of follow-up, supporting that the associations between hs-CRP and fracture risk were not merely a reflection of a poor health status at the time of serum sampling. Femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) was not associated with hs-CRP, and the predictive role of hs-CRP for fracture risk was essentially unchanged when femoral neck BMD was added to the model (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.09-1.72). Exploratory subanalyses of fracture type demonstrated that hs-CRP was clearly associated with clinical vertebral fractures (HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.12-2.29). We demonstrate, using a large prospective population-based study, that elderly men with high hs-CRP have increased risk of fractures, and that these fractures are mainly vertebral. The association between hs-CRP and fractures was

  8. Dairy food supplementation may reduce malnutrition risk in institutionalised elderly.

    PubMed

    Iuliano, Sandra; Poon, Shirley; Wang, Xiaofang; Bui, Minh; Seeman, Ego

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition in institutionalised elderly increases morbidity and care costs. Meat and dairy foods are high-quality protein sources so adequate intakes may reduce malnutrition risk. We aimed to determine whether inadequate intakes of meat and dairy foods contribute to malnutrition in institutionalised elderly. This cross-sectional study involved 215 elderly residents (70·2 % females, mean age 85·8 years) from twenty-one aged-care facilities in Melbourne, Australia. Dietary intake was assessed using observed plate waste. Food groups and serving sizes were based on the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating. Nutrient content was analysed using a computerised nutrient analysis software (Xyris). Malnutrition risk was assessed using the Mini Nutrition Assessment (MNA) tool; a score between 24 and 30 indicates normal nutritional status. Data were analysed using robust regression. Mean MNA score was 21·6 (sd 2·7). In total, 68 % of residents were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (MNA score≤23·5). Protein intake was 87 (sd 28) % of the Australian recommended dietary intake (RDI). Consumption averaged 1 serving each of dairy foods and meat daily. Number of dairy and meat servings related to proportion of protein RDI (both P24 points). Provision of meat and dairy foods did not meet recommended levels. On the basis of current dietary intakes in aged-care residents, increasing consumption of dairy foods to the recommended four servings daily ensures protein adequacy and may reduce malnutrition risk in institutionalised elderly, and so reduce risk of comorbidities and costs associated with malnutrition.

  9. Performing colonoscopy in elderly and very elderly patients: Risks, costs and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Otto S

    2014-01-01

    Many diagnostic and screening colonoscopies are performed on very elderly patients. Although colonoscopic yield increases with age, the potential benefits in such patients decrease because of shorter life expectancy and more frequent comorbidities. Colonoscopy in very elderly patients carries a greater risk of complications and morbidity than in younger patients, and is associated with lower completion rates and higher likelihood of poor bowel preparation. Thus, screening colonoscopy in very elderly patients should be performed only after careful consideration of potential benefits, risks and patient preferences. On the other hand, diagnostic and therapeutic colonoscopy are more likely to benefit even very elderly patients, and in most cases should be performed if indicated. PMID:24932373

  10. Performing colonoscopy in elderly and very elderly patients: Risks, costs and benefits.

    PubMed

    Lin, Otto S

    2014-06-16

    Many diagnostic and screening colonoscopies are performed on very elderly patients. Although colonoscopic yield increases with age, the potential benefits in such patients decrease because of shorter life expectancy and more frequent comorbidities. Colonoscopy in very elderly patients carries a greater risk of complications and morbidity than in younger patients, and is associated with lower completion rates and higher likelihood of poor bowel preparation. Thus, screening colonoscopy in very elderly patients should be performed only after careful consideration of potential benefits, risks and patient preferences. On the other hand, diagnostic and therapeutic colonoscopy are more likely to benefit even very elderly patients, and in most cases should be performed if indicated.

  11. Brain Scan Test Predicts Fall Risk in Elderly

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162417.html Brain Scan Test Predicts Fall Risk in Elderly Such ... research suggests that measurements of healthy older adults' brain activity may help determine their future risk. "Our ...

  12. Nutritional risk and cognitive impairment in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Soo; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Kyung Ran; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Hong, Chang Hyung

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nutritional risk and cognitive impairment in the elderly living in the community. Data obtained from 2934 subjects (912 men and 2022 women) aged above 60 years was analyzed from the Gwangju Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment Study (GDEMCIS). The study questionnaire comprised demographic characteristics, history of current and past illnesses, drug history, Korean version-Mini Mental State Examination (K-MMSE), and Nutritional Screening Initiative (NSI) checklist. Additionally, we examined the blood pressure, fasting serum glucose level, lipid profile, body mass index, and ApoE genotype. Of the total, 1942 (66.2%) demonstrated good nutritional state (NSI checklist score< or =2) and 992 (33.8%) were at moderate or high nutritional risk (NSI checklist score>2). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that moderate or high nutritional risk subjects were associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment (K-MMSE score< or =17) after adjustment for age, sex, educational level, and Korean version of Short form Geriatric Depression Scale (K-SGDS) score (Odds ratio=OR=1.71, 95%; confidence interval=CI=1.17-2.50). These results suggest that nutritional risk may be associated with cognitive impairment in the elderly.

  13. [The elderly at risk in the province of Guadalajara].

    PubMed

    Urbina Torija, J R; Flores Mayor, M J; García Salazar, M P; Rodríguez Estremera, E; Torres Buisan, L; Torrubias Fernández, R M

    2004-10-15

    To study fragile elderly people in the population, their characteristics and their distribution according to fragility markers. Cross-sectional, descriptive study using a survey. Primary care. Elderly people living in Guadalajara in January 2002. 434 people were interviewed (1.24% of population). There were 157 losses (26.6%). The questionnaire contained social and demographic variables (age, sex, setting), care variables (medication, pathologies, home care) and evaluative scales (Barthel, Folstein, Yesavage, Diaz-Palacios). Fragility markers: 3 or more pathologies, 6 or more drugs, dementia, and/or positive on one of the four scales used. Subjects lived in rural areas more (56.7%; CI, 52-61.3), but there were not more women. Fragile elderly, n=257 (59.2%; CI, 54.6-63.8), were more women (OR=1.8; CI, 1.5-2.2) and over 70 (OR=80-84, 5.2; CI, 3.7-7.5; OR=85-89, 8.2; CI, 5.3-12.8). Prevalence of markers was: 3 or more pathologies, 30.2% (95% CI, 25.8-34.5); cognitive deterioration, 22.6% (95% CI, 18.7-26.5); social risk, 20.8% (95% CI, 16.3-23.8); multi-medication, 18.7% (95% CI, 15-22.3); Barthel incapacity, 11.7 (95% CI, 8.7-14.8); depression, 5.3% (95% CI, 3.2-7.5); and dementia, 3.2% (95% CI, 1.6-4.9). Women suffered cognitive deterioration more. The over-80s suffered cognitive deterioration, social risk and incapacity more. There was high prevalence of fragility with cognitive deterioration, multi-medication and social risk; and lower presence of dementia. Women and the most elderly people were most affected.

  14. Perceived health, life satisfaction, and cardiovascular risk factors among elderly Korean immigrants and elderly Koreans.

    PubMed

    Sin, Mo-Kyung; Chae, Young-Ran; Choe, Myoung-Ae; Murphy, Patrick; Kim, Jeungim; Jeon, Mi-Yang

    2011-03-01

    Acknowledging that changes in sociocultural environment influence health status, the purpose of this study was to compare perceived health, life satisfaction, and cardiovascular health in elderly Korean immigrants and elderly Koreans. In this cross-sectional study, a convenience sample of 88 elderly Korean immigrants and 295 elderly Koreans 65 and older were recruited from Korean communities in the United States and Korea. Respondents' perceived health was measured by self-assessment; life satisfaction was self-assessed using a dichotomous scale of general satisfaction with life; and cardiovascular health status was surveyed by self-report of major diagnosed cardiovascular risk factors (i.e., hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus) and body mass index measurement for obesity. Despite having better perceived health and life satisfaction, elderly Korean immigrants also had higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. The findings provide health care providers with useful information for effective health assessment of minority immigrants.

  15. Elderly abuse: risk factors and nursing role.

    PubMed

    Corbi, Graziamaria; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Ivshina, Evgeniya; Ferrara, Nicola; Solimeno Cipriano, Angela; Campobasso, Carlo Pietro

    2015-04-01

    Elderly abuse is still a hidden problem, often underestimated. It is much more common than the data available suggest. Unfortunately, the incidence is expected to grow with the progressive increase in the elderly population in the future. The aim was to examine the available literature in the last 5 years to define the state of art on this phenomenon, with particular regard to the nursing role in elderly abuse, focusing on the possible types of mistreatment, the motivations and preventive interventions. Articles published in the last 5 years regarding the mistreatment of the elderly were selected, by using scientifically recognized databases such as PubMed, Cochrane Library, Medline, Scopus, and Web of Knowledge. Several keywords were used for the query among which were: "elderly abuse" and "elderly abuse in nursing home". Moreover, to better understand the entity of the phenomenon, we also searched the corresponding keywords for child abuse. Considering the Scopus database, only 78 out of 1,342 published articles in the last 5 years deal with abuse of the elderly in relation to nursing, representing a very small part (5.81%) of the considered sample. Comparing the number of articles, the ratio child/elderly is equal to 1/0.04, underlying the poor interest of research on this phenomenon. Moreover, it was observed that elderly abuse in nursing homes is still underreported in both original articles and reviews. Despite the aging of the population, elderly abuse and neglect still remain hidden problems, overlooked and also underestimated in the literature.

  16. Dyadic Vulnerability and Risk Profiling for Elder Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulmer, Terry; Paveza, Gregory; VandeWeerd, Carla; Fairchild, Susan; Guadagno, Lisa; Bolton-Blatt, Marguarette; Norman, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Neglect of older adults accounts for 60% to 70% of all elder-mistreatment reports made to adult protective services. The purpose of this article is to report data from research, using a risk-and-vulnerability model, that captures the independent contributions of both the elder and the caregiver as they relate to the outcome of neglect.…

  17. Dyadic Vulnerability and Risk Profiling for Elder Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulmer, Terry; Paveza, Gregory; VandeWeerd, Carla; Fairchild, Susan; Guadagno, Lisa; Bolton-Blatt, Marguarette; Norman, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Neglect of older adults accounts for 60% to 70% of all elder-mistreatment reports made to adult protective services. The purpose of this article is to report data from research, using a risk-and-vulnerability model, that captures the independent contributions of both the elder and the caregiver as they relate to the outcome of neglect.…

  18. Effects of 18-month low-magnitude high-frequency vibration on fall rate and fracture risks in 710 community elderly--a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Leung, K S; Li, C Y; Tse, Y K; Choy, T K; Leung, P C; Hung, V W Y; Chan, S Y; Leung, A H C; Cheung, W H

    2014-06-01

    This study is a prospective cluster-randomized controlled clinical trial involving 710 elderly subjects to investigate the long-term effects of low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) on fall and fracture rates, muscle performance, and bone quality. The results confirmed that LMHFV is effective in reducing fall incidence and enhancing muscle performance in the elderly. Falls are direct causes of fragility fracture in the elderly. LMHFV has been shown to improve muscle function and bone quality. This study is to investigate the efficacy of LMHFV in preventing fall and fractures among the elderly in the community. A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted with 710 postmenopausal females over 60 years. A total of 364 participants received daily 20 min LMHFV (35 Hz, 0.3 g), 5 days/week for 18 months; 346 participants served as control. Fall or fracture rate was taken as the primary outcome. Also, quadriceps muscle strength, balancing abilities, bone mineral density (BMD), and quality of life (QoL) assessments were done at 0, 9, and 18 months. With an average of 66.0% compliance in the vibration group, 18.6% of 334 vibration group subjects reported fall or fracture incidences compared with 28.7% of 327 in the control (adjusted HR = 0.56, p = 0.001). The fracture rate of vibration and control groups were 1.1 and 2.3 % respectively (p = 0.171). Significant improvements were found in reaction time, movement velocity, and maximum excursion of balancing ability assessment, and also the quadriceps muscle strength (p < 0.001). No significant differences were found in the overall change of BMD. Minimal adverse effects were documented. LMHFV is effective in fall prevention with improved muscle strength and balancing ability in the elderly. We recommend its use in the community as an effective fall prevention program and to decrease related injuries.

  19. [Cognitive functions in elderly high-risk patients after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting versus conventional bypass grafting - a randomised study - Secondary publication].

    PubMed

    Jensen, Birte Østergaard; Hughest, Pia; Rasmussen, Lars S; Pedersen, Preben U; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A

    2006-10-30

    It has been suggested that the risk of cerebral dysfunction is less with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) than with conventional coronary artery bypass grafting (CCAB). The study is a part of the Best Bypass Surgery Trial. A total of 120 elderly patients underwent psychometric testing with a neuropsychological test battery before as well as 3 months after surgery. Cognitive dysfunction was identified in 7.4% of the patients in the OPCAB group and 9.8% in the CCAB group. We found no significant difference after either OPCAB or CCAB.

  20. Sex differences in response to angiotensin II receptor blocker-based therapy in elderly, high-risk, hypertensive Japanese patients: a subanalysis of the OSCAR study.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kunihiko; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Ogawa, Hisao; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2014-06-01

    The OlmeSartan Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study is a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded, end point study of elderly hypertensive Japanese patients that compared the efficacy of a high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) treatment to an ARB plus calcium channel blocker (CCB) combination. In this pre-specified subgroup analysis, we compared the response to such therapy according to sex. A total of 1164 patients (515 (44%) men and 649 (56%) women) were included, and each gender was split into two nearly equal treatment groups. The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular events and non-cardiovascular death. The baseline characteristics between the two treatment groups in each sex were similar, except for some variables. Male patients had lower systolic and higher diastolic blood pressure than female patients (156.8/85.7 vs. 158.5/84.2 mm Hg). At the end of the study, the mean systolic pressure was higher in the ARB group (134.4 mm Hg) than in the ARB plus CCB group (131.5 mm Hg; P=0.03) for men but not for women (135.4 vs. 133.4 mm Hg; P=0.12). For men, the primary outcome events tended to be higher in the ARB group than in the ARB plus CCB group (hazard ratio (HR)=1.66; P=0.055) but not for women (HR=0.97; P=0.92). This difference in men was due to cardiovascular events (HR=1.86; P=0.03). The interaction between sex and treatment group was not significant (P=0.17). These findings suggest that, in addition to blood pressure control, appropriate patient risk assessment is important for the treatment of hypertension, especially in male patients, as opposed to possible sex differences in treatment effects.

  1. Elderly fall risk prediction using static posturography

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining and controlling postural balance is important for activities of daily living, with poor postural balance being predictive of future falls. This study investigated eyes open and eyes closed standing posturography with elderly adults to identify differences and determine appropriate outcome measure cut-off scores for prospective faller, single-faller, multi-faller, and non-faller classifications. 100 older adults (75.5 ± 6.7 years) stood quietly with eyes open and then eyes closed while Wii Balance Board data were collected. Range in anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) center of pressure (CoP) motion; AP and ML CoP root mean square distance from mean (RMS); and AP, ML, and vector sum magnitude (VSM) CoP velocity were calculated. Romberg Quotients (RQ) were calculated for all parameters. Participants reported six-month fall history and six-month post-assessment fall occurrence. Groups were retrospective fallers (24), prospective all fallers (42), prospective fallers (22 single, 6 multiple), and prospective non-fallers (47). Non-faller RQ AP range and RQ AP RMS differed from prospective all fallers, fallers, and single fallers. Non-faller eyes closed AP velocity, eyes closed VSM velocity, RQ AP velocity, and RQ VSM velocity differed from multi-fallers. RQ calculations were particularly relevant for elderly fall risk assessments. Cut-off scores from Clinical Cut-off Score, ROC curves, and discriminant functions were clinically viable for multi-faller classification and provided better accuracy than single-faller classification. RQ AP range with cut-off score 1.64 could be used to screen for older people who may fall once. Prospective multi-faller classification with a discriminant function (-1.481 + 0.146 x Eyes Closed AP Velocity—0.114 x Eyes Closed Vector Sum Magnitude Velocity—2.027 x RQ AP Velocity + 2.877 x RQ Vector Sum Magnitude Velocity) and cut-off score 0.541 achieved an accuracy of 84.9% and is viable as a screening tool for older

  2. Diagnostic value of osteoporosis self-assessment tool for Asians (OSTA) and quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS) in detecting high-risk populations for osteoporosis among elderly Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xiao-Yun; Hu, Yu; Pang, Xiao-Na; Chang, Gui-Lin; Li, Li

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate an osteoporosis self-assessment tool for Asians (OSTA) and quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS) and their combination in detecting populations at high risk for osteoporosis, and to determine the best cutoff value for the diagnosis of osteoporosis among elderly Chinese men. A group of Chinese men, aged ≥ 60 years, recruited from the health checkup population of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, were included. The OSTA index was calculated from age and weight. Bone mineral density (BMD) at left hip (femoral neck, internal, and total hip) and lumbar spine (L1-L4, L-Total) was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and calcaneal BMD was measured with QUS. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine the best cutoff values, sensitivity, and specificity. The area under the curve (AUC) between the different screening tools was compared. Our study included 472 men with mean age of 78.0 years. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 27.7%.The best cutoff for OSTA was -3.5 for predicting men with osteoporosis at any site; this yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 47.3% and 76.8%, respectively. The AUC for OSTA was 0.676. The optimal cutoff for QUS-T score was -1.25, with a sensitivity of 80.4% and specificity of 59.7%. The AUC for QUS-T score was 0.762. Combining QUS with OSTA improved the specificity to 92.9% but reduced sensitivity to 36.1%. A new variable derived from a combination of OSTA and the QUS-T score gave a better performance, with sensitivity of 70.1% and specificity of 72.1%; the AUC for this variable was 0.771, which was greater than OSTA but not different from QUS alone. In conclusion, OSTA and QUS, respectively, and their combination may help find populations at high risk for osteoporosis, which could be an alternative method for diagnosing osteoporosis, especially in areas where DXA measurement is not accessible.

  3. The Functional Competency of Elderly at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Barbara; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated functional competency to make informed decisions by elderly depressed and cognitively impaired psychiatric patients. Although depressed elderly patients did not appear to experience problems in informed consent process, cognitively impaired patients had difficulty understanding important aspects of consent information. Suggests that…

  4. Cimetidine in elderly patients: review of uses and risks.

    PubMed

    Jenike, M A

    1982-03-01

    Cimetidine is widely prescribed but has numerous potential side effects, especially in elder patients, who require a lower dosage, e.g., 300 mg twice daily. Antacids may be more effective than cimetidine in preventing acute gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill elderly patients. Cimetidine increases the risk of toxicity of other commonly used drugs such as phenytoin, diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, propranolol, theophylline, warfarin, and carbamazepine. Elderly patients taking cimetidine are at risk for neuropsychiatric changes, which may be temporarily reversed by physostigmine. Other side effects and indications for use are reviewed.

  5. Dairy consumption, cardiovascular risk factors and inflammation in elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Pour Fard, Nafiseh; Karimi, Majid; Baghaei, Mohammad Hassan; Haghighatdoost, Fahimeh; Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Azadbakht, Leila

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous epidemiological studies of dairy product consumption and health outcomes have reported mixed findings. Despite increasing in life expectancy, scarce data are available in this field in elderly individuals. We tested the hypothesis that greater dairy intake is associated with lower high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level and better lipid profile and glycemic control. METHODS This cross-sectional study was undertaken on 107 elderly individuals who aged 60-78 years. Usual dietary intakes were assessed by means of a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Anthropometric measures and biochemical markers were determined using standard protocols. RESULTS The reported mean ± standard deviation (SD) of daily intake of dairy products and age were 588.02 ± 418.88 g/d and 63.22 ± 6.92 years, respectively. After control for demographic characteristics and dietary intakes, dairy consumption was not significantly related to the increased risk of insulin resistance [Odds ratio (OR): 2.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.54, 8.86; P = 0.520] and elevated hs-CRP (OR: 1.54, 95% CI: 0.37, 6.35; P = 0.550). Participants in the top tertile of dairy had greater, but statistically not a significant risk of elevated triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). No significant relations were seen for hs-CRP, insulin resistance and lipid profile across tertiles of dairy products. CONCLUSION In this elderly population, total dairy consumption was not associated with inflammatory biomarkers levels and other cardiometabolic risk factors. PMID:26862340

  6. Risk factors of falls in community dwelling active elderly.

    PubMed

    Tuunainen, Eeva; Rasku, Jyrki; Jäntti, Pirkko; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2014-02-01

    To search for measures to describe and relate to accidental falls in community dwelling elderly. A EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire based on a patient's otoneurological case history provided a general health related quality of life measure, a fall history for the last 3 months and force platform measures for 96 active elderly from a pensioner organization. On average, the elderly experienced 0.3 falls over the preceding three months. A fall was seen to cause a significant deterioration in the quality of life and vertigo and caused fear of falling. The postural instability correlated with falls. Vertigo was present among 42% and was most commonly characterized as episodic and rotatory in factorial analysis items relating to vertigo correlated to falls and balance complaints. Four factors were identified and three of these correlated with falls. Vestibular failure correlated to a fall occurring when a person was rising up; Movement intolerance correlated with falls due to slips and trips, and Near-syncope factor correlated to falls for other reasons. In posturography, the variable measuring critical time describing the memory based "closed loop" control of postural stability carried a risk for accidental fall with an odds ratio of 6. The variable measuring zero crossing velocity showed a high rate of velocity change around the neutral position of stance. Vertigo and poor postural stability were the major reasons for falls in the active elderly. In ageing, postural control is shifted towards open loop control (visual, proprioception, exteroception and vestibular) instead of closed loop control and is a factor that contributes to a fall. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bone mineral density (BMD) and vertebral trabecular bone score (TBS) for the identification of elderly women at high risk for fracture: the SEMOF cohort study.

    PubMed

    Popp, Albrecht W; Meer, Salome; Krieg, Marc-Antoine; Perrelet, Romain; Hans, Didier; Lippuner, Kurt

    2016-11-01

    To determine the predictive value of the vertebral trabecular bone score (TBS) alone or in addition to bone mineral density (BMD) with regard to fracture risk. Retrospective analysis of the relative contribution of BMD [measured at the femoral neck (FN), total hip (TH), and lumbar spine (LS)] and TBS with regard to the risk of incident clinical fractures in a representative cohort of elderly post-menopausal women previously participating in the Swiss Evaluation of the Methods of Measurement of Osteoporotic Fracture Risk study. Complete datasets were available for 556 of 701 women (79 %). Mean age 76.1 years, LS BMD 0.863 g/cm(2), and TBS 1.195. LS BMD and LS TBS were moderately correlated (r (2) = 0.25). After a mean of 2.7 ± 0.8 years of follow-up, the incidence of fragility fractures was 9.4 %. Age- and BMI-adjusted hazard ratios per standard deviation decrease (95 % confidence intervals) were 1.58 (1.16-2.16), 1.77 (1.31-2.39), and 1.59 (1.21-2.09) for LS, FN, and TH BMD, respectively, and 2.01 (1.54-2.63) for TBS. Whereas 58 and 60 % of fragility fractures occurred in women with BMD T score ≤-2.5 and a TBS <1.150, respectively, combining these two thresholds identified 77 % of all women with an osteoporotic fracture. Lumbar spine TBS alone or in combination with BMD predicted incident clinical fracture risk in a representative population-based sample of elderly post-menopausal women.

  8. Thyroid Surgery for Elderly Patients: Are They at Increased Operative Risks?

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sze-How; Wong, Kai-Pun; Lang, Brian Hung-Hin

    2012-01-01

    An increasing elderly population, a rising incidence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), and a rising incidence of benign nodular disease with age are all contributing to a rise in thyroid operations for the elderly. Literature review on the outcome and safety of thyroid surgery in elderly patients has been filled with conflicting results and this subject remains controversial. Although most single-institution studies conducted by high-volume surgeons did not find significant differences of complication rates in elderly when compared with younger cohorts, they often lacked the power necessary to identify subtle differences and suffered from various selection and referral biases. Recent evidence from large population-based studies concluded that thyroid surgery in the elderly was associated with higher complication rates. One of the major contributing factors for the increased complication rate was because most elderly patients suffered from many preexisting comorbidities. Therefore, elderly patients who have abnormal thyroid findings should complete a thorough preoperative workup and better postoperative care after undergoing any thyroid surgery. Furthermore, these high-risk patients would benefit if they could be referred to high-volume, specialized surgical units early. In this systemic review, we aimed to evaluate different issues and controversies in thyroidectomy for elderly patients. PMID:22970410

  9. Elder Abuse: Global Situation, Risk Factors, and Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pillemer, Karl; Burnes, David; Riffin, Catherine; Lachs, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Elder mistreatment is now recognized internationally as a pervasive and growing problem, urgently requiring the attention of health care systems, social welfare agencies, policymakers, and the general public. In this article, we provide an overview of global issues in the field of elder abuse, with a focus on prevention. Design and Methods: This article provides a scoping review of key issues in the field from an international perspective. Results: By drawing primarily on population-based studies, this scoping review provided a more valid and reliable synthesis of current knowledge about prevalence and risk factors than has been available. Despite the lack of scientifically rigorous intervention research on elder abuse, the review also identified 5 promising strategies for prevention. Implications: The findings highlight a growing consensus across studies regarding the extent and causes of elder mistreatment, as well as the urgent need for efforts to make elder mistreatment prevention programs more effective and evidence based. PMID:26994260

  10. Applying Atherosclerotic Risk Prevention Guidelines to Elderly Patients: A Bridge Too Far?

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ross D; Harris, Stewart B; Hegele, Robert A; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The primary prevention of atherosclerotic disease is on the basis of optimal management of the major risk factors. For the major risk factors of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, management for most patients is on the basis of well developed and extensive evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines. However, for a growing segment of the population who are at the highest risk for atherosclerotic disease (ie, older adults), the application of these guidelines is problematic. First, few studies that form the evidence base for these primary prevention guidelines actually include substantial numbers of elderly subjects. Second, elderly patients represent a special population from multiple perspectives related to their accumulation of health deficits and in their development of frailty. These patients with frailty and multiple comorbidities have been mostly excluded from the primary prevention studies upon which the guidelines are based yet comprise a very significant proportion of the very elderly population. Third, elderly people are at most risk from adverse drug reactions because of the increasing number of medications prescribed in this patient population. When applying the existing guidelines to elderly people the limitations of our knowledge must be recognized regarding how best to mitigate the high risk of heart disease in our aging population and how to generalize these recommendations to the management of the largest subgroup of elderly patients (ie, those with multiple comorbidities and frail older adults). Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Therapeutic Strategies. Cardiovascular risk and dyslipidemia in elderly and women].

    PubMed

    Morales, Clotilde; Royuela, Meritxell

    2013-01-01

    The management of cardiovascular risk and dyslipidemia are justified in guidelines. In the elderly, when they are in primary prevention, recommendations are controversial, even if there is evidence in reducing morbidity. In secondary prevention, between 65 and 85 years, there is enough evidence to recommend statins. The decision to start or to continue further treatment must be complemented by comprehensive assessment of the risk-benefit factor. In elderly patients we have to support in decision-making, we take clinical judgment and not just the age criteria. In women the risk is underestimated and may be untreated. The recomendations are the same as in men. During pregnancy there are particular recommendations.

  12. Risk for contrast-induced nephropathy in elderly trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Finigan, Ryan; Pham, Jacqueline; Mendoza, Rosemarie; Lekawa, Michael; Dolich, Matthew; Kong, Allen; Bernal, Nicole; Lush, Stephanie; Barrios, Cristobal

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if elderly trauma patients are at risk for contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). A retrospective study was conducted identifying 362 patients 65 years and older in our Level I trauma center who received computerized tomography (CT) scans with intravenous contrast. CIN was defined as a 25 per cent increase in serum creatinine levels or a 0.5 mg/dL increase above baseline after CT. History of diabetes mellitus, hospital length of stay, intensive care unit length of stay, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and age were recorded. Eighteen per cent (21 of 118) of the patients had a peak in creatinine, 12 per cent (14 of 118) peaked and returned to baseline, and 6 per cent (7 of 118) peaked and stayed high. Pre-CT elevated creatinine, diabetes mellitus, increased hospital length of stay, ISS, and age show little association to CIN. The data suggest that CIN in elderly trauma patients is rare, regardless of history of diabetes mellitus, age, creatinine, high ISS, or result in higher length of stay. Therefore, there is little justification for the delay in diagnosis to assess a patient's renal susceptibility.

  13. Urban-hazard risk analysis: mapping of heat-related risks in the elderly in major Italian cities.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Marco; Crisci, Alfonso; Gioli, Beniamino; Gualtieri, Giovanni; Toscano, Piero; Di Stefano, Valentina; Orlandini, Simone; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Short-term impacts of high temperatures on the elderly are well known. Even though Italy has the highest proportion of elderly citizens in Europe, there is a lack of information on spatial heat-related elderly risks. Development of high-resolution, heat-related urban risk maps regarding the elderly population (≥ 65). A long time-series (2001-2013) of remote sensing MODIS data, averaged over the summer period for eleven major Italian cities, were downscaled to obtain high spatial resolution (100 m) daytime and night-time land surface temperatures (LST). LST was estimated pixel-wise by applying two statistical model approaches: 1) the Linear Regression Model (LRM); 2) the Generalized Additive Model (GAM). Total and elderly population density data were extracted from the Joint Research Centre population grid (100 m) from the 2001 census (Eurostat source), and processed together using "Crichton's Risk Triangle" hazard-risk methodology for obtaining a Heat-related Elderly Risk Index (HERI). The GAM procedure allowed for improved daytime and night-time LST estimations compared to the LRM approach. High-resolution maps of daytime and night-time HERI levels were developed for inland and coastal cities. Urban areas with the hazardous HERI level (very high risk) were not necessarily characterized by the highest temperatures. The hazardous HERI level was generally localized to encompass the city-centre in inland cities and the inner area in coastal cities. The two most dangerous HERI levels were greater in the coastal rather than inland cities. This study shows the great potential of combining geospatial technologies and spatial demographic characteristics within a simple and flexible framework in order to provide high-resolution urban mapping of daytime and night-time HERI. In this way, potential areas for intervention are immediately identified with up-to-street level details. This information could support public health operators and facilitate coordination for heat

  14. The implications of a growing evidence base for drug use in elderly patients Part 2. ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in heart failure and high cardiovascular risk patients.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, A A; Jackson, S H D

    2006-05-01

    Traditionally, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been used for the management of patients with congestive cardiac failure. Studies performed over the last decade have demonstrated that (1) angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are as effective as ACE inhibitors in reducing morbidity and mortality in cardiac failure; and (2) inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system provides beneficial effects in patients at high cardiovascular risk without cardiac failure. This review focuses on the applicability of the results of the main trials with ACE inhibitors and ARBs to the elderly population.

  15. [Clinical efficacy of decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haplo-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen on elderly patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Dou, Li-Ping; Jing, Yu; Wang, Quan-Shun; Mei, Jun-Hui; Yu, Li

    2013-06-01

    This study was aimed to observe the clinical efficacy and adverse effects of decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haploid-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen on elderly patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Five elderly patients with MDS and AML were treated with decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen. Examinations on liver and renal function, electrocardiogram and bone marrow analysis were performed before and after treatment, and adverse effects were observed. The results indicated that after a course of treatment by decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haplo-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen, the total effective rate was 100%, and 4 patients (80%) achieved complete remission, 1 patient achieved partial remission. The dominant clinical adverse effect was bone marrow depression, the median time of neutrophil>0.5×10(9)/L and platelet>20×10(9)/L was 15 d and 16 d respectively for patients without previous MDS. It is concluded that decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haploid-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen may be effective with less adverse effects for elderly primary AML and high risk MDS patients, it is a promising therapeutic methods and worthy to deeply study.

  16. [Specific risks of physical activity in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Paillard, T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the specific risks of physical activity in elderly subjects. These risks mainly consist of the loss of physical integrity and the weakening of the capabilities of metabolic regulation. The risk of impairment of physical integrity (e.g. injury) related to regular physical activity is not overall greater in elderly subjects than in young subjects. The choice of a physical activity that is suited to the elderly subject's physical and cognitive abilities largely limits these risks. When physical activity is adapted to suit elderly subjects, the number of accidents in relation to the number of participants is actually very low. In fact, participation in a program of education for prevention related to physical activity reduces the risk of accidents and injuries (and, thus, falls) occurring thereafter. In the case of metabolic risks, isometric muscular contractions carried out under certain conditions (duration: > 6 seconds; intensity: > 50% of maximal voluntary contraction) are inappropriate. Physical activity carried out in extreme thermal atmospheres (0-5° < and > 25-30°) should be avoided. Hydration is very important and liquids should be drunk well before any thirst sensation occurs.

  17. [Nutritional status and risk factors for malnutrition in low-income urban elders].

    PubMed

    Hyun, Hye Sun; Lee, Insook

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of low-income urban elders by diversified ways, and to analyze the risk factors for malnutrition. The participants in this study were 183 low-income elders registered at a visiting healthcare facility in a public health center. Data were collected using anthropometric measurements, and a questionnaire survey. For data analysis, descriptive statistics, χ²-test, t-test, Fisher's exact test, multiple logistic regression analysis were performed using SPSS 20.0. Regarding the nutritional status of low-income elders as measured by the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), 10.4% of the elders were classified as malnourished; 57.4% as at high risk for malnutrition; and 32.2% as having normal nutrition levels. The main factors affecting malnutrition for low-income elders were loss of appetite (OR=3.34, 95% CI: 1.16~9.56) and difficulties in meal preparation (OR=2.35, 95% CI: 1.13~4.88). In order to effectively improve nutrition in low-income urban elders, it is necessary to develop individual intervention strategies to manage factors that increase the risk of malnutrition and to use systematic approach strategies in local communities in terms of a nutrition support system.

  18. Incisional hernia in the elderly: risk factors and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Caglià, Pietro; Tracia, Angelo; Borzì, Laura; Amodeo, Luca; Tracia, Lucio; Veroux, Massimiliano; Amodeo, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Ventral incisional hernia is a common complication of abdominal surgery. The marked improvements in medical technology and healthcare, lead to an increasing number of elderly patients to take advantage of even complex surgical procedures. The objective of this literature review was to analyze the risk factors for ventral incisional hernia in elderly patients and to identify measures that might decrease the incidence of this complication. An analysis of the surgical literature was performed using the search engines EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and PubMed with particular reference to elderly patients using the keywords: abdominal hernia, wound dehiscence, incisional hernia, incidence, trocar site hernia, and hernia prevention. In our opinion the risk factors for incisional hernia should be separately considered. First those related to the patients and to the abdominal surgery and, in addition, those related to the surgery of the abdominal wall defects. Reparative surgery of the abdominal wall, to date uniquely characterized by the use of the mesh, should be considered an additional risk factor for the occurrence of incisional hernia. However, the low incarceration risk, the risk of recurrence, the relevant rate of postoperative pain and discomfort and complications associated with mesh repair, as small bowel obstruction, mesh infection, and entero-cutaneous fistula, suggest that the general indication for surgical treatment of incisional hernias, in a symptomatic or oligosymptomatic elderly patients, should be critically reconsidered in order to avoid unnecessary surgery. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sublobar resection is associated with improved outcomes over radiotherapy in the management of high-risk elderly patients with Stage I non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bai-Lin; Chen, Jie; Zeng, Xian-Liang; Deng, Lei; Meng, Mao-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim A matched-pair comparison was performed to compare the efficacy and safety of sublobar resection versus radiotherapy for high-risk elderly patients with Stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE and manual searches. The meta-analysis was performed to compare overall survival, pattern of failure, and toxicity among the homogeneous studies. Subdivided analyses were also performed. Results Sixteen studies containing 11540 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Among these studies, 9 were propensity-score matched (PSM) cohort studies, and 7 were cohort studies. Sublobar resection, compared with radiotherapy (either conventional fraction radiation therapy or stereotactic body radiation therapy), significantly improved the overall survival regardless in both PSM and non-PSM analyses (all p < 0.05). However, the difference in the pattern of failure and toxicity were not significant (all p > 0.05). Conclusions Sublobar resection was associated with improved outcomes in high-risk elderly patients with Stage I NSCLC, which supports the need to compare both treatments in large prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trials. PMID:28002808

  20. Neuroleptics under high risk conditions.

    PubMed

    Oyewumi, L K

    1983-08-01

    A critical review of various high risk situations in which neuroleptics could be used and have been used in clinical practice is presented. These high risk situations include: women of child bearing age (pregnant women, lactating and/or nursing mothers), the two extremes of life (children and the elderly), patients with sexual dysfunction, patients with tardive dyskinesia, non-psychotic psychiatric patients, physically ill and suicidal patients. The extraordinary applications of these drugs, such as for rapid tranquilization and megadose regimens are examined. The author provides guidelines for the use of neuroleptics in these clinical situations.

  1. Risk of osteoporosis in elderly individuals attending a dental clinic.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Hideto; Kawakami, Masayoshi; Kawakami, Tetsuji; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kirita, Tadaaki; Komasa, Yutaka

    2017-04-01

    Osteoporosis has become a critical public health problem with the rapidly aging population in Japan. It is necessary for dentists to know their patients' status because it influences dental treatment. The purpose of this study was to predict the risk of osteoporosis in elderly patients visiting a dental clinic by assessing mandibular cortical morphology on panoramic radiographs. Three-hundred and thirty patients were divided into three classes based on the morphology of their mandibular cortex on panoramic radiographs. Mandibular cortical bone width at the mental foramen was also measured. Bone mineral density (BMD) was determined at the calcaneus using a quantitative ultrasound device. The mandibular cortical width decreased significantly from Class 1 (normal cortex), to Class 2 (moderately eroded cortex) and to Class 3 (severely eroded cortex). BMD was negatively correlated with age in both female and male patients. Most (108/186) female patients had a class 3 cortex with a low BMD. Among women, mandibular cortical width was significantly correlated with BMD. Thirty-three percent of the female had received a previous diagnosis of osteoporosis. In contrast, only 13.9% (20/144) of the male had a Class 3 cortex. In men, mandibular cortical width did not significantly correlate with BMD. Only a few of the men had received a previous diagnosis of osteoporosis. The number of remaining teeth did not correlate with low BMD in either sex. Our findings reveal that most elderly female patients visiting the dental clinic had a high risk of osteoporosis and a low BMD. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  2. Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies for Suicide among the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Rebecca; Burnett, Donna O.; Evans, Retta R.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a preventable public health concern affecting the nation as the 10th leading cause of death. The prevalence of suicide among the elderly is higher than any other group. Risk factors attributed to this phenomenon are depression, social isolation, substance abuse, poor physical health or function, financial stress, and access to lethal…

  3. Teaching Art to High Risk Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossol, Monona

    The role of art therapy is considered in working with such high risk groups as the institutionalized, mentally retarded, elderly, visually impaired, physically handicapped, asthmatic, hyper- and hypo-active children, hearing impaired, and patients on mind altering drugs. The special risks of infectious diseases (such as serum hepatitis), and…

  4. Impact of specific Beers Criteria medications on associations between drug exposure and unplanned hospitalisation in elderly patients taking high-risk drugs: a case-time-control study in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Price, Sylvie D; Holman, C D'Arcy J; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Emery, Jon D

    2014-04-01

    Certain broad medication classes have previously been associated with high rates of hospitalisation due to related adverse events in elderly Western Australians, based on clinical coding recorded on inpatient summaries. Similarly, some medications from the Beers Criteria, considered potentially inappropriate in older people, have been linked with an increased risk of unplanned hospitalisation in this population. Our objective was to determine whether risk estimates of drug-related hospitalisations are altered in elderly patients taking 'high-risk drugs' (HRDs) when specific Beers potentially inappropriate medications (PIMS) are taken into consideration. Using the pharmaceutical claims of 251,305 Western Australians aged ≥65 years (1993-2005) linked with other health data, we applied a case-time-control design to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for unplanned hospitalisations associated with anticoagulants, antirheumatics, opioids, corticosteroids and four major cardiovascular drug groups, from which attributable fractions (AFs), number and proportion of drug-related admissions were derived. The analysis was repeated, taking into account exposure to eight specific PIMs, and results were compared. A total of 1,899,699 index hospitalisations were involved. Of index subjects, 12-57 % were exposed to each HRD at the time of admission, although the proportions taking both an HRD and one of the selected PIMs were much lower (generally ≤2 %, but as high as 8 % for combinations involving temazepam and for most PIMs combined with hypertension drugs). Included PIMs (indomethacin, naproxen, temazepam, oxazepam, diazepam, digoxin, amiodarone and ferrous sulphate) all tended to increase ORs, AFs and drug-related hospitalisation estimates in HRD combinations, although this was less evident for opioids and corticosteroids. Indomethacin had the greatest overall impact on HRD ORs/AFs. Indomethacin (OR 1.40; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.27-1.54) and naproxen (OR 1.22; 1

  5. Exercise frequency, health risk factors, and diseases of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; von Stengel, Simon

    2013-11-01

    To determine the effect of exercise frequency on various diseases and risk factors of the elderly. Retrospective analysis of a randomized controlled 18-month exercise trial. University ambulatory group setting. Community-dwelling women aged ≥65 years (N=162) in the area of Northern Bavaria. Mixed, intense aerobic, resistance, and balance protocol for 18 months. Subjects were retrospectively subdivided into 2 groups according to their effective attendance over 18 months (>1-<2 vs ≥2-4 sessions/wk). Bone mineral density (BMD), lean body mass, appendicular skeletal muscle mass by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, Framingham study-based 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, and number of falls by calendar method. Significant differences between the low-frequency exercise group (LF-EG) and the high-frequency exercise group (HF-EG) were observed for lumbar spine BMD (HF-EG, 2.4%±2.8% vs LF-EG, 0.3%±2.2%; P<.001) and proximal femur BMD (HF-EG, 2.4%±2.8% vs LF-EG, -0.5%±1.6%; P=.014), lean body mass (1.6%±3.4% vs 0.3%±2.6%, P=.053), and appendicular skeletal muscle mass (0.9%±4.5% vs -1.3%±3.2%, P=.011). No differences between both exercise groups were observed for 10-year CHD risk (-1.94%±4.14% vs -2.00%±3.13%; P=.943) and number of falls (0.95±1.36 vs 1.03±1.21 falls/person). Comparing the LF-EG with the less active control group (n=47), only nonsignificant effects for fall number (P=.065) and 10-year CHD risk (P=.178) were evaluated. Although this result might not be generalizable across all exercise types and cohorts, it indicates that an overall exercise frequency of at least 2 sessions/wk may be crucial for impacting bone and muscle mass of elderly subjects. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Elder Abuse: Global Situation, Risk Factors, and Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Pillemer, Karl; Burnes, David; Riffin, Catherine; Lachs, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    Elder mistreatment is now recognized internationally as a pervasive and growing problem, urgently requiring the attention of health care systems, social welfare agencies, policymakers, and the general public. In this article, we provide an overview of global issues in the field of elder abuse, with a focus on prevention. This article provides a scoping review of key issues in the field from an international perspective. By drawing primarily on population-based studies, this scoping review provided a more valid and reliable synthesis of current knowledge about prevalence and risk factors than has been available. Despite the lack of scientifically rigorous intervention research on elder abuse, the review also identified 5 promising strategies for prevention. The findings highlight a growing consensus across studies regarding the extent and causes of elder mistreatment, as well as the urgent need for efforts to make elder mistreatment prevention programs more effective and evidence based. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Assessment of caries risk in elderly patients using the Cariogram model.

    PubMed

    Alian, Anna Y; McNally, Mary E; Fure, Solveig; Birkhed, Dowen

    2006-06-01

    For several decades, Swedish researchers, clinicians and educators have recognized risk assessment as an important part of routine management of dental caries. Innovative caries risk assessment models, such as the Cariogram software program, have been developed to systematize the evaluation of various risk factors for caries and to develop targeted prevention interventions based on caries risk. The benefits derived from these models in terms of improving the health of high-risk groups such as older adults have not been well studied. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the application of the Cariogram software in the management of dental care for 3 elderly patients.

  8. Aging and Risk: Physical and Sexual Abuse of Elders in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brozowski, Kari; Hall, David R.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we review the literature on physical and sexual elder abuse within the context of risk theory and feminist sociology. Employing data from the 1999 General Social Survey, we also examine several variables potentially associated with the risk for physical or sexual abuse of elders. Women, Aboriginal Canadians, and elders who are…

  9. Aging and Risk: Physical and Sexual Abuse of Elders in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brozowski, Kari; Hall, David R.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we review the literature on physical and sexual elder abuse within the context of risk theory and feminist sociology. Employing data from the 1999 General Social Survey, we also examine several variables potentially associated with the risk for physical or sexual abuse of elders. Women, Aboriginal Canadians, and elders who are…

  10. Greater risks of chemotherapy toxicity in elderly patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Lazzaro

    2003-01-01

    Complications of cytotoxic chemotherapy are more common in older patients (65 years of age and older) with cancer than in younger patients, and the occurrence of myelosuppression, mucositis, cardiodepression, peripheral neuropathy, and central neurotoxicity can complicate treatment. Age-related physiologic changes that can increase the toxicity of chemotherapy are decreased stem-cell reserves, decreased ability to repair cell damage, progressive loss of body protein, and accumulation of body fat. A decline in organ function can alter the pharmacokinetics of many of the commonly used chemotherapeutic agents in some elderly patients, making toxicity less predictable. Comorbidities increase the risk of toxicity through their effects on the body. Furthermore, the drugs used to treat comorbidities may interact with chemotherapeutic drugs, potentially increasing toxicity in elderly patients. Prospective trials in older patients with lymphoma or solid tumors have found that age is a risk factor for chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and its complications. Anemia may be present because of the disease or its treatment, and, if left uncorrected, it can alter drug activity and increase toxicity. Being able to predict which elderly patients are at greater risk of toxicity on the basis of pretreatment factors would be valuable, and there is a need for prospective trials to determine regimen- and patient-specific prognostic factors. Effective management of the toxicity associated with chemotherapy with appropriate supportive care is crucial, especially in the elderly population, to give them the best chance of cure and survival, or to provide palliation. For example, management of neutropenic complications with colony-stimulating factors makes treatment with standard-dose chemotherapy possible, which can lead to better outcomes. A better understanding of drug activity and toxicity in older patients is necessary for developing guidelines for safe and effective treatment. Few

  11. High Cancer Burden in Elderly Chinese, 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    Li, Shugang; Zhang, Xuefei; Yan, Yizhong; Wang, Kui; Rui, Dongsheng; Pang, Lijuan; Li, Feng

    2015-09-29

    Cancer risk increases with age, creating a challenge for the Chinese health system. To inform public health policy and research, we evaluated the cancer burden in elderly Chinese. Based on the published Chinese Cancer Registry Annual Report or related literature and the China Population and Employment Statistics Yearbooks, we estimated the cancer burden of elderly Chinese, who were representative of the Chinese population. We calculated the cancer incidence, cancer-related mortality, potential years of life lost (PYLL), and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in 2005-2011 by age, sex, district (rural, urban), and calendar year using national cancer registry, publication, and census data. The relative ratios (RRs) were determined between the elderly (≥60 years) and young (<60 years). Cancer incidence and related mortality in the elderly were 8.47 and 13.96 times, respectively, those in the young. The PYLL and DALY rates of the elderly were 1.63 and 5.00 times, respectively, those in the young. The PYLL and DALY rates for elderly men and rural districts were higher than for elderly women and urban districts. The RRs for male sex and rural districts were higher than for female sex and urban districts. RRs increased sharply from 2005 to 2011. The cancer burden in elderly Chinese was higher in men and rural districts than in women and urban districts, which creates considerable challenges for the Chinese health care system. Comprehensive measures for cancer prevention and treatment in the elderly are needed.

  12. Cohort study of institutionalized elderly people: fall risk factors from the nursing diagnosis1

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Karine Marques Costa; de Jesus, Cristine Alves Costa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to determine the incidence of falls in elderly residents of long-stay institutions of the Federal District, to identify the aspects involved in the falls, in terms of risk factors, from the application of scales and the Taxonomy II of NANDA-I, and to define the level of accuracy with its sensitivity and specificity for application in the clinical nursing practice. Method: this was a cohort study with the evaluation of 271 elderly people. Cognition, functionality, mobility and other intrinsic factors were evaluated. After six months, the elderly people who fell were identified, with significance analysis then performed to define the risk factors. Results: the results showed an incidence of 41%. Of the 271 patients included, 69 suffered 111 episodes of falls during the monitoring period. Risk factors were the presence of stroke with its sequelae (OR: 1.82, 95% CI 1.01 - 3.28, p=.045), presenting more than five chronic diseases (OR: 2.82, 95% CI 1.43 - 5.56, p=.0028), foot problem (OR: 2.45, 95% CI 1.35 - 4.44, p=.0033) and motion (OR: 2.04, 95% CI 1.15 - 3.61, p=.0145). Conclusion: the taxonomy has high validity regarding the detection of elderly people at risk of falling and should be applied consistently in the clinical nursing practice. PMID:26626005

  13. Adjuvant Chemoradiation After Surgical Resection in Elderly Patients With High-Risk Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: A National Cancer Database Analysis.

    PubMed

    Woody, Neil M; Ward, Matthew C; Koyfman, Shlomo A; Reddy, Chandana A; Geiger, Jessica; Joshi, Nikhil; Burkey, Brian; Scharpf, Joseph; Lamarre, Eric; Prendes, Brandon; Adelstein, David J

    2017-07-15

    To determine the patterns of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy use in elderly patients treated with definitive surgical resection for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with extracapsular extension (ECE) or positive margins and determine whether an association with overall survival (OS) exists with adjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The National Cancer Database was queried to identify patients with SCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx who were treated with primary definitive surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy between 2004 and 2012. For elderly patients (aged >70 years) with pathology revealing ECE or positive margin, the benefit of concurrent chemotherapy was explored using multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling. A total of 7349 patients were identified meeting study criteria, of whom 1187 were elderly (aged >70 years) with a median follow-up of 30.6 months. Of these elderly patients, 445 had ECE or positive margin and represent the study population, of whom 187 (42%) received CRT. Delivery of CRT in this cohort increased over the study period, and intensity modulated radiation therapy was associated with increased use of CRT (odds ratio 2.07; P=.004). Increasing age was associated with reduced use of CRT (odds ratio 0.88; P<.001). Chemoradiotherapy was associated with a significant improvement in OS on multivariable analysis (hazard ratio 0.74; P=.04) and a trend toward significance on inverse propensity score analysis (hazard ratio 0.78; P=.051). Three-year OS was 53.8% in the CRT group, compared with 44.6% in the adjuvant radiation therapy-alone patients. The use of adjuvant CRT is increasing among elderly patients with resected squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck exhibiting ECE or positive margins. Chemoradiotherapy was associated with an improvement in OS on multivariable analysis but not propensity-weighted analysis. Among fit elderly patients with ECE or positive margins after definitive surgical

  14. Elder Abuse and Neglect Risk Alleviation in Protective Services.

    PubMed

    Burnes, David P R; Rizzo, Victoria M; Courtney, Erin

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about conditions associated with favorable elder mistreatment (EM) case outcomes. The fundamental goal of EM protective service programs is to alleviate risk associated with substantiated cases of elder abuse and neglect. Using the EM socio-cultural model, this study examined victim, perpetrator, victim-perpetrator relationship, social embeddedness, and socio-cultural factors predicting risk alleviation of EM cases. Data from a random sample of EM protective social service cases (n = 250) at a large community agency in New York City were collected and coded by multiple, independent raters. Multinomial and binary logistic regression were used to examine undifferentiated risk alleviation for the entire sample of EM cases as well as differentiated financial, emotional, and physical abuse sub-types. Undifferentiated EM risk alleviation was associated with male victim gender, older victim age, previous community help-seeking, and victim-perpetrator dyads characterized by a separate living arrangement and shorter term abuse longevity. Financial abuse cases with younger perpetrators were less likely to have risk reduction. Physical abuse risk reduction was less likely when the perpetrator was male and the victim-perpetrator dyad included different genders. Distinct findings across EM sub-types suggest a need to develop targeted practice strategies with clients experiencing different forms of EM. Findings highlight a need to develop EM protective service infrastructure around perpetrator rehabilitation.

  15. Urban-Hazard Risk Analysis: Mapping of Heat-Related Risks in the Elderly in Major Italian Cities

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, Marco; Crisci, Alfonso; Gioli, Beniamino; Gualtieri, Giovanni; Toscano, Piero; Di Stefano, Valentina; Orlandini, Simone; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-term impacts of high temperatures on the elderly are well known. Even though Italy has the highest proportion of elderly citizens in Europe, there is a lack of information on spatial heat-related elderly risks. Objectives Development of high-resolution, heat-related urban risk maps regarding the elderly population (≥65). Methods A long time-series (2001–2013) of remote sensing MODIS data, averaged over the summer period for eleven major Italian cities, were downscaled to obtain high spatial resolution (100 m) daytime and night-time land surface temperatures (LST). LST was estimated pixel-wise by applying two statistical model approaches: 1) the Linear Regression Model (LRM); 2) the Generalized Additive Model (GAM). Total and elderly population density data were extracted from the Joint Research Centre population grid (100 m) from the 2001 census (Eurostat source), and processed together using “Crichton’s Risk Triangle” hazard-risk methodology for obtaining a Heat-related Elderly Risk Index (HERI). Results The GAM procedure allowed for improved daytime and night-time LST estimations compared to the LRM approach. High-resolution maps of daytime and night-time HERI levels were developed for inland and coastal cities. Urban areas with the hazardous HERI level (very high risk) were not necessarily characterized by the highest temperatures. The hazardous HERI level was generally localized to encompass the city-centre in inland cities and the inner area in coastal cities. The two most dangerous HERI levels were greater in the coastal rather than inland cities. Conclusions This study shows the great potential of combining geospatial technologies and spatial demographic characteristics within a simple and flexible framework in order to provide high-resolution urban mapping of daytime and night-time HERI. In this way, potential areas for intervention are immediately identified with up-to-street level details. This information could support public

  16. Reducing the risk of stroke in elderly patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: a practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Foody, Joanne M

    2017-01-01

    Non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) significantly contributes to the burden of stroke, particularly in elderly patients. The challenge of optimizing anticoagulation therapy is balancing efficacy and bleeding risk, especially as the same patients at high risk of stroke also tend to be at high risk of bleeding. Treating the elderly patient with NVAF presents special challenges because of their heightened risk for both stroke and bleeding. Despite clinical trial data and evidence-based guidelines, surveys indicate that physicians underuse anticoagulation in older patients for reasons that include overemphasis of bleeding risk, particularly with the increased risk of falling, at the cost of thromboembolic risk. Clinical trial data are now available, and real-world data are emerging, to illustrate the relative merits of the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants compared with conventional anticoagulation in the treatment of elderly patients with this condition, and to suggest some subgroups of older patients who may be more suitable candidates for particular agents. Care of elderly patients with NVAF is often complicated by factors including risk of falling, adherence, health literacy, cognitive function, adverse effects, and involvement of caregivers, as well as other factors including the patient–provider relationship and logistical barriers to obtaining medication. Thus, conversations between clinicians and patients, as well as shared decision making, are important. In addition, elderly patients often suffer from comorbidities including hypertension, coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, COPD, and/or heart failure, which necessitate the use of multiple concomitant medications, increasing the risk of drug/drug interactions. This review provides an overview of clinical trial data on the use of non-vitamin K anticoagulant agents in elderly populations, and serves as a practical resource for the management of NVAF in the elderly patient. PMID:28182166

  17. Oral health and mortality risk in the institutionalised elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sandvik, Leiv; Gil-Montoya, José A.; Willumsen, Tiril

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Examining oral health and oral hygiene as predictors of subsequent one-year survival in the institutionalized elderly. Design: It was hypothesized that oral health would be related to mortality in an institutionalized geriatric population. A 12-month prospective study of 292 elderly residing in nine geriatric institutions in Granada, Spain, was thus carried out to evaluate the association between oral health and mortality. Independent samples, T-test, chi-square test and Cox regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Sixty-three participants died during the 12-month follow-up. Results: Mortality was increased in denture users (RR = 2.18, p= 0.007) and in people suffering severe cognitive impairment (RR = 2. 24, p= 0.003). One-year mortality was 50% in participants having both these characteristics. Conclusions: Oral hygiene was not significantly associated with mortality. Cognitive impairment and wearing dentures increased the risk of death. One-year mortality was 50% in cognitively impaired residents wearing dentures as opposed to 10% in patients without dentures and cognitive impairment. Key words:Oral health, mortality risk, institutionalised elderly. PMID:22322487

  18. Impact of acculturation on cardiovascular risk factors among elderly Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    López, Lenny; Peralta, Carmen A; Lee, Anne; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Haan, Mary N

    2014-10-01

    Higher levels of acculturation among Latinos have been shown to be associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in some studies of middle-age persons. The association of acculturation and prevalence of CV risk factors in elderly Latinos is less well established. Acculturation was measured using the validated bidimensional Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans-II. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the association of acculturation with prevalence of CV risk factors among 1789 elderly men and women from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging using multivariate linear and logistic regression. We tested for the interaction of acculturation with risk factors by nativity status. Median age was 69.8 years. Higher acculturation was associated with lower systolic blood pressure, lower low-density lipoprotein, higher high-density lipoprotein, and lower prevalence of CV disease after age and sex adjustment. Higher acculturation remained associated with lower level of low-density lipoprotein and higher level of high-density lipoprotein after full adjustment. Nativity status did not affect these results. Contrary to other reports in middle-aged persons, higher levels of acculturation were associated with better lipid profiles and no significant differences in other CV risk factors by acculturation level in elderly Latinos. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cervical Spine Surgery Complications and Risks in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Kris; Ong, Kevin L; Lovald, Scott; Lau, Edmund; Kurd, Mark

    2017-03-15

    Cervical decompression (CD) and cervical fusion (CF) patients in 5% Medicare Part B claims data. Evaluate the complication rate and associated risk factors after cervical spine surgery using a national sample of elderly patients. The number of cervical spine procedures in the United States has risen along with associated hospital costs. Postoperative complications lead to longer hospitalizations and greater costs. Demographic information and postoperative complications (90 days) were evaluated. Multivariate Cox regression was used to evaluate the risk factors for the complications, while adjusting for age, socioeconomic status, Charlson comorbidity index, race, census region, sex, and year of surgery. Between 2010 and 2012, 1519 CD and 1273 CF Medicare patients were identified in the dataset. Respiratory complications (CD: 12.1% and CF: 14.6%), urinary retention (CD: 8.2% and CF: 9.1%), acute delirium (CD: 5.3% and CF: 6.0%), and nausea/vomiting (CD: 2.8% and CF: 3.1%) were the most commonly diagnosed complications. All other complications had an incidence of less than 1.5%. Older patients had higher risks of respiratory complications for both procedures, and CD patients with Charlson scores of 1 to 2 and 5+ were also at higher risk of respiratory complications. Males (P <0.001) were at higher risk of urinary retention. Patients with dementia (P <0.001) had a higher risk of acute delirium after both CD and CF. For CD patients, those aged 85 years and over had higher risk of acute delirium, along with patients with transient ischemic attack/stroke. Age was also a significant risk factor (P = 0.019) for acute delirium for CF patients. Females were at a significantly higher risk of nausea/vomiting after CD and CF. These data help to provide baseline information regarding the complication rates in the elderly CD and CF patient population in the United States, and will serve to help minimize these complications. 3.

