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Sample records for elderly psychiatric outpatients

  1. Biochemical Abnormalities in Psychiatric Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Lipman, Daniel G.; Collins, James L.; Mathura, Clyde B.; Elder, Zelda B.

    1984-01-01

    This research project was an outgrowth of the observations of the senior author over a period exceeding four decades of practice, teaching, and research as internist and psychiatrist, with primary emphasis on relationships between psyche and soma. Patients at the Outpatient Psychiatric Clinic of the Howard University Hospital, Washington, DC, were given thorough annual physical examinations and laboratory evaluations of blood and urine. The authors found a significantly high incidence of medical illnesses and abnormal laboratory findings not previously suspected. There was a significant and direct correlation between psychopathology as projected in the Lipman Personality Image Projection (LPIP) test and abnormal laboratory and physical findings. The results in this study concur with previous reports that so-called purely psychogenic stress symptoms may be related to unrecognized medical illnesses. These somatic illnesses may remain unrecognized for indefinite periods of time in the traditional psychiatric outpatient setting from which patients are often referred elsewhere for treatment of nonpsychiatric illness. Initial and periodic physical and laboratory examinations should be performed by psychiatrists trained to recognize nonpsychiatric diseases that often present with psychiatric symptoms. A thorough knowledge of the mind-body relationship is essential to the practice of modern psychiatry. PMID:6716498

  2. Anesthesia for the elderly outpatient.

    PubMed

    Aurini, Lucia; White, Paul F

    2014-12-01

    As the number of ambulatory surgery procedures continues to grow in an aging global society, the implementation of evidence-based perioperative care programs for the elderly patients will assume increased importance. Increasing evidence supports the expanded use of ambulatory surgery for managing elderly patients undergoing elective surgery procedures. This review article describes the demographics of ambulatory surgery in the elderly population. This review article describes the effects of aging on the responses of geriatric patients to anesthetic and analgesic drugs used during ambulatory surgery. Important considerations in the preoperative evaluation of elderly outpatients with co-existing diseases, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of different anesthetic techniques on a procedural-specific basis, and recommendations regarding the management of common postoperative side-effects (including delirium and cognitive dysfunction, fatigue, dizziness, pain, and gastrointestinal dysfunction) after ambulatory surgery. Finally, we discuss the future challenges related to the continued expansion of ambulatory surgery practice in this growing segment of our surgical population. The role of anesthesiologists as perioperative physicians is of critical importance for optimizing surgical outcomes for elderly patients undergoing ambulatory surgery. Providing high-quality, evidence-based anesthetic and analgesic care for elderly patients undergoing elective operations on an ambulatory basis will assume greater importance in the future.

  3. Psychiatric disorders in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Ingmar

    2011-07-01

    Recent research has shown that depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosis are more common than previously supposed in elderly populations without dementia. It is unclear whether the frequency of these disorders increases or decreases with age. Clinical expression of psychiatric disorders in old age may be different from that seen in younger age groups, with less and often milder symptoms. Concurrently, comorbidity between different psychiatric disorders is immense, as well as comorbidity with somatic disorders. Cognitive function is often decreased in people with depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosis, but whether these disorders are risk factors for dementia is unclear. Psychiatric disorders in the elderly are often related to cerebral neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular disease, although psychosocial risk factors are also important. Psychiatric disorders, common among the elderly, have consequences that include social deprivation, poor quality of life, cognitive decline, disability, increased risk for somatic disorders, suicide, and increased nonsuicidal mortality.

  4. Tobacco Smoking in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditchburn, K. Marie; Sellman, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Three main aims of this study were to ascertain the prevalence rate of smoking among adolescent psychiatric outpatients; estimate smokers' degree of nicotine dependence; and investigate the relationship between smoking and common mental health disorders. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 93 patients ages 13-18 presenting to an adolescent…

  5. Tobacco Smoking in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditchburn, K. Marie; Sellman, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Three main aims of this study were to ascertain the prevalence rate of smoking among adolescent psychiatric outpatients; estimate smokers' degree of nicotine dependence; and investigate the relationship between smoking and common mental health disorders. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 93 patients ages 13-18 presenting to an adolescent…

  6. Creative Art Therapy Groups: A Treatment Modality for Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapeau, Marie-Celine; Kronish, Neomi

    2007-01-01

    This brief report examines the benefits of a creative art therapy group program for outpatients suffering from psychiatric disorders. Included is a review of relevant treatment outcomes literature on the effectiveness of group art therapy. The authors describe the Creative Art Therapy Group Program offered to adult psychiatric outpatients that is…

  7. ADHD prevalence in adult outpatients with nonpsychotic psychiatric illnesses.

    PubMed

    Almeida Montes, Luis Guillermo; Hernández García, Ana Olivia; Ricardo-Garcell, Josefina

    2007-09-01

    The prevalence of ADHD in the general adult population has been estimated to be about 4.4%. However, few studies exist in which the prevalence of ADHD in psychiatric adult outpatient samples has been estimated. These studies suggest that the prevalence is higher than in the general population. The objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of ADHD in a psychiatric nonpsychotic adult outpatient sample and to compare this data with the prevalence of a group of nonclinical participants. The structured clinical interview Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.-Plus) was applied to 161 consecutive nonpsychotic psychiatric adult outpatients and to 149 healthy participants from the community. In addition, clinical rating scales were applied to measure the severity of general psychopathology such as mania, anxiety, depression, ADHD, and alcohol consumption in both groups. The prevalence of ADHD in psychiatric nonpsychotic adult outpatients was 16.80% and 5.37% in nonclinical participants. In male psychiatric outpatients the prevalence of ADHD was 8.5% and for females was 21.6%. This study concludes that a higher prevalence of ADHD exists in psychiatric nonpsychotic adult outpatients compared with nonclinical participants. In the psychiatric adult outpatients, females showed a higher prevalence of ADHD than males. Implications and limitations are discussed.

  8. Dissociative disorders and suicidality in psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Foote, Brad; Smolin, Yvette; Neft, Deborah I; Lipschitz, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Although it is common for patients with dissociative disorders to report a history of suicide attempts, there is very little data systematically comparing suicidality in patients with dissociative disorders versus patients without these disorders. The subjects in our study were 231 patients consecutively admitted to an inner-city, hospital-based outpatient psychiatric clinic. Eighty-two of these patients completed structured interviews for dissociative disorders, borderline personality disorder, and trauma history (dissociative disorders interview schedule) and for posttraumatic stress disorder and substance abuse (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV). Patients receiving a dissociative disorder diagnosis were compared with nondissociative patients on measures of self-harm and suicidality. Presence of a dissociative disorder was strongly associated with all measures of self-harm and suicidality. When we focused on patients with a history of multiple suicide attempts, significant associations were found between several diagnoses (dissociative disorder; borderline personality disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder; alcohol abuse/dependence) and multiple suicide attempter status. When these diagnoses were entered in a logistic regression, a highly significant association remained for dissociative diagnosis and multiple suicide attempter status (odds ratio, 15.09; 95% confidence interval, 2.67-85.32; p = 0.002). Dissociative disorders are commonly overlooked in studies of suicidality, but in this population they were the strongest predictor of multiple suicide attempter status.

  9. Patterns of Psychiatric Outpatient Practice in Taiwan: A Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ying-Xiu; Chen, Mu-Hong; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Ming-Hwai

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Limited studies have utilized nationwide data to assess the patterns of psychiatric practice in other countries. In this study, data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan (NHIRD-TW) for 2012 was analyzed to determine the patterns of psychiatric outpatient practice in Taiwan; (2) Methods: To determine the patterns of psychiatric outpatient practice in Taiwan, the data were drawn from the datasets of Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database for 2012, with 619,760 records of outpatient visits representing 1/500 of all the claims in Taiwan for that year. The analysis of psychiatric outpatient visits included patient demographics, diagnoses, and prescribed medications; (3) Results: Neurotic disorders were the most prevalent diagnoses (43.1%, n = 5714). Hypnotics-sedatives and anxiolytics were prescribed in 51.7% (n = 6850) and 39.1% (n = 5181) of psychiatric visits, respectively, with zolpidem being the most commonly prescribed drug (22.6%, n = 2998); and (4) Conclusion: Hypnotics and sedatives were widely prescribed for the outpatient population, and zolpidem had the highest annual prevalence of use. These findings deserve the attention of clinicians and policy makers for monitoring the abuse and dependence of these agents and subsequent adverse events. PMID:27690067

  10. [Prescription drug abuse in elderly psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Wetterling, Tilman; Schneider, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    Due to demographic changes there will be a fraction of elderly patients with substance use disorders. However, only a few data have been published about elderly abusers of prescription drugs. Since substance abuse is frequently comorbid with psychiatric disorders, treatment in a psychiatric hospital is often needed. In this explorative study elderly people with prescription drug abuse who required psychiatric inpatient treatment should be characterized. This study was part of the gerontopsychiatry study Berlin (Gepsy-B), an investigation of the data of all older inpatients (≥ 65 years) admitted to a psychiatric hospital within a period of 3 years. Among 1266 documented admissions in 110 cases (8.7 %) (mean age: 75.7 ± 7.1 years) prescription drug abuse, mostly of benzodiazepines was diagnosed. Females showed benzodiazepine abuse more often than males. In only a small proportion of the cases the reason for admission was withdrawal of prescribed drugs. 85.5 % suffered from psychiatric comorbidity, mostly depression. As risk factors for abuse depressive symptoms (OR: 3.32) as well as concurrent nicotine (OR: 2.69) or alcohol abuse (OR: 2.14) were calculated. Psychiatric inpatient treatment was primarily not necessary because of prescription drug abuse but because of other psychopathological symptoms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Narcissism and relational representations among psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kealy, David; Ogrodniczuk, John S; Joyce, Anthony S; Steinberg, Paul I; Piper, William E

    2015-06-01

    Pathological narcissism is associated with maladaptive interpersonal behavior, although less is known regarding the internal relational representations of narcissistic patients. The authors examined the relationship between pathological narcissism and two constructs that reflect internal representations of relational patterns: quality of object relations and attachment style. Patients attending a psychiatric day treatment program (N = 218) completed measures of narcissism, general psychiatric distress, and attachment style in terms of attachment avoidance and anxiety. A semistructured interview was used to assess quality of object relations. Multiple regression analysis was conducted, controlling for general psychiatric distress. Pathological narcissism was associated with anxious attachment, but not with avoidant attachment. Narcissism was also associated with lower levels of quality of object relations. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of internal representations of self-other relations.

  12. Teaching Psychodynamics to Psychiatric Residents through Psychiatric Outpatient Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardoso Zoppe, Eva Helena C.; Schoueri, Patricia; Castro, Monica; Neto, Francisco Lotufo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates whether a course that was designed for first-year psychiatric residents and that specifically addressed psychodynamic principles fostered residents' progress in knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding these concepts. Methods: The course was given in the 2005 academic year to all residents (N=18) in their first…

  13. Teaching Psychodynamics to Psychiatric Residents through Psychiatric Outpatient Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardoso Zoppe, Eva Helena C.; Schoueri, Patricia; Castro, Monica; Neto, Francisco Lotufo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates whether a course that was designed for first-year psychiatric residents and that specifically addressed psychodynamic principles fostered residents' progress in knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding these concepts. Methods: The course was given in the 2005 academic year to all residents (N=18) in their first…

  14. Perceived Mental Illness Stigma among Youth in Psychiatric Outpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkington, Katherine S.; Hackler, Dusty; McKinnon, Karen; Borges, Cristiane; Wright, Eric R.; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the experiences of mental illness stigma in 24 youth (58.3% male, 13-24 years, 75% Latino) in psychiatric outpatient treatment. Using Link and Phelan's (2001) model of stigmatization, we conducted thematic analysis of the interview texts, examining experiences of stigma at individual and structural levels, in addition to the…

  15. Self-Esteem and Suicide Ideation in Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhar, Sunil; Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Brown, Gregory; Beck, Aaron T.

    2008-01-01

    Depression, hopelessness, and low self-esteem are implicated as vulnerability factors for suicide ideation. The association of self-esteem with suicide ideation after controlling for depressed mood and hopelessness was examined. Adult psychiatric outpatients (N = 338) completed measures of self-esteem, suicide ideation, hopelessness, and…

  16. ADHD Prevalence in Adult Outpatients with Nonpsychotic Psychiatric Illnesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida Montes, Luis Guillermo; Hernandez Garcia, Ana Olivia; Ricardo-Garcell, Josefina

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of ADHD in the general adult population has been estimated to be about 4.4%. However, few studies exist in which the prevalence of ADHD in psychiatric adult outpatient samples has been estimated. These studies suggest that the prevalence is higher than in the general population. The objective of this study is to estimate…

  17. Self-Esteem and Suicide Ideation in Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhar, Sunil; Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Brown, Gregory; Beck, Aaron T.

    2008-01-01

    Depression, hopelessness, and low self-esteem are implicated as vulnerability factors for suicide ideation. The association of self-esteem with suicide ideation after controlling for depressed mood and hopelessness was examined. Adult psychiatric outpatients (N = 338) completed measures of self-esteem, suicide ideation, hopelessness, and…

  18. Occurrence of Medical Concerns in Psychiatric Outpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azimi, Kousha; Modi, Miti; Hurlbut, Janice; Lunsky, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that adults with both intellectual disabilities (ID) and psychiatric disorders are at increased risk for physical health problems, few studies have described their medical concerns specifically. This study reports on the rates of physical health issues and completion of recommended health screenings among 78 adult outpatients with…

  19. Perceived Mental Illness Stigma among Youth in Psychiatric Outpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkington, Katherine S.; Hackler, Dusty; McKinnon, Karen; Borges, Cristiane; Wright, Eric R.; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the experiences of mental illness stigma in 24 youth (58.3% male, 13-24 years, 75% Latino) in psychiatric outpatient treatment. Using Link and Phelan's (2001) model of stigmatization, we conducted thematic analysis of the interview texts, examining experiences of stigma at individual and structural levels, in addition to the…

  20. Occurrence of Medical Concerns in Psychiatric Outpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azimi, Kousha; Modi, Miti; Hurlbut, Janice; Lunsky, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that adults with both intellectual disabilities (ID) and psychiatric disorders are at increased risk for physical health problems, few studies have described their medical concerns specifically. This study reports on the rates of physical health issues and completion of recommended health screenings among 78 adult outpatients with…

  1. Dysfunctional Attitudes and Suicidal Ideation in Psychiatric Outpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Self-Concept Test (BST), and Scale for Suicide Ideation (SSI) to 908 psychiatric outpatients. Found that none of DAS subscales discriminated ideators and nonideators or was significantly related to SSI total scores of suicide ideators after…

  2. Unintentional Injuries among Psychiatric Outpatients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ching-I; Liu, Chia-Yih; Yang, Ching-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background No study has investigated the percentages of and factors related to unintentional injuries among psychiatric outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This study aimed to investigate these issues. Methods One-hundred and forty-one outpatients with MDD at baseline were enrolled from psychiatric outpatients by systematic sampling, and 119 subjects attended a one-year follow-up. Self-reported unintentional injuries in the past one year were recorded. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR. The severity of depression was evaluated by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Other data, including body weight and height, cigarette smoking, headaches, and medications, were collected. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to investigate independent factors related to unintentional injuries. Results At baseline and follow-up, 40.4% and 27.7% of subjects had experienced at least one unintentional injury in the past one year, respectively. About half of subjects with unintentional injuries needed medical treatment for injuries and had functional impairment due to injuries. A greater severity of depression, cigarette smoking, a higher body mass index, and an older age were independent risk factors related to unintentional injuries. Conclusion Unintentional injuries that increased the medical burden and functional impairment were common among outpatients with MDD and should not be neglected. Treatment of depression, control of body weight, and quitting cigarettes might be helpful to prevent unintentional injuries. PMID:27992483

  3. Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among urban elderlies: Lucknow elderly study

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, S. C.; Tripathi, Rakesh Kumar; Kumar, Aditya; Kar, A. M.; Singh, Ragini; Kohli, V. K.; Agarwal, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Paucity of systematic studies in elderly mental health in an aging population is an urgent need, which is required to address services and planning issues for health. Aim: The present study aims to investigate the distribution of physical, neuropsychiatric, and cognitive disorders of a community sample of elderlies with certain socioeconomic data. Materials and Methods: A door-to-door household survey was conducted to identify houses with elderlies (≥55 years) in two urban localities of Lucknow. Mini mental state examination (MMSE), Survey Psychiatric Assessment Schedule (SPAS)/Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) and physical and neurological examination were used for screening all consenting elderlies. MMSE positive participants were assessed on Cambridge Mental Disorders of the Elderly Examination-Revised for diagnosis of cognitive disorders; SPAS/MDQ positives were assessed on Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry based clinical interview for diagnosis of neuropsychiatric disorders other than cognitive disorders (using ICD-10 criteria). Routine and indicated laboratory/radiological investigations on all and on MMSE/SPAS (organic section) positive/physically ill participants respectively were done to confirm organic and/or physical illness. Only percentages were calculated to find the distribution of morbidity. Results: The sample had proportionate age structure as that of the surveyed population and had balanced gender representation in each age deciles. Prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders (with/without comorbidities) was 11.8% in the elderlies (60 years and above) highest being in the 60-69 years age group. Being women and of lower socioeconomic status was more commonly associated with a neuropsychiatric diagnosis. 7.6% of the elderlies had cognitive impairment. Overall findings suggest a prevalence rate of 17.34% of total psychiatric morbidity among elderlies. A significant number had comorbid physical illness diagnoses

  4. Psychiatric Emergencies in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Sikka, Veronica; Kalra, S; Galwankar, Sagar; Sagar, Galwankar

    2015-11-01

    With the increasing life expectancy, the geriatric population has been increasing over the past few decades. By the year 2050, it is projected to compose more than a fifth of the entire population, representing a 147% increase in this age group. There has been a steady increase in the number of medical and psychiatric disorders, and a large percentage of geriatric patients are now presenting to the emergency department with such disorders. The management of our progressively complex geriatric patient population will require an integrative team approach involving emergency medicine, psychiatry, and hospitalist medicine.

  5. Metabolic syndrome among psychiatric outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-I; Liu, Chia-Yih; Hsiao, Mei-Chun; Yu, Nan-Wen; Chu, Chun-Lin

    2014-06-21

    Few studies have simultaneously compared the impacts of pharmacotherapy and mental diagnoses on metabolic syndrome (MetS) among psychiatric outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of pharmacotherapy and mental diagnoses on MetS and the prevalence of MetS among these patients. Two-hundred and twenty-nine outpatients (men/women = 85/144) were enrolled from 1147 outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders by systematic sampling. Psychiatric disorders and MetS were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR and the new International Diabetics Federation definition, respectively. The numbers of antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants being taken were recorded. Logistic regression was used to investigate the impacts of pharmacotherapy and psychiatric diagnoses on MetS. Among 229 subjects, 51 (22.3%) fulfilled the criteria for MetS. The prevalence of MetS was highest in the bipolar I disorder (46.7%) patients, followed by bipolar II disorder (25.0%), major depressive disorder (22.0%), anxiety-only disorders (16.7%), and no mood and/or anxiety disorders (14.3%). The percentages of MetS among the five categories were correlated with those of the patients being treated with antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Use of antipsychotics and/or mood stabilizers independently predicted a higher risk of MetS after controlling for demographic variables and psychiatric diagnoses. When adding body mass index (BMI) as an independent variable in the regression model, BMI became the most significant factor to predict MetS. BMI was found to be an important factor related to MetS. Pharmacotherapy might be one of underlying causes of elevated BMI. The interactions among MetS, BMI, pharmacotherapy, and psychiatric diagnoses might need further research.

  6. Migraine predicts physical and pain symptoms among psychiatric outpatients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background No study has been performed to compare the impacts of migraine and major depressive episode (MDE) on depression, anxiety and somatic symptoms, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among psychiatric outpatients. The aim of this study was to investigate the above issue. Methods This study enrolled consecutive psychiatric outpatients with mood and/or anxiety disorders who undertook a first visit to a medical center. Migraine was diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition. Three psychometric scales and the Short-Form 36 were administered. General linear models were used to estimate the difference in scores contributed by either migraine or MDE. Multiple linear regressions were employed to compare the variance of these scores explained by migraine or MDE. Results Among 214 enrolled participants, 35.0% had migraine. Bipolar II disorder patients (70.0%) had the highest percentage of migraine, followed by major depressive disorder (49.1%) and only anxiety disorder (24.5%). Patients with migraine had worse depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms and lower SF-36 scores than those without. The estimated differences in the scores of physical functioning, bodily pain, and somatic symptoms contributed by migraine were not lower than those contributed by MDE. The regression model demonstrated the variance explained by migraine was significantly greater than that explained by MDE in physical and pain symptoms. Conclusions Migraine was common and the impact of migraine on physical and pain symptoms was greater than MDE among psychiatric outpatients. Integration of treatment strategies for migraine into psychiatric treatment plans should be considered. PMID:23565902

  7. Sex differences in the use of psychiatric outpatient facilities.

    PubMed

    Kessler, R C; Reuter, J A; Greenley, J R

    1979-12-01

    Previous research has shown that both symptoms and sociocultural factors are related to use of psychiatric outpatient facilities. However, the utility of using treatment rates from these facilities to make etiological inferences depends on whether sociocultural effects on utilization are trivial or substantial. In this paper data are presented for one such inference, that women are more in need of treatment than men. We find that observed sex differences in the use of a student psychiatric clinic are due both to differential propensities to seek help for problems and also to differential numbers of problems, both of which are higher among women than men. However, the differential propensity to seek help is found to be by far the more important of these two effects.

  8. Predictors of two-year outcome among psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Harder, D W; Greenwald, D F; Strauss, J S; Kokes, R F; Ritzler, B A; Gift, T E

    1990-05-01

    This study hypothesized that social competence and clinical factors previously associated with psychiatric outcome among inpatients would be effective predictors of outcome among outpatients (N = 77) as well. Intake and 2-year outcome status were assessed multidimensionally with absolute-level and residualized indices of functioning, overall clinical status, and symptomatology. Menninger health-sickness proved to be the best single predictor, although Phillips premorbid functioning, Strauss-Carpenter prognosis, social class, and diagnostic severity also predicted well to outcome. Patterns of associated predictor/outcome variable clusters were described. Results suggest that a general social competence factor predicts to psychiatric outcome across the entire range of disorders, but that life events stress does not.

  9. A Program for the Elderly at a Private Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Lawrence W.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses the rationale for initiating group psychotherapy and a group program for the elderly in a private psychiatric hospital setting. The problems encountered and solutions found for patients, group therapists, and attending psychiatrists, and the therapeutic value of group therapy for the elderly psychiatric patient are examined.…

  10. Mental health/psychiatric issues in elder abuse and neglect.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Claudia; Livingston, Gill

    2014-11-01

    Elder abuse may be defined as a violation of a vulnerable older person's human and civil rights. Psychiatric illness is an important cause of vulnerability to abuse, especially when it is comorbid with other risk factors, such as physical frailty, sensory impairment, social isolation, and physical dependency. Health care providers are likely to encounter elder abuse regularly, and therefore have an important role in its detection and management, and in the treatment of subsequent psychiatric illness. This article reviews the relationships between psychiatric illnesses and elder abuse and neglect, examines the psychiatric consequences, and discusses how these may be treated.

  11. Association between autoimmune thyroiditis and depressive disorder in psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Degner, Detlef; Haust, Merle; Meller, Johannes; Rüther, Eckart; Reulbach, Udo

    2015-02-01

    Thyroid diseases are often associated with psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in the general population is estimated to be at about 5-14 %. A clinical study was conducted to evaluate the association between autoimmune thyroiditis and depression in psychiatric outpatients. Fifty-two patients with depression and nineteen patients with schizophrenia (serving as control group), attending a psychiatric outpatient unit, were included. In addition to the measurement of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies, and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, ultrasound examination of the thyroid gland was performed. The proportion of pathologically increased anti-TPO levels in patients with depression was high. Furthermore, the distribution of pathologically increased anti-TPO levels was significantly (χ (2) = 5.5; p = 0.019) different between patients with depression (32.7 %) and patients with schizophrenia (5.3 %). In a gender- and age-adjusted logistic regression, the odds ratio of uni- or bipolar patients with depression for an autoimmune thyroiditis was ten times higher (95 % CI = 1.2-85.3) when compared with schizophrenia patients. TSH basal level did not differ between patients with depression and patients with schizophrenia. Our study demonstrates a strong association between anti-TPO levels, which are considered to be of diagnostic value for autoimmune thyroiditis (in combination with a hypoechoic thyroid in ultrasonography) with uni- or bipolar depression. It should be noted that the routinely measured TSH level is not sufficient in itself to diagnose this relevant autoimmune comorbidity.

  12. Plasma oxytocin and personality traits in psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Bendix, Marie; Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin; Petersson, Maria; Gustavsson, Petter; Svanborg, Pär; Åsberg, Marie; Jokinen, Jussi

    2015-07-01

    The oxytocin system is regarded as being of relevance for social interaction. In spite of this, very few studies have investigated the relationship between oxytocin and personality traits in clinical psychiatric populations. We assessed the relationship between personality traits and plasma oxytocin levels in a population of 101 medication-free psychiatric outpatients (men = 37, women = 64). We used the Karolinska Scale of Personality (KSP) and diagnostic and symptomatic testing. Plasma oxytocin levels were analysed with a specific radioimmunoassay at inclusion and after one month for testing of stability. Plasma oxytocin levels were stable over time and did not differ between patients with or without personality disorders, nor were they related to severity of depressive or anxiety symptoms. The KSP factors Impulsiveness and Negative Emotionality were significant independent predictors of plasma oxytocin. A subscale analysis of these personality factors showed significant positive correlations between baseline plasma oxytocin and the KSP subscales monotony avoidance and psychic anxiety. The significant association between the KSP factor Impulsiveness and oxytocin levels observed at baseline was observed also one month later in men. These findings suggest that personality traits such as Impulsiveness and Negative emotionality which are linked to social functioning in several psychiatric disorders seem to be associated with endogenous plasma oxytocin levels. These variations in oxytocin levels might have an impact on social sensitivity or social motivation with possible gender differences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Screening of alcohol use disorders in psychiatric outpatients: influence of gender, age, and psychiatric diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Autet, Mónica; Garriga, Marina; Zamora, Francisco Javier; González, Idilio; Usall, Judith; Tolosa, Leticia; Benítez, Concepción; Puertas, Raquel; Arranz, Belén

    2017-07-14

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) are 2 times higher among psychiatric patients than in the general population. The under-recognition of this dual diagnosis can entail several negative outcomes. Early assessment with a screening tool like the CAGE questionnaire could be an opportunity to improve patients' prognoses. The objective of this study is to assess AUD risk in an outpatient psychiatric sample with a modified CAGE, considering the influence of age, gender and clinical psychiatric diagnosis. An observational, multicentric, descriptive study was carried out. The 4-item CAGE scale, camouflaged in a healthy lifestyle questionnaire, was implemented, using a cut-off point of one. 559 outpatients were assessed. 54% were female and the average age was 50.07 years. 182 patients presented a CAGE score ≥1 (45.1% of men and 21.9% of women). Gender was the strongest predictor of a positive result in CAGE, as men were 3.03 times more likely to score ≥1 on the CAGE questionnaire (p < .001, 95% CI: 0.22-0.49). Patients with bipolar and personality disorders had the highest rates of CAGE scores ≥1 (45.2 and 44.9%, respectively), with a significant association between diagnosis and a positive score (p = .002). Patients above 60 years were 2.5 times less likely to score ≥1 on the CAGE (p = .017, 95% CI: 0.19-0.85). Specific screening questionnaires, like the CAGE scale, can be an easy and useful tool in the assessment of AUD risk in psychiatric outpatients. Male patients with a bipolar or personality disorder present a higher risk of AUD.

  14. Patterns of psychotropic medication use in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alosaimi, Fahad D; Alhabbad, Abdulhadi; Abalhassan, Mohammed F; Fallata, Ebtihaj O; Alzain, Nasser M; Alassiry, Mohammad Zayed; Haddad, Bander Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    with more number of treated outpatients in comparison to inpatients. Among elderly patients, 75.9% received antipsychotics, mainly second-generation formulations (67.2%), whereas only 41% received antidepressants and 13.8% received mood stabilizers. Conclusion Based upon the present study data, it is concluded that among all the psychotropic medications, antipsychotics were heavily used and the frequency was found to be significantly high in the case of inpatients compared with outpatients. Such a practice may lead to multiple negative consequences among the Saudi psychiatric patient population. Further, extensive use of sodium valproate in the case of bipolar disorder, and also among females either in childbearing age or during pregnancy is also the cause of concern and warrants logical use. Overall, this study may help in assessing the burden of psychiatric illness within specific patient demographics and might be effectively used to strategically plan health resources allocation, generate new treatment hypothesis, or be used as a source of evidence that could further integrate other observational studies. PMID:27143891

  15. Religion, spirituality, and depression in adolescent psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Dew, Rachel E; Daniel, Stephanie S; Goldston, David B; Koenig, Harold G

    2008-03-01

    This study examines in a preliminary manner the relationship between multiple facets of religion/spirituality and depression in treatment-seeking adolescents. One hundred seventeen psychiatric outpatients aged 12 to 18 completed the brief multidimensional measure of religiousness/spirituality, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), a substance abuse inventory. Controlling for substance abuse and demographic variables, depression was related to feeling abandoned or punished by God (p < 0.0001), feeling unsupported by one's religious community (p = 0.0158), and lack of forgiveness (p < 0.001). These preliminary results suggest that clinicians should assess religious beliefs and perceptions of support from the religious community as factors intertwined with the experience of depression, and consider the most appropriate ways of addressing these factors that are sensitive to adolescents' and families' religious values and beliefs.

  16. STRESSFUL LIFE EVENTS IN PSYCHIATRIC OUTPATIENTS : A CONTROLLED STUDY1

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Shekhar; Mohan, D.; Dube, S.; Chawla, P.L.; Sundaram, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY The present study was conducted to investigate the frequency and types of life events experienced by psychiatric outpatients and to compare these with the events experienced by a control sample consisting of their normal relatives. One hundred and sixty-six patients and an equal number of marked controls were studied. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the help of an event list. Results showed that; the patients experienced a significantly higher number of events compared to matched controls in previous one year. Desirable as well as undesirable events in all areas of life functioning were experienced more frequently by patients. Results are discussed in the light of existing information and suggestions offered for use of suitable methodology for further studies in this area. PMID:21847270

  17. Interpersonal problems associated with narcissism among psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Ogrodniczuk, John S; Piper, William E; Joyce, Anthony S; Steinberg, Paul I; Duggal, Satna

    2009-06-01

    Narcissistic personality disorder is the subject of extensive discussion in the literature. Yet, the validity of this diagnostic category remains questionable. This is owed, in large part, to the relative absence of empirical work that has examined narcissism in clinical samples. Descriptions and findings from studies involving non-clinical samples suggest that narcissism is associated with considerable interpersonal impairment. The objective of the present study was to examine this possibility in a sample of psychiatric outpatients. Consecutively admitted patients (N=240) to a day treatment program completed measures of narcissism, interpersonal problems, and general psychiatric distress. Patients were categorized into high, moderate, and low narcissism groups. The groups were compared on overall interpersonal impairment, as well as on particular domains of interpersonal behavior. Treatment duration and discharge status were also compared among the three groups. Analysis of covariance and chi-square analyses were used. At baseline, higher levels of narcissism were significantly associated with greater interpersonal impairment. The interpersonal style of the more narcissistic patients was particularly characterized by domineering, vindictive, and intrusive behavior. At post-treatment, only the association between narcissism and intrusive behavior remained significant. Change in interpersonal difficulties following treatment did not differ significantly among the groups. However, failure to complete treatment was associated with narcissism. The results underscore the interpersonal impairment associated with narcissism and support the notion of narcissistic personality disorder as a valid diagnostic category.

  18. Psychiatric monitoring of not guilty by reason of insanity outpatients.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fernando; Moreira, Diana; Moura, Helena; Mota, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Individuals deemed Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity (NGRI) by the courts, under Article 20 of the Portuguese Criminal Code, have often committed very serious crimes. It is unreasonable to consider that these patients were usually kept without adequate supervision after the security measure had been declared extinct. They often decompensated after leaving the institution where they complied with the security measure, and/or relapsed to alcohol and drug abuse. Very often, severe repeated crime erupted again. Considering this, there was an urgent need to keep a follow-up assessment of these patients in order to prevent them from relapsing in crime. This work presents the results of a psychiatric follow-up project with NGRI outpatients. The main goals of the project were: ensuring follow-up and appropriate therapeutic responses for these patients, maintaining all individuals in a care network, and preventing them from decompensating. The team consisted of a psychiatrist, a nurse, and a psychologist. Seventy-two patients were monitored during two years. Results demonstrated the unequivocal need to follow up decompensated patients after the court order is extinguished. Suggestions are presented for a better framing and psychiatric follow-up of these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. History of interpersonal violence, abuse, and nonvictimization trauma and severity of psychiatric symptoms among children in outpatient psychiatric treatment.

    PubMed

    Ford, Julian D; Gagnon, Kerry; Connor, Daniel F; Pearson, Geraldine

    2011-11-01

    In a clinical sample of child psychiatry outpatients, chart review data were collected for 114 consecutive admissions over a 1-year period at a Child and Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic. Data included history of documented maltreatment, potentially traumatic domestic or community violence, neglect or emotional abuse, and noninterpersonal stressors as well as demographics, psychiatric diagnoses, and parent-rated child emotional and disruptive behavior problems. On a bivariate and multivariate basis, any past exposure to interpersonal violence-but not to noninterpersonal traumas-was related to more severe disruptive behavior problems, independent of the effects of demographics and psychiatric diagnoses. Noninterpersonal trauma and psychiatric diagnoses were associated with emotional problems; exposure to interpersonal violence appeared to partially account for this relationship despite not being independently associated with emotional problem severity. History of exposure to interpersonal violence warrants clinical and research attention as a severity marker and potential treatment focus in psychiatric outpatient services for children, particularly those with disruptive behavior problems.

  20. Factors associated with problematic drug use among psychiatric outpatients 1

    PubMed Central

    Corradi-Webster, Clarissa Mendonça; Gherardi-Donato, Edilaine Cristina da Silva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to examine the factors associated with problematic drug use among psychiatric outpatients. Method: a cross-sectional study was carried out in two mental health services. Eligible individuals were patients of these mental health services, who used them within the data collection period. Instruments: standardized questionnaire with sociodemographic, social network, social harm, and clinical information; Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test; Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale. Statistical analysis was performed using parametric statistics considering a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Study participants were 243 patients, with 53.9% of these presenting problematic drug use. Results: the most important independent predictors of problematic drug use were marital status (OR = 0.491), religious practice (OR = 0.449), satisfaction with financial situation (OR = 0.469), having suffered discrimination (OR = 3.821) and practicing sports activities in previous 12 months (OR = 2.25). Conclusion: the variables found to be predictors were those related to the social context of the patient, there, it is recommended that mental health services valorize psychosocial actions, seeking to know the social support network of patients, their modes of socialization, their financial needs, and their experiences of life and suffering. PMID:27901217

  1. Psychiatric Disorders in Outpatients With Borderline Intellectual Functioning: Comparison With Both Outpatients From Regular Mental Health Care and Outpatients With Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Jannelien; Haan, Sara Kapitein-de; Zitman, Frans G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the Netherlands, patients with borderline intellectual functioning are eligible for specialized mental health care. This offers the unique possibility to examine the mix of psychiatric disorders in patients who, in other countries, are treated in regular outpatient mental health care clinics. Our study sought to examine the rates of all main Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, Axis I psychiatric diagnoses in outpatients with borderline intellectual functioning of 2 specialized regional psychiatric outpatient departments and to compare these with rates of the same disorders in outpatients from regular mental health care (RMHC) and outpatients with mild intellectual disabilities (IDs). Method: Our study was a cross-sectional, anonymized medical chart review. All participants were patients from the Dutch regional mental health care provider Rivierduinen. Diagnoses of patients with borderline intellectual functioning (borderline intellectual functioning group; n = 235) were compared with diagnoses of patients from RMHC (RMHC group; n = 1026) and patients with mild ID (mild ID group; n = 152). Results: Compared with the RMHC group, psychotic and major depressive disorders were less common in the borderline intellectual functioning group, while posttraumatic stress disorder and V codes were more common. Compared with the mild ID group, psychotic disorders were significantly less common. Conclusion: Mental health problems in people with borderline intellectual functioning may not be well addressed in general psychiatry, or by standard psychiatry for patients with ID. Specific attention to this group in clinical practice and research may be warranted lest they fall between 2 stools. PMID:25007114

  2. Psychiatric outpatient consultation for seniors. Perspectives of family physicians, consultants, and patients / family: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, Mark J; Primeau, Francois; McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G; Belzile, Eric; Dendukuri, Nandini; Elie, Michel; Laplante, Johanne

    2005-01-01

    Background Family practitioners take care of large numbers of seniors with increasingly complex mental health problems. Varying levels of input may be necessary from psychiatric consultants. This study examines patients'/family, family practitioners', and psychiatrists' perceptions of the bi-directional pathway between such primary care doctors and consultants. Methods An 18 month survey was conducted in an out-patient psychogeriatric clinic of a Montreal university-affiliated community hospital. Cognitively intact seniors referred by family practitioners for assessment completed a satisfaction and expectation survey following their visits with the psychiatric consultants. The latter completed a self-administered process of care questionnaire at the end of the visit, while family doctors responded to a similar survey by telephone after the consultants' reports had been received. Responses of the 3 groups were compared. Results 101 seniors, referred from 63 family practitioners, met the study entry criteria for assessment by 1 of 3 psychogeriatricians. Both psychiatrists and family doctors agreed that help with management was the most common reason for referral. Family physicians were accepting of care of elderly with mental health problems, but preferred that the psychiatrists assume the initial treatment; the consultants preferred direct return of the patient; and almost 1/2 of patients did not know what to expect from the consultation visit. The rates of discordance in expectations were high when each unique patient-family doctor-psychiatrist triad was examined. Conclusion Gaps in expectations exist amongst family doctors, psychiatrists, and patients/family in the shared mental health care of seniors. Goals and anticipated outcomes of psychogeriatric consultation require better definition. PMID:15840163

  3. PSYCHIATRIC PROBLEMS OF AFGHAN REFUGEES IN DELHI : A STUDY ON 152 OUTPATIENTS1

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Shekar; Wig, N.N.