  20. An angiotensin II receptor blocker-calcium channel blocker combination prevents cardiovascular events in elderly high-risk hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease better than high-dose angiotensin II receptor blockade alone.

    PubMed

    Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Ogawa, Hisao; Matsui, Kunihiko; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2013-01-01

    The OSCAR study was a multicenter, prospective randomized open-label blinded end-point study of 1164 Japanese elderly hypertensive patients comparing the efficacy of angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) uptitration to an ARB plus calcium channel blocker (CCB) combination. In this prospective study, we performed prespecified subgroup analysis according to baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with chronic kidney disease (CKD) defined as an eGFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Blood pressure was lower in the combined therapy than in the high-dose ARB cohort in both groups with and without CKD. In patients with CKD, significantly more primary events (a composite of cardiovascular events and noncardiovascular death) occurred in the high-dose ARB group than in the combination group (30 vs. 16, respectively, hazard ratio 2.25). Significantly more cerebrovascular and more heart failure events occurred in the high-dose ARB group than in the combination group. In patients without CKD, however, the incidence of primary events was similar between the two treatments. The treatment-by-subgroup interaction was significant. Allocation to the high-dose ARB was a significant independent prognostic factor for primary events in patients with CKD. Thus, the ARB plus CCB combination conferred greater benefit in prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with CKD compared with high-dose ARB alone. Our findings provide new insight into the antihypertensive strategy for elderly hypertensive patients with CKD.

  1. Are sedatives and hypnotics associated with increased suicide risk of suicide in the elderly?

    PubMed

    Carlsten, Anders; Waern, Margda

    2009-06-04

    . Given the extremely high prescription rates, a careful evaluation of the suicide risk should always precede prescribing a sedative or hypnotic to an elderly individual.

  2. Risk factors of falls among elderly living in urban Suez--Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Mohammed Hany; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed; Ismail, Sally El-Sayed

    2013-01-01

    Falling is one of the most common geriatric syndromes threatening the independence of older persons. Falls result from a complex and interactive mix of biological or medical, behavioral and environmental factors, many of which are preventable. Studying these diverse risk factors would aid early detection and management of them at the primary care level. This is a cross sectional study about risk factors of falls was conducted to 340 elders in Urban Suez. Those are all patients over 60 who attended two family practice centers in Urban Suez. When asked about falling during the past 12 months, 205 elders recalled at least one incident of falling. Of them, 36% had their falls outdoors and 24% mentioned that stairs was the most prevalent site for indoor falls. Falls were also reported more among dependant than independent elderly. Using univariate regression analysis, almost all tested risk factors were significantly associated with falls in the studied population. These risk factors include: living alone, having chronic diseases, using medications, having a physical deficit, being in active, and having a high nutritional risk. However, the multivariate regression analysis proved that the strongest risk factors are low level of physical activity with OR 0.6 and P value 0.03, using a cane or walker (OR 1.69 and P value 0.001) and Impairment of daily living activities (OR 1.7 and P value 0.001). Although falls is a serious problem among elderly with many consequences, it has many preventable risk factors. Health care providers should advice people to remain active and more research is needed in such an important area of Family Practice.

  3. Thyrotropin and Alzheimer's Disease Risk in the Elderly: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunyang; Sheng, Qi; Hou, Xu; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Wenjuan; Yan, Shengli; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Shihua

    2016-03-01

    Although several epidemiological studies assessed the relationship between thyrotropin and risk of Alzheimer's disease in the elderly, the results were inconsistent. A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies was conducted to assess the impact of serum thyrotropin levels on Alzheimer's disease risk. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched through September 20, 2014 to identify cohort studies on the relationship between serum thyrotropin levels and risk of Alzheimer's disease in the elderly. Pooled relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated to assess the risk of Alzheimer's disease according to serum thyrotropin levels. Eight prospective cohort studies were included, with a total of 9456 participants and 640 cases of Alzheimer's disease. Low thyrotropin level was significantly associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (fixed RR = 1.69, 95% CI 1.31-2.19, P < 0.001; I(2) = 38.0%). High thyrotropin level was also significantly associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (fixed RR = 1.70, 95% CI 1.18-2.45, P = 0.005; I(2) = 42.2%) when compared with normal thyrotropin level. When using random effect model, low thyrotropin level was still significantly associated with risk of Alzheimer's disease (random RR = 1.65, 95% CI 1.14-2.37, P = 0.007), but high thyrotropin level was not (random RR = 1.54, 95% CI 0.88-2.68, P = 0.129). When investigating thyrotropin levels continuously, an inverse but not significant association between serum thyrotropin levels and Alzheimer's disease risk was observed (per standard deviation increment of thyrotropin: RR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.78-1.01, P = 0.06; I(2) = 31.3%). This meta-analysis supports that low thyrotropin level is significantly associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in the elderly.

  4. The Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index Predicts Survival in Elderly Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients with Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kunlun; Liu, Yang; You, Jie; Cui, Han; Zhu, Yiwei; Yuan, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The impact of nutritional status on survival among elderly esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients undergoing radiotherapy is unclear. In this study, we aimed at validating the performance of the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) in predicting overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 239 ESCC patients aged 60 and over admitted consecutively from January 2008 to November 2014 in the Department of Radiotherapy, Henan Tumor Hospital (Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Zhengzhou University), Zhengzhou, Henan, China. All patients were subjected to nutritional screening using GNRI, and were followed for the occurrence of lymphatic node metastasis, radiation complication and mortality. The Kaplan–Meier method with Log-rank test was used to estimate survival curves. Univariable Cox regression analysis was used to identify variables associated with overall survival time. Among the 239 patients, 184 patients (76.9%) took no nutritional risk, 32 patients (13.4%) took moderate risk of malnutrition, and 23 patients (9.7%) took a high risk of malnutrition. Univariable Cox regression showed that both high nutritional risk group and moderate nutritional risk group were significantly less likely to survive than no nutritional risk patients (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.688, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.019–2.798 for moderate risk group, and HR = 2.699, 95% CI = 1.512–4.819 for high risk group, respectively). The GNRI is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A GNRI ≤98 can be suggested as an indicator of surviving less. PMID:27196126

  5. Dental caries: risk assessment and treatment solutions for an elderly population.

    PubMed

    Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2002-10-01

    Caries remains one of the top three most common infectious diseases in the world today. Although caries prevalence decreased markedly in children and in adults up to age 40 between 1975 and 2000, the overall risk for caries in older age groups (45 to 64, 65 to 84, and > 85 years of age) has not decreased appreciably. In fact, the risk for caries in individuals 70 years of age and older has increased. The increase in restorative work needed between 1990 and 2030 will be highest in adults over the age of 44 years. Root caries prevalence and the number of restored teeth will be greatest in the elderly population. Approximately 30% of individuals over the age of 65 will have no permanent teeth. It is also apparent that additional caries risk factors are associated with a significant proportion of the older population, including reduced saliva flow, inadequate oral hygiene, frequent sugar intake, Asian ethnicity, and the presence of partial dentures. The principles of modern caries management focus on risk assessment, risk reduction, monitoring noncavitated carious lesions, and the assignment of specific treatment options according to risk. Because a relatively high proportion of elderly patients will remain at high risk for caries, therapeutic regimens for managing caries as an infectious disease must focus on the use of antibacterial treatment; high-fluoride dentifrices; supplementary low-dose, high-frequency fluoride rinses; patient education; and shorter recall intervals.

  6. Association between advanced oxidation protein products and 5-year mortality risk among amazon riparian elderly population.

    PubMed

    Silva, T O; Jung, I E C; Moresco, R N; Barbisan, F; Ribeiro, E E; Ribeiro, E A M; Motta, K; Britto, E; Tasch, E; Bochi, G; Duarte, M M F; Oliveira, A R; Marcon, M; Belló, C; dos Santos Montagner, G F; da Cruz, I B M

    2015-02-01

    Proteins are important targets of several modifications caused by oxidative stress, leading to structural changes and consequently partial or total loss of their functions. The oxidized proteins include advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) derived from oxidation-modified albumin, as well as fibrinogen and lipoproteins. An increase in AOPP levels indicates an oxidative stress state and the presence of coexisting inflammation. Several investigations have also suggested an association between high AOPP levels and aging-related diseases. However, the link between elevated AOPP levels and elderly mortality risk has not yet been investigated. Here, we report on a 5-year longitudinal study that investigated the potential association between AOPP levels and mortality using a population-based representative sample of riparian elders living in Brazilian Amazon region (Maués-AM). Age, sex, socioeconomic and cultural conditions, chronic morbidities, polypharmacy, and previous morbidities were also tested as potential confounders. The AOPP levels were measured in 540 (84.78%) individuals, all of whom were followed over a 5-year period in order to establish the mortality rate. Within this study period, 74 (13.7%) elders died and 466 (86.3%) survived. The AOPP levels were higher among the elders who died within the 5-year period (46.27 ± 40.6 mmol/L) compared with those who survived (36.79 ± 20.84 mmol/L) (p = 0.002). The analysis confirmed the link between high AOPP levels and mortality risk, independent of other intervenient factors. These results suggest that elevated AOPP levels could be used to predict mortality risk in elderly patients.

  7. Acute Precipitants of Physical Elder Abuse: Qualitative Analysis of Legal Records From Highly Adjudicated Cases.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Tony; Bloemen, Elizabeth M; LoFaso, Veronica M; Clark, Sunday; Flomenbaum, Neal E; Breckman, Risa; Markarian, Arlene; Riffin, Catherine; Lachs, Mark S; Pillemer, Karl

    2016-08-09

    Elder abuse is a common phenomenon with potentially devastating consequences for older adults. Although researchers have begun to identify predisposing risk factors for elder abuse victims and abusers, little is known about the acute precipitants that lead to escalation to physical violence. We analyzed legal records from highly adjudicated cases to describe these acute precipitants for physical elder abuse. In collaboration with a large, urban district attorney's office, we qualitatively evaluated legal records from 87 successfully prosecuted physical elder abuse cases from 2003 to 2015. We transcribed and analyzed narratives of the events surrounding physical abuse within victim statements, police reports, and prosecutor records. We identified major themes using content analysis. We identified 10 categories of acute precipitants that commonly triggered physical elder abuse, including victim attempting to prevent the abuser from entering or demanding that he or she leave, victim threatening or attempting to leave/escape, threat or perception that the victim would involve the authorities, conflict about a romantic relationship, presence during/intervention in ongoing family violence, issues in multi-generational child rearing, conflict about the abuser's substance abuse, confrontation about financial exploitation, dispute over theft/destruction of property, and disputes over minor household issues. Common acute precipitants of physical elder abuse may be identified. Improved understanding of these acute precipitants for escalation to physical violence and their contribution to elder abuse may assist in the development of prevention and management strategies.

  8. Salzburg Skiing for the Elderly Study: changes in cardiovascular risk factors through skiing in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Niederseer, D; Ledl-Kurkowski, E; Kvita, K; Patsch, W; Dela, F; Mueller, E; Niebauer, J

    2011-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown that treatment of the modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) results in a decreased risk to suffer from stroke or myocardial infarction. Despite the fact that exercise training is a potent treatment choice for CVRF, this is the first randomized study to assess the effects of alpine skiing on CVRF in elderly skiers. Subjects (n=42) were randomized into an intervention group (IG; n=22; 12 males/10 females; age: 66.6 ± 2.1 years) completing 12 weeks of guided skiing or a control group (CG; n=20; 10 males/10 females; age: 67.3 ± 4.4 years). CVRF were assessed before and after the intervention period. No cardiovascular event occurred within a total of 795.1 h of skiing. A significant increase in exercise capacity in IG (ΔVO(2 max) : +2.0 mL/kg/min, P=0.005) but not in CG (ΔVO(2 max) : -0.1 mL/kg/min, P=0.858; IG vs CG: P=0.008) as well as a decrease in body fat mass [IG: -2.3%, P<0.0001; CG: ± 0.0%, P=0.866; IG vs CG: P<0.0001] was achieved. Blood pressure, blood lipids, heart rate and everyday physical activity remained essentially unchanged. Alpine skiing in the elderly is safe with respect to cardiovascular events, and improves some, but not all CVRF.

  9. Atorvastatin and cardiovascular risk in the elderly – patient considerations

    PubMed Central

    Acharjee, Subroto; Welty, Francine K

    2008-01-01

    Elderly individuals are at increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and account for a majority of CHD deaths. Several clinical trials have assessed the beneficial effects of statins in individuals with, or at risk of developing, CHD. These trials provide evidence that statins reduce risk and improve clinical outcomes even in older patients; however, statin therapy remains under-utilized among the aged. Atorvastatin has been widely investigated among the older subjects and has the greatest magnitude of favorable effects on clinical outcomes of CHD. The pharmacokinetic properties of atorvastatin allow it to be used every other day, a factor which may decrease adverse events and be especially important in the elderly. The purpose of this article is to review the evidence available from randomized clinical trials regarding the safety and efficacy of atorvastatin in primary and secondary prevention of CHD and stroke in older patients and to discuss issues such as drug interactions, patient compliance and cost-effectiveness, which affect prescription of lipid-lowering therapy among older patients. PMID:18686752

  10. Atorvastatin and cardiovascular risk in the elderly--patient considerations.

    PubMed

    Acharjee, Subroto; Welty, Francine K

    2008-01-01

    Elderly individuals are at increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and account for a majority of CHD deaths. Several clinical trials have assessed the beneficial effects of statins in individuals with, or at risk of developing, CHD. These trials provide evidence that statins reduce risk and improve clinical outcomes even in older patients; however, statin therapy remains under-utilized among the aged. Atorvastatin has been widely investigated among the older subjects and has the greatest magnitude of favorable effects on clinical outcomes of CHD. The pharmacokinetic properties of atorvastatin allow it to be used every other day, a factor which may decrease adverse events and be especially important in the elderly. The purpose of this article is to review the evidence available from randomized clinical trials regarding the safety and efficacy of atorvastatin in primary and secondary prevention of CHD and stroke in older patients and to discuss issues such as drug interactions, patient compliance and cost-effectiveness, which affect prescription of lipid-lowering therapy among older patients.

  11. Trazodone in the elderly: risk of extrapyramidal acute events.

    PubMed

    Sotto Mayor, Joana; Pacheco, Ana Paula; Esperança, Sofia; Oliveira e Silva, Antonio

    2015-07-14

    Trazodone is a second-generation atypical antidepressant exercising selective inhibitory action on the transport of serotonin. It also has an antagonist effect, similar to nefazodone, on the 5HT1 and 5HT2 receptors, probably due to the therapeutic effects of such substances. It is very effective in the treatment of depression, in anxiety and insomnia. Its known side effects mainly occur with prolonged use of daily doses of 150-200 mg. The ability to enhance drowsiness may be associated with some risk in elderly patients. This clinical case illustrates an acute extrapyramidal event induced by a low dose of trazodone.

  12. Age and sex-related differences in risk factors for elderly suicide: Differentiating between suicide ideation and attempts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyuk; Seol, Ki Ho; Kim, Jun Won

    2017-10-02

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the age and sex-related differences in socio-demographic factors that influence suicide ideation and attempts in the elderly. The total number of subjects was 93 151, of whom 8441 belonged to the high suicide-risk group (2064 male; 6377 female). Following this identification, we investigated their socio-demographic information, health status, and depressive symptoms, which might have influenced their suicide ideation and attempts. Residence in an urban area was identified as a risk factor for both male and female elderly in their 60s and 70s and female elderly in their 80s. Marital status showed a different influence on suicide ideation depending on age and sex. A negative perception of one's own health status was a significant risk factor that increased the likelihood of suicide ideation in all ages, except the female elderly in their 60s. No factor was identified that significantly influenced suicide attempts in the male elderly. However, in the female elderly, residence in an urban area and a negative perception of one's own health status were identified as significant risk factors. This study revealed that factors known to influence suicide ideation in the elderly from previous studies, such as residence area, separation from a spouse, education level, religion, and drinking, show changed influence as the elderly reach their 70s and 80s. However, a negative perception of one's own health status was a risk factor that encompassed most ages and sexes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Nutritional Status among Rural Community Elderly in the Risk Area of Liver Fluke, Surin Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Namwichaisirikul, Niwatchai; Loyd, Ryan A; Churproong, Seekaow; Ueng-Arporn, Naporn; Matrakool, Likit; Tongtawee, Taweesak; Rujirakul, Ratana; Nimkhuntod, Porntip; Wakhuwathapong, Parichart; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2015-01-01

    Thailand is becoming an aging society, this presenting as a serious problem situation especially regarding health. Chronic diseases found frequently in the elderly may be related to dietary intake and life style. Surin province has been reported as a risk area for liver fluke with a high incidence of cholangiocarcinma especially in the elderly. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the nutritional status and associated factors among elderly in Surin province, northeast of Thailand. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 405 people aged 60 years and above, between September 2012 and July 2014. The participants were selected through a randomized systematic sampling method and completed a pre-designed questionnaire with general information, food recorded, weight, height, waist circumference, and behavior regarding to food consume related to liver fluke infection. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. The majority of participants was female (63.5%), age between 60-70 years old (75.6%), with elementary school education (96.6%), living with their (78.9%), and having underlying diseases (38.3%). Carbohydrate (95.3%) was need to improve the consumption. The participants demonstrated under-nutrition (24.4%), over-nutrition (16.4%), and obesity (15.4%). Elderly had a waist circumference as the higher than normal level (34.0%). Gender, female, age 71-80 years old, elementary school and underlying diseases were significantly associated with poor nutritional status. The majority of them had a high knowledge (43.0%), moderate attitude (44.4%), and moderate practice (46.2%) regarding food consumption related to liver fluke infection. In conclusion, these findings data indicated that elderly age group often have an under- or over-nutritional status. Carbohydrate consumption needs to be improved. Some elderly show behavior regarding food consumption that is related to liver fluke infection hat needs

  14. Severe pneumonia in the elderly: a multivariate analysis of risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Ding, Cheng; Yin, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the second leading reason for hospitalization of medicare beneficiaries. The mortality rate is high, especially in the elderly. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors associated with severe pneumonia in the elderly. Retrospective study was conducted and data of old patients with severe pneumonia were collected. They were divided into two groups: the experiment group (death group) and the control (living group). The general situation, underlying diseases, laboratory tests, types of etiology, imaging analysis and treatment situation of patients were analyzed and compared. Univariate analysis and logistic multivariate regression analysis were used to screen the related and independent risk factors for the diagnosis of severe pneumonia in the elderly. In univariate analysis, there were many factors had statistical significance including chronic kidney disease, electrolyte disturbance, low phosphorus and so on. Result of logistic multivariate regression analysis showed pro-BNP level and serum prealbumin were independent risk factors. In sputum culture, the relevance ratio of acinetobacter baumannii was the highest in gram negative bacteria followed by klebsiella pneumoniae. In gram positive bacteria, the relevance ratio of staphylococcus aureus was the highest. In conclusion, the analysis on risk factors for severe pneumonia has great clinical significance on improving the prognosis. PMID:26550157

  15. Severe pneumonia in the elderly: a multivariate analysis of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Ding, Cheng; Yin, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the second leading reason for hospitalization of medicare beneficiaries. The mortality rate is high, especially in the elderly. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors associated with severe pneumonia in the elderly. Retrospective study was conducted and data of old patients with severe pneumonia were collected. They were divided into two groups: the experiment group (death group) and the control (living group). The general situation, underlying diseases, laboratory tests, types of etiology, imaging analysis and treatment situation of patients were analyzed and compared. Univariate analysis and logistic multivariate regression analysis were used to screen the related and independent risk factors for the diagnosis of severe pneumonia in the elderly. In univariate analysis, there were many factors had statistical significance including chronic kidney disease, electrolyte disturbance, low phosphorus and so on. Result of logistic multivariate regression analysis showed pro-BNP level and serum prealbumin were independent risk factors. In sputum culture, the relevance ratio of acinetobacter baumannii was the highest in gram negative bacteria followed by klebsiella pneumoniae. In gram positive bacteria, the relevance ratio of staphylococcus aureus was the highest. In conclusion, the analysis on risk factors for severe pneumonia has great clinical significance on improving the prognosis.

  16. Red Blood Cell Eicosapentaenoic Acid Inversely Relates to MRI-Assessed Carotid Plaque Lipid Core Burden in Elders at High Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Bargalló, Núria; Gilabert, Rosa; Romero-Mamani, Edwin-Saúl; Cofán, Montserrat; Calder, Philip C; Fitó, Montserrat; Corella, Dolores; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Estruch, Ramon; Ros, Emilio; Sala-Vila, Aleix

    2017-09-20

    Supplemental marine omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has an anti-atherosclerotic effect. Clinical research on EPA supplied by the regular diet and atherosclerosis is scarce. In the framework of the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) trial, we conducted a cross-sectional study in 161 older individuals at high vascular risk grouped into different stages of carotid atherosclerosis severity, including those without ultrasound-detected atheroma plaque (n = 38), with plaques <2.0 mm thick (n = 65), and with plaques ≥2.0 mm (n = 79). The latter were asked to undergo contrast-enhanced 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and were subsequently grouped into absence (n = 31) or presence (n = 27) of MRI-detectable plaque lipid, a main feature of unstable atheroma plaques. We determined the red blood cell (RBC) proportion of EPA (a valid marker of long-term EPA intake) at enrolment by gas chromatography. In multivariate models, EPA related inversely to MRI-assessed plaque lipid volume, but not to maximum intima-media thickness of internal carotid artery, plaque burden, or MRI-assessed normalized wall index. The inverse association between EPA and plaque lipid content in patients with advanced atherosclerosis supports the notion that this fatty acid might improve cardiovascular health through stabilization of advanced atheroma plaques.

  17. Balance training program is highly effective in improving functional status and reducing the risk of falls in elderly women with osteoporosis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Madureira, M. M.; Takayama, L.; Gallinaro, A. L.; Caparbo, V. F.; Costa, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a 12-month Balance Training Program on balance, mobility and falling frequency in women with osteoporosis. Methods Sixty-six consecutive elderly women were selected from the Osteometabolic Disease Outpatient Clinic and randomized into 2 groups: the ‘Intervention’, submitted for balance training; and the ‘Control’, without intervention. Balance, mobility and falling frequency were evaluated before and at the end of the trial, using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Clinical Test Sensory Interaction Balance (CTSIB) and the Timed “Up & Go” Test (TUGT). Intervention used techniques to improve balance consisting of a 1-hour session each week and a home-based exercise program. Results Sixty women completed the study and were analyzed. The BBS difference was significant higher in the Intervention group compared to Control (5.5 ± 5.67 vs −0.5 ± 4.88 score, p < 0.001). Similarly, the number of patients in the Intervention group presented improvement in two conditions of CTSIB compared to Control (eyes closed and unstable surface condition: 13 vs one patient, p < 0.001 and eyes open, visual conflict and unstable surface condition: 12 vs one patient, p < 0.001). Additionally, the differences between the TUGT were reduced in the Intervention group compared to Control (−3.65 ± 3.61 vs 2.27 ± 7.18 seconds, p< 0.001). Notably, this improvement was paralleled by a reduction in the number of falls/patient in the Intervention group compared to Control (−0.77 ± 1.76 vs 0.33 ± 0.96, p = 0.018). Conclusion This longitudinal prospective study demonstrated that an intervention using balance training is effective in improving functional and static balance, mobility and falling frequency in elderly women with osteoporosis. PMID:17089080

  18. Efficacy of bleeding risk scores in elderly patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Solé, Albert; Formiga, Francesc; Lorente, Victoria; Sánchez-Salado, José C; Sánchez-Elvira, Guillermo; Roura, Gerard; Sánchez-Prieto, Remedios; Vila, Maria; Moliner, Pedro; Cequier, Angel

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of acute coronary syndromes is high in the elderly population. Bleeding is associated with a poorer prognosis in this clinical setting. The available bleeding risk scores have not been validated specifically in the elderly. Our aim was to assess predictive ability of the most important bleeding risk scores in patients with acute coronary syndrome aged ≥ 75 years. We prospectively included consecutive acute coronary syndromes patients. Baseline characteristics, laboratory findings, and hemodynamic data were collected. In-hospital bleeding was defined according to CRUSADE, Mehran, ACTION, and BARC definitions. CRUSADE, Mehran, and ACTION bleeding risk scores were calculated for each patient. The ability of these scores to predict major bleeding was assessed by binary logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic curves, and area under the curves. We included 2036 patients, with mean age of 62.1 years; 369 patients (18.1%) were ≥ 75 years. Older patients had higher bleeding risk (CRUSADE, 42 vs 22; Mehran, 25 vs 15; ACTION, 36 vs 28; P<.001) and a slightly higher incidence of major bleeding events (CRUSADE bleeding, 5.1% vs 3.8%; P=.250). The predictive ability of these 3 scores was lower in the elderly (area under the curve, CRUSADE: 0.63 in older patients, 0.81 in young patients; P=.027; Mehran: 0.67 in older patients, 0.73 in younger patients; P=.340; 0.58 in older patients, 0.75 in younger patients; P=.041). Current bleeding risk scores showed poorer predictive performance in elderly patients with acute coronary syndromes than in younger patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk factors for hospital readmission of elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Carlotta; Nobili, Alessandro; Mari, Daniela; Tettamanti, Mauro; Djade, Codjo D; Pasina, Luca; Salerno, Francesco; Corrao, Salvatore; Marengoni, Alessandra; Iorio, Alfonso; Marcucci, Maura; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify which factors were associated with a risk of hospital readmission within 3 months after discharge of a sample of elderly patients admitted to internal medicine and geriatric wards. Of the 1178 patients aged 65 years or more and discharged from one of the 66 wards of the 'Registry Politerapie SIMI (REPOSI)' during 2010, 766 were followed up by phone interview 3 months after discharge and were included in this analysis. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of several variables with rehospitalization within 3 months from discharge. Nineteen percent of patients were readmitted at least once within 3 months after discharge. By univariate analysis in-hospital clinical adverse events (AEs), a previous hospital admission, number of diagnoses and drugs, comorbidity and severity index (according to Cumulative Illness Rating Scale-CIRS), vascular and liver diseases with a level of impairment at discharge of 3 or more at CIRS were significantly associated with risk of readmission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that only AEs during hospitalization, previous hospital admission, and vascular and liver diseases were significantly associated with the likelihood of readmission. The results demonstrate the need for increased medical attention towards elderly patients discharged from hospital with characteristics such as AEs during the hospitalization, previous admission, vascular and liver diseases. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High Serum SHBG Predicts Incident Vertebral Fractures in Elderly Men

    PubMed Central

    Vandenput, Liesbeth; Mellström, Dan; Kindmark, Andreas; Johansson, Helena; Lorentzon, Mattias; Leung, Jason; Redlund‐Johnell, Inga; Rosengren, Björn E; Karlsson, Magnus K; Wang, Yi‐Xiang; Kwok, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous prospective cohort studies have shown that serum levels of sex steroids and sex hormone‐binding globulin (SHBG) associate with nonvertebral fracture risk in men. The predictive value of sex hormones and SHBG for vertebral fracture risk specifically is, however, less studied. Elderly men (aged ≥65 years) from Sweden and Hong Kong participating in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study had baseline estradiol and testosterone analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC‐MS) and SHBG by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Incident clinical vertebral fractures (n = 242 cases) were evaluated in 4324 men during an average follow‐up of 9.1 years. In a subsample of these men (n = 2256), spine X‐rays were obtained at baseline and after an average follow‐up of 4.3 years to identify incident radiographic vertebral fractures (n = 157 cases). The likelihood of incident clinical and radiographic vertebral fractures was estimated by Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression models, respectively. Neither serum estradiol (hazard ratio [HR] per SD increase = 0.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80–1.08) nor testosterone (1.05, 0.91–1.21) predicted incident clinical vertebral fractures in age‐adjusted models in the combined data set. High serum SHBG, however, associated with increased clinical vertebral fracture risk (1.24, 1.12–1.37). This association remained significant after further adjustment for FRAX with or without bone mineral density (BMD). SHBG also associated with increased incident radiographic vertebral fracture risk (combined data set; odds ratio [OR] per SD increase = 1.23, 95% CI 1.05–1.44). This association remained significant after adjustment for FRAX with or without BMD. In conclusion, high SHBG predicts incident clinical and radiographic vertebral fractures in elderly men and adds moderate information beyond FRAX with BMD for vertebral fracture risk prediction. © 2015 The

  1. A Summary Risk Score for the Prediction of Alzheimer Disease in Elderly Persons

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane; Tang, Ming-Xin; Schupf, Nicole; Manly, Jennifer J.; Mayeux, Richard; Luchsinger, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a simple summary risk score for the prediction of Alzheimer disease in elderly persons based on their vascular risk profiles. Design A longitudinal, community-based study. Setting New York, New York. Patients One thousand fifty-one Medicare recipients aged 65 years or older and residing in New York who were free of dementia or cognitive impairment at baseline. Main Outcome Measures We separately explored the associations of several vascular risk factors with late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) using Cox proportional hazards models to identify factors that would contribute to the risk score. Then we estimated the score values of each factor based on their βcoefficients and created the LOAD vascular risk score by summing these individual scores. Results Risk factors contributing to the risk score were age, sex, education, ethnicity, APOE ε4 genotype, history of diabetes, hypertension or smoking, high-density lipoprotein levels, and waist to hip ratio. The resulting risk score predicted dementia well. According to the vascular risk score quintiles, the risk to develop probable LOAD was 1.0 for persons with a score of 0 to 14 and increased 3.7-fold for persons with a score of 15 to 18, 3.6-fold for persons with a score of 19 to 22, 12.6-fold for persons with a score of 23 to 28, and 20.5-fold for persons with a score higher than 28. Conclusions While additional studies in other populations are needed to validate and further develop the score, our study suggests that this vascular risk score could be a valuable tool to identify elderly individuals who might be at risk of LOAD. This risk score could be used to identify persons at risk of LOAD, but can also be used to adjust for confounders in epidemiologic studies. PMID:20625090

  2. A summary risk score for the prediction of Alzheimer disease in elderly persons.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Christiane; Tang, Ming-Xin; Schupf, Nicole; Manly, Jennifer J; Mayeux, Richard; Luchsinger, José A

    2010-07-01

    To develop a simple summary risk score for the prediction of Alzheimer disease in elderly persons based on their vascular risk profiles. A longitudinal, community-based study. New York, New York. Patients One thousand fifty-one Medicare recipients aged 65 years or older and residing in New York who were free of dementia or cognitive impairment at baseline. We separately explored the associations of several vascular risk factors with late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) using Cox proportional hazards models to identify factors that would contribute to the risk score. Then we estimated the score values of each factor based on their beta coefficients and created the LOAD vascular risk score by summing these individual scores. Risk factors contributing to the risk score were age, sex, education, ethnicity, APOE epsilon4 genotype, history of diabetes, hypertension or smoking, high-density lipoprotein levels, and waist to hip ratio. The resulting risk score predicted dementia well. According to the vascular risk score quintiles, the risk to develop probable LOAD was 1.0 for persons with a score of 0 to 14 and increased 3.7-fold for persons with a score of 15 to 18, 3.6-fold for persons with a score of 19 to 22, 12.6-fold for persons with a score of 23 to 28, and 20.5-fold for persons with a score higher than 28. While additional studies in other populations are needed to validate and further develop the score, our study suggests that this vascular risk score could be a valuable tool to identify elderly individuals who might be at risk of LOAD. This risk score could be used to identify persons at risk of LOAD, but can also be used to adjust for confounders in epidemiologic studies.

  3. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's.

    PubMed

    Goes, Vanessa Fernanda; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela Billig; de Oliveira, Lilian Oliveira; Hack, Jaqueline; Magro, Marcela; Bonini, Juliana Sartori

    2014-01-01

    to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease. the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed. it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients. an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Risk factors in road crossing among elderly pedestrians and readiness to adopt safe behavior in socio-economic comparison.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Tova; Sapir-Lavid, Yael; Perlman, Amotz

    2016-08-01

    This research examines the Health Promotion Behavior (HPB) models regarding elderly pedestrians' behaviors and attitudes. We studied cognitive-psychological variables, such as risk estimation, self-efficacy and demographic variables and compared elderly pedestrians' attitudes and behaviors in a city with higher socio-economic level (Tel Aviv) versus a city with low socio-economic level (Beer Sheva). We expected to find more problematic behaviors among elderly pedestrians in the low socio-economic city compared to the high socio-economic city, and also less feeling of self-efficacy, and lessened awareness of the risks, that leads to lessened willingness to adopt preventive behaviors. The research was conducted in two studies. The first study was based on observations on 2591 pedestrians in six similar crosswalks in both cities. It revealed that pedestrians in the high socio-economic city demonstrated safer road crossing patterns than in the low socio-economic city and that elderly pedestrians reveal safer crossing patterns than younger pedestrians. We found an interaction of location and age due to greater gap of safe behaviors of elderly and young pedestrians in the high socio-economic city than in the low socio-economic city. In Tel Aviv elderly adhere to the crossing rules much more than the young while in Beer Sheva elderly and young people are almost similar in their crossing patterns. The second study used questionnaires that have been completed by 143 elderly in both cities. The questionnaires referred to (a) demographic variables such as gender, age, marital status, education, socio-economic level, (b) variables related to the affiliation to the main culture such as migration, date of migration, knowledge in Hebrew (local language) and connectivity to media and (c) cognitive as well as psychological variables related to the decline to adopt healthy behaviors based on Schwarzer and Fuchs (1995). This part also indicated that elderly in Tel Aviv have higher

  5. A Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER): Screening Experience and Baseline Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Ian; Blauw, Gerard Jan; Murphy, Michael B; Shepherd, James; Cobbe, Stuart M; Bollen, Edward LEM; Buckley, Brendan M; Jukema, J Wouter; Hyland, Michael; Gaw, Allan; Lagaay, A Margot; Perry, Ivan J; Macfarlane, Peter; Norrie, John; Meinders, A Edo; Sweeney, Brian J; Packard, Chris J; Westendorp, Rudi GJ; Twomey, Cillian; Stott, David J

    2002-01-01

    Background PROSPER was designed to investigate the benefits of treatment with pravastatin in elderly patients for whom a typical doctor might consider the prescription of statin therapy to be a realistic option. Methods The PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) is a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trial to test the hypothesis that treatment with pravastatin (40 mg/day) will reduce the risk of coronary heart disease death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and fatal or non-fatal stroke in elderly men and women with pre-existing vascular disease or with significant risk of developing this condition. Results In Scotland, Ireland, and the Netherlands, 23,770 individuals were screened, and 5,804 subjects (2,804 men and 3,000 women), aged 70 to 82 years (average 75 years) and with baseline cholesterol 4.0–9.0 mmol/l, were randomised. Randomised subjects had similar distributions with respect to age, blood pressure, and body mass index when compared to the entire group of screenees, but had a higher prevalence of smoking, diabetes, hypertension, and a history of vascular disease. The average total cholesterol level at baseline was 5.4 mmol/l (men) and 6.0 mmol/l (women). Conclusions Compared with previous prevention trials of cholesterol-lowering drugs, the PROSPER cohort is significantly older and for the first time includes a majority of women. The study, having achieved its initial goal of recruiting more than 5,500 elderly high-risk men and women, aims to complete all final subject follow-up visits in the first half of 2002 with the main results being available in the fourth quarter of 2002. PMID:12097148

  6. Morning blood pressure surge, dipping, and risk of ischemic stroke in elderly patients treated for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pierdomenico, Sante D; Pierdomenico, Anna M; Cuccurullo, Franco

    2014-04-01

    The independent prognostic significance of morning surge (MS) in blood pressure (BP) is not yet clear. We investigated the association between MS in systolic BP (SBP) and risk of ischemic stroke in elderly patients treated for hypertension. Occurrence of ischemic stroke was evaluated in 1,191 elderly patients treated for hypertension (aged 60-90 years). Patients were divided according to tertiles of MS in SBP in the population as a whole, dipping status, and group-specific tertiles of MS in SBP in dippers and nondippers. During follow-up (9.1±4.9 years, range 0.4-20 years), 139 ischemic strokes occurred. The event rate per 100 patient-years was 1.28. After adjustment for various covariates, Cox regression analysis showed that stroke risk was not significantly associated with tertiles of MS in SBP in the population as a whole. When nondippers and dippers were analyzed separately by group-specific tertiles of MS in SBP, stroke risk was not associated with MS in nondippers. Conversely, in dippers, stroke risk was significantly higher in the third tertile (>23mm Hg) of MS in SBP (hazard ratio, 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-4.23; P = 0.04). Additional analysis showed that stroke risk was significantly and similarly higher in dippers with MS >23mm Hg and in nondippers than in dippers with MS <23mm Hg. In elderly patients treated for hypertension, high MS in SBP predicts stroke in dippers but not in nondippers. Nondippers are at high stroke risk with or without MS >23mm Hg.

  7. Effects of a Stroke Primary Prevention Program on Risk Factors for At-Home Elderly.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol

    2015-11-28

    BACKGROUND To prevent stroke from occurring, stroke risk factors in at-risk subjects should be controlled and the diseases causing stroke should be managed. This study evaluated a nursing intervention to prevent stroke in at-risk elderly living at home. The program consisted of stroke and nutrition education as well as exercise guidance. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study targeted 93 elderly people living at home residing in E province with 1 or more stroke risk factors, including high blood pressure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, smoking, or drinking alcohol. The 12-week program included a stroke education class once a week, a nutrition management class once a week, and exercise guidance 3 times a week. Each session lasted 50-70 min. Each disease education and nutrition management session lasted for 20 min and each exercise session lasted for 30-50 min. RESULTS The experimental group's body mass index (BMI) (t=8.27, p<.001), systolic blood pressure (t=2.39, p=.021), fasting blood sugar (t=0.39, p=.700), total cholesterol (t=4.18, p<.001), triglyceride levels (t=2.50, p=.016), and depression scores (t=5.48, p<.001) were significantly reduced and high-density phospholipid protein levels increased significantly by the end of the program (t=-2.94, p=.005). CONCLUSIONS Based on the results of this study, participating in a stroke prevention program enabled at-risk elderly participants who lived at home in rural areas to perform health-promoting behaviors. This program may reduce the incidence of stroke by reducing risk factors and managing stroke precursor diseases.

  8. Elimination of early rehospitalization in a randomized, controlled trial of multidisciplinary care in a high-risk, elderly heart failure population: the potential contributions of specialist care, clinical stability and optimal angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor dose at discharge.

    PubMed

    McDonald, K; Ledwidge, M; Cahill, J; Kelly, J; Quigley, P; Maurer, B; Begley, F; Ryder, M; Travers, B; Timmons, L; Burke, T

    2001-03-01

    Despite a growing body of data demonstrating the benefits of multidisciplinary care in heart failure, persistently high rates of readmission, especially within the first month of discharge, continue to be documented. As part of an ongoing randomized study on the value of multidisciplinary care in a high risk (NYHA Class IV), elderly (mean age 69 years) heart failure population, we examined the effects of this intervention on previously high (20%) 1-month readmission rates. Unlike previous studies of this approach, both multidisciplinary (MC) and routine care (RC) populations were cared for by the cardiology service, complied with adherence to clinical stability criteria prior to discharge (100% of patients) and received at least target dose angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition with perindopril prior to discharge (94% of indicated patients). We analysed death and unplanned readmission for heart failure at 1 month. This early report from the first 70 patients (67% male, 71% systolic dysfunction with a mean ejection fraction of 31.0+/-6.7%) enrolled in this study demonstrates elimination of 1-month hospital readmission in both RC and MC groups. This unexpected result represents a dramatic improvement both for this patient cohort (20% 30-day readmission rate prior to enrollment reduced to 0% following the index admission in both care groups) and in comparison with available data. Critical contributors to this improvement appear to be specialist cardiology care, adherence to clinical stability criteria prior to discharge and routine use of target or high-dose ACE inhibitor therapy prior to discharge. Widespread application of this approach may have a dramatic improvement in morbidity of CHF while limiting the escalating costs of this condition.

  9. Identification of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment Based Risk Factors for Malnutrition in Elderly Asian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Whee Sze; Rajasekaran, Tanujaa; Nee Koo, Khai; Chan, Li Li; Poon, Donald; Roy Chowdhury, Anupama; Krishna, Lalit; Kanesvaran, Ravindran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Elderly cancer patients are at increased risk for malnutrition. We aim to identify comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) based clinical factors associated with increased nutritional risk and develop a clinical scoring system to identify nutritional risk in elderly cancer patients. Patients and Methods CGA data was collected from 249 Asian patients aged 70 years or older. Nutritional risk was assessed based on the Nutrition Screening Initiative (NSI) checklist. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to assess the association between patient clinical factors together with domains within the CGA and moderate to high nutritional risk. Goodness of fit was assessed using Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Discrimination ability was assessed based on the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC). Internal validation was performed using simulated datasets via bootstrapping. Results Among the 249 patients, 184 (74%) had moderate to high nutritional risk. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified stage 3–4 disease (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.54; 95% CI, 1.14–5.69), ECOG performance status of 2–4 (OR 3.04; 95% CI, 1.57–5.88), presence of depression (OR 5.99; 95% CI, 1.99–18.02) and haemoglobin levels <12 g/dL (OR 3.00; 95% CI 1.54–5.84) as significant independent factors associated with moderate to high nutritional risk. The model achieved good calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow test’s p = 0.17) and discrimination (AUC = 0.80). It retained good calibration and discrimination (bias-corrected AUC = 0.79) under internal validation. Conclusion Having advanced stage of cancer, poor performance status, depression and anaemia were found to be predictors of moderate to high nutritional risk. Early identification of patients with these risk factors will allow for nutritional interventions that may improve treatment tolerance, quality of life and survival outcomes. PMID:27231951

  10. [An investigation on the risk factors of elderly falls in the countryside old folks' homes].

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Yang, B; Liu, Y

    1998-12-01

    A case-control study was conducted among 154 cases of falls aged over 60 years in 18 old folks' homes in the countryside, using 1:1 pair-matching to explore the risk factors for the elderly falls. Data were analysed through Linear Logistic Regression. Results showed that spouseless, poor physical condition, abnormal gait, sufferying chronic situations as hypertension and sequelae of cerebral apoplexy, taking anti-hypertension drugs, abnormalities in taking static dynamic balance and walking tests in the elderly were main risk factors of the elderly falls. The strategies of prevention of the elderly falls were also discussed in the paper.

  11. Biweekly rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, non-pegylated liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin and prednisone (R-COMP-14) in elderly patients with poor-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and moderate to high ‘life threat’ impact cardiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Corazzelli, Gaetano; Frigeri, Ferdinando; Arcamone, Manuela; Lucania, Anna; RosariaVilla, Maria; Morelli, Emanuela; Amore, Alfonso; Capobianco, Gaetana; Caronna, Antonietta; Becchimanzi, Cristina; Volzone, Francesco; Marcacci, Gianpaolo; Russo, Filippo; De Filippi, Rosaria; Mastrullo, Lucia; Pinto, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    This Phase II study assessed feasibility and efficacy of a biweekly R-COMP-14 regimen (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, non-pegylated liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) in untreated elderly patients with poor-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and moderate to high ‘life threat’ impact NIA/NCI cardiac comorbidity. A total of 208 courses were delivered, with close cardiac monitoring, to 41 patients (median age: 73 years, range: 62–82; 37% >75 years) at a median interval of 15·6 (range, 13–29) days; 67% completed all six scheduled courses. Response rate was 73%, with 68% complete responses (CR); 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and time to treatment failure (TTF) were 72% and 49%, respectively. Failures were due to early death (n = 3), therapy discontinuations (no-response n = 2; toxicity n = 6), relapse (n = 6) and death in CR (n = 3). Incidence of cardiac grade 3–5 adverse events was 7/41 (17%; 95% confidence interval: 8–31%). Time to progression and overall survival at 4-years were 77% and 67%, respectively. The Age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (aaCCI) correlated with failures (P = 0·007) with patients scoring ≤7 having a longer TTF (66% vs. 29%; P = 0·009). R-COMP-14 is feasible and ensures a substantial DFS to poor-risk DLBCL patients who would have been denied anthracycline-based treatment due to cardiac morbidity. The aaCCI predicted both treatment discontinuation rate and TTF. PMID:21707585

  12. Biweekly rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, non-pegylated liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin and prednisone (R-COMP-14) in elderly patients with poor-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and moderate to high 'life threat' impact cardiopathy.

    PubMed

    Corazzelli, Gaetano; Frigeri, Ferdinando; Arcamone, Manuela; Lucania, Anna; Rosariavilla, Maria; Morelli, Emanuela; Amore, Alfonso; Capobianco, Gaetana; Caronna, Antonietta; Becchimanzi, Cristina; Volzone, Francesco; Marcacci, Gianpaolo; Russo, Filippo; De Filippi, Rosaria; Mastrullo, Lucia; Pinto, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    This Phase II study assessed feasibility and efficacy of a biweekly R-COMP-14 regimen (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, non-pegylated liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) in untreated elderly patients with poor-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and moderate to high 'life threat' impact NIA/NCI cardiac comorbidity. A total of 208 courses were delivered, with close cardiac monitoring, to 41 patients (median age: 73years, range: 62-82; 37% >75years) at a median interval of 15·6 (range, 13-29) days; 67% completed all six scheduled courses. Response rate was 73%, with 68% complete responses (CR); 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and time to treatment failure (TTF) were 72% and 49%, respectively. Failures were due to early death (n=3), therapy discontinuations (no-response n=2; toxicity n=6), relapse (n=6) and death in CR (n=3). Incidence of cardiac grade 3-5 adverse events was 7/41 (17%; 95% confidence interval: 8-31%). Time to progression and overall survival at 4-years were 77% and 67%, respectively. The Age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (aaCCI) correlated with failures (P=0·007) with patients scoring ≤7 having a longer TTF (66% vs. 29%; P=0·009). R-COMP-14 is feasible and ensures a substantial DFS to poor-risk DLBCL patients who would have been denied anthracycline-based treatment due to cardiac morbidity. The aaCCI predicted both treatment discontinuation rate and TTF.

  13. Reducing fall risk in the elderly: risk factors and fall prevention, a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pfortmueller, C A; Lindner, G; Exadaktylos, A K

    2014-08-01

    Falls in the elderly are a major source of injury resulting in disability and hospitalization. They have a significant impact on individual basis (loss of quality of live, nursing home admissions) and social basis (healthcare costs). Even though falls in the elderly are common there are some well studied risk factors. Special emphasis should be put on sarcopenia/frailty, polypharmacy, multimorbidity, vitamin D status and home hazards. There are several well evaluated fall prevention approaches that either target a single fall risk factor or focus on multiple risk factors. It has to be kept in mind that not all fall prevention strategies are useful for all patients as for example dietary substitution of vitamin D is only recommended in people with increased risk for a vitamin D deficiency. Home hazard reduction strategies are more effective when combined with other fall prevention approaches such as for example exercise programs. In conclusion elderly patients should routinely be screened for relevant risk factors and if need an indiviudally targeted fall prevention program compiled.

  14. A randomized phase 2 study comparing EC or CMF versus nab-paclitaxel plus capecitabine as adjuvant chemotherapy for nonfrail elderly patients with moderate to high-risk early breast cancer (ICE II-GBG 52).

    PubMed

    von Minckwitz, Gunter; Conrad, Bettina; Reimer, Toralf; Decker, Thomas; Eidtmann, Holger; Eiermann, Wolfgang; Hackmann, John; Möbus, Volker; Marmé, Frederik; Potenberg, Jochem; Stickeler, Elmar; Simon, Eike; Thomssen, Christoph; Huober, Jens; Denkert, Carsten; Alfer, Joachim; Jackisch, Christian; Nekljudova, Valentina; Burchardi, Nicole; Loibl, Sibylle

    2015-10-15

    geriatric scores (Charlson comorbidity index, Vulnerable Elders Survey [VES-13], Instrumental Activities of Daily Living [IADL], and G8) independently predicted grade 3 to 5 toxic events or treatment discontinuations. No differences in survival between the treatment groups were observed after 22.8 months. Compared with EC/CMF, treatment with nPX led to more treatment discontinuations and nonhematological toxicities in elderly patients with moderate or high-risk breast cancer. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  15. Effects of Family Meal Frequency on Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Korean Elderly Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    JEONG, Tchae-Won; JUNG, Min-Ju; LEE, Jun-Woo; KIM, Tae-Young

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background In the case of the elderly who highly depend on family, serious health problems can be caused due to the reduction of family meals. Therefore, this study aims to suggest the fundamental data for management of cardiovascular disease, one of the major causes of death in elderly Koreans, by investigating the effects of family meal frequency on the risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Korean elderly males and females. Methods The raw data of the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES III) were utilized. Data of 1,236 respondents were extracted for analysis regarding anthropometry, blood, blood pressure, nutrients and total energy intake. For collected data, using SPSS 18.0 and Amos 18.0, the mean and standard deviation, and the path coefficient between groups through a multi-group analysis by structural equation model were checked Results As family meal frequency increased, triglyceride and fasting blood glucose in Korean elderly males were likely to decrease, which led to conflicting results with those of Korean elderly females. Conclusion Frequent family meal makes a positive effect on reducing several risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Korean elderly. PMID:26060777

  16. Effects of Family Meal Frequency on Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Korean Elderly Males and Females.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tchae-Won; Jung, Min-Ju; Lee, Jun-Woo; Kim, Tae-Young

    2015-01-01

    In the case of the elderly who highly depend on family, serious health problems can be caused due to the reduction of family meals. Therefore, this study aims to suggest the fundamental data for management of cardiovascular disease, one of the major causes of death in elderly Koreans, by investigating the effects of family meal frequency on the risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Korean elderly males and females. The raw data of the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES III) were utilized. Data of 1,236 respondents were extracted for analysis regarding anthropometry, blood, blood pressure, nutrients and total energy intake. For collected data, using SPSS 18.0 and Amos 18.0, the mean and standard deviation, and the path coefficient between groups through a multi-group analysis by structural equation model were checked. As family meal frequency increased, triglyceride and fasting blood glucose in Korean elderly males were likely to decrease, which led to conflicting results with those of Korean elderly females. Frequent family meal makes a positive effect on reducing several risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Korean elderly.

  17. Clinical effectiveness of telmisartan alone or in combination therapy for controlling blood pressure and vascular risk in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Jugdutt, Bodh I

    2010-01-01

    Elderly patients (age ≥65 years) with hypertension are at high risk for vascular complications, especially when diabetes is present. Antihypertensive drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin system have been shown to be effective for controlling blood pressure in adult and elderly patients. Importantly, renin-angiotensin system inhibitors were shown to have benefits beyond their classic cardioprotective and vasculoprotective effects, including reducing the risk of new-onset diabetes and associated cardiovascular effects. The discovery that the renin-angiotensin system inhibitor and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker (ARB), telmisartan, can selectively activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ, an established antidiabetic drug target) provides the unique opportunity to prevent and treat cardiovascular complications in high-risk elderly patients with hypertension and new-onset diabetes. Two large clinical trials, ONTARGET (Ongoing Telmisartan Alone in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial) and TRANSCEND (Telmisartan Randomized AssessmeNt Study in ACE-I iNtolerant subjects with cardiovascular disease) have assessed the cardioprotective and antidiabetic effects of telmisartan. The collective data suggest that telmisartan is a promising drug for controlling hypertension and reducing vascular risk in high-risk elderly patients with new-onset diabetes. PMID:21152242

  18. Morning Blood Pressure Surge, Dipping, and Risk of Coronary Events in Elderly Treated Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Pierdomenico, Sante D; Pierdomenico, Anna M; Di Tommaso, Roberta; Coccina, Francesca; Di Carlo, Silvio; Porreca, Ettore; Cuccurullo, Franco

    2016-01-01

    The independent prognostic significance of morning surge (MS) of blood pressure (BP) is not yet clear. We investigated the association between MS of systolic BP and risk of coronary events in elderly treated hypertensive patients. The occurrence of coronary events was evaluated in 1,191 elderly treated hypertensive patients (age range 60-90 years). Subjects were divided according to tertiles of MS of systolic BP of the population as a whole, by dipping status and by group-specific tertiles of MS of systolic BP in dippers and nondippers. During the follow-up (9.1 ± 4.9 years, range 0.4-20 years), 120 coronary events occurred. In the population as a whole, coronary event risk was not significantly associated with tertiles of MS of systolic BP, whereas nondippers were at higher risk than dippers. When nondippers and dippers were analyzed separately, by group-specific tertiles of MS of systolic BP, coronary event risk was associated with MS of systolic BP in dippers but not in nondippers. After adjustment for various covariates, Cox regression analysis showed that dippers in the third tertile (>23 mm Hg) of MS of systolic BP (hazard ratio 1.912, 95% confidence interval 1.048-3.488, P = 0.03) and nondippers (hazard ratio 1.739, 95% confidence interval 1.074-2.815, P = 0.02) were at higher coronary event risk than dippers with MS of systolic BP <23 mm Hg . In elderly treated hypertensive patients, high MS of systolic BP predicts coronary events in dippers but not in nondippers. Nondippers, however, show higher risk of coronary events independently of MS in systolic BP. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Abdominal obesity is strongly associated with Cardiovascular Disease and its Risk Factors in Elderly and very Elderly Community-dwelling Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huimin; Li, Xiaolin; Zheng, Liang; Chen, Xiaoli; lan, Qin; Wu, Hong; Ding, Xugang; Qian, Dingguang; Shen, Yixin; Yu, Zuoren; Fan, Lieying; Chen, Ming; Tomlinson, Brian; Chan, Paul; Zhang, Yuzhen; Liu, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is usually considered to predispose to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) but milder degrees of obesity or overweight may be protective in some elderly populations. We examined the relationships between general and abdominal obesity indices with ASCVD and its risk factors in elderly (aged ≥65 years) Shanghai community residents Among the 3950 participants, 21.5% had ASCVD, 56.2% had body mass index (BMI) ≥24 kg/m2, 50.1% had high waist circumference (WC) and 77.1% had waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) ≥0.50. WHtR increased with age in both men and women whereas WC increased with age only in women and BMI decreased with age only in men. The optimal WHtR cut-off value to predict the risk of ASCVD determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis was WHtR ≥0.53 with a prevalence of 55.8%. Having abdominal obesity was significantly associated with prevalent ASCVD with WHtR ≥0.53 having a higher value for the odds ratio than high WC, whereas high BMI was not associated. All three indices predicted high glucose, triglycerides and hsCRP levels but only the WHtR ≥0.53 showed a significant association with physical activity. Abdominal obesity indices, but not BMI, predicted prevalent ASCVD and its risk factors in this elderly Chinese population. PMID:26882876

  20. Abdominal obesity is strongly associated with Cardiovascular Disease and its Risk Factors in Elderly and very Elderly Community-dwelling Chinese.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huimin; Li, Xiaolin; Zheng, Liang; Chen, Xiaoli; Lan, Qin; Wu, Hong; Ding, Xugang; Qian, Dingguang; Shen, Yixin; Yu, Zuoren; Fan, Lieying; Chen, Ming; Tomlinson, Brian; Chan, Paul; Zhang, Yuzhen; Liu, Zhongmin

    2016-02-17

    Obesity is usually considered to predispose to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) but milder degrees of obesity or overweight may be protective in some elderly populations. We examined the relationships between general and abdominal obesity indices with ASCVD and its risk factors in elderly (aged ≥ 65 years) Shanghai community residents Among the 3950 participants, 21.5% had ASCVD, 56.2% had body mass index (BMI) ≥ 24 kg/m2, 50.1% had high waist circumference (WC) and 77.1% had waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) ≥ 0.50. WHtR increased with age in both men and women whereas WC increased with age only in women and BMI decreased with age only in men. The optimal WHtR cut-off value to predict the risk of ASCVD determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis was WHtR ≥ 0.53 with a prevalence of 55.8%. Having abdominal obesity was significantly associated with prevalent ASCVD with WHtR ≥ 0.53 having a higher value for the odds ratio than high WC, whereas high BMI was not associated. All three indices predicted high glucose, triglycerides and hsCRP levels but only the WHtR ≥ 0.53 showed a significant association with physical activity. Abdominal obesity indices, but not BMI, predicted prevalent ASCVD and its risk factors in this elderly Chinese population.

  1. Association between vitamin D deficiency and heart failure risk in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Porto, Catarina Magalhães; Silva, Vanessa De Lima; da Luz, João Soares Brito; Filho, Brivaldo Markman; da Silveira, Vera Magalhães

    2017-08-17

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between vitamin D deficiency and risk of heart failure in elderly patients of cardiology outpatient clinics. A cross-sectional study with an analytical approach was employed. Clinical data were collected from the elderly from August 2015 to February 2016. The dependent variable was the risk of heart failure; the independent variable was vitamin D deficiency; and intervening factors were age, gender, education, ethnicity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, renal failure, dementia, stroke, dyslipidaemia, depression, smoking, alcoholism, obesity, andropause, and cardiac arrhythmia. To analyse the association between vitamin D deficiency and risk of heart failure, we used the bivariate logistic analysis, followed by analysis through the multivariate logistic regression model. Of the 137 elderly, the study found the following: women (75.9%); overweight (48.2%); obese (30.6%); increase in the index waist/hip (88.3%); dyslipidaemia (94.2%) and hypertension (91.2%); coronary artery disease (35.0%); and 27.7% with cardiac arrhythmia or left ventricular hypertrophy. Sixty-five per cent of the elderly were deficient in vitamin D. The risk of heart failure was significantly associated with vitamin D deficiency [odds ratio (OR): 12.19; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.23-35.16; P = 0.000], male gender (OR: 15.32; 95% CI = 3.39-69.20, P = 0.000), obesity (OR: 4.17; 95% CI = 1.36-12.81; P = 0.012), and cardiac arrhythmia (OR: 3.69; 95% CI = 1.23-11.11; P = 0.020). There was a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the elderly, and the evidence shows a strong association between vitamin D deficiency and increased risk of heart failure in this population. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  2. The prevalence and consequences of malnutrition risk in elderly Albanian intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Shpata, Vjollca; Ohri, Ilir; Nurka, Tatjana; Prendushi, Xhensila

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Many investigators have reported rising numbers of elderly patients admitted to the intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of malnutrition risk in the ICU by comparing the prevalence of malnutrition between older adults (aged 65 years and above) and adults (aged 18–64 years), and to examine the negative consequences associated with risk of malnutrition in older adults. Materials and methods A prospective cohort study in the ICU of the University Hospital Center of Tirana, Albania, was conducted. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the effect of malnutrition risk on the length of ICU stay, the duration of being on the ventilator, the total complications, the infectious complications, and the mortality. Results In this study, 963 patients participated, of whom 459 patients (47.7%) were aged ≥65 years. The prevalence of malnutrition risk at the time of ICU admission of the patients aged ≥65 years old was 71.24%. Logistic regression adjusted for confounders showed that malnutrition risk was an independent risk factor of poor clinical outcome for elderly ICU patients, for 1) infections (odds ratio [OR] =4.37; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.61–7.31); 2) complications (OR =6.73; 95% CI: 4.26–10.62); 3) mortality (OR =2.68; 95% CI: 1.72–4.18); and 4) ICU length of stay >14 days (OR =5.18, 95% CI: 2.43–11.06). Conclusion Malnutrition risk is highly prevalent among elderly ICU patients, especially among severely ill patients with malignancy admitted to the emergency ward. ICU elderly patients at malnutrition risk will have higher complication and infection rates, longer duration of ICU stay, and increased mortality. Efforts should be made to implement a variety of nutritional care strategies, to change the nutritional practices not only at ward level, but nationally, according to the best clinical practice and recent guidelines. PMID:25733824

  3. Risk of falls and bleeding in elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Kämpfen, P; Méan, M; Limacher, A; Righini, M; Jaeger, K; Beer, H-J; Osterwalder, J; Frauchiger, B; Matter, C M; Kucher, N; Cornuz, J; Banyai, M; Egloff, M; Aschwanden, M; Bounameaux, H; Rodondi, N; Aujesky, D

    2014-10-01

    Whether or not a high risk of falls increases the risk of bleeding in patients receiving anticoagulants remains a matter of debate. We conducted a prospective cohort study involving 991 patients ≥ 65 years of age who received anticoagulants for acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) at nine Swiss hospitals between September 2009 and September 2012. The study outcomes were as follows: the time to a first major episode of bleeding; and clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. We determined the associations between the risk of falls and the time to a first episode of bleeding using competing risk regression, accounting for death as a competing event. We adjusted for known bleeding risk factors and anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate. Four hundred fifty-eight of 991 patients (46%) were at high risk of falls. The mean duration of follow-up was 16.7 months. Patients at high risk of falls had a higher incidence of major bleeding (9.6 vs. 6.6 events/100 patient-years; P = 0.05) and a significantly higher incidence of clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding (16.7 vs. 8.3 events/100 patient-years; P < 0.001) than patients at low risk of falls. After adjustment, a high risk of falls was associated with clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding [subhazard ratio (SHR) = 1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.23-2.46], but not with major bleeding (SHR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.83-1.86). In elderly patients who receive anticoagulants because of VTE, a high risk of falls is significantly associated with clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding, but not with major bleeding. Whether or not a high risk of falls is a reason against providing anticoagulation beyond 3 months should be based on patient preferences and the risk of VTE recurrence. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  4. Social-Relational Risk Factors for Predicting Elder Physical Abuse: An Ecological Bi-Focal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Heydrich, Levente; Schiamberg, Lawrence B.; Chee, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Annually in the United States, 1 to 5 million older adults, 65 and above, are physically or sexually injured or mistreated by their caregivers in family settings. This study examined the prevalence and risk factors involved in elder physical abuse by adult child caregivers, moving from the immediate elderly parent/adult child relationship context…

  5. Social-Relational Risk Factors for Predicting Elder Physical Abuse: An Ecological Bi-Focal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Heydrich, Levente; Schiamberg, Lawrence B.; Chee, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Annually in the United States, 1 to 5 million older adults, 65 and above, are physically or sexually injured or mistreated by their caregivers in family settings. This study examined the prevalence and risk factors involved in elder physical abuse by adult child caregivers, moving from the immediate elderly parent/adult child relationship context…

  6. Are sedatives and hypnotics associated with increased suicide risk of suicide in the elderly?

    PubMed Central

    Carlsten, Anders; Waern, Margda

    2009-01-01

    adjustment for appropriate indications. Given the extremely high prescription rates, a careful evaluation of the suicide risk should always precede prescribing a sedative or hypnotic to an elderly individual. PMID:19497093

  7. NSAIDs and the risk of accidental falls in the elderly: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, Judith; van den Bemt, Bart J F; Duysens, Jacques; van Limbeek, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Accidental falls, especially those occurring in the elderly, are a major health and research topic nowadays. Besides environmental hazards and the physiological changes associated with aging, medication use (e.g. benzodiazepines, vasodilators and antidepressants) and polypharmacy are significant risk factors for falling as well. Exposure to NSAIDs has been associated with accidental falls too, although information on this area is less consistent. Therefore, the main goal of this review is to provide an updated overview of all the evidence published on the risk of falling due to NSAID use thus far. A systematic literature search for material published between 1966 and March 2008 in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Exerpta Medica, Current Contents and Science Citation Index was combined with a check of the reference lists of all the retrieved articles. Validity and data extraction of the eligible articles was assessed by adapted criteria, based on checklists that were originally developed to assess case-control or cohort studies. From the 16 selected articles, two studies were rejected because of clustering of data and one article was excluded because it contained the same data as that in one of the included articles. None of the articles retrieved included a randomized controlled trial. The remaining 13 studies all showed some lack in completeness of their statistical methods, and much variation in reporting of effects. The overall mean age was high in the study populations, leaving the results to be poorly generalizable to a larger population and other age categories. Despite these imperfections, all studies showed an increased risk of falling due to NSAID use (four significant, nine non-significant), and a tendency towards an increased fall risk with NSAID exposure could be noted. The results shown in the present review suggest that an increased risk for accidental falls is probable when elderly individuals are exposed to NSAIDs. The

  8. All-cause mortality risk in elderly individuals with disabilities: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Wei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Peng, Tao-Chun; Chiang, Sheng-Ta; Yang, Hui-Fang; Sun, Yu-Shan; Chan, James Yi-Hsin; Kao, Tung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Disability is considered an important issue that affects the elderly population. This study aimed to explore the relationship between disability and all-cause mortality in US elderly individuals. Design Retrospective and longitudinal designs. Setting Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999–2002) conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Participants A total of 1834 participants in the age range 60–84 years from NHANES 1999–2002. Main outcome measures We acquired five major domains of disability (activities of daily living (ADL), general physical activities (GPA), instrumental ADL (IADL), lower extremity mobility (LEM) and leisure and social activities (LSA)) through self-reporting. We applied an extended-model approach with Cox (proportional hazards) regression analysis to investigate the relationship between different features of disability and all-cause mortality risk in the study population. Results During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 77 deaths occurred. An increased risk of all-cause mortality was identified in elderly individuals with disability after adjustment for potential confounders (HR 2.23; 95% CI 1.29 to 3.85; p=0.004). Participants with more than one domain of disability were associated with a higher risk of mortality (ptrend=0.047). Adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for each domain of disability were 2.53 (1.49 to 4.31), 1.99 (0.93 to 4.29), 1.74 (0.72 to 4.16), 1.57 (0.76 to 3.27) and 1.52 (0.93 to 2.48) for LEM, LSA, ADL, IADL and GPA, respectively. Conclusions The results of this study support an increased association between disability and all-cause mortality in the elderly in the USA. Disability in LEM may be a good predictor of high risk of all-cause mortality in elderly subjects. PMID:27625055

  9. Similar outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a modified FLAMSA conditioning protocol substituting 4 Gy TBI with treosulfan in an elderly population with high-risk AML.

    PubMed

    Holtick, Udo; Herling, Marco; Pflug, Natali; Chakupurakal, Geothy; Leitzke, Silke; Wolf, Dominik; Hallek, Michael; Scheid, Christof; Chemnitz, Jens M

    2017-03-01

    The fludarabine, amsacrine, and cytarabine (FLAMSA)-reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) protocol has been described to be effective in patients with high-risk and refractory acute myeloic leukemia (AML) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aSCT). To increase safety and tolerability of the conditioning, we previously reported the feasibility to substitute the TBI component by treosulfan in elderly AML patients. We now present long-term follow-up data on patients treated with FLAMSA/treosulfan compared to the original FLAMSA/4Gy TBI protocol. We retrospectively analyzed 130 consecutive patients with high-risk or relapsed AML after aSCT following FLAMSA conditioning at our center. Fifty-eight patients were treated with FLAMSA/treosulfan due to age and/or comorbidities. Seventy-two patients were treated with FLAMSA/TBI. Median age of patients treated with FLAMSA/treosulfan was 60 years compared to 46 years in those treated with FLAMSA/TBI. The cumulative incidence of a non-relapse mortality at 4 years was 28% in FLAMSA/treosulfan patients as compared to 13% in FLAMSA/TBI. Cumulative incidence of relapse was higher in patients treated with FLAMSA/TBI (46 vs. 32%). This difference was even more prominent for patients treated in blast persistence prior to transplant (relapse incidence 70% for TBI vs. 35% for treosulfan). The overall and relapse-free survival rates at 4 years were 47 and 41%, respectively, for patients treated with FLAMSA/TBI as compared to 43 and 40% in patients treated with FLAMSA/treosulfan. These data indicate an anti-leukemic activity by FLAMSA/treosulfan especially in patients with a blast persistence prior to transplant. Older age was an independent factor for a higher non-relapse mortality. Translating FLAMSA/treosulfan to younger patients, a lower non-relapse mortality, and an improved anti-leukemic activity might add up to improved overall survival. Randomized studies are required to demonstrate an improved efficacy

  10. Predictors of the risk of falls among elderly with chronic atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Angela Cristina Silva; Nobre, Moacyr Roberto Cucê; Nussbacher, Amit; de Paula Rodrigues, Giselle Helena; Gebara, Otavio Celso Eluf; Azul, João Batista Carvalho Serro; Wajngarten, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Though elderly persons with chronic atrial fibrillation have more comorbidities that could limit indications for the chronic use of anticoagulants, few studies have focused on the risk of falls within this particular group. To evaluate the predictors of the risk of falls among elderly with chronic atrial fibrillation, a cross-sectional, observational study was performed. METHODS: From 295 consecutive patients aged 60 years or older with a history of atrial fibrillation who were enrolled within the last 2 years in the cardiogeriatrics outpatient clinic of the Instituto do Coração do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, 107 took part in this study. Their age was 77.9±6.4 years, and 62 were female. They were divided into two groups: a) no history of falls in the previous year and b) a history of one or more falls in the previous year. Data regarding the history of falls and social, demographic, anthropometric, and clinical information were collected. Multidimensional assessment instruments and questionnaires were applied. RESULTS: At least one fall was reported in 55 patients (51.4%). Among them, 27 (49.1%) presented recurrent falls, with body lesions in 90.4% and fractures in 9.1% of the cases. Multivariate logistic regression showed that self-reported difficulty maintaining balance, use of amiodarone, and diabetes were independent variables associated with the risk of falls, with a sensitivity of 92.9% and a specificity of 44.9%. CONCLUSION: In a group of elderly patients with chronic atrial fibrillation who were relatively independent and able to attend an outpatient clinic, the occurrence of falls with recurrence and clinical consequences was high. Difficulty maintaining balance, the use of amiodarone and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus were independent predictors of the risk for falls. Thus, simple clinical data predicted falls better than objective functional tests. PMID:22522754

  11. Risk factors and clinical aspects of delirium in elderly hospitalized patients in Iran.

    PubMed

    Foroughan, Mahshid; Delbari, Ahmad; Said, Said Ebn; AkbariKamrani, Ahmad Ali; Rashedi, Vahid; Zandi, Taher

    2016-04-01

    Recognition of the risk factors of delirium has been clearly advantageous in preventing and managing it as it occurs. The main aims of this study were to investigate the occurrence of delirium and identify the associated risk factors in a sample of hospitalized elderly in Southwestern Iran. A cross-sectional, hospital-based study was performed on a total of 200 elderly patients, admitted to a general hospital for various health reasons. Data were gathered over a 3-month period of time in 2010. Abbreviated Mental Test score (AMTs) used for delirium detection in post-admission days 1, 3, and 5, followed by clinical diagnostic confirmation according to the DSM-IV-TR criteria for delirium. Information regarding physical, cognitive, emotional, and functional states of the participants was collected, too. Delirium developed in 22 % of the participants. The demographic characteristics of the patients with delirium indicated that they were typically single, older men who lived alone and had a lower level of education and poorer functional status. Among other variables, the following were significantly associated with delirium: hemoglobin ≤12 (P < 0.001); Blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio ≥1/20 (P < 0.005); and positive C-reactive protein (P = 0.022); depressive symptoms (P < 0.001), and previous cognitive decline (P < 0.001). Patients with more than six different categories of medications were at high risk for delirium as well. Delirium is a serious and common problem in people over 60 years of age who are admitted to hospitals. Understanding risk factors and clinical aspects of delirium in elderly hospitalized patients will provide us with a better delirium management strategy.

  12. Incidence and risk factors for cognitive impairment in rural elderly populations in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Nadel, Jeffrey L; Ulate, Diana

    2014-09-01

    Risk factors for the onset of cognitive impairment in Costa Rica are not well understood, despite a substantial elderly population stemming from a higher than average life expectancy for the western hemisphere. To investigate the risk factors that predict the onset of cognitive impairment in the rural elderly of Costa Rica, a modified version of the Mini Mental State Exam-designed for illiterate populations-was administered to 90 elderly inhabitants of San Carlos, Alajuela, Costa Rica between April and May of 2011. Subsequently, each participant took a structured interview assessing viability of risk factors and behaviors potentially contributing to a diagnosis of cognitive impairment. Results showed strong dependencies between age (p = 0.0001), education level (p = 0.0095), the ability to read (p = 0.0001) and write (p = 0.0153), frequency of reading (p = 0.0011), use of puzzles and mind games (p < 0.0001), vocation (p = 0.0225), area of residence (p < 0.0001), comorbid mental dis- eases (p = 0.0005), history of stroke or brain trauma (p = 0.0104), urinary or renal problems (p = 0.0443), consistent cooking practices (p = 0.0262) and number of living companions (p = 0.0299) in susceptibility for developing cognitive impairment. The study concluded that high intellectual use, or lack thereof, during the lifetime of a person was a predictor for cognitive status later in life. In addition, comorbid mental disorders, including neu- rological trauma due to stroke, impeded normal cognitive function. Future research should examine incidence and risk factors of cognitive impairment in urban, more educated populations.

  13. Risk factors associated with falls in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yuko; Kimbara, Yoshiyuki; Kodera, Remi; Tsuboi, Yuki; Sato, Ken; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Mori, Seijiro; Ito, Hideki; Araki, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated risk factors of falls in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 211 patients aged ≧60years (168 diabetic patients and 43 non-diabetic control subjects) were studied. Factors associated with falls in the past year were retrospectively examined using multiple logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of patients who had a history of falls in the past year was twice as high as in diabetic patients compared in control subjects (36.9% vs. 18.6%, P<0.05). When diabetic patients were exclusively analyzed, the presence of any level of hypoglycemia and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) scores correlated with patients' falls. The presence of hypoglycemia (OR 3.62, 95% CI: 1.242-10.534, P=0.018), cognitive impairment (OR 3.63, 95% CI: 1.227-10.727, P=0.020), and high Fall Risk Index scores (OR 1.2, 95% CI: 1.010-1.425, P=0.039) was independently correlated with the presence of multiple falls. When the diabetic patients were divided into three groups according to the frequency of hypoglycemia episodes, the prevalence of falls increased as the frequency of hypoglycemia increased. Hypoglycemia was a risk factor of falls in elderly type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Low zinc status: a new risk factor for pneumonia in the elderly?

    PubMed

    Barnett, Junaidah B; Hamer, Davidson H; Meydani, Simin N

    2010-01-01

    Low zinc status may be a risk factor for pneumonia in the elderly. This special article reviews the magnitude of the problem of pneumonia (its prevalence, morbidity, and mortality) in the elderly, pneumonia's etiology, and the dysregulation of the immune system associated with increasing age. In addition, recent evidence from the literature is presented demonstrating that low zinc status (commonly reported in the elderly) impairs immune function, decreases resistance to pathogens, and is associated with increased incidence and duration of pneumonia, increased use and duration of antimicrobial treatment, and increased overall mortality in the elderly. Inadequate stores of zinc might, therefore, be a risk factor for pneumonia in the elderly. Randomized, double-blind, controlled studies are needed to determine the efficacy of zinc supplementation as a potential low-cost intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality due to pneumonia in this vulnerable population.

  15. Elderly Peritoneal Dialysis Compared with Elderly Hemodialysis Patients and Younger Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: Competing Risk Analysis of a Korean Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsuk; An, Jung Nam; Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Myoung-Hee; Kim, Ho; Kim, Yong-Lim; Park, Ki Soo; Oh, Yun Kyu; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Yon Su; Lee, Jung Pyo

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in elderly patients have not been thoroughly investigated. We aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes and risk factors associated with PD in elderly patients. We conducted a prospective observational nationwide adult end-stage renal disease (ESRD) cohort study in Korea from August 2008 to March 2013. Among incident patients (n = 830), patient and technical survival rate, quality of life, and Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI) scores of elderly PD patients (≥65 years, n = 95) were compared with those of PD patients aged ≤49 years (n = 205) and 50~64 years (n = 192); and elderly hemodialysis (HD) patients (n = 315). The patient death and technical failure were analyzed by cumulative incidence function. Competing risk regressions were used to assess the risk factors for survival. The patient survival rate of elderly PD patients was inferior to that of younger PD patients (P<0.001). However, the technical survival rate was similar (P = 0.097). Compared with elderly HD patients, the patient survival rate did not differ according to dialysis modality (P = 0.987). Elderly PD patients showed significant improvement in the BDI scores, as compared with the PD patients aged ≤49 years (P = 0.003). Low albumin, diabetes and low residual renal function were significant risk factors for the PD patient survival; and peritonitis was a significant risk factor for technical survival. Furthermore, low albumin and hospitalization were significant risk factors of patient survival among the elderly. The overall outcomes were similar between elderly PD and HD patients. PD showed the benefit in BDI and quality of life in the elderly. Additionally, the technical survival rate of elderly PD patients was similar to that of younger PD patients. Taken together, PD may be a comparable modality for elderly ESRD patients. PMID:26121574

  16. Suspicion of elder abuse in South Eastern Spain: the extent and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cárceles, M D; Rubio, L; Pereniguez, J E; Pérez-Flores, D; Osuna, E; Luna, A

    2009-01-01

    Elder abuse is recognized internationally as a growing problem. Recent years have seen an increase in the number of authors recommending that the MDs systematically question old people concerning possible abuse. The aim of our study was to ascertain the extent of suspicion of elder abuse and the different types of abuse. We design a cross-sectional survey including 460 patients > or = 65 years at different health centers (South East Spain). A face-to-face interview and a physical examination was carried out. Extent of suspected abuse was 44.6%. Female sex, > or = 75 years, widowhood, living alone or with children, accommodation in house of relatives and income < or = 300 euros/month were the associated sociodemographic variables. The risk factors associated are recent worsening of health, living with a mentally ill person, excessive consumption of alcohol or illegal drugs, arguing frequently with relatives or the dependence on someone to carry out a daily activity. The signs in the physical examination associated are dehydration/malnutrition, pressure ulcers and poor body and/or mouth hygiene. There is a high extent of suspicion of elder abuse and the keyword in this respect is prevention.

  17. Elderly Black Farm Women: A Population at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton-LaNey, Iris

    1992-01-01

    Elderly black farm women are neglected segment of elderly population. Their self-reliance, mutual support, and rurality have helped keep them isolated and underserved. Ten such women recalled their productive lifestyles in oral-history interviews and described problems faced because of their advancing age, poor health, caregiving responsibilities,…

  18. Investigation into Differences in Level of Knowledge about Hypertension between High School Students and Elderly People.

    PubMed

    Sanagawa, Akimasa; Ogasawara, Misa; Kusahara, Yuri; Yasumoto, Miki; Iwaki, Soichiro; Fujii, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

     As a major chronic non-communicable disease, hypertension is the most important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, stroke and, if not treated appropriately, premature death. A population-based approach aimed at decreasing high blood pressure among the general population is an important component of any comprehensive plan to prevent hypertension. However, few studies have investigated generational differences in knowledge about, and consciousness of, hypertension. Thus, we conducted a questionnaire survey about hypertension, with the aim of clarifying differences of understanding about hypertension between high school students and elderly people. The results of this investigation suggested that there is indeed a generational difference: knowledge about hypertension, and awareness of its relationship with salt intake, was higher in elderly people than in high school students. Furthermore, our study showed that among high school students, salt intake consciousness correlated with a family history of hypertension. By contrast, in elderly people, salt intake consciousness is related to age and to an awareness of recommended daily salt intake. This study strongly showed that knowledge and consciousness of hypertension varied among generations, with the elderly being more aware and conscientious about salt intake. Acknowledgement of this generational diversity is critical to developing an effective overall preventive strategy for hypertension.

  19. Assessment of risk of falls in elderly living at home.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adriana de Azevedo; Silva, Antonia Oliveira; Rodrigues, Rosalina Aparecida Partezani; Moreira, Maria Adelaide Silva Paredes; Nogueira, Jordana de Almeida; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel

    2017-04-06

    to assess the risk of falls in elderly, by comparing the sociodemographic and cognitive factors, history of falls and self-reported comorbidities. cross-sectional and quantitative study with 240 elderly. Data were collected based on the social profile, through the instrument of risk of falls and assessment of falls, by univariate analysis, bivariate and multiple logistic regression. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19 was used for statistical analysis. there was a significant association of the risk of falls, as measured by the Fall Risk Score, with sex (<0.001), age (0.054), cognitive status (<0.001) and history of falls (<0.001). All variables were statistically significant and contributed to the occurrence of falls. In logistic regression, the variables that showed association with risk of falls were: fall, with whom they live, hypertension and visual impairment. female gender, older elderly (over 80 years old), with low cognitive status and occurrence of previous falls in the last six months are factors that increase the prevalence of falls. In logistic regression, the variables that were associated with risk of falls were: fall, with whom they live, visual impairment and rheumatologic diseases. avaliar o risco de quedas em idosos, comparando com os fatores sóciodemográficos, cognitivos, presença de quedas e co-morbidades autorreferidas. Estudo transversal e quantitativo com 240 idosos. Os dados foram coletados a partir do perfil social, instrumento do risco de quedas e avaliação de quedas, utilizando análise univariada, bivariada e regressão logística múltipla. Para a análise estatística, utilizou-se o Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) versão 19. há associação entre o risco de quedas, mensurado pelo Fall Risk Score, com o sexo (<0,001), a faixa etária (0,054), o desempenho cognitivo (<0,001) e a presença de quedas (<0,001). Todas as variáveis apresentaram significância estatística e contribu

  20. Elder Self-neglect and Abuse and Mortality Risk in a Community-Dwelling Population

    PubMed Central

    Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa; de Leon, Carlos Mendes; Fulmer, Terry; Beck, Todd; Hebert, Liesi; Dyer, Carmel; Paveza, Gregory; Evans, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Context Both elder self-neglect and abuse have become increasingly prominent public health issues. The association of either elder self-neglect or abuse with mortality remains unclear. Objective To examine the relationship of elder self-neglect or abuse reported to social services agencies with all-cause mortality among a community-dwelling elderly population. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective, population-based cohort study (conducted from 1993 to 2005) of residents living in a geographically defined community of 3 adjacent neighborhoods in Chicago, Illinois, who were participating in the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP; a longitudinal, population-based, epidemiological study of residents aged ≥65 years). A subset of these participants had suspected elder self-neglect or abuse reported to social services agencies. Main Outcome Measures Mortality ascertained during follow-up and by use of the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess independent associations of self-neglect or elder abuse reporting with the risk of all-cause mortality using time-varying covariate analyses. Results Of 9318 CHAP participants, 1544 participants were reported for elder self-neglect and 113 participants were reported for elder abuse from 1993 to 2005. All CHAP participants were followed up for a median of 6.9 years (interquartile range, 7.4 years), during which 4306 deaths occurred. In multivariable analyses, reported elder self-neglect was associated with a significantly increased risk of 1-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 5.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.20–6.51). Mortality risk was lower but still elevated after 1 year (HR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.67–2.14). Reported elder abuse also was associated with significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.07–1.84). Confirmed elder self-neglect or abuse also was associated with mortality. Increased mortality risks associated with either elder self-neglect or

  1. Inappropriate medication use in elderly lebanese outpatients: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Saab, Yolande B; Hachem, Alya; Sinno, Soha; El-Moalem, Habib

    2006-01-01

    Inappropriate use of medications has become an international cause for concern in geriatric patients, who are at high risk of drug-related morbidity. This study is the first attempt to determine the prevalence of inappropriate drug use in elderly Lebanese outpatients, using community pharmacy data, and to identify factors that predict potentially inappropriate drug intake in this population. Records of elderly patients aged > or =65 years were selected from different community pharmacies. Each patient profile was reviewed and to confirm patient record information, in-person interviews were conducted with elderly patients between November 2004 and May 2005 by qualified pharmacists. Based on a literature review describing guidelines for the inappropriate use of medications in the elderly, courses of therapy were assessed and classified as either appropriate or inappropriate. Courses of therapy that were judged inappropriate were further classified according to the specific area of inappropriate use (i.e. Beers' criteria, duplicate therapy, indication, dose, dose frequency including missing doses, duration and discontinuation of therapy, adverse effects, drug-drug and/or drug-disease interactions, and poor memory). Statistical analyses were performed to estimate the prevalence of inappropriate medication use and to identify potentially predictive factors of such use arising from patients' sociodemographic characteristics, health factors and drug regimen intake. A total of 350 elderly patient profiles were reviewed, from which 277 evaluable records were obtained. More than half (59.6%) of the patients taking drugs at the time of the study were taking at least one inappropriate medication. Inappropriate medication use was most frequently identified in terms of Beers' criteria (22.4%), missing doses (18.8%) or incorrect frequency of administration of drugs (13.0%). Factors predicting potentially inappropriate drug intake included female sex (65.7% vs 53.3% for males, p

  2. Serum trace elements and risk of malnutrition in institutionalised elderly.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, G; Lorini, C; Bani Assad, G; Pepe, P; Santomauro, F

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the association between Selenium (Se)-, Copper (Cu)- and Zinc (Zn)-circulating concentrations and indicators of nutritional status. This study enroled 428 institutionalised elderly. The diagnostic tools used are a form to collect data regarding gender, age, duration of stay in nursing home, number of prescribed drugs, chronic diseases, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), anthropometric measurements, albumin, transferrin and serum concentrations of Se, Cu and Zn. The collected data were analysed with descriptive assessments of the differences χ(2), Student's t-test and analysis of variance. Multivariate linear regression were performed to evaluate the association between the concentrations of each trace elements and the other variables. The study population was represented by 327 women and 101 men, of whom 13.8% were 65-75 years old and 47.4% were older than 85 years. According to the MNA score, 58.4% were at risk of malnutrition and 21.3% were malnourished. The results show a significant reduction in the average concentrations of Se and Zn in women when the nutritional status gets worse. The same trend, although not statistically significant, is also observed in men. In both genders, the Cu concentration does not show a statistically significant association with nutritional status. Multivariate linear regression show some positive or negative associations. Our study seems to confirm the association between Se and nutritional status, as well as with some blood chemistry parameters. The length of institutionalisation seems to be an independent predictor of Se concentration.

  3. Determining the risk of falling in elderly patients undergoing hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, E; Cavdar, I

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY This study examines the risk of falling in elderly patients who underwent hip fracture surgery in the orthopaedic clinic during the postoperative period. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was a cross-sectional study. The study sample consisted of 71 elderly patients aged more than 65 years undergoing hip fracture surgery. A questionnaire, the Tinetti balance test and the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) were used. RESULTS The analyses included 71 elderly patients with a mean age of 78.45 years. All patients had been hospitalized for hip fracture due to falling, and 29.6% had a history of falling in the one year prior to hospitalization. The mean MMSE score was 18.37 ± 6.54 and the mean Tinetti score was 11.10 ± 6.66. CONCLUSION We found that as the mean age of the elderly patients increased, the risk of falling also increased and the MMSE scores deteriorate and that the elderly patients living alone were at a greater risk of falling and had worse cognitive function, that those with a history of falling before hospitalization were at a greater risk of falling again and that the risk of falling increased as cognitive function declined. Key words:elderly, falling, hip fracture, risk of falling.

  4. Insulin Resistance Is an Important Risk Factor for Cognitive Impairment in Elderly Patients with Primary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lina; Feng, Ming; Qian, Yuying; Yang, Wei; Liu, Jia; Han, Rui; Zhu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Insulin resistance plays a role in the development of dementia and hypertension. We investigated a possible relationship between cognitive impairment and insulin resistance in elderly Chinese patients with primary hypertension. Materials and Methods One hundred and thirty-two hypertensive elderly patients (>60 years) were enrolled in this study, and assigned into either the cognitive impairment group (n=61) or the normal cognitive group (n=71). Gender, age, education, body mass index (BMI), waist hip ratio (WHR), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), C-reactive protein (CRP), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), creatinine (Cr), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (FINS), homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, smoking history, atherosclerosis and the proportion of uncontrolled hypertension were compared between the two groups. Multi-factorial logistic regression analysis was performed. Results No significant differences were found in gender, age, TC, CRP, HDL-C, LDL-C, Cr, BP, smoking history, atherosclerosis and the proportion of uncontrolled hypertension between the two groups. The cognitive impairment group had lower education levels, and higher BMI, WHR, TG, FPG, FINS, and HOMA-IR levels than the control group. Logistic regression analysis revealed the levels of education, BMI, WHR, and HOMA-IR as independent factors that predict cognitive impairment in patients. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that poor education and increased BMI, WHR, and HOMA-IR are independent risk factors for cognitive impairment in elderly patients with hypertension. Insulin resistance plays an important role in the development of cognitive impairment in primary elderly hypertensive patients. PMID:25510751

  5. Considerations for resuscitation at high altitude in elderly and untrained populations and rescuers.

    PubMed

    Suto, Takashi; Saito, Shigeru

    2014-03-01

    With the development of transportation technologies, elderly people with chronic diseases are increasingly enjoying trekking and tours of nature resorts that include mountain highlands. Because of problems related to circulation, respiration, metabolism, and/or the musculoskeletal system in this population, the impact of high altitude on cardiopulmonary function is increased. Alpine accidents, therefore, tend to be more common in this population, and cases of cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) at high altitudes seem to be increasing. However, relatively few studies have described cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at high altitudes. Although insufficient studies are available to standardize CPR guidelines at high altitude at this time, the aim of this review is to summarize previous studies relevant to physiologic changes after exposure to high-altitude environments and exercise, which may be a risk factor for CPA in elderly trekkers. In addition, we summarize our previous studies that described the effect of CPR procedures on cardiopulmonary function in untrained rescuers. The available data suggest that prolonged CPR at high altitudes requires strenuous work from rescuers and negatively affects their cardiopulmonary physics and subjectively measured fatigue. Alpine rescue teams should therefore be well prepared for their increased physical burden and difficult conditions. Elderly travelers should be made aware of their increased risk of CPA in alpine settings. The use of mechanical devices to assist CPR should be considered wherever possible.

  6. Lesion-Related Carotid Angioplasty and Stenting with Closed-Cell Design without Embolic Protection Devices in High-Risk Elderly Patients-Can This Concept Work Out? A Single Center Experience Focusing on Stent Design.

    PubMed

    Hopf-Jensen, Silke; Marques, Leonardo; Preiß, Michael; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    To compare the performance differences of three carotid artery stents in high-risk elderly patients without embolic protection devices (EPDs) on the basis of stent design, procedure-related complications, conveniences in handling, in-stent restenosis, 30-day outcome, and long-term follow-up. A total of 101 symptomatic internal carotid stenoses of 94 patients were prospectively treated with stent-protected angioplasty to 94 patients. Three closed-cell stents, one of those being hybrid cell design, were chosen depending on vascular anatomy: curved vessel, lesion length > 1 cm: 64 Carotid Wallstent (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA); curved vessel, lesion length < 1 cm: 21 Cristallo Ideale (Invatec, Roncadelle, Italy); straight vessel, lesion length > 1 cm: 16 Xact (Vascular Abbott, Santa Clara, CA). Comparisons of demographics, procedures, and outcomes were performed. The mean age of patients was 73.1 years (standard deviation [SD], ± 7.9; range, 58-87 years), 71% of the patients were older than 70 years and 20% were octogenarians. Male/female ratio was 3.1:1. About 13.9% (14/101) had contralateral internal carotid artery occlusion. Overall peri-interventional complication rate was 2.9% and 30-day mortality rate was 1%. During the long-term follow-up (34 months, range 1-59) no ipsilateral stroke was documented. Ten deaths (three after MI) were recognized. Two in-stent restenosis were detected (> 70% North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial) during follow-up, one patient was detected with previous carotid endarterectomy. Especially, if individual anatomical variance is considered, lesion-related stent-protected carotid angioplasty with lesion-adapted closed-cell design is an effective, reliable, safe, and comprehensible treatment option in symptomatic patients. Even without EPDs, the rate of complications is low, when compared with symptomatic carotid artery stenosis described in the literature. In-stent restenosis seems to play no

  7. Joint use of cardio-embolic and bleeding risk scores in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, Maura; Nobili, Alessandro; Tettamanti, Mauro; Iorio, Alfonso; Pasina, Luca; Djade, Codjo D; Franchi, Carlotta; Marengoni, Alessandra; Salerno, Francesco; Corrao, Salvatore; Violi, Francesco; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2013-12-01

    Scores for cardio-embolic and bleeding risk in patients with atrial fibrillation are described in the literature. However, it is not clear how they co-classify elderly patients with multimorbidity, nor whether and how they affect the physician's decision on thromboprophylaxis. Four scores for cardio-embolic and bleeding risks were retrospectively calculated for ≥ 65 year old patients with atrial fibrillation enrolled in the REPOSI registry. The co-classification of patients according to risk categories based on different score combinations was described and the relationship between risk categories tested. The association between the antithrombotic therapy received and the scores was investigated by logistic regressions and CART analyses. At admission, among 543 patients the median scores (range) were: CHADS2 2 (0-6), CHA2DS2-VASc 4 (1-9), HEMORR2HAGES 3 (0-7), HAS-BLED 2 (1-6). Most of the patients were at high cardio-embolic/high-intermediate bleeding risk (70.5% combining CHADS2 and HEMORR2HAGES, 98.3% combining CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED). 50-60% of patients were classified in a cardio-embolic risk category higher than the bleeding risk category. In univariate and multivariable analyses, a higher bleeding score was negatively associated with warfarin prescription, and positively associated with aspirin prescription. The cardio-embolic scores were associated with the therapeutic choice only after adjusting for bleeding score or age. REPOSI patients represented a population at high cardio-embolic and bleeding risks, but most of them were classified by the scores as having a higher cardio-embolic than bleeding risk. Yet, prescription and type of antithrombotic therapy appeared to be primarily dictated by the bleeding risk. © 2013.

  8. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Abuse among Community Dwelling Elderly of Guwahati City, Assam

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Anku Moni; Mahanta, Neelakshi; Mahanta, Ajaya; Deka, Ashok Jyoti; Kakati, Arupjyoti

    2015-01-01

    Background: In spite of tremendous impact on health, elder abuse is still an underreported and unrecognized issue. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of abuse among community dwelling elderly and to identify the various risk factors. Materials and Methods: This community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 10 randomly selected wards of Guwahati city. A total of 331 elderly (60 years and above) were interviewed. Abuse was screened by Hwalek-Sengstock Elder Abuse Screening Test (H-S EAST). Results: The study revealed 9.31% prevalence. Neglect was the most common type of abuse reported. Age, sex, socioeconomic status, living status, and functional status were found to be significantly associated with abuse. Conclusion: Abuse is prevalent among elderly population. PMID:26435603

  9. [Fall risk factors and sex differences among community-dwelling elderly individuals in Japan. A Kameoka study].

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Taeko; Yamada, Yosuke; Yamada, Minoru; Nakaya, Tomoki; Miyake, Motoko; Watanabe, Yuya; Yoshida, Tsukasa; Yokoyama, Keiichi; Yamagata, Emi; Date, Heiwa; Nanri, Hinako; Komatsu, Mitsuyo; Yoshinaka, Yasuko; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Okayama, Yasuko; Kimura, Misaka

    2015-01-01

    Although factors associated with falls might differ between men and women, no large-scale studies were conducted to examine the sex difference of risk factors for falls in Japanese elderly. The purpose of this study was to examine fall risk factors and sex differences among community-dwelling elderly individuals using a complete survey of the geriatric population in Kameoka city. A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted with 18,231 community-dwelling elderly individuals aged 65 years or over in Kameoka city, Kyoto Prefecture, between July and August 2011, excluding people who were publicly certified with a long-term care need of grade 3 or higher. The questionnaire was individually distributed and collected via mail. Out of 12,159 responders (recovery rate of 72.2%), we analyzed the data of 12,054 elderly individuals who were not certified as having long-term care needs. The questionnaire was composed of basic attributes, a simple screening test for fall risk, the Kihon Check List with 25 items, and the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology (TMIG) index of competence with 13 items. These items were grouped into nine factors: motor function, malnutrition, oral function, houseboundness, forgetfulness, depression, Instrumental Activity of Daily Living (IADL), intellectual activities, and social role. Of all the respondents, 20.8% experienced falls within the last year, and 26.6% were classified as having high fall risk. Fall risk increased with age in both sexes, and risk in all age groups was higher for women than for men. All factors were significantly associated with fall risk in both sexes. After controlling for these factors, a significant relationship was found between fall risk and motor function, malnutrition, oral function, forgetfulness, depression, and IADL in men and motor function, oral function, forgetfulness, depression, and IADL in women. The deterioration of motor function was associated with three-times-higher risk than non

  10. The effectiveness of BMI, calf circumference and mid-arm circumference in predicting subsequent mortality risk in elderly Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Alan C; Chang, Tsui-Lan

    2011-01-01

    BMI, mid-arm circumference (MAC) and calf circumference (CC) are anthropometric indicators often included in geriatric health measurement scales. However, their relative effectiveness in predicting long-term mortality risk has not been extensively examined. The present study aimed to evaluate the relative effectiveness of these anthropometrics in predicting long-term mortality risk in older adults. The study prospectively analysed the ability of these indicators in predicting 4-year follow-up mortality risk of a population-representative sample of 4191 men and women, 53 years of age or older in the 'Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly in Taiwan'. Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association of follow-up mortality risk with low ( < 21 kg/m2) or high ( ≥ 27 kg/m2) BMI, low MAC ( < 23·5/22 cm for men/women) and low CC ( < 30/27 cm) respectively, according to Taiwanese-specific cut-off points. Results showed that low CC and low MAC were more effective than low BMI in predicting follow-up mortality risk in 65-74-year-old elderly. But low CC and low BMI were more effective than low MAC in ≥ 75-year-old elderly, and low BMI was more effective than low MAC or low CC in 53-64-year-old persons. High BMI was not effective in predicting mortality risk in any of these age ranges. These results suggest that in elderly adults, CC is more effective than BMI in predicting long-term mortality risk. Thus, more consideration to CC and MAC in designing geriatric health or nutritional measurement scales is recommended.

  11. Elderly black farm women: a population at risk.

    PubMed

    Carlton-LaNey, I

    1992-11-01

    Elderly black farm women are a neglected segment of the elderly population. Their self-reliance, mutual support, and rurality have helped keep them isolated and underserved. This article describes the productive life-styles that 10 such women in southeastern North Carolina recalled in oral-history interviews and the problems these women face because of their advancing age, poor health, caregiving responsibilities, and isolation and the deterioration of traditional resources.

  12. A Novel Risk Score to the Prediction of 10-year Risk for Coronary Artery Disease Among the Elderly in Beijing Based on Competing Risk Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Tang, Zhe; Li, Xia; Luo, Yanxia; Guo, Jin; Li, Haibin; Liu, Xiangtong; Tao, Lixin; Yan, Aoshuang; Guo, Xiuhua

    2016-03-01

    The study aimed to construct a risk prediction model for coronary artery disease (CAD) based on competing risk model among the elderly in Beijing and develop a user-friendly CAD risk score tool. We used competing risk model to evaluate the risk of developing a first CAD event. On the basis of the risk factors that were included in the competing risk model, we constructed the CAD risk prediction model with Cox proportional hazard model. Time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and time-dependent area under the ROC curve (AUC) were used to evaluate the discrimination ability of the both methods. Calibration plots were applied to assess the calibration ability and adjusted for the competing risk of non-CAD death. Net reclassification index (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) were applied to quantify the improvement contributed by the new risk factors. Internal validation of predictive accuracy was performed using 1000 times of bootstrap re-sampling. Of the 1775 participants without CAD at baseline, 473 incident cases of CAD were documented for a 20-year follow-up. Time-dependent AUCs for men and women at t = 10 years were 0.841 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.806-0.877], 0.804 (95% CI: 0.768-0.839) in Fine and Gray model, 0.784 (95% CI: 0.738-0.830), 0.733 (95% CI: 0.692-0.775) in Cox proportional hazard model. The competing risk model was significantly superior to Cox proportional hazard model on discrimination and calibration. The cut-off values of the risk score that marked the difference between low-risk and high-risk patients were 34 points for men and 30 points for women, which have good sensitivity and specificity. A sex-specific multivariable risk factor algorithm-based competing risk model has been developed on the basis of an elderly Chinese cohort, which could be applied to predict an individual's risk and provide a useful guide to identify the groups at a high risk for CAD among the Chinese adults over 55

  13. A Novel Risk Score to the Prediction of 10-year Risk for Coronary Artery Disease Among the Elderly in Beijing Based on Competing Risk Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Tang, Zhe; Li, Xia; Luo, Yanxia; Guo, Jin; Li, Haibin; Liu, Xiangtong; Tao, Lixin; Yan, Aoshuang; Guo, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study aimed to construct a risk prediction model for coronary artery disease (CAD) based on competing risk model among the elderly in Beijing and develop a user-friendly CAD risk score tool. We used competing risk model to evaluate the risk of developing a first CAD event. On the basis of the risk factors that were included in the competing risk model, we constructed the CAD risk prediction model with Cox proportional hazard model. Time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and time-dependent area under the ROC curve (AUC) were used to evaluate the discrimination ability of the both methods. Calibration plots were applied to assess the calibration ability and adjusted for the competing risk of non-CAD death. Net reclassification index (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) were applied to quantify the improvement contributed by the new risk factors. Internal validation of predictive accuracy was performed using 1000 times of bootstrap re-sampling. Of the 1775 participants without CAD at baseline, 473 incident cases of CAD were documented for a 20-year follow-up. Time-dependent AUCs for men and women at t = 10 years were 0.841 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.806–0.877], 0.804 (95% CI: 0.768–0.839) in Fine and Gray model, 0.784 (95% CI: 0.738–0.830), 0.733 (95% CI: 0.692–0.775) in Cox proportional hazard model. The competing risk model was significantly superior to Cox proportional hazard model on discrimination and calibration. The cut-off values of the risk score that marked the difference between low-risk and high-risk patients were 34 points for men and 30 points for women, which have good sensitivity and specificity. A sex-specific multivariable risk factor algorithm-based competing risk model has been developed on the basis of an elderly Chinese cohort, which could be applied to predict an individual's risk and provide a useful guide to identify the groups at a high risk for CAD among the Chinese

  14. Cystatin C and Sudden Cardiac Death Risk in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Rajat; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Katz, Ronit; Sarnak, Mark J.; Fried, Linda F.; Chonchol, Michel; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Psaty, Bruce M.; Siscovick, David S.; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated an association between moderate kidney dysfunction and sudden cardiac death in people with cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results The study was a longitudinal analysis among 4465 participants from the Cardiovascular Health Study without prevalent cardiovascular disease at baseline. Cystatin C and creatinine were measured from baseline sera. SCD was defined as a sudden pulseless condition from a cardiac origin in a previously stable individual that occurred out of the hospital or in the emergency room. The association between cystatin C tertiles and SCD was determined with multivariate Cox proportional hazards. A similar analysis compared SCD incidence across creatinine-based eGFR tertiles. Over a median follow-up of 11.2 years, 91 adjudicated SCD events occurred. The annual incidence of SCD events increased across cystatin C tertiles: 10 events per 10,000 person years in tertile 1, 25 events per 10,000 person years in tertile 2 and 32 events per 10,000 person years in the highest cystatin C tertile. These associations persisted after multivariate adjustment: [HR = 2.72, 95% CI (1.44–5.16) in tertile 2 and HR = 2.67, 95% CI (1.33–5.35) in tertile 3]. After multivariate adjustment, the rate of SCD also increased in a linear distribution across creatinine-based eGFR tertiles: 15 events per 10,000 person years in tertile 1, 22 events per 10,000 person years in tertile 2 and 27 events per 10,000 person years in tertile 3. No significant associations, however, remained between creatinine-based eGFR and SCD after multivariable adjustment. Conclusion Impaired kidney function, as measured by cystatin C, has an independent association with SCD risk among elderly persons without clinical cardiovascular disease. PMID:20233980

  15. Risk of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease among the elderly: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Ellen; Duclos, Philippe; Yactayo, Sergio; Schuster, Melanie

    2013-12-02

    Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) is a rare and serious adverse event of the yellow fever (YF) vaccine that mimics wild-type YF. Research shows there may be an increased risk of YEL-AVD among the elderly population (≥ 60-65 years old), however this research has yet to be accumulated and reviewed in order to make policy recommendations to countries currently administering the YF vaccine. This paper systematically reviewed all information available on YEL-AVD to determine if there is an increased risk among the elderly, for both travelers and endemic populations. Age-specific reporting rates (RRs) were re-calculated from the literature using the Brighton Collaboration case definition for YEL-AVD and were then analyzed to determine if there was a significant difference between the RRs of younger and older age groups. Two out of the five studies found a significantly higher rate of YEL-AVD among the elderly population. Our findings suggest unexposed elders may be at an increased risk of developing YEF-AVD, however the evidence remains limited. Therefore, our findings for YF vaccination of elderly populations support the recommendations made by the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) in their April 2013 meeting, mainly vaccination of the elderly should be based on a careful risk-benefit analysis. Copyright © 2013 World Health Organization (WHO). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk Factors for new accidental falls in elderly patients at traumatology ambulatory center.

    PubMed

    Porto Gautério, Daiane; Zortea, Bruna; Costa Santos, Silvana Sidney; da Silva Tarouco, Bárbara; Lopes, Manoel José; João Fonseca, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    To identify the risks factors for new accidental falls in elderly patients attended in the Traumatology Ambulatory of a University hospital in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Quantitative study of the type of multiple cases. Performed at the traumatology ambulatory, amongst fifteen elders that attended the inclusion criteria: age of sixty or more; patient at the traumatology ambulatory because of a fall motivated by accident, oriented and in conditions of answer an interview of data collectors. The data collection was made between April and June, 2013, with the Elderly Nursing Core Set scale (Lopes & Fonseca). The data analysis was made by a descriptive structure, which helped identify the existence of relation patterns among the cases. The risk factors for new accidental falls identified with larger incidence amongst the elders studied were: impaired balance (15/15), age above 65 (11/15), use of antihypertensive drugs (9/15), absence of non-slip material at home environment (7/15), in seven cases; rugs scattered at the floor of the house (6/15). The combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that include the environmental risks is considered a much more relevant cause to occur the new falls. The minimization of the home dangers, allied to the control of the elder intrinsic factors, may reduce the risks of causes. In that sense, is necessary that the nursing team make available more attention to the elderly assisted at the ambulatories, mainly those with sequelae due to fall accidents.

  17. Student-facilitated health promotion intervention for chronic disease self-management in at-risk elders reflections from the field.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Connie J; Cannon, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A student-facilitated and faculty-supervised health promotion program for chronic disease management in at-risk elders was developed based on the belief that individual contact with high-risk elders will facilitate improved health behaviors while enhancing the real-life experiences of students through interdisciplinary collaboration and community-based learning. Subjects were seven students enrolled as health professions academic majors at the university who served as student health advocates in the Healthy Elder Living Program (HELP). The data collected included student reflection questionnaires, field notes from the HELP staff, and communication logs between the HELP coordinator and students. As student health advocates, the students made visits to at-risk elders to reinforce recommendations from health care providers, to review adherence to the Health Promotion Inventory (HPI), and to interact socially with the client through discussion of health- and non-health-related issues. A training model for health promotion was developed based on identification of four common themes of student performance as health advocates. Overall, students demonstrated a greater appreciation for the complexity of social, psychological, and physical aspects of chronic disease as a result of participation in this program for at-risk elders. They were able to apply professional skills learned in the classroom while providing a needed service to elders. At-risk clients also benefited from the HELP intervention, showing improved physical performance and less depression.

  18. [Detecting high risk pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Doret, Muriel; Gaucherand, Pascal

    2009-12-20

    Antenatal care is aiming to reduce maternal land foetal mortality and morbidity. Maternal and foetal mortality can be due to different causes. Their knowledge allows identifying pregnancy (high risk pregnancy) with factors associated with an increased risk for maternal and/or foetal mortality and serious morbidity. Identification of high risk pregnancies and initiation of appropriate treatment and/or surveillance should improve maternal and/or foetal outcome. New risk factors are continuously described thanks to improvement in antenatal care and development in biology and cytopathology, increasing complexity in identifying high risk pregnancies. Level of risk can change all over the pregnancy. Ideally, it should be evaluated prior to the pregnancy and at each antenatal visit. Clinical examination is able to screen for intra-uterin growth restriction, pre-eclampsia, threatened for preterm labour; ultrasounds help in the diagnosis of foetal morphological anomalies, foetal chromosomal anomalies, placenta praevia and abnormal foetal growth; biological exams are used to screen for pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, trisomy 21 (for which screening method just changed), rhesus immunisation, seroconversion for toxoplasmosis or rubeola, unknown infectious disease (syphilis, hepatitis B, VIH). During pregnancy, most of the preventive strategies have to be initiated during the first trimester or even before conception. Prevention for neural-tube defects, neonatal hypocalcemia and listeriosis should be performed for all women. On the opposite, some measures are concerning only women with risk factors such as prevention for toxoplasmosis, rhesus immunization (which recently changed), tobacco complications and pre-eclampsia and intra-uterine growth factor restriction.

  19. Risk Factors for Dementia in a Senegalese Elderly Population Aged 65 Years and Over

    PubMed Central

    Toure, K.; Coume, M.; Ndiaye, M.; Zunzunegui, M. V.; Bacher, Y.; Diop, A. G.; Ndiaye, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background With the aging of the population, dementia is increasing worldwide. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for dementia in an elderly population utilizing a primary health care service in Dakar, Senegal. Methods Through a cross-sectional study conducted from March 2004 to December 31, 2005, 507 elderly patients aged ≥65 years who came to the Social and Medical Center of IPRES, Dakar, Senegal, were first screened with the screening interview questionnaire ‘Aging in Senegal’. Those who were cognitively impaired underwent a clinical examination to detect dementia. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were done. Results The whole population had a mean age of 72.4 years (±5.2) and was mostly male, married, and non-educated. Hypertension, arthritis, and gastrointestinal diseases were the main health conditions reported in the past medical history. Smoking was important while alcohol consumption was rare. Social network was high. Forty-five patients (8.87%) had dementia. In the multivariate model, only advanced age, education, epilepsy, and family history of dementia were independently associated with dementia. Conclusion The risk factors identified are also found in developed countries confirming their role in dementia. It is important to take dementia into consideration in Senegal and to sensitize the community for prevention. PMID:22590476

  20. [Depression and frontal dysfunction: risks for the elderly?].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Hazif Thomas, C; Billon, R; Peix, R; Faugeron, P; Clément, J-P

    2009-09-01

    daily functioning of depressed older adults, and dysfunction may lead to a lack of compensatory strategies that would improve the outcomes of late-life depression or of increasing dependency as well. In demented patients, depression triggers loss of motivation and executive dysfunction as well. Depression and executive dysfunction triggers the loss of autonomy, the risk of fall and of malnutrition in elderly patients. The clinical significance of this study is that the delineation of specific executive in depressed elderly patients may facilitate the development of effective treatment interventions, including treatment for geriatric depression.

  1. Pressure Ulcer Risk Factors Among the Elderly Living in Long-term Institutions .

    PubMed

    Ferreira Chacon, Julieta Marie; Nagaoka, Caroline; Blanes, Leila; Masako Ferreira, Lydia

    2010-04-01

     Although many intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors are involved, pressure is the most important factor in the development of pressure ulcers. The elderly are more susceptible to the development of these skin lesions as a result of changes associated with the aging process. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for pressure ulcers in the elderly living in long-term institutions. An analytic cross-sectional study of 40 patients age 60 years and older with pressure ulcers was conducted in six long-term institutions for the elderly (LTIE) in the West Side of São Paulo, Brazil. The present study evaluates pressure ulcers and their associated risk factors. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's chi-square test, Student's t-test, and Fisher's exact test. A statistically significant association between the risk factors evaluated in this study and the development of pressure ulcers in the sample was not found. According to the Braden scale, 67.5% of the patients were at high risk for pressure ulcer development. Fifty-one pressure ulcers were detected, with the majority (56.2%) being located in the sacral region. In the present study, more than 50% of the patients had low sensory perception, mobility, nutrition, and friction and shear subscales scores. The most prevalent risk factors were advanced age (mean, 83.8 years), length of stay that exceeded 31 months, white skin, neuromotor and skeletal muscle disorders, urinary and fecal incontinence, and continuous use of sedatives, analgesics, and hypotensives. The knowledge of risk factors is essential for healthcare professionals in planning effective prevention programs that target the elderly living in LTIE.