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY A brief review of literature on psychiatric morbidity associated with migration is presented, with particular emphasis on the problems of political refugees. Initial experiences with 152 Afghan nationals attending the psychiatric outpatient department of a general hospital in Delhi during a period of 18 months are described supported by retrospective data from the records. Problems encountered in adequate assessment and management of these patients are highlighted. Need for prospective and longitudinal research on this group of patients is pointed out. PMID:21847250

  4. Psychiatric morbidity in a Nigerian general out-patient clinic.

    PubMed

    Jegede, R O; Ohaeri, J U; Bamgboye, E A; Okunade, A O

    1990-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of a systematic random sample of new patients attending the clinic of the G.O.P.D. of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, using the PSE, the CES-D and clinical evaluation, at least 40% of 104 subjects were found to have sufficient symptoms of psychic distress to warrant treatment. There was statistically significant association between the measures for psychiatric caseness. Among those rated as psychiatric cases on clinical evaluation, neurosis was the predominant diagnosis. Symptoms of depression were commonly admitted to by these subjects. At review of case notes one year later, the initial diagnoses for those referred to the psychiatric clinic were sustained. In view of the commoness of psychiatric symptoms in general practice, it is suggested that undergraduate psychiatric posting duration be increased; residency training in general practice and internal medicine should include a period of posting in psychiatry; and national health care planning should pay a greater attention to mental health care than is at present the case.

  5. Perceived reasons for, opinions about, and suggestions for elders considering suicide: elderly outpatients' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Jen; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Ku, Yan-Chiou; Lee, Shwu-Hua; Lee, Hsiu-Lan

    2014-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to explore elderly outpatients' perceived reasons for, opinions of, and suggestions for elderly people considering suicide in Taiwan. Elderly outpatients (N = 83) were recruited in 2011-2012 by convenience sampling from three randomly selected medical centers in Taiwan. Data were collected in individual interviews using a semi-structured guide and analyzed by content analysis. Findings revealed that most participants had heard of elderly suicide, with television news as the main source for their information. Their opinions about elderly suicide reflected judgmental attitudes, negative emotional reactions, expectations of social welfare, and could happen after losing one's meaning in life. Their suggestions for elderly people considering suicide fell into four major themes: give up suicidal ideas, seek help, enhance social welfare, and attend religious activities. Since television news was the main source for participants' information about elderly suicide, this mass medium should be used in suicide prevention to disseminate suicide knowledge, increase access to help, and strengthen suicide-protective factors among the elderly. Furthermore, no participants mentioned depression as a reason for attempted or completed suicide among older people despite depression being a well-known suicide-risk factor. Future suicide-prevention programs should emphasize the role of depression in suicide among older people. Participants also did not suggest that older people considering suicide seek help from the health system. Thus, older people should be educated about the role of the health system in suicide prevention and trained as gatekeepers to recognize signs of suicide ideation and respond appropriately.

  6. Age, Gender, and Treatment Attendance among Forensic Psychiatric Outpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Dianne C.; Reddon, John R.; Reddick, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Uses the records of forensic psychiatry outpatients (N=6,299) to evaluate absenteeism from treatment in relation to age and gender. Results reveal that females had a significantly higher absentee rate than males in all age groups. For both males and females, missed appointments declined significantly with age. (Contains 34 references and 1 table.)…

  7. Correlates of Substance Use Disorder among Psychiatric Outpatients: Focus on Cognition, Social Role Functioning and Psychiatric Status

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Kate B.; Carey, Michael P.; Simons, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    This study compared psychiatric outpatients who were never, former, and current substance abusers on psychiatric, social, and cognitive functioning. Fifty-six outpatients with schizophrenia-spectrum and bipolar disorders volunteered to complete diagnostic and social role function interviews, self-report inventories, and neuropsychological tests. Multinomial logit regression analyses indicated that current and former abusers reported greater subjective feelings of distress than those who never abused. Contrary to expectations, however, both groups of substance abusers performed better on non-verbal cognitive tests compared to those who never abused. Differences in social functioning were also observed: former abusers demonstrated better instrumental role functioning than those who never abused. This pattern of findings challenges assumptions about additive effects of comorbid disorders on cognitive and social functioning. PMID:12819549

  8. Factors associated with problematic drug use among psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Corradi-Webster, Clarissa Mendonça; Gherardi-Donato, Edilaine Cristina da Silva

    2016-11-28

    to examine the factors associated with problematic drug use among psychiatric outpatients. a cross-sectional study was carried out in two mental health services. Eligible individuals were patients of these mental health services, who used them within the data collection period. Instruments: standardized questionnaire with sociodemographic, social network, social harm, and clinical information; Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test; Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale. Statistical analysis was performed using parametric statistics considering a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Study participants were 243 patients, with 53.9% of these presenting problematic drug use. the most important independent predictors of problematic drug use were marital status (OR = 0.491), religious practice (OR = 0.449), satisfaction with financial situation (OR = 0.469), having suffered discrimination (OR = 3.821) and practicing sports activities in previous 12 months (OR = 2.25). the variables found to be predictors were those related to the social context of the patient, there, it is recommended that mental health services valorize psychosocial actions, seeking to know the social support network of patients, their modes of socialization, their financial needs, and their experiences of life and suffering. analisar os fatores associados ao consumo problemático de droga entre pacientes psiquiátricos ambulatoriais. estudo transversal em dois serviços de saúde mental. Foram considerados indivíduos elegíveis os usuários desses serviços de saúde mental, que os utilizaram dentro do período de coleta de dados. Instrumentos: Questionário padronizado sobre dados sociodemográficos, redes sociais, prejuízos sociais e informações clínicas; Teste de Triagem do Envolvimento com Álcool, Cigarro e outras Substâncias (ASSIST); Escala de Impulsividade de Barratt; e Escala de Avaliação de Reajustamento Social de Holmes e Rahe. A análise estat

  9. Traumatization in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Adult Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Øhre, Beate; Uthus, Mette Perly; von Tetzchner, Stephen; Falkum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Deaf and hard-of-hearing persons are at risk for experiencing traumatic events and such experiences are associated with symptoms of mental disorder. We investigated the prevalence of traumatic events and subsequent traumatization in adults referred to specialized psychiatric outpatient units for deaf and hard-of-hearing patients. Sixty-two…

  10. Principal diagnoses in psychiatric outpatients with borderline personality disorder: Implications for screening recommendations.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy; Rosenstein, Lia

    2017-02-01

    In the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project, we examined how often borderline personality disorder (BPD) is the principal diagnosis in patients presenting for outpatient psychiatric treatment. To inform clinicians when it is most productive to screen for BPD, we examined the prevalence of BPD in psychiatric outpatients with different principal diagnoses. In this study, 3,674 psychiatric outpatients were evaluated with a semi-structured diagnostic interview for DSM-IV BPD. Slightly ≥10% of the sample was diagnosed with BPD (n = 390, 10.6%). For 80 (20.5%) patients with BPD, the chief concern was related to a feature of BPD; therefore, BPD was designated as a comorbid diagnosis. The highest rate of BPD as a principal diagnosis was found among patients with bipolar disorder. The rate of BPD in patients with principal diagnoses of adjustment disorder, dysthymic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder was significantly lower than in patients without these principal diagnoses. For the majority of psychiatric outpatients with BPD, the principal diagnosis for which they seek treatment is not BPD but, rather, a mood or anxiety disorder. This highlights the importance of screening for BPD.

  11. Psychiatric Syndromes in Adolescents with Marijuana Abuse and Dependency in Outpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Guy; Panichelli-Mindel, Susan M.; Shera, David; Dennis, Mike; Tims, Frank; Ungemack, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the current study to assist in understanding the prevalence and clinical correlates of psychiatric distress in adolescents seeking outpatient services for marijuana abuse or dependency. Methods: In a multi-site randomized clinical trial, 600 adolescents and their parents were assessed at intake using the Global Appraisals…

  12. Efficacy of Group Art Therapy on Depressive Symptoms in Adult Heterogeneous Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandraiah, Shambhavi; Ainlay Anand, Susan; Avent, Lindsay Cherryl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential benefit of weekly group art therapy in groups of adult psychiatric outpatients at a university medical center. Eighteen patients participated in 4 successive 8-week groups of 6 to 8 patients each that met weekly and were led by 2 therapists (a board-certified art therapist and a psychiatry resident). The…

  13. Domestically and Generally Violent Forensic Psychiatric Outpatients: Personality Traits and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsveld, Ruud H. J.; Bezuijen, Siemon; Leenaars, Ellie E. M.; Kraaimaat, Floris W.

    2008-01-01

    A group of 63 domestically violent patients and a group of 103 generally violent patients at a Dutch forensic psychiatric outpatient clinic are examined with regard to personality traits and problem behaviors to develop treatment programs for domestically violent patients. The domestically violent patients are more unstable from a psychological…

  14. Efficacy of Group Art Therapy on Depressive Symptoms in Adult Heterogeneous Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandraiah, Shambhavi; Ainlay Anand, Susan; Avent, Lindsay Cherryl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential benefit of weekly group art therapy in groups of adult psychiatric outpatients at a university medical center. Eighteen patients participated in 4 successive 8-week groups of 6 to 8 patients each that met weekly and were led by 2 therapists (a board-certified art therapist and a psychiatry resident). The…

  15. Demographic Characteristics as Predictors of Quality of Life in a Population of Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masthoff, Erik; Trompenaars, Fons; Van Heck, Guus; Hodiamont, Paul; De Vries, Jolanda

    2006-01-01

    Studies examining relationships between demographic variables in a general population of psychiatric outpatients and quality of life (QOL), in which QOL was assessed according to current recommendations, have not been performed yet. The aim of this study was to examine one particular aspect of this relationship: the question to what extent QOL…

  16. Traumatization in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Adult Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Øhre, Beate; Uthus, Mette Perly; von Tetzchner, Stephen; Falkum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Deaf and hard-of-hearing persons are at risk for experiencing traumatic events and such experiences are associated with symptoms of mental disorder. We investigated the prevalence of traumatic events and subsequent traumatization in adults referred to specialized psychiatric outpatient units for deaf and hard-of-hearing patients. Sixty-two…

  17. Demographic Characteristics as Predictors of Quality of Life in a Population of Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masthoff, Erik; Trompenaars, Fons; Van Heck, Guus; Hodiamont, Paul; De Vries, Jolanda

    2006-01-01

    Studies examining relationships between demographic variables in a general population of psychiatric outpatients and quality of life (QOL), in which QOL was assessed according to current recommendations, have not been performed yet. The aim of this study was to examine one particular aspect of this relationship: the question to what extent QOL…

  18. Psychiatric Syndromes in Adolescents with Marijuana Abuse and Dependency in Outpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Guy; Panichelli-Mindel, Susan M.; Shera, David; Dennis, Mike; Tims, Frank; Ungemack, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the current study to assist in understanding the prevalence and clinical correlates of psychiatric distress in adolescents seeking outpatient services for marijuana abuse or dependency. Methods: In a multi-site randomized clinical trial, 600 adolescents and their parents were assessed at intake using the Global Appraisals…

  19. Psychiatric disorder prevalence among deaf and hard-of-hearing outpatients.

    PubMed

    Diaz, David R; Landsberger, Sarah A; Povlinski, Jessica; Sheward, Jerry; Sculley, Charleen

    2013-10-01

    To contribute to the dearth of literature on the prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in deaf adults, this study examined the diagnostic and clinical characteristics of deaf psychiatric outpatients in comparison to hearing psychiatric outpatients. Archival clinical data for deaf adults (N=241), treated at a specialized, linguistically and culturally affirmative outpatient community mental health program from 2002 to 2010, was compared to data from a random sample of hearing adult outpatients (N=345) who were treated at the same community mental health center. In various diagnostic categories, significant differences were seen between the deaf and hearing groups: bipolar disorders (3.7% versus 14.2%), impulse control disorders (15.8% versus 5.2%), anxiety disorders (18.7% versus 30.1%), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (11.2% versus 4.9%), pervasive developmental disorders (3.3% versus 0.3%), substance use disorders (27.8% versus 48.4%), and intellectual disabilities (10.4% versus 2.9%). The deaf outpatient group evidenced a different diagnostic profile than the hearing sample. It is suggested that the use of culturally competent and fluent ASL-signing clinicians provides more diagnostic clarity and is encouraged as a best practice for the care of deaf individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Substance use and response to psychiatric treatment in methadone-treated outpatients with comorbid psychiatric disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kidorf, Michael; King, Van L.; Peirce, Jessica; Gandotra, Neeraj; Ghazarian, Sharon; Brooner, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    The psychiatric care of opioid users receiving agonist therapies is often complicated by high rates of illicit drug use (Brooner et al., 2013). The present study evaluates if illicit drug use (i.e., opioids, cocaine, sedatives) detected at the start of psychiatric care affects treatment response. Methadone maintenance patients (n = 125) with at least one current psychiatric disorder completed a 3-month randomized clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of financial incentives on attendance to on-site integrated substance abuse and psychiatric services (Kidorf et al., 2013). The present study re-analyzes the data set by grouping participants into one of two conditions based on the 4-week baseline observation: 1) no illicit drug use (Baseline Negative; n = 50), or 2) any illicit drug use (Baseline Positive; n = 75). All participants received a similar schedule of psychiatric services, and had good access to prescribed psychiatric medications. The Global Severity Index (GSI) of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-Revised was administered monthly to evaluate changes in psychiatric distress. Results showed that while both conditions evidenced similar utilization of on-site psychiatric services, Baseline Negative participants remained in treatment somewhat longer (80.7 vs. 74.8 days, p = .04) and demonstrated greater reductions in GSI scores than Baseline Positive participants at Month 3 (p = .004). These results have implications for interpreting previous studies that have shown inconsistent efficacy of pharmacotherapy and other psychiatric treatments, and for providing clinical care for patients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25468006

  1. Effectiveness of abbreviated CBT for insomnia in psychiatric outpatients: sleep and depression outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wagley, J Nile; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Nay, William T; Danish, Steven; Lund, Hannah G

    2013-10-01

    To test the efficacy of cogntive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) as a supplement treatment for psychiatric outpatients. Comorbid insomnia is prevalent among individuals with varied psychiatric disorders and evidence indicates that CBT-I may be effective for reducing insomnia and other psychiatric symptoms. The present study randomly assigned 30 psychiatric outpatients (mean duration of treatment = 3.6 years) with low sleep quality and residual depressive symptoms to two sessions of CBT-I or a treatment as usual control group. Assessment included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for insomnia and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depression at pretreatment and 4 and 8 weeks posttreatment. Patients who received CBT-I demonstrated within group changes in PSQI and the PHQ-9 scores at both 4 and 8 weeks posttreatment, but did not show between-group differences. Additionally, 38% of the treatment participants achieved normal sleep at follow-up compared with none in the control condition. This study provides preliminary evidence that abbreviated behavioral treatment has beneficial effects on residual insomnia and depression in long-term psychiatric outpatients. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dependence, misuse, and beliefs regarding use of hypnotics by elderly psychiatric patients taking zolpidem, estazolam, or flunitrazepam.

    PubMed

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Ko, Chih-Hung; Chang, Yu-Ping; Yu, Cheng-Ying; Huang, Mei-Feng; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Lin, Jin-Jia; Chen, Cheng-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    To examine the prevalence rates and correlates of dependence on, misuse of, and beliefs regarding use of hypnotics in elderly psychiatric patients with long-term use of zolpidem, estazolam, or flunitrazepam. A total of 139 psychiatric outpatients 65 or more years of age who used zolpidem, estazolam, or flunitrazepam for at least 3 months were studied. The levels of hypnotic dependence and beliefs regarding hypnotic use (necessity and concern) were assessed. Three patterns of hypnotic misuse in the past 1 month were also explored. The correlates of high dependence, misuse, and unfavorable attitude and high concern toward hypnotic use were examined using logistic regression analyses. A total of 28.8%, 7.9%, 12.2%, and 22.3% of participants reported high dependence on, misuse of, unfavorable attitude toward, and high concern toward hypnotic use, respectively. Males were more likely to report unfavorable attitude toward hypnotic use than females. Elders with significant depression were more likely to report high concern toward hypnotic use than those without significant depression. Elders with high concern toward hypnotic use were more likely to report high dependence on hypnotics than those with low concern. Elders with significant depression and taking zolpidem were more likely to misuse hypnotics than those without significant depression and taking estazolam or flunitrazepam, respectively. Clinicians should monitor the possibility of dependence on and misuse of hypnotics among elderly psychiatric patients who had the correlates identified in this study. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Dietary intake of elderly outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Laudisio, Alice; Costanzo, Luisa; Di Gioia, Claudia; Delussu, Anna Sofia; Traballesi, Marco; Gemma, Antonella; Antonelli Incalzi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with malnutrition, which is in turn associated with poor outcomes. Accordingly, in COPD patients adequate nutrition might improve several clinical and functional outcomes. Nevertheless, information about nutrient intake of older populations with COPD is still scanty. We analysed data of 523 elderly attending a geriatric ambulatory. Of these, 165 had a diagnosis of COPD, while 358 were control participants, matched for demographic characteristics and free from respiratory diseases. COPD was diagnosed according to the global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) criteria. The intake of micro and macronutrients was recorded using the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) questionnaire. Nutrient intake of COPD patients was compared with that of the control group and with recommended dietary allowances RDA. COPD patients had a lower energy intake, as compared with control participants (29.4 vs 34.4 kcal/kg of ideal weight; P<.0001), due to reduced intake of carbohydrates and proteins. Accordingly, in the energy intake was lower than recommended in 52% of COPD patients, vs 30% of controls (P<.0001). The intake of calcium, potassium, folate, cholecalciferol, retinol, and thiamine was lower than RDA in over 75% of COPD patients. The diet of elderly COPD outpatients does not provide the recommended energy intake, nor does it meet the RDA for many micronutrients. Such deficits are more severe than in age matched non- respiratory subjects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Music increases satisfaction in elderly outpatients undergoing cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Cruise, C J; Chung, F; Yogendran, S; Little, D

    1997-01-01

    Music has long been known to reduce anxiety, minimize the need for sedatives, and make patients feel more at ease. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of music in elderly outpatients undergoing elective cataract surgery with retrobulbar block and monitored anaesthetic care using fentanyl or alfentanil and midazolam. One hundred and twenty one patients were prospectively and randomly assigned to hear: relaxing suggestions, white noise, operating room noise or relaxing music via audio-cassette headphones. Vital signs were documented before and after retrobulbar block and every 15 min thereafter. Anxiety was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after surgery. Visual analogue scales (VAS) were used to assess anxiety and patient satisfaction postoperatively with a standardized questionnaire. Between group comparisons were made using Chi-Square, or ANOVA, where appropriate. There were no differences between groups in STAI or anxiety VAS scores at any time. Differences were noted in systolic blood pressure, but not in other vital signs. Patients' ratings of the whole operative experience, satisfaction with the tape played, general level of relaxation and preference for the chosen tape for subsequent surgery were different (music > relaxing suggestions > white noise and OR noise, P < 0.05). Elderly patients undergoing cataract surgery under retrobulbar block were more satisfied with their experience if they heard relaxing music, rather than relaxing suggestions or white noise or OR noise. The type of auditory stimuli to which the patients were exposed did not influence the level of anxiety.

  5. Psychiatric morbidity in outpatients of gynecological oncology clinic in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mendonsa, Rohan Dilip; Appaya, Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric morbidity in gynecological oncology patients is relatively less studied. Aims: This cross-sectional observational study was undertaken to assess the common psychiatric disorders in women who consult the gynecological oncology outpatients’ department. Materials and methods: We assessed a total of 101 outpatients who were recruited by convenience method of sampling. The main outcome measures were PRIME-MD PHQ diagnoses, gynecological and sociodemographic profiles. Results: Psychiatric disorders as detected by PRIME –MD PHQ were diagnosed in 44% of the patients. Mood disorders were most common. Major depression was present in 25.7% of patients. Anxiety disorders were diagnosed in 16.8% of the patients. Among 44 patients with a psychiatric diagnosis only one patient was on psychiatric treatment. Major depression was much more common (34.4%) in cancer patients than in women with benign conditions (16.6%). Conclusion: The findings of our study reveal a high rate of psychiatric morbidity in the gynecological oncology outpatients. PMID:21267366

  6. [Decentralized outpatient teams in community-based psychiatric care: comparison of two Bavarian rural catchment areas].

    PubMed

    Valdes-Stauber, J; Putzhammer, A; Kilian, R

    2014-05-01

    Psychiatric outpatient clinics (PIAs) are an indispensable care service for crisis intervention and multidisciplinary treatment of people suffering from severe and persistent mental disorders. The decentralization of outpatient clinics can be understood as a further step in the deinstitutionalization process. This cross-sectional study (n=1,663) compared the central outpatient clinic with the decentralized teams for the year 2010 by means of analyses of variance, χ(2)-tests and robust multivariate regression models. The longitudinal assessment (descriptively and by means of Prais-Winsten regression models for time series) was based on all hospitalizations for the two decentralized teams (n = 6,693) according to partial catchment areas for the time period 2002-2010 in order to examine trends after their installation in the year 2007. Decentralized teams were found to be similar with respect to the care profile but cared for relatively more patients suffering from dementia, addictive and mood disorders but not for those suffering from schizophrenia and personality disorders. Decentralized teams showed less outpatient care costs as well as psychopharmacological expenses but a lower contact frequency than the central outpatient clinic. Total expenses for psychiatric care were not significantly different and assessed hospitalization variables (e.g. total number of annual admissions, cumulative length of inpatient-stay and annual hospitalizations per patient) changed slightly 3 years after installation of the decentralized teams. The number of admissions of people suffering from schizophrenia decreased whereas those for mood and stress disorders increased. Decentralized outpatient teams seemed to reach patients in rural regions who previously were not reached by the central outpatient clinic. Economic figures indicate advantages for the installation of such teams because care expenses are not higher than for patients treated in centralized outpatient clinics and

  7. Patient factors predicting early dropout from psychiatric outpatient care for borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    De Panfilis, Chiara; Marchesi, Carlo; Cabrino, Chiara; Monici, Alberto; Politi, Virginia; Rossi, Matteo; Maggini, Carlo

    2012-12-30

    Despite obvious clinical need, factors underlying early treatment discontinuation among 'real world' borderline personality disorder (BPD) patients are still unknown. This study investigates individual characteristics that can predict early (outpatients at a general psychiatric service. Out of a sample of 1437 consecutively treatment-seeking psychiatric outpatients, 162 BPD subjects have been identified by means of the Structured Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) Personality. Sociodemographic, clinical and personality variables potentially relevant for dropout were assessed for all participants at baseline. Early dropouts (n=54) were compared to continuers (n=108) on all measures. Logistic regression was then used to identify independent predictors of early dropout. A history of suicide attempts predicted early discontinuation, whereas the presence of an eating disorder and of avoidant personality features protected from early dropout. If confirmed, these findings may help clinicians operating in general psychiatric settings with estimating the risk of premature treatment discontinuation, and stress the need to specifically address suicidal behaviours in order to improve treatment retention among borderline outpatients. In this regard, implementing general psychiatric care with specialised, evidence-based psychotherapeutic interventions may be deemed necessary. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Evaluation of Elderly Patients by a Psychiatric Emergency Service

    PubMed Central

    Baker, F. M.; Scholhamer, Nanne

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective descriptive study of older patients evaluated by the psychiatric emergency service (PES) of a general hospital was implemented. The medical records of all patients aged 65 years and older evaluated by the PES during the 1980 calendar year were reviewed. Seventy-four patients were identified, 38 male and 36 female. Forty-three percent of the sample had no medical problems, 59 percent had a prior psychiatric history, and 38 percent had a diagnosis of organic brain syndrome. After their evaluation, 43 percent of these older patients were discharged home with a referral for outpatient treatment. In contrast to prior studies, only 35 percent of the sample were taking two or more psychoactive medications. Only two patients were referred for evaluation from skilled nursing homes. PMID:3404560

  9. Diagnostic profiles of adult psychiatric outpatients with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Eugenia I; Dalrymple, Kristy; Chelminski, Iwona; Zimmerman, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Despite growing recognition that attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly prevalent, impairing, and comorbid disorder that persists into adulthood, reports on the nature and extent of its psychiatric comorbidities have been mixed to date. This study compared the prevalence rates of all major Axis I disorders as well as borderline personality disorder in an unselected sample of adult psychiatric outpatients with and without ADHD. As part of the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project, we administered a DSM-IV-based semi-structured diagnostic interview assessing ADHD and other psychiatric disorders to 1134 patients presenting for initial evaluation at an outpatient psychiatric practice. Logistic regression analyses were used to compare the rates of each disorder in patients with versus without an ADHD diagnosis (both overall and by Combined and Inattentive type). Patients with (versus without) any ADHD diagnosis had significantly higher rates of bipolar disorder, social phobia, impulse control disorders, eating disorders, and BPD, and significantly lower rates of major depressive disorder and adjustment disorder (all p<.05). Patients with (versus without) ADHD-Inattentive type had significantly higher rates of social phobia and eating disorders, whereas those with (versus without) the ADHD-Combined type had significantly higher rates of bipolar disorder, alcohol dependence, and BPD (all p<.05). In this novel investigation of the psychiatric profiles of an unselected sample of treatment-seeking adult outpatients with versus without ADHD, a distinct pattern of comorbidities emerged across subtypes, with implications for the accurate assessment and treatment of patients presenting for psychiatric care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychiatric morbidity in hypertensives attending a cardiology outpatient clinic in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Oshodi, Y O; Adeyemi, J D; Oke, D A; Seedat, S

    2012-01-01

    To determine kinds of psychiatric morbidity among a sample of stable hypertensive outpatients in a teaching hospital. A cross-sectional study of 260 enrolled outpatients. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using a 2-stage evaluation method with the General Health Questionnaire Version 12 (GHQ-12) and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) to assess for psychiatric diagnosis. 28 (10.8%) of the 260 patients endorsed some psychological distress, with a mean GHQ-12 score of ≥ 2. At the second stage, 16.1% (N=13 of 81) interviewed had one or more psychiatric disorder on the SCID. The commonest psychiatric diagnosis made were mood disorders, with current major depressive disorder occurring at a rate of 6.2%. Other disorders found were past major depressive episode (2.5%), organic mood syndrome (3.7%), and somatoform disorder (3.7%). The relationship between hypertension and mood disorders should inform a higher index of suspicion among physicians and general practitioners in order to give patients appropriate treatments or referrals where necessary. It is recommended that collaboration with mental health service providers be encouraged.

  11. Blood pressure associates with standing balance in elderly outpatients.

    PubMed

    Pasma, Jantsje H; Bijlsma, Astrid Y; Klip, Janneke M; Stijntjes, Marjon; Blauw, Gerard Jan; Muller, Majon; Meskers, Carel G M; Maier, Andrea B

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of the association of blood pressure measurements in supine and standing position after a postural change, as a proxy for blood pressure regulation, with standing balance in a clinically relevant cohort of elderly, is of special interest as blood pressure may be important to identify patients at risk of having impaired standing balance in routine geriatric assessment. In a cross-sectional cohort study, 197 community-dwelling elderly referred to a geriatric outpatient clinic of a middle-sized teaching hospital were included. Blood pressure was measured intermittently (n = 197) and continuously (subsample, n = 58) before and after a controlled postural change from supine to standing position. The ability to maintain standing balance was assessed during ten seconds of side-by-side, semi-tandem and tandem stance, with both eyes open and eyes closed. Self-reported impaired standing balance and history of falls were recorded by questionnaires. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between blood pressure and 1) the ability to maintain standing balance; 2) self-reported impaired standing balance; and 3) history of falls, adjusted for age and sex. Blood pressure decrease after postural change, measured continuously, was associated with reduced ability to maintain standing balance in semi-tandem stance with eyes closed and with increased self-reported impaired standing balance and falls. Presence of orthostatic hypotension was associated with reduced ability to maintain standing balance in semi-tandem stance with eyes closed for both intermittent and continuous measurements and with increased self-reported impaired standing balance for continuous measurements. Continuous blood pressure measurements are of additional value to identify patients at risk of having impaired standing balance and may therefore be useful in routine geriatric care.

  12. Blood Pressure Associates with Standing Balance in Elderly Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Pasma, Jantsje H.; Bijlsma, Astrid Y.; Klip, Janneke M.; Stijntjes, Marjon; Blauw, Gerard Jan; Muller, Majon; Meskers, Carel G. M.; Maier, Andrea B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Assessment of the association of blood pressure measurements in supine and standing position after a postural change, as a proxy for blood pressure regulation, with standing balance in a clinically relevant cohort of elderly, is of special interest as blood pressure may be important to identify patients at risk of having impaired standing balance in routine geriatric assessment. Materials and Methods In a cross-sectional cohort study, 197 community-dwelling elderly referred to a geriatric outpatient clinic of a middle-sized teaching hospital were included. Blood pressure was measured intermittently (n = 197) and continuously (subsample, n = 58) before and after a controlled postural change from supine to standing position. The ability to maintain standing balance was assessed during ten seconds of side-by-side, semi-tandem and tandem stance, with both eyes open and eyes closed. Self-reported impaired standing balance and history of falls were recorded by questionnaires. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between blood pressure and 1) the ability to maintain standing balance; 2) self-reported impaired standing balance; and 3) history of falls, adjusted for age and sex. Results Blood pressure decrease after postural change, measured continuously, was associated with reduced ability to maintain standing balance in semi-tandem stance with eyes closed and with increased self-reported impaired standing balance and falls. Presence of orthostatic hypotension was associated with reduced ability to maintain standing balance in semi-tandem stance with eyes closed for both intermittent and continuous measurements and with increased self-reported impaired standing balance for continuous measurements. Conclusion Continuous blood pressure measurements are of additional value to identify patients at risk of having impaired standing balance and may therefore be useful in routine geriatric care. PMID:25222275

  13. Self-construal among psychiatric outpatients: a test of the golden section.

    PubMed

    Badesha, J; Horley, J

    2000-12-01

    Self-construal among individuals diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder has been examined infrequently, and many variables (e.g. sex, patient status, type of problem) possibly related to self-construal and psychological problems have yet to be examined in combination and in detail. This paper reports on research into a variety of factors that could influence self-construing as predicted by the golden section hypothesis. A study was conducted to examine how psychiatric outpatients, both male and female with varying mental health diagnoses, view themselves and others in terms of positive and negative construct poles. A card-sort repertory test was used to elicit personal constructs. Among 40 Canadian outpatient participants, the golden section could account for the overall results, with no significant statistical differences by sex or diagnosis. Some deviations from the golden section were found, however. Females with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, for example, applied more negative than positive constructs to themselves.

  14. Self-Determination Theory and Outpatient Follow-Up After Psychiatric Hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Rebecca K; Bowersox, Nicholas W; Ganoczy, Dara; Valenstein, Marcia; Pfeiffer, Paul N

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether the constructs of self-determination theory-autonomy, competence, and relatedness-are associated with adherence to outpatient follow-up appointments after psychiatric hospitalization. 242 individuals discharged from inpatient psychiatric treatment within the Veterans Health Administration completed surveys assessing self-determination theory constructs as well as measures of depression and barriers to treatment. Medical records were used to count the number of mental health visits and no-shows in the 14 weeks following discharge. Logistic regression models assessed the association between survey items assessing theory constructs and attendance at mental healthcare visits. In multivariate models, none of the self-determination theory factors predicted outpatient follow-up attendance. The constructs of self-determination theory as measured by a single self-report survey may not reliably predict adherence to post-hospital care. Need factors such as depression may be more strongly predictive of treatment adherence.

  15. Prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use in psychiatric outpatients: comparison of women of childbearing age with men.

    PubMed

    Camsarı, Ulas; Viguera, Adele C; Ralston, Laurel; Baldessarini, Ross J; Cohen, Lee S

    2014-12-01

    To characterize current treatment practices, we compared the use of atypical antipsychotic drugs among women of childbearing age to men based on electronic medical records of 1073 hospital-based psychiatric outpatients given at least one second-generation antipsychotic drug. One quarter of psychiatric outpatients sampled were prescribed at least one atypical antipsychotic, in more than half of cases for off-label indications. Women were significantly more likely than men to be diagnosed with mood or anxiety disorders than psychotic disorders and to be prescribed quetiapine (60.7 vs. 48.0 %) or aripiprazole (31.2 vs. 23.9 %), but less likely risperidone (15.8 vs. 26.1 %) or ziprasidone (10 vs. 14 %).

  16. Pathological narcissism and depressive symptoms in psychiatric outpatients: mediating role of dysfunctional attitudes.

    PubMed

    Marčinko, Darko; Jakšić, Nenad; Ivezić, Ena; Skočić, Milena; Surányi, Zsuzsanna; Lončar, Mladen; Franić, Tomislav; Jakovljević, Miro

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between pathological narcissism (narcissistic grandiosity and narcissistic vulnerability), dysfunctional attitudes (perfectionism and dependency on other people), and depressive symptoms in psychiatric outpatients. A sample of 234 adult psychiatric outpatients (57.3% male; mean age 44.39 years) completed the Pathological Narcissism Inventory, the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale-Form A, and the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales-21. Narcissistic vulnerability exhibited unique positive correlations with depressive symptoms, whereas narcissistic grandiosity showed substantially weaker correlations with depressive symptoms. Perfectionism partially mediated the relationship between narcissistic vulnerability and depressive symptoms. The mediating role of dependency was not confirmed. Among adult psychiatric outpatients, narcissistic vulnerability is more strongly related to depressive symptoms than narcissistic grandiosity, and dysfunctional perfectionism represents one of the underlying mechanisms of this relationship. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders diagnostic criteria and the treatment of pathological narcissism. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Common psychiatric disorders among the elderly attending a general psychiatric out patient clinic in Accra, Ghana: a five year retrospective study (1989-1993).

    PubMed

    Turkson, S N; Asamoah, V

    1997-01-01

    Details of thirty-five (35) elderly patients aged from sixty (60) years and upwards, who had attended a general psychiatric outpatient clinic, and duly registered as new patients between 1989-1993 were analysed. Depressive illness using the ICD-10 diagnostic criteria was found to be the predominant diagnostic category. This was followed by Dementia and Paranoid delusional disorder. No significant psychosocial contributory factors were elicited among the depressives. However, among the demerits there was a strong association with a previous history of excessive alcohol intake, especially the locally brewed Gin-Akpeteshie among the males. Paranoid delusional disorder was found to be commoner among females, a third of those having had similar disorder in the past, and was associated with partial blindness and partial deafness. The majority of the patients were living with relatives. The implications of these findings with regards to future planning and the care of the elderly are discussed.

  18. Measures of motivation for psychiatric treatment based on self-determination theory: psychometric properties in Dutch psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Jochems, Eline C; Mulder, Cornelis L; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; van Dam, Arno

    2014-08-01

    Self-determination theory is potentially useful for understanding reasons why individuals with mental illness do or do not engage in psychiatric treatment. The current study examined the psychometric properties of three questionnaires based on self-determination theory-The Treatment Entry Questionnaire (TEQ), Health Care Climate Questionnaire (HCCQ), and the Short Motivation Feedback List (SMFL)-in a sample of 348 Dutch adult outpatients with primary diagnoses of mood, anxiety, psychotic, and personality disorders. Structural equation modeling showed that the empirical factor structures of the TEQ and SMFL were adequately represented by a model with three intercorrelated factors. These were interpreted as identified, introjected, and external motivation. The reliabilities of the Dutch TEQ, HCCQ, and SMFL were found to be acceptable but can be improved on; congeneric estimates ranged from 0.66 to 0.94 depending on the measure and patient subsample. Preliminary support for the construct validities of the questionnaires was found in the form of theoretically expected associations with other scales, including therapist-rated motivation and treatment engagement and with legally mandated treatment. Additionally, the study provides insights into the relations between measures of motivation based on self-determination theory, the transtheoretical model and the integral model of treatment motivation in psychiatric outpatients with severe mental illness.

  19. Psychiatric rehospitalization among elderly persons in the United States.

    PubMed

    Prince, Jonathan D; Akincigil, Ayse; Kalay, Ece; Walkup, James T; Hoover, Donald R; Lucas, Judith; Bowblis, John; Crystal, Stephen

    2008-09-01

    This study examined predictors of psychiatric rehospitalization among elderly persons. Readmission within six months of an index hospitalization was modeled by using Medicare data on all hospitalizations with a primary psychiatric diagnosis in the first half of 2002 (N=41,839). Data were linked with state and community-level information from the U.S. census. Twenty-two percent of beneficiaries were rehospitalized for psychiatric reasons within six months of discharge. After the analyses adjusted for sociodemographic factors, readmission was most likely among persons with a primary diagnosis of schizophrenia (hazard ratio [HR]=2.63), followed by bipolar disorder (HR=2.51), depression (HR=1.75), and substance abuse (HR=1.38) (reference group was "other" psychiatric conditions). A baseline hospital stay of five or more days for an affective disorder was associated with a reduced readmission hazard (HR=.68, relative to shorter stays), yet the opposite was true for a nonaffective disorder (HR=1.26). For persons with nonaffective disorders, an elevated hazard of readmission was associated with comorbid alcohol dependence (HR=1.32), panic disorder (HR=1.76), borderline personality disorder (HR=2.33), and drug dependence (HR=1.17). However, for persons with affective disorders, having a personality disorder other than borderline personality disorder or dependent personality disorder (HR=1.27) and having an "other" anxiety disorder (HR=1.15) were significantly associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization. Obsessive-compulsive disorder increased the readmission hazard in both groups. Readmission risk factors may differ for affective disorders and nonaffective disorders. Very short hospitalizations were associated with increased risk of rehospitalization among persons with an affective disorder, which underscores the need for adequate stabilization of this group of patients during hospitalization. Results also highlight the specific types of comorbidities associated

  20. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed. PMID:27774073

  1. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients' engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed.

  2. Intimate partner violence perpetrators in a forensic psychiatric outpatient setting: criminal history, psychopathology, and victimization.

    PubMed

    Henrichs, Jens; Bogaerts, Stefan; Sijtsema, Jelle; Klerx-van Mierlo, Fanny

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated criminological, psychopathological, and victimological profiles of intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators in a sample of 119 Dutch female and male forensic psychiatric outpatients aged 18 to 58 years. In addition, differences in criminological, psychopathological, and victimological factors between IPV perpetrators (n = 61, 51.3%) and non-intimate violence (NIV) perpetrators (n = 58, 48.7%) were examined. All data, including information on demographics, criminal history, history of psychological, sexual, and physical victimization during childhood or adolescence, family history of psychopathology, history of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence, and mental disorders, were derived from archival electronic medical records. Mental disorders were measured using structured psychiatric interviews and final consensus diagnoses were established during weekly case consultations. Both IPV and NIV perpetrators displayed high rates of criminal history, psychopathology, and previous victimization, but the two groups did not differ in these factors with two exceptions. IPV perpetrators were significantly more likely to have higher rates of previous physical victimization and intermittent explosive disorder than NIV perpetrators. The current study suggests that a history of physical victimization and intermittent explosive disorder are specific characteristics of IPV perpetrators in a forensic psychiatric outpatient setting. Future research should focus on mechanisms explaining the association of childhood victimization and IPV and increase our understanding of the role of intermittent explosive disorder in IPV.

  3. Psychiatric Outpatients After the 3.11 Complex Disaster in Fukushima, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hori, Arinobu; Hoshino, Hiroshi; Miura, Itaru; Hisamura, Masaki; Wada, Akira; Itagaki, Shuntaro; Kunii, Yasuto; Matsumoto, Junya; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Katz, Craig L; Yabe, Hirooki; Niwa, Shin-Ichi

    After the 3.11 complex disaster, fear of radioactive contamination and forced evacuation influenced a number of residents to seek psychiatric care. This study assessed the sequential changes in the number of new outpatients and patients with acute stress disorder (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), adjustment disorder, and depression after the Fukushima disaster. We distributed questionnaires to 77 psychiatric institutions to determine the number of new outpatients between March and June in 2010, 2011, and 2012. There were 771, 1000, and 733 new patients in 2010, 2011, and 2012, respectively. We observed a statistically significant increase in new patients with ASD or PTSD and a significant decrease in patients with depression in 2011, which returned to predisaster levels in 2012. There were time- and disease-dependent changes in the numbers of psychiatric care-seeking individuals after the 3.11 complex disaster in Fukushima. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Parent Burden in Accessing Outpatient Psychiatric Services for Adolescent Depression in a Large State System.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Kaitlin P; Olin, S Serene; Storfer-Isser, Amy; O'Connor, Briannon C; Whitmyre, Emma D; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2017-04-01

    This study examined barriers facing parents who seek outpatient psychiatric care in a large state system for adolescents with depression. A total of 264 outpatient facilities licensed to treat youths in New York were contacted by using a mystery shopper methodology. Callers tracked the number of call attempts, in-person appointments, and other steps required prior to seeing a psychiatrist. Fewer than two-thirds of parents made a psychiatry, therapy, or intake appointment. Of those who did not make an appointment, 19% received no referrals. Most callers made at least two calls and spoke with at least two people before initiating scheduling. Virtually all clinics required at least one intake or therapy appointment before receipt of a psychiatry appointment. Parental burden did not differ by region, urbanicity, clinic type, seasonality (spring or summer), or insurance status. Families of youths with mental health needs face considerable burden in accessing timely treatment.

  5. A test of the tripartite model of depression and anxiety in older adult psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Cook, Joan M; Orvaschel, Helen; Simco, Edward; Hersen, Michel; Joiner, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    This study examined the tripartite model of depression and anxiety in 131 psychiatric outpatients, ages 55-87. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed that a 3-factor model provided an adequate fit to the observed data, that the 3-factor model was empirically superior to 1- or 2-factor models, and that the 3-factor structure obtained in the current sample of older adult outpatients converged with that obtained on a separate, younger 'sample. Negative affect was significantly related to depression and anxiety symptoms and syndromes, and positive affect was more highly related to depression than anxiety symptoms and syndromes. Ways for taking into account possible age-associated differences in emotion in older adults and thus improving the conceptual model of anxiety and depression are briefly noted.

  6. Prevalence of and Factors Associated With Sleep-Related Eating Disorder in Psychiatric Outpatients Taking Hypnotics.

    PubMed

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Jun; Komada, Yoko; Murakoshi, Akiko; Futenma, Kunihiro; Nishida, Shingo; Inoue, Yuichi

    2016-07-01

    To clarify the prevalence and clinical features of sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) in psychiatric outpatients taking hypnotics as well as factors associated with the disorder. From February 1, 2012, to February 29, 2012, a cross-sectional study was undertaken. A questionnaire addressing demographics, the Japanese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), presence of abnormal behavior during sleep focusing on SRED and sleepwalking, and duration of hypnotic medication and subjective side effects of the drug was distributed to psychiatric outpatients who were taking hypnotics at the time of the survey. Of 1,318 patients taking hypnotics, 1,048 patients (79.5%) provided valid responses, and 88 of them (8.4%) had experienced SRED. The SRED group was significantly younger, had a significantly higher total PSQI score, and took higher bedtime diazepam-equivalent doses of hypnotics than the non-SRED group (P < .01 for all comparisons). In the SRED group, subjective side effects due to hypnotics were present at significantly higher proportions than in the non-SRED group. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.96-0.99, P = .021), taking 2 or more kinds of antipsychotics (aOR = 3.41, 95% CI = 1.93-6.05, P < .001), and the bedtime diazepam-equivalent dose of a hypnotic (aOR = 1.03, 95% CI = 1.01-1.05, P = .039) were significantly associated with the experience of SRED. The prevalence of SRED in psychiatric outpatients taking hypnotics is elevated, particularly in younger patients, and the hypnosedative effects of the drugs could be responsible for the occurrence of the disorder in this population. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  7. Psychiatric diagnoses and psychosocial needs of outpatient deaf children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, Sarah A; Diaz, David R; Spring, Noah Z; Sheward, Jerry; Sculley, Charleen

    2014-02-01

    Deaf youth may be more vulnerable to psychiatric disorders but very little research data is available. The current study identified prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders and examined the psychosocial needs and strengths of deaf youth aged 4-17 receiving specialized outpatient mental health services for the deaf. Compared to hearing peers, deaf youth had greater rates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct, autism-spectrum and bipolar disorders and spent three times longer in treatment than their hearing peers. In the deaf subsample, moderate-severe risk was found in social functioning (33.3 %) and suicidal behavior (14 %). Deaf youth had moderate to severe impairment in social relationships (54.8 %), school functioning (42.9 %). Over one-third of deaf youth had impaired family relationships, living situation, communication, judgment and physical health. Deaf youth present with higher rates of certain clinical disorders and have deficits in multiple life domains that may impact functioning and create a longer treatment course.

  8. Text Messaging for Psychiatric Outpatients: Effect on Help-Seeking and Self-Harming Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Toyohiko; Syouji, Hiroko; Takaki, Sachiko; Fujimoto, Hirokazu; Ishikawa, Shinichi; Fukutake, Masaaki; Taira, Masaru; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    A mobile phone intervention was developed and tested with 30 psychiatric outpatients with mental illness, who had high ideation for suicide. The intervention involved promoting help-seeking behaviors by sending text messages, including information about social welfare services and reminders about medical appointments, for 6 months. After the intervention period, the number of participants who used social services significantly increased, and more than 80% of participants reported that the text messaging service was helpful and useful. Compared to baseline, participants' self-harming behaviors decreased and the attending psychiatrists rated their suicide ideation as weaker. This is the first intervention study to promote psychiatric patients' help-seeking using text messaging, and although it was not a randomized controlled trial, this intervention has practical value and may lead to the prevention of suicide. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Traumatization in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Adult Psychiatric Outpatients.

    PubMed

    Øhre, Beate; Uthus, Mette Perly; von Tetzchner, Stephen; Falkum, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Deaf and hard-of-hearing persons are at risk for experiencing traumatic events and such experiences are associated with symptoms of mental disorder. We investigated the prevalence of traumatic events and subsequent traumatization in adults referred to specialized psychiatric outpatient units for deaf and hard-of-hearing patients. Sixty-two patients were diagnosed with mental disorders and assessed for potential traumatic experiences in their preferred language and mode of communication using instruments translated into Norwegian Sign Language. All patients reported traumatic events, with a mean of 6.2 different types; 85% reported subsequent traumatization not significantly associated with either residential school setting or communicative competence of childhood caregivers. Traumatization patterns in both sexes were similar to those in hearing clinical samples. Findings indicate that psychiatric intake interviews should routinely assess potentially traumatic events and their impacts, and that mental health professionals working with deaf and hard-of-hearing patients should be able to treat trauma-related disorders.

  10. Use of Legal Drugs by Psychiatric Outpatients: Benefits, Costs, and Change

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Kate B.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Carey, Michael P.; Gordon, Christopher M.; Correia, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol use by persons with a severe mental illness occurs frequently but is poorly understood. We used qualitative methods to elicit information regarding the functional relationships between legal substance use and its antecedents and consequences. This report summarizes responses provided by 37 psychiatric outpatients who participated in focus groups and key informant interviews regarding the use and functions of alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine. We describe major themes regarding positive and negative consequences, triggers for use, change efforts, and offer observations regarding substance use in this under-served population. PMID:18545676

  11. Chance of psychiatric morbidity amongst recently diagnosed cancer outpatients attending a chemotherapy unit.

    PubMed

    Chaves, A C; Pinto, R N; Lourenço, M T; Mari, J J

    2005-09-01

    The prevalent rate of psychiatry morbidity amongst patients with cancer reported in various studies ranges from 5 to 50%, a variation that can be attributed to differences in sample size, the disease itself and treatment factors. The objectives of the present study were to determine the frequency of psychiatric morbidity amongst recently diagnosed cancer outpatients and try to identify which factors might be related to further psychological distress. Two hundred and eleven (70.9%) female patients and 87 (29.1%) male patients from the chemotherapy unit of the Cancer Hospital A.C. Camargo (São Paulo) completed a questionnaire that featured data on demographic, medical and treatment details. The Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) was administered to the patients to determine their personal psychiatric morbidity. Seventy-two patients (25.8%) scored > or = 8 in the SRQ-20, the cut-off point for a patient to be considered a psychiatric case. When the low and high scoring groups were compared no differences were detected regarding age, marital status, tumor site, sex, or previous treatment. Nonetheless, patients in the lowest social class and those who were bedridden less than 50% of the time had a significantly higher probability of being a psychiatric case. Regarding help-seeking behavior in situations in which they had doubts or were frightened, about 64% of the total sample did not seek any type of support and did not talk to anyone. This frequency of psychiatric morbidity agrees with data from the cancer literature. According to many investigators, the early detection of a comorbid psychiatric disorder is crucial to relieve a patient's suffering.

  12. Psychiatric disorders among elderly patients admitted to hospital medical wards.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, B

    1987-01-01

    A psychiatric investigation was carried out on patients aged 65-80 years who were admitted to the medical wards of six general hospitals in an industrial urban area of West Germany. In all, 626 patients were screened for cognitive and affective disorder using a short standardized interview, and at the second stage all those with abnormal responses, as well as a subsample of the apparently normal patients, were examined in greater detail. After correction for inaccuracies of screening, the frequency of psychiatric illness in this patient population was estimated as 30.2%, made up of 9.1% with organic brain syndromes and 21.1% with functional mental disorders. Comparison with field-study data for the same background population showed that the hospital patients were at increased risk for mental disturbance. At follow up after one year, outcome in terms of mortality, admission to long-term care and dependency on others was worst for patients with organic mental disorder, even after matching for age and initial severity of physical impairment. Functional mental illness was also associated with a relatively poor outcome in terms of dependency. The mental status of elderly medical patients appears to be important for the prognosis. PMID:3560118

  13. Outpatient repair for inguinal hernia in elderly patients: still a challenge?

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Piergaspare; Amatucci, Chiara; Perotti, Bruno; Zullino, Antonio; Dezzi, Claudia; Illuminati, Giulio; Vietri, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Elective inguinal hernia repair as a day case is a safe and suitable procedure, with well-recognized feasibility. The increasing number of elderly patients requiring inguinal hernia repair leads clinicians to admit a growing number of outpatients. The aim of the current study was to analyze the outcomes (feasibility and safety) of day case treatment in elderly patients. Eighty patients >80 years of age and 80 patients ≤55 years of age underwent elective inguinal hernia repairs under local anesthesia. There were no mortalities or major complications in the elderly undergoing inguinal herniorraphies as outpatients, and only one unanticipated admission occurred in the younger age group. Elective inguinal hernia repair in the elderly has a good outcome, and age alone should not be a drawback to day case treatment. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Economic Hardship, Parent Positive Communication and Mental Health in Urban Adolescents Seeking Outpatient Psychiatric Care.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Erin M; Nichols, Sara R; Javdani, Shabnam; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri R

    2015-03-01

    Economic hardship and poor parenting behaviors are associated with increased risk for mental health problems in community adolescents. However, less is known about the impact of socioeconomic status (SES) and parenting behaviors on youth at elevated risk for mental health problems, such as teens seeking outpatient psychiatric care. This study examined whether family SES and parent positive communication were directly and indirectly associated with mental health symptoms six months later in urban teens seeking outpatient treatment, after accounting for baseline levels of symptoms. At baseline, adolescent participants (N = 346; 42% female; 61% African-American) ages 12 to 19 years old (M = 14.9; SD = 1.8) and their primary caregivers reported on SES and teen internalizing and externalizing symptoms and engaged in a videotaped discussion of a real-life conflict to assess parent positive communication. At 6-month follow-up, 81% (N = 279) of families were retained and teens and caregivers again reported internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to test the hypothesized models with a sample of 338, using the full information likelihood method to adjust for missing data. For parent-reported externalizing symptoms, SEM revealed support for the indirect association of SES with follow-up externalizing symptoms via parent positive communication and externalizing symptoms at baseline. For parent reported internalizing symptoms, there was a direct association between SES and follow-up internalizing symptoms, but not an indirect effect via parent positive communication. Youth-reported symptoms were not associated with SES nor with parent positive communication. Current findings extend prior research on adolescent mental health in a diverse sample of urban youth seeking outpatient psychiatric care. These families may benefit from interventions that directly target SES-related difficulties and parent positive communication.

  15. Economic Hardship, Parent Positive Communication and Mental Health in Urban Adolescents Seeking Outpatient Psychiatric Care

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Sara R.; Javdani, Shabnam; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri R.

    2014-01-01

    Economic hardship and poor parenting behaviors are associated with increased risk for mental health problems in community adolescents. However, less is known about the impact of socioeconomic status (SES) and parenting behaviors on youth at elevated risk for mental health problems, such as teens seeking outpatient psychiatric care. This study examined whether family SES and parent positive communication were directly and indirectly associated with mental health symptoms six months later in urban teens seeking outpatient treatment, after accounting for baseline levels of symptoms. At baseline, adolescent participants (N = 346; 42% female; 61% African-American) ages 12 to 19 years old (M = 14.9; SD = 1.8) and their primary caregivers reported on SES and teen internalizing and externalizing symptoms and engaged in a videotaped discussion of a real-life conflict to assess parent positive communication. At 6-month follow-up, 81% (N = 279) of families were retained and teens and caregivers again reported internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to test the hypothesized models with a sample of 338, using the full information likelihood method to adjust for missing data. For parent-reported externalizing symptoms, SEM revealed support for the indirect association of SES with follow-up externalizing symptoms via parent positive communication and externalizing symptoms at baseline. For parent reported internalizing symptoms, there was a direct association between SES and follow-up internalizing symptoms, but not an indirect effect via parent positive communication. Youth-reported symptoms were not associated with SES nor with parent positive communication. Current findings extend prior research on adolescent mental health in a diverse sample of urban youth seeking outpatient psychiatric care. These families may benefit from interventions that directly target SES-related difficulties and parent positive communication. PMID:25750502

  16. Attachment, affective temperament, and personality disorders: a study of their relationships in psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Kai; Berlow, Rustin; Thomas, Michael L

    2013-12-01

    As the result of extensive translational and cross-disciplinary research, attachment theory is now a construct with significant neuropsychiatric traction. The correlation of attachment with other influential conceptual models (i.e. temperament and personality) is therefore of interest. Consequently, we explored how two attachment dimensions (attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance) correlated with measures of temperament and personality in 357 psychiatric outpatients. We performed a retrospective review of four questionnaires (the Experiences in Close Relationship scale (ECR-R), Temperament and Character inventory (TCI), Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego questionnaire (TEMPS-A), and Personality Self-Portrait Questionnaire (PSQ)). Frequency measures and correlations were examined, as was the predictive value of attachment security for a personality disorder (PD). Significant, robust correlations were found between attachment anxiety and (1) several negative affective temperaments (dysthymic and cyclothymic); (2) several indices of personality pathology (low self-directedness (TCI), DSM-IV paranoid, borderline, histrionic, avoidant and dependent personality traits). Attachment avoidance had fewer large correlations. In an exploratory model, the negative predictive value of attachment security for a PD was 86%. Subjects were a relatively homogeneous subset of ambulatory psychiatric outpatients. PD diagnoses were via self-report. Clinically, these findings highlight the significant overlap between attachment, affective temperament, and personality and support the value of attachment as a screen for PDs. More broadly, given our growing understanding of the neurobiology of attachment (i.e. links with the oxytocin system), these results raise interesting questions about underlying biological systems and psychiatric treatment. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Disclosure of Use and Abuse of Controlled Substances Among Psychiatric Outpatients.

    PubMed

    De Marco Centeno, Patricia; Baig, Mirza; Lee, Sung-Eun Melanie; Lane, Christianne J; Lagomasino, Isabel T

    2015-11-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a serious health concern and is considered a nationwide epidemic. Patients often fail or refuse to disclose the use of controlled substances, leaving prescribers and pharmacies unaware of the potential for harmful drug interactions and risk of overdose. Psychiatric patients are especially vulnerable to controlled substance misuse. To determine hazardous patterns of prescription drug use among psychiatric outpatients and to raise awareness about the importance of reviewing information provided by prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs). The medical records of 150 patients attending the Adult Outpatient Psychiatric Clinic at the Los Angeles County+University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center from July 2012 through May 2013 were reviewed. Patient activity reports were generated from California's PDMP. Nondisclosure of controlled substance use was identified by a discrepancy between patient reporting of prescriptions according to the medical records and PDMP reports. A "pattern suggestive of prescription drug abuse" was defined as having one or more of the following: within-class prescriptions from multiple providers and/or within-class early refills or within-class overlapping prescriptions picked up within 10 days of each other. Of the 150 patients, 113 were found in California's PDMP database. Of these 113 patients, 81 had obtained 111 prescriptions for controlled substances in the past 12 months. Of these 111 prescriptions, 52 (47%) were not disclosed to the primary psychiatrist, of which 14 (27%) revealed patterns consistent with prescription drug abuse. Reviewing PDMP databases before prescribing controlled substances should be considered a standard prescribing practice to prevent abuse, diversion, and adverse medical outcomes.

  18. Satisfaction and associated factors of outpatient psychiatric service consumers in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Yimer, Solomon; Yohannis, Zegeye; Getinet, Wondale; Mekonen, Tesfa; Fekadu, Wubalem; Belete, Habte; Menberu, Melak; Getnet, Asmamaw; Belete, Amsalu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the level of patient satisfaction and associated factors with psychiatric outpatient services in Ethiopia. Patients and methods A cross-sectional study was performed from May 2015 to June 2015. A total of 454 participants selected by systematic random sampling were included in this study. Pretested and interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. Patient satisfaction was measured using Charleston Psychiatric Outpatient Satisfaction Scale, and other validated tools were used to assess the associated variables. Multivariate logistic regressions with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the strength, and P-value <0.05 was used to indicate significance of association. Results A total of 441 respondents were enrolled, with a response rate of 97.1% and magnitude of satisfaction of 61.2%. Being male (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =0.612, 95% CI: 0.39, 0.94), being widowed (AOR =0.13, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.36), urban residence (AOR =0.49, 95% CI: 0.31, 0.78), diagnosed with schizophrenia (AOR =0.48, 95% CI: 0.28, 0.81), unfavorable attitude (AOR =0.49, 95% CI: 0.28, 0.86), and poor social functioning (AOR =0.52, 95% CI: 0.34, 0.80) were significantly associated with satisfaction. Conclusion More than one-third of psychiatric service consumers were dissatisfied with the service they received. Integrating patients to their own treatment plan and regular service evaluation are important to improve satisfaction. PMID:27703333

  19. Satisfaction and associated factors of outpatient psychiatric service consumers in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Yimer, Solomon; Yohannis, Zegeye; Getinet, Wondale; Mekonen, Tesfa; Fekadu, Wubalem; Belete, Habte; Menberu, Melak; Getnet, Asmamaw; Belete, Amsalu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the level of patient satisfaction and associated factors with psychiatric outpatient services in Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was performed from May 2015 to June 2015. A total of 454 participants selected by systematic random sampling were included in this study. Pretested and interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. Patient satisfaction was measured using Charleston Psychiatric Outpatient Satisfaction Scale, and other validated tools were used to assess the associated variables. Multivariate logistic regressions with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the strength, and P-value <0.05 was used to indicate significance of association. A total of 441 respondents were enrolled, with a response rate of 97.1% and magnitude of satisfaction of 61.2%. Being male (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =0.612, 95% CI: 0.39, 0.94), being widowed (AOR =0.13, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.36), urban residence (AOR =0.49, 95% CI: 0.31, 0.78), diagnosed with schizophrenia (AOR =0.48, 95% CI: 0.28, 0.81), unfavorable attitude (AOR =0.49, 95% CI: 0.28, 0.86), and poor social functioning (AOR =0.52, 95% CI: 0.34, 0.80) were significantly associated with satisfaction. More than one-third of psychiatric service consumers were dissatisfied with the service they received. Integrating patients to their own treatment plan and regular service evaluation are important to improve satisfaction.

  20. Psychiatric disorder among adolescents attending a psychiatric out-patient clinic in Accra, Ghana: a seven year review study (1987-1994).

    PubMed

    Turkson, S N

    1996-01-01

    The records of four hundred and fifty four (454) adolescent comprising of two hundred and thirty nine (239) female and two hundred and fifteen (215) male who had attended a psychiatric out-patient clinic in Accra over a seven year period were reviewed. Only 269 patients had psychiatric illness while 185 (40.7%) had purely physical illness with no associated psychiatric illness. Of the 269 (59.3%) with psychiatric illness, there were 88 (32.7%) with functional psychoses consisting mainly of depression, 47 (17.5%), and psychoneurotic disorders 63, (23.4%); with personality disorders, 55 (20.4%) and with organic psychosis, 27, (10%) while 36, (13.4%) had psychiatric disorders. The aetiology of these disorders could be deduced from the profound biological events that occur during adolescence and the rapid period for personality growth and its associated emotional turmoil. It was suggested that due to the large numbers who attended the psychiatric out-patient clinic with non identifiable psychiatric illness, residency in general practice and internal medicine should include a posting in Psychiatry and that the national health care should pay a greater attention to mental health.

  1. [Sociodemographic characteristics and mental disorders in children and adolescents psychiatric outpatient clinic children of Medellin].

    PubMed

    Ricardo-Ramírez, Carmenza; Álvarez-Gómez, Matilde; Rodríguez-Gázquez, María de los Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    Mental disorders in the world affecting 15% to 30% in children and adolescents, altering its function and emotional, cognitive and social. Affect interpersonal relationships, school performance and increased substance use and the risk of suicide. describe the social-demographic characteristics and mental disorders of children and adolescents of psychiatric consultation. Retrospective descriptive study that analyzed all the histories of children and adolescents of both sexes from 5 to 16 years who attended for the first time outpatient psychiatry university clinic of Medellin, from July 2010 to July 2012. We studied 197 patients, the average age was 11±3.5 years, male sex was the most common 69%, 46.2% belonged to nuclear family. The most prevalent psychiatric disorders were 44.2% ADHD, depressive disorders 9.1% and 8.1% TOC. 61% had psychiatric comorbidity, the most frequent was oppositional defiant disorder with ADHD 35.6%. The frequency of mental disorders and comorbidities found in this study were similar to those reported by other researchers. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Transition Hand-Off from Inpatient to Outpatient Treatment of Acute Pyelonephritis in an Elderly Male.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Patricia L; Shane-McWhorter, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Pyelonephritis is the progression of a urinary tract infection (UTI) to the kidney. In younger patients the infection may not be as severe and may even be treated with oral antibiotics. However, in elderly males pyelonephritis can be more complex and may require hospitalization and treatment with intravenous antibiotics. In the United States UTIs are responsible for frequent visits to emergency departments by elderly individuals. Current literature suggests that pyelonephritis in elderly males is a serious infection that may result in significant morbidity and mortality. Pharmacists are in a unique position to oversee the transition of antibiotic treatment from the inpatient to outpatienT SETTING.

  3. Improving outpatient services for elderly patients in Taiwan: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ren-Jieh; Wu, Yung-Hung; Hsu, Tsung-Shin; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2011-01-01

    The rapid pace of population aging poses significant importance of establishing an age-friendly health care system, including outpatient, inpatient, intermediate, and long-term care. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the quality of outpatient services for elderly patients in Taiwan. Quality function deployment (QFD) is a tool effectively shortening the research-and-development period, reducing costs, and fulfilling customer needs (CNs). This study applied Kano's model and the analytic network process (ANP) to improve the basic framework of QFD. Kano's model enables a thorough understanding of elderly patients' needs and problems with regard to medical care services, so that appropriate outpatient services can be offered to them from the outset. In addition, adapting the supermatrix of ANP to the calculation of the house of quality (HoQ) will reduce subjective judgments. Using Kano's model and an integrated ANP-QFD approach, we extracted five needs of elderly patients and calculated their priorities: 'Professional medical care services convincing patients' (27%), 'With sufficient knowledge to answer patients' questions' (23.5%), 'Providing fast services to solve patients' problems' (19.3%), 'Voluntarily serving patients' (19.1%), and 'Providing proper medical equipment to patients' (11.1%). We then identified six outpatient service attributes deserving of improvement and their priorities: 'Physician with a high level of professionalism and giving clear interpretation of patient's condition' (25%), 'Staff with good communication skills and assistance to patients' (22%), 'High standardization of operating procedures' (18%), 'Staff getting on-the-job training periodically' (15%), 'Facilities sufficient and fitting for elderly patients' (10%), and 'Applying IT (internet) to help patients to receive medical care' (10%). In conclusion, we reconstructed an integrated QFD model which will not only reduce costs but also reveal the crucial outpatient service items

  4. Reported maltreatment in childhood in relation to the personality features of Norwegian adult psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Fosse, Gunilla Klensmeden; Holen, Are

    2007-01-01

    To explore long-term associations between maltreatment in childhood and personality features in adulthood, 160 consecutive adult psychiatric outpatients completed self-administered questionnaires. Maltreatment was defined as either child abuse or neglect exerted by parents or other adults, coldness and overprotection by parents, or bullying by peers. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire was used to detect childhood abuse by parents or other adults, while dimensions of parental coldness and overprotection were captured by the Parental Bonding Instrument. Bullying by peers was measured by an inventory used in schools. Personality variables were covered by the 5-PFa related to the "Big Five," The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Locus of Control of Behavior. Reports of bullying by peers were linked to poor self-esteem and external locus of control. Child maltreatment by parents or other adults were linked to the Big Five personality dimensions; bullying by peers was not.

  5. Prevalence and associated factors of hypnotics dependence among Japanese outpatients with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Akiko; Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Komada, Yoko; Ishikawa, Jun; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-12-30

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of the dependence for benzodiazepine or their agonist (BZDs) hypnotics, as well as factors associated with this dependence among Japanese psychiatric outpatients. One thousand and forty-three patients in the psychiatric outpatient clinic of Tokyo Medical University Hospital receiving treatment with BZDs hypnotics were analyzed. The subjects answered questionnaires including demographic variables, subjective sleep difficulty assessed by the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), duration of hypnotics medication, dose of diazepam equivalent BZDs hypnotics, the presence or absence of subjective side effects due to BZDs hypnotics (dizziness, fatigue, daytime sleepiness, amnesia, and headache), and dependency assessed by the Dependency 2-A (D 2-A) score. Subjects with a D 2-A score ≥10 were considered as having BZDs hypnotics dependence, and the variables associated with the presence of dependence were examined using logistic regression analyses. Eighty-two out of the 1043 subjects (7.9%) were determined to have BZDs hypnotics dependence. Compared with the non-dependence group, the dependence group had a significantly higher proportion of positive respondents for all the side effects. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that the dependence was significantly associated with younger age, higher total PSQI score, and higher daily dose of BZDs hypnotics. Younger age, higher total PSQI score, and higher dose may be associated with BZDs hypnotics dependence. The finding that patients with BZDs hypnotics dependence frequently suffered from subjective side effects and had greater sleep difficulty encourages the establishment of alternative treatments for patients with insomnia symptoms refractory to BZDs hypnotics treatment.

  6. Dissociative identity disorder among adolescents: prevalence in a university psychiatric outpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Sar, Vedat; Onder, Canan; Kilincaslan, Ayse; Zoroglu, Süleyman S; Alyanak, Behiye

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dissociative identity disorder (DID) and other dissociative disorders among adolescent psychiatric outpatients. A total of 116 consecutive outpatients between 11 and 17 years of age who were admitted to the child and adolescent psychiatry clinic of a university hospital for the 1st time were evaluated using the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale, adolescent version of the Child Symptom Inventory-4, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and McMaster Family Assessment Device. All patients were invited for an interview with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D) administered by 2 senior psychiatrists in a blind fashion. There was excellent interrater reliability between the 2 clinicians on SCID-D diagnoses and scores. Among 73 participants, 33 (45.2%) had a dissociative disorder: 12 (16.4%) had DID, and 21 (28.8%) had dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. There was no difference in gender distribution, childhood trauma, or family dysfunction scores between the dissociative and nondissociative groups. Childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction correlated with self-reported dissociation. Of the dissociative adolescents, 93.9% had an additional psychiatric disorder. Among them, only separation anxiety disorder was significantly more prevalent than in controls. Although originally designed for adults, the SCID-D is promising for diagnosing dissociative disorders in adolescents, its modest congruence with self-rated dissociation and lack of relationship between diagnosis and childhood trauma and family dysfunction suggest that the prevalence rates obtained with this instrument originally designed for adults must be replicated. The introduction of diagnostic criteria for adolescent DID in revised versions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, would refine the assessment of dissociative disorders in this age group.

  7. Off-label prescribing of psychotropic drugs in a Danish child and adolescent psychiatric outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Eva Skovslund; Hellfritzsch, Maja; Sørensen, Merete Juul; Rasmussen, Helle; Thomsen, Per Hove; Laursen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the level of off-label treatment with psychotropic drugs at a child and adolescent psychiatric outpatient clinic in Denmark. We performed a cross-sectional study assessing records on patients treated with medicine at two outpatient clinics at the child and adolescent psychiatric ward, on 1 day in 2014. Prescriptions of drugs from ATC group N05-N06 were classified according to label status. Six hundred and fifteen drug prescriptions distributed on nine different drugs were prescribed to 503 children eligible for this study. Overall results showed that 170 of the 615 prescriptions were off-label, which corresponds to 27.6 %. Attention deficit hyperkinetic disorder (ADHD) drugs were prescribed 450 times (73.2 %) of which 11 prescriptions were off-label (2.4 %). Other psychotropic drugs comprised 165 (26.8 %) prescriptions and of these 159 (96.4 %) were off-label. With 106 prescriptions, melatonin was the most prescribed of these drugs; all prescriptions were off-label. The main reasons for classifying prescriptions as off-label were age and indication of treatment. This cross-sectional study reveals that medical treatment of children with other psychotropic drugs than ADHD drugs is usually off-label. ADHD drugs were, as the only drug group, primarily prescribed on-label. Although off-label prescription may be rational and even evidence based, the responsibility in case of, e.g. adverse drug reactions is a challenge, and clinical trials in children should be incited.

  8. Evaluation of factors associated with psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Minamisawa, Atsumi; Narumoto, Jin; Yokota, Isao; Fukui, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient dropout from treatment can lead to a deterioration in clinical condition, thereby increasing the need for more intensive therapy that incurs substantial social and economic losses. The aim of this study was to identify factors related to psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan. Methods We retrospectively examined the medical charts of new psychiatric patients who were diagnosed with either a mood disorder (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, code: F3) or an anxiety disorder (F4) in the outpatient clinic at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Hospital in Kyoto, Japan, between April 2010 and March 2013. The baseline characteristics of the patients (age, sex, Global Assessment of Functioning score, Clinical Global Impression–Severity of Illness score, education, occupation, marital status, duration of treatment, and prior treatment history), treating psychiatrist experience in years, and sex concordance between the patients and their treating psychiatrists were analyzed using Cox regression models. Results From among 1,626 eligible new patients during the study period, 532 patients were enrolled in the study (F3: n=176; F4: n=356). The dropout rate was 35.7%, which was similar to that of previous studies. Higher educational level, being married, and lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores were associated with a lower dropout rate. Although psychiatrist experience was not significantly associated with patient dropout in the multivariate analysis, patients treated by less experienced psychiatrists had a higher hazard ratio for dropout (1.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.94–1.85). Conclusion In order to reduce the dropout rate, special focus should be placed on patients with the factors identified in this study, and young psychiatrists should undergo further education to foster adherence. PMID:27703335

  9. Evaluation of factors associated with psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan.

    PubMed

    Minamisawa, Atsumi; Narumoto, Jin; Yokota, Isao; Fukui, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Patient dropout from treatment can lead to a deterioration in clinical condition, thereby increasing the need for more intensive therapy that incurs substantial social and economic losses. The aim of this study was to identify factors related to psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan. We retrospectively examined the medical charts of new psychiatric patients who were diagnosed with either a mood disorder (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, code: F3) or an anxiety disorder (F4) in the outpatient clinic at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Hospital in Kyoto, Japan, between April 2010 and March 2013. The baseline characteristics of the patients (age, sex, Global Assessment of Functioning score, Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness score, education, occupation, marital status, duration of treatment, and prior treatment history), treating psychiatrist experience in years, and sex concordance between the patients and their treating psychiatrists were analyzed using Cox regression models. From among 1,626 eligible new patients during the study period, 532 patients were enrolled in the study (F3: n=176; F4: n=356). The dropout rate was 35.7%, which was similar to that of previous studies. Higher educational level, being married, and lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores were associated with a lower dropout rate. Although psychiatrist experience was not significantly associated with patient dropout in the multivariate analysis, patients treated by less experienced psychiatrists had a higher hazard ratio for dropout (1.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.94-1.85). In order to reduce the dropout rate, special focus should be placed on patients with the factors identified in this study, and young psychiatrists should undergo further education to foster adherence.

  10. [Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy in childhood anxiety disorders in a university psychiatric outpatient clinic].

    PubMed

    Goletz, Hildegard; Yang, Young-Im; Suhr-Dachs, Lydia; Walter, Daniel; Döpfner, Manfred

    2013-07-01

    Only few studies have examined whether the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders as demonstrated in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) generalizes to clinical practice. This study examines the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy for juvenile anxiety disorders under routine care conditions in a university-based psychiatric outpatient clinic. 92 children and adolescents with parent-ratings regarding anxiety and comorbid symptoms and 61 children and adolescents with self-ratings regarding anxiety and comorbid symptoms were treated with cognitive-behavioral interventions. Pre/post mean comparisons, effect sizes, and the clinical significance of changes in symptoms were examined. The effect size for reduction of anxiety symptoms was .81 for children whose parents had completed the rating scale and .79 for children who had filled in a self-rating scale. Effect sizes for reduction of comorbid symptoms varied between .37 and .84 for parent ratings and between .21 and .62 for self-ratings. The percentage of children and adolescents who achieved clinically significant improvements in anxiety symptoms was 55.1 % according to the parent ratings and 65.7 % according to the children's self-ratings. More than 50 % of parents and children reported clinically significant improvements in comorbid symptoms. Significant reductions in both anxiety and comorbid symptoms were demonstrated over the course of cognitive-behavioral therapy of juvenile anxiety disorders in a university psychiatric outpatient clinic. The effect sizes for anxiety symptoms were found to be comparable to the effect sizes reported in RCTs. Similarly, clinically significant improvements were as frequent as the rates of remission of anxiety symptoms reported in RCTs.

  11. Productivity growth in Norwegian psychiatric outpatient clinics for children and youths.

    PubMed

    Halsteinli, Vidar; Kittelsen, Sverre A C; Magnussen, Jon

    2005-12-01

    Norwegian government policy is to increase the supply of psychiatric services to children and young persons, both by increasing the number of personnel, and by increasing productivity in the psychiatric outpatient clinics. Increased accessibility is observed for the last years, measured as the number of children receiving services each year. The paper aims to estimate change in productivity among outpatient clinics, and whether any change is related to personnel mix, budget growth or financial incentives. We use a non-parametric method called Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) to estimate a best-practice production frontier. A Malmquist output-based technical productivity index is calculated and decomposed in technical efficiency change, scale efficiency change and frontier shifts. Bootstrapping methods are used to estimate standard errors and confidence intervals for the technical productivity index and its decomposition. In a second stage, the technical productivity index is regressed on variables that may potentially be statistically associated with productivity growth. The paper analyses panel data for the period of 1996-2001. The results indicate increased overall technical productivity by about 4.5 per cent a year in the period, mostly due to frontier shift, but with important contribution from increased technical efficiency. Scale efficiency does not change. Personnel growth has a negative influence on productivity growth, whilst a growth in the portion of university educated personnel improves productivity. The financial reform of 1997 that gave greater weight to interventions per patient led to lower productivity growth in the subsequent period for those that had an initial budgetary gain from the reform. Technical productivity has increased substantially during the period of study, implying a degree of success in the government plan for increasing psychiatric health care. While the decomposition of technical productivity change is less robust to outliers

  12. Outpatient antibiotic therapy for elderly patients. HIAT Study Group.

    PubMed

    Angel, J V

    1994-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of outpatient intravenous (IV) therapy with a third-generation cephalosporin, cefotaxime, in patients > or = 60 years of age and to determine its effect on length of hospital stay. Subset analysis was performed with 62 patients with various infections who had been enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, open-label trial of IV cefotaxime delivered through a computerized ambulatory delivery system (ADS). Initial treatment was given in hospital if required, followed by home therapy. The overall clinical response rate among evaluable patients was 98%, and the overall bacteriologic response rate was 93%. The mean duration of inpatient therapy was 3.6 days less than the mean of 8.2 days allowed under diagnosis-related group (DRG) allotments. Outpatient therapy with cefotaxime via infusion pump is safe and effective and may reduce hospitalization requirements.

  13. Substance Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: Self-Report, Health Care Providers' Clinical Impressions, and Urine Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Laurent; Pihet, Sandrine; Passini, Christina Moses; Feijo, Isabelle; Camus, Didier; Eap, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of substance use among adolescent psychiatric outpatients using a variety of data sources. Method: Using a questionnaire, 3-month prevalence of substance use data were obtained from 50 adolescents and their health care providers. Adolescents' self-reports and providers' clinical impressions were compared with…

  14. Substance Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: Self-Report, Health Care Providers' Clinical Impressions, and Urine Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Laurent; Pihet, Sandrine; Passini, Christina Moses; Feijo, Isabelle; Camus, Didier; Eap, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of substance use among adolescent psychiatric outpatients using a variety of data sources. Method: Using a questionnaire, 3-month prevalence of substance use data were obtained from 50 adolescents and their health care providers. Adolescents' self-reports and providers' clinical impressions were compared with…

  15. Temporal Stability of the Timeline Followback Interview for Alcohol and Drug Use with Psychiatric Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Kate B.; Carey, Michael P.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Henson, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the Timeline Followback (TLFB) interview for assessing daily alcohol and drug use with adults living with a severe mental illness. Method Participants were 132 psychiatric outpatients (64% male) with a confirmed schizophrenia-spectrum (52%) or major mood disorder (48%) and a lifetime history of substance use disorder. This sample completed a 90-day TLFB twice, separated by a mean of 5 days, and represents 55% of the participants who originally consented to be in the study. Results Test-retest reliability coefficients ranged from .73 to 1.00 (rounded) for 30-day TLFB, and from .77 to 1.00 (rounded) for the 90-day TLFB. Within-subject comparisons of means across the three 30-day windows revealed no significant differences, and no degradation of the magnitude of the reliability coefficients was observed with increasingly distal assessment periods. Conclusion The TLFB is a reliable method of assessing alcohol and drug use in outpatients diagnosed with severe mental illness. PMID:15700516

  16. No-show at a forensic psychiatric outpatient clinic: risk factors and reasons.

    PubMed

    Feitsma, W Nathalie; Popping, Roel; Jansen, Daniëlle E M C

    2012-02-01

    Nonattendance for and late cancellations of scheduled appointments, that is no-show, is a well-known phenomenon in psychiatric outpatient clinics. Research on the topic of no-show for initial and consecutive appointments in the field of forensic psychiatry is scarce. This study therefore aims to determine the prevalence and causes of no-show and to explore reasons for nonattendance. The study was carried out in an outpatient clinic in northern Netherlands. Telephone interviews were administered to 27 no-show clients, 84 follow-up no-show clients, and 41 attendees of 18 years and older. A no-show rate of 24.9% and a follow-up no-show rate of 9.8% was found. The majority of appointments missed were in the beginning phase of clinic contact. No-show clients were younger than their attending counterparts and more often dropped out from clinic contact. Also, less family social support was experienced by nonattendees. Reasons for nonattendance were having forgotten about appointment and work commitments.