  2. [Contextual effects associated with depression risk variability in the elderly, Antioquia, Colombia, 2012].

    PubMed

    Cardona, Doris; Segura, Alejandra; Segura, Ángela; Garzón, María Osley

    2015-01-01

    Depression is an affective disorder where interest in living is lost and functional areas like work, feelings, personal life, and relationships are negatively altered. However, little has been said about the association between place of residence and this mood disorder. To determine the effects of the municipality and block of residence on the depression risk variability in the elderly in the Department of Antioquia, Colombia, in 2012. This was a multilevel descriptive study of secondary source records of 4,060 elderly people from the Department of Antioquia. Demographic, social and functional characteristics were assessed to calculate raw and adjusted odds ratios and find an association between the risk of depression, as measured by Yesavage´s Geriatric Depression Scale, and context variables (municipality and block of residence) in the design of the model. We used Markov chain Monte Carlo estimation methods and the deviance information criterion to assess goodness of fit. The prevalence of the risk of depression was 29.5% and we found an association with ages over 75 years, being female, residing in rural areas, and widowhood. Additionally, they had a higher risk of anxiety, moderate functional capacity and malnutrition. The municipality and block of residence were associated with this risk in the elderly. The municipality and block of residence had a 10% contribution toward the total variability in the risk of depression for the elderly. This information is important to encourage participation and adherence of the elderly to community groups.

  3. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's

    PubMed Central

    Goes, Vanessa Fernanda; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela Billig; de Oliveira, Lilian Oliveira; Hack, Jaqueline; Magro, Marcela; Bonini, Juliana Sartori

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease. Methods the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed. Results it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients. Conclusion an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26107841

  4. Obesity risk class and asthma outpatient service utilization by the middle aged and elderly in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei-Hua; Liu, Li-Fan; Wang, Jiu-Yao

    2016-05-01

    According to the estimates of the World Health Organization (WHO), there were about 300 million people in the world suffering from asthma in 2005. Among the risk factors of asthma is obesity, which was found to be significantly associated with asthma in recent decades. In this study, we analyze the relationship between obesity risk class and asthma outpatient service utilization by the middle-aged and elderly in Taiwan. Adopting data from the 2005 Nation Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), we first utilize latent class analysis (LCA) to identify obesity risk classes. Next, we utilize a logit and a negative binominal model to analyze the relationship between each obesity risk class and asthma outpatient service utilization. Results indicate that compared with the "overweight/obese with low consumption of vegetable/fruit and little exercise" class, the classes "normal-weight with high consumption of vegetable/fruit and moderate exercise" and "overweight/obese with high consumption of vegetable/fruit and moderate exercise" tend to have low probabilities and less number of visits of utilizing asthma outpatient services. Our results may constitute useful references for clinicians and government policy makers formulating strategies for asthma management and prevention. Better informed strategies for asthma management could, in turn, increase the efficiency of asthmatic patients' care, which could provide efficient assistance to the target group based on the obesity risk classes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Preoperative Personalized Risk Assessment Calculator for Elderly Ovarian Cancer Patients undergoing Primary Cytoreductive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Emma L; Rutstein, Sarah; Miller, William C; Gehrig, Paola A

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer has higher rates of postoperative complication than neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery. If patients at high risk of postoperative complication were identified preoperatively, primary therapy could be tailored. Our objective was to develop a predictive model to estimate the risk of major postoperative complication after primary cytoreductive surgery among elderly ovarian cancer patients. Methods Patients who underwent primary surgery for ovarian cancer between 2005-2013 were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project. Patients were selected using primary procedure CPT codes. Major complications were defined as grade 3 or higher complications on the validated Claviden-Dindo scale. Using logistic regression, we identified demographic and clinical characteristics predictive of postoperative complication. Results We identified 2,101 ovarian cancer patients of whom 35.9% were older than 65. Among women older than 65, the rate of major postoperative complication was 16.4%. Complications were directly associated with preoperative laboratory values (serum creatinine, platelets, white blood cell count, hematocrit), ascites, white race, and smoking status, and indirectly associated with albumin. Our predictive model had an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.725. In order to not deny patients necessary surgery, we chose a 50% population rate of postoperative complication which produced model sensitivity of 9.8% and specificity of 98%. Discussion Our predictive model uses easily and routinely obtained objective preoperative factors to estimate the risk of postoperative complication among elderly ovarian cancer patients. This information can be used to assess risk, manage postoperative expectations, and make decisions regarding initial treatment. PMID:26432038

  6. Examination of useful items for the assessment of fall risk in the community-dwelling elderly Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Demura, Shinichi; Sato, Susumu; Yokoya, Tomohisa; Sato, Toshiro

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to select useful items for assessing fall risk in healthy elderly Japanese individuals. A total of 965 healthy elderly Japanese subjects aged ≥60 years (349 males 70.4 ± 7.1 years, 616 females 69.9 ± 7.1 years) participated in this study. Of these, 16.6% had suffered from a previous fall. We assumed five fall risk factors: symptoms of falling, physical function, disease and physical symptoms, environment, and behavior and character. Eighty-six items were selected to represent these factors. To confirm the component items for each risk factor, we performed factor analysis (principle factor solution and varimax rotation). The high-fall risk response rate was also calculated for each item, and significant differences in this rate were examined between groups of those who had and not had experienced a fall. Useful items were selected using the following criteria: (1) items showing a significant difference in high fall risk response rate between faller and non-faller groups were selected as useful items; (2) items showing low factor loading (<0.4) for any factor were deleted as inappropriate items; (3) the top two items showing a greater amount of the difference in high fall risk response rate among the representative items for each factor. A total of 50 items were selected from each fall risk factor (symptoms of falling, 3 items; physical function, 22 items; disease and physical symptom, 13 items; environment, 4 items; behavior and character, 8 items). Based on our results, the selected items can comprehensively assess the fall risk of a healthy elderly Japanese population. In addition, the assessment items for physical function comprised items of different levels of difficulty, and these are able to gradually and comprehensively assess physical function.

  7. Association between cardiovascular disease risk scores and subclinical atherosclerosis prevalence in non-elderly adult patients from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Ricardo A; Ferrer, Dario G; Romagnoli, Pablo A; Tinti, María E; Amigone, José L; Capra, Raúl; Chiabrando, Gustavo A

    2017-05-10

    The goal of our study was to use statistical analysis to try to associate cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk scores and the observed prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis (SA) in a non-elderly adult local population. An observational cross-sectional study was carried out (143 male and 131 female) on non-elderly adults (20-59 years). CVD risk scores included Framingham Risk Scores for 10-year hard (FRS 10 H), 30-year lipid hard or CVD (FRS 30 L H or FRS 30 L CVD), 30 year-body mass index hard or CVD (FRS 30 BMI H or FRS 30 BMI CVD) and Pooled Cohort Risk Equations for either 10 years (PCE 10) or lifetime (PCE LT). The Carotid Ultrasound (CU) study was performed and the Coronary Artery Calcium (CAC) score were obtained to assess SA. The Receiving Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis followed by Youden's index was used to evaluate and adjust the stratification of CVD risk scores. SA was detected in 32.4% of individuals. The risk scores that showed the biggest areas under the ROC curve were FRS 30 L (H and CVD). When the cut-off values for these CVD risk scores were adjusted, the FRS 30 L H increased the negative predictive value for the low risk group from 87.7 to 97.0% and the FRS 30 L CVD increased the positive predictive values for the high risk group from 69.7 to 85.7%. The CVD risk stratification of non-elderly adults using FRS 30 L H and FRS 30 L CVD may be a useful tool for selecting candidate patients for diagnostic imaging studies that assess their SA prevalence.

  8. [Consequence and risk factors of falls-related injuries in community-dwelling elderly in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bai-Yu; Shi, Jing; Yu, Pu-Lin

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the incidence of falls during the past year,as well as the consequence of falls so as to explore the risk factors for fall-related injuries in the community-dwelling elderly in Beijing. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a community in Beijing. A total of 1512 persons aged 60 years and over were selected using stratified cluster sampling method. Information related to all kinds of falls was collected with a standardized structured questionnaire through face-to-face interview. Binary logistic regression was used to explore the related factors for consequence of any falls, especially falls-related injuries in the elderly. 272 older adults had one falling episode at the baseline study, with the incidence rate of fall and the frequency of falls as 18.0% (272/1512) and 379 times respectively. Among the 1512 interviewees, 8.7% (131) suffered from injuries as a result of falls. Out of the total 379 times of falls, 143 resulted in injuries. Most common injuries appeared to be soft tissue related (84 times, 58.7%) and epidermal abrasion (57 times, 39.9%), followed by fracture (20 times, 14.0%) and open wound (9 times, 6.3%). The most common injured areas were lower limbs (67 times, 46.9%), followed by upper limbs (39 times, 27.3%), head (27 times, 18.9%), face (19 times, 13.3%), hip (11 times,2.9%), waist/abdomen (10 times, 2.6%), chest (6 times, 1.6%) ,vertebral column (5 times, 1.3%) and neck (3 times, 0.8%). Data from logistic regression analysis showed that being female (OR = 2.09), with proper bench height (OR = 1.94), being alcoholic (OR = 3.10), being able to walk more than 400 meters (OR = 2.11), fear of falls (OR = 3.30) etc. were risk factors, while enough handrails provided in surrounding areas (OR = 0.41) showed as the protective factor for falls-related injuries in the elderly. The incidence rates of falls and falls-related injuries among elderly community-dwellers in urban areas of Beijing were considered to be high. Falls and its related

  9. Development of a local malnutrition risk screening tool-hospital (MRST-H) for hospitalised elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Sakinah, H; Suzana, S; Noor Aini, M Y; Philip Poi, J H; Shahrul Bahyah, K

    2012-08-01

    Hospitalised elderly patients are at high risk of malnutrition due to the presence of chronic diseases and inadequate food intake. It was on this premise that a Malnutrition Risk Screening Tool-Hospital (MRST-H) was developed for identifying the risk of malnutrition among Malaysian elderly patients. A total of 181 respondents aged 65 years and above who had been admitted to the Geriatric Ward of the University Malaya Medical Centre were recruited. The respondents' nutritional assessment was assessed using the Global Indicator of Malnutrition (GIM), a reference gold standard of malnutrition consisting of anthropometric measurements, biochemical indicators and the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). Important predictive factors of malnutrition were determined by logistic regression analysis. Five out of 18 predictive factors were significantly associated with malnutrition (p<0.05) in the final multivariate logistic regression model. These five factors were used to develop the MRST-H. Its validity was tested among 100 elderly inpatients in the Kuala Lumpur Hospital. The MRST-H was found to have 66.7% sensitivity, 96.2% specificity and 82.4% positive predictive value to GIM. The MRST-H was tested for reliability among 40 patients involving three raters (a dietitian and two nurses). The Kappa index of agreement was excellent between the dietitian with nurse A (81.3%, Kappa=0.84) and nurse B (87.5%, Kappa=0.89) respectively. The MRST-H developed showed high validity and reliability as a screening tool for identifying hospitalised elderly patients with high risk of malnutrition.

  10. Staff Ratings of Relocation Risk in Elderly Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusak, Judith M.; And Others

    Patients in long-term care facilities are often moved from one living area to another within an institution. While the staff often consider such moves as part of the daily work load, even intrainstitutional relocation has been observed to have negative consequences for the elderly patient. If staff could identify those patients who might…

  11. Sex hormones and androgen receptor: risk factors of coronary heart disease in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jian; Zou, Hui; Zhu, Bing-Po; Wang, Hao; Li, Jian; Ding, Yu; Li, Xiao-Ying

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the variation of sex hormone and its receptor level in elderly male patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and to evaluate the correlations between CHD and sex hormone as well as sex hormone receptor. Altogether 139 male CHD patients (CHD group) aged 60-92 years and 400 healthy men (control group) aged 60-90 years were included in this cross sectional study. The plasma concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), estradiol (E2), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured. The androgen receptor (AR) was tested by flow cytometry. Correlations between CHD and levels of sex hormones and AR were analyzed. Compared with the control group, the levels of DHEAS, TT, FT, SHBG, and the fluorescence intensity of AR in the CHD group significantly reduced (P < 0.05), while the levels of FSH and E2 significantly increased (P < 0.01). Age was negatively correlated with TT (r = -0.28, P = 0.00) and FT (r = -0.17, P = 0.01), while it was positively correlated with SHBG (r = 0.14, P = 0.04) and E2 (r = 0.33, P = 0.00). AR fluorescence intensity was negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure (r = -0.12, P = 0.01). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that TT, SHBG, and AR were all negatively correlated with CHD (P < 0.05). Elderly male patients with CHD are found to have low levels of DHEAS, TT, FT, SHBG, and AR, while high concentrations of E2 and FSH. Low levels of TT and SHBG may be the potential risk factors of CHD in elderly men.

  12. The increased risk of venous thromboembolism by advancing age cannot be attributed to the higher incidence of cancer in the elderly: the Tromsø study.

    PubMed

    Blix, Kristine; Brækkan, Sigrid K; le Cessie, Saskia; Skjeldestad, Finn E; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2014-04-01

    Whether the high incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the elderly can be attributed to cancer is not well studied. We assessed the impact of cancer on risk of VTE in young, middle-aged and elderly. 26,094 subjects without a history of cancer or VTE were recruited from the Tromsø study. Incident cancer (n = 2,290) and VTE (n = 531) were recorded from baseline (1994-1995) through December 31st, 2009. Cox regression with cancer as time-varying exposure was used to calculate hazard ratios with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Overt cancer was associated with a fivefold (95 %CI 4.3, 6.7) increased risk of VTE, with an age-dependent gradient from 26-fold (95 %CI 12.1, 56.5) increased in the young, ninefold (95 % CI 6.6, 12.7) increased in the middle-aged, and threefold (95 % CI 2.5, 4.5) increased risk in the elderly. The population attributable risks were 14, 27 and 18 %, respectively. The relative risk of VTE by cancer were higher in young compared to elderly subjects, but the proportion of VTEs in the population due to cancer did not differ much across age groups. Our findings indicate that the increased risk of VTE by advancing age cannot be attributed to higher incidence of cancer in the elderly.

  13. Application of screening tools to detect risk of hospital readmission in elderly patients in Valencian Healthcare System (VHS) (Spain).

    PubMed

    Doñate-Martínez, Ascensión; Garcés Ferrer, Jorge; Ródenas Rigla, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The Sustainable Social and Healthcare Model (SSHM) is aimed to establish new care pathways in primary care systems contributing to the decrease of health services use and costs and improve the integration and efficiency of social and health care for elderly people with long-term care (LTC) needs. One of these strategies is the segmentation of population in risk groups through standardized tools. This paper is a retrospective study aimed to determine the viability of the implementation of the screening tools Probability of Repeated Admission - Pra - and The Community Assessment Risk Screen - CARS - to detect patients at risk of hospital readmission in a sample of 500 elderly people (65+) from the VHS in Spain. Patients were recruited from three Health Departments. Data from selected tools and predictive variables were collected through the healthcare database from the VHS. The most important results indicate that both instruments predict with high efficacy the proportion of patients not readmitted (negative predictive value between 91% and 92%). Moreover, the tools performed with a moderate efficiency being the Pra less sensitive (54%) and more specific (81%) than CARS (with a sensitivity and specificity of 64%). Results from this study suggest that the application of instruments as Pra and CARS are of interest to the Valencian Health Administration as they can be a good strategy to improve the management of elderly patients at risk with comorbidities and guiding clinical decision. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Elder abuse as a risk factor for hospitalization in older persons.

    PubMed

    Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa A

    2013-05-27

    Elder abuse is associated with increased mortality risk. However, the relationship between elder abuse and health care services utilization remains unclear. To examine the relationship between overall elder abuse and specific subtypes of elder abuse and rate of hospitalization in a community-dwelling population of older adults. Prospective population-based study. Chicago Health and Aging Project. Of the 6674 community-dwelling older adults who participated in the Chicago Health and Aging Project, 106 were identified by social services agencies for elder abuse. The primary predictor was elder abuse (reported and confirmed) reported to social services agency. The outcome of interest was the annual rate of hospitalization obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Poisson regression models were used to assess these longitudinal relationships. The unadjusted mean annual rate of hospitalization was 0.62 (95% CI, 0.59-0.66) for those without elder abuse and 1.97 (95% CI, 1.33-2.61) for those with reported elder abuse. After adjusting for sociodemographic and socioeconomic variables, medical comorbidities, cognitive and physical function, and psychosocial well-being, reported elder abuse had higher rates of hospitalization (rate ratio [RR], 2.00 [95% CI, 1.45-2.75]). Psychological abuse (RR, 2.22 [95% CI, 1.44-3.43]), financial exploitation (RR, 1.75 [95% CI, 1.06-2.90]), caregiver neglect (RR, 2.43 [95% CI, 1.60-3.69]), and 2 or more types of elder abuse (RR, 2.59 [95% CI, 1.82-3.66]) were associated with increased rates of hospitalization, after considering the same potential confounders. Results from interaction term analyses suggested that the association between elder abuse and hospitalization did not differ across the levels of medical comorbidities, cognitive and functional impairment, or psychosocial distress. Elder abuse was associated with increased rates of hospitalization in this community population. Future research is needed to explore the

  15. Relationship between hyperuricemia and risk of coronary heart disease in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Tian, Jian; Zeng, Chao; Wei, Jie; Li, Liang-Jun; Xie, Xi; Yang, Tuo; Li, Hui; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between hyperuricemia and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk based on the Framingham risk score (FRS) in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population. Methods This cross-sectional study enrolled patients undergoing routine check-ups at Xiangya Hospital between October 2013 and November 2014. Hyperuricemia was defined as uric acid ≥416 mmol/l for males and ≥360 mmol/l for females. A 10-year CHD risk was calculated from FRS. A multivariable logistic analysis model was used to evaluate associations. Results Of the 6347 patients, 3415 (53.8%) were male, 1543 (24.3%) had a CHD risk ≥10% (i.e. intermediate and high risk) and the prevalence of hyperuricemia was 18.1% ( n = 1148). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the 10-year CHD risk was increased in patients with hyperuricemia compared with those without hyperuricemia by 0.28 times in the total population (odds ratio [OR] 1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09, 1.48), by 0.25 times in the male population (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.06, 1.47) and by 2.76 times in the female population (OR 3.76; 95% CI 2.08, 6.79). Conclusion Hyperuricemia was positively associated with a 10-year risk of CHD suggesting that it might be an independent CHD risk factor in middle-aged and elderly individuals.

  16. Three-year follow-up of the fall risk and physical function characteristics of the elderly participating in a community exercise class.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, Tomohisa; Demura, Shinichi; Sato, Susumu

    2009-03-01

    This study targeted the elderly participating in community exercise classes implemented by the local government, and followed their fall risk and physical function characteristics for three years. This study aimed to compare these changes between low and high fall risk individuals. The participants consisted of 34 male and 163 female Japanese elderly people aged 60 years or over who participated in a community exercise class once a week for three years. Physical fitness and activities of daily living (ADL) capability were evaluated by the physical fitness test of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan. The fall risk was evaluated using a Fall Assessment Chart (Suzuki, 2000), and if the total score was >or=5, the subject was assessed as a high fall risk. Significant changes in the fall risk characteristics were examined by McNemar's test. Significant changes in physical function characteristics (Physical fitness and ADL tests) were examined by two-way (fall risk group and pre-post) ANOVA. The fall risk and number of falling incidents decreased only for the high risk group. In addition to the observed decrease in risk and incidents, it was found that the elderly who exercised were able to maintain their physical function (ADL capability level) with regard to muscular strength, walking, and maintaining and changing posture over the course of the three-year study. Effectiveness of the exercise class implemented by the local government for fall prevention was found for the high fall risk elderly. These findings indicate the possibility that health promotion activities based on exercise classes may be a prevention strategy for falls within the community-dwelling elderly by incorporating more diverse activities adapted to an individual's functional level.

  17. [The Risks of Perioperative Addiction to Benzodiazepines in the Elderly: What the Surgeon Needs to Know].

    PubMed

    Brinkers, M; Pfau, G; Schilling, T; Meyer, F

    2016-02-01

    In Germany, more than one million people use benzodiazepines on a regular basis. The majority of them is older than 60 years and take low-dose benzodiazepines for sleep disorders. This does not necessarily induce tolerance, but may result in problems such as falling, seizures or delirium if benzodiazepines are discontinued or taken on a long-term basis. Therefore, benzodiazepines can be associated with problems before, during and after surgery, in particular in the elderly. This narrative review aims to describe the clinical relevance for daily practice. 1. The high-dose use of drugs that induce addiction with possible parallel consumption of other drugs is clinically important. Even more relevant, however, is the large number of elderly people taking benzodiazepines periodically and in low doses for sleep disturbances. 2. Low-dose addiction of benzodiazepines is defined as daily use of less than 20 mg of a diazepam equivalent. 3. Short-acting benzodiazepines can promote addiction; long-acting benzodiazepines produce hangover effects. 4. During a hospital stay, rapid discontinuation induces withdrawal symptoms; continuous prescription may result in incidents and increases the risk of postoperative delirium. For the intake and continuous prescription there are four basic rules:Well-defined indication, correct dosage, short application, no sudden discontinuation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement in high risk patient groups

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Harriet; Benedetto, Umberto; Caputo, Massimo; Angelini, Gianni; Vohra, Hunaid A.

    2017-01-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (AVR) aims to preserve the sternal integrity and improve postoperative outcomes. In low risk patients, this technique can be achieved with comparable mortality to the conventional approach and there is evidence of possible reduction in intensive care and hospital length of stay, transfusion requirement, renal dysfunction, improved respiratory function and increased patient satisfaction. In this review, we aim to asses if these benefits can be transferred to the high risk patient groups. We therefore, discuss the available evidence for the following high risk groups: elderly patients, re-operative surgery, poor lung function, pulmonary hypertension, obesity, concomitant procedures and high risk score cohorts. PMID:28740685

  19. Importance of Numeracy as a Risk Factor for Elder Financial Exploitation in a Community Sample.

    PubMed

    Wood, Stacey A; Liu, Pi-Ju; Hanoch, Yaniv; Estevez-Cores, Sara

    2016-11-01

    To examine the role of numeracy, or comfort with numbers, as a potential risk factor for financial elder exploitation in a community sample. Individually administered surveys were given to 201 independent, community-dwelling adults aged 60 and older. Risk for financial elder exploitation was assessed using the Older Adult Financial Exploitation Measure (OAFEM). Other variables of interest included numeracy, executive functioning, and other risk factors identified from the literature. Assessments were completed individually at the Wood Lab at Scripps College in Claremont, CA and neighboring community centers. After controlling for other variables, including education, lower numeracy was related to higher scores on the OAFEM consistent with higher risk for financial exploitation. Self-reported physical and mental health, male gender, and younger age were also related to increased risk. Results indicated that numeracy is a significant risk factor for elder financial exploitation after controlling for other commonly reported variables. These findings are consistent with the broader literature relating numeracy to wealth and debt levels and extend them to the area of elder financial exploitation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Rethinking the association of high blood pressure with mortality in elderly adults: the impact of frailty.

    PubMed

    Odden, Michelle C; Peralta, Carmen A; Haan, Mary N; Covinsky, Kenneth E

    2012-08-13

    The association of hypertension and mortality is attenuated in elderly adults. Walking speed, as a measure of frailty, may identify which elderly adults are most at risk for the adverse effects of hypertension. We hypothesized that elevated blood pressure (BP) would be associated with a greater risk of mortality in faster-, but not slower-, walking older adults. Participants included 2340 persons 65 years and older in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2000 and 2001-2002. Mortality data were linked to death certificates in the National Death Index. Walking speed was measured over a 20-ft (6 m) walk and classified as faster (≥ 0.8 m/s [n = 1307]), slower (n = 790), or incomplete (n = 243). Potential confounders included age, sex, race, survey year, lifestyle and physiologic variables, health conditions, and antihypertensive medication use. Among the participants, there were 589 deaths through December 31, 2006. The association between BP and mortality varied by walking speed. Among faster walkers, those with elevated systolic BP (≥ 140 mm Hg) had a greater adjusted risk of mortality compared with those without (hazard ratio [HR], 1.35; 95% CI, 1.03-1.77). Among slower walkers, neither elevated systolic nor diastolic BP (≥ 90 mm Hg) was associated with mortality. In participants who did not complete the walk test, elevated BP was strongly and independently associated with a lower risk of death: HR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.23-0.62 (systolic); and HR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.01-0.81 (diastolic). Walking speed could be a simple measure to identify elderly adults who are most at risk for adverse outcomes related to high BP.

  1. [Statin and risk of falls in the elderly: A sytematic review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Venegas Sanabria, Luis Carlos; Barbosa Balaquera, Stephany; Suarez Acosta, Ana María; García Peña, Ángel Alberto; Cano Gutiérrez, Carlos Alberto

    2017-07-17

    With the high incidence of cardiovascular events in the elderly population the effectiveness of statins in reducing mortality from coronary events has been demonstrated. However, there have been adverse effects, such as myalgia, myopathy, myonecrosis, not to mention the falls as a result of muscle damage with statin use. The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review to assess the literature on the association between statin use and the risk of falls. The databases that were included PUBMED AND SCOPUS, with articles published from January 2000 to May 2016. The MESH terms used for the search were "FALLS" AND "STATIN". Selected studies included cohort populations from the community (>50 years old), and analysed using the Scottish Intercollegiate (SIGN) methodology guidelines, as no randomised controlled study was found. In the study by Ham et al., statin use was shown to be a protective factor for presence of falls. In the second study by Scott et al., there was an increased risk of falls (P=.029) and an impairment in muscle strength and quality muscle (P=.033 and P=.046, respectively). In the third study Haerer et al., found an increased risk of falls (P=.63). The association between use of statins and risk of falls could not be determined with the available evidence, although an association with the involvement of some determinants of muscular function was found. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Dietary inflammation factor rating™ system and risk of Alzheimer’s disease in elders

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yian; Nieves, Jeri W; Luchsinger, Jose A; Scarmeas, Nikolaos

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that inflammation is involved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between inflammatory aspects of diet and incident AD risk. 2258 non-demented elderly (age ≥ 65) in New York who provided dietary information at baseline were followed-up prospectively for AD development. We examined the composite total Inflammation Factor Rating (tIFR), as a measure of inflammatory impact of foods, in relation with (i) serum level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and (ii) risk of incident AD using Cox proportional hazards model. The tIFR was not associated with serum hsCRP level. After an average of 4.0 years of follow-up, 262 subjects developed incident AD. The tIFR was not associated with AD risk: compared to the lowest tertile of tIFR (most pro-inflammatory), HRs (95% CI) for the highest tertile (most anti-inflammatory) was 0.97(0.69–1.35) (p-for-trend=0.84), in the adjusted model. We conclude that tIFR might not be a biologically relevant measure of the inflammatory impact of the diet. Additionally, although it remains possible that tIFR might be related with some other aspects of inflammation not captured by hsCRP, lack of association with AD risk suggests its limited clinical utility. PMID:21606905

  3. [Cancer and suicide among the elderly: psychosocial determinants of risks, psychopathology and opportunities for prevention].

    PubMed

    Santos, Manoel Antônio Dos

    2017-09-01

    Suicide is a serious public health problem worldwide. Increasing age is directly associated with the rising rates of cancer and physical and functional limitations are important factors regarded as being associated with suicidal behavior among the elderly. This study sought to conduct a critical review of the literature on the risk factors associated with suicide among elderly cancer patients published between 2000 and 2015. Psychosocial precipitants of risks and psychopathology in 20 selected articles were conducted. The studies consistently identified a number of factors that have been considered to be associated with suicidal behavior among the elderly diagnosed with cancer. These include physical and mental health constraints (particularly major depression), social isolation, and the manner in which these factors and others interact. Further research is needed given the importance of the issue and to examine whether further education for healthcare providers and their abilities in suicide risk assessment and management could have positive effects on reducing the suicide rates among elderly patients with cancer. Considerations for upcoming studies encourage the adoption of empirically supported interventions for individualized management of the elderly cancer patient.

  4. [Risk factors for suicide attempts in elderly and old elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Polewka, Andrzej; Chrostek Maj, Jan; Kroch, Stanisław; Szkolnicka, Beata; Mikołaszek-Boba, Magdalena; Groszek, Barbara; Zieba, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the phenomenon of suicide attempt in the elderly inhabitants of Kraków. Special attention has been paid to the group of "seniors"--aged 75 years or over. The authors have analyzed all the 136 cases of suicide attempts by individuals aged over 60 years, selected from the cases of suicide attempts by self-intoxications by patients hospitalized in the Department of Clinical Toxicology, CMUJ in Kraków in the years 2000-2002. The group concerned included 45 males and 91 females. A large number of subjects (over a half of the total) ranged in age from 60 to 65 years. The group of seniors comprised 35 individuals (aged 75 years or over), including 7 males and 28 females. On the basis of the data from medical documentation, the subjects were analysed from the point of view of their health condition and in the psycho-social context. In the majority of cases the subjects are pensioners residing in Kraków, often living alone. In the case of 98% of the subjects, it was their first suicide attempt. Pharmaceuticals used for self-poisoning were most frequently psychotropic, or mixed-type drugs. The assessment of the severity of poisoning indicates that in about 20% patients poisoning was severe. 70% of the subjects suffered from depressive, reactive, or situational disorders, affective depression or organic brain disorders, often with dementive signs. A significant number of subjects suffered from hypertension, coronary artery disease, arteriosclerosis, or alimentary tract diseases. In the group of the seniors, the most conspicuous problems included serious somatic diseases (malignant diseases and chronic respiratory system diseases), depression, organic dementia, loneliness, and bad family situation. Taking into consideration the scantiness of research into attempted and completed suicide in the elderly and in the old elderly, the present authors stress the importance of the continuation of the research to prevent suicide in the aforesaid

  5. [Hemodynamic study of the elderly subject. Indications, risks and value].

    PubMed

    Ohayon, J; Colle, J P; Besse, P

    1985-04-30

    The authors record all the hemodynamic evaluations realised on aged population above severity years during two years (549 patients) representing ten per cent of the whole investigations in an hemodynamic department. The greater part of the indications were severe coronaritis resistant to medical treatment (54 percent) with unstable angina or steady state angina, and valvulopathy (37 percent) with prevalence of symptomatic aortic stenosis. The catheterization incidents and accidents do not appear more owing to the high risk pathology and to the taken precautions. The lethal accident frequency is three point five per thousand little above the frequency in a general catheterized population (two per thousand). Seldinger difficulties are easily got over by using axillary passage in case of need. The surgical interest is underlined by the fact that sixty six percent of the investigated patients will be operated. The hemodynamic evaluation in aged population between 70 and 80 years is realizable in good conditions with little risk increase when it's necessary.

  6. Automated In-Home Fall Risk Assessment and Detection Sensor System for Elders

    PubMed Central

    Rantz, Marilyn; Skubic, Marjorie; Abbott, Carmen; Galambos, Colleen; Popescu, Mihail; Keller, James; Stone, Erik; Back, Jessie; Miller, Steven J.; Petroski, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Falls are a major problem for the elderly people leading to injury, disability, and even death. An unobtrusive, in-home sensor system that continuously monitors older adults for fall risk and detects falls could revolutionize fall prevention and care. Design and Methods: A fall risk and detection system was developed and installed in the apartments of 19 older adults at a senior living facility. The system includes pulse-Doppler radar, a Microsoft Kinect, and 2 web cameras. To collect data for comparison with sensor data and for algorithm development, stunt actors performed falls in participants’ apartments each month for 2 years and participants completed fall risk assessments (FRAs) using clinically valid, standardized instruments. The FRAs were scored by clinicians and recorded by the sensing modalities. Participants’ gait parameters were measured as they walked on a GAITRite mat. These data were used as ground truth, objective data to use in algorithm development and to compare with radar and Kinect generated variables. Results: All FRAs are highly correlated (p < .01) with the Kinect gait velocity and Kinect stride length. Radar velocity is correlated (p < .05) to all the FRAs and highly correlated (p < .01) to most. Real-time alerts of actual falls are being sent to clinicians providing faster responses to urgent situations. Implications: The in-home FRA and detection system has the potential to help older adults remain independent, maintain functional ability, and live at home longer. PMID:26055784

  7. White Matter Hyperintensity Associations with Cerebral Blood Flow in Elderly Subjects Stratified by Cerebrovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, Ahmed A; Powell, David K; Yu, Guoquiang; Johnson, Eleanor S; Jicha, Gregory A; Smith, Charles D

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to add clarity to the relationship between deep and periventricular brain white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebrovascular risk in older persons. Deep white matter hyperintensity (dWMH) and periventricular white matter hyperintensity (pWMH) and regional gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) blood flow from arterial spin labeling were quantified from magnetic resonance imaging scans of 26 cognitively normal elderly subjects stratified by cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images were acquired using a high-resolution 3-dimensional (3-D) sequence that reduced partial volume effects seen with slice-based techniques. dWMHs but not pWMHs were increased in patients at high risk of CVD; pWMHs but not dWMHs were associated with decreased regional cortical (GM) blood flow. We also found that blood flow in WM is decreased in regions of both pWMH and dWMH, with a greater degree of decrease in pWMH areas. WMHs are usefully divided into dWMH and pWMH regions because they demonstrate differential effects. 3-D regional WMH volume is a potentially valuable marker for CVD based on associations with cortical CBF and WM CBF. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Body mass index and the risk of incident functional disability in elderly Japanese

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Tomata, Yasutake; Sugiyama, Kemmyo; Kaiho, Yu; Honkura, Kenji; Watanabe, Takashi; Tanji, Fumiya; Sugawara, Yumi; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between the body mass index (BMI) and the incidence of cause-specific disability remains unclear. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 12,376 Japanese individuals aged ≥65 years who were followed up for 5.7 years. Information on BMI and other lifestyle factors was collected via a questionnaire in 2006. Functional disability data were retrieved from the public Long-term Care Insurance database. BMI was divided into 6 groups (<21, 21–<23, 23–<25, 25–<27[reference], 27–<29 and ≥29). Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for cause-specific disability were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. A U-shaped relationship between BMI and functional disability was observed, with a nadir at 26. The nadir BMI values with the lowest disability risk were 28 for dementia, 25 for stroke, and 23 for joint disease. A low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, the HR values (95% CI) being 2.48 (1.70–3.63) for BMI <21 and 2.25 (1.54–3.27) for BMI 21 to <23; a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease, the HR value (95% CI) being 2.17 (1.40–3.35). There was no significant relationship between BMI and disability due to stroke. The BMI nadirs for cause-specific disability differed: a low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, and a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease. Because BMI values of 23 to <29 did not pose a significantly higher risk for each cause of disability, this range should be regarded as the optimal one for the elderly population. PMID:27495075

  9. Relationship between subjective fall risk assessment and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Objective measurements can be used to identify people with risks of falls, but many frail elderly adults cannot complete physical performance tests. The study examined the relationship between a subjective risk rating of specific tasks (SRRST) to screen for fall risks and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people. Methods The SRRST was investigated in 5,062 individuals aged 65 years or older who were utilized day-care services. The SRRST comprised 7 dichotomous questions to screen for fall risks during movements and behaviours such as walking, transferring, and wandering. The history of falls and fall-related fractures during the previous year was reported by participants or determined from an interview with the participant's family and care staff. Results All SRRST items showed significant differences between the participants with and without falls and fall-related fractures. In multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, diseases, and behavioural variables, the SRRST score was independently associated with history of falls and fractures. Odds ratios for those in the high-risk SRRST group (≥ 5 points) compared with the no risk SRRST group (0 point) were 6.15 (p < 0.01) for a single fall, 15.04 (p < 0.01) for recurrent falls, and 5.05 (p < 0.01) for fall-related fractures. The results remained essentially unchanged in subgroup analysis accounting for locomotion status. Conclusion These results suggest that subjective ratings by care staff can be utilized to determine the risks of falls and fall-related fractures in the frail elderly, however, these preliminary results require confirmation in further prospective research. PMID:21838891

  10. Preoperative patient assessment: Identifying patients at high risk.

    PubMed

    Boehm, O; Baumgarten, G; Hoeft, A

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative mortality remains alarmingly high with a mortality rate ranging between 0.4% and 4%. A small subgroup of multimorbid and/or elderly patients undergoing different surgical procedures naturally confers the highest risk of complications and perioperative death. Therefore, preoperative assessment should identify these high-risk patients and stratify them to individualized monitoring and treatment throughout all phases of perioperative care. A "tailored" perioperative approach might help further reduce perioperative morbidity and mortality. This article aims to elucidate individual morbidity-specific risks. It further suggests approaches to detect patients at the risk of perioperative complications.

  11. Variation in nutritional risk among Mexican American and non-Mexican American homebound elders who receive home-delivered meals.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Joseph R

    2004-01-01

    Good nutritional health is essential to prevent functional decline and improve quality of life. Little is known of disparities in the extent of risk for poor nutritional health among homebound Mexican American (MA) elders who receive Older American Act Nutrition Program (OAANP) home-delivered meals. In order to assist OAANP service providers in understanding racial/ethnic differences in nutritional risk, this study examined routinely collected data on 908 homebound MA and non-MA in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley. Homebound MA were more likely to report poverty, risk factors for and indicators of poor nutritional health. Independent of poverty and covariates,MA were more likely to report very high nutritional risk. This underscores the importance of understanding racial/ethnic disparities in the extent of risk for poor nutritional health for the development, implementation, and evaluation of effective strategies to alleviate nutritional health disparities.

  12. Cancer risk among the HIV-infected elderly in the United States.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Katki, Hormuzd A; Engels, Eric A

    2016-06-19

    HIV-infected people and elderly people have higher cancer risk, but the combined effects of aging and HIV are not well described. We aimed to evaluate the magnitude of cancer risk in the HIV-infected elderly population. We conducted a case-cohort study including a 5% sample of U.S. Medicare enrollees and all cancer cases aged at least 65 in linked cancer registries. HIV was identified through Medicare claims. Among the HIV-infected, absolute cancer risk was calculated accounting for the competing risk of death. Associations between HIV and cancer were estimated with weighted Cox regression adjusting for demographic characteristics. Among 469 954 people in the 5% sample, 0.08% had an HIV diagnosis. Overall, 825 776 cancer cases were identified in cancer registries. Over 5 years, 10.1% of the HIV-infected elderly developed cancer, the most common diagnoses comprising lung (5-year cumulative incidence=2.2%), prostate (2.7%, among men), and colorectal cancer (0.9%), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (0.8%). HIV was strongly associated with incidence of Kaposi sarcoma [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)=94.4, 95% confidence interval (95%CI)=54.6-163], anal cancer (aHR=34.2, 95%CI=23.9-49.0) and Hodgkin lymphoma (aHR=6.3, 95%CI=2.8-14.3). HIV was also associated with incidence of liver cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and lung cancer (aHR=3.4, 2.6, and 1.6, respectively). In the elderly, HIV infection is associated with higher risk for many cancers, although some associations were weaker than expected, perhaps reflecting effects of non-HIV pathways on cancer development. Due to the effects of HIV and aging, the HIV-infected elderly have a sizeable absolute risk, highlighting a need for cancer prevention.

  13. Cumulative Cardiovascular Polypharmacy Is Associated With the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Shin; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Polypharmacy is common in the elderly due to multimorbidity and interventions. However, the temporal association between polypharmacy and renal outcomes is rarely addressed and recognized. We investigated the association between cardiovascular (CV) polypharmacy and the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in elderly patients. We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance PharmaCloud system to investigate the relationship between cumulative CV medications in the 3 months before admission and risk of AKI in the elderly at their admission to general medical wards in a single center. Community-dwelling elderly patients (>60 years) were prospectively enrolled and classified according to the number of preadmission CV medications. CV polypharmacy was defined as use of 2 or more CV medications. We enrolled 152 patients, 48% with AKI (based upon Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes [KDIGO] classification) and 64% with CV polypharmacy. The incidence of AKI was higher in patients taking more CV medications (0 drugs: 33%; 1 drug: 50%; 2 drugs: 57%; 3 or more drugs: 60%; P = 0.05) before admission. Patients with higher KDIGO grades also took more preadmission CV medications (P = 0.04). Multiple regression analysis showed that patients who used 1 or more CV medications before admission had increased risk of AKI at admission (1 drug: odds ratio [OR] = 1.63, P = 0.2; 2 drugs: OR = 4.74, P = 0.03; 3 or more drugs: OR = 5.92, P = 0.02), and that CV polypharmacy is associated with higher risk of AKI (OR 2.58; P = 0.02). Each additional CV medication increased the risk for AKI by 30%. We found that elderly patients taking more CV medications are associated with risk of adverse renal events. Further study to evaluate whether interventions that reduce polypharmacy could reduce the incidence of geriatric AKI is urgently needed. PMID:26252287

  14. Cumulative Cardiovascular Polypharmacy Is Associated With the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Shin; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Polypharmacy is common in the elderly due to multimorbidity and interventions. However, the temporal association between polypharmacy and renal outcomes is rarely addressed and recognized. We investigated the association between cardiovascular (CV) polypharmacy and the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in elderly patients.We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance PharmaCloud system to investigate the relationship between cumulative CV medications in the 3 months before admission and risk of AKI in the elderly at their admission to general medical wards in a single center. Community-dwelling elderly patients (>60 years) were prospectively enrolled and classified according to the number of preadmission CV medications. CV polypharmacy was defined as use of 2 or more CV medications.We enrolled 152 patients, 48% with AKI (based upon Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes [KDIGO] classification) and 64% with CV polypharmacy. The incidence of AKI was higher in patients taking more CV medications (0 drugs: 33%; 1 drug: 50%; 2 drugs: 57%; 3 or more drugs: 60%; P = 0.05) before admission. Patients with higher KDIGO grades also took more preadmission CV medications (P = 0.04). Multiple regression analysis showed that patients who used 1 or more CV medications before admission had increased risk of AKI at admission (1 drug: odds ratio [OR] = 1.63, P = 0.2; 2 drugs: OR = 4.74, P = 0.03; 3 or more drugs: OR = 5.92, P = 0.02), and that CV polypharmacy is associated with higher risk of AKI (OR 2.58; P = 0.02). Each additional CV medication increased the risk for AKI by 30%.We found that elderly patients taking more CV medications are associated with risk of adverse renal events. Further study to evaluate whether interventions that reduce polypharmacy could reduce the incidence of geriatric AKI is urgently needed.

  15. High prevalence of skin and wound care of hospitalized elderly in Brazil: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    da Rosa Silva, Carleara Ferreira; Santana, Rosimere Ferreira; de Oliveira, Beatriz Guitton Renaud Baptista; do Carmo, Thalita Gomes

    2017-02-02

    Skin changes caused by aging increase the risk of skin damages, such as pressure ulcers, during hospitalization of elderly patients. There is few information about the cost of wound treatment in Brazil. Conversely, skin and wound problems are highly reported among hospitalized elderly patients and caregivers. The purpose is to analyze the socio-demographic and clinical profile associated with skin and wound care in hospitalized elderly. This is a prospective observational study. The sample consisted of 75 patients, aged 60 years or more, randomly selected in three hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data extraction from nursing records of the sample, using cross mapping with Nursing Interventions Classification. Data Synthesis supported by SAS 6.11 (SAS Institute, Inc. Cary North Carolina) in association with SPSS version 14.0 and statistics analysis. The findings were: age standard deviation 7.8, with minimum as 60, and maximum as 91 years old. Prevalence of women and married seniors. High prevalence of long-term hospitalization. There were 21 Nursing Interventions in the nursing records and seventeen of them related to skin and wound care. They were described in 57 nursing activities, present during 376 evaluations and repeated 1756 times. A significant difference was obtained between age and the presence of the nursing interventions "Positioning" (p-0.004), Eye Care/Hygiene (p- < 0.0001) and Oral Health Maintenance (p-0.0003). The skin care to prevention and treatment of skin damages represented the major demand of nursing interventions in different clinical conditions of hospitalized elderly.

  16. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Obesity among Elderly Attending Geriatric Outpatient Clinics in Mansoura City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shebl, Amany Mohamed; Hatata, El Sayed Zaki; Boughdady, Aziza Mahmoud; El-Sayed, Sally Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem affecting all ages in both developed and developing countries. It is considered the fifth leading risk factor for deaths all over the world as about 2.8 million people die due to obesity each year directly or indirectly. Obesity in elderly is considered one of the most serious public health challenges for…

  17. Social Support and Well-Being in an At-Risk Elderly Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Mary J.; And Others

    Since 1972 ,when the city of Miami Beach, Florida initiated redevelopment plans for South Miami Beach, the elderly residents have been besieged by a series of events beyond their control that have left them at risk emotionally and physically. To examine the relative impact of health, personal control, and social support as predictors of affect and…

  18. [Diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for dementia in the Mexican elder population].

    PubMed

    Mejía-Arango, Silvia; Zúñiga-Gil, Clemente

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes and dementia are growing problems throughout the world and especially in developing countries. To determine the risk of developing dementia in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Diabetic elders free of dementia from the Mexican Health and Aging study, a prospective community-based cohort research were followed after two years. Socio-demographic factors, comorbid conditions and type of diabetes treatment were analyzed in subjects who become demented. At baseline, 749 participants (13.8%) had diabetes mellitus. During the follow-up period (mean: 2.02 years; range: 1-3 years), 306 of 749 persons with diabetes mellitus developed dementia, yielding a relative risk (RR) of 2.08 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI = 1.59-2.73). The effect was strongest in persons aged 80 years or older with a RR of 2.44 (95% CI = 1.46-4.08), men had a greater relative risk than women (RR = 2.25; 95% CI = 1.46-3.49 vs. RR = 1.98; 95% CI = 1.08-1.11) and subjects with low education (< 7 years of schooling) had a significant RR while those with higher education didn't. Individuals treated with insulin where at highest risk of dementia (RR = 2.83; 95% CI = 1.58-5.06). Hypertension (RR = 2.75; 95% CI = 1.86-4.06) and depression (RR = 3.78; 95% CI = 2.37-6.04) where the two comorbidities which increased the risk of dementia. Subjects with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of developing dementia. Sociodemographic factors and other co-morbidities highly prevalent in the Mexican population contribute to the diabetes-dementia association.

  19. Chronic heart failure in the elderly: value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Davies, L; Francis, D; Piepoli, M; Scott, A; Ponikowski, P; Coats, A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in predicting prognosis in a cohort of elderly patients with chronic heart failure (CHF).
DESIGN—A retrospective cohort study of all patients with CHF over the age of 70 years assessed between January 1992 and May 1997.
SETTING—Tertiary centre.
PATIENTS—50 patients (mean (SD) age 75.9 (4.5) years, 8 women) with CHF New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I (3 patients), II (25 patients), III (20 patients), and IV (2 patients). Follow up was complete for two years in all patients.
RESULTS—The patients underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (peak oxygen consumption 15.2 (4.5) ml/kg/min, minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2) slope 38.7 (11.8)); radionucleide ventriculography (left ventricular ejection fraction 32.8 (14.3)%); serum sodium measurement (139 (2.8) mmol/l); and echocardiography (left ventricular end diastolic dimension 6.1 (1.1) cm, left ventricular end systolic dimension 4.7 (1.5) cm). At the end of follow up in May 1999, 26 patients had died. The median follow up of the survivors was 47.7 months (interquartile range 31.5-53.5 months). On univariate analysis VE/VCO2 slope (p < 0.0001), NYHA class (p < 0.001), peak oxygen uptake (VO2) (p < 0.01), left ventricular end systolic dimension (p < 0.05), and serum sodium concentration (p < 0.05) had significant predictive power. Stepwise multivariate analysis identified only VE/VCO2 slope (p < 0.01), NYHA class (p < 0.05), and peak VO2 (p< 0.05) as conveying significant independent prognostic information.
CONCLUSION—Elderly patients with CHF have a high mortality, with the majority dead within two years. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing provides important information for risk stratification within this group and its use should not be neglected.


Keywords: cardiopulmonary exercise testing; chronic heart failure; elderly patients; risk factor stratification PMID

  20. Risk factors for age-related macular degeneration in elderly Chinese population in Shenyang of China.

    PubMed

    Jia, LiHong; Shen, XueLi; Fan, Rui; Sun, Yan; Pan, XingYue; Yanh, HongMei; Liu, Lu

    2011-10-01

    The paper aims to evaluate the risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in elderly Chinese population in Shenyang, a northeast city of China. A case-control study was conducted to investigate the risk factors for the prevalence of AMD. Ninety three AMD patients diagnosed by a complete ophthalmic examination were recruited as cases from the outpatient departments of two eye hospitals in Shenyang, while 108 normal subjects of similar age and sex were recruited as controls. A questionnaire was administered among both cases and controls. AMD patients aged 60 years and older accounted for 75.3%. There were significantly higher educational levels, shorter smoking history, less sunlight exposure and cataract, and higher proportion of antioxidants intake in controls than in AMD patients. The frequency of intake of fruits, legumes, fish and shrimps was significantly higher in controls than in AMD patients. In a binary logistic regression analysis, smoking and cataract were the risk factors for AMD (OR: 4.44, 95% CI: 2.27-8.69; OR: 4.47, 95% CI: 2.26-8.85 respectively). The high educational background was a protective factor for AMD (OR: 0.761, 95% CI: 0.51-0.98). A low educational background, smoking and cataract are associated with a higher prevalence of AMD. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk analysis highly valued.

    PubMed

    Gammelsaeter, Håkon; Ramstad, Jens Eirik; Røv, Ann Solberg; Walseth, Frode; Paulsen, Anne Margrethe

    2003-11-01

    It is felt that risk and vulnerability analysis is an excellent means of assessing and communicating risk and inconvenience related to extensive construction activities. The main reasons for this are: It uncovers the risks and inconveniences involved. Risk reducing and alert measures are identified. Preventive action and emergency plans are implemented. It is easy to learn. It is unbureaucratic. It promotes cross-professional communication. It distributes correct information very effectively.

  2. A prospective community-based pilot study of risk factors for the investigation of elder mistreatment.

    PubMed

    Lachs, M S; Berkman, L; Fulmer, T; Horwitz, R I

    1994-02-01

    To identify risk factors for the investigation of elder abuse, neglect, self-neglect, exploitation, and abandonment in a population-based observational cohort of community living elders. Population-based sample of 2,812 community-living men and women in New Haven, Connecticut who were over age 65 in 1982. Matching process whereby cohort members who were investigated by Connecticut's State Ombudsman on Aging in 1985 or 1986 were identified. Relative risks for ombudsman investigation in 1985 or 1986 were calculated based on risk factors status at baseline interview in 1982. Sixty-eight (2.4%) members of the cohort received investigation. Features at cohort entry significantly associated with investigation in multiple logistic regression included: requiring assistance with feeding (Adjusted OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.2, 11.7), being a minority elder (Adj. OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4, 2.8), over age 75 at cohort inception (Adj. OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1, 3.1), and having a poor social network as defined by a social network index (Adj. OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0, 2.7). When stratified by race, requiring assistance with feeding was associated with ombudsman investigation in minority elders (Adj. OR 10.8, 95% CI 2.8, 40.5) but not non-minority elders (Adj. OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.5, 7.5). Functional disability, minority status, older age, and poor social networks were associated with investigation for elder mistreatment in this prospective, community-based population of men and women over the age of 65.

  3. Postoperative delirium is an independent risk factor for posttraumatic stress disorder in the elderly patient: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Drews, Tanja; Franck, Martin; Radtke, Finn M; Weiss, Björn; Krampe, Henning; Brockhaus, Wolf R; Winterer, Georg; Spies, Claudia D

    2015-03-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may appear after hospitalisation for surgery with general anaesthesia in elderly patients. Prevalence and risk factors in this setting are unknown. Postoperative delirium could be a risk factor. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of, and risk factors for, PTSD 3 months after surgery with general anaesthesia in elderly patients. A prospective, clinical observational study. This study was carried out between March 2009 and May 2010 in a German university hospital in Berlin and was part of a larger study focusing on depth of anaesthesia. at least 60 years of age; noncardiac surgery with general anaesthesia. impaired preoperative cognitive function [mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score <24]; expected surgery time less than 1 h; nonproficiency in the German language. None. Screening for PTSD 3 months after surgery using the screening instrument Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome 14-Questions Inventory Score (PTSS-14). The following risk factors for PTSD 3 months after surgery were tested: age; American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status; sex; duration of anaesthesia; postoperative delirium; PTSS-14 score 7 days after surgery; postoperative vomiting and nausea; postoperative pain; and preoperative depression. Univariate statistical analysis was performed with Fisher's exact test and Spearman correlation. A backward logistic regression was performed. A total of 559 out of 1277 patients were included. Sixty-six patients (12%) were identified with PTSD 3 months after surgery. Seventy-seven patients (14%) were identified with postoperative delirium. Independent associated factors in the backward logistic regression were postoperative delirium (risk factor) and preoperative depression (protective factor). The prevalence of PTSD 3 months after surgery in elderly patients was high using the screening instrument PTSS-14. Postoperative delirium is a risk factor for PTSD 3 months after surgery. ISRCTN

  4. Perceptions of high risk sports.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, D M

    1997-10-01

    High risk sports were rated as to risk, appeal, and likelihood of participation by 282 men and 162 women. Ascending order of perceived risk was skiing, scuba diving, bungee jumping, rock climbing, motorcycle racing, hang gliding, cliff jumping, and skydiving. Profile analysis showed stated likelihood of participation to be directly related to appeal and inversely related to perceived risk.

  5. Assessment of risk of falls in elderly living at home 1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adriana de Azevedo; Silva, Antonia Oliveira; Rodrigues, Rosalina Aparecida Partezani; Moreira, Maria Adelaide Silva Paredes; Nogueira, Jordana de Almeida; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the risk of falls in elderly, by comparing the sociodemographic and cognitive factors, history of falls and self-reported comorbidities. Method: cross-sectional and quantitative study with 240 elderly. Data were collected based on the social profile, through the instrument of risk of falls and assessment of falls, by univariate analysis, bivariate and multiple logistic regression. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: there was a significant association of the risk of falls, as measured by the Fall Risk Score, with sex (<0.001), age (0.054), cognitive status (<0.001) and history of falls (<0.001). All variables were statistically significant and contributed to the occurrence of falls. In logistic regression, the variables that showed association with risk of falls were: fall, with whom they live, hypertension and visual impairment. Conclusion: female gender, older elderly (over 80 years old), with low cognitive status and occurrence of previous falls in the last six months are factors that increase the prevalence of falls. In logistic regression, the variables that were associated with risk of falls were: fall, with whom they live, visual impairment and rheumatologic diseases. PMID:28403333

  6. Estimation of the risk factors for falls in the elderly: can meta-analysis provide a valid answer?

    PubMed

    Bloch, Frederic; Thibaud, Marie; Tournoux-Facon, Caroline; Brèque, Cyril; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie; Dugué, Benoit; Kemoun, Gilles

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze whether a meta-analysis could allow us to draw useful conclusions about the risk factors for falls in the elderly. A systematic review was carried out of various databases and completed manually. To satisfy the inclusion criteria, an article had to examine a population of subjects aged over 60 years to pertain to falls occurring during daily living activities, and to involve observational or interventional studies. This review identified 4405 indexed articles published between 1981 and 2011. Of the 220 studies with available data that were included in the final study, just 4% were interventional. Among these 220 studies, just 45% offered a satisfactory level of scientific proof. In total, 88 meta-analyses were carried out on the 156 potential protectors or risk factors that were identified. Our systematic review and meta-analyses ensured that high-quality results were obtained from this comprehensive literature search and included a detailed assessment of the quality of the included studies. Several factors appeared to be disproportionately represented in the literature, a fact that likely reflects the objective and precise assessment of these factors rather than their importance in the falls of the elderly. Thus, we cannot be certain that we obtained the most comprehensive analysis of the risk factors for falling with this method. Meta-analyses can help to define the association between falls and various risk factors, but they have to be used complementary to systematic review for the assessment of risk factors.

  7. [FIBRA-RJ Network: frailty and risk of hospitalization in the elderly in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Perez, Mariangela; Lourenço, Roberto Alves

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the risk profile and factors associated with frailty in elderly community residents. The population consisted of individuals 65 years or older living in the northern districts of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and who held private health insurance policies. The cross-sectional study was done at baseline in a cohort with a sample (N = 764) stratified by gender and age. Risk stratification used probability of repeated admissions (PRA) as the screening instrument. Following bivariate analyses, logistic regression analyses were performed to study associations between probability of repeated admissions and socio-demographic, health-status, functional, and cognitive variables. Of the total sample, 6.7% were classified as high risk. Cancer, falls, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, use of medication, receiving a visit from a health professional, being bedridden at home, living alone, and level of activities of daily living were statistically associated with risk of hospitalization. The instrument appeared to be useful for stratifying risk in the elderly.