  17. Leveling and abuse among patients with bipolar disorder at psychiatric outpatient departments in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Belete, Habte

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) clearly states the importance of psychological well-being in the definition of health as "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity". However, in the community, the lives of people with bipolar disorders are often harsh and abusive. Till now, the rate and related information concerning verbal or physical abuse among patients with bipolar disorder at psychiatric outpatient clinics have not been well addressed in Ethiopian settings. Data were collected by interviewing 411 systematically selected participants at outpatient department of Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital. For analysis, logistic regression and adjusted odds ratios (AOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used, and P  < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The prevalence of abuse (verbal/physical) was 37.7%. Having two or more episodes [AOR 1.70, 95% CI (1.06, 2.74)], a history of aggression [AOR 3.06, 95% CI (1.63, 5.75)] and comorbid illness [AOR 2.21, 95% CI (1.25, 3.90)] were significantly associated. The prevalence of reported abuse is high among patients with bipolar disorder, and it is important to remember the rights of patients during treatment.

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of the Short Beck Depression Inventory with Iranian Psychiatric Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Dadfar, Mahboubeh; Kalibatseva, Zornitsa

    2016-01-01

    The short form of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13) is useful for the screening and assessment of depression in clinical and research settings. The aim of the present study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Persian (Farsi) version of BDI-13 in an Iranian clinical sample. The sample consisted of 52 Iranian psychiatric outpatients who received services at psychiatric and psychological clinics at the School of Behavioral Sciences & Mental Health-Tehran Institute of Psychiatry, Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS) in Tehran, Iran. The study examined the reliability, construct validity, and factor structure of the instrument. The instrument indicated good reliability with Cronbach's alpha of .85 and strong construct validity based on moderate to strong positive correlations with other measures of mental health issues. Using a Principal Component Analysis and Varimax Rotation with Kaiser Normalization, three factors were identified and labeled Affective (F1), Somatic/Vegetative (F2), and Cognitive/Loss of Functioning (F3). The current factor structure suggests that depression is a multidimensional construct in an Iranian clinical sample. This study provides further evidence that the Persian version of the BDI-13 is a psychometrically sound instrument that can be used for clinical and research purposes in Iran. PMID:27293979

  19. Assessment of Capacity to Consent to Research Among Psychiatric Outpatients: Prevalence and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Morán-Sánchez, Inés; Luna, Aurelio; Pérez-Cárceles, Maria D

    2016-03-01

    Mental capacity is an emerging ethical legal concept in psychiatric settings but its relation to clinical parameters remains yet uncertain. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between capacity to consent research and different psychiatric disorders and to characterize predictors of impairments in research decision-making capacity across diagnostic groups in a cross-sectional study. 139 consecutively referred outpatients with DSM-IV TR diagnoses of psychotic, mood and anxiety disorders were interviewed and a binary judgment of incapacity was made guided by the MacArthur competence assessment tool for consent research (MacCAT-CR). Demographics and clinical information were assessed by cases notes. Patients with anxiety disorders performed the best on the MacCAT-CR, and patients with psychotic disorders had the worst performance, however, there was considerable heterogeneity within each group. Cognitive impairment and global functioning were strongly correlated with MacCAT-CR subscales scores. 30.6% participants lacked research-related decisional capacity. Low Understanding score OR 0.07 (IC 95% 0.01-0.32) and Low Reasoning score OR 0.30 (IC 95% 0.11-0.82) were the factors most closely associated with lack of capacity. No absolute statements about decisional capacity can be driven merely due to the diagnosis. We found several risk factors which may be considered to decide which populations may require more thorough capacity assessments. The issues under consideration in the present study are by no means unique to people with psychiatric conditions. Ignoring this caveat, risks further inappropriate stigmatization of those with serious mental illness.

  20. Low cognitive status is associated with a lower ability to maintain standing balance in elderly outpatients.

    PubMed

    Stijntjes, Marjon; Pasma, Jantsje H; van Vuuren, Marjet; Blauw, Gerard Jan; Meskers, Carel G M; Maier, Andrea B

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that cognitive performance is involved in maintaining balance and thereby involved in falls in the elderly. To investigate the association of cognitive status with measures of standing balance in elderly outpatients. In a cross-sectional study, 197 community-dwelling elderly [mean age (SD) 81.9 (7.1) years] referred to a geriatric outpatient clinic were included and subsequently dichotomized into a group with low and normal cognitive status based on cut-off values of the Mini-Mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Visual Association Test. The ability to maintain standing balance as well as the center of pressure (CoP) movement were assessed during 10 s of side-by-side, semi-tandem and tandem stance with eyes open and eyes closed. Logistic and linear regression were used to examine the association between cognitive status and measures of standing balance adjusted for age, gender and highest completed education. Low cognitive status in elderly outpatients was associated with a lower ability to maintain 10 s of balance in side-by-side stance with eyes closed [OR (95% CI): 3.57 (1.60; 7.97)] and in semi-tandem stance with eyes open and eyes closed [OR (95% CI): 3.93 (1.71; 9.00) and OR (95% CI): 2.32 (1.11; 4.82), respectively]. Cognitive status was not associated with CoP movement. Low cognitive status associates with a lower ability to maintain standing balance in more demanding standing conditions in elderly outpatients. This may have implications for routine geriatric screening strategies and interpretation of results of either standing balance or cognitive tests. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Factors Associated With Outpatient Visit Attendance After Discharge From Inpatient Psychiatric Units in a New York City Hospital.

    PubMed

    Humensky, Jennifer L; Fattal, Omar; Feit, Rachel; Mills, Sarah D; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    A class action lawsuit in New York (Koskinas v. Cuomo) established the right of psychiatric inpatients to receive discharge planning, including arranging outpatient treatment. The attendance rate of the initial outpatient appointment after discharge from inpatient treatment in one city hospital was examined to determine whether rates varied by inpatient unit type. The authors performed retrospective chart review of 1,884 discharges to outpatient care. Multivariate regression models were used to examine the odds of attending the initial appointment. Eighty-four percent of patients attended the initial appointment. Higher odds of attendance were associated with case management, living in a shelter or being homeless, general medical comorbidity, and inpatient treatment in a co-occurring disorders unit. Lower odds were associated with being non-Latino black. Inpatient treatment in a Latino unit had no significant effect. Hospital characteristics, patient population, and availability of local outpatient services may influence continuity of care.

  2. Burden of illness and health care resource utilization in adult psychiatric outpatients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in Europe.

    PubMed

    Karlsdotter, Kristina; Bushe, Chris; Hakkaart, L; Sobanski, Esther; Kan, C C; Lebrec, Jeremie; Kraemer, Susanne; Dieteren, Nicole A H M; Deberdt, Walter

    2016-09-01

    To assess the burden of illness and health care resource utilization of adult nonpsychotic psychiatric outpatients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Europe. This was a multicountry, cross-sectional, observational study where unselected routine patients from clinical psychiatric outpatient settings were screened and assessed for ADHD. Patients were evaluated using the Clinical Global Impressions of Severity (CGI-S) scale, the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), and the EuroQol-5 Dimensions questionnaire. Data on comorbidities, functional impairment, and health care resource utilization were captured. The study enrolled 2284 patients, of whom 1986 completed the study. The prevalence of ADHD was 17.4%, of whom 46.0% had a previous ADHD diagnosis. Patients with ADHD had a high clinical burden with psychiatric comorbidities, especially depression (43.0%) and anxiety disorders (36.4%). Substance abuse (9.2% vs. 3.4%) and alcohol abuse (10.3% vs. 5.2%) were more common in the ADHD cohort vs. the non-ADHD cohort. Only 11.5% of the patients with ADHD had no other psychiatric disorder. Various measures indicated a significantly poorer level of functioning for patients with ADHD than without ADHD, as indicated by higher scores for CGI-S (3.8 vs. 3.3) and SDS (18.9 vs. 11.6) and higher percentages of debt (35.5% vs. 24.3%) and criminality (13.8% vs. 6.1%). Lastly, the health care resource utilization was considerable and similar between adult psychiatric outpatients diagnosed and not diagnosed with ADHD. Although care was taken when choosing the sites for this study, to make it representative of the general outpatient adult psychiatric population, caution should be advised in generalizing the findings of our study to the general ADHD or psychiatric outpatient population. This was an observational study, thus no inference on causality can be drawn. Having ADHD imposes a considerable health and social burden on patient and health care resource utilization

  3. Comparison of outpatient services between elderly people with intellectual disabilities and the general elderly population in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Jin-Ding; Chiang, Po-Huang; Chang, Yu-Chia; Tung, Ho-Jui

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the ambulatory visit frequency and medical expenditures of the general elderly population versus the elderly with intellectual disabilities in Taiwan, while examining the effects of age, gender, urbanization and copayment status on ambulatory utilization. A cross-sectional study was conducted to analyze data from 103,183 national health insurance claimants aged 65 or older. A total of 1469 had a principal diagnosis of mental retardation (intellectual disability) and claimed medical outpatient services in 2007. The average number of ambulatory visits was 30.1 ± 23.1, which is much higher than in the United States and other developed countries, and the mean annual visits of the elderly with intellectual disabilities was significantly higher than the general population in Taiwan (35.2 ± 28.7 vs. 30.0 ± 23.1). Age and copayment status affected outpatient visit frequency. The mean medical expenditure per visit and the mean annual outpatient cost were 1146.5 ± 4497.7 NT$ and 34,533.7 ± 115,891.7 NT$, respectively. Male beneficiaries tended to have higher average annual medical expenses and mean medical expenses per visit than female beneficiaries. The three most frequent principal diagnoses at ambulatory visits were circulatory system diseases, musculoskeletal system and connective tissue diseases and digestive system diseases. We conclude that the elderly with intellectual disabilities had higher demand than the general population for healthcare services, and the NHI program lowers the barrier to care for populations with special needs.

  4. Nursing diagnoses in adult/elderly patients undergoing outpatient antineoplastic chemotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Jomar, Rafael Tavares; Gomes, Rebeca Anselmo Furtado; Leite, Dayana Carvalho; Gomes, Helena Ferraz; Peres, Ellen Marcia; Junior, Eugenio Fuentes Perez

    2017-01-01

    To search in the scientific literature for nursing diagnoses identified in adult/elderly patients undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy in an outpatient setting. Review of studies published in Portuguese, English, or Spanish which were searched in five electronic databases in March 2016, using the descriptors nursing process, nursing diagnosis, neoplasms, drug therapy and hospital outpatient clinic. In the four studies selected for review, 40 nursing diagnoses were identified, namely unbalanced nutrition, less than body requirements, risk of deficient fluid volume, diarrhoea, fatigue, impaired home maintenance, deficient knowledge, disturbed body image, interrupted family processes, ineffective sexuality pattern, anxiety, powerlessness, fear, readiness for enhanced religiosity, risk of infection, impaired dentition, risk of impaired skin integrity, acute pain, and nausea. The nursing diagnoses identified can support the selection of interventions and the creation of nursing guidelines in outpatient oncology services.

  5. Nursing diagnoses in adult/elderly patients undergoing outpatient antineoplastic chemotherapy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Jomar, Rafael Tavares; Gomes, Rebeca Anselmo Furtado; Leite, Dayana Carvalho; Gomes, Helena Ferraz; Peres, Ellen Marcia; Junior, Eugenio Fuentes Perez

    2017-01-01

    Objective To search in the scientific literature for nursing diagnoses identified in adult/elderly patients undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy in an outpatient setting. Methods Review of studies published in Portuguese, English, or Spanish which were searched in five electronic databases in March 2016, using the descriptors nursing process, nursing diagnosis, neoplasms, drug therapy and hospital outpatient clinic. Results In the four studies selected for review, 40 nursing diagnoses were identified, namely unbalanced nutrition, less than body requirements, risk of deficient fluid volume, diarrhoea, fatigue, impaired home maintenance, deficient knowledge, disturbed body image, interrupted family processes, ineffective sexuality pattern, anxiety, powerlessness, fear, readiness for enhanced religiosity, risk of infection, impaired dentition, risk of impaired skin integrity, acute pain, and nausea. Conclusions The nursing diagnoses identified can support the selection of interventions and the creation of nursing guidelines in outpatient oncology services. PMID:28596802

  6. Quality of Life and Multimorbidity of Elderly Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    de Nóbrega, Thaís Cano Miranda; Jaluul, Omar; Machado, Adriana Nunes; Paschoal, Sérgio M. P.; Filho, Wilson Jacob

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Substantial medical research has established an inverse relationship between quality of life and illness. However, there exists minimal evidence for such a connection in the context of stable and controlled diseases. OBJECTIVE: We wished to correlate multimorbidity with quality of life for elderly patients who suffer from stable chronic diseases. METHODS: We used a tool to evaluate quality of life, namely World Health Organization quality of life-BRIEF, together with a scale of multimorbidity known as the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale - Geriatric Version. Furthermore, the quality of life data were correlated with scores recorded on the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale - Geriatric Version, the number of drugs used, and individual perceptions of health and age. RESULTS: We studied 104 elderly patients who suffered from chronic diseases. The patients had exhibited neither acute events nor secondary complications, their cognition was intact, and they were functionally independent. The Cumulative Illness Rating Scale - Geriatric Version showed an inverse correlation with the physical domain (p= 0.008) and a tendency toward an inverse correlation with the psychological domain (p= 0.052). Self-perception of health showed a high correlation with the physical domain (p= 0.000), psychological domain (p= 0.000) and environmental domain (p= 0.000). The number of drugs used correlated only with the physical domain (p= 0.004). Age and social domain showed a tendency toward a positive correlation (p= 0.054). DISCUSSION: We uncovered an inverse relationship between quality of life and multimorbidity in a group of patients who suffered from stable chronic diseases, with no functional limitations, pain or complications. Our data suggest that a patient’s knowledge that they have a certain clinical condition changes their subjective assessment of quality of life in the related domain. CONCLUSION: The perceived quality of life of the sample was affected by

  7. Factors associated with functional balance and mobility among elderly diabetic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Renata Cereda; Jardim, José Roberto; Perracini, Monica Rodrigues; Ramos, Luiz Roberto

    2009-10-01

    To characterize balance and mobility among diabetic elderly outpatients and to estimate the extent to which functional balance and mobility abnormalities can be influenced by sociodemographic, clinical and other functional factors in a cross-sectional study. Ninety-one elderly (65+ years) outpatients were assessed. Mobility was evaluated by the Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT) and the balance, by the Berg Balance Scale (BS). TUGT mean score was 15.65 +/- 5.9 seconds and BS mean score was 49.31 +/- 7.3 points. Using linear regression analysis (alpha < 0.05), significant and independent positive relationships were obtained between TUGT and age, daily activities (ADL/IADL), step strategy, and proprioceptive sensitivity. Factors negatively associated with BS were: ADL/IADL, step strategy, proprioceptive sensitivity, orthostatic hypotension (OH) and conflictive sensory conditions. Elderly diabetic outpatients show abnormal balance and mobility related mainly to advanced age, disability, absence of step strategy, absence of proprioceptive sensitivity and presence of OH.

  8. Medical and psychiatric comorbidities among elderly individuals with bipolar disorder: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lala, Sonali V; Sajatovic, Martha

    2012-03-01

    The common comorbid conditions that accompany late-life bipolar disorder (BD) have not been well studied. This is a literature review on psychiatric and medical comorbidities among elderly individuals with BD. A focused literature review searched PubMed. Inclusion criteria were original research reports, in English, until June 2009, specifically focused on medical and psychiatric comorbidities in BD individuals over the age of 50. A limited number of studies were identified. Most involved small samples (n < 100). Metabolic syndrome, respiratory and cardiovascular conditions, and endocrine abnormalities are common, with patients having an average of 3 to 4 medical comorbid conditions. Approximately 4.5% to 19% of elderly individuals with BD have dementia. Rates of psychiatric comorbidity appear lower than in younger BD populations, with the most common concurrent psychiatric illnesses being anxiety and substance use disorders. Rates of comorbid medical conditions appear similar to rates among geriatric patients without BD. Elderly individuals with BD are burdened by multiple concomitant medical disorders. In contrast to the elevated rates of medical comorbidity, rates of psychiatric comorbidity appear lower in elderly individuals with BD than in younger populations with BD. Greater awareness of concurrent medical conditions might help inform coordinated care that considers both mental and physical health among geriatric patients with BD.

  9. History of Interpersonal Violence, Abuse, and Nonvictimization Trauma and Severity of Psychiatric Symptoms among Children in Outpatient Psychiatric Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Julian D.; Gagnon, Kerry; Connor, Daniel F.; Pearson, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    In a clinical sample of child psychiatry outpatients, chart review data were collected for 114 consecutive admissions over a 1-year period at a Child and Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic. Data included history of documented maltreatment, potentially traumatic domestic or community violence, neglect or emotional abuse, and noninterpersonal…

  10. History of Interpersonal Violence, Abuse, and Nonvictimization Trauma and Severity of Psychiatric Symptoms among Children in Outpatient Psychiatric Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Julian D.; Gagnon, Kerry; Connor, Daniel F.; Pearson, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    In a clinical sample of child psychiatry outpatients, chart review data were collected for 114 consecutive admissions over a 1-year period at a Child and Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic. Data included history of documented maltreatment, potentially traumatic domestic or community violence, neglect or emotional abuse, and noninterpersonal…

  11. Double depression in older adult psychiatric outpatients: hopelessness as a defining feature.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Thomas E; Cook, Joan M; Hersen, Michel; Gordon, Kathryn H

    2007-08-01

    There is a paucity of research on the distinguishing features of double depression, particularly in older adults. Preliminary studies have revealed that individuals with double depression diagnoses tend to have more severe depression than individuals with major depression or dysthymia alone, but few other distinctions between the diagnostic categories have been found. We examined the possibility that hopelessness particularly characterizes double depression, by comparing older adults with double depression, dysthymia alone, or major depression alone, on hopelessness, as well as on internal and external locus of control. The sample included 54 older psychiatric outpatients who completed a battery of cognitive and symptom measures, and underwent structured clinical interviews. Double depressed patients showed high levels of hopelessness, whereas patients with either major depression or dysthymia alone showed more moderate levels of hopelessness. Low internal locus of control characterized both groups with a dysthymia diagnosis (dysthymia alone and double depression), and differentiated them from the group with major depression alone. The sample size was modest, and the results may not generalize to older adults with different demographic characteristics. Hopelessness may be important in understanding the phenomenology of double depression in older adults, and may inform diagnostics and psychotherapeutics as well.

  12. Enabling healthy living: Experiences of people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services.

    PubMed

    Blomqvist, Marjut; Sandgren, Anna; Carlsson, Ing-Marie; Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2017-02-03

    It is well known that people with severe mental illness have a reduced life expectancy and a greater risk of being affected by preventable physical illnesses such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. There are still, however, only a few published studies focusing on what enables healthy living for this group. This study thus aimed to describe what enables healthy living among people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services. The data were collected in qualitative interviews (n = 16) and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The interviews resulted in an overall theme "Being regarded as a whole human being by self and others", which showed the multidimensional nature of health and the issues that enable healthy living among people with severe mental illness. Three categories emerged: (i) everyday structure (ii), motivating life events and (iii) support from significant others. The results indicate that a person with severe mental illness needs to be encountered as a whole person if healthy living is to be enabled. Attaining healthy living requires collaboration between the providers of care, help and support. Health care organizations need to work together to develop and provide interventions to enable healthy living and to reduce poor physical health among people with severe mental illness. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  13. National trends in the antipsychotic treatment of psychiatric outpatients with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Comer, Jonathan S; Mojtabai, Ramin; Olfson, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine patterns and recent trends in the antipsychotic medication treatment of anxiety disorders among visits to office-based psychiatrists in the United States. Annual data from the 1996-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were analyzed to examine the patterns and trends in antipsychotic medication treatment within a nationally representative sample of 4,166 visits to office-based psychiatrists in which an anxiety disorder was diagnosed. Across the 12-year period, antipsychotic prescriptions in visits for anxiety disorders increased from 10.6% (1996-1999) to 21.3% (2004-2007). Over the study period, the largest increase in antipsychotic prescribing occurred among new patient visits. Antipsychotic prescribing also significantly increased among privately insured visits and visits in which neither antidepressants nor sedative/hypnotics were prescribed. Among the common anxiety disorder diagnoses, the largest increase in antipsychotic medication treatment was observed in visits for panic disorder. Antipsychotic prescribing rose from 6.9% (1996-1999) to 14.5% (2004-2007) among visits for anxiety disorders in which there were no co-occurring diagnoses with an indication approved by the Food and Drug Administration for antipsychotic medications. Although little is known about their effectiveness for anxiety disorders, antipsychotic medications are becoming increasingly prescribed to psychiatric outpatients with these disorders.

  14. Internalized stigma among psychiatric outpatients: Associations with quality of life, functioning, hope and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Picco, Louisa; Pang, Shirlene; Lau, Ying Wen; Jeyagurunathan, Anitha; Satghare, Pratika; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Lim, Susan; Poh, Chee Lien; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2016-12-30

    This study aimed to: (i) determine the prevalence, socio-demographic and clinical correlates of internalized stigma and (ii) explore the association between internalized stigma and quality of life, general functioning, hope and self-esteem, among a multi-ethnic Asian population of patients with mental disorders. This cross-sectional, survey recruited adult patients (n=280) who were seeking treatment at outpatient and affiliated clinics of the only tertiary psychiatric hospital in Singapore. Internalized stigma was measured using the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale. 43.6% experienced moderate to high internalized stigma. After making adjustments in multiple logistic regression analysis, results revealed there were no significant socio-demographic or clinical correlates relating to internalized stigma. Individual logistic regression models found a negative relationship between quality of life, self-esteem, general functioning and internalized stigma whereby lower scores were associated with higher internalized stigma. In the final regression model, which included all psychosocial variables together, self-esteem was the only variable significantly and negatively associated with internalized stigma. The results of this study contribute to our understanding of the role internalized stigma plays in patients with mental illness, and the impact it can have on psychosocial aspects of their lives.

  15. Predicting dropout in outpatient dialectical behavior therapy with patients with borderline personality disorder receiving psychiatric disability.

    PubMed

    Landes, Sara J; Chalker, Samantha A; Comtois, Katherine Anne

    2016-01-01

    Rates of treatment dropout in outpatient Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in the community can be as high as 24 % to 58 %, making dropout a great concern. The primary purpose of this article was to examine predictors of dropout from DBT in a community mental health setting. Participants were 56 consumers with borderline personality disorder (BPD) who were psychiatrically disabled participating in a larger feasibility trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy- Accepting the Challenges of Exiting the System. The following variables were examined to see whether they predicted dropout in DBT: age, education level, baseline level of distress, baseline level of non-acceptance of emotional responses, and skills module in which a consumer started DBT skills group. These variables were chosen based on known predictors of dropout in consumers with BPD and in DBT, as well as an interest in what naturally occurring variables might impact dropout. The dropout rate in this sample was 51.8 %. Results of the logistic regression show that younger age, higher levels of baseline distress, and a higher level of baseline non-acceptance of emotional responses were significantly associated with dropout. The DBT skills module in which an individual started group did not predict dropout. The implications of these findings are that knowledge of consumer age and pretreatment levels of distress and non-acceptance of emotional responses can impact providers' choice of commitment and treatment strategies to reduce dropout. Future research should examine these strategies, as well as the impact of predictor variables on outcome and reasons for dropout.

  16. Associations between plasma glucose and DSM-III-R cluster B personality traits in psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Svanborg, P; Mattila-Evenden, M; Gustavsson, P J; Uvnäs-Moberg, K; Asberg, M

    2000-01-01

    Associations between personality traits, measured with the Karolinska Scales of Personality, the Impulsiveness subscale from the Impulsiveness, Venturesomeness and Empathy (IVE) Inventory, and with self-assessed personality traits and disorders (SCID-II Screen Questionnaire), and plasma insulin, glucagon and glucose, respectively, were explored in a sample of 101 psychiatric outpatients of both sexes. No relationships between the peptide hormones and personality measures were found. However, fasting glucose values, which were all essentially within the normal biological variation, were significantly related to several personality measures. For males, a low blood glucose was associated with low stable general level of functioning, with high IVE Impulsiveness, and with self-assessed histrionic and narcissistic traits. High number of self-assessed personality traits for all cluster B personality disorders was strongly associated with high IVE Impulsiveness. The results of the present study support the generalizability of earlier findings from alcoholic impulsive offenders: in males, low blood glucose is associated with an extrovert and impulsive, acting-out behavior that includes the breaking of societal norms and rules. In contrast, for females a positive relationship between fasting glucose and self-assessed histrionic personality traits was found. Because no association between global level of functioning and glucose was found in women, these personality traits may not necessarily be maladaptive, as was the case for males.

  17. Dimensionality of the Chinese hospital anxiety depression scale in psychiatric outpatients: Mokken scale and factor analyses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chin-Pang; Chou, Ya-Hsin; Liu, Chia-Yih; Hung, Ching-I

    2017-04-18

    The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) is a widely used scale of anxiety and depression. However, recent studies have challenged the bi-dimensional scoring of the HADS. The present study was to examine the dimensionality of the Chinese HADS. We recruited a convenience sample of 214 adult psychiatric outpatients at a medical centre in Taiwan, and they completed the Chinese HADS. We used Mokken scale analysis (MSA), exploratory factor analysis (EFA), exploratory bifactor analysis (EBA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to examine the dimensionality of the Chinese HADS. The Chinese HADS was a moderate Mokken scale (Hs = 0.44), and had a two-factor structure. EBA showed that one general factor, emotional distress, explained 68% of the common variance of the Chinese HADS. CFA confirmed that the bifactor model had the best fit statistics. The items 5 and 7 of the Chinese HADS contributed to structural ambiguity in the Chinese HADS subscales. The sum scores of the Chinese HADS were a reliable and valid unidimensional measure of emotional distress. The Chinese HADS subscales were incapable of differentiating between anxiety and depression. Clinicians and researchers should choose other scales that are specifically designed for measuring anxiety and depression.

  18. Pharmacogenomic testing and outcome among depressed patients in a tertiary care outpatient psychiatric consultation practice.

    PubMed

    Rundell, J R; Harmandayan, M; Staab, J P

    2011-05-10

    The authors tested the hypothesis that pharmacogenomic genotype knowledge is associated with better clinical and cost outcomes in depressed patients, after controlling for other factors that might differentiate tested and non-tested patients. Medical records of 251 patients, seen in the Mayo Clinic Rochester outpatient psychiatric practice, who had patient health questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scores before and after consultation, were reviewed. Comparisons of differences in pre-consultation and post-consultation depression scores and slopes between tested and non-tested patients and between genotype categories of tested patients, were evaluated, along with healthcare cost and utilization comparisons between tested and non-tested patients, using Kruskal-Wallis tests, Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and group mean comparisons, controlling for significant univariate demographic and clinical differences. Tested patients had significantly higher depression diagnosis frequency, baseline PHQ-9 scores, family history of depression, psychiatric hospitalization history, and higher numbers of antidepressant, mood stabilizer and antipsychotic medication trials. After controlling for these differences, there were no differences between tested and non-tested patients in post-baseline depression scores or slopes for CYP genotype categories. For patients with 5-HTTLPR testing, there was significantly more depression score improvement for patients with the long/long genotype at time 4 (N=55, χ(2)-value=8.0492, P=0.018) and at time 5 (N=44, χ(2)-value=6.1492, P=0.046). For a subgroup (n=46) with ≥two pre- and ≥two post-baseline PHQ-9 scores, the mean difference between pre-baseline and post-baseline PHQ-9 score slopes for tested patients was -0.08 (median -0.01; range -1.20 to 0.15) compared with 0.13 (median 0.02; range -0.18 to 2.16) for non-tested patients (P=0.03). Among genotype categories, mean differences between pre-consultation and post-consultation slopes were significantly better

  19. Psychometric properties and validation of the Satisfaction with Life Scale in psychiatric and medical outpatients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Aishvarya, Sinniah; Maniam, Thambu; Karuthan, Chinna; Sidi, Hatta; Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei; Oei, Tian Po Sumantri

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) in a sample of clinical outpatients in Malaysia. The SWLS is a measure designed to assess subjective life satisfaction. Four hundred eighty-three participants (283 with psychiatric illnesses and 200 with other medical illnesses) completed the SWLS and other self-report instruments. Results of the EFA and CFA supported the fit for the one-factor model as the best-fitting model. The internal consistency of the SWLS (α=0.86) was found to be high. Correlational analyses showed that SWLS had adequate concurrent validity. Scores on SWLS, which differentiated psychiatric patients and medical patients, supported criterion validity. The logistic regression analyses showed good discriminative validity of SWLS. The SWLS is a reliable and valid instrument to measure the satisfaction with life among psychiatry and clinical outpatients in Malaysia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Temperament profiles in physicians, lawyers, managers, industrialists, architects, journalists, and artists: a study in psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Akiskal, Kareen K; Savino, Mario; Akiskal, Hagop S

    2005-03-01

    With the possible exception of cyclothymia in artists, there is a paucity of data in the literature on the temperament in different professions. For this exploratory study, we sought to generate preliminary data on temperaments among psychiatric outpatients, including physicians (n=41), lawyers (n=30), managers and executives (n=35), industrialists (n=48), architects (n=27), journalists (n=34), and a mixed group of artists (n=48). They were compared with age, sex, social class, and affective disorder matched outpatients outside of these professions, drawn from the same clinical settings to serve as our Comparison Group (CG, n=120). We used an interview version of the Akiskal-Mallya criteria for temperaments. We finally used the DSM-III-R obsessive compulsive personality (OC traits). Compared with the CG, lawyers and physicians had high rates of dysthymic temperament and OC traits. Managers, like lawyers and doctors, had high rates on OC traits but were different in being very low on cyclothymic and twice as hyperthymic than the CG was. Industrialists, who, by definition, were self-made, had even higher rates of hyperthymic traits. Both architects and artists seemed to have benefited from being cyclothymic (3-4 times higher than CG's); interestingly, architects had higher levels of OC traits, and artists were less obsessional than the CG was. Overall, among managers/executives and lawyers, 41% met criteria for affective temperaments, whereas the equivalent rate among the remainder was 77%. Given that this is a chart review of existing clinical records, it was not possible to be blind to the profession of the patients. A mixed group of artists may have obscured differences among artists from different domains of art (e.g., poets vs. performing artists), and the same can be said of physicians (e.g., internists vs. surgeons). A disclaimer would be appropriate: Ours is not a study on eminence in the different professions but on the temperament and personality profiles

  1. Validation of an abbreviated version of the structured interview of reported symptoms in outpatient psychiatric and community settings.

    PubMed

    Green, Debbie; Rosenfeld, Barry; Dole, Tia; Pivovarova, Ekaterina; Zapf, Patricia A

    2008-04-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an abbreviated version of the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS-A) in identifying malingered mental illness. The SIRS-A is comprised of 69 items drawn from the SIRS (R. Rogers et al. 1992, SIRS: Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms: Professional Manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc.), substantially reducing the administration time. A simulation design was used with three samples; 87 psychiatric outpatients who responded honestly were compared to 29 community-dwelling adults and 24 psychiatric patients instructed to malinger psychopathology. The SIRS-A generated sensitivity comparable to or exceeding that of the SIRS normative data, but specificity was poorer; many genuinely impaired patients were misclassified as malingering. Although these findings suggest the SIRS-A may be an effective means to assess malingering in psychiatric populations, further research assessing the reasons for the elevated false positive rates is necessary.

  2. On the Distinction of Suicide Ideation versus Attempt in Elderly Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Hermann; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Study of selected elderly psychiatric inpatients (n=152) suggests that suicidal ideation may initiate process of smoldering when patient, family, and professionals interact in such a way as to dampen apparent distress. Suicidal thoughts/mood may be masked by affective or cognitive constriction, camouflaged by anxiety and external agitation, and…

  3. Adapting the D-dimer cutoff for thrombosis detection in elderly outpatients.

    PubMed

    Andro, Marion; Righini, Marc; Le Gal, Grégoire

    2013-06-01

    D-dimer measurement is an important step in diagnostic strategies for venous thromboembolism. It allows the safe ruling out of the diagnosis with no need for imaging tests in approximately 30% of outpatients. However, the usefulness of d-dimer is limited in elderly patients; the likelihood of a negative d-dimer strongly decreases with age, making physicians reluctant to order the test. Several attempts to improve the performance of D-dimer in elderly patients have been pursued. Recently, an age-adjusted cutoff was derived; the optimal cutoff value (in µg/l) appears to be equal to the patient's age (in years) multiplied by ten in patients over 50 years of age with a low pretest clinical risk of venous thromboembolism. This age-adjusted cutoff value has been extensively and externally validated in retrospective studies that included mostly outpatients with suspected deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism and used various quantitative D-dimer assays. All available studies confirmed the increased usefulness and similar safety of the age-adjusted cutoff compared with the conventional cutoff, the most important benefit being obtained in elderly patients. However, before any recommendation for clinical practice can be made, a prospective diagnostic management outcome study is lacking, in which all low clinical risk patients with D-dimer levels below their age-adjusted cutoff would be left untreated with no further diagnostic testing.

  4. [Satisfaction with life and functionality among elderly patients in a geriatric outpatient clinic].

    PubMed

    Sposito, Giovana; D'Elboux, Maria José; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Guariento, Maria Elena

    2013-12-01

    Aging is often accompanied by functional limitations that affect self esteem, lowering the level of satisfaction with life. Studies highlight satisfaction with life as a predictor of quality of life and has a marked correlation with a decrease in functionality. Therefore, this study sought to examine the relationship between satisfaction with life and functional independence and performance of the lower limbs (muscle strength, gait speed and balance) among the elderly in outpatient care with respect to age groups and genders. A total of 125 elderly men and women aged 60 years and above, attending a geriatric outpatient clinic. The instruments used were: 1) Functional Independence Measure (FIM) to evaluate functional dependence; 2) Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) to measure physical performance; 3) Satisfaction with life. The sample was random, with a predominance of females, in which the older participants had greater functional impairment. In univariate logistic regression analysis and multivariate analysis, overall self reported and comparative satisfaction with life was more satisfactory among the oldest elderly. The results suggest that older individuals have better satisfaction with life even though they have greater functional impairment.

  5. Cutaneous factitia in elderly patients: alarm signal for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chiriac, Anca; Foia, Liliana; Birsan, Cristina; Goriuc, Ancuta; Solovan, Caius

    2014-01-01

    Background The factitious disorders, more commonly known in daily practice as pathomimia, are expressed in dermatology units by skin lesions induced voluntarily by the patient, in order to draw attention of the medical staff and/or the family members. The disorder is often challenging to diagnose and even more difficult to document in front of the patient or relatives. It represents a challenge for the physician, and any attempt at treatment may be followed by recurrence of the self-mutilation. This paper describes two cases of pathomimia diagnosed by dermatologists and treated in a psychiatry unit, highlighting the importance of collaboration in these situations. Patients and methods Two case reports, describing old female patients with pathomimia, hospitalized in a department of dermatology for bizarre skin lesions. Results The first case was a 77-year-old female with unknown psychiatric problems and atrophic skin lesions on the face, self-induced for many months, with multiple hospitalizations in dermatology units, with no response to different therapeutic patterns, and full recovery after psychiatric treatment for a major depressive syndrome. The second case was a 61-year-old female patient with disseminated atrophic scars on the face, trunk, and limbs. She raised our interest because of possible psychiatric issues, as she had attempted to commit suicide. The prescription of antidepressants led to a significant clinical improvement. Conclusion These cases indicate that a real psychiatric disease may be recorded in patients suffering from pathomimia. Therefore, complete psychiatric evaluation in order to choose the proper therapy is mandatory for all these cases. Dermatologists and all physicians who take care of old patients must recognize the disorder in order to provide optimum care for this chronic condition. We emphasize therefore the importance of psychiatric evaluation and treatment to avoid the major risk of suicide. Skin lesions must be regarded as an

  6. Inpatient treatment of major depression in Austria between 1989 and 2009: impact of downsizing of psychiatric hospitals on admissions, suicide rates and outpatient psychiatric services.

    PubMed

    Vyssoki, B; Willeit, M; Blüml, V; Höfer, P; Erfurth, A; Psota, G; Lesch, O M; Kapusta, N D

    2011-09-01

    During the last 20 years Austrian psychiatric services underwent fundamental changes, as a focus was set on downsizing psychiatric hospitals. Little is known about how restructuring of mental health services affected patients with major depression and suicide rates. Monthly hospital discharges from all hospitals in Austria with the diagnosis of unipolar major depression as primary reason for inpatient treatment were obtained for the time period between 1989 and 2008. These data were correlated with relevant parameters from the general health system, such as number of hospital beds, suicide rate, density of psychotherapists and sales of antidepressants. While the number of psychiatric beds was reduced by almost 30%, the total annual numbers of inpatient treatment episodes for depression increased by 360%. This increase was stronger for men than for women. Further on this development was accompanied by a decrease in the suicide rate and an improvement in the availability of professional outpatient mental health service providers. Only aggregated patient data and no single case histories were available for this study. The validity of the correct diagnosis of unipolar major depression must be doubted, as most likely not all patients were seen by a clinical expert. Our data show that although inpatient treatment for unipolar major depression dramatically increased, reduction of psychiatric beds did not lead to an increase of suicide rates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Utility of the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) in Psychiatric Outpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieland, J.; Wardenaar, K. J.; Fontein, E.; Zitman, F. G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnostics and care for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and psychiatric disorders need to be improved. This can be done by using assessment instruments to routinely measure the nature and severity of psychiatric symptoms. Up until now, in the Netherlands, assessment measures are seldom used in the psychiatric care for this…

  8. Utility of the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) in Psychiatric Outpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieland, J.; Wardenaar, K. J.; Fontein, E.; Zitman, F. G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnostics and care for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and psychiatric disorders need to be improved. This can be done by using assessment instruments to routinely measure the nature and severity of psychiatric symptoms. Up until now, in the Netherlands, assessment measures are seldom used in the psychiatric care for this…

  9. Psychiatric comorbidity and plasma levels of 2-acyl-glycerols in outpatient treatment alcohol users. Analysis of gender differences.