  8. Frailty and cardiovascular risk in community-dwelling elderly: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Natalia Aquaroni; Pessoa, Germane Silva; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Dias, Rosangela Correa; Perracini, Monica Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests a possible bidirectional connection between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the frailty syndrome in older people. Purpose To verify the relationship between CVD risk factors and the frailty syndrome in community-dwelling elderly. Methods This population-based study used data from the Fragilidade em Idosos Brasileiros (FIBRA) Network Study, a cross-sectional study designed to investigate frailty profiles among Brazilian older adults. Frailty status was defined as the presence of three or more out of five of the following criteria: unintentional weight loss, weakness, self-reported fatigue, slow walking speed, and low physical activity level. The ascertained CVD risk factors were self-reported and/or directly measured hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, waist circumference measurement, and smoking. Results Of the 761 participants, 9.7% were characterized as frail, 48.0% as pre-frail, and 42.3% as non-frail. The most prevalent CVD risk factor was hypertension (84.4%) and the lowest one was smoking (10.4%). It was observed that among those participants with four or five risk factors there was a higher proportion of frail and pre-frail compared with non-frail (Fisher’s exact test: P=0.005; P=0.021). Self-reported diabetes mellitus was more prevalent among frail and pre-frail participants when compared with non-frail participants (Fisher’s exact test: P≤0.001; P≤0.001). There was little agreement between self-reported hypertension and hypertension identified by blood pressure measurement. Conclusion Hypertension was highly prevalent among the total sample. In addition, frail and pre-frail older people corresponded to a substantial proportion of those with more CVD risk factors, especially diabetes mellitus, highlighting the need for preventive strategies in order to avoid the co-occurrence of CVD and frailty. PMID:25336932

  9. The prevalence and risk factors of visual impairment among the elderly in Eastern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Li; Chen, Nancy; Sheu, Min-Muh; Wang, Jen-Hung; Hsu, Wen-Lin; Hu, Yih-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Visual impairment is associated with disability and poor quality of life. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and associated risk factors of visual impairment among the suburban elderly in Eastern Taiwan. The cross-sectional research was conducted from April 2012 to August 2012. The ocular condition examination took place in suburban areas of Hualien County. Medical records from local infirmaries and questionnaires were utilized to collect demographic data and systemic disease status. Logistic regression models were used for the simultaneous analysis of the association between the prevalence of visual impairment and risk factors. Six hundred and eighty-one residents participated in this project. The mean age of the participants was 71.4±7.3 years. The prevalence of vision impairment (better eye<6/18) was 11.0%. Refractive error and cataract were the main causes of vision impairment. Logistic regression analysis showed that people aged 65-75 years had a 3.8 times higher risk of developing visual impairment (p=0.021), while the odds ratio of people aged > 75 years was 10.0 (p<0.001). In addition, patients with diabetic retinopathy had a 3.7 times higher risk of developing visual impairment (p=0.002), while the odds ratio of refractive error was 0.36 (p<0.001). The prevalence of visual impairment was relatively high compared with previous studies. Diabetic retinopathy was an important risk factor of visual impairment; by contrast, refractive error was beneficial to resist visual impairment. Therefore, regular screening of ocular condition and early intervention might aid in the prevention of avoidable vision loss. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  10. Comparison of Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index scores on physical performance among elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Takuro; Mitani, Yuji; Oki, Yutaro; Fujimoto, Yukari; Ohira, Mineko; Kaneko, Hiromi; Kawashima, Tsunehiro; Nishio, Masato; Ishikawa, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) is a new prognostic indicator for nutritional status-related complications and mortality among the elderly. Here we aimed to compare 6-min walk distance (6MWD) between high and low GNRI groups for patients with COPD. We enrolled 63 elderly men with COPD. These subjects were divided into two groups based on their GNRI scores: high GNRI group (≥92 points; n = 44) and low GNRI group (n = 19); we compared 6MWD between these groups. The subjects' characteristics between the high and the low GNRI groups were similar, except for BMI and serum albumin levels. 6MWD were significantly lower in the low GNRI group (279.5 ± 112.3 m versus 211.1 ± 125.3 m; p = 0.03). The GNRI has a more close relation with exercise tolerance and may be a useful nutritional assessment scale for elderly patients with COPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fall risk in an active elderly population – can it be assessed?

    PubMed Central

    Laessoe, Uffe; Hoeck, Hans C; Simonsen, Ole; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Voigt, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Falls amongst elderly people are often associated with fractures. Training of balance and physical performance can reduce fall risk; however, it remains a challenge to identify individuals at increased risk of falling to whom this training should be offered. It is believed that fall risk can be assessed by testing balance performance. In this study a test battery of physiological parameters related to balance and falls was designed to address fall risk in a community dwelling elderly population. Results Ninety-four elderly males and females between 70 and 80 years of age were included in a one year follow-up study. A fall incidence of 15% was reported. The test battery scores were not different between the fallers and non-fallers. Test scores were, however, related to self-reported health. In spite of inclusion of dynamic tests, the test battery had low fall prediction rates, with a sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 43% respectively. Conclusion Individuals with poor balance were identified but falls were not predicted by this test battery. Physiological balance characteristics can apparently not be used in isolation as adequate indicators of fall risk in this population of community dwelling elderly. Falling is a complex phenomenon of multifactorial origin. The crucial factor in relation to fall risk is the redundancy of balance capacity against the balance demands of the individuals levels of fall-risky lifestyle and behavior. This calls for an approach to fall risk assessment in which the physiological performance is evaluated in relation to the activity profile of the individual. PMID:17257414

  12. Low Testosterone Level and Risk of Alzheimer's Disease in the Elderly Men: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenshan; Du, Na; Liu, Ying; Fan, Xinyi; Wang, Yunyang; Jia, Xiujuan; Hou, Xu; Wang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Sex steroids can positively affect the brain function, and low levels of sex steroids may be associated with worse cognitive function in the elderly men. However, previous studies reported contrary findings on the relationship between testosterone level and risk of Alzheimer's disease in the elderly men. The objective of this study was to comprehensively assess the relationship between low testosterone level and Alzheimer's disease risk in the elderly men using a meta-analysis. Only prospective cohort studies assessing the influence of low testosterone level on Alzheimer's disease risk in elderly men were considered eligible. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were pooled to assess the risk of Alzheimer's disease in elderly men with low testosterone level. Seven prospective cohort studies with a total of 5251 elderly men and 240 cases of Alzheimer's disease were included into the meta-analysis. There was moderate degree of heterogeneity among those included studies (I(2) = 47.2%). Meta-analysis using random effect model showed that low plasma testosterone level was significantly associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in elderly men (random RR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.12-1.96, P = 0.006). Sensitivity analysis by omitting one study by turns showed that there was no obvious change in the pooled risk estimates, and all pooled RRs were statistically significant. This meta-analysis supports that low plasma testosterone level is significantly associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in the elderly men. Low testosterone level is a risk factor of worse cognitive function in the elderly men.

  13. [Incidence and risk factors for accidental falls among general practice elderly patients in Latina, Central Italy].

    PubMed

    Capon, Alessandra; Di Lallo, Domenico; Mastromattei, Antonio; Pavoni, Noemi; Simeoni, Siro

    2007-01-01

    falls incidence in home resident elderly people varies from 30% to 40%. Falls induce loss of self-sufficiency and increase mortality and morbidity. to evaluate falls incidence and risk factors in a group of general practice elderly patients. prospective cohort study with 1 year follow-up. 18 practitioners visited their elderly patients (>75 years) for a baseline assessment. Information on current pathologies and previous falls in the last six months was collected. Functional status was evaluated using: Short Portable Mental State Questionnaire, Geriatric Depression Scale, Activities of Daily Living, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living. Total mobility Tinetti score was measured in a subgroup of elderly. Falls were monitored through 2 phone-interviews at 6 and 12 months. Data were analyzed through logistic regression. 1168 elderly were visited and 800 were enrolled in the study. Twenty-eight percent of the elderly fell in the whole period. Sixty percent of falls were not reported to the practitioner. Independent predictors for falls were ADL score (ADL<5: OR 1.90; 95% CI 1.05-3.45), falls occurred in the 6 months previous to the follow-up period (OR 1.62; 95% CI 1.03-2.54) and the interaction term among this factor and the follow-up period (OR 2.39; 95% CI 1.22-4.72). Tinetti score was significantly associated to falls only in univariate analysis. Practitioners can play a key-role in identifying at-risk subjects and managing prevention interventions. Falls monitoring and a continuous practice of comprehensive geriatric assessment should be encouraged.

  14. Urinary tract infection in elderly trauma patients: review of the Trauma Quality Improvement Program identifies the population at risk.

    PubMed

    Polites, Stephanie F; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Thomsen, Kristine M; Amr, Mahmoud A; Jenkins, Donald H; Zietlow, Scott P; Zielinski, Martin D

    2014-12-01

    Elderly trauma patients are at high risk for urinary tract infection (UTI). Despite this, UTI has been deemed a potentially preventable problem and therefore not reimbursable by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Early identification of UTI in these patients should lead to prompt treatment, improved outcomes, and cost savings. Risk factors for UTI development in this population must be elucidated to realize these goals. The Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) database was used to analyze elderly patients (≥65 years) admitted as a result of injury during 2011. Patients with genitourinary injuries or undergoing dialysis before admission were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify UTI risk factors. Mean cost of UTI was calculated based on the assumption of $862 to $1,007 per UTI. In total, 33,257 patients were identified; 1,492 developed UTI (4.5%). Multiple significant risk factors were identified, including age greater than 75 years, female sex, ascites, moderate head injury, impaired sensorium, congestive heart failure, and duration of hospital stay (all p < 0.05). Assuming that UTIs diagnosed on hospital Day 1 were preexisting, the cost of UTI to TQIP hospitals ranged from $1,280,959 to $1,496,434 per year. Duration of stay has a profound impact on the development of UTIs in elderly trauma patients, but overall severity of injury does not. In addition, multiple nonmodifiable risk factors were identified, prompting the possibility for increased screening of occult UTIs. Reimbursement for care of UTI in this complicated patient population should be revisited. The TQIP database must improve urinary catheter data. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  15. Plasma lutein and zeaxanthin and the risk of age-related nuclear cataract among the elderly Finnish population.

    PubMed

    Karppi, Jouni; Laukkanen, Jari A; Kurl, Sudhir

    2012-07-14

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in cataractogenesis. Previous studies have shown that long-term dietary intake of antioxidants (lutein and zeaxanthin) may decrease the risk of age-related cataracts. The aim of the present study was to examine whether plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin are related to age-related nuclear cataract in the elderly population. Subjects were participants in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study and they were classified into tertiles according to plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin. The association of plasma lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations with age-related nuclear cataract in 1689 elderly subjects (aged 61-80 years) was investigated in the present cross-sectional study by using the Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 113 cases of incident age-related cataracts were confirmed, of which 108 cases were nuclear cataracts. After adjustment for age, examination year, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol consumption, serum LDL-cholesterol, serum HDL-cholesterol, years of education, use of oral corticosteroids, history of diabetes and history of hypertension with current use of antihypertensive medication, subjects in the highest tertiles of plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin had 42 and 41 % lower risks of nuclear cataract, respectively, compared with those in the lowest tertiles (relative risk (RR) = 0·58, 95 % CI 0·35, 0·98; P = 0·041 for lutein and RR = 0·59, 95 % CI 0·35, 0·99; P = 0·046 for zeaxanthin). In conclusion, we suggest that high plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin were associated with a decreased risk of age-related nuclear cataract in the elderly population.

  16. Elders' Knowledge about Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease, Their Perceived Risk, and Adopted Preventive Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khayyal, Hatem; El Geneidy, Moshera; El Shazly, Somaya Abdel Moneim

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the most frequent single cause of death among persons over 65 years of age and it seems to continue to be a significant threat to the health and wellbeing of the elderly population all over the world, yet the condition is largely preventable. The aims of this study to assess and determine the relations among elder's…

  17. Impacts of High Serum Total Cholesterol Level on Brain Functional Connectivity in Non-Demented Elderly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Li, He; Zhang, Junying; Li, Xin; Qi, Di; Wang, Nuo; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that high serum cholesterol is a risk factor of dementia. However, the effects of cholesterol on cognition and brain remain largely unclear. This study aims to investigate the associations between serum total cholesterol (TC) and neuropsychological performance, and intrinsic functional networks in non-demented elderly. Among a cohort of 120 community-dwelling Beijing residents, 29 subjects in the high-TC group (1st quartile) and 31 in the low-TC group (4th quartile) were included in this study, and underwent a battery of neuropsychological tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, including T2- and T1-weighted imaging, and resting-state functional MRI. No significant group difference was found in any of the neuropsychological tests used. Stronger connectivity in the default mode network was observed in the high-TC group compared to that in the low-TC group (p <  0.001, uncorrected). While in the salience network (SN), the high-TC group showed lower connectivity in the anterior cingulate cortex and frontal regions, compared to the low-TC group (p <  0.05, FWE corrected). Our findings suggest that in non-demented elderly persons, high serum cholesterol is associated with disruption of functional connectivity in the SN. The results not only deepen our understanding of how cholesterol affects the brain, but are also significant for selecting sensitive indicators for monitoring the impairments of cholesterol on the neural system.

  18. Physical Function Decline and the Risk of Elder Self-Neglect in a Community-Dwelling Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa; Fulmer, Terry; de Leon, Carlos F. Mendes; Rajan, Bharat; Evans, Denis A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This longitudinal study examines the association between physical function decline and the risk of elder self-neglect in a community-dwelling population. Design and Methods: Of the 5,570 participants in the Chicago Health Aging Project, 1,068 were reported to social services agency for suspected elder self-neglect from 1993 to 2005. The…

  19. Physical Function Decline and the Risk of Elder Self-Neglect in a Community-Dwelling Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa; Fulmer, Terry; de Leon, Carlos F. Mendes; Rajan, Bharat; Evans, Denis A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This longitudinal study examines the association between physical function decline and the risk of elder self-neglect in a community-dwelling population. Design and Methods: Of the 5,570 participants in the Chicago Health Aging Project, 1,068 were reported to social services agency for suspected elder self-neglect from 1993 to 2005. The…

  20. Plasma homocysteine level is a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuefeng; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Qun; Fan, Yongqian; Lin, Weilong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship of plasma homocysteine (Hcy), bone turnover biomarkers (BTB), and bone mineral density (BMD) with osteoporotic fracture (OPF) in elderly people. Methods Eighty-two patients (aged 65 years or older) admitted to our orthopedics department between October 2014 and May 2015 were randomly divided into three groups: 1) OPF group: 39 cases with the mean age 81.82±5.49 years, which included 24 females and 15 males; 2) high-energy fracture (HEF) group: 22 cases with the mean age 78.88±5.75 years, which included 16 females and six males; 3) non-bone-fracture group: 21 cases with mean age 79.75±5.47 years without bone fracture, which included 14 females and seven males. Plasma Hcy, BTB, and BMD were measured. Analysis of variance and multiple regression analysis were used in the statistical analysis. Results There was no significant difference in either age or sex among the three groups. There were significant differences in plasma Hcy and hip BMD between the OPF and HEF groups; there was also significant difference in plasma Hcy, 25-(OH) Vit D, and hip BMD between the OPF and non-fracture groups. There was no difference in lumbar spine BMD between the OPF group and the other two groups. There was no significant difference in plasma Hcy, 25-(OH) Vit D, hip or lumbar spine BMD between the HEF and non-fracture group. There was no significant difference in procollagen type I N-propeptide of type I collagen, serum C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen, and parathyroid hormone among the three groups. Plasma Hcy was linearly correlated with age and serum C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen, but not correlated with either hip or lumbar spine BMD or any other BTBs. Conclusion In this study, we found that the plasma Hcy level in elderly patients with OPF is higher than that of nonosteoporotic patients. It is not correlated with BMD, but positively correlated with bone resorption markers. An increased Hcy

  1. High temperatures-related elderly mortality varied greatly from year to year: important information for heat-warning systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuming; Barnett, Adrian G; Tong, Shilu

    2012-01-01

    We examined the variation in association between high temperatures and elderly mortality (age ≥ 75 years) from year to year in 83 US cities between 1987 and 2000. We used a Poisson regression model and decomposed the mortality risk for high temperatures into: a "main effect" due to high temperatures using lagged non-linear function, and an "added effect" due to consecutive high temperature days. We pooled yearly effects across both regional and national levels. The high temperature effects (both main and added effects) on elderly mortality varied greatly from year to year. In every city there was at least one year where higher temperatures were associated with lower mortality. Years with relatively high heat-related mortality were often followed by years with relatively low mortality. These year to year changes have important consequences for heat-warning systems and for predictions of heat-related mortality due to climate change.

  2. [The model of perioperative risk assessment in elderly patients - interim analysis].

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Izabela; Ścisło, Lucyna; Pietruszka, Szymon; Walewska, Elzbieta; Paszko, Agata; Siarkiewicz, Benita; Richter, Piotr; Budzyński, Andrzej; Szczepanik, Antoni M

    2017-04-21

    Demographic changes in contemporary society require implementation of proper perioperative care of elderly patients due to an increased risk of perioperative complications in this group. Preoperative assessment of health status identifies risks and enables preventive interventions, improving outcomes of surgical treatment. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment contains numerous diagnostic tests and consultations, which is expensive and difficult to use in everyday practice. The development of a simplified model of perioperative assessment of elderly patients will help identifying the group of patients who require further diagnostic workup. The aim of the study is to evaluate the usefulness of the tests used in a proposed model of perioperative risk assessment in elderly patients. In a group of 178 patients older than 64 years admitted for surgical procedures, a battery of tests was performed. The proposed model of perioperative risk assessment included: Charlson Comorbidity Index, ADL (activities of daily living), TUG test (timed "up and go" test), MNA (mini nutritional assessment), AMTS (abbreviated mental test score), spirometry measurement of respiratory muscle strength (Pimax, Pemax). Distribution of abnormal results of each test has been analysed. The Charlson Index over 6 points was recorded in 10.1% of patients (15.1% in cancer patients). Abnormal result of the TUG test was observed in 32.1%. The risk of malnutrition in MNA test has been identified in 29.7% (39.2% in cancer patients). Abnormal test results at the level of 10-30% indicate potential diagnostic value of Charlson Comorbidity Index, TUG test and MNA in the evaluation of perioperative risk in elderly patients.

  3. Association between risk perception, subjective knowledge, and depression in community-dwelling elderly people in Japan.

    PubMed

    Imai, Hissei; Okumiya, Kiyohito; Fukutomi, Eriko; Wada, Taizo; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Chen, Wen-Ling; Tanaka, Mire; Sakamoto, Ryota; Fujisawa, Michiko; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2015-05-30

    Risk perception is one of the core factors in theories of health behavior promotion. However, the association between knowledge, risk perception, and depressed mood in depression is unknown. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationships between subjective knowledge, risk perception, and objective scores of depression in community-dwelling elderly people in Japan. A total of 747 elderly participants (mean age: 76.1, female: 59.8%) who completed the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) along with items assessing subjective knowledge and risk perception were included in the analysis. We assessed the correlation between subjective knowledge and risk perception, and then compare GDS-15 scores by level of subjective knowledge and risk perception. Subjective knowledge was weakly associated with risk perception and related to lower GDS-15 scores in a dose-response pattern, which did not change after adjusting for age, gender, basic activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental ADL, years of education and history of depression. There was no significant association between risk perception and GDS-15 scores. The relationship between knowledge, risk perception, and depressed mood in younger generations is unclear, but warrants examination.

  4. Diabetes in the elderly: drug use and the risk of drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Prado, Maria Aparecida Medeiros Barros do; Francisco, Priscila Maria Stolses Bergamo; Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to outline the sociodemographic and health profile of elderly persons with reported diabetes, to assess the knowledge and practices regarding treatment options and describe the use of medications and potential risks for drug interactions (DI) in this subgroup. In 2008,a cross-sectional study was conducted of 1,517 elderly citizens in Campinas in which the prevalence of diabetes was estimated and its associations assessed using the Rao-Scott test (p < 0,05).The potential drug interactions were evaluated using the Micromedex® database. Diabetes prevalence was 21.7%, without significant difference between the sexes. A higher percentage of elderly diabetics was found aged over 70, with less schooling, per capita family income of less than 1 minimum wage and no occupational activity. The average drug intake was 3.9 in the previous 3 days. Possible interactions were identified in 413 cases and 53.1%, 7.8% and 7.2% of the subjects presented moderate, minor and serious risk of DI, respectively. The importance of adopting a healthy diet and physical activity for weight reduction, disease and complication control is stressed. The need for attention to the potential for drug interactions and the use of inappropriate medications among the elderly is highlighted.

  5. Sleep quality among elderly high-altitude dwellers in Ladakh.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Okumiya, Kiyohito; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Shinya; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Motonao; Nakajima, Shun; Wada, Taizo; Fujisawa, Michiko; Imai, Hissei; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Chen, Wenling; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2017-03-01

    It has been already known that people who temporarily stay at high altitude may develop insomnia as a symptom of acute mountain sickness. However, much less is known about people living at high altitude. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of high altitude environment on sleep quality for the elderly who have been living at high altitude for their whole lives. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Domkhar valley at altitudes of 2800-4200m, Ladakh. Sleep quality was assessed using Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Measurement items include body mass index, blood pressure, blood sugar, hemoglobin, timed Up and Go test, oxygen saturation during wakefulness, respiratory function test, Oxford Knee Score (OKS), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and so on. The participants were Ladakhi older adults aged 60 years or over (n=112) in Domkhar valley. The participation rate was 65.1% (male: female=47:65, mean age: 71.3 years and 67.9 years, respectively). The prevalence of the high score of ISI (8 or more) was 15.2% (17 out of 112). Altitude of residence was significantly correlated with ISI. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that OKS and altitude of residence were significantly related with ISI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding of the risk of HIV infection among the elderly in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Lekalakala-Mokgele, Eucebious

    2014-01-01

    The literature pertaining to the elderly shows that HIV infection among this population is on the increase, suggesting that the elderly population engages in activities risky for HIV infection. Reports on such behaviour include frequent sexual relations with much younger people and having multiple partners. A study was carried out in Ga-Rankuwa, a black township in Gauteng Province, South Africa to explore and describe the understanding of these elderly people regarding their risks of HIV infection and AIDS. Using a qualitative, exploratory design, three focus-group interviews were conducted with 32 women aged over 50 years. Findings revealed that older persons have knowledge about transmission of HIV infection and AIDS. However, a few had misconceptions as to how HIV infection is transmitted, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities play a role. Knowledge of mechanisms of protecting themselves against infection, such as use of a condom during coitus and wearing gloves when caring for infected family members, was also evident. The elderly indicated that they would prefer an older person, who they could identify with, to educate them more about HIV infection and AIDS. Although majority of participants had knowledge of how HIV is transmitted, and issues that put them at risk of transmission, a few the older persons had misconceptions about how HIV is transmitted due to lack of knowledge, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities can transmit infection. The lack of knowledge underscores the importance of addressing sexual risk with older people. It was very clear that more needs to be done in terms of education campaigns to dispel the myths of HIV infection and to empower the elderly.

  7. Understanding of the risk of HIV infection among the elderly in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lekalakala-Mokgele, Eucebious

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The literature pertaining to the elderly shows that HIV infection among this population is on the increase, suggesting that the elderly population engages in activities risky for HIV infection. Reports on such behaviour include frequent sexual relations with much younger people and having multiple partners. A study was carried out in Ga-Rankuwa, a black township in Gauteng Province, South Africa to explore and describe the understanding of these elderly people regarding their risks of HIV infection and AIDS. Using a qualitative, exploratory design, three focus-group interviews were conducted with 32 women aged over 50 years. Findings revealed that older persons have knowledge about transmission of HIV infection and AIDS. However, a few had misconceptions as to how HIV infection is transmitted, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities play a role. Knowledge of mechanisms of protecting themselves against infection, such as use of a condom during coitus and wearing gloves when caring for infected family members, was also evident. The elderly indicated that they would prefer an older person, who they could identify with, to educate them more about HIV infection and AIDS. Although majority of participants had knowledge of how HIV is transmitted, and issues that put them at risk of transmission, a few the older persons had misconceptions about how HIV is transmitted due to lack of knowledge, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities can transmit infection. The lack of knowledge underscores the importance of addressing sexual risk with older people. It was very clear that more needs to be done in terms of education campaigns to dispel the myths of HIV infection and to empower the elderly. PMID:24957136

  8. Metabolic syndrome and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Dragsbæk, Katrine; Neergaard, Jesper S.; Laursen, Janne M.; Hansen, Henrik B.; Christiansen, Claus; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Karsdal, Morten A.; Brix, Susanne; Henriksen, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prognostic value of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is believed to vary with age. With an elderly population expecting to triple by 2060, it is important to evaluate the validity of MetS in this age group. We examined the association of MetS risk factors with later risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in elderly Caucasian women. We further investigated if stratification of individuals not defined with MetS would add predictive power in defining future disease prevalence of individuals with MetS. The Prospective Epidemiological Risk Factor Study, a community-based cohort study, followed 3905 Danish women since 2000 (age: 70.1 ± 6.5) with no previous diagnosis of T2DM or CVD, holding all measurements used for MetS definition; central obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and hyperglycemia combined with register-based follow-up information. Elderly women with defined MetS presented a 6.3-fold increased risk of T2DM (95% confidence interval: [3.74–10.50]) and 1.7-fold increased risk of CVD (1.44–2.05) compared to women with no MetS risk factors. Subdividing the control group without defined MetS revealed that both centrally obese controls and controls holding other MetS risk factors also had increased risk of T2DM (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.21 [1.25–3.93] and HR = 1.75 [1.04–2.96]) and CVD (HR = 1.51 [1.25–1.83] and HR = 1.36 [1.15–1.60]) when compared to controls with no MetS risk factors. MetS in elderly Caucasian women increased risk of future T2DM and CVD. While not defined with MetS, women holding only some risk factors for MetS were also at increased risk of T2DM or CVD compared to women with no MetS risk factors. PMID:27603394

  9. Risk of nonvertebral fractures among elderly postmenopausal women using antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Rabenda, Véronique; Bruyère, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2012-10-01

    To examine the association between antidepressants, including TCAs, SSRIs, and miscellaneous antidepressants and the risk of nonvertebral fractures among women with osteoporosis. This study was a post-hoc analysis of pooled data from two international, phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind studies (the Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention [SOTI] and TReatment Of Peripheral OSteoporosis [TROPOS]). A nested case-control study was performed in the placebo treated population. Adjusted logistic regression models were used to estimate the risk of nonvertebral fracture associated with the use of antidepressants. After 3 years of follow-up, 391 nonvertebral fractures cases were identified and matched to 1955 controls. Compared with non-users of antidepressants, antidepressants use was associated with an increased risk of nonvertebral fractures (adjusted OR=1.64; 95%CI, 1.03-2.62]). Particularly, there was a 2-fold risk increase (95%CI, 1.07-3.79) of nonvertebral fracture for current users of SSRIs and a 2.1-fold risk increase for subjects who were current users of TCAs (95%CI, 1.02-4.30). Among patients categorized as recent or past users, none of the classes of antidepressants were statistically associated with increased risk of nonvertebral fracture. Our findings confirm that both SSRIs and TCAs increase the risk of nonvertebral fracture in current users. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in quality of life associated with surgical risk in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Romero, Paola Severo; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; Rodrigues, Juliane; Moraes, Maria Antonieta

    2015-10-01

    The study aims to verify quality of life of elderly patients submitted to cardiac surgery, and correlating surgical risk to health-related quality of life instrument domains. Prospective cohort study, performed at a cardiology hospital. It included elderly patients who had undergone elective cardiac surgery. Pre- and postoperative quality of life was evaluated by applying the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Old (WHOQOL-OLD) scale and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. Surgical risk was stratified using the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE). Fifty-four patients, mostly men (64.8%), were included, with a mean age of 69.3 ± 5.7 years. The eight domains of the SF-36 questionnaire, and the four facets presented for the WHOQOL-OLD scale showed improved quality of life 6 months after surgery (P < 0.001). No difference was found in the association of EuroSCORE with the domains of the health-related quality of life instruments. The data showed improved quality of life of elderly people submitted to cardiac surgery, unrelated to surgical risk. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Edentulism risk indicators among Mexican elders 60-year-old and older.

    PubMed

    Islas-Granillo, H; Borges-Yañez, S A; Lucas-Rincón, S E; Medina-Solís, C E; Casanova-Rosado, A J; Márquez-Corona, M L; Maupomé, G

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of edentulism in Mexican elders aged 60 years and older, and the associated risk indicators. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 139 elders living in either of two long-term care (LTC) facilities, or attending an adult day center (ADC) in Pachuca, Mexico. A subject was edentulous when natural teeth were completely absent, determined through a clinical examination. Risk indicators were collected using questionnaires. Analyses were performed using binary logistic regression in STATA 9.0. Mean age was 79.0±9.8 years. Many subjects were women (69.1%). The prevalence of edentulism was 36.7%. In multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age and sex, the variables that were inversely associated (p<0.05) with edentulism were living with a spouse (odds ratio=OR=0.31), and lacking health insurance (OR=0.70). Variables associated with higher risk of being edentate were lower educational attainment (OR=1.61), having received radiation therapy (OR=4.49), being a smoker (OR=4.82), and having diabetes (OR=2.94) or other chronic illnesses (OR=1.82) (with hypertension approaching significance, p=0.067). In this sample of Mexican elders, diverse variables were associated with edentulism, in particular smoking and past radiotherapy. Oral health programs within and outside LTC/ADC should take into account risk factors specific to the older population.

  12. Risk factors of post-operative delirium after elective vascular surgery in the elderly: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Raats, J W; Steunenberg, S L; de Lange, D C; van der Laan, L

    2016-11-01

    Postoperative delirium is a common and serious adverse event in the elderly patient and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is of great importance to identify patients at risk for delirium, in order to focus preventive strategies. The aim of this article is to systematically review current available literature on pre-operative risk factors for delirium after vascular surgery. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and EMBASE, using the MeSH terms and key words "delirium", "surgery" and "risk factor". Studies were retained for review after meeting strict inclusion criteria that included only prospective studies evaluating risk factors for delirium in patients who had elective vascular surgery. Diagnosis of delirium needed to be confirmed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) or ICD-10. Fifteen articles were selected for inclusion, incidence of delirium across the studies ranged from 5% to 39%. Many factors have been associated with increased risk of delirium, including age, cognitive impairment, comorbidity, depression, smoking, alcohol, visual and hearing impairment, ASA-score, biochemical abnormalities, operative strategies and blood loss. Delirium is a common complication after elective vascular surgery in elderly. The highest delirium incidence was observed after open aortic surgery as well as after surgery for critical limb ischemia. A picture starts to form of which predisposing factors lead to increased risk of delirium. The leading risk factors consistently identified in this systematic review were advanced age and cognitive impairment. Multi-disciplinary specialist-led interventions in the preoperative phase could decrease incidence and severity of delirium and should be focused on identified high-risk patients. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Association Between High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I and Cardiac Events in Elderly Women.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Joshua R; Lim, Wai H; Wong, Germaine; Abbs, Samuel; Zhu, Kun; Lim, Ee M; Thompson, Peter L; Prince, Richard L

    2017-07-30

    Elderly women are at high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and heart failure. High-sensitivity assays allow detection of cardiac troponin I (hsTnI) well below diagnostic cutoffs for acute coronary syndrome. We investigated the association between these levels with future cardiac events in community-based ambulant white women aged over 70 years initially recruited for a 5-year randomized, controlled trial of calcium supplements. This was a prospective study of 1081 elderly women without clinical CHD at baseline (1998) or hsTnI above the diagnostic cutoffs for acute coronary syndrome with 14.5-year follow-up hospitalization and mortality (events). Two hundred forty-three (22%) women had CHD events, 163 (15%) myocardial infarction or CHD death (hard CHD), and 109 (10%) heart failure. In 99.6% of available serum samples, hsTnI was above the level of detection (median, 4.5 ng/L; interquartile range, 3.6-5.8). After adjusting for Framingham risk factors, each SD natural log-transformed hsTnI increase was associated with an increased hazard for CHD (hazard ratio, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.18-1.53; P<0.001) hard CHD (hazard ratio, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.29-1.76; P<0.001), and heart failure (hazard ratio, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.36-1.99; P<0.001). Step-wise increases in relative hazards were observed with increasing quartiles of hsTnI (P for trend, <0.001), whereas the addition of hsTnI to conventional risk factors modestly improved discrimination indices: Harrell's c-statistic, net reclassification, and integrated discrimination (P<0.05). Cardiac troponin I is independently associated with future cardiac events in elderly women without apparent clinical manifestations. The addition of cardiac troponin I to conventional risk factors may modestly improve risk prediction in this setting. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  14. Risk factors and prevalence of periodontitis in community-dwelling elders in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Borges-Yáñez, S Aída; Irigoyen-Camacho, María Esther; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether an association existed between chronic systemic diseases/conditions, risk factors common in old age, and the extent and severity of chronic periodontal disease. Sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics were examined by contrasting rural, urban-marginal, and urban social environments in Central Mexico. Data were analysed with Analysis of Variance, chi2 tests, and multivariable logistic regression. A total of 473 adults 60 years old and over were interviewed; 315 were also examined and underwent laboratory assays (participation rate, 66%); women, 62%; mean age 73+/-8 years; 23% edentulous. The distribution of periodontitis by sociodemographic variables showed differences across locales (73% low-urban, 57% middle-urban, 29% rural). The regression model indicated that periodontitis was more frequently associated with low-urban locale, higher systolic blood pressure, higher body mass index, and worse calculus readings, with an interaction whereby being obese and having a high calculus index was associated with a high probability of having periodontitis. Overall periodontal conditions were fair. While we identified oral, systemic, and social variables that modulated the experience of periodontitis, it would appear that urban, low social class elders appeared to have worse periodontal conditions.

  15. Serum Cholesterol Levels within the High Normal Range are Associated with Better Cognitive Performance among Chinese Elderly

    PubMed Central

    LV, Yue-Bin; YIN, Zhao-Xue; CHEI, Choy-Lye; Brasher, Melanie Sereny; ZHANG, Juan; Kraus, Virginia Byers; QIAN, Frank; SHI, Xiao-Ming; Matchar, David Bruce; ZENG, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The association between cognitive function and cholesterol levels is poorly understood and inconsistent results exist among the elderly. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association of cholesterol level with cognitive performance among Chinese elderly. Design A cross-sectional study was implemented in 2012 and data were analyzed using generalized additive models, linear regression models and logistic regression models. Setting Community-based setting in eight longevity areas in China. Subjects A total of 2000 elderly aged 65 years and over (mean 85.8±12.0 years) participated in this study. Measurements Total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration were determined and cognitive impairment was defined as Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score≤23. Results There was a significant positive linear association between TC, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C and MMSE score in linear regression models. Each 1 mmol/L increase in TC, TG, LDL-C and HDL-C corresponded to a decreased risk of cognitive impairment in logistic regression models. Compared with the lowest tertile, the highest tertile of TC, LDL-C and HDL-C had a lower risk of cognitive impairment. The adjusted odds ratios and 95% CI were 0.73(0.62–0.84) for TC, 0.81(0.70–0.94) for LDL-C and 0.81(0.70–0.94) for HDL-C. There was no gender difference in the protective effects of high TC and LDL-C levels on cognitive impairment. However, for high HDL-C levels the effect was only observed in women. High TC, LDL-C and HDL-C levels were associated with lower risk of cognitive impairment in the oldest old (aged 80 and older), but not in the younger elderly (aged 65 to 79 years). Conclusions These findings suggest that cholesterol levels within the high normal range are associated with better cognitive performance in Chinese elderly, specifically in the oldest old. With further validation, low

  16. Aging Will Amplify the Heat-related Mortality Risk under a Changing Climate: Projection for the Elderly in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiantian; Horton, Radley M.; Bader, Daniel A.; Zhou, Maigeng; Liang, Xudong; Ban, Jie; Sun, Qinghua; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-06-01

    An aging population could substantially enhance the burden of heat-related health risks in a warming climate because of their higher susceptibility to extreme heat health effects. Here, we project heat-related mortality for adults 65 years and older in Beijing China across 31 downscaled climate models and 2 representative concentration pathways (RCPs) in the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Under a scenario of medium population and RCP8.5, by the 2080s, Beijing is projected to experience 14,401 heat-related deaths per year for elderly individuals, which is a 264.9% increase compared with the 1980s. These impacts could be moderated through adaptation. In the 2080s, even with the 30% and 50% adaptation rate assumed in our study, the increase in heat-related death is approximately 7.4 times and 1.3 times larger than in the 1980s respectively under a scenario of high population and RCP8.5. These findings could assist countries in establishing public health intervention policies for the dual problems of climate change and aging population. Examples could include ensuring facilities with large elderly populations are protected from extreme heat (for example through back-up power supplies and/or passive cooling) and using databases and community networks to ensure the home-bound elderly are safe during extreme heat events.

  17. Aging Will Amplify the Heat-Related Mortality Risk Under a Changing Climate: Projection for the Elderly in Beijing, China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Tiantian; Horton, Radley M.; Bader, Daniel A.; Zhou, Maigeng; Liang, Xudong; Ban, Jie; Sun, Qinghua; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    An aging population could substantially enhance the burden of heat-related health risks in a warming climate because of their higher susceptibility to extreme heat health effects. Here, we project heatrelated mortality for adults 65 years and older in Beijing China across 31 downscaled climate models and 2 representative concentration pathways (RCPs) in the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Under a scenario of medium population and RCP8.5, by the 2080s, Beijing is projected to experience 14,401 heat-related deaths per year for elderly individuals, which is a 264.9% increase compared with the 1980s. These impacts could be moderated through adaptation. In the 2080s, even with the 30% and 50% adaptation rate assumed in our study, the increase in heat-related death is approximately 7.4 times and 1.3 times larger than in the 1980s respectively under a scenario of high population and RCP8.5. These findings could assist countries in establishing public health intervention policies for the dual problems of climate change and aging population. Examples could include ensuring facilities with large elderly populations are protected from extreme heat (for example through back-up power supplies and/or passive cooling) and using databases and community networks to ensure the home-bound elderly are safe during extreme heat events.

  18. Aging Will Amplify the Heat-Related Mortality Risk Under a Changing Climate: Projection for the Elderly in Beijing, China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Tiantian; Horton, Radley M.; Bader, Daniel A.; Zhou, Maigeng; Liang, Xudong; Ban, Jie; Sun, Qinghua; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    An aging population could substantially enhance the burden of heat-related health risks in a warming climate because of their higher susceptibility to extreme heat health effects. Here, we project heatrelated mortality for adults 65 years and older in Beijing China across 31 downscaled climate models and 2 representative concentration pathways (RCPs) in the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Under a scenario of medium population and RCP8.5, by the 2080s, Beijing is projected to experience 14,401 heat-related deaths per year for elderly individuals, which is a 264.9% increase compared with the 1980s. These impacts could be moderated through adaptation. In the 2080s, even with the 30% and 50% adaptation rate assumed in our study, the increase in heat-related death is approximately 7.4 times and 1.3 times larger than in the 1980s respectively under a scenario of high population and RCP8.5. These findings could assist countries in establishing public health intervention policies for the dual problems of climate change and aging population. Examples could include ensuring facilities with large elderly populations are protected from extreme heat (for example through back-up power supplies and/or passive cooling) and using databases and community networks to ensure the home-bound elderly are safe during extreme heat events.

  19. Aging Will Amplify the Heat-related Mortality Risk under a Changing Climate: Projection for the Elderly in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiantian; Horton, Radley M.; Bader, Daniel A.; Zhou, Maigeng; Liang, Xudong; Ban, Jie; Sun, Qinghua; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    An aging population could substantially enhance the burden of heat-related health risks in a warming climate because of their higher susceptibility to extreme heat health effects. Here, we project heat-related mortality for adults 65 years and older in Beijing China across 31 downscaled climate models and 2 representative concentration pathways (RCPs) in the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Under a scenario of medium population and RCP8.5, by the 2080s, Beijing is projected to experience 14,401 heat-related deaths per year for elderly individuals, which is a 264.9% increase compared with the 1980s. These impacts could be moderated through adaptation. In the 2080s, even with the 30% and 50% adaptation rate assumed in our study, the increase in heat-related death is approximately 7.4 times and 1.3 times larger than in the 1980s respectively under a scenario of high population and RCP8.5. These findings could assist countries in establishing public health intervention policies for the dual problems of climate change and aging population. Examples could include ensuring facilities with large elderly populations are protected from extreme heat (for example through back-up power supplies and/or passive cooling) and using databases and community networks to ensure the home-bound elderly are safe during extreme heat events. PMID:27320724

  20. The Impacts of Cellular Senescence in Elderly Pneumonia and in Age-Related Lung Diseases That Increase the Risk of Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Yanagi, Shigehisa; Tsubouchi, Hironobu; Miura, Ayako; Matsuo, Ayako; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia generates considerable negative impacts on the elderly. Despite the widespread uses of vaccines and appropriate antibiotics, the morbidity and mortality of elderly pneumonia are significantly higher compared to the counterparts of young populations. The definitive mechanisms of high vulnerability in the elderly against pathogen threats are unclear. Age-associated, chronic low-grade inflammation augments the susceptibility and severity of pneumonia in the elderly. Cellular senescence, one of the hallmarks of aging, has its own characteristics, cell growth arrest and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). These properties are beneficial if the sequence of senescence–clearance–regeneration is transient in manner. However, persisting senescent cell accumulation and excessive SASP might induce sustained low-grade inflammation and disruption of normal tissue microenvironments in aged tissue. Emerging evidence indicates that cellular senescence is a key component in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), which are known to be age-related and increase the risk of pneumonia. In addition to their structural collapses, COPD and IPF might increase the vulnerability to pathogen insults through SASP. Here, we discuss the current advances in understanding of the impacts of cellular senescence in elderly pneumonia and in these chronic lung disorders that heighten the risk of respiratory infections. PMID:28245616

  1. The Impacts of Cellular Senescence in Elderly Pneumonia and in Age-Related Lung Diseases That Increase the Risk of Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Shigehisa; Tsubouchi, Hironobu; Miura, Ayako; Matsuo, Ayako; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2017-02-25

    Pneumonia generates considerable negative impacts on the elderly. Despite the widespread uses of vaccines and appropriate antibiotics, the morbidity and mortality of elderly pneumonia are significantly higher compared to the counterparts of young populations. The definitive mechanisms of high vulnerability in the elderly against pathogen threats are unclear. Age-associated, chronic low-grade inflammation augments the susceptibility and severity of pneumonia in the elderly. Cellular senescence, one of the hallmarks of aging, has its own characteristics, cell growth arrest and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). These properties are beneficial if the sequence of senescence-clearance-regeneration is transient in manner. However, persisting senescent cell accumulation and excessive SASP might induce sustained low-grade inflammation and disruption of normal tissue microenvironments in aged tissue. Emerging evidence indicates that cellular senescence is a key component in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), which are known to be age-related and increase the risk of pneumonia. In addition to their structural collapses, COPD and IPF might increase the vulnerability to pathogen insults through SASP. Here, we discuss the current advances in understanding of the impacts of cellular senescence in elderly pneumonia and in these chronic lung disorders that heighten the risk of respiratory infections.

  2. Health risk assessment of volatile organic compounds in a high risk group surrounding Map Ta Phut industrial estate, Rayong Province.

    PubMed

    Singkaew, Pannawadee; Kongtip, Pornpimol; Yoosook, Witaya; Chantanakul, Suttinun

    2013-12-01

    The health risks of a high-risk group, surrounding Map Ta Phut industrial estate, Rayong, which may be exposed to VOCs through inhalation of contaminated air and dermal contact of contaminated water were assessed. The health risk was assessed for 19 subjects categorized as children, adult and elderly from Ban plong and Nongfab communities following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) method. The VOC concentrations in ambient air and ground water were monitored by Pollution Control Department (PCD), Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment to represent average VOC exposure of subjects. The lifetime cancer risk of VOCs exposure from inhalation and dermal contact with ground water were 1.32 x 10(-7)-5.21 x 10(6) for elderly 1.18 x 10(-7)-6.20 x 10(-6)for adult and 8.93 x 10(-7)-5.93 x 10(-6) for children. For non-cancer risk, the hazard index was 0.44 for elderly, 0.38-0.42 for adult and 0.55 for children. The lifetime cancer risk of the high-risk group living near Map Ta Phut industrial estate was in acceptable range for elderly, adult and children. For non-cancer risk, it is also acceptable.

  3. A systematic review of prevalence and risk factors for elder abuse in Asia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Elsie; Chan, Ko-Ling; Tiwari, Agnes

    2015-04-01

    The number of older victims of domestic violence is expected to increase drastically in Asia as many countries are experiencing rapid population aging. In 2012, 11% of the population in Asia were aged 60 years and over. This is expected to rise to 24% by 2050. This article discusses the unique features of Asian cultures that are relevant to the understanding of elder abuse and summarizes the existing literature looking at the prevalence and risk factors of such abuse in Asian populations.

  4. Risk of falls in Brazilian elders with and without low back pain assessed using the Physiological Profile Assessment: BACE study

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Nayza M. B.; Queiroz, Bárbara Z.; Lopes, Renata A.; Sampaio, Natalia R.; Pereira, Daniele S.; Pereira, Leani S. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Low back pain (LBP) is a common musculoskeletal condition among elders and is associated with falls. However, the underlying biological risk factors for falling among elders with LBP has been poorly investigated. The Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA) is a validated fall-risk assessment tool that involves the direct assessment of sensorimotor abilities and may contribute to the understanding of risk factors for falls among elders with LBP. Objective To assess fall risk using the PPA in elders with and without LBP. Method This is an observational, comparative, cross-sectional study with elders aged ≥65 years. The present study was conducted with a subsample of participants from the Back Complaints in the Elders (BACE) - Brazil study. Fall risk was assessed using the PPA, which contains five tests: visual contrast sensitivity, hand reaction time, quadriceps strength, lower limb proprioception, and postural sway. Results Study participants included 104 individuals with average age of 72.3 (SD=4.0) years, divided into two groups: GI) 52 participants with LBP; GII) 52 participants without LBP. The participants with LBP had a significantly higher fall risk (1.10 95% CI 0.72 to 1.48), greater postural sway (49.78 95% CI 13.54 to 86.01), longer reaction time (58.95 95% CI 33.24 to 84.65), and lower quadriceps strength (–4.42 95% CI –8.24 to –0.59) compared to asymptomatic participants. There was no significant difference for vision and proprioception tests between LBP and non-LBP participants. Conclusion Elders with LBP have greater risk for falls than those without LBP. Our results suggest fall-risk screening may be sensible in elders with LBP. PMID:27683833

  5. Blood Pressure Variability and Cardiovascular Risk in the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER)

    PubMed Central

    Poortvliet, Rosalinde K. E.; Ford, Ian; Lloyd, Suzanne M.; Sattar, Naveed; Mooijaart, Simon P.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Packard, Christopher J.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; de Ruijter, Wouter; Stott, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Variability in blood pressure predicts cardiovascular disease in young- and middle-aged subjects, but relevant data for older individuals are sparse. We analysed data from the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) study of 5804 participants aged 70–82 years with a history of, or risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Visit-to-visit variability in blood pressure (standard deviation) was determined using a minimum of five measurements over 1 year; an inception cohort of 4819 subjects had subsequent in-trial 3 years follow-up; longer-term follow-up (mean 7.1 years) was available for 1808 subjects. Higher systolic blood pressure variability independently predicted long-term follow-up vascular and total mortality (hazard ratio per 5 mmHg increase in standard deviation of systolic blood pressure = 1.2, 95% confidence interval 1.1–1.4; hazard ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 1.1–1.2, respectively). Variability in diastolic blood pressure associated with increased risk for coronary events (hazard ratio 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.2–1.8 for each 5 mmHg increase), heart failure hospitalisation (hazard ratio 1.4, 95% confidence interval 1.1–1.8) and vascular (hazard ratio 1.4, 95% confidence interval 1.1–1.7) and total mortality (hazard ratio 1.3, 95% confidence interval 1.1–1.5), all in long-term follow-up. Pulse pressure variability was associated with increased stroke risk (hazard ratio 1.2, 95% confidence interval 1.0–1.4 for each 5 mmHg increase), vascular mortality (hazard ratio 1.2, 95% confidence interval 1.0–1.3) and total mortality (hazard ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 1.0–1.2), all in long-term follow-up. All associations were independent of respective mean blood pressure levels, age, gender, in-trial treatment group (pravastatin or placebo) and prior vascular disease and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Our observations suggest variability in diastolic blood pressure is more strongly associated

  6. Reducing the risk of aspiration pneumonia among elderly patients in long-term care facilities through oral health interventions.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Jaya; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Corcoran, Amy M; Laudenbach, Joel M; Stoopler, Eric T

    2008-02-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of elderly residents in long-term care facilities. The microflora present in the oral cavity because of poor oral hygiene has been associated with aspiration pneumonia. There is evidence that improved oral care can reduce the risk of developing aspiration pneumonia in the elderly. The purpose of this paper is to review aspiration pneumonia and provide oral health care guidelines in an effort to help reduce the risk of aspiration pneumonia in the elderly residing in long-term care facilities.

  7. Can we predict the risk of falls in elderly patients with instability?

    PubMed

    Soto-Varela, Andrés; Faraldo-García, Ana; Rossi-Izquierdo, Marcos; Lirola-Delgado, Antonio; Vaamonde-Sánchez-Andrade, Isabel; del-Río-Valeiras, María; Gayoso-Diz, Pilar; Santos-Pérez, Sofía

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether clinical and instrumental examination of balance can predict the risk of falls in elderly patients with instability. It is a case control study, with cases defined by falls in the last year, developed in a third level university hospital. Seventy patients aged 65 years or more who met at least one of the following inclusion criteria: (a) at least one fall in the last year; (b) spend more than 15s during the timed up and go test (TUG); (c) a score of less than 68% average balance in the sensory organisation test (SOT) of the computerised dynamic posturography (CDP); or (d) at least one fall in the CDP-SOT. TUG test, CDP-SOT, CDP centre of gravity balancing (CG) and limits of stability (LOS), Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) test and short FES-I test. Number of steps and time (TUG), average balance and use of sensorial information (CDP-SOT), speed and directional control (CDP-CG and LOS), DHI score and short FES-I score. Comparing subjects without falls (non-fallers) vs subjects with at least one fall (fallers) in the last year, fallers obtain worse scores than non-fallers in condition 2 (p=0.043) and use of somatosensory information (p=0.039). Comparing subjects with five falls or less (non-multiple-fallers) vs subjects with more than five falls (multiple-fallers), multiple-fallers obtain worse scores than non-multiple-fallers in overall balance (p=0.023), condition 6 (p=0.036), directional control (swaying (p=0.006) and LOS (p=0.023)) and short FES-I score (p=0.007). The three most useful parameters for identifying unstable elderly patients at particularly high risk of repeated falls are mean balance in the CDP SOT, directional control of CDP LOS and short FES-I score. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolically Healthy Obesity and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in the Elderly Population

    PubMed Central

    Koolhaas, Chantal M.; van Rossum, Elisabeth F. C.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Hofman, Albert; Kavousi, Maryam; Franco, Oscar H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether being metabolically healthy obese (MHO)—defined by the presence of obesity in the absence of metabolic syndrome—is associated with subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains unclear and may depend on the participants’ age. We examined the association of being MHO with CVD risk in the elderly. Methods and Findings This study included 5,314 individuals (mean age 68 years) from the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study. We categorized our population in groups according to body mass index (BMI) and presence and absence of metabolic syndrome, and estimated the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) for every group by using Cox proportional hazard models. Among 1048 (19.7%) obese individuals we identified 260 (24.8%) MHO subjects. Over 14 years of follow-up there were 861 incident CVD cases. In the multivariable adjusted analysis, we did not observe an increased CVD risk in MHO individuals (HR 1.07, 95%CI 0.75–1.53), compared to normal weight individuals without metabolic syndrome. CVD risk was increased by the presence of metabolic syndrome in normal weight (HR 1.35, 95%CI 1.02–1.80), overweight (HR 1.32, 95%CI 1.09–1.60) and obese (HR 1.33, 95%CI 1.07–1.66) individuals, compared to those with normal weight without metabolic syndrome. In a mediation analysis, 71.3% of the association between BMI and CVD was explained by the presence of metabolic syndrome. Conclusions In our elderly population, we found that the presence of obesity without metabolic syndrome did not confer a higher CVD risk. However, metabolic syndrome was strongly associated with CVD risk, and was associated with an increased risk in all BMI categories. Therefore, preventive interventions targeting cardiometabolic risk factors could be considered in elderly, regardless of weight status. PMID:27100779

  9. Recurrent pneumonia: a review with focus on clinical epidemiology and modifiable risk factors in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Dang, T T; Majumdar, S R; Marrie, T J; Eurich, D T

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most common reasons for physician visits and hospitalizations in North America. Rates of CAP increase with age and CAP is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, especially in the elderly. Though there is much written about the epidemiology and risk factors of incident (first episode) pneumonia, much less is known about recurrent pneumonia. Rates of recurrent pneumonia within 3-5-years of an episode of CAP are 9-12% with a median time to recurrence of 123-317 days and mortality ranging from 4 to 10%. Age ≥65-years-old and impaired functional status are the only patient characteristics that are independently associated with increased risk of recurrence. In terms of modifiable risk factors, only the use of proton-pump inhibitors and systemic and inhaled corticosteroids have consistently been associated with increased risk of recurrent pneumonia, while angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may exert a protective effect. Many chronic medical conditions typically associated with increased incident pneumonia-such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), neurological disease (resulting in dysphagia or silent aspiration), and heart failure-were not associated with increased risk of recurrent pneumonia. However, those who are immune-suppressed (e.g., immunoglobulin deficiencies) may be at increased risk of recurrent pneumonia. In summary, among those who survive an episode of pneumonia, recurrence is not uncommon, particularly in the elderly. Following recovery from an episode of pneumonia, patients should be evaluated for risk factors that would predispose to a second episode including seeking evidence of immunosuppression in younger patients and medication optimization, particularly in the elderly.

  10. Connection between competence, usability, environment and risk of falls in elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Leiva-Caro, José Alex; Salazar-González, Bertha Cecilia; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther Carlota; Gómez-Meza, Marco Vinicio; Hunter, Kathleen F

    2015-01-01

    To determine connections between competence, usability, environment and risk of falls in elderly adults. Correlational descriptive study, 123 elderly adults, both male and female, aged 70 years and older were included. Data was collected via the Tinetti Scale, CESD-7 Scale, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Usability Questionnaire on Housing and Housing Enabler; and sociodemographic and health background certificate data. For data analysis, descriptive and inferential statistics were used, multivariate linear and logistic regression models were adjusted. 42.0% of the elderly adults had presented with falls, with a higher prevalence in women, and in the group of 70-75 years. The physical environment of the house, gait, and usability were set as risk factors for falls. A negative relationship between usability and depressive symptoms, cognitive health, balance, gait, the social and physical environment was found, p <0.05; and a strong positive correlation between walking and balance, p <0.05. This study helps to better understand the phenomenon of falling, to find a connection between usability with the risk of falls, and other variables.

  11. Connection between competence, usability, environment and risk of falls in elderly adults

    PubMed Central

    Leiva-Caro, José Alex; Salazar-González, Bertha Cecilia; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther Carlota; Gómez-Meza, Marco Vinicio; Hunter, Kathleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to determine connections between competence, usability, environment and risk of falls in elderly adults. Method: correlational descriptive study, 123 elderly adults, both male and female, aged 70 years and older were included. Data was collected via the Tinetti Scale, CESD-7 Scale, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Usability Questionnaire on Housing and Housing Enabler; and sociodemographic and health background certificate data. For data analysis, descriptive and inferential statistics were used, multivariate linear and logistic regression models were adjusted. Results: 42.0% of the elderly adults had presented with falls, with a higher prevalence in women, and in the group of 70-75 years. The physical environment of the house, gait, and usability were set as risk factors for falls. A negative relationship between usability and depressive symptoms, cognitive health, balance, gait, the social and physical environment was found, p <0.05; and a strong positive correlation between walking and balance, p <0.05. Conclusion: this study helps to better understand the phenomenon of falling, to find a connection between usability with the risk of falls, and other variables. PMID:26626006

  12. Nutrition risk screening: the interrelationship of food insecurity, food intake, and unintentional weight change among homebound elders.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Joseph R

    2004-01-01

    Nutrition risk screening is a key component of the homedelivered meals program. To examine direct and indirect relationships among individual components of nutrition risk, path analysis was conducted on routinely collected data from 908 homebound elders who received home-delivered meals. The good fit of the model revealed that specific nutrition risk factors and indicators of nutritional risk were directly and indirectly associated with meal frequency and unintended weight change. With the heightened vulnerability for poor nutritional health among homebound elders who report food insecurity, policymakers and service providers should strengthen efforts to target individual components of nutrition risk rather than aggregate scores or categorical measures.