    PubMed

    García Marchena, Nuria; Araos, Pedro; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Ponce, Guillermo; Pedraz, María; Serrano, Antonia; Arias, Francisco; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Pastor, Antoni; De la Torre, Rafael; Torrens, Marta; Rubio, Gabriel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2016-09-29

    Alcohol addiction is associated with high psychiatric comorbidity. Objective stratification of patients is necessary to optimize care and improve prognosis. The present study is designed to gain insights into this challenge by addressing the following objectives: a) to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in a sample of outpatients seeking treatment for alcohol use disorder, b) to describe the existence of gender differences and c) to validate 2-acyl-glycerols as biomarkers of alcohol use disorder and/or psychiatric comorbidity. One hundred and sixty-two patients were recruited and evaluated with the semi-structured interview PRISM. The presence of psychopathology was associated with a greater number of criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence according to DSM-IV-TR. We found gender differences in psychiatric comorbidity, e.g., mood disorder, as well as in comorbid substance use disorders. The prevalence of lifetime psychiatric comorbidity was 68.5%, with mood disorders the most frequent (37%), followed by attention deficit disorder (24.7%) and anxiety disorders (17.9%). Substance-induced disorders were more frequent in mood and psychotic disorders, whereas the primary disorders were more prevalent in patients with comorbid anxiety disorders. We found that 2-acyl-glycerols were significantly decreased in comorbid anxiety disorders in alcohol dependent patients in the last year, which makes them a potential biomarker for this psychopathological condition.

  10. Inappropriate medication use in elderly lebanese outpatients: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Saab, Yolande B; Hachem, Alya; Sinno, Soha; El-Moalem, Habib

    2006-01-01

    Inappropriate use of medications has become an international cause for concern in geriatric patients, who are at high risk of drug-related morbidity. This study is the first attempt to determine the prevalence of inappropriate drug use in elderly Lebanese outpatients, using community pharmacy data, and to identify factors that predict potentially inappropriate drug intake in this population. Records of elderly patients aged > or =65 years were selected from different community pharmacies. Each patient profile was reviewed and to confirm patient record information, in-person interviews were conducted with elderly patients between November 2004 and May 2005 by qualified pharmacists. Based on a literature review describing guidelines for the inappropriate use of medications in the elderly, courses of therapy were assessed and classified as either appropriate or inappropriate. Courses of therapy that were judged inappropriate were further classified according to the specific area of inappropriate use (i.e. Beers' criteria, duplicate therapy, indication, dose, dose frequency including missing doses, duration and discontinuation of therapy, adverse effects, drug-drug and/or drug-disease interactions, and poor memory). Statistical analyses were performed to estimate the prevalence of inappropriate medication use and to identify potentially predictive factors of such use arising from patients' sociodemographic characteristics, health factors and drug regimen intake. A total of 350 elderly patient profiles were reviewed, from which 277 evaluable records were obtained. More than half (59.6%) of the patients taking drugs at the time of the study were taking at least one inappropriate medication. Inappropriate medication use was most frequently identified in terms of Beers' criteria (22.4%), missing doses (18.8%) or incorrect frequency of administration of drugs (13.0%). Factors predicting potentially inappropriate drug intake included female sex (65.7% vs 53.3% for males, p

  11. A Comparison of Outpatients with Intellectual Disability Receiving Specialised and General Services in Ontario's Psychiatric Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Y.; Gracey, C.; Bradley, E.; Koegl, C.; Durbin, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study compares outpatients with intellectual disability (ID) receiving specialised services to outpatients with ID receiving general services in Ontario's tertiary mental healthcare system in terms of demographics, symptom profile, strengths and resources, and clinical service needs. Methods: A secondary analysis of Colorado…

  12. Obesity risk class and asthma outpatient service utilization by the middle aged and elderly in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei-Hua; Liu, Li-Fan; Wang, Jiu-Yao

    2016-05-01

    According to the estimates of the World Health Organization (WHO), there were about 300 million people in the world suffering from asthma in 2005. Among the risk factors of asthma is obesity, which was found to be significantly associated with asthma in recent decades. In this study, we analyze the relationship between obesity risk class and asthma outpatient service utilization by the middle-aged and elderly in Taiwan. Adopting data from the 2005 Nation Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), we first utilize latent class analysis (LCA) to identify obesity risk classes. Next, we utilize a logit and a negative binominal model to analyze the relationship between each obesity risk class and asthma outpatient service utilization. Results indicate that compared with the "overweight/obese with low consumption of vegetable/fruit and little exercise" class, the classes "normal-weight with high consumption of vegetable/fruit and moderate exercise" and "overweight/obese with high consumption of vegetable/fruit and moderate exercise" tend to have low probabilities and less number of visits of utilizing asthma outpatient services. Our results may constitute useful references for clinicians and government policy makers formulating strategies for asthma management and prevention. Better informed strategies for asthma management could, in turn, increase the efficiency of asthmatic patients' care, which could provide efficient assistance to the target group based on the obesity risk classes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Conventional Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Facilitated by an Internet-Based Support System: Feasibility Study at a Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic.

    PubMed

    Månsson, Kristoffer Nt; Klintmalm, Hugo; Nordqvist, Ragnar; Andersson, Gerhard

    2017-08-24

    Cognitive behavioral therapies have been shown to be effective for a variety of psychiatric and somatic disorders, but some obstacles can be noted in regular psychiatric care; for example, low adherence to treatment protocols may undermine effects. Treatments delivered via the Internet have shown promising results, and it is an open question if the blend of Internet-delivered and conventional face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapies may help to overcome some of the barriers of evidence-based treatments in psychiatric care. We evaluated the feasibility of an Internet-based support system at an outpatient psychiatric clinic in Sweden. For instance, the support system made it possible to send messages and share information between the therapist and the patient before and after therapy sessions at the clinic. Nine clinical psychologists participated and 33 patients were enrolled in the current study. We evaluated the usability and technology acceptance after 12 weeks of access. Moreover, clinical data on common psychiatric symptoms were assessed before and after the presentation of the support system. In line with our previous study in a university setting, the Internet-based support system has the potential to be feasible also when delivered in a regular psychiatric setting. Notably, some components in the system were less frequently used. We also found that patients improved on common outcome measures for depressive and anxious symptoms (effect sizes, as determined by Cohen d, ranged from 0.20-0.69). This study adds to the literature suggesting that modern information technology could be aligned with conventional face-to-face services.

  14. Muscle strength rather than muscle mass is associated with standing balance in elderly outpatients.

    PubMed

    Bijlsma, Astrid Y; Pasma, Jantsje H; Lambers, Dorine; Stijntjes, Marjon; Blauw, Gerard Jan; Meskers, Carel G M; Maier, Andrea B

    2013-07-01

    Assessment of the association of muscle characteristics with standing balance is of special interest, as muscles are a target for potential intervention (ie, by strength training). Cross-sectional study. Geriatric outpatient clinic. The study included 197 community-dwelling elderly outpatients (78 men, 119 women; mean age 82 years). Muscle characteristics included handgrip and knee extension strength, appendicular lean mass divided by height squared (ALM/height(2)), and lean mass as percentage of body mass. Two aspects of standing balance were assessed: the ability to maintain balance, and the quality of balance measured by Center of Pressure (CoP) movement during 10 seconds of side-by-side, semitandem, and tandem stance, with both eyes open and eyes closed. Logistic and linear regression models were adjusted for age, and additionally for height, body mass, cognitive function, and multimorbidity. Handgrip and knee extension strength, adjusted for age, were positively related to the ability to maintain balance with eyes open in side-by-side (P = .011; P = .043), semitandem (P = .005; P = .021), and tandem stance (P = .012; P = .014), and with eyes closed in side-by-side (P = .004; P = .004) and semitandem stance (not significant; P = .046). Additional adjustments affected the results only slightly. ALM/height(2) and lean mass percentage were not associated with the ability to maintain standing balance, except for an association between ALM/height(2) and tandem stance with eyes open (P = .033) that disappeared after additional adjustments. Muscle characteristics were not associated with CoP movement. Muscle strength rather than muscle mass was positively associated with the ability to maintain standing balance in elderly outpatients. Assessment of CoP movement was not of additional value. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor-induced sexual dysfunction and its treatment: a large-scale retrospective study of 596 psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Keller Ashton, A; Hamer, R; Rosen, R C

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, a large-scale retrospective case review was undertaken to assess the incidence and type of sexual dysfunctions associated with serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) therapy, in addition to the effects of three pharmacological antidotes (yohimbine, amantadine, cyproheptadine) on SRI-induced sexual dysfunctions. A retrospective chart review was conducted on 596 patients treated with SRIs in an outpatient psychiatric practice between July 1991 and September 1994. Patients who reported new-onset sexual dysfunction during this time were categorized as having SRI-induced sexual dysfunctions. Sexual difficulties were characterized by type and duration, and the background characteristics and psychiatric diagnoses of all patients were recorded. Psychiatric outcome and sexual functioning at follow-up were independently assessed by a single psychiatrist by means of a 4-point rating scale. Sexual dysfunction symptoms were clearly associated with SRI administration in 97 (16.3%) cases. The most common problems reported were orgasmic delay or anorgasmia and hypoactive sexual desire. Sexual difficulties were more frequent among men (23.4%) and married patients of both sexes (22.3%), whereas psychiatric diagnosis and type of SRI were unrelated to the occurrence of sexual problems. Of the patients with sexual dysfunction, 45 (46.4%) opted for a trial of antidote therapy with yohimbine, amantadine, or cyproheptadine. All three antidotes were found to be safe and relatively effective, although yohimbine was significantly more effective than amantadine or cyproheptadine in reversing SRI-induced sexual dysfunction.

  16. The use of CAM providers and psychiatric outpatient services in people with anxiety/depression: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anne Helen; Kristoffersen, Agnete E

    2016-11-11

    Depression has been identified as one of the most frequent predictors of CAM use. However, limited data exist about the use of CAM providers among people with anxiety/depression in Norway. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of CAM providers, and the use of CAM providers and psychiatric outpatient services in combination, among people with self-reported anxiety and/or depression. We used questionnaire data from 12,982 participants (30-87 years) in the cross-sectional sixth Tromsø Study (conducted in 2007-8). Eligible for analyses in our study were 1685 participants who reported suffering from anxiety and/or depression. By descriptive statistical methods, we estimated the use of CAM providers, psychiatric outpatient services, and the combination of these. By logistic regressions we studied the association between the use of these services and gender, age, income, education, and self-reported degree of anxiety/depression. During the previous year, 17.8 % of people with anxiety/depression visited a CAM provider once or more, 11.8 % visited psychiatric outpatient services, and 2.5 % visited both. Men with anxiety/depression were less likely to visit CAM providers compared to women (odds ratio [OR] 0.40, confidence interval [CI] 0.30-0.55), whereas higher educated people were more likely to visit compared to the lowest educated (OR 1.47, CI 1.02-2.13). The use of CAM providers was not associated with the degree of anxiety/depression. For those who used both CAM providers and psychiatric specialist services during the previous year, severe anxiety/depression was strongly associated with use compared to moderate disease (OR 7.53, CI 2.75-20.65). People with severe anxiety/depression seem to use CAM providers and psychiatric services additionally, whereas those with moderate disease seem to use these services more as alternative pathways. CAM provider treatment might be a substitute for conventional care, particularly in patients with moderate disease.

  17. Factor structure of the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Exam (COGNISTAT) in healthy, and psychiatrically and neurologically impaired, elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Engelhart, C; Eisenstein, N; Johnson, V; Wolf, J; Williamson, J; Steitz, D; Girard, V; Paramatmuni, K; Ouzounian, N; Losonczy, M

    1999-02-01

    This study reports the results of factor analyses of COGNISTAT (NCSE) in a sample of elderly persons comprised of "healthy" participants with no psychiatric or neurological impairments (n = 153), individuals with psychiatric impairments (n = 70), and those with neurological impairments (n = 80). Our findings support a unitary factor structure for COGNISTAT, though a separate factor of unclear clinical or theoretical significance was suggested.

  18. Relationship between early-life stress load and sleep in psychiatric outpatients: a sleep diary and actigraphy study.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Valérie; Bader, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether stress experienced early in life is associated with actigraphic and subjective sleep measures in a sample of adult psychiatric outpatients. A total of 48 psychiatric outpatients completed self-report questionnaires assessing current depression, current anxiety symptoms and stress load during childhood (before the age of 13 years), adolescence (between the age of 13 and 18 years) and adulthood (between the age of 19 and current age). Sleep-related activity was measured using 24-h wrist actigraphy over a 7-day period at home, during which participants also kept a sleep diary. High stress load in childhood, but not in adolescence, was associated with shortened actigraphically assessed total sleep time, prolonged sleep onset latency, decreased sleep efficiency and an increased number of body movements in sleep, even after accounting for the effects of later occurring stress and psychopathological symptoms such as depression and anxiety scores. Unexpectedly, no significant associations between early-life stress load and subjective sleep measures were found. Results are consistent with findings from previous studies indicating an association between childhood adversities and higher levels of nocturnal activity. The findings suggest that high stress load during childhood might be a vulnerability factor for sleep continuity problems in adulthood.

  19. Treatment compliance and hostility levels of head-injured psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, I. M.; Jenkins, E. J.; Thompson, B.; Levi, D.; Burnett, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-eight head-injured psychiatrically ill patients were compared in terms of compliance with psychiatric treatment and hostility levels to a matched control group of 28 non-head-injured psychiatrically ill patients attending a community mental health clinic. Results indicated that the two groups did not differ in treatment compliance. However, the head-injured group had significantly less rapport with their therapists. Hostility measures revealed that male head-injured patients scored significantly higher on the assaultive scale; and the severity of the head injury correlated positively with levels of hostility and with reported problems at school. PMID:2395175

  20. Assessing the effect of Taiwan's outpatient prescription drug copayment policy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuen-Zen; Romeis, James C

    2003-12-01

    This study uses variance cost analysis and regression analysis as tools for investigating the initial effects of Taiwan's outpatient prescription drug copayment program in the elderly. Under its new National Health Insurance program, Taiwan implemented a prescription drug cost-sharing program August 1, 1999. We compare an elderly population's prescription drug use after the policy was implemented with an elderly population's prescription drug use before the policy change to describe initial and general consequences of the drug cost-sharing program. Approximately 240,000 patients aged 65 and over representing 1,600,000 outpatient prescriptions were drawn from 21 hospitals in the Taipei area for the study using a stratified random sampling method. Variance analysis, as used primarily in accounting, was applied to decompose overall cost variance of the policy into the sum of variances of several specific factors that are important to policymakers. The cost variances of each specific factor can be further decomposed into sublevels of analyses. Regression analysis is then applied to better understand covariates that might influence drug cost variances of significant magnitude. The initial effects of the policy change did not reverse the trend of drug cost increases. Instead, there was a significant increase in total prescription drug costs in the cost-sharing group (approximately 12.86%) and an even higher increase rate in the non-cost-sharing group (approximately 51.42%). The main reason for the drug cost increase for the cost-sharing group was attributed to an increase in average drug costs per prescription (explaining 69.20% of the variance). We found physicians seemed to prescribe more expensive drugs and extend prescription duration, especially when drug costs exceed the upper bound of the cost-sharing schedule. By contrast, the main factor contributing to the increase in drug costs for the non-cost-sharing group was an increase in average prescription duration

  1. Combined medical-psychiatric inpatient units: evaluation of the Centre for the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Maier, A B; Wächtler, C; Hofmann, W

    2007-08-01

    Considering the large number of elderly patients in acute hospitals who receive medical as well as psychiatric treatment because of relevant comorbidity, adequate interdisciplinary treatment models have to be developed and applied. The Centre for Elderly, a cooperation project between the departments of geriatric and psychogeriatric medicine in a community hospital in Germany, was founded in 2000. In addition to traditionally structured units, the centre consists of interdisciplinary units. Patient-, staff- and hospital-related characteristics influenced by the reformation of both departments were evaluated by comparing hospital-based registry data records containing age, gender, main and minor diagnoses, length of stay and patient transferrals within the centre. Experts working at the centre were asked to take a stand on the development of the treatment quality, allocation of patients, diagnostic procedures, consultation services and information transmission. The number of admissions to the Centre for the Elderly increased within one year. The distribution of the main diagnose groups remained unchanged, with an overlap between the geriatric and psychogeriatric department consisting of the main diagnoses dementia and depression. The length of stay and the number of transferrals decreased significantly in both departments. The majority of the interviewed employees stated that the treatment quality and the allocation of patients were improved. We conclude that interdisciplinary treatment between the departments of psychiatry and geriatric medicine may contribute to the medical needs of subgroups of elderly inpatients suffering from medical-psychiatric comorbidity.

  2. [Epidemiology of psychiatric disorders in elderly and their impact on somatic health].

    PubMed

    Schuster, Jean-Pierre; Manetti, Aude; Aeschimann, Myriam; Limosin, Frédéric

    2013-06-01

    Increasing life expectancy over the past half century results in higher demand for healthcare of the aging population, therefore adapting the health system to the needs. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders is high in the elderly, especially for depression. Several studies have shown that twenty percent of elderly residents of public facilities meet the criteria for major depressive episode. Depression is a major burden in the elderly, with increased risk of suicide, impaired quality of life and functional autonomy, consequences on somatic morbidity and elevated mortality rates. It is thus necessary to find out how to improve physicians' abilities to detect and treat depression in older adults. Moreover, use of psychotropic drugs is frequent and increases the risk of injury in this population more vulnerable to drug effects. It is also necessary to develop specific gerontopsychiatric wards in large general hospitals and nursing homes.

  3. Integration of computer and Internet-based programmes into psychiatric out-patient care of adolescents with depression.

    PubMed

    Kurki, Marjo; Hätönen, Heli; Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Välimäki, Maritta

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this explorative study was to describe nurses' opportunities to integrate computer and Internet-based programmes in psychiatric out-patient care among adolescents with depression. Therefore, nurses' daily computer use and possible problems related to it were investigated. The data were collected by conducting focus group interviews with Finnish registered nurses (n =12) working at the out-patient clinics of two university central hospitals. The data were analysed using inductive content analysis. The analysis showed that nurses used the computer and Internet in their daily work for data transmission and informal interaction with adolescents. Findings revealed that nurses have good computer skills, a positive attitude towards using the computer and Internet and were motivated to make use of both on a daily basis. Problems faced in daily computer use were a lack of instructions and education, and lack of help and support. We can conclude that nurses have good opportunities to implement computer and Internet-based programmes in adolescent out-patient care. These results are encouraging keeping in mind that adolescents are the most active Internet users in society.

  4. Prevalence, demographic and clinical characteristics of body dysmorphic disorder among psychiatric outpatients with mood, anxiety or somatoform disorders.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Job; van Rood, Yanda R; van der Wee, Nic J; den Hollander-Gijsman, Margien; van Noorden, Martijn S; Giltay, Erik J; Zitman, Frans G

    2012-09-01

    To describe the prevalence, demographic and clinical characteristics of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) compared with other psychiatric outpatients with a mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder. Outpatients referred for treatment of a mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder were routinely assessed at intake. A structured interview (MINI-Plus), observer-based and self-rating instruments were administered by an independent assessor. Among our sample of 3798 referred patients, 2947 patients were diagnosed with at least one DSM-IV mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder. Of these patients 1.8% (n = 54) met the diagnostic criteria for BDD. In comparison with other outpatients, patients with BDD were on average younger, less often married and were more often living alone. Highly prevalent comorbid diagnoses were major depression (in 46.3% of cases), social anxiety disorder (in 35.2% of cases) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (in 16.7% of cases). Furthermore, patients with BDD had higher scores on the Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S) as well as lower scores on the Short Form 36 social role functioning. BDD is frequently associated with depression, social phobia and OCD. Patients with BDD have more distress and more impaired interpersonal functioning.

  5. The prevalence of diarrhea and its association with drug use in elderly outpatients: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Alberto; Franceschi, Marilisa; Vitale, Dino; Zaninelli, Augusto; Di Mario, Francesco; Seripa, Davide; Rengo, Franco

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of diarrhea and its association with drug use in elderly outpatients. The study was carried out by 133 general practitioners (GPs) who referred to 24 geriatric units in Italy. The demographic data, disability, gastrointestinal symptoms, and current medications were evaluated using a structured interview, including the evaluation of the activities of daily living (ADL), the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and the gastrointestinal symptoms rating scale (GSRS). The study included 5,387 elderly subjects who regularly completed the structured interview. In total, 488 patients (9.1% of the whole population, 210 men and 278 women, mean age 75.6 +/- 6.2 yr, range 65-100 yr) reported diarrhea, that is, items 11 and 12 of the GSRS, during the 7-day period before the interview. The prevalence of diarrhea significantly increased with older age (P = 0.025), the severity of ADL (P < 0.0001) and IADL disability (P < 0.0001), and the number of drugs taken (P = 0.0002). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of diarrhea was significantly associated with the use of antibiotics (odds ratio [OR] 4.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.95-10.73), proton pump inhibitors (OR 2.97, 95% CI 2.03-4.35), allopurinol (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.26-3.81), psycholeptics (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.26-2.61), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.01-2.89), and angiotensin II receptor blockers (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.08-1.99), also accounting for sex, age, and the use of antidiarrheal agents and drugs for functional gastrointestinal disorders. Diarrhea is a common problem in elderly outpatients. Its prevalence increases with old age, the severity of disability, and the number of drugs. Monitoring the presence of diarrhea and its complications in elderly patients who need treatments with drugs significantly associated with diarrhea may be clinically useful.

  6. Home-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Care Through Videoconferencing for Depression: A Randomized Controlled Follow-Up Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rössler, Wulf

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a tremendous opportunity for innovative mental health care solutions such as psychiatric care through videoconferencing to increase the number of people who have access to quality care. However, studies are needed to generate empirical evidence on the use of psychiatric outpatient care via videoconferencing, particularly in low- and middle-income countries and clinically unsupervised settings. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of home-based treatment for mild depression through psychiatric consultations via videoconferencing. Methods A randomized controlled trial with a 6- and 12-month follow-up including adults with mild depression treated in an ambulatory setting was conducted. In total, 107 participants were randomly allocated to the videoconferencing intervention group (n=53) or the face-to-face group (F2F; n=54). The groups did not differ with respect to demographic characteristics at baseline. The F2F group completed monthly follow-up consultations in person. The videoconferencing group received monthly follow-up consultations with a psychiatrist through videoconferencing at home. At baseline and after 6 and 12 months, in-person assessments were conducted with all participants. Clinical outcomes (severity of depression, mental health status, medication course, and relapses), satisfaction with treatment, therapeutic relationship, treatment adherence (appointment compliance and dropouts), and medication adherence were assessed. Results The severity of depression decreased significantly over the 12-month follow-up in both the groups. There was a significant difference between groups regarding treatment outcomes throughout the follow-up period, with better results in the videoconferencing group. There were 4 relapses in the F2F group and only 1 in the videoconferencing group. No significant differences between groups regarding mental health status, satisfaction with treatment, therapeutic

  7. Depression and other psychiatric morbidity in carers of elderly people living at home.

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, G.; Manela, M.; Katona, C.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To describe the mental health of a community sample of carers of elderly people with dementia, depression, or physical disability and to compare that with the mental health of other adults living in the household and of those living alone. DESIGN--Assessment of psychiatric morbidity and physical disability with standardised questionnaire in randomly selected enumeration districts; subjects were interviewed at home. SETTING--London Borough of Islington. SUBJECTS--700 people aged > or = 65 and other coresidents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Depression measured with standardised interview. RESULTS--The prevalence of depression was not significantly higher in carers overall (15%) than in coresidents (11%). Being a woman carer was a significant predictor of psychiatric illness. Depression was more common in the carers of people with a psychiatric disorder than in coresidents (24% v 11%, P < 0.05) and in those living alone (19%). Depression was most common (47%) in women carers of people with dementia. CONCLUSION--The increase in psychiatric morbidity reported in carers of people with psychiatric disorders may reflect the lack of a confiding relationship. PMID:8563534

  8. Distribution and observed associations of orthostatic blood pressure changes in elderly general medicine outpatients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; DesJardin, J. A.; Lichtenstein, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Factors associated with orthostatic blood pressure change in elderly outpatients were determined by surveying 398 medical clinical outpatients aged 65 years and older. Blood pressure was measured with random-zero sphygmomanometers after patients were 5 minutes in a supine and 5 minutes in a standing position. Orthostatic blood pressure changes were at normally distributed levels with systolic and diastolic pressures dropping an average of 4 mm Hg (standard deviation [SD]=15 mm Hg) and 2 mm Hg (SD=11 mm Hg), respectively. Orthostatic blood pressure changes were unassociated with age, race, sex, body mass, time since eating, symptoms, or other factors. According to multiple linear regression analysis, supine systolic pressure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and diabetes mellitus were associated with a decrease in systolic pressure on standing. Hypertension, antiarthritic drugs, and abnormal heartbeat were associated with an increase in systolic pressure on standing. For orthostatic diastolic pressure changes, supine diastolic pressure and COPD were associated with a decrease in diastolic pressure on standing. Congestive heart failure was associated with an increase in standing diastolic pressure. Using logistic regression analysis, only supine systolic pressure was associated with a greater than 20-mm Hg drop in systolic pressure (n=53, prevalence=13%). Supine diastolic pressure and COPD were the only variables associated with a greater than 20-mm Hg drop in diastolic pressure (n=16, prevalence=4%). These factors may help physicians in identifying older persons at risk for having orthostatic hypotension.

  9. Distribution and observed associations of orthostatic blood pressure changes in elderly general medicine outpatients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; DesJardin, J. A.; Lichtenstein, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Factors associated with orthostatic blood pressure change in elderly outpatients were determined by surveying 398 medical clinical outpatients aged 65 years and older. Blood pressure was measured with random-zero sphygmomanometers after patients were 5 minutes in a supine and 5 minutes in a standing position. Orthostatic blood pressure changes were at normally distributed levels with systolic and diastolic pressures dropping an average of 4 mm Hg (standard deviation [SD]=15 mm Hg) and 2 mm Hg (SD=11 mm Hg), respectively. Orthostatic blood pressure changes were unassociated with age, race, sex, body mass, time since eating, symptoms, or other factors. According to multiple linear regression analysis, supine systolic pressure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and diabetes mellitus were associated with a decrease in systolic pressure on standing. Hypertension, antiarthritic drugs, and abnormal heartbeat were associated with an increase in systolic pressure on standing. For orthostatic diastolic pressure changes, supine diastolic pressure and COPD were associated with a decrease in diastolic pressure on standing. Congestive heart failure was associated with an increase in standing diastolic pressure. Using logistic regression analysis, only supine systolic pressure was associated with a greater than 20-mm Hg drop in systolic pressure (n=53, prevalence=13%). Supine diastolic pressure and COPD were the only variables associated with a greater than 20-mm Hg drop in diastolic pressure (n=16, prevalence=4%). These factors may help physicians in identifying older persons at risk for having orthostatic hypotension.

  10. Prognostic factors for clinical failure of exacerbations in elderly outpatients with moderate-to-severe COPD

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert; Anzueto, Antonio; Miravitlles, Marc; Arvis, Pierre; Haverstock, Daniel; Trajanovic, Mila; Sethi, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbations represent a significant burden for patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Each exacerbation episode is frequently associated with a lengthy recovery and impaired quality of life. Prognostic factors for outpatients that may predict poor outcome after treatment with antibiotics recommended in the guidelines, are not fully understood. We aimed to identify pretherapy factors predictive of clinical failure in elderly (≥60 years old) outpatients with acute Anthonisen type 1 exacerbations. Trial registration NCT00656747. Methods Based on the moxifloxacin in AECOPDs (acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) trial (MAESTRAL) database, this study evaluated pretherapy demographic, clinical, sputum bacteriological factors using multivariate logistic regression analysis, with internal validation by bootstrap replicates, to investigate their possible association with clinical failure at end of therapy (EOT) and 8 weeks posttherapy. Results The analyses found that the independent factors predicting clinical failure at EOT were more frequent exacerbations, increased respiratory rate and lower body temperature at exacerbation, treatment with long-acting anticholinergic drugs, and in vitro bacterial resistance to study drug. The independent factors predicting poor outcome at 8 weeks posttherapy included wheezing at preexacerbation, mild or moderate (vs extreme) sleep disturbances, lower body temperature at exacerbation, forced expiratory volume in 1 second <30%, lower body mass index, concomitant systemic corticosteroids for the current exacerbation, maintenance long-acting β2-agonist and long-acting anticholinergic treatments, and positive sputum culture at EOT. Conclusion Several bacteriological, historical, treatment-related factors were identified as predictors of early (EOT) and later (8 weeks posttherapy) clinical failure in this older outpatient population with moderate-to-severe chronic

  11. Animal-assisted interventions for elderly patients affected by dementia or psychiatric disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Bernabei, V; De Ronchi, D; La Ferla, T; Moretti, F; Tonelli, L; Ferrari, B; Forlani, M; Atti, A R

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this literature review was to assess the effects of Animal-Assisted Interventions (AAI) on elderly patients with dementia or various psychiatric disorders. We conducted a comprehensive literature search using the online PubMed network of the US National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health, Embase, PsycINFO, with the purpose of investigating AAI effects on cognitive functions, mood, and behaviour. A total of 18 articles on dementia and 5 on psychiatric disorders were included in the present review. AAI were found to have positive influences on demented patients by reducing degree of agitation and by improving degree and quality of social interaction. Few studies have assessed the effects of AAI on mood, and even fewer have assessed its consequences on cognitive functions. The results that are available indicate a positive effect on communication and coping ability, but none on cognitive performance. A substitute pet robot yielded encouraging results, but its use requires further investigation. The few studies conducted for elderly patients presenting a variety of psychiatric diagnoses produced controversial findings. In spite of the encouraging results of AAI, much more research examining the issue of optimal AAI duration, frequency of sessions, and suitable target group is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality of Life as reported by children and parents: a comparison between students and child psychiatric outpatients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During the recent decade, a number of studies have begun to address Quality of Life (QoL) in children and adolescents with mental health problems in general population and clinical samples. Only about half of the studies utilized both self and parent proxy report of child QoL. Generally children with mental health problems have reported lower QoL compared to healthy children. The question whether QoL assessment by both self and parent proxy report can identify psychiatric health services needs not detected by an established instrument for assessing mental health problems, i.e. the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), has never been examined and was the purpose of the present study. Methods No study exists that compares child QoL as rated by both child and parent, in a sample of referred child psychiatric outpatients with a representative sample of students attending public school in the same catchment area while controlling for mental health problems in the child. In the current study patients and students, aged 8-15.5 years, were matched with respect to age, gender and levels of the CBCL Total Problems scores. QoL was assessed by the self- and parent proxy-reports on the Inventory of Life Quality in Children and Adolescents (ILC). QoL scores were analyzed by non-parametric tests, using Wilcoxon paired rank comparisons. Results Both outpatients and their parents reported significantly lower child QoL on the ILC than did students and their parents, when children were matched on sex and age. Given equal levels of emotional and behavioural problems, as reported by the parents on the CBCL, in the two contrasting samples, the outpatients and their parents still reported lower QoL levels than did the students and their parents. Conclusions Child QoL reported both by child and parent was reduced in outpatients compared to students with equal levels of mental health problems as reported by their parents on the CBCL. This suggests that it should be helpful to add

  13. Relationship between renal function and serum magnesium concentration in elderly outpatients treated with magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    Horibata, Ken; Tanoue, Akiko; Ito, Masaaki; Takemura, Yousuke

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the relationship between renal function and serum magnesium concentration in elderly patients treated with magnesium oxide (MgO) in an outpatient setting of an urban hospital in Japan. In the present study, 44 elderly outpatients (23 patients with constipation treated with daily oral MgO and 21 untreated patients in the control group) who visited Kameyama municipal medical center were enrolled. Variables were age, sex, weight, height, serum magnesium concentration, serum blood urea nitrogen level, serum creatinine level, use of other magnesium-containing supplements and symptoms associated with hypermagnesemia. We calculated the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and classified patients based on eGFR category. Compared with the control group, the MgO group showed a significantly higher concentration of serum magnesium (median 2.2 mg/dL [interquartile range 2.1-2.3] vs 2.4 mg/dL [2.2-2.6], P < 0.001). Hypermagnesemia (>2.6 mg/dL) was noted only in the MgO group. However, symptoms associated with hypermagnesemia occurred in patients from both groups, with no significant difference between groups. In the MgO group, significant difference was seen in the median serum magnesium concentration between eGFR categories (P < 0.05). The category G4 (eGFR 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ) group had the highest serum magnesium concentration in the MgO group (3.0 mg/L [2.9-3.1]). Elderly patients treated with MgO have higher serum magnesium levels compared with the control group. MgO should be prescribed with caution in patients with low renal function as shown by a GFR category G3b or less (eGFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ). Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 600-605. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  14. Socio-Demographic, Clinical and Behavioral Characteristics Associated with a History of Suicide Attempts among Psychiatric Outpatients: A Case Control Study in a Northern Mexican City

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Arnaud-Gil, Carlos Alberto; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Molina-Espinoza, Luis Fernando; Rábago-Sánchez, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the epidemiology of suicide attempts among psychiatric outpatients in Mexico. This study was aimed to determine the socio-demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics associated with suicide attempts in psychiatric outpatients in two public hospitals in Durango, Mexico. Methods: Two hundred seventy six psychiatric outpatients (154 suicide attempters and 122 patients without suicide attempt history) attended the two public hospitals in Durango City, Mexico were included in this study. Socio-demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics were obtained retrospectively from all outpatients and compared in relation to the presence or absence of suicide attempt history. Results: Increased prevalence of suicide attempts was associated with mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use (F10-19) (P=0.01), schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders (F20-29) (P=0.02), mood (affective) disorders (F30-39) (P<0.001), and disorders of adult personality and behavior (F60-69) (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that suicide attempts were associated with young age (OR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.06-1.39; P=0.003), female gender (OR=2.98, 95% CI: 1.55-5.73; P=0.001), urban residence (OR=2.31, 95% CI: 1.17-4.57; P=0.01), memory impairment (OR=1.91, 95% CI: 1.07-3.40; P=0.02), alcohol consumption (OR=2.39, 95% CI: 1.21-4.70; P=0.01), and sexual promiscuity (OR=3.90, 95% CI: 1.74-8.77; P<0.001). Conclusions: We report the association of suicide attempts with socio-demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics in psychiatric outpatients in Mexico. Results may be useful for an optimal planning of preventive measures against suicide attempts in psychiatric outpatients. PMID:24711751

  15. Teaching Interpersonal Skills to Psychiatric Outpatients: Using Structured Learning Therapy in a Community-Based Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprafkin, Robert P.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Structured Learning Therapy (SLT), a type of treatment used to assist psychiatric patients to learn skills they need for effective and satisfying living in the community, is described in this article. A description of the community-based treatment facility in which SLT may be utilized and the results of the evaluation studies are also…

  16. Adolescent Dress, Part I: Dress and Body Markings of Psychiatric Outpatients and Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelman, John D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated dress and body markings of 100 hospitalized and never-hospitalized adolescent psychiatric patients using in-depth interviews. Found that hospitalized patients had higher incidence of self-scarring, but other individual expressions of appearance did not differentiate two groups. Suggests that dress and appearance observations,…

  17. Adolescent Dress, Part I: Dress and Body Markings of Psychiatric Outpatients and Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelman, John D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated dress and body markings of 100 hospitalized and never-hospitalized adolescent psychiatric patients using in-depth interviews. Found that hospitalized patients had higher incidence of self-scarring, but other individual expressions of appearance did not differentiate two groups. Suggests that dress and appearance observations,…

  18. Teaching Interpersonal Skills to Psychiatric Outpatients: Using Structured Learning Therapy in a Community-Based Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprafkin, Robert P.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Structured Learning Therapy (SLT), a type of treatment used to assist psychiatric patients to learn skills they need for effective and satisfying living in the community, is described in this article. A description of the community-based treatment facility in which SLT may be utilized and the results of the evaluation studies are also…

  19. Reducing HIV-Risk Behavior Among Adults Receiving Outpatient Psychiatric Treatment: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Michael P.; Carey, Kate B.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Gordon, Christopher M.; Schroder, Kerstin E. E.; Vanable, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a 10-session, HIV-risk-reduction intervention with 221 women and 187 men receiving outpatient psychiatric care for a mental illness. Patients were randomly assigned to the HIV intervention, a structurally equivalent substance use reduction (SUR) intervention, or standard care; they were assessed pre- and postintervention and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Patients receiving the HIV-risk-reduction intervention reported less unprotected sex, fewer casual sex partners, fewer new sexually transmitted infections, more safer sex communications, improved HIV knowledge, more positive condom attitudes, stronger condom use intentions, and improved behavioral skills relative to patients in the SUR and control conditions. Patients receiving the SUR intervention reported fewer total and casual sex partners compared with control patients. Exploratory analyses suggested that female patients and patients diagnosed with a major depressive disorder were more likely to benefit from the HIV-risk-reduction intervention. PMID:15065959

  20. Achieving Wellness: Monitoring the Success and Challenges of the Youth Health Indicator Program for Youth Treated in Outpatient Psychiatric Settings.

    PubMed

    Radigan, Marleen; Wang, Rui; Calderwood, Christina; Perkins, Matthew B; Lanzara, Carol; Sederer, Lloyd

    2017-09-01

    The youth health indicator (YHI) program was developed to improve health and reduce risk behaviors for youth treated in clinic and day treatment psychiatric settings. This study examined implementation of the YHI program and factors associated with BMI % change for youth participating in the program. Outpatient facilities which implemented the YHI program were surveyed (N = 10) and lessons learned were summarized. Mixed random effects repeated measures analysis was used to examine BMI % trajectory for youth admitted during 2010-2014 with BMI % measured (N = 6403). Treatment settings indicated a variety of strategies to undertake and sustain the YHI program. Factors associated with BMI % change over time were identified. The YHI program resulted in the development of a wide variety of programmatic innovations targeted at improving youth health. Continued work needs to be done to improve the health outcomes for youth in these treatment settings.

  1. Substance Use Disorders in Elderly Admissions to an Academic Psychiatric Inpatient Service over a 10-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowski, Dennis; Norrell, Nelly

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is a paucity of research on substance use disorders (SUDs) in the elderly psychiatric population. This study examines SUDs in a geriatric psychiatry inpatient service over a 10-year period. Methods. Data from 1788 elderly psychiatric inpatients from a ten-year period was collected. Variables collected included psychiatric diagnoses, SUD, number of psychiatric admissions, and length of stay. Those with and without a SUD were compared using Chi-Square or Student's t-test as appropriate using SPSS. Results. 11.7% (N = 210) of patients had a SUD, and the most common substance was alcohol at 73.3% (N = 154) or 8.6% of all admissions. Other SUDs were sedative-hypnotics (11%), opiate (2.9%), cannabis (1%), tobacco (1.4%), and unspecified SUD (38.6%). SUD patients were significantly younger, divorced, male, and less frequently readmitted and had shorter lengths of stay. The most common comorbid diagnoses were major depression (26.1%), bipolar disorder (10.5%), and dementia (17.1%). Conclusions. Over 10% of psychogeriatric admissions were associated with a SUD, with alcohol being the most common. Considering the difficulties in diagnosing SUD in this population and the retrospective study design, the true prevalence in elderly psychiatric inpatients is likely higher. This study adds to sparse literature on SUD in elderly psychiatric patients. PMID:27840765

  2. [Mental Health of elderly people: The prevalence and representations of psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Giordana, J Y; Roelandt, J L; Porteaux, C

    2010-01-01

    Upon the national data basis of the huge study "Mental Health in General Population", elaborated by the WHO Collaborating Centre, our research tries to identify the particularities of the advanced years population. The increasing number of the elderly in France and all over the world, as well as the demographic evolution prospects, truly justify our interest for them. A group of subjects older than 65 years old - representing 21,1% of the general population - was divided into two parts and the 65-74 years old (12.6%) - the 75 old years old and more (8.5%) - and was compared to the population between 18 and 74 years old (78.9%) who answered this investigation. The aim of our study was to detect the prevalence of the main psychic troubles of the elderly (depression, anxiety, addiction and psychiatric disorders), with a psychiatric tool, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). We also wanted to perceive how their perceptions and representations of the behaviours and clinical symptoms of the psychic troubles could be different from the ones of younger people. Thus, and according to the answers "normal/abnormal", "dangerous/not dangerous" linked to each item, we measured the possible difference between the answers and the representations of the general population towards the elderly. The elderly are generally confronted to multiple psychosocial stress factors (decrease of the cognitive performances, decline of the sensory abilities, drop of the social relationships, change of status, succession of loss and breach as well as the cessation of the professional activity and its network, which may favour the emergence of troubles. According to this, a higher rate of psychic troubles among the elderly than in the general investigated population, may be suspected. However, the study in general population points out that the prevalence of persons suffering from at least one trouble with the MINI declines among the subjects belonging to the highest brackets: 34

  3. The mental health of elderly couples. II. Concordance for psychiatric morbidity in spouses.

    PubMed

    Eagles, J M; Walker, L G; Blackwood, G W; Beattie, J A; Restall, D B

    1987-03-01

    A community sample of elderly married couples completed the 60-item General Health Questionnaire and the Leeds General Scales for the Self-Assessment of Depression and Anxiety. Significant concordance was demonstrated between the spouses' scores on these scales. Concordance was higher for depression than for anxiety. There was little to support previous findings that wives are more likely than husbands to be concordant with an ill spouse. The spouse concordance rates for psychiatric morbidity were similar to those found in studies of younger married couples.

  4. The impacts of migraine, anxiety disorders, and chronic depression on quality of life in psychiatric outpatients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-I; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Yang, Ching-Hui; Liu, Chia-Yih

    2008-08-01

    Our purpose was to determine if migraine, anxiety comorbidities, and chronic depression were independently related to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Consecutive psychiatric outpatients with MDD in a medical center were enrolled. MDD, chronic depression, and seven anxiety disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR. Migraine was diagnosed based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition. The acute version of the Short-Form 36 and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) were used to evaluate the HRQoL and the severity of depression, respectively. Multiple linear regressions were used to determine the independent factors related to HRQoL. There were 135 participants (34 men, 101 women) with MDD. Subjects with migraine, anxiety comorbidities, or chronic depression had higher HAMD scores and poor HRQoL. Migraine, specific phobia, and panic disorder were important and independent comorbidities predicting HRQoL. The impact of migraine on HRQoL, especially on bodily pain, was not inferior to those of some anxiety comorbidities or chronic depression. Future studies related to HRQoL of MDD should consider migraine and anxiety comorbidities simultaneously.

  5. Erectile dysfunction in a sample of patients attending a psychiatric outpatient department.

    PubMed

    Mosaku, K S; Ukpong, D I

    2009-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of erectile dysfunction among a sample of patients attending a psychiatric clinic, we administered the International Index of Erectile Function on 108 male patients attending the clinic. We also obtained sociodemographic and clinical variables from the patients. The mean age of the patients studied was 39.6 (s.d.=11.6), with a mean duration of illness of 10.24 (s.d.=8.2) years. There were 46.8% schizophrenics; other diagnoses include bipolar affective disorder, recurrent depressive disorder and substance use disorder. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction was 83%. Age, marital status, current medications and the presence of comorbid medical conditions were significantly associated with erectile dysfunction; however, only age and marital status significantly predicted erectile dysfunction. We concluded that erectile dysfunction is highly prevalent among patients attending the psychiatric clinic, as such inquiries about sexual function should be routinely carried out by clinicians.

  6. A dance movement therapy group for depressed adult patients in a psychiatric outpatient clinic: effects of the treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pylvänäinen, Päivi M.; Muotka, Joona S.; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2015-01-01

    We were interested in investigating the effects of dance movement therapy (DMT) in a psychiatric outpatient clinic with patients diagnosed with depression. DMT aims to engage the patients in physical and verbal exploration of their experiences generated in movement based interaction. The assumption was that DMT, which includes both physical engagement as well as emotional and social exploration, would alleviate the mood and psychiatric symptoms. All adult patients (n = 33) included in the study received treatment as usual (TAU). Twenty-one patients participated in a 12-session DMT group intervention, and the remaining 12 patients chose to take TAU only. The majority of the patients suffered from moderate or severe depression, recurrent and/or chronic type. The effects of the interventions were investigated after the intervention, and at 3-month follow-up. Compared to the TAU, adding DMT seemed to improve the effect of the treatment. The effect of the DMT was observable whether the patient was taking antidepressant medication or not. At follow-up, between group effect sizes (ES) were medium in favor for the DMT group (d = 0.60–0.79). In the DMT group, the within ES at the 3 months follow-up varied from 0.62 to 0.82 as compared to TAU 0.15–0.37. The results indicated that DMT is beneficial in the treatment of depressed patients. PMID:26217292

  7. A dance movement therapy group for depressed adult patients in a psychiatric outpatient clinic: effects of the treatment.

    PubMed

    Pylvänäinen, Päivi M; Muotka, Joona S; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2015-01-01

    We were interested in investigating the effects of dance movement therapy (DMT) in a psychiatric outpatient clinic with patients diagnosed with depression. DMT aims to engage the patients in physical and verbal exploration of their experiences generated in movement based interaction. The assumption was that DMT, which includes both physical engagement as well as emotional and social exploration, would alleviate the mood and psychiatric symptoms. All adult patients (n = 33) included in the study received treatment as usual (TAU). Twenty-one patients participated in a 12-session DMT group intervention, and the remaining 12 patients chose to take TAU only. The majority of the patients suffered from moderate or severe depression, recurrent and/or chronic type. The effects of the interventions were investigated after the intervention, and at 3-month follow-up. Compared to the TAU, adding DMT seemed to improve the effect of the treatment. The effect of the DMT was observable whether the patient was taking antidepressant medication or not. At follow-up, between group effect sizes (ES) were medium in favor for the DMT group (d = 0.60-0.79). In the DMT group, the within ES at the 3 months follow-up varied from 0.62 to 0.82 as compared to TAU 0.15-0.37. The results indicated that DMT is beneficial in the treatment of depressed patients.

  8. Comorbidity of psychiatric disorders and symmetric distal polyneuropathy among type II diabetic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Moreira, R O; Papelbaum, M; Fontenelle, L F; Appolinario, J C; Ellinger, V C M; Coutinho, W F; Zagury, L

    2007-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to establish the frequency of psychiatric comorbidity in a sample of diabetic patients with symmetric distal polyneuropathy (SDPN). Sixty-five patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were selected consecutively to participate in the study at Instituto Estadual de Diabetes e Endocrinologia. All patients were submitted to a complete clinical and psychiatric evaluation, including the Portuguese version of the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Neuropathy Symptom Score, and Neuropathy Disability Score. SDPN was identified in 22 subjects (33.8%). Patients with and without SDPN did not differ significantly regarding sociodemographic characteristics. However, a trend toward a worse glycemic control was found in patients with SDPN in comparison to patients without SDPN (HbA1c = 8.43 +/- 1.97 vs 7.48 +/- 1.95; P = 0.08). Patients with SDPN exhibited axis I psychiatric disorders significantly more often than those without SDPN (especially anxiety disorders, in general (81.8 vs 60.0%; P = 0.01), and major depression--current episode, in particular (18.2 vs 7.7%; P = 0.04)). The severity of the depressive symptoms correlated positively with the severity of SDPN symptoms (r = 0.38; P = 0.006), but not with the severity of SDPN signs (r = 0.07; P = 0.56). In conclusion, the presence of SDPN seems to be associated with a trend toward glycemic control. The diagnosis of SDPN in diabetic subjects seems also to be associated with relevant psychiatric comorbidity, including anxiety and current mood disorders.

  9. [The importance of an early accompanying evaluation of new care forms for the development of indicators for quality assurance in outpatient psychiatric integrated care].

    PubMed

    Hausen, A; Glaeske, G

    2015-05-01

    Aim of this contribution is to illustrate the imp-ortance of an early accompanying evaluation of new care forms for the development of indicators. The illustration uses the experience of the accompanying evaluation of the integrated care model for optimisation of outpatient psychiatric care. For the integrated care model we could develop potential indicators by using medical-psychiatric and insured-related routine data, but all potential indicators need further development to enable reliable statements about achieved quality targets. It is shown that the development of indicators in the outpatient psychiatric integrated care is affected by many different factors such as vague target agreements in the contract and missing contractual agreements for the data. As a result it is illustrated that in this project the evaluation was introduced after implementation of this new form of care and the already established contract and the data management impeded the development of indicators. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Recommendation of Repeated Ammonia Tests for Intrahepatic Portal-Systemic Shunt Without Cirrhosis in Elderly Patients With Psychiatric Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Abe, Michiaki; Soga, Temma; Obana, Nobuya; Seiji, Kazumasa; Tabata, Masao; Saito, Natsumi; Arita, Ryutaro; Numata, Takehiro; Tanaka, Junichi; Kuroda, Hitoshi; Takayama, Shin; Kagaya, Yutaka; Ishii, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    We report an elderly male patient with hyperammonemia induced by intrahepatic portal-systemic shunt without cirrhosis (IPSSwoC). The occasional emergence of his erratic behaviors was misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder. Regardless of his uneven symptoms, IPSSwoC was suspected due to his hyperammonemia. The contrast computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a congenital type of IPSSwoC. As blood ammonia levels are inconstant, repeated blood tests are recommended when this disease is suspected in elderly patients with psychiatric symptoms.

  11. Relationships of objectively scored Bender variables with MMPI scores in an outpatient psychiatric population.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Alan J; Golden, Charles J

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the Advanced Psychodiagnostic Interpretation system for the Bender Gestalt Test could reasonably predict the results of the most widely used objective measure of personality, the MMPI. Despite the widespread use of both tests, no previous studies could be found which correlated actual Bender scores with MMPI results, arising partly from the lack of a well-accepted, reliable, and objective scoring system for the Bender. The study compared the performance of 279 adult psychological outpatients on both the MMPI and Bender. The 55 Bender scorable points, which are seen most frequently in the outpatient population, were factor analyzed to yield 17 factors which were correlated with the MMPI. Significant multiple correlations were found between the Bender factors and 10 of 12 MMPI scales, with significant correlations ranging from .36 to .47. The Bender overall was able to discriminate moderately high scorers on the MMPI from low scorers. The overall results suggested that the Advanced Psychodiagnostic Interpretation scoring system includes measures that reflect general psychopathology and correlate with the MMPI as well as more specific content that is independent of the MMPI scales. The potential of this scoring system and joint use of the MMPI and Bender in personality assessment are discussed. Replication with a larger sample than 279 is encouraged for these 55 Bender and 12 MMPI items.

  12. Job-related stress in psychiatric nurses in Japan caring for elderly patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Yada, Hironori; Abe, Hiroshi; Lu, Xi; Wakizaki, Yuko; Omori, Hisamitsu; Matsuo, Hisae; Ishida, Yasushi; Katoh, Takahiko

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the specificity and structures of job-related stress in psychiatric dementia nurses (PDNs) caring for elderly patients with serious behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia who required substantial assistance with activities of daily living, in order to obtain fundamental knowledge toward providing mental health care for these nurses. Subjects were 244 nurses [63 PDNs and 181 other psychiatric nurses (OPNs)] Analysis of covariance to examine the specificity of job-related stress in PDNs revealed physical workload and work environment to be more significant stressors, and irritability and anxiety to be more significant stress reactions in PDNs than in OPNs. An examination of PDNs' job-related stress structures established in a structural equation model with two stress reactions confirmed as specific outcomes for PDNs revealed a significant positive influence of work environment on irritability; utilization of techniques for anxiety and physical workload influenced both stress reactions. Our findings highlight the importance of reducing physical workload and environment and establishing a structure for nursing techniques in psychiatric dementia wards to improve the mental health of PDNs.

  13. Body checking and eating cognitions in Brazilian outpatients with eating disorders and non psychiatric controls.

    PubMed

    Kachani, Adriana Trejger; Barroso, Lucia Pereira; Brasiliano, Silvia; Cordás, Táki Athanássios; Hochgraf, Patrícia Brunfentrinker

    2015-12-01

    Compare inadequate eating behaviors and their relationship to body checking in three groups: patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and a control group (C). Eighty three outpatients with eating disorders (ED) and 40 controls completed eating attitudes and body checking questionnaires. The overall relationship between the eating attitude and body checking was statistically significant in all three groups. The worse the eating attitude, the greater the body checking behavior. However, when we look at each group individually, the relationship was only statistically significant in the AN group (r=.354, p=0.020). The lower the desired weight and the worse the eating attitude, the more people check themselves, although in the presence of an ED the relationship between body checking and food restrictions is greater. In patients displaying the AN subgroup, body checking is also related to continued dietary control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Experiences of Domestic and School Violence Among Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients.

    PubMed

    Völkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Huemer, Julia; Jandl-Jager, Elisabeth; Abensberg-Traun, Marihan; Marecek, Sonja; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Plattner, Belinda; Skala, Katrin

    2016-10-01

    The experience of cumulative childhood adversities, such as exposure to domestic violence or abuse by caregivers, has been described as risk factor for poor mental health outcomes in adolescence and adulthood. We performed an investigation of experience of violence in all patients aged 6 to 20 years who had consulted the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, as outpatients during the period of one year. We were using the Childhood Trauma Interview (CTI) in order to obtain information on the kind of violence. Seventy-five percent of all patients had reported experiences of violence. These youth were significantly more often involved in acts of school violence, thus a significant correlation between experience of domestic violence and violence at school could be revealed. The results of our study emphasize the need for interventions preventing violence both in domestic and in school environments.

  15. Adolescent dress, Part I: Dress and body markings of psychiatric outpatients and inpatients.

    PubMed

    Michelman, J D; Eicher, J B; Michelman, S O

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigated the dress and body markings of 100 adolescent psychiatric patients (both hospitalized and never-hospitalized). Data were obtained from in-depth interviews conducted by a child psychiatrist. In contrast to nonhospitalized patients, hospitalized patients had a higher incidence of self-scarring, i.e., marks applied to self, either as a self-mutilation/suicide gesture or serving another purpose (for example, carving a boyfriend's initials into one's arm). Other individual expressions of appearance did not differentiate hospitalized from nonhospitalized patients. Detailed dress and appearance observations, questionnaires, photo reviews, self-portraits, and family discussions contributed to the beneficial effect of psychotherapy by focusing on feelings evoked and symbolized in dress and body markings.

  16. Prostitution use has non sexual functions - case report of a depressed psychiatric out-patient

    PubMed Central

    Gysin, Fátima; Gysin, François

    2013-01-01

    Case: A shy, depressed 30 year old male discussed his frequent ego-syntonic indoor prostitution consumption in small peer groups. Several distinctive non-sexual functions of this paid sex habit were identified. Design and method: The patient had 40 hourly psychiatric sessions in the private practice setting over 14 months. The Arizona Sexual Experience Scale was applied to compare the subjective appraisal of both paid sex and sex in a relationship. The informal Social Atom elucidates social preferences and the Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnostic-procedure was applied to describe a dominant relationship pattern. Results: The paid sex consumption functioned as a proud male life style choice to reinforce the patients fragile identity. The effect on self esteem was a release similar to his favorite past-time of kick-boxing. With paid sex asserted as a group ritual, it was practiced even with frequent erectile dysfunction and when sex with a stable romantic partner was more enjoyable and satisfying. The therapeutic attitude of the female psychiatrist, with her own ethical values, is put in to context with two opposing theories about prostitution: the ‘Sex-Work-model’ and the ‘Oppression-model’. The therapist’s reaction to the patients’ information was seen as a starting point to understanding the intrapsychic function of paid sex as a coping mechanism against depressive feelings. Conclusions: Exploring and understanding prostitution consumption patterns in young men can benefit the treatment of psychiatric disorders in the private practice setting. It is the psychiatrists task to investigate the patients hidden motives behind paid sex use to help patients achieve a greater inner and relational freedom. PMID:24627772

  17. Prevalence of elder abuse and neglect in seniors with psychiatric morbidity - example from central moravia, czech republic.

    PubMed

    Luzny, Jan; Jurickova, Lubica

    2012-01-01

    Elder abuse and neglect (EAN) comprises emotional, financial, physical, and sexual abuse, neglect by other individuals, and self-neglect. Elder abuse and neglect in seniors with psychiatric morbidity was not monitored in the Czech Republic at all, despite the literature shows mental morbidity as one of the important risk factor for developing elder abuse and neglect. We designed comparative cross sectional study comprising 305 seniors hospitalized in Mental Hospital Kromeriz in June 2011 - group of 202 seniors hospitalized due to mental disorder in psychogeriatric ward and group of 103 seniors hospitalized due to somatic disorder in internal ward. Content analysis of medical records was done in both groups of seniors, with regards to symptoms of elder abuse. Then, we discussed the topic of elder abuse with 30 nurses of psychogeriatric ward in focus group interview. Between two compared groups of seniors we detected statistically higher prevalence of elder abuse in seniors with psychiatric morbidity (48 cases, 23.8% prevalence of EAN), compared to somatically ill seniors (3 cases, 2.9%). As for nursing staff, 5 from 30 nurses (16.7%) have never heard about symptoms of elder abuse and neglect, 10 from 30 nurses (33.3%) had just a partial knowledge about elder abuse and neglect and its symptoms, the rest of nurses (15 from 30 nurses, 50.0%) had good knowledge about elder abuse and neglect and its symptoms. Elder abuse and neglect seems to be a relevant problem in senior population with mental disorders. Development of educational programs for nursing and medical staff about Elder abuse and neglect (symptoms of EAN, early detection of EAN, knowledge how to report cases of EAN) could improve the situation and help mentally ill seniors to better quality of life.

  18. Prevalence of Elder Abuse and Neglect in Seniors with Psychiatric Morbidity - Example from Central Moravia, Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Luzny, Jan; Jurickova, Lubica

    2012-01-01

    Background: Elder abuse and neglect (EAN) comprises emotional, financial, physical, and sexual abuse, neglect by other individuals, and self-neglect. Elder abuse and neglect in seniors with psychiatric morbidity was not monitored in the Czech Republic at all, despite the literature shows mental morbidity as one of the important risk factor for developing elder abuse and neglect. Methods: We designed comparative cross sectional study comprising 305 seniors hospitalized in Mental Hospital Kromeriz in June 2011 – group of 202 seniors hospitalized due to mental disorder in psychogeriatric ward and group of 103 seniors hospitalized due to somatic disorder in internal ward. Content analysis of medical records was done in both groups of seniors, with regards to symptoms of elder abuse. Then, we discussed the topic of elder abuse with 30 nurses of psychogeriatric ward in focus group interview. Results: Between two compared groups of seniors we detected statistically higher prevalence of elder abuse in seniors with psychiatric morbidity (48 cases, 23.8% prevalence of EAN), compared to somatically ill seniors (3 cases, 2.9%). As for nursing staff, 5 from 30 nurses (16.7%) have never heard about symptoms of elder abuse and neglect, 10 from 30 nurses (33.3%) had just a partial knowledge about elder abuse and neglect and its symptoms, the rest of nurses (15 from 30 nurses, 50.0%) had good knowledge about elder abuse and neglect and its symptoms. Conclusion: Elder abuse and neglect seems to be a relevant problem in senior population with mental disorders. Development of educational programs for nursing and medical staff about Elder abuse and neglect (symptoms of EAN, early detection of EAN, knowledge how to report cases of EAN) could improve the situation and help mentally ill seniors to better quality of life. PMID:23113221

  19. Predictive validity of the Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability for violent behavior in outpatient forensic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Troquete, Nadine A C; van den Brink, Rob H S; Beintema, Harry; Mulder, Tamara; van Os, Titus W D P; Schoevers, Robert A; Wiersma, Durk

    2015-06-01

    It remains unclear whether prediction of violence based on historical factors can be improved by adding dynamic risks, protective strengths, selection of person-specific key strengths or critical vulnerabilities, and structured professional judgment (SPJ). We examine this in outpatient forensic psychiatry with the Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START) at 3 and 6 months follow-up. An incident occurred during 33 (13%) out of 252 3-month and 44 (21%) out of 211 6-month follow-up periods (n = 188 unique clients). Pearson correlations for all predictor variables were in the expected directions. Prediction of recidivism based on historical factor ratings (odds ratio [OR] = 1.10) could not be improved through the addition of dynamic risk, protective strength, or key or critical factor scores (all ORs ns). The addition of the SPJ improved the model to modest accuracy (area under the curve [AUC] = .64) but made no independent significant contribution (OR = 1.55, p = .21) for the 3-month follow-up. For the 6-month follow-up, SPJ scores also increased predictive accuracy to modest (AUC = .67) and made a significant independent contribution to the prediction of the outcome (OR = 1.98, p = .04). Multicollinearity limits were unviolated. Limitations apply, however, results are similar to those from clinical, researcher rated samples and are discussed in the light of setting specific characteristics. Although it is too early to advocate implementing risk assessment instruments in clinical practice, we can conclude that clinicians in a heterogeneous outpatient forensic psychiatric setting can achieve similar results with the START as clinicians and research staff in more homogeneous inpatient settings.

  20. Association of trauma-related disorders and dissociation with four idioms of distress among Latino psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Raggio, Greer A; Peláez, Clara; Chen, Henian; Guarnaccia, Peter J

    2010-06-01

    Past research on idioms of distress among U.S. Latinos has revealed that ataque de nervios and altered perceptions, such as hearing and seeing things when alone, are independent markers of higher morbidity and mental health utilization despite having no one-to-one relationships with any single psychiatric diagnosis. It has been proposed that the idioms exert this effect because they are signs of distressing dissociative capacity associated with traumatic exposure. This study examines the relationships in an ethnically diverse Latino psychiatric outpatient sample (N = 230) among interpersonal trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder, dissociative capacity and four cultural idioms of distress associated with the popular overall category of nervios. We particularly explore how these relationships change with varied measures of traumatic exposure, including trauma severity and timing or persistence of trauma. A series of adjusted bivariate regressions assessed the matrix of associations between the idioms and the clinical variables. In this highly traumatized population, we identified a strong 'nexus' of associations between dissociation and three of the idioms: currently being ill with nerves, ataque de nervios and altered perceptions. These idioms were largely independent from PTSD and depression and were associated with trauma persistence and severity. A fourth idiom, being nervous since childhood, was not associated with any other variable and may represent a personality trait rather than a diagnosable condition. Our results validate the clinical utility of the construct of nervios as a set of specific idioms associated with dissociation that are useful markers of mental health need among Latinos independently of their association with clinical diagnoses.

  1. Association of Trauma-Related Disorders and Dissociation with Four Idioms of Distress Among Latino Psychiatric Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Gorritz, Magdaliz; Raggio, Greer A.; Peláez, Clara; Chen, Henian; Guarnaccia, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Past research on idioms of distress among U.S. Latinos has revealed that ataque de nervios and altered perceptions, such as hearing and seeing things when alone, are independent markers of higher morbidity and mental health utilization despite having no one-to-one relationships with any single psychiatric diagnosis. It has been proposed that the idioms exert this effect because they are signs of distressing dissociative capacity associated with traumatic exposure. This study examines the relationships in an ethnically diverse Latino psychiatric outpatient sample (N = 230) among interpersonal trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder, dissociative capacity and four cultural idioms of distress associated with the popular overall category of nervios. We particularly explore how these relationships change with varied measures of traumatic exposure, including trauma severity and timing or persistence of trauma. A series of adjusted bivariate regressions assessed the matrix of associations between the idioms and the clinical variables. In this highly traumatized population, we identified a strong ‘nexus’ of associations between dissociation and three of the idioms: currently being ill with nerves, ataque de nervios and altered perceptions. These idioms were largely independent from PTSD and depression and were associated with trauma persistence and severity. A fourth idiom, being nervous since childhood, was not associated with any other variable and may represent a personality trait rather than a diagnosable condition. Our results validate the clinical utility of the construct of nervios as a set of specific idioms associated with dissociation that are useful markers of mental health need among Latinos independently of their association with clinical diagnoses. PMID:20414799

  2. Which DSM-IV personality disorders are most strongly associated with indices of psychosocial morbidity in psychiatric outpatients?

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Chelminski, Iwona; Young, Diane; Dalrymple, Kristy; Martinez, Jennifer; Morgan, Theresa A

    2012-10-01

    The DSM-5 Work Group for Personality and Personality Disorders (PDs) recommended retaining 6 specific PD "types" (antisocial, avoidant, borderline, narcissistic, obsessive-compulsive, and schizotypal) and eliminating the other 4 PDs currently included in DSM-IV (paranoid, schizoid, histrionic, and dependent). One important clinical aspect of PDs is their association with indices of psychosocial morbidity. Because the literature on the relationship between PDs and psychosocial morbidity in psychiatric patients is limited, we undertook the current analysis of the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project database to examine which PDs were most strongly associated with a variety of measures of psychosocial morbidity. We tested the hypothesis that the disorders recommended for retention in DSM-5 would be associated with more severe morbidity than the disorders recommended for deletion. A total of 2150 psychiatric outpatients were evaluated with semistructured diagnostic interviews for DSM-IV Axes I and II disorders and 7 measures of psychosocial morbidity. We examined the correlation between each PD dimensional score and each measure of morbidity and then conducted multiple regression analyses to determine which PDs were independently associated with the indices of morbidity. For the 6 PDs proposed for retention in DSM-5, 36 (85.7%) of the 42 correlations were significant, whereas for the 4 PDs proposed for deletion, 26 (92.9%) of the 28 correlations were significant. In the regression analyses for the 6 PDs proposed for retention in DSM-5, 19 (45.2%) of the 42 β coefficients were significant, whereas for the 4 PDs proposed for deletion, 7 (25.0%) of the 28 β coefficients were significant. The results of the present study, along with the results of other studies, do not provide clear evidence for the preferential retention of some PDs over others based on their association with indices of psychosocial morbidity. Copyright © 2012

  3. Depression and suicide risk of outpatients at specialized hospitals for substance use disorder: comparison with depressive disorder patients at general psychiatric clinics.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Matsushita, Sachio; Okudaira, Kenichi; Naruse, Nobuya; Cho, Tetsuji; Muto, Takeo; Ashizawa, Takeshi; Konuma, Kyohei; Morita, Nobuaki; Ino, Aro

    2011-12-01

    The present study used a self-reporting questionnaire to compare suicide risk in outpatients being treated for substance use disorder at specialized hospitals to suicide risk in outpatients being treated for depressive disorder at general psychiatric clinics. Although patients in both groups exhibited an equal severity of depression, the patients with drug use disorder had a higher suicide risk than those with depressive disorder. These findings indicate that drug-abusing patients at specialized hospitals may have a severe risk of committing suicide, suggesting that carefully assessing the comorbidity of depression with drug abuse may be required for preventing suicide in drug-abusing patients.

  4. Stigma resistance and its association with internalised stigma and psychosocial outcomes among psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ying Wen; Picco, Louisa; Pang, Shirlene; Jeyagurunathan, Anitha; Satghare, Pratika; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2017-07-14

    Studies have suggested that stigma resistance plays an important role in the recovery from mental illness. However, there has been limited research in Asian countries that has examined the benefits of stigma resistance among the mentally ill in Asian populations. Hence, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of stigma resistance and establish the socio-demographic correlates of stigma resistance, as well as its association with internalised stigma and psychosocial outcomes among a multi-ethnic population of 280 outpatients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), schizophrenia, depressive disorders and anxiety disorders in Singapore. Prevalence of stigma resistance measured using the Stigma Resistance subscale of the Internalised Stigma of Mental Illness Scale was 82.9%. ANOVA and logistic regressions were conducted and results revealed that: (i) Stigma resistance was positively associated with being separated/divorced/widowed but negatively associated with depression diagnosis; (ii) Psychosocial outcomes such as self-esteem and psychological health were positively associated with stigma resistance; and (iii) Internalised stigma was negatively associated with stigma resistance. Moving forward, treatments could emphasize on improving the self-esteem and psychological health of patients to increase their stigma resistance for counteracting effects of public and internalised stigma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The elderly in the psychiatric emergency service (PES); a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Yves; Beaulieu, Lucie; Paradis, Michel; Labonté, Edith

    2011-07-15

    The impact of an aging population on the psychiatric emergency service (PES) has not been fully ascertained. Cognitive dysfunctions aside, many DSM-IV disorders may have a lower prevalence in the elderly, who appear to be underrepresented in the PES. We therefore attempted to more precisely assess their patterns of PES use and their clinical and demographic characteristics. Close to 30,000 visits to a general hospital PES (Montreal, Quebec, Canada) were acquired between 1990 and 2004 and pooled with over 17,000 visits acquired using the same methodology at three other services in Quebec between 2002 and 2004. The median age of PES patients increased over time. However, the proportion of yearly visits attributable to the elderly (compared to those under 65) showed no consistent increase during the observation period. The pattern of return visits (two to three, four to ten, eleven or more) did not differ from that of patients under 65, although the latter made a greater number of total return visits per patient. The elderly were more often women (62%), widowed (28%), came to the PES accompanied (42%) and reported « illness » as an important stressor (29%). About 39% were referred for depression or anxiety. They were less violent (10%) upon their arrival. Affective disorders predominated in the diagnostic profile, they were less co-morbid and more likely admitted than patients under 65. Although no proportional increase in PES use over time was found the elderly do possess distinct characteristics potentially useful in PES resource planning so as to better serve this increasingly important segment of the general population.

  6. Best practices: a program to support shared decision making in an outpatient psychiatric medication clinic.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Patricia E; Rapp, Charles; Holter, Mark; Riefer, Melody

    2008-06-01

    This column presents preliminary findings of an intervention to support shared decision making in psychopharmacology consultation. The waiting area in an urban psychiatric medication clinic was transformed into a peer-run Decision Support Center featuring a user-friendly, Internet-based software program with which clients could create a one-page computer-generated report for use in the medication consultation. The Decision Support Center was used 662 times by 189 unique users from a young-adult and general adult case management team from October 2006 to September 2007. All clients had severe mental disorders. Only ten clients refused to use the intervention at some point during the pilot study. Focus groups with medical staff (N=4), clients (N=16), case managers (N=14), and peer-specialist staff (N=3) reported that the intervention helped to create efficiencies in the consultation and empower clients to become more involved in treatment-related decision making. A randomized controlled trial is currently in process.

  7. Effectiveness of a nurse-based outreach program for identifying and treating psychiatric illness in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Rabins, P V; Black, B S; Roca, R; German, P; McGuire, M; Robbins, B; Rye, R; Brant, L

    2000-06-07

    Elderly persons with psychiatric disorders are less likely than younger adults to be diagnosed as having a mental disorder and receive needed mental health treatment. Lack of access to care is 1 possible cause of this disparity. To determine whether a nurse-based mobile outreach program to seriously mentally ill elderly persons is more effective than usual care in diminishing levels of depression, psychiatric symptoms, and undesirable moves (eg, nursing home placement, eviction, board and care placement). Prospective randomized trial conducted between March 1993 and April 1996 to assess the effectiveness of the Psychogeriatric Assessment and Treatment in City Housing (PATCH) program. Six urban public housing sites for elderly persons in Baltimore, Md. A total of 945 (83%) of 1195 residents in the 6 sites underwent screening for psychiatric illness. Among those screened, 342 screened positive and 603 screened negative. All screen-positive subjects aged 60 years and older (n=310) and a 10% random sample of screen-negative subjects aged 60 years and older (n=61) were selected for a structured psychiatric interview. Eleven subjects moved or died; 245 (82%) of those who screened positive and 53 (88%) of those who screened negative were evaluated to determine who had a psychiatric disorder. Data were weighted to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders at the 6 sites. Among the 6 sites, residents in 3 buildings were randomized to receive the PATCH model intervention, which included educating building staff to be case finders, performing assessment in residents' apartments, and providing care when indicated; and residents in the remaining 3 buildings were randomized to receive usual care (comparison group). Number of undesirable moves and scores on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), a measure of depressive symptoms, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), a measure of psychiatric symptoms and behavioral disorder, in intervention vs

  8. Gender moderates the relationship between impulsivity and sexual risk-taking in a cocaine-using psychiatric outpatient population.

    PubMed

    Black, Anne C; McMahon, Thomas J; Potenza, Marc N; Fiellin, Lynn E; Rosen, Marc I

    2015-03-01

    Adults who abuse substances are at increased risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Within this population, sexual risk behaviors have been associated with increased impulsivity. Studies in non-clinical populations showing gender-related differences in sexual decision-making and casual sexual partnering suggest impulsivity has a greater influence on men than women, but these differences have not been documented in substance-using patients. In a sample of 89 adults with recent cocaine use and receiving outpatient psychiatric treatment, we tested the hypothesis that gender moderates the effect of impulsivity on sexual risk-taking. Using logistic regression modeling, we tested the main and gender-moderated effects of task-related impulsivity on the probability of having a casual sexual partner and multiple sexual partners. Results confirmed a significant gender-by-impulsivity interaction; men who were more impulsive on a continuous performance task had significantly higher rates of sexual risk-taking than less impulsive men, but women's impulsivity was unrelated to these outcomes. Impulsive men were over three times as likely as less impulsive men to have a recent casual partner. Implications of these results and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  9. Gender moderates the relationship between impulsivity and sexual risk-taking in a cocaine-using psychiatric outpatient population

    PubMed Central

    Black, Anne C.; McMahon, Thomas J.; Potenza, Marc N.; Fiellin, Lynn E.; Rosen, Marc I.

    2014-01-01

    Adults who abuse substances are at increased risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Within this population, sexual risk behaviors have been associated with increased impulsivity. Studies in non-clinical populations showing gender-related differences in sexual decision-making and casual sexual partnering suggest impulsivity has a greater influence on men than women, but these differences have not been documented in substance-using patients. In a sample of 89 adults with recent cocaine use and receiving outpatient psychiatric treatment, we tested the hypothesis that gender moderates the effect of impulsivity on sexual risk-taking. Using logistic regression modeling, we tested the main and gender-moderated effects of task-related impulsivity on the probability of having a casual sexual partner and multiple sexual partners. Results confirmed a significant gender-by-impulsivity interaction; men who were more impulsive on a continuous performance task had significantly higher rates of sexual risk-taking than less impulsive men, but women's impulsivity was unrelated to these outcomes. Impulsive men were over three times as likely as less impulsive men to have a recent casual partner. Implications of these results and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:25554716

  10. Brief screening for mild cognitive impairment in elderly outpatient clinic: validation of the Korean version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Young; Dong Woo Lee; Cho, Seong-Jin; Na, Duk L; Hong Jin Jeon; Kim, Shin-Kyum; You Ra Lee; Youn, Jung-Hae; Kwon, Miseon; Lee, Jae-Hong; Maeng Je Cho

    2008-06-01

    The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is a brief cognitive screening tool with high sensitivity for screening patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The authors examined the validity and reliability of the Korean version of the MoCA (MoCA-K) in elderly outpatients. The MoCA-K, a Korean version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale, and neuropsychological batteries were administered to 196 elderly persons (mild Alzheimer's disease [AD] = 44, MCI = 37, normal controls [NC] = 115). MoCA-K scores were highly correlated with those of MMSE and CDR. Using a cutoff score of 22/23, the MoCA-K had an excellent sensitivity of 89% and a good specificity of 84% for screening MCI. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were good. The results obtained show that the MoCA-K is brief, reliable, and suitable for use as a screening tool to screen MCI patients in elderly outpatient clinic settings.

  11. Comparison of Outpatient Services between Elderly People with Intellectual Disabilities and the General Elderly Population in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Jin-Ding; Chiang, Po-Huang; Chang, Yu-Chia; Tung, Ho-Jui

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the ambulatory visit frequency and medical expenditures of the general elderly population versus the elderly with intellectual disabilities in Taiwan, while examining the effects of age, gender, urbanization and copayment status on ambulatory utilization. A cross-sectional study was conducted to analyze data from 103,183…

  12. Comparison of Outpatient Services between Elderly People with Intellectual Disabilities and the General Elderly Population in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Jin-Ding; Chiang, Po-Huang; Chang, Yu-Chia; Tung, Ho-Jui

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the ambulatory visit frequency and medical expenditures of the general elderly population versus the elderly with intellectual disabilities in Taiwan, while examining the effects of age, gender, urbanization and copayment status on ambulatory utilization. A cross-sectional study was conducted to analyze data from 103,183…

  13. Eating Disorder Inventory-3, validation in Swedish patients with eating disorders, psychiatric outpatients and a normal control sample.

    PubMed

    Nyman-Carlsson, Erika; Engström, Ingemar; Norring, Claes; Nevonen, Lauri

    2015-02-01

    The Eating Disorder Inventory-3 (EDI-3) is designed to assess eating disorder psychopathology and the associated psychological symptoms. The instrument has been revised and has not yet been validated for Swedish conditions in its current form. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of this inventory and present national norms for Swedish females. Data from patients with eating disorders (n = 292), psychiatric outpatients (n = 140) and normal controls (n = 648), all females, were used to study the internal consistency, the discriminative ability, and the sensitivity and specificity of the inventory using preliminary cut-offs for each subscale and diagnosis separately. Swedish norms were compared with those from Denmark, USA, Canada, Europe and Australian samples. The reliability was acceptable for all subscales except Asceticism among normal controls. Analysis of variance showed that the EDI-3 discriminates significantly between eating disorders and normal controls. Anorexia nervosa was significantly discriminated from bulimia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified on the Eating Disorder Risk Scales. Swedish patients scored significantly lower than patients from other countries on the majority of the subscales. Drive for Thinness is the second best predictor for an eating disorder. The best predictor for anorexia nervosa was Interoceptive Deficits and Bulimia for the other diagnoses. Conclusions/clinical implications: The EDI-3 is valid for use with Swedish patients as a clinical assessment tool for the treatment planning and evaluation of patients with eating-related problems. However, it still exist some uncertainty regarding its use as a screening tool.

  14. Screening of psychiatric outpatients for borderline personality disorder with the McLean Screening Instrument for Borderline Personality Disorder (MSI-BPD).