  13. Phase angle as bioelectrical marker to identify elderly patients at risk of sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Basile, Claudia; Della-Morte, David; Cacciatore, Francesco; Gargiulo, Gaetano; Galizia, Gianluigi; Roselli, Mario; Curcio, Francesco; Bonaduce, Domenico; Abete, Pasquale

    2014-10-01

    Several markers have been associated with sarcopenia in the elderly, including bioelectrical indices. Phase angle (PhA) is an impedance parameter and it has been suggested as an indicator of cellular death. Thus, the relationship between PhA and muscle mass and strength was investigated in 207 consecutively elderly participants (mean age 76.2±6.7years) admitted for multidimensional geriatric evaluation. Muscle strength by grip strength using a hand-held dynamometer and muscle mass was measured by bioimpedentiometer. PhA was calculated directly with its arctangent (resistance/reactance×180°/π). Linear relationship among muscular mass and strength and with clinical and biochemical parameters, including PhA at uni- and multivariate analysis were performed. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that lower level of PhA is associated with reduction in grip strength (y=3.16+0.08x; r=0.49; p<0.001), and even more, with muscle mass (y=3.04+0.25x; r=0.60; p<0001). Multivariate analysis confirms these relationships (grip strength β=0.245, p=0.031; muscular mass β=0.623, p<0.01). Thus, PhA is inversely related to muscle mass and strength in elderly subjects and it may be considered a good bioelectrical marker to identify elderly patients at risk of sarcopenia.

  14. Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Healthy Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Kathy V.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors in 57 healthy older individuals were measured (blood pressure, lipids and lipoproteins, and lifestyle behaviors) via a personal health questionnaire. Results indicated that, though the subjects were generally healthy, their lifestyle behaviors, particularly diet and physical activity, could be improved. (SM)

  15. Evaluating the fall risk among elderly population by choice step reaction test

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Donghai; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Yuliang; Zhu, Wenfei; Tian, Shiliu; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Falls during daily activities are often associated with injuries and physical disabilities, thereby affecting quality of life among elder adults. Balance control, which is crucial in avoiding falls, is composed of two elements: muscle strength and central nervous system (CNS) control. A number of studies have reported that reduced muscle strength raises the risk of falling. However, to date there has been only limited research focused on the relationship between fall risk and the CNS. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between CNS and risk of falling among the elderly. A total of 140 elderly people (92 females and 48 males) were divided into faller and nonfaller groups based on questionnaire responses concerning falls in their daily life. Participants undertook a choice step reaction test in which they were required to respond to random visual stimuli using foot movements as fast as possible in the left or right directions. Response time was quantified as premotor time (PMT) and motor time (MT). In addition, the participants’ electro-myography data were recorded during the choice step reaction test. A maximal isokinetic torque test was also performed. PMT was greater in the fallers than in the nonfallers group. There was a significant difference between fall status and direction on PMT. PMT of the left limb in nonfallers was faster than the right, but in fallers there was no difference between left and right limbs. A similar phenomenon was also observed for MT. There were significant differences between fallers and nonfallers in maximum isokinetic torque at knee and ankle joints. The correct rate of PMT was higher than other variables, such as MT and maximal isokinetic torque, in evaluating elderly fall risk by using logistic regression analyses. The results suggest that PMT in the choice step reaction test could be a useful parameter to assess risk of fall among elder adults. In addition, decreased maximal isokinetic torque was related to greater

  16. Evaluating the fall risk among elderly population by choice step reaction test.

    PubMed

    Wang, Donghai; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Yuliang; Zhu, Wenfei; Tian, Shiliu; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Falls during daily activities are often associated with injuries and physical disabilities, thereby affecting quality of life among elder adults. Balance control, which is crucial in avoiding falls, is composed of two elements: muscle strength and central nervous system (CNS) control. A number of studies have reported that reduced muscle strength raises the risk of falling. However, to date there has been only limited research focused on the relationship between fall risk and the CNS. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between CNS and risk of falling among the elderly. A total of 140 elderly people (92 females and 48 males) were divided into faller and nonfaller groups based on questionnaire responses concerning falls in their daily life. Participants undertook a choice step reaction test in which they were required to respond to random visual stimuli using foot movements as fast as possible in the left or right directions. Response time was quantified as premotor time (PMT) and motor time (MT). In addition, the participants' electro-myography data were recorded during the choice step reaction test. A maximal isokinetic torque test was also performed. PMT was greater in the fallers than in the nonfallers group. There was a significant difference between fall status and direction on PMT. PMT of the left limb in nonfallers was faster than the right, but in fallers there was no difference between left and right limbs. A similar phenomenon was also observed for MT. There were significant differences between fallers and nonfallers in maximum isokinetic torque at knee and ankle joints. The correct rate of PMT was higher than other variables, such as MT and maximal isokinetic torque, in evaluating elderly fall risk by using logistic regression analyses. The results suggest that PMT in the choice step reaction test could be a useful parameter to assess risk of fall among elder adults. In addition, decreased maximal isokinetic torque was related to greater PMT

  17. Cancer Risk among the HIV-Infected Elderly in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Yanik, Elizabeth L.; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Engels, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected people and elderly people have higher risk of cancer, but the combined effects of aging and HIV are not well described. As the HIV population is aging, we aimed to evaluate the magnitude of cancer risk in the HIV-infected elderly population. Design We conducted a case-cohort study including a 5% sample of US Medicare enrollees and all cancer cases aged ≥65 in linked cancer registries. Methods HIV was identified through Medicare claims. Among the HIV-infected, absolute cancer risk was calculated accounting for the competing risk of death. Associations between HIV and cancer were estimated with weighted Cox regression adjusting for demographic characteristics. Results Among 469,954 people in the 5% sample, 0.08% had an HIV diagnosis. Overall, 825,776 cancer cases were identified in cancer registries. Over five years, 10.1% of the HIV-infected elderly developed cancer, the most common diagnoses comprising lung (5-year cumulative incidence=2.2%), prostate (2.7%, among men), and colorectal cancer (0.9%), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (0.8%). HIV was strongly associated with incidence of Kaposi sarcoma (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]=94.4, 95%CI=54.6-163), anal cancer (aHR=34.2, 95%CI=23.9-49.0) and Hodgkin lymphoma (aHR=6.3, 95%CI=2.8-14.3). HIV was also associated with incidence of liver cancer (aHR=3.4, 95%CI=2.2-5.1), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (aHR=2.6, 95%CI=1.9-3.4), and lung cancer (aHR=1.6, 95%CI=1.3-2.0). Conclusions In the elderly, HIV infection is associated with higher risk for many cancers, although some associations were weaker than expected, perhaps reflecting effects of non-HIV pathways on cancer development. Due to the effects of HIV and aging, the HIV-infected elderly have a sizeable absolute risk, highlighting a need for cancer prevention. PMID:26950314

  18. Serum C-peptide as a key contributor to lipid-related residual cardiovascular risk in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhao, DuoDuo; Li, Yue; Meng, Lu; Enwer, Gulmire

    2017-11-01

    The serum levels of C-peptide, an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), increase with age. This study aimed to investigate the association between serum C-peptide and increased risk for CVD with altered lipid metabolism in the elderly. This was a population-based cross-sectional study that included 3091 elderly participants aged ≥65 years. Serum C-peptide and lipid levels were measured according to standard protocols. Sampling weights were used to estimate the characteristics of study participants. Stratified analysis of covariance was used to evaluate the changes in the serum lipid levels according to quartiles of serum C-peptide levels, and the linear trend was assessed using a linear model. The logistic regression model was carried out to determine the association between the serum C-peptide levels and serum lipid levels. The results of the analysis of covariance stratified by sex and serum insulin level showed that the serum triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were significantly associated with changes in the serum C-peptide levels, independent of the serum insulin level. The logistic regression analyses indicated that the serum C-peptide levels were positively associated with the serum TG levels, and negatively associated with the serum HDL-C levels. A significant dose-response association was obtained in both men and women. Serum C-peptide levels were strongly associated with increased serum TG and reduced HDL-C levels in the elderly. Our results suggest that serum C-peptide increases the risk of CVD via a pathway that increases TG or decreases HDL-C levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor is related to cardiovascular risk factors in active and inactive elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Zembron-Lacny, A.; Dziubek, W.; Rynkiewicz, M.; Morawin, B.; Woźniewski, M.

    2016-01-01

    Regular exercise plays an important preventive and therapeutic role in heart and vascular diseases, and beneficially affects brain function. In blood, the effects of exercise appear to be very complex and could include protection of vascular endothelial cells via neurotrophic factors and decreased oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to identify the age-related changes in peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its relationship to oxidative damage and conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers, such as atherogenic index, C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL), in active and inactive men. Seventeen elderly males (61-80 years) and 17 young males (20-24 years) participated in this study. According to the 6-min Åstrand-Rhyming bike test, the subjects were classified into active and inactive groups. The young and elderly active men had a significantly better lipoprotein profile and antioxidant status, as well as reduced oxidative damage and inflammatory state. The active young and elderly men had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels compared to their inactive peers. BDNF was correlated with VO2max (r=0.765, P<0.001). In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation of BDNF with atherogenic index (TC/HDL), hsCRP and oxLDL. The findings demonstrate that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness reflected in VO2max was associated with a higher level of circulating BDNF, which in turn was related to common CVD risk factors and oxidative damage markers in young and elderly men. PMID:27332774

  20. Study of the intima-media thickening in carotid arteries of healthy elderly with high blood pressure and elderly with high blood pressure and dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Elizabete Viana; Brandão, Andréa Araújo; Pozzan, Roberto; Magalhães, Maria Eliane; Castier, Márcia; Brandão, Airton Pires

    2008-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the mean intima-media thickening of carotid arteries of elderly subjects, and its relationship with age, anthropometric measurements, high systolic blood pressure and dyslipidemia. Methods In this investigation, 129 subjects were enrolled between 1995 and 1998, age ranging from 29 to 94 years. They were assigned to one of 4 groups, including 2 control groups (group I, of healthy younger subjects; group II of healthy elderly subjects). Groups III and IV included those who presented with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH), and ISH and dyslipidemia, respectively. All subjects were submitted to a medical interview, lab tests with measurement of cholesterol levels, electrocardiogram, and carotid ultrasound. The ultrasound included measurement of the intima-media thickening (IMT) of the carotid arteries, the right carotid artery (RCA) and left carotid artery (LCA), and assessment of the presence of plaques. Blood fat and glucose were measured by a standard method. The results were compared among the groups through statistical tests. The tests employed were: Chi-Square, Pearson’s and Likelihood Ratio, Student’s t, Mann-Whitney; ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test, Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test, and test for multiple comparisons and Odds Ratio determination (OR). Results In this investigation, a positive association was observed between aging and IMT. In relation to systolic hypertension, a significant association was observed with IMT (IMT-RCA p = 0.0034; IMT-LCA p = 0.0196; IMT-RLCA p = 0.0299), and with the presence of plaques (PlaqueR p = 0.0110; PlaqueL p = 0.0294; PlaqueRL p = 0.0040). Conclusion This investigation evidenced the important role of aging in IMT, and of systolic hypertension in the IMT and presence of plaque. However, further studies are needed for a better understanding of the actual role of risk factors in aging. PMID:18982922

  1. Mild prolonged chronic hyponatremia and risk of hip fracture in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ayus, Juan Carlos; Fuentes, Nora Angelica; Negri, Armando Luis; Moritz, Michael L; Giunta, Diego Hernan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Nigwekar, Sagar U; Thadhani, Ravi I; Go, Alan S; De Quiros, Fernan Gonzalez Bernaldo

    2016-10-01

    Hip fractures are among the most serious bone fractures in the elderly, producing significant morbidity and mortality. Several observational studies have found that mild hyponatremia can adversely affect bone, with fractures occurring as a potential complication. We examined if there is an independent association between prolonged chronic hyponatremia (>90 days duration) and risk of hip fracture in the elderly. We performed a retrospective cohort study in adults >60 years of age from a prepaid health maintenance organization who had two or more measurements of plasma sodium between 2005 and 2012. The incidence of hip fractures was assessed in a very restrictive population: subjects with prolonged chronic hyponatremia, defined as plasma sodium values <135 mmol/L, lasting >90 days. Multivariable Cox regression was performed to determine the hazard ratio (HR) for hip fracture risk associated with prolonged chronic hyponatremia after adjustment for the propensity to have hyponatremia, fracture risk factors and relevant baseline characteristics. Among 31 527 eligible patients, only 228 (0.9%) had prolonged chronic hyponatremia. Mean plasma sodium was 132 ± 5 mmol/L in hyponatremic patients and 139 ± 3 mmol/L in normonatremic patients (P < 0.001). The absolute risk for hip fracture was 7/282 in patients with prolonged chronic hyponatremia and 411/313 299 in normonatremic patients. Hyponatremic patients had a substantially elevated rate of hip fracture [adjusted HR 4.52 (95% CI 2.14-9.6)], which was even higher in those with moderate hyponatremia (<130 mmol/L) [adjusted HR 7.61 (95% CI 2.8-20.5)]. Mild prolonged chronic hyponatremia is independently associated with hip fracture risk in the elderly population, although the absolute risk is low. However, proof that correcting hyponatremia will result in a reduction of hip fractures is lacking. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  2. INFECTION HOSPITALIZATION INCREASES RISK OF DEMENTIA IN THE ELDERLY

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Judith A; Snitz, Beth E; Alvarez, Karina A; Nahin, Richard L; Weissfeld, Lisa A; Lopez, Oscar; Angus, Derek C; Shah, Faraaz; Ives, Diane G; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Williamson, Jeffrey D; Arnold, Alice M; DeKosky, Steven T; Yende, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Severe infections, often requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission, have been associated with persistent cognitive dysfunction. Less severe infections are more common and whether they are associated with an increased risk of dementia is unclear. We determined the association of pneumonia hospitalization with risk of dementia in well-functioning older adults. Design Secondary analysis of a randomized multicenter trial to determine the effect of Gingko biloba on incident dementia. Setting and Subjects Community volunteers (n=3069) with a median follow-up of 6.1 years. Measurement and Main Results We identified pneumonia hospitalizations using ICD-9CM codes and validated them in a subset. Less than 3% of pneumonia cases necessitated ICU admission, mechanical ventilation or vasopressor support. Dementia was adjudicated based on neuropsychological evaluation, neurological exam, and magnetic resonance imaging. Two hundred twenty one participants (7.2%) incurred at least one hospitalization with pneumonia (mean time to pneumonia=3.5 years). Of these, 38 (17%) developed dementia after pneumonia with half of these cases occurring 2 years after the pneumonia hospitalization. Hospitalization with pneumonia was associated with increased risk of time to dementia diagnosis (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 2.3, CI: 1.6–3.2, p<0.0001). The association remained significant when adjusted for age, sex, race, study site, education, and baseline Mini-Mental Status Exam (HR=1.9, CI 1.4–2.8, p<.0001). Results were unchanged when additionally adjusted for smoking, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and pre-infection functional status. Results were similar using propensity analysis where participants with pneumonia were matched to those without pneumonia based on age, probability of developing pneumonia, and similar trajectories of cognitive and physical function prior to pneumonia (adjusted incidence rates: 91.7 vs. 65 cases per 1,000 person-years, adjusted incidence

  3. Infection hospitalization increases risk of dementia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Tate, Judith A; Snitz, Beth E; Alvarez, Karina A; Nahin, Richard L; Weissfeld, Lisa A; Lopez, Oscar; Angus, Derek C; Shah, Faraaz; Ives, Diane G; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Williamson, Jeffrey D; Arnold, Alice M; DeKosky, Steven T; Yende, Sachin

    2014-05-01

    Severe infections, often requiring ICU admission, have been associated with persistent cognitive dysfunction. Less severe infections are more common and whether they are associated with an increased risk of dementia is unclear. We determined the association of pneumonia hospitalization with risk of dementia in well-functioning older adults. Secondary analysis of a randomized multicenter trial to determine the effect of Gingko biloba on incident dementia. Five academic medical centers in the United States. Healthy community volunteers (n = 3,069) with a median follow-up of 6.1 years. None. We identified pneumonia hospitalizations using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition-Coding Manual codes and validated them in a subset. Less than 3% of pneumonia cases necessitated ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, or vasopressor support. Dementia was adjudicated based on neuropsychological evaluation, neurological examination, and MRI. Two hundred twenty-one participants (7.2%) incurred at least one hospitalization with pneumonia (mean time to pneumonia = 3.5 yr). Of these, dementia was developed in 38 (17%) after pneumonia, with half of these cases occurring 2 years after the pneumonia hospitalization. Hospitalization with pneumonia was associated with increased risk of time to dementia diagnosis (unadjusted hazard ratio = 2.3; CI, 1.6-3.2; p < 0.0001). The association remained significant when adjusted for age, sex, race, study site, education, and baseline mini-mental status examination (hazard ratio = 1.9; CI, 1.4-2.8; p < 0.0001). Results were unchanged when additionally adjusted for smoking, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and preinfection functional status. Results were similar using propensity analysis where participants with pneumonia were matched to those without pneumonia based on age, probability of developing pneumonia, and similar trajectories of cognitive and physical function prior to pneumonia (adjusted prevalence rates, 91.7 vs 65

  4. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with 131I-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pagel, John M; Gooley, Theodore A; Rajendran, Joseph; Fisher, Darrell R; Wilson, Wendy A; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Matthews, Dana C; Deeg, H Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K; Martin, Paul J; Storb, Rainer F; Press, Oliver W; Appelbaum, Frederick R

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of (131)I-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of (131)I-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  5. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  6. High-resolution computed tomography findings in elderly patients with asthma.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sevda; Ekici, Aydanur; Ekici, Mehmet; Keles, Hatice

    2006-08-01

    Based on the hypothesis that airway remodelling is related to the duration of asthma, HRCT scanning should show greater abnormalities in the early-onset than the late-onset asthmatics. It was, therefore, intended to assess the presence and the frequency of airway and parenchymal abnormalities with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in elderly asthmatic patients, and to determine whether these abnormalities are related to the duration of asthma. Sixty-eight clinically stable asthmatic patients aged > or =60 yr were included in this prospective study. The patients were separated into two groups according to the duration of symptoms as late-onset asthma (n=31) with disease duration of <5 yr, and early-onset asthma (n=37) with disease duration of > or =5 yr. All patients were lifelong non-smoker and had been using inhaled beta agonists and inhaled steroids. HRCT-scanning and histamine inhalation test were performed on all patients. In comparison with late-onset asthmatic patients, those with early-onset asthma had significantly higher frequency of emphysema (21.6% versus 0.0%, p=0.006), bronchial dilatation (13.9% versus 0.0%, p=0.03) and bronchial wall thickness (41.7% versus 12.9%, p=0.01). Multiple logistic regression analysis identified that early-onset of disease was an independent risk factor for the presence of irreversible HRCT-scan abnormalities in elderly asthmatics [odds ratio (OR): 9.4 (2.7-32.7), p=0.00001]. Present data suggest that HRCT abnormalities in early-onset elderly asthmatics reflect parenchymal and airway changes that become irreversible throughout the long course of the disease.

  7. Root caries patterns and risk factors of middle-aged and elderly people in China.

    PubMed

    Du, MinQuan; Jiang, Han; Tai, BaoJun; Zhou, Yinghong; Wu, Bei; Bian, Zhuan

    2009-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe root caries patterns of Chinese adults and to analyze the effect of selected demographic and socioeconomic factors on these patterns. A total sample of 1080 residents aged 35-44-years-old and 1080 residents aged 65-74-years-old from three urban and three rural survey sites in Hubei Province participated in both an oral health interview and a clinical oral health examination. Root surface caries prevalence rates were 13.1% in the middle-aged group and 43.9% in the elderly group. The mean number of teeth affected by caries in the middle-aged group was reported at 0.21 and 1.0 in the elderly group. Mean Root Caries Index (RCI) scores of the middle-aged were reported at 6.29 and elderly subjects were reported at 11.95. Elderly people living in rural areas reported a higher RCI score (13.24) than those living in urban areas (10.70). A significantly higher frequency of root surface caries was observed in elderly participants (P < 0.001, OR = 3.80) and ethnic minorities (P < 0.001, OR = 1.93). In addition, smokers, nontea drinkers, and those with an annual household income of 10,000 yuan or less tended to have higher caries prevalence. RCI figures for the different tooth types ranged from 1% to 16%, indicating a wide variation in attack rates. In conclusion, our study suggests that root surface caries occurrence is high among the Chinese adult population, especially older adults. With an increasing number of retained teeth in both middle-aged and elderly people, root caries is a growing disease in the People's Republic of China which deserves more attention in future research.

  8. [Knowledge of accident causation research in relation to age-induced decrease in the performance of elderly motorists, their accident risk and legal consequences].

    PubMed

    Seib, H

    1990-01-01

    Elderly motorists lose a significant amount of their mental(-somatic) and sensomotor capabilities. No data is available on the percentage of elderly motorists involved in car accidents. Their accident risk, however, is not above average because that decrease is outweighed by increased experience and a more thoughtful manner of driving. The percentage of elderly, especially female pedestrians killed by autos is very high. This is mainly due to age-specific mortality and to the high proportion of aged people, especially women, within the population. Our jurisdiction concerning responsibilities requires elderly people to become aware of any deficiencies and to take them into account. The administrative courts are very reserved in withdrawing driving licenses because of age-caused deficiencies. The mere fact that a driver is very old does not suffice; it even does not justify seeking a psychomedical opinion. In this paper it is argued that actions provided for by the law and regulations asking for a periodical check-up of sensomotor and mental capabilities of the elderly driver are disproportionate. Introducing an "eye-certificate" for all motorists as suggested by the German Ophthalmological Society, however, is considered useful and appropriate since deficiencies of vision have been discovered for all age groups.

  9. "A recipe for elder abuse:" From sin to risk in anti-euthanasia activism.

    PubMed

    Gandsman, Ari

    2016-10-01

    Anti-euthanasia activists currently make their arguments against physician-assisted dying in terms of vulnerability and risk. Tensions in this strategy emerge because many are drawn to activism out of religious beliefs. This article will explain how they have reframed their argument that physician-assisted dying is a "recipe for elder abuse." This strategy attempts to manufacture uncertainty among vulnerable groups by strategically deploying doubt against medical institutions and governments, while generating distrust among family members. This article will argue that underlying this strategic deployment of risk are beliefs that posit assisted death as polluting to society.

  10. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J.; Gondi, Vinai; Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ≥66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients.

  11. Personalizing colonoscopy screening for elderly individuals based on screening history, cancer risk, and comorbidity status could increase cost effectiveness.

    PubMed

    van Hees, Frank; Saini, Sameer D; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Vijan, Sandeep; Meester, Reinier G S; de Koning, Harry J; Zauber, Ann G; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening decisions for elderly individuals are often made primarily on the basis of age, whereas other factors that influence the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of screening are often not considered. We investigated the relative importance of factors that could be used to identify elderly individuals most likely to benefit from CRC screening and determined the maximum ages at which screening remains cost effective based on these factors. We used a microsimulation model (Microsimulation Screening Analysis-Colon) calibrated to the incidence of CRC in the United States and the prevalence of adenomas reported in autopsy studies to determine the appropriate age at which to stop colonoscopy screening in 19,200 cohorts (of 10 million individuals), defined by sex, race, screening history, background risk for CRC, and comorbidity status. We applied a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Less intensive screening history, higher background risk for CRC, and fewer comorbidities were associated with cost-effective screening at older ages. Sex and race had only a small effect on the appropriate age to stop screening. For some individuals likely to be screened in current practice (for example, 74-year-old white women with moderate comorbidities, half the average background risk for CRC, and negative findings from a screening colonoscopy 10 years previously), screening resulted in a loss of QALYs, rather than a gain. For some individuals unlikely to be screened in current practice (for example, 81-year-old black men with no comorbidities, an average background risk for CRC, and no previous screening), screening was highly cost effective. Although screening some previously screened, low-risk individuals was not cost effective even when they were 66 years old, screening some healthy, high-risk individuals remained cost effective until they reached the age of 88 years old. The current approach to CRC

  12. [Study of intrinsic risk factors for falls in institutionalized elderly people].

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Ruth Losada; Bachion, Maria Márcia

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to identify intrinsic risk factors that predispose elderly people living in long-term institutions in the city of Goiânia (GO) to falls. The present descriptive transversal study was carried out in six long-term institutions for seniors in the city of Goiânia. The investigated sample consisted of 95 elderly that fitted the inclusion and exclusion criteria. A questionnaire was used for collecting clinical data related to health-disease conditions; cognitive data; capacity to develop basic daily life activities and equilibrium and gait. In general terms, as pointed out the literature, the examined elderly presented different fall risk factors such as: motor difficulty in lower limbs (90%), visual deficit (81,1%), use of 3 or more kinds of medicines (59,7%), suspected depression (37,9%), lack of equilibrium/unstable unipodal support (37,9%) abnormally decreased height in step (32,6%). The obtained data allow us to set indicators for the increase in falls among the studied sample, demonstrating the need for creating strategies for health promotion, prevention of injuries and rehabilitation.

  13. Orthostatic hypotension: prevalence and associated risk factors among the ambulatory elderly in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing Olivia; Tan, Choon Seng Gilbert; Tan, Hwee Leong; Wong, Ruining Geraldine; Joshi, Chinmaya Shrikant; Cuttilan, Ravi Amran; Sng, Gek Khim Judy; Tan, Ngiap Chuan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The prevalence of orthostatic hypotension (OH) among the elderly population in Singapore, as defined by a decline in blood pressure upon a change in position, is not well-established. Studies associate OH with clinically significant outcomes such as falls. This study aims to determine the prevalence of OH among elderly patients attending a public primary care clinic (polyclinic) for chronic disease management, and examine the relationships between postulated risk factors and OH. METHODS Patients aged ≥ 65 years attending a typical polyclinic in Geylang were identified and targeted for recruitment at the study site. A questionnaire on symptoms and postulated risk factors was administered, followed by supine and standing blood pressure measurements. Cross-sectional analysis was performed with independent sample t-test for continuous data and chi-square test for categorical data. Prevalence rate ratios with 95% confidence interval were calculated for the latter. RESULTS A total of 364 multiethnic patients participated in the study. The prevalence of OH was 11.0%. Older age, comorbidities such as cardiac failure and kidney disease, being physically inactive at work, fatigue, self-reported dizziness in the past year, and the use of loop diuretics were found to be significantly associated with OH. CONCLUSION About one in ten elderly patients at a local polyclinic was affected by OH, which was associated with multiple factors. Some of these factors are modifiable and can be addressed to reduce the incidence of OH. PMID:27549316

  14. Malnutrition risk factors among the elderly from the US-Mexico border: the "one thousand" study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tadeo, A; Wall-Medrano, A; Gaytan-Vidaña, M E; Campos, A; Ornelas-Contreras, M; Novelo-Huerta, H I

    2012-05-01

    The Mexican population is aging, which makes the fact that there is no regional information on the health of the elderly, including those in the northern region of the country. To examine nutritional, functional, and cognitive impairments, as well as depression, in non-institutionalized elderly Mexicans along Mexico's northern border. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study. Demographic and anthropometric measurements were screened and the following scales were applied among 760 elderly individuals in Chihuahua, Mexico: Katz index (for activities of daily living, ADL), the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), the Yesavage (depression), and the Pffeifer (cognitive decline). 7% prevalence of malnutrition, a 18% prevalence of functional disability, a 44% prevalence of depressive symptoms, a 33% prevalence of cognitive impairment, and a risk of disease in almost half the population, without differences between genders. Malnutrition, functional disability, and cognitive impairment increased with age (P <0.001). Functional disability, depression, and cognitive impairment also increased the risk of malnutrition 3.0, 2.9 and 1.4 times (P <0.005). Other factors that may affect nutritional status included isolated living and illiteracy. Levels of malnutrition, functional disability, depression and cognitive impairment are higher than those reported previously and are closely related to one another, so detecting alterations in primary care is important in order to improve quality of life and reduce complications.

  15. Tongue-coating as risk indicator for aspiration pneumonia in edentate elderly.

    PubMed

    Abe, Shu; Ishihara, Kazuyuki; Adachi, Mieko; Okuda, Katsuji

    2008-01-01

    Silent aspiration of oral microorganisms is a major cause of aspiration pneumonia. To establish oral hygiene criteria for the prevention of aspiration pneumonia in edentulous elderly persons, we investigated the relationship between presence of tongue-coating and number of oral bacteria in saliva and episodes of pneumonia. A total of 71 edentulous Japanese people aged 65 years or older living in nursing homes were enrolled in the study. A tongue plaque index (TPI) was used to evaluate quantity of tongue-coating, with TPI0 signifying no tongue-coating and TPI1 signifying presence of tongue-coating. Edentate elderly with TPI1 demonstrated significantly higher salivary bacterial counts than those with TPI0 (p<0.05). The number of elderly patients developing aspiration pneumonia was larger (p<0.005) in patients with TPI-based poor scores (average TPI>0.5) than in those with TPI-based good scores. The relative risk of developing pneumonia in the good tongue hygiene group compared with in the poor tongue hygiene group was 0.12, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.02-0.9. The results demonstrate that tongue-coating is associated with number of viable salivary bacterial cells and development of aspiration pneumonia, suggesting that tongue-coating is a risk indicator of aspiration pneumonia in edentate subjects.

  16. Evaluation of functional deficits and falls risk in the elderly--methods for preventing falls.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Michael R; Scalzi, Maria Elena; Redmond, Stephen J; Lord, Steven R; Celler, Branko G; Lovell, Nigel H

    2009-01-01

    Falls in the elderly have a profound impact on their quality of life through injury, increased fear of falling, reduced confidence to perform daily tasks and loss of independence. Falls come at a substantial economic cost. Tools to quantify falls risk and evaluate functional deficits allow interventions to be targeted to those at increased risk of falling and tailored to correct deficits with the aim of reducing falls rate and reducing ones risk of falling. We describe a system to evaluate falls risk and functional deficits in the elderly. The system is based on the evaluation of performance in a simple set of controlled movements known as the directed routine (DR). We present preliminary results of the DR in a cohort of 68 subjects using features extracted from the DR. Linear least-squares models were trained to estimate falls risk, knee-extension strength, proprioception, mediolateral body sway, anteroposterior body sway and contrast sensitivity. The model estimates provided good to fair correlations with (r=0.76 p<0.001), (r=0.65 p<0.001), (r=0.35 p<0.01), (r=0.53 p<0.001), (r=0.48 p<0.001) and (r=0.37 p<0.01) respectively.

  17. Prevalence of nutritional risk in the non-demented hospitalised elderly: a cross-sectional study from Norway using stratified sampling.

    PubMed

    Eide, Helene K; Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Sortland, Kjersti; Halvorsen, Kristin; Almendingen, Kari

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of accurate prevalence data on undernutrition and the risk of undernutrition among the hospitalised elderly in Europe and Norway. We aimed at estimating the prevalence of nutritional risk by using stratified sampling along with adequate power calculations. A cross-sectional study was carried out in the period 2011 to 2013 at a university hospital in Norway. Second-year nursing students in acute care clinical studies in twenty hospital wards screened non-demented elderly patients for nutritional risk, by employing the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS2002) form. In total, 508 patients (48·8 % women and 51·2 % men) with a mean age of 79·6 (sd 6·4) years were screened by the students. Mean BMI was 24·9 (sd 4·9) kg/m(2), and the patients had been hospitalised for on average 5·3 (sd 6·3) d. WHO's BMI cut-off values identified 6·5 % as underweight, 48·0 % of normal weight and 45·5 % as overweight. Patients nutritionally at risk had been in hospital longer and had lower average weight and BMI compared with those not at risk (all P < 0·001); no differences in mean age or sex were observed. The prevalence of nutritional risk was estimated to be 45·4 (95 % CI 41·7 %, 49·0) %, ranging between 20·0 and 65·0 % on different hospital wards. The present results show that the prevalence of nutritional risk among elderly patients without dementia is high, suggesting that a large proportion of the hospitalised elderly are in need of nutritional treatment.

  18. Prevalence and risk factors for medication reconciliation errors during hospital admission in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Vargas, Blanca; Delgado Silveira, Eva; Iglesias Peinado, Irene; Bermejo Vicedo, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Background Care transitions are risk points for medication discrepancies, especially in the elderly. Objective This study was undertaken to assess prevalence and describe medication reconciliation errors during admission in elderly patients and to analyze associated risk factors. We also evaluate the effect of these errors on the length of hospital stay. Setting General surgery, orthopedics, internal medicines and infectious diseases departments of a 1070-bed Spanish teaching hospital. Method This is a prospective observational study. Patients >65 years and taking ≥5 medications were randomly selected from those admitted to hospital. The pharmacist obtained the best possible medication history based on medical records, medical notes from patients' previous admissions to hospital, "brown bag" review, community care prescriptions, and comprehensive patient interviews. It was compared to current inpatient prescription to detect unintentional discrepancies (discrepancy with no apparent clinical explanation), which were reported to the physician. When the physician accepted the discrepancy by changing the medication order, it was recorded as a medication reconciliation error and classified by type of error. Several variables were analyzed as possible risk/protective factors. Main outcome measure Is prevalence of medication reconciliation errors at admission. Results Reconciliation was performed on 206 patients. Medication reconciliation errors occurred in 49.5 % (102/206) of patients. 1996 medications were recorded, and 359 had unintentional discrepancies (56.0 % (201/359) medication reconciliation errors). The most common was omission (65.1 %). Identified risk factors were as follows: physician experience, number of pre-admission prescribed medications, and previous surgeries. Computerized order entry system was a protective factor. Conclusion Medication reconciliation errors occur in almost half of the elderly patients at admission, especially omissions. Risk

  19. Polypharmacy is associated with an increased risk of bleeding in elderly patients with venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Leiss, Waltraud; Méan, Marie; Limacher, Andreas; Righini, Marc; Jaeger, Kurt; Beer, Hans-Jürg; Osterwalder, Joseph; Frauchiger, Beat; Matter, Christian M; Kucher, Nils; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Cornuz, Jacques; Banyai, Martin; Lämmle, Bernhard; Husmann, Marc; Egloff, Michael; Aschwanden, Markus; Rodondi, Nicolas; Aujesky, Drahomir

    2015-01-01

    Polypharmacy, defined as the concomitant use of multiple medications, is very common in the elderly and may trigger drug-drug interactions and increase the risk of falls in patients receiving vitamin K antagonists. To examine whether polypharmacy increases the risk of bleeding in elderly patients who receive vitamin K antagonists for acute venous thromboembolism (VTE). We used a prospective cohort study. In a multicenter Swiss cohort, we studied 830 patients aged ≥ 65 years with VTE. We defined polypharmacy as the prescription of more than four different drugs. We assessed the association between polypharmacy and the time to a first major and clinically relevant non-major bleeding, accounting for the competing risk of death. We adjusted for known bleeding risk factors (age, gender, pulmonary embolism, active cancer, arterial hypertension, cardiac disease, cerebrovascular disease, chronic liver and renal disease, diabetes mellitus, history of major bleeding, recent surgery, anemia, thrombocytopenia) and periods of vitamin K antagonist treatment as a time-varying covariate. Overall, 413 (49.8 %) patients had polypharmacy. The mean follow-up duration was 17.8 months. Patients with polypharmacy had a significantly higher incidence of major (9.0 vs. 4.1 events/100 patient-years; incidence rate ratio [IRR] 2.18, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.32-3.68) and clinically relevant non-major bleeding (14.8 vs. 8.0 events/100 patient-years; IRR 1.85, 95 % CI 1.27-2.71) than patients without polypharmacy. After adjustment, polypharmacy was significantly associated with major (sub-hazard ratio [SHR] 1.83, 95 % CI 1.03-3.25) and clinically relevant non-major bleeding (SHR 1.60, 95 % CI 1.06-2.42). Polypharmacy is associated with an increased risk of both major and clinically relevant non-major bleeding in elderly patients receiving vitamin K antagonists for VTE.

  20. Aortic valve replacement in the elderly. Risk factors and long-term results.

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, E E; Lee, C A; Cameron, D E; Stuart, R S; Greene, P S; Sussman, M S; Watkins, L; Gardner, T J; Baumgartner, W A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current study was undertaken to determine long-term results of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in the elderly, to ascertain predictors of poor outcome, and to assess quality of life. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Aortic valve replacement is the procedure of choice for elderly patients with aortic valve disease. The number of patients aged 70 and older requiring AVR continues to increase. However, controversy exists as to whether surgery devoted to this subset reflect a cost-effective approach to attaining a meaningful quality of life. METHODS: This study reviews data on 247 patients aged 70 to 89 years who underwent isolated AVR between 1980 and 1995; there were 126 men (51%) and 121 women (49%). Follow-up was 97% complete (239/247 patients) for a total of 974.9 patient-years. Mean age was 76.2 +/- 4.8 years. Operative mortality and actuarial survival were determined. Patient age, gender, symptoms, associated diseases, prior conditions, New York Health Association class congestive heart failure, native valve disease, prosthetic valve type, preoperative catheterization data, and early postoperative conditions were analyzed as possible predictors of outcome. Functional recovery was evaluated using the SF-36 quality assessment tool. RESULTS: Operative mortality was 6.1% (15/247). Multivariate logistic regression showed that poor left ventricular function and preoperative pacemaker insertion were independent predictors of early mortality. After surgery, infection was predictive of early mortality. Overall actuarial survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 89.5 +/- 2% (198 patients at risk), 69.3 +/- 3.4% (89 patients at risk), and 41.2 +/- 6% (13 patients at risk), respectively. Cox proportional hazards model showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and urgency of operation were independent predictors of poor long-term survival. Postoperative renal failure also was predictive of poor outcome. Using the SF-36 quality assessment tool, elderly patients who

  1. Mental representation for action in the elderly: implications for movement efficiency and injury risk.

    PubMed

    Gabbard, Carl

    2015-04-01

    Recent research findings indicate that with older adulthood, there are functional decrements in spatial cognition and more specially, in the ability to mentally represent and effectively plan motor actions. A typical finding is a significant over- or underestimation of one's actual physical abilities with movement planning-planning that has implications for movement efficiency and physical safety. A practical, daily life example is estimation of reachability--a situation that for the elderly may be linked with fall incidence. A strategy used to mentally represent action is the use of motor imagery--an ability that also declines with advancing older age. This brief review highlights research findings on mental representation and motor imagery in the elderly and addresses the implications for improving movement efficiency and lowering the risk of movement-related injury. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Reduced Parahippocampal Theta Activity During Spatial Navigation in Low, but Not in High Elderly Performers.

    PubMed

    Lithfous, Ségolène; Dufour, André; Bouix, Cloé; Pebayle, Thierry; Després, Olivier

    2017-06-29

    Cognitive aging varies widely among individuals. Whereas optimal cognitive agers show highly preserved cognitive functions throughout life, other subjects experience cognitive deficits in various cognitive domains. Among them, elderly individuals frequently report difficulties in spatial navigation. In this study, we aimed to determine whether elderly participants with different cognitive profiles would perform differently at a navigation task, and explore underlying medial hippocampal activity. Two groups of elderly subjects were selected, high- and low-performing (HP and LP, respectively), based on their performance on a detailed neuropsychological examination. A group of young adults was recruited as controls. Cerebral activity was recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) during a virtual navigation task in which participants had 3 trials to find their way in mazes. We analyzed theta activity during navigation in the mazes and performed source reconstruction analyses. The LP group was less accurate than the HP group during the navigation task. Theta activity during navigation was greater in HP subjects compared with controls, whereas that theta activity was reduced in LP subjects. Moreover, theta activity in the left parahippocampal gyrus increased across trials in HP, but not in LP, subjects. Elderly participants performed differently at a navigation task according to their cognitive profile: elderly with cognitive deficits seem to have greater difficulties in spatial navigation than HP elderly. Navigational difficulties in elderly with cognitive deficits might be related to functional alteration of the parahippocampal gyrus. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. High serum adiponectin predicts incident fractures in elderly men: Osteoporotic fractures in men (MrOS) Sweden.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Helena; Odén, Anders; Lerner, Ulf H; Jutberger, Hans; Lorentzon, Mattias; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Karlsson, Magnus K; Ljunggren, Osten; Smith, Ulf; McCloskey, Eugene; Kanis, John A; Ohlsson, Claes; Mellström, Dan

    2012-06-01

    Adipocytes and osteoblasts share a common progenitor, and there is, therefore, potential for both autocrine and endocrine effects of adiponectin on skeletal metabolism. The aim of the present study was to determine whether high serum adiponectin was associated with an increased risk of fracture in elderly men. We studied the relationship between serum adiponectin and the risk of fracture in 999 elderly men drawn from the general population and recruited to the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study in Gothenburg, Sweden. Baseline data included general health questionnaires, lifestyle questionnaires, body mass index (BMI), bone mineral density (BMD), serum adiponectin, osteocalcin, and leptin. Men were followed for up to 7.4 years (average, 5.2 years). Poisson regression was used to investigate the relationship between serum adiponectin, other risk variables and the time-to-event hazard function of fracture. Median levels of serum adiponectin at baseline were 10.4 µg/mL (interquartile range, 7.7-14.3). During follow-up, 150 men sustained one or more fractures. The risk of fracture increased in parallel with increasing serum adiponectin (hazard ratio [HR]/SD, 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-1.72) and persisted after multivariate-adjusted analysis (HR/SD, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.09-1.55). Serum adiponectin shows graded stepwise association with a significant excess risk of fracture in elderly men that was independent of several other risk factors for fracture. Its measurement holds promise as a risk factor for fracture in men.

  4. 41-month follow-up of risk factors correlated with new coronary events in 708 elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Aronow, W S; Herzig, A H; Etienne, F; D'Alba, P; Ronquillo, J

    1989-06-01

    A prospective study correlated coronary risk factors with new coronary events in 192 elderly men and 516 elderly women, mean age 82 +/- 8 years. Follow-up was 41 +/- 6 months (range 24-44). Coronary events (myocardial infarction, primary ventricular fibrillation, and sudden cardiac death) occurred in 64 of 192 men (33%) and in 149 of 516 women (29%), P not significant. Using univariate analysis, significant risk factors for coronary events were antecedent coronary artery disease, cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, serum total cholesterol (TC) greater than or equal to 200 mg/dL and greater than or equal to 250 mg/dL, serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) less than 35 mg/dL, and serum TC/HDL-C greater than or equal to 6.5 in men and women, and obesity in women. Using multivariate analysis, significant risk factors for coronary events were age, antecedent coronary artery disease, cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and serum TC in men and women and serum HDL-C and serum triglycerides in women. Using univariate analysis, significant risk factors for coronary events in men and women with antecedent coronary artery disease were cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, serum TC greater than or equal to 250 mg/dL, and serum TC/HDL-C greater than or equal to 6.5. Using multivariate analysis, significant risk factors for coronary events in men and women with antecedent coronary artery disease were age, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, serum TC, serum HDL-C, and serum triglycerides.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. The risk of falls on initiation of antihypertensive drugs in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Butt, D A; Mamdani, M; Austin, P C; Tu, K; Gomes, T; Glazier, R H

    2013-10-01

    Antihypertensive drugs are associated with an immediate increased falls risk in elderly patients which was significant during the first 14 days after receiving a thiazide diuretic, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin II receptor blocker, calcium channel blocker, or beta-adrenergic blocker. Fall prevention strategies during this period may prevent fall-related injuries. The purpose of this study is to evaluate if initiation of the common antihypertensive drugs is associated with the occurrence of falls. This population-based self-controlled case series study used healthcare administrative databases to identify new users of antihypertensive drugs in the elderly aged 66 and older living in Ontario, Canada who suffered a fall from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2009. The risk period was the first 45 days following antihypertensive therapy initiation, further subdivided into 0-14 and 15-44 days with control periods before and after treatment in a 450-day observation period. We calculated the relative incidence (incidence rate ratio, IRR), defined as the rate of falls in the risk period compared to falls rate in the control periods. Of the 543,572 new users of antihypertensive drugs among community-dwelling elderly, 8,893 experienced an injurious fall that required hospital care during the observation period. New users had a 69 % increased risk of having an injurious fall during the first 45 days following antihypertensive treatment (IRR = 1.69; 95 % CI, 1.57-1.81). This finding was consistent for thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and beta-adrenergic blockers but not angiotensin II receptor antagonists. There was also an increased falls risk during the first 14 days of antihypertensive drug initiation (IRR = 1.94; 95 % CI, 1.75-2.16), which was consistent for all antihypertensive drug classes. This study suggests that initiation of antihypertensive drugs is a risk factor for falls in the elderly

  6. [Hypertension in the elderly and risk of dementia].

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier

    2010-05-20

    Prevention and treatment of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a significant association between the presence of hypertension and the occurrence of cognitive decline or dementia (including Alzheimer's disease). Indeed, the summation of vascular brain damage and degenerative changes may contribute to an early expression of a still subclinical Alzheimer's disease, causing the threshold of dementia to be reached earlier. Some recent randomized controlled trials (SYST-EUR, PROGRESS, HOPE, SCOPE, HYVET) included cognition as secondary endpoint. Their results open the way for prevention of dementia by antihypertensive treatments. It is therefore necessary that further randomized trials are conducted with the primary objective to assess the impact of antihypertensive treatment on cognitive decline or dementia. In clinical practice, it is important to identify, among hypertensive patients, the subjects at risk for dementia, i.e those who already have mild cognitive impairment or extensive cerebral white matter lesions, in order to optimize blood pressure control and monitor cognitive function (regular cognitive assessment, drugs adherence).

  7. Community characteristics associated with elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Jogerst, G J; Dawson, J D; Hartz, A J; Ely, J W; Schweitzer, L A

    2000-05-01

    To help define the relationship between elder abuse rates and counties' demographics, healthcare resources, and social service characteristics. County-level data from Iowa were analyzed to test the association between county characteristics and rates of elder abuse between 1984 and 1993 using univariate correlation analysis and stagewise linear regression. Ninety-nine counties in Iowa. Iowa residents aged 65 years and older. County-level population-adjusted numbers of abused elderly, abused children, children in poverty, high school dropouts, physicians and other healthcare providers, hospital beds, social workers and caseworkers in the Department of Human Services (DHS). Community characteristics that had a positive association with rates of reported or substantiated elder abuse at the P < .001 level were population density, children in poverty, and reported child abuse. Lower substantiated elder abuse rates were associated at P < .05 with higher community rates of high school dropouts, number of chiropractors, and number of nurse practitioners. After adjusting for number of DHS caseworkers and reported child abuse rates (a surrogate for workload) a district effect persists for substantiated elder abuse cases (P = .002). County demographics are risk factors for reported and substantiated elder abuse. The strongest risk factor for reported elder abuse was reported child abuse. The difference in districts may reflect differences in resources and/or differing characteristics of caseworkers who substantiate elder abuse. The risk factors may reflect conditions that influence the amount of elder abuse or the detection of existing elder abuse.

  8. Predictors of high on-aspirin platelet reactivity in elderly patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J W; Liu, W W; McCaffrey, Timothy A; He, X Q; Liang, W Y; Chen, X H; Feng, X R; Fu, Sidney W; Liu, M L

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have illustrated the link between high on-aspirin platelet reactivity (HAPR) with increasing thrombotic risks. The aim of our study was to investigate relative risk factors of HAPR in elderly patients with coronary artery disease. Elderly, hospitalized coronary artery disease patients on regular aspirin treatment were enrolled from January 2014 to September 2016. Medical records of each patient were collected, including demographic information, cardiovascular risk factors, concomitant drugs and routine biological parameters. Arachidonic acid (AA, 0.5 mg/mL) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 5 µmol/L) induced platelet aggregation were measured via light transmission assay (LTA) to evaluate antiplatelet responses, referred as LTA-AA and LTA-ADP. A total of 275 elderly patients were included, with mean age of 77.2±8.1 years, and males accounted for 81.8%. HAPR was defined as LTA-AA in the upper quartile of the enrolled population. HAPR patients tended to have lower renal function (P=0.052). Higher serum uric acid (SUA) level, as well as lower platelet count, hemoglobin and hematocrit were observed in HAPR patients, with a higher proportion of diuretics use (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed that SUA (OR: 1.004, 95% CI: 1.000-1.007, P=0.048), platelet count (OR: 0.994, 95% CI: 0.989-1.000, P=0.045), hematocrit (OR: 0.921, 95% CI: 0.864-0.981, P=0.011) and concomitant P2Y12 receptor inhibitors use (OR: 1.965, 95% CI: 1.075-3.592, P=0.028) were correlated with HAPR. Spearman's correlation analysis demonstrated an inverse association of LTA-AA with hematocrit (r=-0.234, P<0.001), hemoglobin (r=-0.209, P<0.001) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (r=-0.132, P=0.031). SUA, platelet count, hematocrit and P2Y12 receptor inhibitors use were independently correlated with HAPR. These parameters might provide novel therapeutic targets for optimizing antiplatelet therapy.

  9. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors among voluntary screened middle-aged and elderly Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Abd Elaziz, Khaled Mahmoud; Gabal, Mohamed Salah; Aldafrawy, Ola Abdelsamie; Abou Seif, Hasnaa Abdel-Al; Allam, Mohamed Farouk

    2015-12-01

    Central obesity and diabetes mellitus are recorded at high percentages among Egyptians. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular risk factors among a group of middle-aged and elderly Egyptians. Our study included 220 middle-aged and senior Egyptians voluntary screened in an Egyptian private hospital with 800-bed capacity. Detailed medical history was obtained from all subjects, followed by clinical examination with weight and height measurement, body mass index calculation, waist hip ratio and arterial blood pressure measurement. Laboratory investigations done were complete blood picture, lipid profile and fasting blood glucose measurements. The diagnosis of MetS was based on the American Heart Association/Updated NCEP ATP III criteria. Cardiovascular risk assessment was calculated for each subject based on the Framingham/ATP III criteria. The prevalence of MetS in this study was of 55% among the whole sample, 85.6% among diabetics and 76.6% among hypertensive patients. Based on Framingham scoring system, 48.2% of the sample had moderate to high risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Odds ratio for patients with MetS for developing cardiovascular disease in the next 10 years was 2.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.6-4.8). The high prevalence of MetS among middle-aged and elderly Egyptians with the documented high prevalence of chronic diseases in Egypt calls for a nationwide screening program to detect MetS and tackle preventive strategies to face the epidemic of obesity and outcomes of MetS, particularly cardiovascular diseases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Dietary epicatechin intake and 25-y risk of cardiovascular mortality: the Zutphen Elderly Study.

    PubMed

    Dower, James I; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Hollman, Peter Ch; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; Kromhout, Daan

    2016-07-01

    Prospective cohort studies have shown that the consumption of cocoa and tea is associated with lower risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), and cocoa and tea have been shown to improve CVD risk factors in randomized controlled trials. Cocoa and tea are major dietary sources of the flavan-3-ol epicatechin. We investigated the associations of dietary epicatechin intake with 25-y CVD mortality in elderly Dutch men. We used data from the Zutphen Elderly Study, which was a prospective cohort study of 774 men aged 65-84 y in 1985. Epicatechin intake was estimated 4 times in 15 y with the use of the crosscheck dietary history method. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate repeated measures of epicatechin intake in relation to 25-y CVD mortality. Mean intake of epicatechin was 15.2 ± 7.7 mg/d, and the major dietary sources were tea (51%), apples (28%), and cocoa (7%). During 25 y of follow-up, 329 men died from CVD, 148 died from coronary heart disease (CHD), and 72 men died from stroke. Risk of CHD mortality was 38% lower in men in the top tertile of epicatechin intake than in men in the bottom tertile of epicatechin intake (HR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.39, 0.98). Epicatechin intake was also significantly associated with 46% lower risk of CVD mortality in men with prevalent CVD (HR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.31, 0.96) but not in men who were free of CVD. We show, for the first time to our knowledge, that epicatechin intake is inversely related to CHD mortality in elderly men and to CVD mortality in prevalent cases of CVD. More studies are needed before conclusions can be drawn. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and cardiovascular events due to NSAIDs in the diabetic elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungmee; Lee, Joongyub; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) and cardiovascular (CV) risks such as myocardial infarction or stroke associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use among elderly patients with diabetes. Methods Using a nationwide claims database covering 2008–2012, we conducted a cohort study of patients with diabetes aged ≥65 years. Among the 117 610 patients, NSAID users and non-users were propensity score matched, excluding any who had experienced a potentially confounding event in the year prior to cohort entry. Multivariate Cox regression models treating death as competing risk were used. Results There were 2184 (1.86%) cases of GIB and NSAID users had an adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.68 (95% CI 1.54 to 1.83) of GIB risk after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities and recent medications compared to NSAID non-users. There were 9333 (7.94%) cases of myocardial infarction or stroke with an aHR of 1.20 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.25). The risk of GIB was higher in patients with liver disease and renal failure, while that of CV events was higher in patients who received anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, aspirin and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The number needed to harm was 111 for GIB and 77 for CV events. Among different NSAIDs, nimesulide increased the risk of GIB and ketorolac increased the risk of CV events compared to celecoxib (aHR 2.60 and 3.13, respectively). Conclusions Elderly patients with diabetes treating NSAIDs had a significantly higher risk of both upper GIB and CV events compared to NSAID non-users, and the risk varied among different NSAIDs regardless of cyclooxygenase-2 activity. PMID:26719806

  12. Prediagnostic Helicobacter pylori Antibodies and Colorectal Cancer Risk in an Elderly, Caucasian Population.

    PubMed

    Blase, Jennifer L; Campbell, Peter T; Gapstur, Susan M; Pawlita, Michael; Michel, Angelika; Waterboer, Tim; Teras, Lauren R

    2016-12-01

    Study results on overall seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori and colorectal cancer risk have been inconsistent. However, one study found positive associations with antibodies to specific H. pylori proteins. To follow up on those findings, we assessed associations of 15 H. pylori specific proteins with colorectal cancer incidence in the prospective Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. Participants in this nested case-control study included 392 cases and 774 controls who were predominantly elderly (median age at blood draw: 71 years) and Caucasian (98%). Seroreactivity against 15 H. pylori proteins was assessed by fluorescent bead-based multiplex serology and associations with colorectal cancer were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Helicobacter pylori serostatus was not associated with colorectal cancer incidence (odds ratio (OR), 1.17, 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.91-1.50). Among individual antigens, GroEl serostatus was associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR, 1.32, 95% CI: 1.03-1.70), whereas CagM was associated with colon cancer risk only (OR, 1.35, 95% CI: 1.01-1.80). No dose-response relationships were observed for any of the antigens, including GroEl and CagM. The results of our study do not support an association between H. pylori infection and colorectal cancer risk in this elderly, mostly Caucasian population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Components of Metabolic Syndrome and the Risk of Disability among the Elderly Population

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, Fang-Yih; Kao, Tung-Wei; Wu, Li-Wei; Wang, Chung-Ching; Yang, Hui-Fang; Peng, Tao-Chun; Sun, Yu-Shan; Chang, Yaw-Wen; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The direct relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and function disability has not been established. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between MetS and functional disability in the elderly. This retrospective observational study included 1,778 participants aged 60–84 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2002). Impairments in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), leisure and social activities (LSA), lower extremity mobility (LEM), and general physical activities (GPA) were assessed. Additionally, the associations between the features of MetS and disability were evaluated. MetS was associated with a high prevalence of functional dependence in ADL, IADL, LSA, LEM, and GPA. After adjusting for potential confounders, a high number of MetS components was found to be associated with increased disability (P = 0.002). Additionally, associations were observed between MetS components, including abdominal obesity and high triglycerides levels, and functional dependence in ADL, IADL, LSA, LEM, and GPA (all, P < 0.05). A linear increase in disability might be associated with the number of MetS components in an elderly population. Additionally, MetS abnormalities, particularly abdominal obesity and high triglycerides levels, might be highly predictive of functional dependence in the elderly. PMID:26948125

  14. Decline in Cognitive Function and Risk of Elder Self-Neglect: Finding from the Chicago Health Aging Project

    PubMed Central

    Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa A.; Wilson, Robert S.; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Rajan, K. Bharat; Evans, Denis A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to examine the longitudinal association between decline in cognitive function and risk of elder self-neglect in a community-dwelling population. Design Prospective population-based study Setting Geographically-defined community in Chicago. Participants Community-dwelling subjects reported to the social services agency from 1993–2005 for self-neglect who also participated in the Chicago Health Aging Project (CHAP). Of the 5,519 participants in the Chicago Health Aging Project, 1,017 were reported to social services agency for suspected elder self-neglect from 1993–2005. Measurements Reported elder self-neglect was identified by social services agency. The primary predictor was decline in cognitive function assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (Executive Function), and both immediate and delayed recall of the East Boston Memory Test (Episodic Memory). An index of global cognitive function scores was derived by averaging z-scores of all tests. Outcome of interest was elder self-neglect. Logistic and linear regression models were used to assess these longitudinal associations. Results After adjusting for potential confounding factors, decline in global cognitive function, MMSE or episodic memory was not independently associated with increased risk of reported and confirmed elder self-neglect. Decline in executive function was associated with increased risk of reported and confirmed elder self-neglect. Decline in global cognitive function was associated with increased risk of greater self-neglect severity (PE=0.76, SE=0.31, p=0.014). Conclusion Decline in executive function was associated with increased risk of reported and confirmed elder self-neglect. Decline in global cognitive function was associated with increased risk of greater self-neglect severity. PMID:21143438

  15. Heterogeneity of elderly depression: increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and Aβ protein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Namekawa, Yuki; Baba, Hajime; Maeshima, Hitoshi; Nakano, Yoshiyuki; Satomura, Emi; Takebayashi, Naoko; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Toshihito; Arai, Heii

    2013-06-03

    Epidemiological studies have proposed that depression may increase the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), even in patients with early-onset depression. Although metabolism of amyloid β protein (Aβ) in elderly depression received attention in terms of their correlation, there is a serious heterogeneity in elderly depression in terms of age at onset of depression. Moreover, it is unknown whether early-onset major depressive disorder (MDD) has a long-term effect on the involvement of Aβ metabolism and later development of AD. Thus, we evaluated serum Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels, the Aβ40/Aβ42 ratio in 89 elderly (≥60 years of age) inpatients with MDD and 81 age-matched healthy controls, and compared them among patients with early-onset (<60 years) and late-onset (≥60years) MDD and controls. The results showed that the serum Aβ40/Aβ42 ratio was significantly higher in patients with both early- and late-onset MDD than in controls (early-onset, p=0.010; late-onset, p=0.043), and it is of great interest that the serum Aβ40/Aβ42 ratio was negatively correlated with the age at MDD onset (R=-0.201, p=0.032). These results suggest that an earlier onset of MDD may have a more serious abnormality in Aβ metabolism, possibly explaining a biological mechanism underlying the link between depression and AD.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of lumbar spondylolisthesis in elderly Chinese men and women

    PubMed Central

    He, Lai-Chang; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Gong, Jing-Shan; Griffith, James F; Zeng, Xian-Jun; Kwok, Anthony WL; Leung, Jason CS; Kwok, Timothy; Ahuja, Anil T; Leung, Ping Chung

    2014-01-01

    Objective A screening survey for osteoporotic fractures in men and women in Hong Kong represents the first large-scale prospective population-based study on bone health in elderly (≥65 years) Chinese men and women. This study aims to identify the prevalence and potential risk factors of lumbar spondylolisthesis in these subjects. Methods The lateral lumbar radiographs of 1,994 male and 1,996 female patients were analysed using the Meyerding classification. Results Amongst the men, 380 (19.1 %) had at least one spondylolisthesis and 43 (11.3 %) had slips at two or more levels; 283 had anterolisthesis, 85 had retrolisthesis, whereas 12 subjects had both anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis. Amongst the women, 499 (25.0 %) had at least one spondylolisthesis and 69 (13.8 %) had slips at two or more levels; 459 had anterolisthesis, 34 had retrolisthesis, whereas 6 subjects had both anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis. Advanced age, short height, higher body mass index (BMI), higher bone mineral density (BMD) and degenerative arthritis are associated with spondylolisthesis. Lower Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) score was associated with spondylolisthesis in men; higher body weight, angina and lower grip strength were associated with spondylolisthesis in women. Conclusion The male/female ratio of lumbar spondylolisthesis prevalence was 1:1.3 in elderly Chinese. Men are more likely to have retrolisthesis. PMID:24126641

  17. Prevalence and Risk Factor of Neck Pain in Elderly Korean Community Residents

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kyeong Min; Cho, Nam H.; Lim, Seung Hun

    2013-01-01

    Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal condition, which causes substantial medical cost. In Korea, prevalence of neck pain in community based population, especially in elderly subjects, has scarcely been reported. We evaluated the prevalence, the severity and the risk factors of neck pain in elderly Korean community residents. Data for neck pain were collected for 1,655 subjects from a rural farming community. The point, 6-months and cumulative lifetime prevalence of neck pain was obtained in addition to the measurement of the severity of neck pain. The mean age of the study subjects was 61 yr and 57% were females. The lifetime prevalence of neck pain was 20.8% with women having a higher prevalence. The prevalence did not increase with age, and the majority of individuals had low-intensity/low-disability pain. Subjects with neck pain had a significantly worse SF-12 score in all domains except for mental health. The prevalence of neck pain was significantly associated with female gender, obesity and smoking. This is the first large-scale Korean study estimating the prevalence of neck pain in elderly population. Although the majority of individuals had low-intensity/low-disability pain, subjects with neck pain had a significantly worse SF-12 score indicating that neck pain has significant health impact. PMID:23678258

  18. Random fasting hyperglycemia as cardiovascular risk factor in the elderly: a 6-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Antonicelli, R; Gesuita, R; Boemi, M; Paciaroni, E

    2001-04-01

    A large body of evidence suggests that diabetes increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but whether fasting hyperglycemia is associated with a major risk for CHD is still under debate. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role played by fasting hyperglycemia in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in an elderly population when associated with common risk factors for CVD (i.e., hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, etc). We analyzed a sample of 455 subjects aged > or = 60 years. The risk factors taken into account were systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels, use of antihypertensive drugs, total serum cholesterol, serum triglycerides, and smoking habit. Glycemia was measured at entry on a fasting sample. During the follow-up period (mean 6 years), the occurrence of CVD was monitored (criteria for the occurrence of CVD included total cardiovascular mortality, fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction, symptomatic coronary heart disease [stable and unstable angina], the need for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft, fatal or nonfatal stroke, and transient ischemic attack). A total of 427 subjects completed the follow-up. During this period, 73 subjects (17.10%) developed CVD according to the above criteria. A Cox proportional hazard model was designed to evaluate the contribution of variables in predicting CVD. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for CVD were calculated from the regression coefficients to study the association between the risk of developing CVD and predicting variables. We found a relation between occurrence of CVD and fasting hyperglycemia: subjects with fasting glycemia, > 126 mg/dl at enrollment, but without previous clinical diagnosis of diabetes, showed a 2.01 times higher risk than those with fasting glycemia < 126 mg/dl. Hence, random fasting hyperglycemia can predict the occurrence of CVD in elderly subjects.