    PubMed

    Melartin, Tarja; Häkkinen, Miikka; Koivisto, Maaria; Suominen, Kirsi; Isometsä, Erkki T

    2009-11-01

    Detecting patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) is important, and feasible screening instruments are needed. To investigate our Finnish translation of the McLean Screening Instrument for Borderline Personality Disorder (MSI-BPD) as a screen for BPD among psychiatric outpatients, its psychometric and screening properties, and feasibility in improving the recognition of BPD. We screened 302 consecutive psychiatric outpatients at the Department of Psychiatry at the Helsinki University Central Hospital in Finland for BPD using the Finnish MSI-BPD. Of the patients, 69 (23%) were assigned to a random sample that was stratified according to the number of screens returned to the outpatient clinics, and further stratified into the three strata, high scores deliberately enriched, according to the MSI-BPD scores. Finally, a stratified random sample of 45 patients was interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II) by the interviewers blind to the patients' MSI-BPD scores. One third (29%) of 302 screened patients had a positive MSI-BPD. The internal consistency of the MSI-BPD was good (Cronbach's alpha = 0.77). Of the 45 patients interviewed with the SCID-II, 11 (24%) were found to have BPD, five (46%) of whom a previously clinical diagnosis. In a ROC analysis, the optimal cut-off score was 7. The translated MSI-BPD was found to be a feasible screen for BPD in Finnish psychiatric outpatient care. Further studies investigating the clinical utility of MSI-BPD in larger clinical samples are warranted.

  15. Posttraumatic growth, depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress symptoms, post-migration stressors and quality of life in multi-traumatized psychiatric outpatients with a refugee background in Norway.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Dinu-Stefan; Siqveland, Johan; Heir, Trond; Hauff, Edvard; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Lien, Lars

    2012-07-23

    Psychiatric outpatients with a refugee background have often been exposed to a variety of potentially traumatizing events, with numerous negative consequences for their mental health and quality of life. However, some patients also report positive personal changes, posttraumatic growth, related to these potentially traumatic events. This study describes posttraumatic growth, posttraumatic stress symptoms, depressive symptoms, post-migration stressors, and their association with quality of life in an outpatient psychiatric population with a refugee background in Norway. Fifty five psychiatric outpatients with a refugee background participated in a cross-sectional study using clinical interviews to measure psychopathology (SCID-PTSD, MINI), and four self-report instruments measuring posttraumatic growth, posttraumatic stress symptoms, depressive symptoms, and quality of life (PTGI-SF, IES-R, HSCL-25-depression scale, and WHOQOL-Bref) as well as measures of social integration, social network and employment status. All patients reported some degree of posttraumatic growth, while only 31% reported greater amounts of growth. Eighty percent of the patients had posttraumatic stress symptoms above the cut-off point, and 93% reported clinical levels of depressive symptoms. Quality of life in the four domains of the WHOQOL-Bref levels were low, well below the threshold for the'life satisfaction' standard proposed by Cummins. A hierarchic regression model including depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress symptoms, posttraumatic growth, and unemployment explained 56% of the total variance found in the psychological health domain of the WHOQOL-Bref scale. Posttraumatic growth made the strongest contribution to the model, greater than posttraumatic stress symptoms or depressive symptoms. Post-migration stressors like unemployment, weak social network and poor social integration were moderately negatively correlated with posttraumatic growth and quality of life, and positively

  16. Posttraumatic growth, depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress symptoms, post-migration stressors and quality of life in multi-traumatized psychiatric outpatients with a refugee background in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Psychiatric outpatients with a refugee background have often been exposed to a variety of potentially traumatizing events, with numerous negative consequences for their mental health and quality of life. However, some patients also report positive personal changes, posttraumatic growth, related to these potentially traumatic events. This study describes posttraumatic growth, posttraumatic stress symptoms, depressive symptoms, post-migration stressors, and their association with quality of life in an outpatient psychiatric population with a refugee background in Norway. Methods Fifty five psychiatric outpatients with a refugee background participated in a cross-sectional study using clinical interviews to measure psychopathology (SCID-PTSD, MINI), and four self-report instruments measuring posttraumatic growth, posttraumatic stress symptoms, depressive symptoms, and quality of life (PTGI-SF, IES-R, HSCL-25-depression scale, and WHOQOL-Bref) as well as measures of social integration, social network and employment status. Results All patients reported some degree of posttraumatic growth, while only 31% reported greater amounts of growth. Eighty percent of the patients had posttraumatic stress symptoms above the cut-off point, and 93% reported clinical levels of depressive symptoms. Quality of life in the four domains of the WHOQOL-Bref levels were low, well below the threshold for the’life satisfaction’ standard proposed by Cummins. A hierarchic regression model including depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress symptoms, posttraumatic growth, and unemployment explained 56% of the total variance found in the psychological health domain of the WHOQOL-Bref scale. Posttraumatic growth made the strongest contribution to the model, greater than posttraumatic stress symptoms or depressive symptoms. Post-migration stressors like unemployment, weak social network and poor social integration were moderately negatively correlated with posttraumatic growth and

  17. Differences in HIV-related knowledge, attitudes, and behavior among psychiatric outpatients with and without a history of a sexually transmitted infection.

    PubMed

    Vanable, Peter A; Carey, Michael P; Carey, Kate B; Maisto, Stephen A

    2007-01-01

    HIV infection among the mentally ill is estimated to be at least eight times the prevalence in the general population. Psychiatric patients may also be disproportionately vulnerable to other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), but this has not been well studied. We sought to characterize the prevalence and correlates of STIs in a sample of psychiatric outpatients (N=464). Over one-third of the sample (38%) reported a lifetime history of one or more STIs. Multivariate analyses showed that, relative to those without an STI history, patients with a lifetime STI history were more knowledgeable about HIV, expressed stronger intentions to use condoms, and perceived themselves to be at greater risk for HIV. However, those with a past STI were also more likely to report sex with multiple partners and reported more frequent unprotected sex in the past 3 months. Treatment for an STI may increase HIV knowledge and risk reduction motivation, but does not necessarily lead to changes in sexual risk behavior among psychiatric patients. Findings highlight the need for STI/ HIV risk reduction interventions in psychiatric settings, particularly for patients with high-risk profiles.

  18. Changes in drug utilization following the outpatient prescription drug cost-sharing program--evidence from Taiwan's elderly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuen-Zen; Romeis, James C

    2004-06-01

    This paper examines changes in drug utilization following Taiwan's newly implemented National Health Insurance (NHI) outpatient prescription drug cost-sharing program for persons over 65 years old. The study is a hospital outpatient prescription level analysis that adopts a pretest-posttest control group experiment design. Selected measures of outpatient prescription drug utilization are examined for cost-sharing and non cost-sharing groups in cost-sharing periods and pre cost-sharing periods. Additional analyses were conducted comparing older patients with and without chronic diseases and differences for essential and non-essential drugs. Patients over age 65 were drawn from 21 hospitals in the Taipei area using a stratified random sampling method. This paper yields several interesting findings. First, average prescription cost and prescription period increased for both the cost-sharing and non cost-sharing groups. However, the rate of increase was significantly less in the cost-sharing group when compared with the non cost-sharing group. Second, the elderly with non-chronic diseases were more sensitive (i.e., reducing drug utilization) to the drug cost-sharing program when compared with those with chronic diseases. Third, for the elderly with non-chronic diseases average drug cost per prescription experienced a smaller decrease in essential drugs but a moderate increase in non-essential drugs for the cost-sharing group. By contrast, for the non cost-sharing group, average drug cost per prescription increased sharply in non-essential drugs as well as essential drugs. Finally, there was a significant increase in the number of prescriptions as well as drug costs above the upper bound of the cost-sharing schedule. The outpatient drug cost-sharing program implemented by the NHI in Taiwan did not reverse the trend of prescription drug cost increases in hospitals. The significant increase in the number of prescriptions above the upper bound of the cost-sharing schedule

  19. The Yoruba version of the Beck Hopelessness Scale: psychometric characteristics and correlates of hopelessness in a sample of Nigerian psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Aloba, Olutayo; Akinsulore, Adesanmi; Mapayi, Boladale; Oloniniyi, Ibiduniyi; Mosaku, Kolawole; Alimi, Taiwo; Esan, Olufemi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies from the developed western countries have repeatedly demonstrated that hopelessness positively correlates with an increased risk of suicide in the context of chronic mental disorders such as schizophrenia and affective disorders. Despite this persistently strong association, the construct of hopelessness in terms of its factorial structure and correlates has not been explored among Nigerian psychiatric outpatients. The aim of this present study is to examine the psychometric characteristics of the Yoruba language culturally adapted version of the Beck Hopelessness Scale in a cross-sectional sample of psychiatric outpatients in South-western Nigeria. The participants were 327 Nigerian adult outpatients receiving treatment for schizophrenia, bipolar and depressive disorders, consecutively recruited from the outpatient psychiatric clinics of a university teaching hospital in South-western Nigeria. The outpatients were recruited over a one year period. They completed the Yoruba translated version of the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS-Y), a sociodemographic and illness-related questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Their level of functioning was assessed with the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF), psychopathology was evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the level of disability measured with the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS-II). Suicidality and confirmation of the diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar and depressive disorders were evaluated with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). The construct of hopelessness in terms of factorial structure, reliability, validity and correlates was explored. Exploratory Factor Analysis using Principal Component Analysis with Varimax rotation was used to examine the factorial structure of the BHS-Y. Internal consistency was examined with Cronbach's alpha, and the construct validity of the scale was assessed

  20. Neighborhood linking social capital as a predictor of psychiatric medication prescription in the elderly: a Swedish national cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sundquist, Jan; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Li, Xinjun; Kawakami, Naomi; Shiwaku, Kuninori; Sundquist, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the association between neighborhood linking social capital and psychiatric medication in the elderly. The present study analyzes whether there is an association between linking social capital (a theoretical concept describing the amount of trust between individuals and societal institutions) and prescription of antipsychotics, anxiolytics, hypnotics/sedatives, antidepressants, or anti-dementia drugs. Design, Setting, Participants and Measurements The entire Swedish population aged 65+, a total of 1,292,816 individuals, were followed from 1 July 2005 until first prescription of psychiatric medication, death, emigration, or the end of the study on 31 December 2010. Small geographic units were used to define neighborhoods. The definition of linking social capital was based on mean voting participation in each neighborhood unit, categorized in three groups. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and between-neighborhood variance in three different models. Results There was an inverse association between the level of linking social capital and prescription of psychiatric medications (except for anti-dementia drugs). The associations decreased, but remained significant, after accounting for age, sex, family income, marital status, country of birth, and education level (except for antidepressants). The OR for prescription of antipsychotics in the crude model was 1.65 (95% CI 1.53–1.78) and decreased, but remained significant (OR = 1.26; 95% CI 1.17–1.35), after adjustment for the individual-level sociodemographic variables. Conclusions Decision-makers should take into account the potentially negative effect of linking social capital on psychiatric disorders when planning sites of primary care centers and psychiatric clinics, as well as other kinds of community support for elderly patients with such disorders. PMID:24831853

  1. Psychiatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, S V

    1986-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in medical inpatient and outpatient populations. As a result, internists commonly are the first to see psychiatric emergencies. As with all medical problems, a good history, including a collateral history from relatives and friends, physical and mental status examination, and appropriate laboratory tests help establish a preliminary diagnosis and treatment plan. Patients with suicidal ideation usually have multiple stressors in the environment and/or a psychiatric disorder (i.e., a major affective disorder, dysthymic disorder, anxiety or panic disorder, psychotic disorder, alcohol or drug abuse, a personality disorder, and/or an adjustment disorder). Of all patients who commit suicide, 70% have a major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, psychotic organic mental disorder, alcoholism, drug abuse, and borderline personality disorder. Patients who are at great risk have minimal supports, a history of previous suicide attempts, a plan with high lethality, hopelessness, psychosis, paranoia, and/or command self-destructive hallucinations. Treatment is directed toward placing the patient in a protected environment and providing psychotropic medication and/or psychotherapy for the underlying psychiatric problem. Other psychiatric emergencies include psychotic and violent patients. Psychotic disorders fall into two categories etiologically: those that have an identifiable organic factor causing the psychosis and those that have an underlying psychiatric disorder. Initially, it is essential to rule out organic pathology that is life-threatening or could cause irreversible brain damage. After such organic causes are ruled out, neuroleptic medication is indicated. If the patient is not agitated or combative, he or she may be placed on oral divided doses of neuroleptics in the antipsychotic range. Patients who are agitated or psychotic need rapid tranquilization with an intramuscular neuroleptic every half hour to 1 hour until the agitation and

  2. [The prevalence of heartburn in the elderly patients in urban outpatient clinics in Russia].

    PubMed

    Morozov, S V; Stavraki, E S; Isakov, V A

    2010-01-01

    Heartburn is the most common symptom of GERD. It's prevalence among different age groups of Russian population has not been studied yet. To study the prevalence of heartburn and its influence on the quality of life patterns in Russian urban primary care patients. The data presented in the article is a part of ARIADNE study on epidemiology of heartburn in Russian urban population. A cross-sectional survey, using a reliable and validated self-filled questionnaire was performed on randomly selected 18706 primary care patients in the 11 largest cities of Russia. The data of 14,521 respondents were available to the final analysis. Among the respondents 8,643 (59.5%) reported heartburn, among them elderly (> or = 60 y. o.) 2,017. Heartburn was more prevalent in elderly (61.87%) compared to younger people (59.29%), p = 0.028. Frequent (> or = 2 times a week) heartburn was found in 3,295 respondents. The prevalence of frequent symptom was also higher in elderly then in people less than 60 y. o.: 30.59% compared to 21.42%, p < 0.001. The deeper influence of heartburn on the quality of life of the elderly respondents was found compared to younger patients, especially in regard to necessity to avoid favorite dishes and beverages (40.95% vs 37.52% in younger, p = 0.021), sleep disturbance (29.41% vs 19.22% respectively, p = 0.00001), need to limit physical activity (16.99% vs 13.61%, p = 0.0015). CONCLUSIONS; Heartburn is the prevalent symptom among Russian urban primary care patients. The prevalence of heartburn in patients 60 y. o. and older is higher than in younger people. Frequent heartburn is more prevalent in elderly people compared to younger. The quality of life is significantly decreased in patients experiencing heartburn. The impact of heartburn on the quality of life changes is stronger in elderly people.

  3. Proportion of dementia and its associated factors among elderly patients attending outpatient clinics of Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital.

    PubMed

    Norlaily, H; Azidah, A K; Asrenee, A R; Rohayah, H; Juwita, S

    2009-06-01

    The increase in life expectancy observed over the last decade has particular relevance for conditions such as cognitive decline and dementia. This is a cross sectional study to determine the rate of dementia and to identify its associated factors among 399 elderly patients attending outpatient clinics of Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital. This study was conducted in 2 phases. In the first phase, the literate subjects were screened using validated Malay version of Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the illiterate subjects with Malay version of Elderly Cognitive Assessment Questionnaire (ECAQ). All subjects suspected to have dementia were selected for further evaluation in phase 2 of this study. The second phase involved full clinical examination in order to establish clinical diagnosis of dementia. The proportion of dementia in this study was 2.5% (10). Although history of exposure to pesticide (p < 0.05) and history of stroke (p < 0.05) were significant, they were not significant factors. These were because vast discrepancy in number between those exposed to pesticide and having stroke between dementia and non dementia.

  4. Association of Socio-Demographic Factors, Sick-Leave and Health Care Patterns with the Risk of Being Granted a Disability Pension among Psychiatric Outpatients with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor; Härkänen, Tommi; Tiihonen, Jari; Haukka, Jari

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression ranges among the leading causes of early exit from the labor market worldwide. We aimed to investigate the associations of socio-demographic factors, sickness absence, health care and prescription patterns with the risk of being granted a disability pension in psychiatric outpatients with depression. Methods All non-retired patients aged 18–60 years and living in Sweden 31.12.2005 with at least one psychiatric outpatient care visit due to a depressive episode during 2006 (N = 18034): were followed from 01.01.2007 to 31.12.2010 with regard to granting of all-cause and diagnosis-specific disability pension. Uni- and multivariate Rate Ratios (RR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were estimated for the various risk markers by Poisson Regression. Results During the four years of follow-up, 3044 patients (16.8%) were granted a disability pension, the majority due to mental disorders (2558, 84%). In the multivariate analyses, being female, below 25 or above 45 years of age, with low educational level, living alone, residing outside big cities and being born outside Europe were predictive of a granted disability pension. Frequent in- and outpatient care due to mental disorders, prescription of antidepressants and long sickness absence spells were also associated with an increased risk of disability pension (range of RRs 1.10 to 5.26). Somatic health care was only predictive of disability pension due to somatic disorders. The risk of being granted a disability pension remained at the same level as at the start of follow-up for about 1.5 years, when it started to decrease and to level off at about 20% of the risk at the end of follow-up. Conclusions Identified risk markers should be considered when monitoring individuals with depression and when designing intervention programs. PMID:24963812

  5. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Obesity among Elderly Attending Geriatric Outpatient Clinics in Mansoura City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shebl, Amany Mohamed; Hatata, El Sayed Zaki; Boughdady, Aziza Mahmoud; El-Sayed, Sally Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem affecting all ages in both developed and developing countries. It is considered the fifth leading risk factor for deaths all over the world as about 2.8 million people die due to obesity each year directly or indirectly. Obesity in elderly is considered one of the most serious public health challenges for…

  6. Sleep problems as reported by parents in Swedish children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), child psychiatric outpatients and school children.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Tord; Larsson, Bo

    2009-11-01

    To examine prevalence of sleep problems among children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) as rated by their parents and the role of comorbidity. Children and adolescents with OCD (n=185) referred to specialized OCD unit were compared with children from child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) outpatient units (n=177) and a school sample (GP) (n=317). All were assessed by parents on the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). Sleep problems were common in both the OCD (28.8 %) and CAP (20.3%) groups compared with the GP group (5.4%). While the OCD group significantly more often had less sleep than the CAP group (11.7% vs. 6.8%), small differences were found between these two groups for nightmares (5.9%, vs. 6.8% n.s.). Comparing the OCD and CAP groups on total sleep problem scores, OCD was a weak while the CBCL syndrome scales Thought problems (which includes OCD symptoms), Anxiety/Depressed, Somatic problems and Aggressive behaviour were strong predictors indicating that comorbidity rather than OCD might be especially important. Sleep problems are common among children and adolescents with OCD as well as among regular CAP outpatients. In OCD patients, the total comorbid symptom burden predicts sleep problems to a greater extent than the OCD itself. A thorough assessment of sleep problems and their causes are needed for all outpatients referred to child and adolescent psychiatric service.

  7. Acute Psychiatric Hospital Admissions of Adults and Elderly Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Examination of the records of 240 inpatients with mental retardation and 7 with autism discharged from a university hospital indicated that elderly adults had more medical problems than did adults, more elderly adults were transferred to a state hospital, and the most common diagnosis in both adults and elderly adults was chronic schizophrenia,…

  8. Randomized Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder in a Community-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic.

    PubMed

    Ekeblad, Annika; Falkenström, Fredrik; Andersson, Gerhard; Vestberg, Robert; Holmqvist, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Several head-to-head comparisons have been made, mostly in the United States. In this trial, we compared the two treatments in a small-town outpatient psychiatric clinic in Sweden. The patients had failed previous primary care treatment and had extensive Axis-II comorbidity. Outcome measures were reduction of depressive symptoms and attrition rate. Ninety-six psychiatric patients with MDD (DSM-IV) were randomized to 14 sessions of CBT (n = 48) or IPT (n = 48). A noninferiority design was used with the hypothesis that IPT would be noninferior to CBT. A three-point difference on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used as noninferiority margin. IPT passed the noninferiority test. In the ITT group, 53.5% (23/43) of the IPT patients and 51.0% (24/47) of the CBT patients were reliably improved, and 20.9% (9/43) and 19.1% (9/47), respectively, were recovered (last BDI score <10). The dropout rate was significantly higher in CBT (40%; 19/47) compared to IPT (19%; 8/43). Statistically controlling for antidepressant medication use did not change the results. IPT was noninferior to CBT in a sample of depressed psychiatric patients in a community-based outpatient clinic. CBT had significantly more dropouts than IPT, indicating that CBT may be experienced as too demanding. Since about half the patients did not recover, there is a need for further treatment development for these patients. The study should be considered an effectiveness trial, with strong external validity but some limitations in internal validity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Plasma profile of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in cocaine users under outpatient treatment: influence of cocaine symptom severity and psychiatric co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Araos, Pedro; Pedraz, María; Serrano, Antonia; Lucena, Miguel; Barrios, Vicente; García-Marchena, Nuria; Campos-Cloute, Rafael; Ruiz, Juan J; Romero, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Baixeras, Elena; de la Torre, Rafael; Montesinos, Jorge; Guerri, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, José; Martínez-Riera, Roser; Torrens, Marta; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Mason, Barbara J; Pavón, Francisco J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    The treatment for cocaine use constitutes a clinical challenge because of the lack of appropriate therapies and the high rate of relapse. Recent evidence indicates that the immune system might be involved in the pathogenesis of cocaine addiction and its co-morbid psychiatric disorders. This work examined the plasma pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine profile in abstinent cocaine users (n = 82) who sought outpatient cocaine treatment and age/sex/body mass-matched controls (n = 65). Participants were assessed with the diagnostic interview Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Diseases according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12)/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) were decreased in cocaine users, although all cytokines were identified as predictors of a lifetime pathological use of cocaine. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1 (CX3CL1)/fractalkine and CXCL12/SDF-1 positively correlated with the cocaine symptom severity when using the DSM-IV-TR criteria for cocaine abuse/dependence. These cytokines allowed the categorization of the outpatients into subgroups according to severity, identifying a subgroup of severe cocaine users (9-11 criteria) with increased prevalence of co-morbid psychiatric disorders [mood (54%), anxiety (32%), psychotic (30%) and personality (60%) disorders]. IL-1β was observed to be increased in users with such psychiatric disorders relative to those users with no diagnosis. In addition to these clinical data, studies in mice demonstrated that plasma IL-1β, CX3CL1 and CXCL12 were also affected after acute and chronic cocaine administration, providing a preclinical model for further research. In conclusion, cocaine exposure modifies the circulating levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. Plasma

  10. Reliability and validity of a semi-structured DSM-based diagnostic interview module for the assessment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in adult psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Eugenia I; Dalrymple, Kristy; Chelminski, Iwona; Zimmerman, Mark

    2016-08-30

    Despite growing recognition that the symptoms and functional impairments of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) persist into adulthood, only a few psychometrically sound diagnostic measures have been developed for the assessment of ADHD in adults, and none have been validated for use in a broad treatment-seeking psychiatric sample. The current study presents the reliability and validity of a semi-structured DSM-based diagnostic interview module for ADHD, which was administered to 1194 adults presenting to an outpatient psychiatric practice. The module showed excellent internal consistency and interrater reliability, good convergent and discriminant validity (as indexed by relatively high correlations with self-report measures of ADHD and ADHD-related constructs and little or no correlation with other, non-ADHD symptom domains), and good construct validity (as indexed by significantly higher rates of psychosocial impairment and self-reported family history of ADHD in individuals who meet criteria for an ADHD diagnosis). This instrument is thus a reliable and valid diagnostic tool for the detection of ADHD in adults presenting for psychiatric evaluation and treatment. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. [Prevalence of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in outpatient adolescents and young adults with other psychiatric disorders refractory to previous treatments].

    PubMed

    Vidal, Raquel; Barrau, Víctor; Casas, Miguel; Caballero-Correa, María; Martínez-Jiménez, Pedro; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the prevalence of symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adolescents and young adults diagnosed with other primary psychiatric disorders, who had not responded to previous treatments. A total of 795 outpatients aged 15 to 24 years were included. The presence of ADHD was studied using DSM-IV criteria and the frequency of symptoms using the 18 item DuPaul ADHD Rating Scale. ADHD (DSM-IV criteria) was present in 48 patients (6%), none of whom had previously received the diagnosis. A total of 260 patients (32.7%) met the criteria for moderate ADHD and between them, severity of primary psychiatric disorder was higher according to the CGI-S (P=.007). Risk factors for moderate ADHD symptoms were the presence of substance use disorders (SUD) (odds ratio=1.543, P=.01) and borderline personality disorders (odds ratio =2.173, p=.0001). Unrecognized ADHD was present in 6% of patients; moreover 32.7% of the sample also presented moderate symptoms of the disorder. Screening for ADHD in young patients with refractory response to primary disorder treatment, mainly those with substance use disorders, conduct and personality disorders is highly advisable, due to the high frequency of ADHD comorbidity in these psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. [Psychiatric disability and work: assessment of a group of patients examined at the Occupational Medicine Outpatient Department of the Turin University in the period 2000-2012].

    PubMed

    Gullino, A; Coggiola, M; Accomazzo, V; Baracco, A; De Marzi, G P; Occhipinti, R; Perrelli, F; Romano, C

    2012-01-01

    Problems at workplace with psychiatric subjects are increasing and the role of occupational physicians is basic to achieve a suitable job role. The purpose of this study is to assess the main occupational factors and to evaluate the judgement of fitness to work in 1109 patients with psychiatric diseases examined in our outpatients department during the period 2000-2012. These subjects were sent to our service by family doctors or, more frequently, by the companies seeking for judgement of the working residual capacities. The psychiatric diseases were classified according to the DSM IV; for each group considered, we evaluated the production sector, the specific job role, the pharmacological therapy as compared to the final judgement. The most frequent diagnoses were depressive and anxious disorders. The pharmacological therapy does not seem to be related to the final judgement but the small number of subjects defined as unfit to work does not allow a final evaluation. The study suggests the relevance of team work among the different actors of prevention to achieve a successful management of these workers in a specific job role.

  13. Prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in elderly ambulatory outpatients in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Linnebur, Sunny A; Vondracek, Sheryl F; Vande Griend, Joseph P; Ruscin, J Mark; McDermott, Michael T

    2007-03-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is common in the elderly. However, previous studies have utilized 25-hydroxvvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations as low as <16 ng/mL for defining vitamin D insufficiency. Moreover, most of the studies have been conducted in European patients, in certain geographic areas of the United States, or in institutionalized elderly. The goal of this study was to characterize vitamin D concentrations in ambulatory elderly living in metropolitan Denver, Colorado, utilizing 25(OH)D concentrations <32 ng/mL as the definition for vitamin D insufficiency. Ambulatory older adults (aged 65-89 years) with clinic visits during December 2005 and January 2006 were enrolled. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, phosphorus, creatinine, and albumin were measured; height and weight were also measured. Data regarding dietary and over-the-counter vitamin D intake were collected, as well as information on body mass index, history of osteoporosis, osteoporosis treatment, and history of falls and fractures. Eighty patients (mean [SD] age, 77.8 [5.3] years; age range, 66-89 years) completed the study; there were no dropouts. The majority of patients were white (88%) and female (68%). Fifty-nine (74%) were found to have vitamin D insufficiency. Mean total and over-the-counter vitamin D intake was significantly higher in sufficient (P < 0.01) and insufficient (P < 0.05) patients compared with deficient patients, but dietary intake did not differ significantly between groups. The majority of patients who were vitamin D insufficient consumed more than the recommended 400 to 600 IU/d of vitamin D. Obese patients were found to have significantly lower 25(OH)D concentrations (P < 0.001) and higher PTH concentrations (P = 0.04) than nonobese patients. Vitamin D insufficiency is prevalent in ambulatory, and especially obese, elderly living in Denver, Colorado, despite vitamin D intake consistent with national recommendations. Dietary intake of vitamin

  14. Health facility determinants and trends of ICD-10 outpatient psychiatric consultations across Sofala, Mozambique: time-series analyses from 2012 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Bradley H; Cumbe, Vasco; Raunig-Berhó, Manuela; Rao, Deepa; Napúa, Manuel; Hughes, James P; Sherr, Kenneth

    2015-09-23

    Few peer-reviewed publications have taken a longitudinal or systems approach to mental healthcare (MH) utilization in low- and middle-income countries. We analyzed: (1) outpatient ICD-10 diagnoses over time and by gender; and (2) health facility determinants of MH service utilization. We reviewed a census of 15,856 outpatient psychiatric consultations conducted at Ministry clinics in Sofala province, Mozambique from January 2012-June 2014. Generalized estimating equations were used to model facility determinants of ICD-10 diagnoses. Across the period, 48.9 % of consults were for epilepsy, 22.4 % for schizophrenia/delusional disorders, and 8.8 % for neurotic/stress-related disorders. The proportion of schizophrenia/delusional disorders has decreased over time (32 % in 2012; 13 % in 2014, p = 0.003), in favor of greater diversity of diagnoses. Epilepsy has increased significantly in absolute and proportional terms. Women are more likely to present for neurotic/stress-related conditions (12.8 % of consults for women, 5.7 % for men, p < 0.001), while men are more likely to present for substance use (1.9 % for women, 6.4 % for men, p < 0.001). Clinics with more psychiatric technicians have a 2.1-fold (CI: 1.2, 3.6) increased rate of schizophrenia/delusional disorder diagnoses. Rural clinics saw a higher proportion of epilepsy cases and a lower proportion of organic, substance use, schizophrenia, and mood disorder cases. Outpatient MH service provision is increasing in Mozambique, although currently focuses on epilepsy and schizophrenia/delusional disorders. Mid-level psychiatric providers appear to be associated with a higher proportion of schizophrenia/delusional disorder diagnoses. Due to diagnostic or utilization differences, rural clinics may be missing important cases of organic, substance use, schizophrenia, and mood disorders. Models and decision-support tools for mental healthcare integration with primary care practice are needed in

  15. Quality of Publicly-Funded Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Care for Common Childhood Psychiatric Disorders in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zima, Bonnie T.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Knapp, Penny; Ladd, Heather; Tang, Lingqi; Duan, Naihua; Wallace, Peggy; Rosenblatt, Abram; Landsverk, John; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To describe the documented adherence to quality indicators for the outpatient care of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, and major depression for children in public mental health clinics and to explore how adherence varies by child and clinic characteristics. Method: A statewide, longitudinal cohort study of 813…

  16. Quality of Publicly-Funded Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Care for Common Childhood Psychiatric Disorders in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zima, Bonnie T.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Knapp, Penny; Ladd, Heather; Tang, Lingqi; Duan, Naihua; Wallace, Peggy; Rosenblatt, Abram; Landsverk, John; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To describe the documented adherence to quality indicators for the outpatient care of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, and major depression for children in public mental health clinics and to explore how adherence varies by child and clinic characteristics. Method: A statewide, longitudinal cohort study of 813…

  17. Understanding bipolar disorder in late life: clinical and treatment correlates of a sample of elderly outpatients.

    PubMed

    Montes, Jose M; Alegria, Analucía; Garcia-Lopez, Aurelio; Ezquiaga, Elena; Balanzá-Martínez, Vicent; Sierra, Pilar; Toledo, Francisco; Alcaraz, Carmen; Perez, Josefina; de Dios, Consuelo

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the demographic, clinical, and treatment correlates of bipolar disorder (BD) in outpatients 65 years or older and to compare patients with BD subtype I (BD-I) versus BD subtype II (BD-II) and patients with early onset (EO; <=50 years old) versus late onset (LO; >50 years old) of the illness. Sixty-nine consecutive outpatients with BD were included. Diagnosis was delayed for a mean of 14.1 years, significantly longer in patients with EO (18.6 years) than with LO (3.3 years). Mild to moderate depressive symptoms were detected in 29% of the patients. The patients were receiving a mean of 3 different psychotropic medications. Antidepressantswere more frequently prescribed to patients with BD-II than to patients with BD-I (75.80% vs. 48.60%) and to patients with EO (71.7%) than to LO (35.3%). Geriatric BD has similar clinical characteristics with those of younger ages, and these do not seem to greatly differ with subtype or age of onset.

  18. Prevalence of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity among Children Attending Outpatient Clinic in Psychiatric Teaching Hospital in Erbil City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakir, Lana Nabeel; Sulaiman, Karwan Hawez

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the common psychiatric disorder in childhood and it affects on children socially and academically. The aim of this study is to find out the prevalence of Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder among the studied population, describe its association with certain…

  19. Maltreatment clusters among youth in outpatient substance abuse treatment: co-occurring patterns of psychiatric symptoms and sexual risk behaviors.

    PubMed

    Tubman, Jonathan G; Oshri, Assaf; Taylor, Heather L; Morris, Staci L

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to describe the use of a brief maltreatment assessment instrument to classify adolescents receiving alcohol or other drug (AOD) treatment services based on the extensiveness and severity of prior maltreatment. This goal is significant because maltreatment reduces the effectiveness of AOD treatment and is associated significantly with co-occurring patterns of psychiatric symptoms and sexual risk behaviors. Structured interviews were administered to 300 adolescent treatment clients (202 males, 98 females; M = 16.22 years; SD = 1.13 years) to assess childhood maltreatment experiences, past year psychiatric symptoms, and sexual risk behaviors during the past 180 days. Cluster analysis classified adolescents into unique groups via self-reported sexual abuse, physical punishment, and parental neglect/negative home environment. Significant between-cluster differences in psychiatric symptoms and sexual risk behaviors were documented using MANOVA and chi-square analyses. More severe maltreatment profiles were associated with higher scores for psychiatric symptoms and unprotected intercourse. Significant heterogeneity and distinct types within this treatment sample of adolescents supports the adaptation of selected prevention efforts to promote HIV/STI risk reduction.

  20. Maltreatment Clusters Among Youth in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment: Co-Occurring Patterns of Psychiatric Symptoms and Sexual Risk Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Oshri, Assaf; Taylor, Heather L.; Morris, Staci L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to describe the use of a brief maltreatment assessment instrument to classify adolescents receiving alcohol or other drug (AOD) treatment services based on the extensiveness and severity of prior maltreatment. This goal is significant because maltreatment reduces the effectiveness of AOD treatment and is associated significantly with co-occurring patterns of psychiatric symptoms and sexual risk behaviors. Structured interviews were administered to 300 adolescent treatment clients (202 males, 98 females; M=16.22 years; SD=1.13 years) to assess childhood maltreatment experiences, past year psychiatric symptoms, and sexual risk behaviors during the past 180 days. Cluster analysis classified adolescents into unique groups via self-reported sexual abuse, physical punishment, and parental neglect/negative home environment. Significant between-cluster differences in psychiatric symptoms and sexual risk behaviors were documented using MANOVA and chi-square analyses. More severe maltreatment profiles were associated with higher scores for psychiatric symptoms and unprotected intercourse. Significant heterogeneity and distinct types within this treatment sample of adolescents supports the adaptation of selected prevention efforts to promote HIV/STI risk reduction. PMID:21165690

  1. Psychiatric comorbidity in a sample of cocaine-dependent outpatients seen in the Community of Madrid drug addiction care network.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gras, Isabel; Ferre Navarrete, Francisco; Pascual Arriazu, Jesús; Peñas Pascual, José; de Iceta Ruiz de Gauna, Mariano; Fraguas Herráez, David; Rubio Valladolid, Gabriel

    2016-03-02

    The objective of this study was to estimate the current prevalence of psychiatric disorders in cocaine-dependent patients who attend different treatment centres in the Community of Madrid. A prospective multicentre study was used, and a total of 197 cocaine-dependent subjects were assessed. The assessment instrument used for diagnosis was the Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders (PRISM-IV). The main findings of this study were a high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in cocaine-dependent patients seeking treatment (64.0%). The most common Non Substance Use Disorders found were attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorders (34.5%) and depressive disorders (13.7%). The most common Substance Use Disorder was alcohol dependence (28.4%). Cocaine-dependent patients who had a depressive disorder and were alcohol dependent presented a more severe clinical profile and a higher degree of psychopathology, measured using different assessment tools, than the patients who were only cocaine dependent. These data suggest that the presence of psychiatric comorbidity could constitute a risk factor associated with the severity of cocaine dependence. The clinical heterogeneity found also indicates the need to search for individualised treatments that more specifically fit the needs of this population.

  2. [Effects of body mass index on blood pressure control rate in elderly coronary heart disease outpatients with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Liang, D L; Li, X Y; Wang, L; Xu, H; Tuo, X P; Jian, Z J

    2016-09-20

    Objective: To explore the influences of body mass index (BMI) on blood pressure control rate in elderly coronary heart disease (CHD) outpatients with hypertension. Methods: In this multicenter, non-intervention and cross-sectional survey, the elderly coronary heart disease patients with hypertension aged 60 years or over were recruited from 165 hospitals in 21 provinces or cities across China from April to July 2011, and 5 140 cases of elderly CHD patients with hypertension were finally included into the study. The cases were divided into low BMI group (n=130 cases), normal body mass index (BMI) group (n=1 390 cases), overweight (n=2 418 cases), obesity group (n=662 cases) according to the different levels of BMI. Clinical data and blood pressure control rate were compared among the groups, and relationships of different BMI levels with blood pressure control rate were analyzed by the binary classification unconditioned Logistic regression equation. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in blood pressure control rate of general population, men and women patients among low BMI group, normal BMI group, overweight and obesity group (χ(2)=66.346, 58.995, 26.044, respectively, P<0.001), blood pressure failure rate in obesity group (73.7%) was higher than that in overweight group (65.8%) and normal BMI group (57.5%) (P<0.05), and overweight group was also higher than normal BMI group (P<0.05); blood pressure failure rate in obesity men was higher than that in normal BMI and low BMI group (P<0.05), overweight group was higher than normal BMI group (P<0.05); blood pressure failure rate in obesity women was higher than that in normal BMI and low BMI group (P<0.05). There was a statistically significant difference in blood pressure control rate of different age groups (60-70, 71-80, >80 years old) among low BMI group, normal BMI group, overweight and obesity group (χ(2)=37.729, 20.007, 15.538, respectively, P<0.001). Blood pressure failure rate in

  3. The relationship of psychological reactance, health locus of control and sense of self-efficacy with adherence to treatment in psychiatric outpatients with depression.

    PubMed

    De Las Cuevas, Carlos; Peñate, Wenceslao; Sanz, Emilio J

    2014-11-21

    Although non-adherence to antidepressant medications is a significant barrier to the successful treatment of depression in clinical practice, few potentially modifiable predictors of poor adherence to antidepressant treatment are known. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of psychological reactance, health locus of control and the sense of self-efficacy on adherence to treatment regimen among psychiatric outpatients with depression. One hundred and forty-five consecutive psychiatric outpatients suffering from depressive disorders were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study and 119 accepted. Patients completed a series of self-reported questionnaires assessing psychological reactance, health locus of control, self-efficacy, and adherence to prescribed medication in addition to socio-demographic and clinical variables. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine which factors better correlate to treatment adherence. Age was found to be the best correlate of adherence to prescribed treatment. As regards psychological dimension studied, medication adherence was negatively associated with both cognitive and affective psychological reactance; patients with higher psychological reactance were more likely to be noncompliant than patients showing a low level of psychological reactance. Regarding health locus of control, only the external dimension of doctor-attributed health locus of control was positively associated with medications adherence. No effect on adherence was observed for the self-efficacy scale. Psychological reactance is an important correlate of adherence to treatment in patients with depressive disorders and this needs to be considered when giving clinical advice in order to avoid inducing reactance and thus non-adherence to prescribed treatments. Mental health professionals need to learn about communication techniques and counseling skills that enable them to deal with the psychological reactance of their patients.