  19. Determining Prevalence and Correlates of Elder Abuse Using Promotores: Low Income Immigrant Latinos Report High Rates of Abuse and Neglect

    PubMed Central

    DeLiema, Marguerite; Gassoumis, Zachary D.; Homeier, Diana C.; Wilber, Kathleen H.

    2012-01-01

    Low-income Latino immigrants are understudied in elder abuse research. Limited English proficiency, economic insecurity, neighborhood seclusion, a tradition of resolving conflicts within the family, and mistrust of authorities may impede survey research and suppress abuse reporting. To overcome these barriers, we recruited and trained promotores, local Spanish-speaking Latinos, to interview a sample of Latino adults age 66 and older residing in low-income communities. The promotores conducted door-to-door interviews in randomly selected census tracts in Los Angeles to assess the frequency of psychological, physical, and sexual abuse, financial exploitation, and caregiver neglect. Overall, 40.4% of Latino elders experienced some form of abuse and/or neglect within the previous year. Nearly 25% reported psychological abuse, 10.7% indicated physical assault, 9% reported sexual abuse, 16.7% indicated financial exploitation, and 11.7% were neglected by their caregivers. Younger age, higher education, and experiencing sexual or physical abuse before age 65 were significant risk factors for psychological, physical, and/or sexual abuse. Years lived in the United States, younger age, and prior abuse were associated with increased risk of financial exploitation. Years spent living in the U.S. was a significant risk factor for caregiver neglect. Abuse prevalence was much higher in all mistreatment domains than findings from previous research on community-dwelling elders, suggesting that low-income Latino immigrants are highly vulnerable to elder mistreatment, or that respondents are more willing to disclose abuse to promotores who represent their culture and community. PMID:22697790

  20. Lifestyle, Cardiovascular Drugs and Risk Factors in Younger and Elder Adults: The PEP Family Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Schwandt, Peter; Liepold, Evelyn; Bertsch, Thomas; Haas, Gerda-Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to compare cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, lifestyle habits and pharmacological treatment in two groups of elder adults with 20 years difference in their mean age. This study comprised 590 women including two groups with mean age of 42.4±5.5 vs. 66.5±4.0 years, and 486 men of two groups with mean age of 44.1±5.6 vs. 63.9±7.0 years. Data on physical examination, fasting blood analyses, 7-day dietary records, physical activity, smoking and actual medication use were recorded. Compared with younger individuals, seniors had a more adverse risk factor profile in terms of abdominal obesity, overweight, hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipoproteinemia without differences in HDL-C. But this is not reflected by lifestyle behavior. Less than 2% of the elderly and 17% of the younger adults were current smoker. Furthermore, the pattern of physical activity was different in terms of more continuous sports in seniors contrasting with extremes between no sports and more than twice a week in the younger group. Seniors consumed significantly less carbohydrates including more monosaccharide and less polysaccharides, more alcohol and water. The intake of fat and protein was higher in elder women than in all other groups. One third of seniors took antihypertensive medications and 12% used lipid modifying drugs. Different levels of prevention against CVDs and their risk factors shall be considered for various age groups of population. The findings of this study emphasize on the necessity of preventive measures against smoking and physical inactivity in younger adults and dietary habits in seniors.

  1. Association of Osteoarthritis With Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases in the Elderly: Findings From the Progetto Veneto Anziano Study Cohort.

    PubMed

    Veronese, Nicola; Trevisan, Caterina; De Rui, Marina; Bolzetta, Francesco; Maggi, Stefania; Zambon, Sabina; Musacchio, Estella; Sartori, Leonardo; Perissinotto, Egle; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Manzato, Enzo; Sergi, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    The possible relevance of osteoarthritis (OA) as a cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor is still debated. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between OA and the onset of CVD in older individuals. Among a sample of 3,099 elderly subjects, 2,158 were identified as having no CVD at baseline and were followed up for a mean ± SD 4.4 ± 1.2 years. OA was defined using a standardized algorithm that investigated disease history, medical documentation (including radiographic reports), symptoms, and physical examination of the joints. Incident CVD was defined as the onset of coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke/transient ischemic attack, peripheral artery disease, and CVD-related hospitalization or mortality. At baseline, 1,336 (61.9%) of the 2,158 study participants had OA. Participants with OA had more potential CVD risk factors, including obesity, hypertension, high levels of low-density lipoprotein, greater severity of inflammation, and worse renal function, than did those without OA. During the follow-up, 47.8% of the subjects with OA developed a new CVD event, compared to 41.3% of those without OA. Using an adjusted Cox regression analysis, the presence of OA significantly increased the risk of CVD (hazard ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.49; P = 0.04). The association between OA and CVD was stronger when the hip or knee was affected, and also was stronger in women than in men and when ≥2 joints were involved. Considering single CVD outcomes, the presence of OA significantly increased the risk of new coronary artery disease, heart failure, and hospitalization for CVD. OA may be a significant predictor of the onset of CVD in elderly individuals, particularly in women with OA and when OA affects the lower limbs or ≥2 joints are involved. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Association of Serum Fetuin-A Levels With the Risk of Albuminuria in Middle-Aged and Elderly Chinese.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaofei; Sun, Wanwan; Huang, Xiaolin; Chen, Ying; Ding, Lin; Lin, Lin; Chen, Yuhong; Lu, Jieli; Xu, Min; Bi, Yufang; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Xu, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Fetuin-A is an important hepatokine associated with many cardiometabolic abnormities. The association between fetuin-A and albuminuria has not been investigated in a prospective cohort. The objective of the study was to prospectively investigate whether serum fetuin-A levels were associated with albuminuria in middle-aged and elderly Chinese. A community-based study was conducted at baseline in 2009, including 3102 individuals aged 40 years or older and followed up for 4 years. Baseline and follow-up urine samples were collected to measure urinary albumin and creatinine concentrations. Albuminuria was defined as urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) of 30 mg/g or greater. A total of 194 participants (8.5%) developed albuminuria during the follow-up. Men who developed albuminuria had significantly higher baseline levels of fetuin-A compared with those who did not (338.2 vs 292.9 mg/L, P = .02). Among men, after adjustment for traditional risk factors, each 1-SD increase of fetuin-A level (131.6 mg/L) was associated with a 32% higher risk for developing albuminuria (odds ratio 1.32, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.62). In addition, among men, compared with participants in the lowest tertile (<253.1 mg/L) of serum fetuin-A levels, those in the highest tertile (>338.2 mg/L) had a 2-fold risk for developing albuminuria (odds ratio 2.07, 95% confidence interval 1.04-4.12) after multivariate adjustment. No association between fetuin-A levels and incident albuminuria was observed in women. High serum fetuin-A levels were independently associated with an increased risk of developing albuminuria in middle-aged and elderly men, whereas no significant associations were found in women.

  3. August 2003 heat wave in France: risk factors for death of elderly people living at home.

    PubMed

    Vandentorren, S; Bretin, P; Zeghnoun, A; Mandereau-Bruno, L; Croisier, A; Cochet, C; Ribéron, J; Siberan, I; Declercq, B; Ledrans, M

    2006-12-01

    The August 2003 heat wave in France resulted in many thousands of excess deaths particularly of elderly people. Individual and environmental risk factors for death among the community-dwelling elderly were identified. We conducted a case-control survey and defined cases as people aged 65 years and older who lived at home and died from August 8 through August 13 from causes other than accident, suicide, or surgical complications. Controls were matched with cases for age, sex, and residential area. Interviewers used questionnaires to collect data. Satellite pictures provided profiles of the heat island characteristics around the homes. Lack of mobility was a major risk factor along with some pre-existing medical conditions. Housing characteristics associated with death were lack of thermal insulation and sleeping on the top floor, right under the roof. The temperature around the building was a major risk factor. Behaviour such as dressing lightly and use of cooling techniques and devices were protective factors. These findings suggest people with pre-existing medical conditions were likely to be vulnerable during heat waves and need information on how to adjust daily routines to heat waves. In the long term, building insulation and urban planning must be adapted to provide protection from possible heat waves.

  4. Metabolic predictors of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular attack in elderly diabetic individuals: difference in risk by age

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) and glucose levels are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) in middle-aged diabetic individuals; however, the risk among the elderly, especially the very elderly, is not well known. The aim of this study was to identify factors that predict IHD and cerebrovascular attack (CVA) in the elderly and to investigate their differences by age. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study (Japan Cholesterol and Diabetes Mellitus Study) with 5.5 years of follow-up. A total of 4,014 patients with type 2 diabetes and without previous IHD or CVA (1,936 women; age 67.4 ± 9.5 years, median 70 years; <65 years old, n = 1,261; 65 to 74 years old, n = 1,731; and ≥ 75 years old, n = 1,016) were recruited on a consecutive outpatient basis from 40 hospitals throughout Japan. Lipids, glucose, and other factors related to IHD or CVA risk, such as blood pressure (BP), were investigated using the multivariate Cox hazard model. Results One hundred fifty-three cases of IHD and 104 CVAs (7.8 and 5.7/1,000 people per year, respectively) occurred over 5.5 years. Lower HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and female gender were correlated with IHD in patients ≥75 years old (hazard ratio (HR):0.629, P < 0.01 and 1.132, P < 0.05, respectively). In contrast, systolic BP (SBP), HbA1C, LDL-C and non-HDL-C were correlated with IHD in subjects <65 years old (P < 0.05), and the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio was correlated with IHD in all subjects. HDL-C was correlated with CVA in patients ≥75 years old (HR: 0.536, P < 0.01). Kaplan-Meier estimator curves showed that IHD occurred more frequently in patients <65 years old in the highest quartile of the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio. In patients ≥75 years old, IHD and CVA were both the most frequent among those with the lowest HDL-C levels. Conclusions IHD and CVA in late elderly diabetic patients were predicted by HDL-C. LDL-C, HbA1C, SBP and non-HDL-C are risk factors for

  5. Potential contribution of the neurodegenerative disorders risk loci to cognitive performance in an elderly male gout population.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Jia, Zhaotong; Cao, Chunwei; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Fuqiang; Wang, Lin; Ren, Wei; Sun, Mingxia; Wang, Baoping; Li, Changgui; Chen, Li

    2017-09-01

    Cognitive impairment has been described in elderly subjects with high normal concentrations of serum uric acid. However, it remains unclear if gout confers an increased poorer cognition than those in individuals with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. The present study aimed at evaluating cognitive function in patients suffering from gout in an elderly male population, and further investigating the genetic contributions to the risk of cognitive function.This study examined the cognitive function as assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) in 205 male gout patients and 204 controls. The genetic basis of these cognitive measures was evaluated by genome-wide association study (GWAS) data in 102 male gout patients. Furthermore, 7 loci associated with cognition in GWAS were studied for correlation with gout in 1179 male gout patients and 1848 healthy male controls.Compared with controls, gout patients had significantly lower MoCA scores [22.78 ± 3.01 vs 23.42 ± 2.95, P = .023, adjusted by age, body mass index (BMI), education, and emotional disorder]. GWAS revealed 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associations with MoCA test at a level of conventional genome-wide significance (P < 9.6 × 10). The most significant association was observed between rs12895072 and rs12434554 within the KTN1 gene (Padjusted = 4.2 × 10, Padjusted = 4.7 × 10) at 14q22. The next best signal was in RELN gene (rs155333, Padjusted = 1.3 × 10) at 7q22, while the other variants at rs17458357 (Padjusted = 3.98 × 10), rs2572683 (Padjusted = 8.9 × 10), rs12555895 (Padjusted = 2.6 × 10), and rs3764030 (Padjusted = 9.4 × 10) were also statistically significant. The 7 SNPs were not associated with gout in further analysis (all P > .05).Elderly male subjects with gout exhibit accelerated decline in cognition performance. Several neurodegenerative disorders risk loci

  6. Improved Method to Stratify Elderly Patients With Cancer at Risk for Competing Events.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Ruben; Zakeri, Kaveh; Green, Garrett; Hwang, Lindsay; Gulaya, Sachin; Xu, Beibei; Verma, Rohan; Williamson, Casey W; Triplett, Daniel P; Rose, Brent S; Shen, Hanjie; Vaida, Florin; Murphy, James D; Mell, Loren K

    2016-04-10

    To compare a novel generalized competing event (GCE) model versus the standard Cox proportional hazards regression model for stratifying elderly patients with cancer who are at risk for competing events. We identified 84,319 patients with nonmetastatic prostate, head and neck, and breast cancers from the SEER-Medicare database. Using demographic, tumor, and clinical characteristics, we trained risk scores on the basis of GCE versus Cox models for cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. In test sets, we examined the predictive ability of the risk scores on the different causes of death, including second cancer mortality, noncancer mortality, and cause-specific mortality, using Fine-Gray regression and area under the curve. We compared how well models stratified subpopulations according to the ratio of the cumulative cause-specific hazard for cancer mortality to the cumulative hazard for overall mortality (ω) using the Akaike Information Criterion. In each sample, increasing GCE risk scores were associated with increased cancer-specific mortality and decreased competing mortality, whereas risk scores from Cox models were associated with both increased cancer-specific mortality and competing mortality. GCE models created greater separation in the area under the curve for cancer-specific mortality versus noncancer mortality (P < .001), indicating better discriminatory ability between these events. Comparing the GCE model to Cox models of cause-specific mortality or all-cause mortality, the respective Akaike Information Criterion scores were superior (lower) in each sample: prostate cancer, 28.6 versus 35.5 versus 39.4; head and neck cancer, 21.1 versus 29.4 versus 40.2; and breast cancer, 24.6 versus 32.3 versus 50.8. Compared with standard modeling approaches, GCE models improve stratification of elderly patients with cancer according to their risk of dying from cancer relative to overall mortality. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Improved Method to Stratify Elderly Patients With Cancer at Risk for Competing Events

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Ruben; Zakeri, Kaveh; Green, Garrett; Hwang, Lindsay; Gulaya, Sachin; Xu, Beibei; Verma, Rohan; Williamson, Casey W.; Triplett, Daniel P.; Rose, Brent S.; Shen, Hanjie; Vaida, Florin; Murphy, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare a novel generalized competing event (GCE) model versus the standard Cox proportional hazards regression model for stratifying elderly patients with cancer who are at risk for competing events. Methods We identified 84,319 patients with nonmetastatic prostate, head and neck, and breast cancers from the SEER-Medicare database. Using demographic, tumor, and clinical characteristics, we trained risk scores on the basis of GCE versus Cox models for cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. In test sets, we examined the predictive ability of the risk scores on the different causes of death, including second cancer mortality, noncancer mortality, and cause-specific mortality, using Fine-Gray regression and area under the curve. We compared how well models stratified subpopulations according to the ratio of the cumulative cause-specific hazard for cancer mortality to the cumulative hazard for overall mortality (ω) using the Akaike Information Criterion. Results In each sample, increasing GCE risk scores were associated with increased cancer-specific mortality and decreased competing mortality, whereas risk scores from Cox models were associated with both increased cancer-specific mortality and competing mortality. GCE models created greater separation in the area under the curve for cancer-specific mortality versus noncancer mortality (P < .001), indicating better discriminatory ability between these events. Comparing the GCE model to Cox models of cause-specific mortality or all-cause mortality, the respective Akaike Information Criterion scores were superior (lower) in each sample: prostate cancer, 28.6 versus 35.5 versus 39.4; head and neck cancer, 21.1 versus 29.4 versus 40.2; and breast cancer, 24.6 versus 32.3 versus 50.8. Conclusion Compared with standard modeling approaches, GCE models improve stratification of elderly patients with cancer according to their risk of dying from cancer relative to overall mortality. PMID:26884579

  8. Association of Smoking and Alcohol Drinking with Dementia Risk Among Elderly Men in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shiming; Zhou, Rui; Zhong, Tingting; Li, Rui; Tan, Jun; Zhou, Huadong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies relating smoking and alcohol drinking with the incidence of dementia have been inconsistent. Objectives: We assessed whether smoking and alcohol drinking was associated with the risk of dementia, including Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) after seven years of follow-up. Design: We prospectively analysed the incidence of dementia from 2004 to 2011 among 2959 elderly men, according to their smoking and alcohol drinking status. Setting: six neighbourhoods from three districts mentioned in Chongqing city. Participants: A total of 3170 men were followed up annually for 7 years. Measurements: Cox proportional hazards models were established to evaluate the association between smoking, alcohol drinking and the risk of dementia. Results: The incidences of AD and VaD were higher respectively in current smoking than never smoking, daily drinking than never drinking over 7 years of follow-up (p<0.01). After adjusting for age and other potential confounders, current smoking was associated with increased risk of AD (HR= 2.14, 95% CI 1.20-4.46) and VaD (HR= 3.28, 95% CI 1.14-4.52), meanwhile, daily drinking was related to increased risk of AD (HR= 2.25, 95% CI 1.43-3.97) and VaD (HR= 3.42, 95% CI 1.18-4.51). In addition, co-smoking and drinking were related to with a significantly higher risk of AD and VaD than non-smoking and drinking (HR= 3.03, 95% CI 1.65-4.19) and VaD (HR= 3.96, 95% CI 1.64-4.71). Moreover, co-smoking and drinking had higher risk of AD and VaD compared with current smoking and daily drinking. Conclusions: Current smoking and daily drinking were found to be significantly associated with dementia in elderly men. PMID:25274108

  9. Association of smoking and alcohol drinking with dementia risk among elderly men in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiming; Zhou, Rui; Zhong, Tingting; Li, Rui; Tan, Jun; Zhou, Huadong

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies relating smoking and alcohol drinking with the incidence of dementia have been inconsistent. We assessed whether smoking and alcohol drinking was associated with the risk of dementia, including Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) after seven years of follow-up. We prospectively analysed the incidence of dementia from 2004 to 2011 among 2959 elderly men, according to their smoking and alcohol drinking status. six neighbourhoods from three districts mentioned in Chongqing city. A total of 3170 men were followed up annually for 7 years. Cox proportional hazards models were established to evaluate the association between smoking, alcohol drinking and the risk of dementia. The incidences of AD and VaD were higher respectively in current smoking than never smoking, daily drinking than never drinking over 7 years of follow-up (p<0.01). After adjusting for age and other potential confounders, current smoking was associated with increased risk of AD (HR= 2.14, 95% CI 1.20-4.46) and VaD (HR= 3.28, 95% CI 1.14-4.52), meanwhile, daily drinking was related to increased risk of AD (HR= 2.25, 95% CI 1.43-3.97) and VaD (HR= 3.42, 95% CI 1.18-4.51). In addition, co-smoking and drinking were related to with a significantly higher risk of AD and VaD than non-smoking and drinking (HR= 3.03, 95% CI 1.65-4.19) and VaD (HR= 3.96, 95% CI 1.64-4.71). Moreover, co-smoking and drinking had higher risk of AD and VaD compared with current smoking and daily drinking. Current smoking and daily drinking were found to be significantly associated with dementia in elderly men.

  10. Fall Risk Assessment Tools for Elderly Living in the Community: Can We Do Better?

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Pierpaolo; Palmerini, Luca; Bandinelli, Stefania; Chiari, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background Falls are a common, serious threat to the health and self-confidence of the elderly. Assessment of fall risk is an important aspect of effective fall prevention programs. Objectives and methods In order to test whether it is possible to outperform current prognostic tools for falls, we analyzed 1010 variables pertaining to mobility collected from 976 elderly subjects (InCHIANTI study). We trained and validated a data-driven model that issues probabilistic predictions about future falls. We benchmarked the model against other fall risk indicators: history of falls, gait speed, Short Physical Performance Battery (Guralnik et al. 1994), and the literature-based fall risk assessment tool FRAT-up (Cattelani et al. 2015). Parsimony in the number of variables included in a tool is often considered a proxy for ease of administration. We studied how constraints on the number of variables affect predictive accuracy. Results The proposed model and FRAT-up both attained the same discriminative ability; the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for multiple falls was 0.71. They outperformed the other risk scores, which reported AUCs for multiple falls between 0.64 and 0.65. Thus, it appears that both data-driven and literature-based approaches are better at estimating fall risk than commonly used fall risk indicators. The accuracy–parsimony analysis revealed that tools with a small number of predictors (~1–5) were suboptimal. Increasing the number of variables improved the predictive accuracy, reaching a plateau at ~20–30, which we can consider as the best trade-off between accuracy and parsimony. Obtaining the values of these ~20–30 variables does not compromise usability, since they are usually available in comprehensive geriatric assessments. PMID:26716861

  11. Insomnia and daytime sleepiness are risk factors for depressive symptoms in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Jaussent, Isabelle; Bouyer, Jean; Ancelin, Marie-Laure; Akbaraly, Tasnime; Pérès, Karine; Ritchie, Karen; Besset, Alain; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have reported that insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) may predict depression in adults. However, these associations have not been investigated in community-dwelling elderly taking into account insomnia symptoms, EDS, and sleep medication. Four-year longitudinal study. The French Three-City Study. 3824 subjects aged ≥ 65 years and free of depressive symptoms at baseline. Questionnaires were used to evaluate "insomnia symptoms", EDS, and sleep medication at baseline. Depressive symptoms (DEP-s) were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale at baseline, and at 2-year and 4-year follow-up. Logistic regression models controlling for potential confounders were generated to determine whether sleep disturbances were associated with incident DEP-s and to determine the effect of individual insomnia symptoms. Insomnia symptoms and EDS independently increased the risk of incident DEP-s (OR=1.23, 95% CI=1.01-1.49 and OR=2.05, 95% CI=1.30-3.23, respectively). Poor sleep quality and difficulty in initiating and in maintaining sleep-but not early morning awakening-were identified as risk factors of DEP-s, with risk increasing with the frequency of insomnia symptoms. Sleep medication was not only a risk factor for DEP-s independent of insomnia symptoms (OR=1.62, 95% CI=1.26-2.09), but also independent of EDS (OR=1.71 95%=1.33-2.20). Insomnia symptoms, EDS, and the use of medication independently increase the risk of subsequent depression in the elderly. In clinical practice, disturbed sleep and prolonged use of sleep medication may be early indicators or potentially reversible risk factors for depression, suggesting the need for further clinical interventional research.

  12. Anthropometric indicators of obesity as screening tools for high blood pressure in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Leal Neto, João de Souza; Coqueiro, Raildo da Silva; Freitas, Roberta Souza; Fernandes, Marcos Henrique; Oliveira, Daniela Sousa; Barbosa, Aline Rodrigues

    2013-08-01

    The study objectives were to investigate the indicators of obesity most associated with high blood pressure in community-dwelling elderly and identify among these which one best discriminates high blood pressure. This is an epidemiological, population, cross-sectional and home-based study of elderly people (≥ 60 years, n = 316) residing in northeastern Brazil. The results showed that the body mass index and the body adiposity index were the indicators more closely associated with high blood pressure in both sexes. Both in female and male genders, body mass index showed high values of specificity and low sensitivity values for discriminating high blood pressure, whereas the body adiposity index showed high sensitivity and moderate specificity values. In clinical practice and health surveillance, it is suggested that both indicators be used as screening tools for hypertension in the elderly.

  13. Elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus-the need for high-quality, inpatient diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Sinclair, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients (aged > 70 years) with diabetes are at high risk of -hospitalization. We provide a detailed commentary about recent international clinical guidelines and a consensus statement devoted to elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the context of hospitalization. In emergency departments, the 4 medication agents associated with the greatest number of patient adverse drug events are warfarin, oral glucose-lowering medications, insulin, and antiplatelet agents, all of which are commonly prescribed in older patients with diabetes. Comprehensive gerontological assessment, including review and, if indicated, discontinuation of all potentially unsafe or inappropriate patient medications should be done upstream to reduce the likelihood of adverse drugs events. Severe infections and ischemic heart disease are also frequent causes of acute admission into hospital in patients aged > 75 years. These patients are also likely to be malnourished and nutritional status should be monitored. Nutritional support, combined with specific products to avoid uncontrolled hyperglycemia must be implemented in patients at risk of malnutrition. Early exercise prescription may help patients maintain physical function and prevent the risk of falling. Clinical guidelines should be applied to achieve safe and effective patient target glucose levels. Insulin should be used earlier for its anabolic properties and patients closely monitored to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia and excessive hyperglycemia. The discharge plan needs to address full medical and social needs along with suitable follow-up to ensure a high level of patient safety.

  14. Limited Clinical Utility of a Genetic Risk Score for the Prediction of Fracture Risk in Elderly Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Joel; Evans, Daniel S.; Nielson, Carrie M.; Shen, Jian; Srikanth, Priya; Hochberg, Marc; McWeeney, Shannon; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Wilmot, Beth; Zmuda, Joseph; Tranah, Greg; Mirel, Daniel B; Challa, Sashi; Mooney, Michael; Crenshaw, Andrew; Karlsson, Magnus; Mellström, Dan; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Orwoll, Eric; Ohlsson, Claes

    2014-01-01

    Context It is important to identify the patients at highest risk of fractures. A recent large-scale meta-analysis identified 63 autosomal SNPs associated with bone mineral density (BMD), of which 16 were also associated with fracture risk. Based on these findings two genetic risk scores (GRS63 and GRS16) were developed. Objective To determine the clinical usefulness of these GRS for the prediction of BMD, BMD change and fracture risk in elderly subjects. Design, Settings and Participants Two male (MrOS US, MrOS Sweden) and one female (SOF) large prospective cohorts of older subjects. Main Outcome Measures BMD, BMD change and radiographically and/or medically confirmed incident fractures (8,067 subjects, 2,185 incident non-vertebral or vertebral fractures). Results GRS63 was associated with BMD (≅3% of the variation explained), but not with BMD change. Both GRS63 and GRS16 were associated with fractures. After BMD-adjustment, the effect sizes for these associations were substantially reduced. Similar results were found using an unweighted GRS63 and an unweighted GRS16 compared to those found using the corresponding weighted risk scores. Only minor improvements in C-statistics (AUC) for fractures were seen when the GRSs were added to a base model (age, weight and height) and no significant improvements in C-statistics were seen when they were added to a model further adjusted for BMD. Net reclassification improvements with the addition of the GRSs to a base model were modest and substantially attenuated in BMD-adjusted models. Conclusions and Relevance GRS63 is associated with BMD, but not BMD change, suggesting that the genetic determinants of BMD differ from those of BMD change. When BMD is known, the clinical utility of the two GRSs for fracture prediction is limited in elderly subjects. PMID:25043339

  15. A Screening Instrument for Identifying Elderly at Risk of Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwalek, Melanie A.; Sengstock, Mary C.

    Recently more attention has been focused on elder abuse, with laws enacted requiring reporting of this crime. Since service providers often do not recognize elder abuse, a validated screening tool for elder abuse is needed. A screening tool called the Hwalek-Sengstock Elder Abuse Screening Protocol has been developed and is currently being…

  16. [Tuberculosis control in health care facilities for the elderly, from the viewpoint of risk management].

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Masako; Wada, Masako; Mitarai, Satoshi; Yanai, Hideki; Ito, Kunihiko; Yamauchi, Yuko; Shishido, Shinji

    2006-02-01

    To discuss the optimal TB control system in health care facilities for the elderly where the periodic TB screening is currently not obligatory. A study was conducted in three health care facilities for the elderly in Tokyo during the period from 2002 to 2004, and 212 admitted elderly persons were enrolled in this study. Medical charts were analyzed to identify informations about mental and physical conditions and TB risk factors. Questionnaire-based interviews were conducted in 58 residents who had no dementia or no serious conditions. TB mass screening was carried out with a mobile vehicle equipped with computed radiography, financially supported by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government. Since this mobile vehicle is equipped with a special wheelchair for chest X-ray examination, most elderly persons were able to receive chest X-ray examination. Medical chart review and interview were conducted at around the time of TB mass screening. The screening results of 183 elderly residents who received X-ray examination were reviewed. Of the 212 persons admitted to the facilities, 73.1% were women. The mean ages of men and women were 80.7 and 84.2 years, respectively. Mental disorders were observed in 42.9% and dysfunction of extremities in 54.7%. At the time of admission, chest X-ray records were submitted by the attending doctors in 73.1% of the residents, but this proportion differed among facilities. From these records, old TB was found in 12.3%; however this proportion was 20.8% according to the TB mass screening results. A history of TB was more prevalent in the group interviewed than in the non-interview group (24.1% vs. 6.5%; p < 0.001). Two facilities had conducted TB screening for three consecutive years and comparative reading of chest X-ray films could be done in 35.8%. The remaining facility conducted TB screening for the first time, and comparative reading was not possible. The proportion of cases requiring further investigations was higher in the facility where

  17. Performance of risk assessment tools for predicting osteoporosis in south Indian rural elderly men.

    PubMed

    Satyaraddi, Anil; Shetty, Sahana; Kapoor, Nitin; Cherian, Kripa Elizabeth; Naik, Dukhabandhu; Thomas, Nihal; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2017-12-01

    Osteoporosis in elderly men is an under-recognized problem. In the current study, we intend to look at the performance of two risk assessment tools [OSTA and MORES] for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis was seen in 1/4th of elderly men at spine and 1/6th of them at femoral neck. Both risk assessment tools were found to have good sensitivity in predicting osteoporosis at spine and femoral neck with good area under curve (AUC). This study attempts to look at the performance of osteoporosis self-assessment tool for Asians (OSTA) and male osteoporosis risk estimation score (MORES) for predicting osteoporosis in south Indian rural elderly men. Five hundred and twelve men above 65 years of age from a south Indian rural community were recruited by cluster random sampling. All subjects underwent detailed clinical, anthropometric, and bone mineral density measurement at lumbar spine and femoral neck using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. A T score ≤ - 2.5 was diagnostic of osteoporosis. Scores for OSTA and MORES were calculated at various cut offs, and their sensitivities and specificities for predicting osteoporosis were derived. The prevalence of osteoporosis was found to be 16% at femoral neck and 23% at spine. OSTA with a cut-off value of ≤2 predicted osteoporosis with a sensitivity and specificity at lumbar spine of 94 and 17% and at femoral neck of 99 and 18%. The area under ROC curve for OSTA index for spine was 0.716 and for femoral neck was 0.778. MORES with a cut-off value of ≥6 predicted osteoporosis at spine with a sensitivity of 98% and specificity of 15%, and at femoral neck, they were 98 and 13%, respectively. The area under ROC curve for MORES for spine was 0.855 and for femoral neck was 0.760. OSTA and MORES were found to be useful screening tools for predicting osteoporosis in Indian elderly men. These tools are simple, easy to perform, and cost effective in the context of rural Indian setting.

  18. Dietary habits and cardiovascular disease risk in middle-aged and elderly populations: a review of evidence.

    PubMed

    Tourlouki, Eleni; Matalas, Antonia-Leda; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B

    2009-01-01

    The proportion of elderly is increasing worldwide. This trend is paralleled by an increase in chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease. A limited number of studies have investigated the effect of diet on cardiometabolic risk factors (such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, obesity) in older populations, despite the fact that diet plays a significant role in elderly health. In this review, a summary of studies that have evaluated the effect of dietary habits on cardiovascular disease risk in elderly populations is presented. A search was made in available databases (PubMed and Scopus) looking for results from observational studies and clinical trials that assessed dietary habits on cardiovascular disease risk in elderly populations (>65 years old). Studies during the last decade were retrieved and summarized. All eight of the reviewed observational studies and all three reviewed clinical trials performed in elderly populations reported an inverse association between healthy dietary patterns with cardiovascular disease risk and its predisposing markers. Dietary intervention strategies should be implemented in older adults, in order to prevent cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality, and improve quality of life.

  19. Is the useful field of view a good predictor of at-fault crash risk in elderly Japanese drivers?

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yuji; Takahara, Miwa; Doi, Shun'ichi; Kubota, Fumiko; Yoshimura, Takayoshi; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Kurahashi, Tetsuo

    2015-05-01

    Although age-related decline in the useful field of view (UFOV) is well recognized as a risk factor for at-fault crash involvement in elderly drivers, there is still room to study its applicability to elderly Japanese drivers. In the current study, we thus examined the relationship between UFOV and at-fault crash history in an elderly Japanese population. We also explored whether potential factors that create awareness of reduced driving fitness could be a trigger for the self-regulation of driving in elderly drivers. We measured UFOV and at-fault crash history from 151 community-dwelling Japanese aged 60 years or older, and compared UFOV of at-fault crash-free and crash-involved drivers. We also measured self-evaluated driving style using a questionnaire. UFOV in crash-involved drivers was significantly lower than that in crash-free drivers. No significant difference was found in self-evaluated driving style between crash-free and crash-involved drivers. In addition, there was no significant association between UFOV and self-evaluated driving style. The present study showed that UFOV is a good predictor of at-fault crash risk in elderly Japanese drivers. Furthermore, our data imply that it might be difficult for elderly drivers to adopt appropriate driving strategies commensurate with their current driving competence. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  20. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Postoperative Delirium after Major Surgery in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raats, Jelle W.; van Eijsden, Wilbert A.; Crolla, Rogier M. P. H.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2015-01-01

    Background Early identification of patients at risk for delirium is important, since adequate well timed interventions could prevent occurrence of delirium and related detrimental outcomes. The aim of this study is to evaluate prognostic factors for delirium, including factors describing frailty, in elderly patients undergoing major surgery. Methods We included patients of 65 years and older, who underwent elective surgery from March 2013 to November 2014. Patients had surgery for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) or colorectal cancer. Delirium was scored prospectively using the Delirium Observation Screening Scale. Pre- and peri-operative predictors of delirium were analyzed using regression analysis. Outcomes after delirium included adverse events, length of hospital stay, discharge destination and mortality. Results We included 232 patients. 51 (22%) underwent surgery for AAA and 181 (78%) for colorectal cancer. Postoperative delirium occurred in 35 patients (15%). Predictors of postoperative delirium included: delirium in medical history (Odds Ratio 12 [95% Confidence Interval 2.7–50]), advancing age (Odds Ratio 2.0 [95% Confidence Interval 1.1–3.8]) per 10 years, and ASA-score ≥3 (Odds Ratio 2.6 [95% Confidence Interval 1.1–5.9]). Occurrence of delirium was related to an increase in adverse events, length of hospital stay and mortality. Conclusion Postoperative delirium is a frequent complication after major surgery in elderly patients and is related to an increase in adverse events, length of hospital stay, and mortality. A delirium in the medical history, advanced age, and ASA-score may assist in defining patients at increased risk for delirium. Further attention to prevention of delirium is essential in elderly patients undergoing major surgery. PMID:26291459

  1. Prospective Validation of Modified NEXUS Cervical Spine Injury Criteria in Low-risk Elderly Fall Patients.

    PubMed

    Tran, John; Jeanmonod, Donald; Agresti, Darin; Hamden, Khalief; Jeanmonod, Rebecca K

    2016-05-01

    The National Emergency X-radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS) criteria are used extensively in emergency departments to rule out C-spine injuries (CSI) in the general population. Although the NEXUS validation set included 2,943 elderly patients, multiple case reports and the Canadian C-Spine Rules question the validity of applying NEXUS to geriatric populations. The objective of this study was to validate a modified NEXUS criteria in a low-risk elderly fall population with two changes: a modified definition for distracting injury and the definition of normal mentation. This is a prospective, observational cohort study of geriatric fall patients who presented to a Level I trauma center and were not triaged to the trauma bay. Providers enrolled non-intoxicated patients at baseline mental status with no lateralizing neurologic deficits. They recorded midline neck tenderness, signs of trauma, and presence of other distracting injury. We enrolled 800 patients. One patient fall event was excluded due to duplicate enrollment, and four were lost to follow up, leaving 795 for analysis. Average age was 83.6 (range 65-101). The numbers in parenthesis after the negative predictive value represent confidence interval. There were 11 (1.4%) cervical spine injuries. One hundred seventeen patients had midline tenderness and seven of these had CSI; 366 patients had signs of trauma to the face/neck, and 10 of these patients had CSI. Using signs of trauma to the head/neck as the only distracting injury and baseline mental status as normal alertness, the modified NEXUS criteria was 100% sensitive (CI [67.9-100]) with a negative predictive value of 100 (98.7-100). Our study suggests that a modified NEXUS criteria can be safely applied to low-risk elderly falls.

  2. Testosterone Threshold for Increased Cardiovascular Risk in Middle-Aged and Elderly Men: A Locally Weighted Regression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pin-Wen; Wu, Chia-Chang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Liu, Shih-Ping; Ho, Chen-Hsun

    2016-12-01

    Although testosterone deficiency has a well-known association with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the threshold remains to be determined. To investigate whether there is a discriminatory testosterone level below which the CVD risk increases. The study included 876 men 45 to 74 years old who underwent a general health checkup. The Framingham Risk Score was used to estimate the 10-year CVD risk; a high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level of at least 1 mg/L was considered an indicator of increased CVD risk. Aging symptoms and sexual function were evaluated with the Aging Males' Symptom Scale. Locally weighted regression was performed to determine the testosterone threshold for Framingham CVD risk and increased hsCRP. The mean age was 56.6 ± 7.0 years. The mean total testosterone level was 394.3 ± 115.7 ng/dL. The mean 10-year Framingham CVD risk was 16.6 ± 10.7%, and 169 (19.3%) had increased hsCRP. The locally weighted regression showed that total testosterone levels of 440 and 480 ng/dL were associated with increased Framingham CVD risk and an increased probability of increased hsCRP, respectively. Men with sexual dysfunction (poor sexual performance, decreased morning erection, and loss of libido) had significantly greater CVD risk. Their risk appeared to increase at a relatively higher testosterone level, and it reached a plateau at a testosterone level of 300 to 350 ng/dL. In contrast, the risk in those with no or less sexual dysfunction remained low at a higher testosterone level, and a threshold level of 425 to 475 ng/dL was associated with increased CVD risk. A similar pattern and threshold were identified in the analyses of the relation between testosterone and hsCRP. These data showed that a testosterone threshold of 440 ng/dL was associated with increased Framingham 10-year CVD risk in middle-aged and elderly men. Poor sexual performance, decreased morning erection, and loss of libido had an impact on the testosterone threshold

  3. Cognitive impairment and the associated risk factors among the elderly in the Shanghai urban area: a pilot study from China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Our study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cognitive impairment(CI) and the associated risk factors among elderly people in Shanghai urban area, China. Methods A population-based survey was conducted among people aged 55 years or older in urban areas of Shanghai. Face-to-face interviews were carried out to collect information including demographic characteristics, medical history, and medication use, etc. The validated Chinese version of the Mini-Mental State Examination(MMSE) was used to screen subjects with CI, and the criteria of CI were adjusted for education levels. Results A total of 3,176 home-living residents (≥55 years old) were included in the study. Among them, 266 people (102 men and 164 women) were identified as cognition impaired, with a prevalence of 8.38% (266/3,176, 95% CI: (8.26, 8.49)) for both genders, 9.21% (102/1,107,95% CI: (9.18, 9.33)) for men and 7.93% (164/2,069, 95% CI: (7.80, 8.09)) for women, respectively. Furthermore, we found that several significant risk factors, including social factors(education, number of children, marriage status, and family structure), physiological factors (age, blood glucose level, and obesity), factors on living styles(physical exercise, diet & chronic diseases), and genetic factor(ApoE), associated with CI onset. Conclusions This study confirms the high prevalence of CI among the elderly population in the Shanghai urban in China, similar to previous epidemiologic studies in Western countries. The putative risk factors associated with CI merit further investigated. PMID:23210893

  4. High-grade glioma in elderly patients: can the oncogeriatrician help?

    PubMed Central

    Tabouret, Emeline; Tassy, Louis; Chinot, Olivier; Crétel, Elodie; Retornaz, Frederique; Rousseau, Frederique

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumors in adults. As the population ages in Western countries, the number of people being diagnosed with glioblastoma is expected to increase. Clinical management of elderly patients with primary brain tumors is difficult, owing to multiple comorbidities, polypharmacy, decreased tolerance to chemotherapy, and an increased risk of radiation-induced neurotoxicity. A few specific randomized studies have shown a benefit for radiotherapy in elderly patients with good performance status. For patients with poor performance status, chemotherapy (temozolomide) has been shown to be associated with prolonged duration of response. Patients with methylated O6-alkylguanine deoxyribonucleic acid alkyltransferase promoter seem to have better outcomes. Oncogeriatrics proposes the geriatric evaluation of elderly patients to improve therapeutic choices and optimize the management of treatment toxicities and comorbidities. PMID:24353408

  5. Treatment tolerance and patient-reported outcomes favor online hemodiafiltration compared to high-flux hemodialysis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Morena, Marion; Jaussent, Audrey; Chalabi, Lotfi; Leray-Moragues, Hélène; Chenine, Leila; Debure, Alain; Thibaudin, Damien; Azzouz, Lynda; Patrier, Laure; Maurice, Francois; Nicoud, Philippe; Durand, Claude; Seigneuric, Bruno; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Picot, Marie-Christine; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Canaud, Bernard

    2017-03-15

    Large cohort studies suggest that high convective volumes associated with online hemodiafiltration may reduce the risk of mortality/morbidity compared to optimal high-flux hemodialysis. By contrast, intradialytic tolerance is not well studied. The aim of the FRENCHIE (French Convective versus Hemodialysis in Elderly) study was to compare high-flux hemodialysis and online hemodiafiltration in terms of intradialytic tolerance. In this prospective, open-label randomized controlled trial, 381 elderly chronic hemodialysis patients (over age 65) were randomly assigned in a one-to-one ratio to either high-flux hemodialysis or online hemodiafiltration. The primary outcome was intradialytic tolerance (day 30-day 120). Secondary outcomes included health-related quality of life, cardiovascular risk biomarkers, morbidity, and mortality. During the observational period for intradialytic tolerance, 85% and 84% of patients in high-flux hemodialysis and online hemodiafiltration arms, respectively, experienced at least one adverse event without significant difference between groups. As exploratory analysis, intradialytic tolerance was also studied, considering the sessions as a statistical unit according to treatment actually received. Over a total of 11,981 sessions, 2,935 were complicated by the occurrence of at least one adverse event, with a significantly lower occurrence in online hemodiafiltration with fewer episodes of intradialytic symptomatic hypotension and muscle cramps. By contrast, health-related quality of life, morbidity, and mortality were not different in both groups. An improvement in the control of metabolic bone disease biomarkers and β2-microglobulin level without change in serum albumin concentration was observed with online hemodiafiltration. Thus, overall outcomes favor online hemodiafiltration over high-flux hemodialysis in the elderly.

  6. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation among elderly Norwegian men with a history of long-term endurance sport practice

    PubMed Central

    Myrstad, M; Løchen, M-L; Graff-Iversen, S; Gulsvik, A K; Thelle, D S; Stigum, H; Ranhoff, A H

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. The prevalence increases with increasing age. In middle-aged men, endurance sport practice is associated with increased risk of AF but there are few studies among elderly people. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of long-term endurance sport practice as a risk factor for AF in elderly men. A cross-sectional study compared 509 men aged 65–90 years who participated in a long-distance cross-country ski race with 1768 men aged 65–87 years from the general population. Long-term endurance sport practice was the main exposure. Self-reported AF and covariates were assessed by questionnaires. Risk differences (RDs) for AF were estimated by using a linear regression model. After multivariable adjustment, a history of endurance sport practice gave an added risk for AF of 6.0 percent points (pp) (95% confidence interval 0.8–11.1). Light and moderate leisure-time physical activity during the last 12 months reduced the risk with 3.7 and 4.3 pp, respectively, but the RDs were not statistically significant. This study suggests that elderly men with a history of long-term endurance sport practice have an increased risk of AF compared with elderly men in the general population. PMID:24256074

  7. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation among elderly Norwegian men with a history of long-term endurance sport practice.

    PubMed

    Myrstad, M; Løchen, M-L; Graff-Iversen, S; Gulsvik, A K; Thelle, D S; Stigum, H; Ranhoff, A H

    2014-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. The prevalence increases with increasing age. In middle-aged men, endurance sport practice is associated with increased risk of AF but there are few studies among elderly people. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of long-term endurance sport practice as a risk factor for AF in elderly men. A cross-sectional study compared 509 men aged 65-90 years who participated in a long-distance cross-country ski race with 1768 men aged 65-87 years from the general population. Long-term endurance sport practice was the main exposure. Self-reported AF and covariates were assessed by questionnaires. Risk differences (RDs) for AF were estimated by using a linear regression model. After multivariable adjustment, a history of endurance sport practice gave an added risk for AF of 6.0 percent points (pp) (95% confidence interval 0.8-11.1). Light and moderate leisure-time physical activity during the last 12 months reduced the risk with 3.7 and 4.3 pp, respectively, but the RDs were not statistically significant. This study suggests that elderly men with a history of long-term endurance sport practice have an increased risk of AF compared with elderly men in the general population.

  8. [The risk of falling due to benzodiazepine administration, alone or in combination, in elderly subjects].

    PubMed

    Tillement, J P; Albengres, E; Cottin, D; Klouz, A; Arkoub, H; Le Louet, H

    2001-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are well tolerated by young adults whereas in elderly people they are less safe and globally induce more central nervous system side-effects and falls. Falls result from a decrease of vigilance and an alteration of postural reflex. This latter includes the reception of sensory information and central integration modulated mainly by dopaminergic D2 receptors and motor stimulation. Benzodiazepines act simultaneously on the three stages, decreasing their efficacy. The risk increases when certain other drugs are coprescribed, especially synergistic drugs such as another psycholeptic drug, an aminoside or a centrally active antihypertensive drug. Thus their co-prescription with a benzodiazepine increases the risk of falls. The pharmacokinetic parameters of benzodiazepines may be modified or remain constant during ageing. The choice of molecules whose parameters do not vary seems advisable. Whatever the selected benzodiazepine, it is obvious that it must be administered at the lowest possible dose, this dose being increased only if necessary, the overall prescription being time limited.

  9. An assessment of interventions that target risk factors for elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Day, Andrew; Boni, Nadia; Evert, Helen; Knight, Tess

    2017-09-01

    Although there is increasing concern about both the prevalence of, and harms associated with the abuse of older adults, progress in the development of interventions to prevent its occurrence has been slow. This paper reports the findings of a systematic review of the published literature that identified studies in which the outcomes of preventative interventions are described. A total of eight different intervention trials, published since 2004, are described across the primary, secondary and tertiary levels of prevention and in terms of the types of risk factor that they target. The current evidence to support the effectiveness of these interventions is not only limited by the small number of outcome studies but also the poor quality of evaluation designs and the focus of many interventions on single risk factors. It is concluded that work is needed to strengthen the evidence base that supports the delivery of interventions to prevent elder abuse. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. An Overview. High Risk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report provides an overview of efforts undertaken by the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) in 1990 to review and report on federal program areas its work identified as high risk because of vulnerabilities to waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement. It reviews the current status of efforts to address these concerns. The six categories of…

  11. An Overview. High Risk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report provides an overview of efforts undertaken by the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) in 1990 to review and report on federal program areas its work identified as high risk because of vulnerabilities to waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement. It reviews the current status of efforts to address these concerns. The six categories of…

  12. Clinical functional tests help identify elderly women highly concerned about falls.

    PubMed

    de Souza Moreira, Bruno; Mourão Barroso, Cristiano; Cavalcanti Furtado, Sheyla Rossana; Sampaio, Rosana Ferreira; Drumond das Chagas e Vallone, Márcia Luciane; Kirkwood, Renata Noce

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/STUDY CONTEXT: Limited research exists on functional tests in the discrimination of elderly individuals with high concern about falls from individuals with low concern about falls. The purpose of this study was to determine which functional test best discriminates between elderly women with low and high concern about falls. One hundred thirty-five elderly women (72.6 ± 4.8 years) were divided into two groups based on their Falls Efficacy Scale-International score: low concern (n = 56) and high concern (n = 79) about falls. Five functional tests were applied: Timed Up and Go test (TUG), unipodal stance test, five-repetition sit-to-stand test (5-STS), gait velocity, and grip strength. Factorial analysis and discriminant analysis were used. Factorial analysis resulted in three factors that explained 83.8% of the total variance. Factor 1, with 49.5% of total variance explanation, was represented by the TUG, 5-STS, and gait velocity tests and was the only factor to discriminate between the groups, classifying correctly 68.9% of the observations. Among the original variables of Factor 1, the Fisher linear coefficient showed that the TUG was the most discriminant of the tests. The TUG test best discriminates elderly women with low and high concern about falls; therefore, it is an important test that should be performed during the assessment of elderly individuals afraid of falling.

  13. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is a strong risk factor for resistant hypertension in elderly subjects from general population

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Alberto; Lenti, Salvatore; Schiavon, Laura; Del Monte, Alvise; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Ramazzina, Emilio; Rubello, Domenico; Casiglia, Edoardo

    2017-01-01

    Objective In clinical practice, patient characteristics predicting resistant hypertension (RH) include higher blood pressure levels, left ventricular hypertrophy, older age, obesity, chronic kidney disease and diabetes. On the contrary little is known about the role of serum uric acid (SUA) as a risk factor for RH in subjects from general population. Material and methods 580 elderly subjects aged ≥65 years were enrolled in the Risk Of Vascular complications Impact of Genetics in Old people (ROVIGO) study. RH was defined as the failure to maintain blood pressure values below 140 mmHg (systolic) and 90 mmHg (diastolic) despite therapeutic interventions that include appropriate lifestyle measures plus adherence to treatment with full doses of at least three antihypertensive drugs, including a diuretic. RH was confirmed using 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurement. Hyperuricemic was defined as the subjects having SUA ≥6.8 mg/dl or taking uricosuric drugs. Gender-specific odds ratio (OR) for RH was calculated by logistic regression analysis. Results The prevalence of RH was 5.7% in the cohort and was higher in women (8.3%) than in men (3.0%, p < 0.05). Independent of chronic kidney disease (OR 3.89, 95% confidence interval 1.49–10.1), hyperuricemia predicted resistant hypertension in women (odds ratio 3.11, 95% confidence intervals 1.06–9.1, p = 0.03) but not in men. Conclusions In elderly women from the general population, an SUA value of ≥6.8 mg/dl triples the risk of RH. SUA assessment should be recommended to better define the pattern of risk associated with RH. PMID:28027534

  14. Physical Function Decline and the Risk of Elder Self-neglect in a Community-Dwelling Population

    PubMed Central

    Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa; Fulmer, Terry; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Rajan, Bharat; Evans, Denis A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This longitudinal study examines the association between physical function decline and the risk of elder self-neglect in a community-dwelling population. Design and Methods: Of the 5,570 participants in the Chicago Health Aging Project, 1,068 were reported to social services agency for suspected elder self-neglect from 1993 to 2005. The primary predictor was objectively assessed physical function using decline in physical performance testing. Secondary predictors were assessed using the decline in self-reported Katz, Nagi, and Rosow–Breslau scales. Outcome of interest was elder self-neglect. Logistic and linear regression models were used to assess these associations. Results: After adjusting for confounding factors, every 1-point decline in physical performance testing was associated with increased risk of reported elder self-neglect (odds ratio [OR], 1.05, confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.07, p < .001). Decline in Katz (OR, 1.05, CI, 1.00–1.10, p < .05) and decline in Rosow–Breslau (OR, 1.19, CI, 1.11–1.27, p < .001) were associated with increased risk of reported elder self-neglect. Decline in physical performance testing (standardized parameter estimate [PE]: 0.19, SE: 0.06, p = .002), Katz (PE: 0.65, SE: 0.14, p < .001), Nagi (PE: 0.48, SE: 0.14, p < .001), and Rosow–Breslau (PE: 0.57, SE: 0.21, p = .006) scales were associated with increased risk of greater self-neglect severity. Implications: Decline in physical function was associated with increased risk of reported elder self-neglect and greater self-neglect severity in this community-dwelling population. PMID:20019180

  15. Treating hypertension in the very elderly-benefits, risks, and future directions, a focus on the hypertension in the very elderly trial.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ruth; Beckett, Nigel; McCormack, Terry; Fagard, Robert; Fletcher, Astrid; Bulpitt, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    Although the number of individuals reaching 80 who are considered to be healthy is increasing, the very elderly are likely to have long-term conditions, to report symptoms and/or be taking at least one regular medication. The impact of antihypertensive treatment has to be taken into account in this context. The treatment regimen in Hypertension in the Very Elderly Trial with a goal blood pressure of <150/80 mmHg has been shown to provide benefits in terms of a reduction in risk of total mortality, stroke, and cardiovascular events with potential benefits and no evidence of increased risk for fracture, dementia, depression, and quality-of-life outcomes. Questions remain as to the level of benefit that would be accrued in the frailer elderly and those at extreme age, for example, over 90. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2013. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Elderly Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview (continued) • One of the leading causes of suicide among the elderly is depression; often undiagnosed and/or untreated. Risk Factors The act of completing suicide is rarely preceded by only one cause or ...

  17. Asymmetry in Auditory and Spatial Attention Span in Normal Elderly Genetically At Risk for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    JACOBSON, MARK W.; DELIS, DEAN C.; BONDI, MARK W.; SALMON, DAVID P.

    2010-01-01

    Some studies of elderly individuals with the ApoE-e4 genotype noted subtle deficits on tests of attention such as the WAIS-R Digit Span subtest, but these findings have not been consistently reported. One possible explanation for the inconsistent results could be the presence of subgroups of e4+ individuals with asymmetric cognitive profiles (i.e., significant discrepancies between verbal and visuospatial skills). Comparing genotype groups with individual, modality-specific tests might obscure subtle differences between verbal and visuospatial attention in these asymmetric subgroups. In this study, we administered the WAIS-R Digit Span and WMS-R Visual Memory Span subtests to 21 nondemented elderly e4+ individuals and 21 elderly e4- individuals matched on age, education, and overall cognitive ability. We hypothesized that a) the e4+ group would show a higher incidence of asymmetric cognitive profiles when comparing Digit Span/Visual Memory Span performance relative to the e4- group; and (b) an analysis of individual test performance would fail to reveal differences between the two subject groups. Although the groups’ performances were comparable on the individual attention span tests, the e4+ group showed a significantly larger discrepancy between digit span and spatial span scores compared to the e4- group. These findings suggest that contrast measures of modality-specific attentional skills may be more sensitive to subtle group differences in at-risk groups, even when the groups do not differ on individual comparisons of standardized test means. The increased discrepancy between verbal and visuospatial attention may reflect the presence of “subgroups” within the ApoE-e4 group that are qualitatively similar to asymmetric subgroups commonly associated with the earliest stages of AD. PMID:15903153

  18. Pneumonia Hospitalization Risk in the Elderly Attributable to Cold and Hot Temperatures in Hong Kong, China.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hong; Sun, Shengzhi; Tang, Robert; Chan, King-Pan; Tian, Linwei

    2016-10-15

    The growth of pathogens potentially relevant to respiratory tract infection may be triggered by changes in ambient temperature. Few studies have examined the association between ambient temperature and pneumonia incidence, and no studies have focused on the susceptible elderly population. We aimed to examine the short-term association between ambient temperature and geriatric pneumonia and to assess the disease burden attributable to cold and hot temperatures in Hong Kong, China. Daily time-series data on emergency hospital admissions for geriatric pneumonia, mean temperature, relative humidity, and air pollution concentrations between January 2005 and December 2012 were collected. Distributed-lag nonlinear modeling integrated in quasi-Poisson regression was used to examine the exposure-lag-response relationship between temperature and pneumonia hospitalization. Measures of the risk attributable to nonoptimal temperature were calculated to summarize the disease burden. Subgroup analyses were conducted to examine the sex difference. We observed significant nonlinear and delayed associations of both cold and hot temperatures with pneumonia in the elderly, with cold temperatures having stronger effect estimates. Among the 10.7% of temperature-related pneumonia hospitalizations, 8.7% and 2.0% were attributed to cold and hot temperatures, respectively. Most of the temperature-related burden for pneumonia hospitalizations in Hong Kong was attributable to cold temperatures, and elderly men had greater susceptibility. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The ROVIGO study (risk of vascular complications: impact of genetics in old people): protocol, study design, and preliminary results of the initial survey : cardiovascular epidemiology in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Alberto; Zamboni, Sergio; Ramazzina, Emilio; Schiavon, Laura; Rempelou, Panagiota; Zorzan, Sara; Bascelli, Anna; Segato, Rosa; Redi, Rossana; Pagnin, Elisa; Camerotto, Alessandro; Zuin, Marco; Rizzato, Enzo; Marcolongo, Adriano; Orsini, Arturo; Rubello, Domenico; Casiglia, Edoardo

    2015-03-01

    The epidemiology of cardiovascular risk (CV) in the elderly is far from being defined, and the reasons why some subjects retain a healthy body while growing old while others are affected by different diseases or die prematurely are still unknown. To compare the CV risk pattern in two elderly cohorts living in North-East Italy. The Risk Of Vascular complications: Impact of Genetics in Old people (ROVIGO) study is a population-based study including 580 unrelated elderly subjects representative of general population living in Rovigo in the Veneto region. They were compared to a cohort of 580 age-gender-matched unrelated subjects from the CArdiovascular STudy in the Elderly (CASTEL) living in the same region in Castelfranco Veneto and Chioggia. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, and prevalence of coronary heart disease, heart failure and chronic pulmonary disease were lower in the ROVIGO than in the CASTEL cohort, while high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and the prevalence of diabetes were higher in the former than in the latter. In the ROVIGO cohort, diabetes, left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary and cerebrovascular diseases were more represented in men. In the CASTEL cohort, systolic BP was higher in women. In both cohorts, the lipid pattern was less favourable and HR higher in women, chronic pulmonary disease more represented in men. People living in Rovigo were at lower CV risk than those in Castelfranco Veneto and Chioggia, mainly due to lower BP values, better lipid pattern and lower prevalence of CV and pulmonary disease.

  20. Improvement in muscle performance after one-year cessation of low-magnitude high-frequency vibration in community elderly

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, W-H.; Li, C-Y.; Zhu, T.Y.; Leung, K-S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects on muscle performance after one-year cessation of 18-month low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) intervention in the untrained community elderly. Methods: This is a case-control study with 59 community elderly women (25 control without any treatment; 34 received 18-month LMHFV but discontinued for 1 year from our previous clinical study). Muscle strength, balancing ability, occurrence of fall/fracture, quality of life (QoL) were assessed 1-year after cessation of intervention. The 30-month results were compared with baseline and 18-month treatment endpoint data between groups. Results: At 30 months (i.e. one year post-intervention), the muscle strengths of dominant and non-dominant legs relative to baseline in treatment group were significantly better than those of control. In balancing ability test, reaction time, movement velocity and maximum excursion of treatment group (relative to baseline) remained significantly better than the control group. The muscle strength, balancing ability and quality of life at 30 months relative to 18 months did not show significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion: The benefits of LMHFV for balancing ability, muscle strength and risk of falling in elderly were retained 1 year after cessation of LMHFV. PMID:26944817

  1. Improvement in muscle performance after one-year cessation of low-magnitude high-frequency vibration in community elderly.

    PubMed

    Cheung, W-H; Li, C-Y; Zhu, T Y; Leung, K-S

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effects on muscle performance after one-year cessation of 18-month low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) intervention in the untrained community elderly. This is a case-control study with 59 community elderly women (25 control without any treatment; 34 received 18-month LMHFV but discontinued for 1 year from our previous clinical study). Muscle strength, balancing ability, occurrence of fall/fracture, quality of life (QoL) were assessed 1-year after cessation of intervention. The 30-month results were compared with baseline and 18-month treatment endpoint data between groups. At 30 months (i.e. one year post-intervention), the muscle strengths of dominant and non-dominant legs relative to baseline in treatment group were significantly better than those of control. In balancing ability test, reaction time, movement velocity and maximum excursion of treatment group (relative to baseline) remained significantly better than the control group. The muscle strength, balancing ability and quality of life at 30 months relative to 18 months did not show significant differences between the two groups. The benefits of LMHFV for balancing ability, muscle strength and risk of falling in elderly were retained 1 year after cessation of LMHFV.

  2. Serum cystatin C and the risk of Alzheimer disease in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Sundelöf, J; Arnlöv, J; Ingelsson, E; Sundström, J; Basu, S; Zethelius, B; Larsson, A; Irizarry, M C; Giedraitis, V; Rönnemaa, E; Degerman-Gunnarsson, M; Hyman, B T; Basun, H; Kilander, L; Lannfelt, L

    2008-09-30

    Multiple lines of research suggest that increased cystatin C activity in the brain protects against the development of Alzheimer disease (AD). Serum cystatin C levels were analyzed at two examinations of the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, a longitudinal, community-based study of elderly men (age 70 years, n = 1,153 and age 77 years, n = 761, a subset of the age 70 examination). Cox regressions were used to examine associations between serum cystatin C and incident AD. AD cases were identified by cognitive screening and comprehensive medical chart review in all subjects. On follow-up (median 11.3 years), 82 subjects developed AD. At age 70 years, lower cystatin C was associated with higher risk of AD independently of age, APOE4 genotype, glomerular filtration rate, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, cholesterol, body mass index, smoking, education level, and plasma amyloid-beta protein 40 and 42 levels (hazard ratio [HR] for lowest [<1.12 micromol/L] vs highest [>1.30 micromol/L] tertile = 2.67, 95% CI 1.22-5.83, p < 0.02). The results were similar at age 77 years (43 participants developed AD during follow-up). Furthermore, a 0.1-mumol/L decrease of cystatin C between ages 70 and 77 years was associated with a 29% higher risk of incident AD (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.03-1.63, p < 0.03). Low levels of serum cystatin C precede clinically manifest Alzheimer disease (AD) in elderly men free of dementia at baseline and may be a marker of future risk of AD. These findings strengthen the evidence for a role for cystatin C in the development of clinical AD.

  3. Compensatory larger cortical thickness in healthy elderly individuals with electroencephalographic risk for cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Castro-Chavira, Susana A; Barrios, Fernando A; Pasaye, Erick H; Alatorre-Cruz, Graciela C; Fernández, Thalía

    2016-06-15

    Excess theta electroencephalographic (EEG) activity has been described as an accurate predictor for cognitive decline at least 7 years before symptom presentation. To test whether this predictor for cognitive decline correlates with structural changes in the brains of healthy elderly individuals, we compared the magnetic resonance structural images of healthy individuals with excess of theta activity [group with a risk for cognitive decline, risk group (RG); n=14] with healthy controls with normal EEG activity (control group; n=14). Neuropsychological and epidemiological analyses showed significant differences in only two features: more years of education and better performance in the visuospatial process task in the control group. Voxel-based morphometry results were not conclusive, but showed tendencies toward larger volumes in the prefrontal and parietal lobes, and smaller volumes in the right temporal lobe, right occipital lobe, and left cerebellum for the RG; these tendencies are in agreement with those proposed by the posterior-anterior shift in an aging model. Cortical-thickness analyses yielded a significant correlation between cortical thickness and years of education in the prefrontal and inferior-temporal regions, and larger cortical thickness in the RG, independent of age and years of education, in the right superior temporal region. These results suggest changes in the cortical thickness of structures related to memory and visuospatial functions in healthy, cognitively normal individuals before the appearance of cognitive decline. Thus, the performance of healthy elderly individuals with EEG risk may only be slightly different from normal because of compensation mechanisms allowing them to fulfill daily-life tasks, masking structural changes during preclinical neurocognitive disorders.

  4. [Falls in the Spanish elderly population: Incidence, consequences and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Molinero, Alejandro; Narvaiza, Leire; Gálvez-Barrón, César; de la Cruz, Juan José; Ruíz, Jorge; Gonzalo, Natalia; Valldosera, Esther; Yuste, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Falls in the elderly constitute a public health concern. The objective of the present study was to collect updated data on the frequency of falls in the Spanish elderly population, as well as to analyse their consequences and associated risk factors. This prospective study was conducted on a probabilistic sample of 772 Spanish, community dwelling, older adults. During the baseline visit, data were collected on functional capacity, history of falls, disease background, number of medications used, balance impairment, use of walking aids, cognitive capacity and depression symptoms. Participants were followed up for one year by means of quarterly phone calls, where they were asked about the number of falls occurred in that period, as well as their consequences and associated use of healthcare resources. During the one-year follow up period, 28.4% (95%CI 24.9-32.1) of participants suffered one or more falls, while 9.9% (95%CI 7.4-11.4) suffered multiple falls. One-third of the falls were due to accidental extrinsic causes. Among participants who had suffered falls, 9.3% suffered a fracture (3.1% hip fracture), and 55.4% required healthcare services (29% were managed in the hospital emergency room, and 7.3% were admitted to hospital). Risk factors identified through multivariate analysis were: advanced age (>79 years), not having a companion, using more than 2 drugs, dependency in BADLs, impaired strength or balance, and use of walking aids. Falls continue to be a major public health concern in Spain. Given that some of the associated risk factors may be modified, introducing programs aimed at tackling this problem should be regarded as a priority. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Reducing Fall Risk with Combined Motor and Cognitive Training in Elderly Fallers

    PubMed Central

    Barban, Francesco; Annicchiarico, Roberta; Melideo, Matteo; Federici, Alessia; Lombardi, Maria Giovanna; Giuli, Simone; Ricci, Claudia; Adriano, Fulvia; Griffini, Ivo; Silvestri, Manuel; Chiusso, Massimo; Neglia, Sergio; Ariño-Blasco, Sergio; Cuevas Perez, Raquel; Dionyssiotis, Yannis; Koumanakos, Georgios; Kovačeić, Milo; Montero-Fernández, Nuria; Pino, Oscar; Boye, Niels; Cortés, Ulises; Barrué, Cristian; Cortés, Atia; Levene, Peter; Pantelopoulos, Stelios; Rosso, Roberto; Serra-Rexach, José Antonio; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Background. Falling is a major clinical problem in elderly people, demanding effective solutions. At present, the only effective intervention is motor training of balance and strength. Executive function-based training (EFt) might be effective at preventing falls according to evidence showing a relationship between executive functions and gait abnormalities. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of a motor and a cognitive treatment developed within the EU co-funded project I-DONT-FALL. Methods. In a sample of 481 elderly people at risk of falls recruited in this multicenter randomised controlled trial, the effectiveness of a motor treatment (pure motor or mixed with EFt) of 24 one-hour sessions delivered through an i-Walker with a non-motor treatment (pure EFt or control condition) was evaluated. Similarly, a 24 one-hour session cognitive treatment (pure EFt or mixed with motor training), delivered through a touch-screen computer was compared with a non-cognitive treatment (pure motor or control condition). Results. Motor treatment, particularly when mixed with EFt, reduced significantly fear of falling (F(1,478) = 6.786, p = 0.009) although to a limited extent (ES −0.25) restricted to the period after intervention. Conclusions. This study suggests the effectiveness of motor treatment empowered by EFt in reducing fear of falling. PMID:28208604

  6. Risk factors of recurrent seizure, co-morbidities, and mortality in new onset seizure in elderly.

    PubMed

    Phabphal, Kanitpong; Geater, Alan; Limapichat, Kitti; Sathirapanya, Pornchai; Setthawatcharawanich, Suwanna

    2013-09-01

    To determine the risk factors of seizure recurrence and the most common comorbidities in elderly patients with epilepsy. We did a retrospective study of 278 patients older than 65 years with first seizure. We evaluated electrolytes, blood glucose, urea and creatinine levels, and performed electrocardiography (ECG), and routine electroencephalogram (EEG) on all patients. We evaluated seizure recurrence and comorbidities at 2 years. Univariate analysis found that significant (P<0.05) factors affecting seizure recurrence were etiology of seizure, EEG, and status epilepticus at first presentation. In multivariate regression analysis, etiology of seizure and EEG were significant statistical factors in seizure recurrence at 2 years follow up. Age, sex, duration of time between first seizure and diagnosis of seizure, seizure type, misdiagnosis of non-epileptic seizure, and use of antiepileptic drugs were not significant factors for predicting seizure recurrence. Depression and anxiety were the most common comorbidities in our study, followed by sleep-related disorders and stroke. There were no statistically significantly differences in comorbidities between patients who remained seizure free and patients who had recurrent seizure. Most of the new onset seizures in our elderly patients were focal onset. Acute symptomatic etiology, remote symptomatic etiology, progressive symptomatic etiology and abnormal EEG features were powerful predictors of seizure recurrence, and mood disorder, sleep disorder and stroke were the common comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Incident venous thromboembolic events in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolic events (VTE), including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are common in older age. It has been suggested that statins might reduce the risk of VTE however positive results from studies of middle aged subjects may not be generalisable to elderly people. We aimed to determine the effect of pravastatin on incident VTE in older people; we also studied the impact of clinical and plasma risk variables. Methods This study was an analysis of incident VTE using data from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER), a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pravastatin in men and women aged 70-82. Mean follow-up was 3.2 years. Risk for VTE was examined in non-warfarin treated pravastatin (n = 2834) and placebo (n = 2865) patients using a Cox's proportional hazard model, and the impact of other risk factors assessed in a multivariate forward stepwise regression analysis. Baseline clinical characteristics, blood biochemistry and hematology variables, plasma levels of lipids and lipoproteins, and plasma markers of inflammation and adiposity were compared. Plasma markers of thrombosis and hemostasis were assessed in a nested case (n = 48) control (n = 93) study where the cohort was those participants, not on warfarin, for whom data were available. Results There were 28 definite cases (1.0%) of incident VTE in the pravastatin group recipients and 20 cases (0.70%) in placebo recipients. Pravastatin did not reduce VTE in PROSPER compared to placebo [unadjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.42 (0.80, 2.52) p = 0.23]. Higher body mass index (BMI) [1.09 (1.02, 1.15) p = 0.0075], country [Scotland vs Netherlands 4.26 (1.00, 18.21) p = 0.050 and Ireland vs Netherlands 6.16 (1.46, 26.00) p = 0.013], lower systolic blood pressure [1.35 (1.03, 1.75) p = 0.027] and lower baseline Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score [1.19 (1.01, 1.41) p = 0.034] were associated with an increased risk of

  8. Multiprofessional Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Very Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jardim, Luciana Muniz Sanches Siqueira Veiga; Jardim, Thiago Veiga; de Souza, Weimar Kunz Sebba Barroso; Pimenta, Camila Dutra; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga

    2017-01-01

    Background As the world population ages, patients older than 80 years, known as very elderly, are more frequently found. There are no studies in this age group aimed at analyzing the multidisciplinary intervention in the treatment of systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) and some comorbidities. Objectives To assess the effect of a multidisciplinary approach in very elderly hypertensives cared for at a specialized service. Methods Longitudinal retrospective cohort study in a multidisciplinary service specialized in the SAH treatment in the Brazilian West-Central region. Patients aged 80 years and older by June 2015 were included. Data from the first (V1) and last visit (Vf) were assessed. Anthropometric variables, blood pressure (BP), renal function, pharmacological treatment, lifestyle, comorbidities and cardiovascular events were studied, comparing data from V1 and Vf. Controlled BP was defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) lower than 140 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) lower than 90 mm Hg. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSSR software, version 21.0. Values of p<0,05 were considered significant. Results Data of 71 patients were assessed with a mean follow-up time of 15,22 years. Their mean age at V1 was 69.2 years, and, at Vf, 84.53 years, and 26.8% of them were males. There was a significant reduction in mean SBP (157.3 x 142.1 mm Hg; p<0.001) and DBP (95.1 x 77.8 mm Hg; p<0.001), with an increase in BP control rates from V1 to Vf (36.6 x 83.1%; p<0.001). The number of antihypertensive drugs used increased (1.49 x 2.85; p<0.001), with an increase in the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (22.5 x 46.5%; p=0.004), angiotensin II receptor blockers (4.2 x 35.2%; p<0.001) and calcium-channel blockers (18.3 x 67.6%; p<0.001). There was a reduction in total cholesterol (217.9 x 191 mg/dL; p<0.001) and LDL-cholesterol (139.6 x 119.0 mg/dL; p<0.001), but worsening of the glomerular filtration rate (62.5 x 45.4 mL/min; p<0.001). Conclusion

  9. Relocation, Residence & Risk: A Study of Housing Risks and the Causes of Homelessness among the Urban Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keigher, Sharon M.; And Others

    Homelessness is growing among the elderly as it is among every other age cohort in America, but the elderly appear to be underrepresented. This underrepresentation is puzzling, since the elderly appear to have unique vulnerabilities to homelessness. This study explored the connection between the growing shortage of low rent housing, the unique…

  10. Investigation on treatment strategy, prognostic factors, and risk factors for early death in elderly Taiwanese patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Shih-Feng; Liu, Yi-Chang; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Huang, Chiung-Tang; Tsai, Yu-Fen; Wang, Hui-Ching; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Liu, Ta-Chih

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the treatment strategy, prognostic factors, and risk factors of early death in elderly patients (age ≥ 65 years) with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the rituximab era. Data from elderly patients diagnosed with DLBCL between 2008 and 2014 were collected for analysis. Patients who were younger and had a better performance status were more likely to receive intensive frontline treatment. The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were 15 and 21 months, respectively. Anthracycline-containing chemotherapy achieved a higher remission rate and showed a trend towards better overall survival but a higher risk of severe neutropenia. Multivariate analysis revealed that very old age (≥81 years), a high-risk age-adjusted international prognostic index (aaIPI) score, and bone marrow involvement were associated with poorer PFS and overall survival. Progression of lymphoma was the major cause of death in the study population. In addition, approximately 25% of patients died within 120 days of being diagnosed. The risk factors for early mortality included very old age, a high-risk aaIPI score, and bone marrow involvement. The appearance of symptoms or signs of tumour lysis syndrome at diagnosis was associated with a trend towards early death. PMID:28290477

  11. Assessing the cumulative effects of exposure to selected benzodiazepines on the risk of fall-related injuries in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Čapek, Radan; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2012-04-01

    The use of benzodiazepines is associated with increased risk of fall-related injuries in the elderly. However, it is unclear if the risks vary across the products and how they depend on the pattern of use and dosage. Specifically, the possibility of cumulative effects of past benzodiazepine use has not been thoroughly investigated. We used the administrative database for a cohort of 23,765 new users of benzodiazepines, aged 65 years and older, in Quebec, Canada, between 1990 and 1994. The associations between the use of seven benzodiazepines and the risk of fall-related injuries were assessed using several statistical models, including a novel weighted cumulative exposure model. That model assigns to each dose taken in the past a weight that represents the importance of that dose in explaining the current risk of fall. For flurazepam, the best-fitting model indicated a cumulative effect of doses taken in the last two weeks. Uninterrupted use of flurazepam in the past months was associated with a highly significant increase in the risk of fall-related injuries (HR = 2.83, 95% CI: 1.45-4.34). The cumulative effect of a 30-day exposure to alprazolam was 1.27 (1.13-1.42). For temazepam, the results suggested a potential withdrawal effect. Mechanisms affecting the risk of falls differ across benzodiazepines, and may include cumulative effects of use in the previous few weeks. Thus, benzodiazepine-specific analyses that account for individual patterns of use should be preferred over simpler analyses that group different benzodiazepines together and limit exposure to current use or current dose.

  12. The Nicoya region of Costa Rica: a high longevity island for elderly males

    PubMed Central

    Dow, William H.; Rehkopf, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Reliable data show that the Nicoyan region of Costa Rica is a hot spot of high longevity. A survival follow-up of 16,300 elderly Costa Ricans estimated a Nicoya death rate ratio (DRR) for males 1990–2011 of 0.80 (0.69–0.93 CI). For a 60-year-old Nicoyan male, the probability of becoming centenarian is seven times that of a Japanese male, and his life expectancy is 2.2 years greater. This Nicoya advantage does not occur in females, is independent of socio-economic conditions, disappears in out-migrants and comes from lower cardiovascular (CV) mortality (DRR = 0.65). Nicoyans have lower levels of biomarkers of CV risk; they are also leaner, taller and suffer fewer disabilities. Two markers of ageing and stress—telomere length and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate—are also more favourable. The Nicoya diet is prosaic and abundant in traditional foods like rice, beans and animal protein, with low glycemic index and high fibre content. PMID:25426140

  13. Excess risk of renal allograft loss and early mortality among elderly recipients is associated with poor exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Yango, A F; Gohh, R Y; Monaco, A P; Reinert, S E; Gautam, A; Dworkin, L D; Morrissey, P E

    2006-06-01

    Successful renal transplantation in the elderly offers substantial benefits in quality and life expectancy. However, in this group of patients there is an early increased risk of death compared with those remaining on dialysis. Graft and patient outcomes in 64 older transplant recipients were compared with 338 patients aged 18 - 59 years. We identified potential risk factors that may predict clinical outcomes in older transplant recipients. A log-rank test and Cox regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of various patient characteristics on graft and patient survival. Among older patients, graft survival was 76.6% and 67% at 1 and 3 years, respectively. When graft survival was censored for death with functioning graft, the 1- and 3-year graft survival was 83% and 82%, respectively. Patient survival was 78% and 71% at 1 and 3 years, respectively. These survival rates were significantly lower than those of younger recipients. Pretransplant inactivity, delayed graft function, smoking history and longer waiting time predicted poor graft and patient survival. A history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and peripheral vascular disease also predicted a higher mortality among older recipients. Older kidney transplant recipients are at high risk for allograft failure and early death. Poor functional capacity predicts a poor outcome for older patients undergoing renal transplantation. Therefore, careful patient selection is paramount, and every effort should be made to initiate timely interventions aimed at increasing physical activity in those with low fitness level.

  14. Determining prevalence and correlates of elder abuse using promotores: low-income immigrant Latinos report high rates of abuse and neglect.

    PubMed

    DeLiema, Marguerite; Gassoumis, Zachary D; Homeier, Diana C; Wilber, Kathleen H

    2012-07-01

    Low-income Latino immigrants are understudied in elder abuse research. Limited English proficiency, economic insecurity, neighborhood seclusion, a tradition of resolving conflicts within the family, and mistrust of authorities may impede survey research and suppress abuse reporting. To overcome these barriers, promotores, local Spanish-speaking Latinos, were recruited and trained to interview a sample of Latino adults aged 66 and older residing in low-income communities. The promotores conducted door-to-door interviews in randomly selected census tracts in Los Angeles to assess the frequency of psychological, physical, and sexual abuse; financial exploitation; and caregiver neglect. Overall, 40.4% of elderly Latino adults had experienced some form of abuse or neglect within the previous year. Nearly 25% reported psychological abuse, 10.7% physical assault, 9% sexual abuse, and 16.7% financial exploitation, and 11.7% were neglected by their caregivers. Younger age, higher education, and experiencing sexual or physical abuse before age 65 were significant risk factors for psychological, physical, and sexual abuse. Years lived in the United States, younger age, and prior abuse were associated with greater risk of financial exploitation. Years spent living in the United States was a significant risk factor for caregiver neglect. Abuse prevalence was much higher in all mistreatment domains than findings from previous research on community-dwelling elderly adults, suggesting that low-income Latino immigrants are highly vulnerable to elder mistreatment or that respondents are more willing to disclose abuse to promotores who represent their culture and community.

  15. Risk of malnutrition is associated with mental health symptoms in community living elderly men and women: The Tromsø Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Little research has been done on the relationship between malnutrition and mental health in community living elderly individuals. In the present study, we aimed to assess the associations between mental health (particularly anxiety and depression) and both the risk of malnutrition and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) in a large sample of elderly men and women from Tromsø, Norway. Methods In a cross-sectional survey, with 1558 men and 1553 women aged 65 to 87 years, the risk of malnutrition was assessed by the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool ('MUST'), and mental health was measured by the Symptoms Check List 10 (SCL-10). BMI was categorised into six groups (< 20.0, 20.0-22.4, 22.5-24.9, 25.0-27.4, 27.5-29.9, ≥ 30.0 kg/m2). Results The risk of malnutrition (combining medium and high risk) was found in 5.6% of the men and 8.6% of the women. Significant mental health symptoms were reported by 3.9% of the men and 9.1% of the women. In a model adjusted for age, marital status, smoking and education, significant mental health symptoms (SCL-10 score ≥ 1.85) were positively associated with the risk of malnutrition (odds ratio 3.9 [95% CI 1.7-8.6] in men and 2.5 [95%CI 1.3-4.9] in women), the association was positive also for subthreshold mental health symptoms. For individuals with BMI < 20.0 the adjusted odds ratio for significant mental health symptoms was 2.0 [95% CI 1.0-4.0]. Conclusions Impaired mental health was strongly associated with the risk of malnutrition in community living elderly men and women and this association was also significant for subthreshold mental health symptoms. PMID:21762535

  16. Using the timed up and go test to stratify elderly inpatients at risk of falls.

    PubMed

    Large, Julienne; Gan, Neesha; Basic, David; Jennings, Natalie

    2006-05-01

    To determine whether the Timed Up and Go Test is useful at stratifying acutely unwell elderly inpatients according to their risk for subsequent falls. Prospective cohort study. Multidisciplinary acute care unit for the elderly at Liverpool Hospital, in Sydney, Australia. A total of 2388 consecutive admissions to the unit of mean age 82 years. The Timed Up and Go, administered on admission to the unit, and two modifications (an ordinal scale and a dichotomous scale, both incorporating patients unable to complete the Timed Up and Go) were evaluated. Number of falls, and reasons for the inability to complete the Timed Up and Go. During a median length of stay of nine days, 180 patients had at least one fall. The Timed Up and Go was unable to identify those patients who subsequently fell (P = 0.78). When the Timed Up and Go was modified to include the majority of patients unable to complete the test, both the ordinal (range of values 1-8, odds ratio (OR) 1.12, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03-1.21, P = 0.01) and dichotomous (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.09-2.32, P = 0.02) modifications significantly predicted falls in multivariate analyses. Patients unable to do the Timed Up and Go due to non-physical disability had the highest fall rate (11%), followed by those with physical disability (9%), while those able to do the Timed Up and Go had the lowest fall rate (6%) (P< 0.001). Acutely unwell, immobile patients with dementia and delirium were not at excessive risk of falls. In the acute care setting, the value of the Timed Up and Go lies in the inability to complete the test, and the reasons for this inability, rather than the time recorded.

  17. Fall risks assessment among community dwelling elderly using wearable wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Soangra, Rahul; Frames, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Postural stability characteristics are considered to be important in maintaining functional independence free of falls and healthy life style especially for the growing elderly population. This study focuses on developing tools of clinical value in fall prevention: 1) Implementation of sensors that are minimally obtrusive and reliably record movement data. 2) Unobtrusively gather data from wearable sensors from four community centers 3) developed and implemented linear and non-linear signal analysis algorithms to extract clinically relevant information using wearable technology. In all a total of 100 community dwelling elderly individuals (66 non-fallers and 34 fallers) participated in the experiment. All participants were asked to stand-still in eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) condition on forceplate with one wireless inertial sensor affixed at sternum level. Participants' history of falls had been recorded for last 2 years, with emphasis on frequency and characteristics of falls. Any participant with at least one fall in the prior year were classified as faller and the others as non-faller. The results indicated several key factors/features of postural characteristics relevant to balance control and stability during quite stance and, showed good predictive capability of fall risks among older adults. Wearable technology allowed us to gather data where it matters the most to answer fall related questions, i.e. the community setting environments. This study opens new prospects of clinical testing using postural variables with a wearable sensor that may be relevant for assessing fall risks at home and patient environment in near future.

  18. Risk factors for dementia with type 2 diabetes mellitus among elderly people in China.

    PubMed

    Fei, Ma; Yan Ping, Zhang; Ru Juan, Miao; Ning Ning, Lin; Lin, Gao

    2013-05-01

    to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of diabetes to dementia and its subtypes such as Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) among the Chinese elderly population. among 8,213 Chinese people aged 65 years and older, 1,109 subjects with type 2 diabetes millitus (T2DM) were ascertained by interview and direct glucose testing. All diabetic subjects were initially screened with the "DSM-IV criteria" for dementia and its subtypes. We compared the prevalence of dementia in diabetic patients with that in ordinary subjects, and analyzed the association of the status of diabetes with dementia including AD and VD. Logistic regression was used to assess OR of dementia and its subtypes with T2DM. after a comprehensive geriatric and cognitive assessment, 132 diabetic subjects were diagnosed with all-cause dementia. The prevalence rate for dementia with T2DM was 1.61%. Of demented subjects, 37 subjects had AD, 30 subjects had VD. The prevalence rates for AD with T2DM and VD with T2DM were 4.51% and 3.65%, respectively. In the univariate analyses, among all diabetic subjects, compared with cognitive intactly subjects, the demented subjects, including AD and VD subjects, were older, more female had higher percentage of current smoking, had a greater duration of diabetes, took more frequent use of diabetes medications, and stronger effect of APOE ε4 status. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, variables including age, APOE ε4 allele, duration from onset of diabetes, using oral hypoglycemic agents, HMG-CoA reductase (statins) were significantly associated with increased risk for dementia with T2DM (all P < 0.05). the present study shows that T2DM is associated with dementia and its subtypes amongst elderly people in the Chinese population.

  19. The Motives of Intergenerational Transfer to the Elderly Parents in China: Consequences of High Medical Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Li, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    The support for the elderly is facing big challenges with the problem of population aging. Transfers from adult children could partly insure elderly parents against low income and high medical expenditure. There are two main motives for transfers in the literature, namely altruism and exchange. Using data from a new household survey of people aged 45 and above in China, we estimate the transfer derivatives with the adjustment of medical expenditure in elderly parents’ income. We find a large negative impact of adjusted income on transfers at the lower end of income distribution, which is consistent with the altruistic motive. Evidence on the exchange motive is found only for sons, but not for daughters. In addition, there is evidence on the “exchange-for-service” motive, which interprets transfer as a payment to parents’ family services, such as taking care of grandchildren. PMID:23681718

  20. Trends from 1995 to 2006 in the prevalence of self-reported cardiovascular risk factors among elderly Spanish diabetics.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Trujillo, Isabel; Jiménez García, Rodrigo; Vazquez-Fernandez del Pozo, Silvia; Hernández Barrera, Valentin; Carrasco Garrido, Pilar; Suarez, Pilar; Gil de Miguel, Angel

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we examined the trends from 1995 to 2006 in cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in Spaniards aged 65 years or older with diabetes. We looked at the individual data from adults aged > or =65 years from the Spanish National Health Surveys of 1995 (n=1117), 1997 (n=1111), 2001 (n=4328), 2003 (n=6134) and 2006 (n=7835). Those classified as having diabetes had answered the two following questions in the affirmative: Has your doctor told you that you currently have diabetes? Have you taken any medication to treat diabetes in the last two weeks? The CVRF of interest included high blood pressure (HBP), high cholesterol levels, obesity (BMI > or =30 kg/m(2)), smoking and sedentarity, which were estimated and compared for prevalence by survey year, age group and gender. Progression over time was analyzed using logistic-regression models. During the study period, the prevalences of all of the CVRF of interest were significantly higher among the elderly with diabetes compared with those without diabetes, except for current smoking, which was less frequent. The percentages of diabetic patients with HBP and obesity increased from 49.6 and 17.1%, respectively, in 1995 to 64 and 30.6%, respectively, in 2006 (adjusted ORs: 1.95 for HBP; 2.22 for obesity). Overall, the self-reported prevalence of CVRF among elderly patients with diabetes did not improve during 1995-2006 but, instead, showed significant increases in self-reported obesity and HBP. This lack of improvement calls for further investigations, and the dedicated attention of both healthcare providers and the diabetic patients themselves. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Lifetime principal occupation and risk of cognitive impairment among the elderly.

    PubMed

    Li, Chung-Yi; Wu, Shwu Chong; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2002-01-01

    We used a nested case-control design with study participants sampled from two cohorts, for a total of 2,198 elderly people 65 years or older and completed cognitive tests between 1993 and 1997, to assess the association between an individual's lifetime principal occupation and the subsequent risk of cognitive impairment. Cases consisted of 290 older adults with impaired cognitive functioning. For each case, two controls with comparable age (within 5 years) and sex frequencies were randomly sampled from the seniors free of cognitive impairment. Occupational data were collected through interviews. Individual's job content was coded into one of the occupational categories or the occupation-based social classes. Compared to those who were former legislators, government administrators, or business executives and managers, a significantly elevated risk of cognitive impairment was estimated for those who were employed as agriculture/animal husbandry/forestry/fishing workers (odds ratio (OR)=3.2), craft and related trades workers (OR=2.2), plant and machine operators and assemblers (OR=14.7), workers of elementary occupations (OR=3.2), or housekeepers (OR=2.6). We also observed health inequalities in the risk of cognitive impairment across social classes with a significant dose-response trend in which unskilled blue-collar workers had the highest risk. After adjustment for education, we still observed an inverse relationship between risk of cognitive impairment and occupational class. This may mean that lifetime longest-held occupation is more intimately involved in the causal pathways leading to cognitive impairment. Further studies that collect information on specific work hazards would help make specific interpretations of the observed effect of lifetime longest-held occupation in early adulthood on risk of cognitive decline in late life.

  2. Low morale is associated with increased risk of mortality in the elderly: a population-based prospective study (NEDICES)

    PubMed Central

    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D.; Rivera-Navarro, Jesús; Medrano, María José; Vega, Saturio; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2010-01-01

    Objective: the study aimed to assess the association between morale and mortality. Design: we used data from the Neurological Disorders in Central Spain (NEDICES), a population-based study. Subjects: 2,516 older persons (mean age 75.7 years) participated in the study. Methods: Cox models were used to estimate risk of mortality. Morale was assessed using the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale. Results: 489 (21.8%) participants died over a median follow-up of 5.9 years (range 0.1–7.7 years), including 253 (21.8%) deaths among 1,163 participants with low morale scores, 168 (19.3%) among 870 participants with moderate scores and 68 (14.1%) among participants with high scores. In an unadjusted Cox model, relative risk (RR) of mortality in participants with low morale scores = 1.69 (P < 0.001) and RR in participants with moderate scores = 1.47 (P < 0.01) were compared to the reference group (participants with high scores). In a Cox model that adjusted for a variety of demographic factors and co-morbidities, RR of mortality in participants with low morale scores = 1.35 (P <0.05) and moderate scores = 1.16 (not significant) were compared to the reference group. Conclusion: low morale may be an independent predictor of mortality in the elderly. By assessing morale, practitioners might be better positioned to identify patients with poorer prognoses. PMID:20299322

  3. [Mobility and the risk of falls among elderly people of the community of São Carlos].

    PubMed

    Aveiro, Mariana Chaves; Driusso, Patricia; Barham, Elizabeth Joan; Pavarini, Sofia Cristina Iost; Oishi, Jorge

    2012-09-01

    The scope of this study was to assess the mobility and risk of falls among elderly people living within the Family Health Strategy area in São Carlos and identify some factors that have been associated with risks of falls. This is a cross-sectional study that presents data from 739 elderly people (mean age of 69.9 ± 7.2 years old) registered in the Health and Aging Research Group. Data related to sex, age, falls in the last year, mobility using the Timed "Up & Go" (TUG) test and cognitive impairment by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), were analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square test and Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U non-parametric tests. The level of significance used for all comparisons was 5% (p < 0.05). Fallers present worse performance to TUG than non-fallers (p < 0.001). A higher prevalence of fallers was found among women (p < 0.001). No significant association was found between elderly fallers and cognitive impairment by MMSE (p = 0.11). Performance in TUG revealed a significant difference between the different age groups (p < 0.001). Elderly people from São Carlos had lower mobility and higher risk of falls in comparison with healthy people without chronic disorders and independent for daily living activities.

  4. Development and evaluation of evidence based risk assessment tool (STRATIFY) to predict which elderly inpatients will fall: case-control and cohort studies.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, D.; Britton, M.; Seed, P.; Martin, F. C.; Hopper, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify clinical characteristics of elderly inpatients that predict their chance of falling (phase 1) and to use these characteristics to derive a risk assessment tool and to evaluate its power in predicting falls (phases 2 and 3). DESIGN: Phase 1: a prospective case-control study. Phases 2 and 3: prospective evaluations of the derived risk assessment tool in predicting falls in two cohorts. SETTING: Elderly care units of St Thomas's Hospital (phase 1 and 2) and Kent and Canterbury Hospital (phase 3). SUBJECTS: Elderly hospital inpatients (aged > or = 65 years): 116 cases and 116 controls in phase 1,217 patients in phase 2, and 331 in phase 3. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 21 separate clinical characteristics were assessed in phase 1, including the abbreviated mental test score, modified Barthel index, a transfer and mobility score obtained by combining the transfer and mobility sections of the Barthel index, and several nursing judgements. RESULTS: In phase 1 five factors were independently associated with a higher risk of falls: fall as a presenting complaint (odds ratio 4.64 (95% confidence interval 2.59 to 8.33); a transfer and mobility score of 3 or 4 (2.10 (1.22 to 3.61)); and primary nurses' judgment that a patient was agitated (20.9 (9.62 to 45.62)), needed frequent toileting (2.48 (1.08 to 5.70)), and was visually impaired (3.56 (1.26 to 10.05)). A risk assessment score (range 0-5) was derived by scoring one point for each of these five factors. In phases 2 and 3 a risk assessment score > 2 was used to define high risk: the sensitivity and specificity of the score to predict falls during the following week was 93% and 88% respectively in phase 2 and 92% and 68% respectively in phase 3. CONCLUSION: This simple risk assessment tool predicted with clinically useful sensitivity and specificity a high percentage of falls among elderly hospital inpatients. PMID:9366729

  5. Physical activity and fracture risk in a free-living elderly cohort.

    PubMed

    Sorock, G S; Bush, T L; Golden, A L; Fried, L P; Breuer, B; Hale, W E

    1988-09-01

    A prospective study to determine if regular leisure-time physical activity (including recreational walking) is associated with fracture risk was conducted in a large cohort (N = 3110) of free-living elderly men and women in the retirement community of Dunedin, Florida. Sixty-three percent of the cohort was female, all were white, and the average age was 73.0 years +/- 5.3 (SD). Participants in regular physical activity at baseline had a reduced risk of fracture; the risk ratio (RR) of fracture for men and women, respectively, was RR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.17 to 1.01 and RR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.50 to 1.15. Walking at least one mile 3 times/week appeared to offer a protective effect for both sexes. After controlling for potentially confounding variables including body mass and selected health conditions, the RR for regular physical activity on fracture incidence in men and women remained essentially unchanged. We conclude that regular physical activity such as walking may protect against fracture in older persons.

  6. Elderly users of fall-risk-increasing drug perceptions of fall risk and the relation to their drug use - a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Bell, Hege Therese; Steinsbekk, Aslak; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how home-dwelling elderly who use fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs) perceive their fall risk and how they relate this to their drug use. A qualitative study with 14 home-dwelling elderly FRID users between 65 and 97 years in Central Norway participating in semi-structured individual interviews. The data were analyzed thematically by using systematic text condensation. The main finding was that the informants did not necessarily perceive the use of FRIDs to be a prominent risk factor for falls. Some informants said they did not reflect upon drug use whatsoever and said they fully trusted their physician's choices. When either experiencing dizziness, fall episodes or by reading the patient information leaflet the informants said to either adjust their drug use or to contact their physician. Some felt rejected due to not getting their point across or their wish to alter the drug was not granted by the physician. Elderly FRID users did not necessarily relate their drug use to fall risk or struggled to present their perceived drug-related problems. Physicians need to regularly inform, monitor and assess the drug treatment when treating elderly with FRIDs.

  7. Low Serum Albumin Level, Male Sex, and Total Gastrectomy Are Risk Factors of Severe Postoperative Complications in Elderly Gastric Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung Chan; Kim, Hyun Il; Kim, Min Gyu

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that old age is a risk factor for postoperative complications. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the risk factors for poor postoperative surgical outcomes in elderly gastric cancer patients. Between January 2006 and December 2015, 247 elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent curative gastrectomy were reviewed. In this study, an elderly patient was defined as a patient aged ≥65 years. All possible variables were used to explore the risk factors for poor early surgical outcomes in elderly gastric cancer patients. Based on multivariate analyses of preoperative risk factors, preoperative low serum albumin level (<3.5 g/dl) and male sex showed statistical significance in predicting severe postoperative complications. Additionally, in an analysis of surgery-related risk factors, total gastrectomy was a risk factor for severe postoperative complications. Our study findings suggest that low serum albumin level, male sex, and total gastrectomy could be risk factors of severe postoperative complications in elderly gastric cancer patients. Therefore, surgeons should work carefully in cases of elderly gastric cancer patients with low preoperative serum albumin level and male sex. We believe that efforts should be made to avoid total gastrectomy in elderly gastric cancer patients.

  8. Risk of falling among elderly persons living in the community: assessment by the Timed up and go test.

    PubMed

    Bretan, Onivaldo; Silva Júnior, José Elias; Ribeiro, Odilon R; Corrente, José Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The risk of falling in elderly can be analyzed by a simple mobility test. To assess the balance of elderly subjects through the 'Timed up and go' test. Subjects were timed for the moment they got up from a chair, walked for three meters, and came back to the chair. They also answered questions on imbalance, dizziness, and falls. Approximately 69% of the subjects completed the test in up to 19 seconds. There was a significant correlation between imbalance, time spent in the test, dizziness, and falls. Most of the elderly subjects performed well in the test, thus attesting to their good level of functional mobility. However, a significant number of poor-performers is probably more prone to falling and to depending on others to perform activities of daily living.

  9. The effectiveness of preventive care at reducing curative care risk for the Taiwanese elderly under National Health Insurance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Shyan; Peng, Yu-I; Lee, Ping-Chang; Liu, Tsai-Ching

    2015-06-01

    Whether provision of free preventive care for the elderly under National Health Insurance has reduced the risk for curative care use raises much concern in Taiwan. This study analyzes the relationship by examining the impact of health examination utilization on the utilizations of outpatient care and inpatient care. Data come from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey and National Health Insurance Research Database. A two-stage method is used in the estimation. We found a negative relationship between the utilization of preventive care and hospitalization care in terms of length of stay and medical expenditures. On average, the elderly people who used preventive care tended to have 16 shorter hospitalization stays and NTD64,220 lower hospitalization expenditures than their counterparts. In order to improve the health of the elderly and reduce the escalation of medical expenditures due to aging, including preventive care in the health insurance is a very effective strategy.

  10. The high prevalence of depression and dementia in elder abuse or neglect.

    PubMed

    Dyer, C B; Pavlik, V N; Murphy, K P; Hyman, D J

    2000-02-01

    The risk factors for mistreatment of older people include age, race, low income, functional or cognitive impairment, a history of violence, and recent stressful events. There is little information in the literature concerning the clinical profile of mistreated older people. To describe the characteristics of abused or neglected patients and to compare the prevalence of depression and dementia in neglected patients with that of patients referred for other reasons. A case control study. Baylor College of Medicine Geriatrics Clinic at the Harris County Hospital District (Houston, Texas). Forty-seven older persons referred for neglect and 97 referred for other reasons. Comprehensive geriatric assessment. Standard geriatric assessment tools. There was a statistically significant higher prevalence of depression (62% vs 12%) and dementia (51% vs 30%) in victims of self-neglect compared to patients referred for other reasons. This is the first primary data study that highlights a high prevalence of depression as well as dementia in mistreated older people. Geriatric clinicians should rule out elder neglect or abuse in their depressed or demented patients.

  11. Tramadol and the risk of fracture in an elderly female population: a cost utility assessment with comparison to transdermal buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Alexander; Knight, Chris; Hirst, Matt; Dunlop, Will; Akehurst, Ron

    2016-03-01

    Opioid treatment for chronic pain is a known risk factor for falls and/or fractures in elderly patients. The latter cause a significant cost to the National Health Service and the Personal Social Services in the UK. Tramadol has a higher risk of fractures than some other opioid analgesics used to treat moderate-to-severe pain and, in the model described here, we investigate the cost effectiveness of transdermal buprenorphine treatment compared with tramadol in a high-risk population. A model was developed to assess the cost effectiveness of tramadol compared with transdermal buprenorphine over a 1-year time horizon and a patient population of high-risk patients (female patients age 75 or older). To estimate the total cost and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) of treatment, published odds ratios are used in combination with the published incidence rates of four types of fracture: hip, wrist, humerus and other. The model shows tramadol to be associated with 1,058 more fractures per 100,000 patients per year compared with transdermal buprenorphine, resulting in transdermal buprenorphine being cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of less than £7,000 compared with tramadol. Sensitivity analysis found this result to be robust. In the UK data, there is uncertainty regarding the transdermal buprenorphine odds ratios for fractures. Odds ratios published in Danish and Swedish studies show similar point estimates but are associated with less uncertainty. Transdermal buprenorphine is cost-effective compared to tramadol at a willingness-to-pay threshold of £20,000 per QALY.

  12. Denture Wearing during Sleep Doubles the Risk of Pneumonia in the Very Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Iinuma, T.; Arai, Y.; Abe, Y.; Takayama, M.; Fukumoto, M.; Fukui, Y.; Iwase, T.; Takebayashi, T.; Hirose, N.; Gionhaku, N.; Komiyama, K.

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health and hygiene are increasingly recognized as major risk factors for pneumonia among the elderly. To identify modifiable oral health–related risk factors, we prospectively investigated associations between a constellation of oral health behaviors and incident pneumonia in the community-living very elderly (i.e., 85 years of age or older). At baseline, 524 randomly selected seniors (228 men and 296 women; mean age, 87.8 years) were examined for oral health status and oral hygiene behaviors as well as medical assessment, including blood chemistry analysis, and followed up annually until first hospitalization for or death from pneumonia. During a 3-year follow-up period, 48 events associated with pneumonia (20 deaths and 28 acute hospitalizations) were identified. Among 453 denture wearers, 186 (40.8%) who wore their dentures during sleep were at higher risk for pneumonia than those who removed their dentures at night (log rank P = 0.021). In a multivariate Cox model, both perceived swallowing difficulties and overnight denture wearing were independently associated with an approximately 2.3-fold higher risk of the incidence of pneumonia (for perceived swallowing difficulties, hazard ratio [HR], 2.31; and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11–4.82; and for denture wearing during sleep, HR, 2.38; and 95% CI, 1.25–4.56), which was comparable with the HR attributable to cognitive impairment (HR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.06–4.34), history of stroke (HR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.13–5.35), and respiratory disease (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.20–4.23). In addition, those who wore dentures during sleep were more likely to have tongue and denture plaque, gum inflammation, positive culture for Candida albicans, and higher levels of circulating interleukin-6 as compared with their counterparts. This study provided empirical evidence that denture wearing during sleep is associated not only with oral inflammatory and microbial burden but also with incident pneumonia, suggesting

  13. Denture wearing during sleep doubles the risk of pneumonia in the very elderly.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, T; Arai, Y; Abe, Y; Takayama, M; Fukumoto, M; Fukui, Y; Iwase, T; Takebayashi, T; Hirose, N; Gionhaku, N; Komiyama, K

    2015-03-01

    Poor oral health and hygiene are increasingly recognized as major risk factors for pneumonia among the elderly. To identify modifiable oral health-related risk factors, we prospectively investigated associations between a constellation of oral health behaviors and incident pneumonia in the community-living very elderly (i.e., 85 years of age or older). At baseline, 524 randomly selected seniors (228 men and 296 women; mean age, 87.8 years) were examined for oral health status and oral hygiene behaviors as well as medical assessment, including blood chemistry analysis, and followed up annually until first hospitalization for or death from pneumonia. During a 3-year follow-up period, 48 events associated with pneumonia (20 deaths and 28 acute hospitalizations) were identified. Among 453 denture wearers, 186 (40.8%) who wore their dentures during sleep were at higher risk for pneumonia than those who removed their dentures at night (log rank P = 0.021). In a multivariate Cox model, both perceived swallowing difficulties and overnight denture wearing were independently associated with an approximately 2.3-fold higher risk of the incidence of pneumonia (for perceived swallowing difficulties, hazard ratio [HR], 2.31; and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-4.82; and for denture wearing during sleep, HR, 2.38; and 95% CI, 1.25-4.56), which was comparable with the HR attributable to cognitive impairment (HR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.06-4.34), history of stroke (HR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.13-5.35), and respiratory disease (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.20-4.23). In addition, those who wore dentures during sleep were more likely to have tongue and denture plaque, gum inflammation, positive culture for Candida albicans, and higher levels of circulating interleukin-6 as compared with their counterparts. This study provided empirical evidence that denture wearing during sleep is associated not only with oral inflammatory and microbial burden but also with incident pneumonia, suggesting potential

  14. Management for Elderly Women With Advanced-Stage, High-Grade Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rauh-Hain, J Alejandro; Pepin, Kristen J; Meyer, Larissa A; Clemmer, Joel T; Lu, Karen H; Rice, Laurel W; Uppal, Shitanshu; Schorge, John O; Del Carmen, Marcela G

    2015-12-01

    To examine the treatment and survival of elderly women diagnosed with advanced-stage, high-grade endometrial cancer. We performed a retrospective cohort study of women diagnosed between 2003 and 2011 with advanced-stage, high-grade endometrial cancers (grade 3 adenocarcinoma, carcinosarcoma, clear-cell carcinoma, and uterine serous carcinoma) using the National Cancer Database. Women were stratified by age: younger than 55, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 years old or older. Multivariate logistic regression models and Cox proportional hazards survival methods for all-cause mortality were used for analyses. Twenty thousand four hundred sixty-eight patients were included, 14.9% younger than 55 years, 30.9% 55-64 years, 31.1% 65-74 years, 18.8% 75-84 years, and 4.3% 85 years old or older. Patients younger than 55 years had surgery more frequently compared with patients 75-84 years (97.2% compared with 95.8%; P<.001) and 85 years or older (97.2% compared with 94.8%; P<.001) and a higher rate of lymph node dissection (78.7% compared with 70.5%; P<.001 and 78.7% compared with 59.5%; P<.001, respectively). Women younger than 55 years old were more likely to receive chemotherapy compared with those 75-84 years (63.9% compared with 42.2%; P<.001) and 85 years old or older (63.9% compared with 22%; P<.001). After adjusting for prognostic factors, women ages 75-84 and 85 years or older were less likely to have received chemotherapy compared with women younger than 55 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29-0.38 and OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.10-0.14). The same was true with surgery (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.45-0.88 and OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.30-0.70) and radiotherapy (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.53-0.70 and OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.37-0.56). The Cox regression model showed that in women with stage III disease, women 75-84 years had a twofold higher risk of death (hazard ratio [HR] 2.38, 95% CI 2.14-2.65) and those 85 years or older had a threefold higher risk (HR 3.16, 95% CI 2

  15. Six simple questions to detect malnutrition or malnutrition risk in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Gómez, Tranquilina; Cortés, Ernesto; Peñarrieta-de Córdova, Isabel; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Ferrer-Diego, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    Of the numerous instruments available to detect nutritional risk, the most widely used is the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), but it takes 15–20 min to complete and its systematic administration in primary care units is not feasible in practice. We developed a tool to evaluate malnutrition risk that can be completed more rapidly using just clinical variables. Between 2008 and 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 418 women aged ≥60 years from Mexico. Our outcome was positive MNA and our secondary variables included were: physical activity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, educational level, dentition, psychological problems, living arrangements, history of falls, age and the number of tablets taken daily. The sample was divided randomly into two groups: construction and validation. Construction: a risk table was constructed to estimate the likelihood of the outcome, and risk groups were formed. Validation: the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated and we compared the expected and the observed outcomes. The following risk factors were identified: physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, dentition, psychological problems and living with the family. The AUC was 0.77 (95% CI [0.68–0.86], p < 0.001). No differences were found between the expected and the observed outcomes (p = 0.902). This study presents a new malnutrition screening test for use in elderly women. The test is based on six very simple, quick and easy-to-evaluate questions, enabling the MNA to be reserved for confirmation. However, it should be used with caution until validation studies have been performed in other geographical areas. PMID:26500824

  16. Six simple questions to detect malnutrition or malnutrition risk in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Gómez, Tranquilina; Cortés, Ernesto; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Peñarrieta-de Córdova, Isabel; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Ferrer-Diego, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    Of the numerous instruments available to detect nutritional risk, the most widely used is the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), but it takes 15-20 min to complete and its systematic administration in primary care units is not feasible in practice. We developed a tool to evaluate malnutrition risk that can be completed more rapidly using just clinical variables. Between 2008 and 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 418 women aged ≥60 years from Mexico. Our outcome was positive MNA and our secondary variables included were: physical activity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, educational level, dentition, psychological problems, living arrangements, history of falls, age and the number of tablets taken daily. The sample was divided randomly into two groups: construction and validation. Construction: a risk table was constructed to estimate the likelihood of the outcome, and risk groups were formed. the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated and we compared the expected and the observed outcomes. The following risk factors were identified: physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, dentition, psychological problems and living with the family. The AUC was 0.77 (95% CI [0.68-0.86], p < 0.001). No differences were found between the expected and the observed outcomes (p = 0.902). This study presents a new malnutrition screening test for use in elderly women. The test is based on six very simple, quick and easy-to-evaluate questions, enabling the MNA to be reserved for confirmation. However, it should be used with caution until validation studies have been performed in other geographical areas.

  17. The clinical value of metabolic syndrome and risks of cardiometabolic events and mortality in the elderly: the Rotterdam study.

    PubMed