  4. Reliability and Validity of the Korean Version of the Lifetime Stressor Checklist-Revised in Psychiatric Outpatients with Anxiety or Depressive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kang Rok; Jang, Eun Young; Bae, Hwallip; Kim, Seok Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Traumatic events and adverse stressful experiences are major etiological factors in a wide variety of physical and mental disorders. Developing psychological instruments that can be easily administered and that have good psychometric properties have become an integral part for research and practice. This study investigated the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Lifetime Stressor Checklist-Revised (LSC-R) in a consecutive sample of psychiatric outpatients. The LSC-R is a 30-item self-reporting questionnaire examining lifetime traumatic and non-traumatic stressors. Materials and Methods A final sample of 258 outpatients with anxiety or depressive disorders was recruited at the psychiatric department of a university-affiliated teaching hospital. Self-reported data included the Life Events Checklist (LEC), the Zung Self-Rating Depression and Anxiety Scales, and the Impact of Events Scale-Revised, in addition to the LSC-R. A convenience sample of 50 college students completed the LSC-R on two occasions separated by a three week-interval for test-retest reliability. Results Mean kappa for temporal stability was high (κ=0.651) and Cronbach alpha was moderate (α=0.724). Convergent validity was excellent with corresponding items on the LEC. Concurrent validity was good for symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. An exploratory factor analysis revealed that 11 factors explained 64.3 % of the total variance. Conclusion This study demonstrated good psychometric properties of the Korean version of the LSC-R, further supporting its use in clinical research and practice with a Korean speaking population. PMID:27873517

  5. Reliability and Validity of the Korean Version of the Lifetime Stressor Checklist-Revised in Psychiatric Outpatients with Anxiety or Depressive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kang Rok; Kim, Daeho; Jang, Eun Young; Bae, Hwallip; Kim, Seok Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic events and adverse stressful experiences are major etiological factors in a wide variety of physical and mental disorders. Developing psychological instruments that can be easily administered and that have good psychometric properties have become an integral part for research and practice. This study investigated the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Lifetime Stressor Checklist-Revised (LSC-R) in a consecutive sample of psychiatric outpatients. The LSC-R is a 30-item self-reporting questionnaire examining lifetime traumatic and non-traumatic stressors. A final sample of 258 outpatients with anxiety or depressive disorders was recruited at the psychiatric department of a university-affiliated teaching hospital. Self-reported data included the Life Events Checklist (LEC), the Zung Self-Rating Depression and Anxiety Scales, and the Impact of Events Scale-Revised, in addition to the LSC-R. A convenience sample of 50 college students completed the LSC-R on two occasions separated by a three week-interval for test-retest reliability. Mean kappa for temporal stability was high (κ=0.651) and Cronbach alpha was moderate (α=0.724). Convergent validity was excellent with corresponding items on the LEC. Concurrent validity was good for symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. An exploratory factor analysis revealed that 11 factors explained 64.3 % of the total variance. This study demonstrated good psychometric properties of the Korean version of the LSC-R, further supporting its use in clinical research and practice with a Korean speaking population.

  6. Sociodemographic and clinical correlates of sexual dysfunction among psychiatric outpatients receiving common psychotropic medications in a Neuropsychiatric Hospital in Northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olisah, V O; Sheikh, T L; Abah, E R; Mahmud-Ajeigbe, A F

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is common in patients receiving psychotropic medications and may reduce their quality of life and medication adherence with resultant negative impact on treatment outcomes. In this study, we described the various types of sexual dysfunction among psychiatric outpatients receiving psychotropic medications and the sociodemographic and clinical correlates associated with it. A descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted in a Neuropsychiatric Hospital in Northern Nigeria. The participants were made up of a consecutive sample of 255 outpatients attending psychiatric clinic from January to March 2014. Data were collected on sociodemographic items, patient's clinical diagnosis, psychotropic medications received, and duration of treatment. Information about sexual functioning was obtained using the International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire for the male participants and the Female Sexual Function Index for the female participants. The mean age of the patients studied was 34.7 years (standard deviation [SD] =5.9), with a mean duration of treatment of 3.8 (SD = 6.5) years. Males constituted 47.8% and patients with schizophrenia constituted 43.1%; other diagnoses include bipolar affective disorder, recurrent depressive disorder, and substance use disorder. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 64.3%. Age, employment status, and psychotropic medication use were significantly associated with sexual dysfunction; however, only employment status and psychotropic medication use significantly predicted sexual dysfunction. We concluded that sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent among patients receiving psychotropic medication; as such inquiries about sexual function should be routinely carried out by clinicians as this may negatively impact on adherence and quality of life.

  7. The impact of exposure to Internet-based information about the Rorschach and the MMPI-2 on psychiatric outpatients' ability to simulate mentally healthy test performance.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Ellen; Hartmann, Terje

    2014-01-01

    To examine the impact of Internet-based information about how to simulate being mentally healthy on the Rorschach (Exner, 2003) and the MMPI-2 (Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989), 87 psychiatric outpatients completed the tests under 4 conditions: uncoached and Internet-coached outpatients under faking healthy instructions (faking patients and Internet-faking patients) and patients and nonpatients under standard instructions (standard patients and standard nonpatients). On the Rorschach, faking patients and Internet-faking patients did not manage to portray healthy test performance and, like standard patients, revealed a significantly greater number of perceptual and cognitive disturbances than standard nonpatients. Faking patients scored in the psychopathological direction on most variables. Internet-faking patients produced constricted protocols with significantly higher F% (57%) and lower use of provoking and aggressive contents than the other groups. On the MMPI-2, faking patients and Internet-faking patients were able to conceal symptoms and, like standard nonpatients, scored in the normal range on the clinical scales. The validity scale L successfully detected the faking patients and the Internet-faking patients, whereas the F scale only distinguished the Internet-faking patients and K only the faking patients. We conclude that Internet-based information could threaten test validity.

  8. Planning with elderly outpatients for contingencies of severe illness: a survey and clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Finucane, T E; Shumway, J M; Powers, R L; D'Alessandri, R M

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined whether elderly patients would report positive or adverse emotional effects after their doctor, during a routine clinic visit, asked them to begin planning for future serious illness. Seventy-four patients, 65 years old or older, who were followed at a university hospital medical clinic were randomly allocated to an intervention or a control group. The intervention was a detailed discussion with the patient's physician of the patient's wishes about decision making and life support therapy in the event of extreme or incapacitating illness. A blinded interviewer then asked all consenting patients how they felt about the physician, the clinic visit, and their medical care. Intervention-group patients were questioned about their reactions to the physician and the discussion. Four important findings emerged: 1) Some emotional uncertainty was created when doctors raised these questions unexpectedly: one patient became visibly upset during the discussion, and three who gave consent to be interviewed afterward said that the discussion had made them wonder about their health. Nonetheless, all patients who received the intervention and completed the study were pleased that their doctor had asked. 2) Only 44% of all consenting patients reported having discussed these issues previously; only one had done so with a doctor. 3) 97% of patients who responded wanted to be kept informed by the doctor about their medical situations in times of serious illness. 4) Patients' replies to specific questions about life-sustaining therapy in the event of their own severe illnesses were quite variable. During routine clinic visits doctors can encourage most elderly patients to begin specific planning for potential severe illnesses.

  9. Mediating effects of self-stigma on the relationship between perceived stigma and psychosocial outcomes among psychiatric outpatients: findings from a cross-sectional survey in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Picco, Louisa; Lau, Ying Wen; Pang, Shirlene; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2017-08-29

    To examine whether self-stigma mediates the relationship between perceived stigma and quality of life, self-esteem and general functioning among outpatients with depression, schizophrenia, anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Cross-sectional survey. Outpatient clinics at a tertiary psychiatric hospital in Singapore. 280 outpatients with a primary clinical diagnosis of either schizophrenia, depression, anxiety or OCD. Data were collected in relation to self-stigma, perceived stigma, self-esteem, functioning and quality of life. In order to examine the mediating role of self-stigma on the relationship between perceived stigma and psychosocial outcomes, bootstrapping mediation analyses were used. Mediation analyses revealed that the relationship between perceived stigma and psychosocial outcomes was subject to the effects of self-stigma among the overall sample. Separate mediation analyses were conducted by diagnoses and showed differences in the mediating effects of self-stigma. Among the whole sample and the subsample with OCD, self-stigma mediated the relationship between perceived stigma and all psychosocial outcomes. For those with anxiety, depression and schizophrenia, the mediating effects of self-stigma were present in all relationships except (1) perceived stigma with physical health in the anxiety sample, (2) perceived stigma with social relationships in the depression sample and (3) perceived stigma with physical health in the schizophrenia sample. The mediating effects of self-stigma on the relationship between perceived stigma and various psychosocial outcomes are evident and differ across diagnoses. Interventions to address and reduce the effects of self-stigma along with targeted treatments and psychoeducation to assist people with mental illness overcome or better manage self-stigma while providing them the skills to counteract public stigma are needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  10. Non-suicidal self-injury among psychiatric outpatient adolescent offspring of Croatian posttraumatic stress disorder male war veterans: Prevalence and psychosocial correlates.

    PubMed

    Boričević Maršanić, Vlatka; Aukst Margetić, Branka; Ožanić Bulić, Suzana; Đuretić, Irena; Kniewald, Hrvoje; Jukić, Tatjana; Paradžik, Ljubica

    2015-05-01

    The children of male veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at particularly high risk of emotional and behavioral problems. However, no studies have examined non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in this population of youth. To determine the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of lifetime NSSI in a sample of psychiatric outpatient adolescent offspring of Croatian PTSD male veterans. Consecutive outpatient adolescent offspring of Croatian male PTSD veterans, aged 12 to 18 years, were assessed on the Deliberate Self Harm Inventory, the Youth Self-Report, the Family Assessment Device, the Parental Bonding Instrument and the Demographics Questionnaire. Of the whole sample, 52.7% of adolescents reported NSSI at least once during their lifetime. Lifetime NSSI was significantly associated with internalizing symptoms (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.14; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-4.42, p = .040), poor family functioning (adjusted OR = 6.54; 95% CI: 2.02-21.22, p = .002), lower maternal and paternal care (adjusted OR = 0.47; 95% CI: 0.40-0.56, p = .000 and adjusted OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.73-0.91, p = .000, respectively) and higher paternal control (adjusted OR = 1.84; 95% CI: 1.59-2.14, p = .000) in multivariate analysis. No association was found between lifetime NSSI and any of the socio-demographic variables. NSSI is a significant clinical problem in outpatient adolescent offspring of PTSD male veterans, which may be influenced by clinical and family factors. Interventions aimed at reducing internalizing symptoms and improving family functioning and parental behaviors are needed in the treatment of adolescent offspring of male PTSD veterans engaging in NSSI. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and plasma biomarkers for cocaine addiction in abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects in outpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Pedraz, María; Araos, Pedro; García-Marchena, Nuria; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Pastor, Antoni; Barrios, Vicente; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are sex differences in the progression of drug addiction, relapse, and response to therapies. Because biological factors participate in these differences, they should be considered when using biomarkers for addiction. In the current study, we evaluated the sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and the concentrations of plasma mediators that have been reported to be affected by cocaine. Fifty-five abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects diagnosed with lifetime cocaine use disorders (40 men and 15 women) and 73 healthy controls (48 men and 25 women) were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview "Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders." Plasma concentrations of chemokines, cytokines, N-acyl-ethanolamines, and 2-acyl-glycerols were analyzed according to history of cocaine addiction and sex, controlling for covariates age and body mass index (BMI). Relationships between these concentrations and variables related to cocaine addiction were also analyzed in addicted subjects. The results showed that the concentrations of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2/MCP-1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12/SDF-1) were only affected by history of cocaine addiction. The plasma concentrations of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were affected by history of cocaine addiction and sex. In fact, whereas cytokine concentrations were higher in control women relative to men, these concentrations were reduced in cocaine-addicted women without changes in addicted men. Regarding fatty acid derivatives, history of cocaine addiction had a main effect on the concentration of each acyl derivative, whereas N-acyl-ethanolamines were increased overall in the cocaine group, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased. Interestingly, N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA) was only increased in cocaine-addicted women. The covariate BMI had a significant

  12. Sex Differences in Psychiatric Comorbidity and Plasma Biomarkers for Cocaine Addiction in Abstinent Cocaine-Addicted Subjects in Outpatient Settings

    PubMed Central

    Pedraz, María; Araos, Pedro; García-Marchena, Nuria; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Pastor, Antoni; Barrios, Vicente; Chowen, Julie A.; Argente, Jesús; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are sex differences in the progression of drug addiction, relapse, and response to therapies. Because biological factors participate in these differences, they should be considered when using biomarkers for addiction. In the current study, we evaluated the sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and the concentrations of plasma mediators that have been reported to be affected by cocaine. Fifty-five abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects diagnosed with lifetime cocaine use disorders (40 men and 15 women) and 73 healthy controls (48 men and 25 women) were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview “Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders.” Plasma concentrations of chemokines, cytokines, N-acyl-ethanolamines, and 2-acyl-glycerols were analyzed according to history of cocaine addiction and sex, controlling for covariates age and body mass index (BMI). Relationships between these concentrations and variables related to cocaine addiction were also analyzed in addicted subjects. The results showed that the concentrations of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2/MCP-1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12/SDF-1) were only affected by history of cocaine addiction. The plasma concentrations of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were affected by history of cocaine addiction and sex. In fact, whereas cytokine concentrations were higher in control women relative to men, these concentrations were reduced in cocaine-addicted women without changes in addicted men. Regarding fatty acid derivatives, history of cocaine addiction had a main effect on the concentration of each acyl derivative, whereas N-acyl-ethanolamines were increased overall in the cocaine group, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased. Interestingly, N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA) was only increased in cocaine-addicted women. The covariate BMI had a significant

  13. Effect of Short Message Service Reminders on Clinic Attendance Among Outpatients With Psychosis at a Psychiatric Hospital in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ibironke Felicia; Lawani, Ambrose Onivefu; James, Bawo Onesirosan

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether patients with first-episode psychosis who were seeking treatment at a regional tertiary psychiatric facility for the first time would be more likely to attend their next scheduled clinic visit after receiving short message service (SMS) reminders about the upcoming appointment. Two hundred patients seeking treatment for a psychotic episode for the first time were randomly assigned to a control group or an intervention group by using simple randomization. Both groups received appointment dates on appointment cards, and the intervention group also received SMS text reminders of their appointments. Proportion of missed next appointments was the primary outcome measured. A total of 192 patients were included in a per-protocol analysis. A majority of them were single and cared for by a first-degree relative. The mean±SD age of the patients was 33.7±11.9 years. The median duration of untreated psychosis was 12 weeks, and the mean score on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale was 47.3±12.9 (possible scores range from 13 to 168). Participants who received the SMS reminders were almost twice as likely to attend their appointment compared with the control group. After adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical variables, the analysis showed that receiving an SMS reminder independently reduced the risk of a missed next appointment by 50%. SMS reminders of appointments were an effective intervention to improve clinic attendance among persons treated for first-episode psychosis at the Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital in Benin City, Nigeria.

  14. How pressure is applied in shared decisions about antipsychotic medication: a conversation analytic study of psychiatric outpatient consultations.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Alan; Chaplin, Rob; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

    2012-01-01

    The professional identity of psychiatry depends on it being regarded as one amongst many medical specialties and sharing ideals of good practice with other specialties, an important marker of which is the achievement of shared decision-making and avoiding a reputation for being purely agents of social control. Yet the interactions involved in trying to achieve shared decision-making are relatively unexplored in psychiatry. This study analyses audiotapes of 92 outpatient consultations involving nine consultant psychiatrists focusing on how pressure is applied in shared decisions about antipsychotic medication. Detailed conversation analysis reveals that some shared decisions are considerably more pressured than others. At one end of a spectrum of pressure are pressured shared decisions, characterised by an escalating cycle of pressure and resistance from which it is difficult to exit without someone losing face. In the middle are directed decisions, where the patient cooperates with being diplomatically steered by the psychiatrist. At the other extreme are open decisions where the patient is allowed to decide, with the psychiatrist exerting little or no pressure. Directed and open decisions occurred most frequently; pressured decisions were rarer. Patient risk did not appear to influence the degree of pressure applied in these outpatient consultations. © 2011 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2011 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Listening to older adults: elderly patients' experience of care in residency and practicing physician outpatient clinics.

    PubMed

    Hess, Brian J; Lynn, Lorna A; Conforti, Lisa N; Holmboe, Eric S

    2011-05-01

    The population of people aged 65 and older is rapidly growing. Research has demonstrated significant quality gaps in the clinical care of older patients in the United States, especially in training programs. Little is known about how older patients' experience with care delivered in residency clinics compares with that delivered by practicing physicians. Using patient surveys from the American Board of Internal Medicine Care of the Vulnerable Elderly Practice Improvement Module, the quality of care provided to adults aged 65 and older by 52 internal medicine and family medicine residency clinics and by a group of 144 practicing physicians was studied. The residency clinics received 2,213 patient surveys, and the practicing physicians received 4,204. Controlling for age and overall health status, patients from the residency clinic sample were less likely to report receiving guidance and interventions for important aspects of care for older adults than patients from the practicing physician sample. The largest difference was observed in providing ways to help patients prevent falls or treat problems with balance or walking (42.1% vs 61.8%, P<.001). Patients from the residency clinic sample were less likely to rate their overall care as high (77.5% vs 88.8%, P<.001). Patient surveys reveal important deficiencies in processes of care that are more pronounced for patients cared for in residency clinics. Quality of patient experience and communication are vital aspects of overall quality of care, especially for older adults. Physician education at all levels, faculty development, and practice system redesign are needed to ensure that the care needs of older adults are met. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Perceived Mental Illness Stigma and HIV Risk Behaviors Among Adult Psychiatric Outpatients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Elkington, Katherine S.; McKinnon, Karen; Mann, Claudio Gruber; Collins, Pamela Y.; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the associations between perceived mental illness stigma and HIV risk and protective behaviors among adults with severe mental illness (SMI) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We measured mental illness stigma across three domains (“Personal Experiences,” “Perceived Attractiveness,” and “Relationship Discrimination”), and examined the relationship between experiences of stigma in each domain and HIV risk and protective behaviors over the past three months in 98 outpatients with SMI. Those who reported greater “Relationship Discrimination” stigma were significantly more likely to be sexually active and to have unprotected sex; they were significantly less likely to report deliberately having fewer partners as a way to protect themselves from HIV. The role of stigma in unprotected sexual behavior should be examined further and considered in any HIV prevention intervention for people with SMI. PMID:19543974

  17. Depressive symptoms and the self-reported use of alcohol, caffeine, and carbohydrates in normal volunteers and four groups of psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Leibenluft, E; Fiero, P L; Bartko, J J; Moul, D E; Rosenthal, N E

    1993-02-01

    The authors examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and the self-reported use of alcohol, carbohydrates, and caffeine in normal volunteers and four groups of psychiatric outpatients. Outpatients and normal volunteers were given a questionnaire asking about their use of each of the three substances in response to each of the 14 depressive symptoms on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. They also rated how much each substance improved each symptom. Twenty-six normal volunteers, 35 patients with major depression, 117 patients with seasonal affective disorder, 16 patients with alcohol dependence, and 24 patients with comorbid primary depression and secondary alcohol dependence completed the questionnaire. Test-retest reliability was established. Analysis of variance and stepwise multivariate discriminant function analyses were used to determine if diagnostic groups differed in the reported use and effect of each of the three substances. The responses concerning use and effect of alcohol of patients with alcohol dependence with or without depression were indistinguishable from each other. The responses of the patient groups regarding caffeine and carbohydrate use did not differ from each other, but all differed significantly from the responses of normal volunteers. Discriminant function analysis distinguished alcoholics from nonalcoholics in the relationship between drinking and the symptoms of anger and anhedonia. The relationship between symptoms and substance use varied depending on the substance. Alcoholics without depression were as likely to report drinking in response to depressive symptoms as were those who had had depression. Patients of all diagnostic groups were more likely than normal volunteers to report using caffeine and carbohydrates in response to depressive symptoms.

  18. [Prescription of antipsychotics in elderly patients with dementia in a psychiatric hospital: Impact of recommendations of the French health authority].

    PubMed

    Jégouzo, X; Desbordes, M; Delègue, S; Le Vacon, G; Patrick, M; Mouchabac, S

    2016-10-12

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms have a high prevalence in dementia. They include mood disorders, psychotic disorders and behavioral disorders such as aggression or screaming. Despite a number of side effects and an increased mortality, antipsychotic drugs are widely prescribed for treatment of this disorder. In France, this increased risk of mortality led in 2009 to the adoption of guidelines concerning all antipsychotics. The guidelines propose a sensible use of antipsychotics after the establishment of non-pharmacological measures. The aim of this study is firstly to assess the impact of the French drug agency warnings on use of antipsychotics in elderly patients with dementia in our psychiatric hospital between 2008 and 2013. Secondly, we compare the prescription of antipsychotics between geriatric psychiatry and other adult medical departments in 2013. Thirty elderly with dementia were included in 2008 and 116 in 2013. We compare the prescriptions of antipsychotics in terms of percentage of subjects under antipsychotics. For these patients, we measure average number of different antipsychotics prescribed during the hospital stay or on the exit prescription, the average daily dosage per patient, the presence or the absence of association of antipsychotics. We show that the percentage of subjects under antipsychotics increased between 2008 and 2013 while the average dosage decreased in adult wards except in the geriatric psychiatry ward where the average dosage increased. There is no difference in the average number of different antipsychotics prescribed. In 2013, the geriatric department prescribed more antipsychotics but with lower dosages and lesser associations than in other departments. The impact of the French guidelines is limited in our psychiatric hospital. It is probable that the lack of means, both human and pharmacologic, as well as the possible worsening of the severity of the behavior and psychotic disorders in patients with dementia

  19. Psychosocial profile of male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction in a psychiatric outpatient department in Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Kamath, Ravindra; Subramanyam, Alka; Shah, Henal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sexual dysfunction can occur due to biological problems, relationship problems, lack of proper sexual knowledge or a combination of these. India is often known as the land of Kamasutra. But as far as sexuality research is concerned, there is a paucity of relevant data from India. In view of this, we conducted a study to assess the psychosocial profile of males presenting with sexual dysfunction to psychiatry out-patient department of a tertiary medical hospital. Materials and Methods: Hundred consecutive male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction were screened using Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale for clinical sexual dysfunction and after obtaining their informed consent were included in this study. They were assessed using a semi-structured proforma, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision criteria, Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and Dyadic Adjustment Scale. Results: Majority of our respondents were in the 18–30 years age group and were married. The main source of sex knowledge for 69% of them was peer group. Age of onset of masturbation was 11–13 years for 43% of them. Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction seen in the respondents. Marital discord was seen in significantly lesser number of respondents (32.35%) as also major depressive disorder that was seen in only 16%. Discussion: Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction in our sample. Despite the sexual dysfunction, marital discord and depression were seen less commonly in our respondents. PMID:25657457

  20. Psychosocial profile of male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction in a psychiatric outpatient department in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Kamath, Ravindra; Subramanyam, Alka; Shah, Henal

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction can occur due to biological problems, relationship problems, lack of proper sexual knowledge or a combination of these. India is often known as the land of Kamasutra. But as far as sexuality research is concerned, there is a paucity of relevant data from India. In view of this, we conducted a study to assess the psychosocial profile of males presenting with sexual dysfunction to psychiatry out-patient department of a tertiary medical hospital. Hundred consecutive male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction were screened using Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale for clinical sexual dysfunction and after obtaining their informed consent were included in this study. They were assessed using a semi-structured proforma, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4(th) Edition, Text Revision criteria, Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and Dyadic Adjustment Scale. Majority of our respondents were in the 18-30 years age group and were married. The main source of sex knowledge for 69% of them was peer group. Age of onset of masturbation was 11-13 years for 43% of them. Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction seen in the respondents. Marital discord was seen in significantly lesser number of respondents (32.35%) as also major depressive disorder that was seen in only 16%. Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction in our sample. Despite the sexual dysfunction, marital discord and depression were seen less commonly in our respondents.

  1. Psychometric Properties and Normative Data of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire in a Psychiatric Outpatient Sample.

    PubMed

    Martínez Ortega, Yolanda; Gomà-I-Freixanet, Montserrat; Valero, Sergi

    2017-01-01

    The Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ; Zuckerman, Kuhlman, Joireman, Teta, & Kraft, 1993 ) was designed for the assessment of personality. The goal of this work was to determine the psychometric properties of the ZKPQ, as well as to establish normative data by gender and age in an outpatient sample attending primary mental health care services. We administered the questionnaire to 314 participants (34.7% males) 18 to 81 years old. The most prevalent primary diagnoses were mood (37.9%) and adjustment disorders (35.0%). Concerning the psychometric properties of the ZKPQ, the pattern of internal consistencies was similar to that previously found among general population, student, or clinical samples. Regarding gender differences, a general pattern was found, with women scoring higher on neuroticism and sociability, and lower on aggression-hostility. As for age, in general, scores declined with age. Norm-based decision making has the potential for significant and long-lasting consequences, and the quality of decisions based on score comparisons can be improved when scores are compared to norms fitted to the group of reference. The availability of the ZKPQ norms by gender and age in mental health care will benefit the accuracy of assessment and therapeutic decision making, providing more effective treatment planning overall.

  2. The Interplay of Outpatient Services and Psychiatric Hospitalization Among Medicaid-Enrolled Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, David S.; Xie, Ming; Morales, Knashawn H.; Lawer, Lindsay; McCarthy, Megan; Marcus, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine whether increased provision of community-based services is associated with decreased psychiatric hospitalizations among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Design Retrospective cohort study using discrete-time logistic regression to examine the association of service use in the preceding 60 days with the risk of hospitalization. Setting The Medicaid-reimbursed health care system in the continental United States. Participants Medicaid-enrolled children with an ASD diagnosis in 2004 (N=28 428). Main Exposures Use of respite care and therapeutic services, based on procedure codes. Main Outcome Measures Hospitalizations associated with a diagnosis of ASD (International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, codes 299.0, 299.8, and 299.9). Results Each $1000 increase in spending on respite care during the preceding 60 days resulted in an 8% decrease in the odds of hospitalization in adjusted analysis. Use of therapeutic services was not associated with reduced risk of hospitalization. Conclusions Respite care is not universally available through Medicaid. It may represent a critical type of service for supporting families in addressing challenging child behaviors. States should increase the availability of respite care for Medicaid-enrolled children with ASDs. The lack of association between therapeutic services and hospitalization raises concerns regarding the effectiveness of these services. PMID:22213753

  3. Psychosocial morbidity associated with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder in psychiatric out-patients: comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Ellison, William; Morgan, Theresa A; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy

    2015-10-01

    The morbidity associated with bipolar disorder is, in part, responsible for repeated calls for improved detection and recognition. No such commentary exists for the improved detection of borderline personality disorder. Clinical experience suggests that it is as disabling as bipolar disorder, but no study has directly compared the two disorders. To compare the levels of psychosocial morbidity in patients with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. Patients were assessed with semi-structured interviews. We compared 307 patients with DSM-IV borderline personality disorder but without bipolar disorder and 236 patients with bipolar disorder but without borderline personality disorder. The patients with borderline personality disorder less frequently were college graduates, were diagnosed with more comorbid disorders, more frequently had a history of substance use disorder, reported more suicidal ideation at the time of the evaluation, more frequently had attempted suicide, reported poorer social functioning and were rated lower on the Global Assessment of Functioning. There was no difference between the two patient groups in history of admission to psychiatric hospital or time missed from work during the past 5 years. The level of psychosocial morbidity associated with borderline personality disorder was as great as (or greater than) that experienced by patients with bipolar disorder. From a public health perspective, efforts to improve the detection and treatment of borderline personality disorder might be as important as efforts to improve the recognition and treatment of bipolar disorder. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  4. Evaluation of plasma-free endocannabinoids and their congeners in abstinent cocaine addicts seeking outpatient treatment: impact of psychiatric co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Pavón, Francisco Javier; Araos, Pedro; Pastor, Antoni; Calado, Montserrat; Pedraz, María; Campos-Cloute, Rafael; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Serrano, Antonia; Blanco, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Suárez, Juan; Romero-Cuevas, Miguel; Pujadas, Mitona; Vergara-Moragues, Esperanza; Gornemann, Isolde; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Cocaine is associated with serious health problems including psychiatric co-morbidity. There is a need for the identification of biomarkers for the stratification of cocaine-addicted subjects. Several studies have evaluated circulating endocannabinoid-related lipids as biomarkers of inflammatory, metabolic and mental disorders. However, little is known in substance use disorders. This study characterizes both free N-acyl-ethanolamines (NAEs) and 2-acyl-glycerols in abstinent cocaine addicts from outpatient treatment programs who were diagnosed with cocaine use disorder (CUD; n = 88), and age-/gender-/body mass-matched healthy control volunteers (n = 46). Substance and mental disorders that commonly occur with substance abuse were assessed by the semi-structured interview 'Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Diseases' according to the 'Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision' (DSM-IV-TR) and plasma-free acyl derivatives were quantified by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system. The results indicate that plasma acyl derivatives are altered in abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects with CUD (CUD subjects). While NAEs were found to be increased, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased in CUD subjects compared with controls. Multivariate predictive models based on these lipids as explanatory variables were developed to distinguish CUD subjects from controls providing high discriminatory power. However, these alterations were not influenced by the DSM-IV-TR criteria for cocaine abuse and dependence as cocaine trait severity measure. In contrast, we observed that some free acyl derivatives in CUD subjects were found to be affected by the diagnosis of some co-morbid psychiatric disorders. Thus, we found that the monounsaturated NAEs were significantly elevated in CUD subjects diagnosed with mood [N-oleoyl-ethanolamine and N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA)] and anxiety (POEA) disorders compared

  5. Middle-aged and elderly outpatients show lower body temperature responses than the young, even with the same C-reactive protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, A; Tamura, J; Nakazawa, M; Koyama, H

    2007-01-01

    The variation of body temperature response and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels with age was investigated. A cross-sectional study on new outpatients between January 2004 and June 2005 was carried out. Body temperature and serum CRP levels were examined for screening purposes in 1081 patients. Mean axillary body temperature was maintained at around 36.7 degrees C in early adulthood, and gradually declined in middle age. Middle-aged and elderly outpatients tended to show a lower body temperature response than the young, even with the same CRP levels. The critical age (boundary age) was assumed to be when the relationship between body temperature response and CRP level changed. This study suggests that the boundary age is about 40 years old.

  6. Is treatment in groups a useful alternative for psychiatry in low-income countries? An evaluation of a psychiatric outpatient unit in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Caldera, T; Kullgren, G; Penayo, U; Jacobsson, L

    1995-11-01

    Centro de Atención Psicosocial in León, Nicaragua is a psychiatric outpatient unit that has developed a group-oriented model of working, in which 80% of all visits are in groups: first-admission groups, insight-oriented group psychotherapy, psycho-educative, family groups and relatives groups. The aim of the present study was to analyze patient characteristics and make a preliminary study of improvement, compliance and patient satisfaction in a 1-year perspective. One hundred consecutive visits were assessed, 44 of them first admissions. They were assessed according to all axes of DSM-III-R plus the Structural Clinical Interview for DSM-III Disorders. A 1-year follow up was conducted on 39 of 41 selected patients within the major diagnostic groups. One of 4 patients had a psychotic disorder where schizophrenia dominated. Among nonpsychotics major depression, anxiety and adjustment disorders were most frequent. Personality disorders were common (80%) among nonpsychotic patients, paranoid, obsessive-compulsive, passive-aggressive and masochistic personality disorders dominating. The illiteracy rate was 10%, but 50% had high school or university background. Severity of mental disorders and functional level did not differ between educational levels. There was a strong male dominance in all diagnostic, socioeconomic and educational level strata and few old patients. Improvement in functional level was clinically and statistically significant in all groups, and more than two thirds were very satisfied with the group treatment offered.

  7. Early psychosis intervention outpatient service of the 1st Psychiatric University Clinic in Athens: 3 Years of experience.

    PubMed

    Kollias, Constantinos; Xenaki, Lida-Alkisti; Dimitrakopoulos, Stefanos; Kosteletos, Ioannis; Kontaxakis, Vassilis; Stefanis, Nikos; Papageorgiou, Charalampos

    2016-11-09

    To present the 3-year experience of the early intervention in psychosis (EIP) service implementation of the 1st Psychiatric University Clinic in Athens. An overview of: (1) the purpose of our service, (2) the referral network, (3) the selection criteria, (4) the diagnostic procedures, (5) the therapeutic interventions and (6) the research activities. The service was established in 2012 and developed gradually aiming to provide information, early detection, treatment and support to people aged 15 to 40 years with psychotic manifestations, who are either at increased risk of developing psychosis (at-risk mental state [ARMS]) or with first episode psychosis (FEP). In order to assess individuals with ARMS, we used the comprehensive assessment of at-risk mental states interview and the Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale The duration of untreated psychosis was estimated by using the Nottingham Onset Schedule. So far we have had 65 referrals, of which 26 were ARMS and 17 FEP. Based on the individual needs, they were offered psychotherapeutic and/or pharmacological treatment. After 3 years, the rate of transition to psychosis was 19.2% and the rate of psychosis relapse was 11.7%. The implementation of our service has had positive results, enabling young people with early psychosis to receive prompt and effective care. The rates of transition to psychosis are the first to be published from a Greek EIP service. Further development of our referral network and inter-hospital collaboration will allow us to address the needs of a wider part of the population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Widowhood and the risk of psychiatric care, psychotropic medication and all-cause mortality: a cohort study of 658,022 elderly people in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Möller, Jette; Björkenstam, Emma; Ljung, Rickard; Yngwe, Monica Aberg

    2011-03-01

    To study the effect of widowhood on the risk of psychiatric care, psychotropic medication and mortality, and to study if the effect is modified by educational level. A nationwide, register-based cohort study. All married or widowed individuals aged 75 and older who were alive and registered in Sweden on 31 December 2004 and still registered on 31 December 2005. A total of 658,022 individuals were included in the study and followed in 2006. Odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Loss of spouse increased the risk of outpatient psychiatric visits, psychotropic medication and all-cause mortality. Prescribed psychotropic medication was more common among those newly bereaved, adjusted OR of 1.46 (95% CI 1.41-1.50), compared to those married. For those widowed for a longer period, the corresponding estimate was 1.12 (95% CI 1.11-1.14). The OR for all-cause mortality was 1.18 (95% CI 1.11-1.26). The analyses also indicated different effects on inpatient care depending on educational level. Loss of spouse increases the risk of people getting psychiatric care, both for severe and minor psychiatric conditions. The effect seems to differ depending on educational level. Further studies are needed to disentangle the mechanism behind the effects of each measurement of psychiatric conditions and how these are affected by educational level.

  9. A pilot study: comparative research of social functioning, circadian rhythm parameters, and cognitive function among institutional inpatients, and outpatients with chronic schizophrenia and healthy elderly people.

    PubMed

    Kume, Yu; Sugita, Takio; Oga, Kenya; Kagami, Kai; Igarashi, Hitomi

    2015-01-01

    Irregular circadian rhythm and cognitive impairment are frequently observed in patients with chronic schizophrenia. However, their effects in different living environments or with aging remain unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the characteristics of circadian rhythm and cognition function in the patients with chronic schizophrenia. This report described data collected using continuous wrist-active monitoring in real-life settings for seven days and the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia Japanese Version (BACS-J) from 10 inpatients with chronic schizophrenia, 10 outpatients with chronic schizophrenia, and 15 healthy elderly people. The Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) Scale was used to measure the social functioning in the patients with chronic schizophrenia. The outpatients with chronic schizophrenia exhibited highly interrupted circadian patterns in terms of stability and the fragmentation of activity (p < 0.05) as indexed according to Interdaily Stability (IS) and Intradaily Variability (IV). The inpatients with chronic schizophrenia indicated the most stable rhythm (p < 0.05) and inactive state (p = 0.001) among the groups. Also, the inpatients with chronic schizophrenia showed poorer cognitive functioning with Z-scores of subtests except digit sequencing (p < 0.01). According to stepwise linear regression analysis, the motor speed of BACS-J and IS of circadian parameters were the most powerful variables to predict the GAF in patients with chronic schizophrenia. The characteristics of circadian rhythm and cognition function in the inpatients with chronic schizophrenia appear distinct from those in the outpatients and the healthy elderly people. Circadian rhythm and cognition function in the patients with chronic schizophrenia may, in part, be affected by different living environments.

  10. Psychiatric assessment and screening for the elderly in primary care: design, implementation, and preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Robert C.; Boné, Blanca; Reid, M. Cary; Adelman, Ronald D.; Breckman, Risa; Goralewicz, Ronald; Palombo, Marlena; Stern, Amy; Shengelia, Rouzi; Teresi, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We describe the design and implementation of a psychiatric collaborative care model in a University-based geriatric primary care practice. Initial results of screening for anxiety and depression are reported. Methods and Materials Screens for anxiety and depression were administered to practice patients. A mental health team, consisting of a psychiatrist, mental health nurse practitioner and social worker, identified patients who on review of screening and chart data warranted evaluation or treatment. Referrals for mental health interventions were directed to members of the mental health team, primary care physicians at the practice, or community providers. Results Subjects (N=1505) comprised 38.2% of the 3940 unique patients seen at the practice during the 4-year study period. 37.1% (N=555) screened positive for depression, 26.9 % (N=405) for anxiety, and 322 (21.4%) screened positive for both. Any positive score was associated with age (p<0.033), female gender (p<0.006), and a non-significant trend toward living alone (p<0.095). 8.87% had suicidal thoughts. Conclusions Screening captured the most affectively symptomatic patients, including those with suicidal ideation, for intervention. The partnering of mental health professionals and primary care physicians offers a workable model for addressing the scarcity of expertise in geriatric psychiatry. PMID:25954771

  11. Prevalence and risk of polypharmacy among the elderly in an outpatient setting: a retrospective cohort study in the Emilia-Romagna region, Italy.

    PubMed

    Slabaugh, S Lane; Maio, Vittorio; Templin, Megan; Abouzaid, Safiya

    2010-12-01

    Polypharmacy, the simultaneous taking of many medications, has been well documented and is a topic of much concern for those looking to improve the quality of care for the elderly. Elderly patients often develop complicated and multifactorial health states that require extensive pharmacotherapy, leaving this population at risk for exposure to drug-drug interactions and other adverse events. Previous literature supports an association between an increase in the rate of adverse events as the number of drugs taken by a patient increases. We sought to evaluate the prevalence of polypharmacy, and to determine patient characteristics that are predictive of exposure to polypharmacy, in the elderly population of the Emilia-Romagna region in Italy. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of the 2007 Emilia-Romagna outpatient pharmacy database linked with patient information available from a demographic file of approximately 1 million Emilia-Romagna residents aged ≥65 years. The cohort comprised 887,165 elderly subjects who had at least one prescription filled during the study year. Using the WHO's defined daily dose (DDD) to determine the duration of treatment for a given drug, we defined a polypharmacy episode as overlapping treatment with five or more medications occurring for at least 1 day. The prevalence of polypharmacy was measured together with subject characteristics found to be predictive of polypharmacy exposure. A total of 349,689 elderly people in the population (39.4%) were exposed to at least one episode of polypharmacy during the study period. The prevalence of polypharmacy substantially increased with age and with a higher number of chronic conditions. Over 35% of those exposed to polypharmacy were exposed for 101 or more days of the year. The top three classes of medications involved in polypharmacy were antithrombotics, peptic ulcer disease and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease agents, and ACE inhibitors. The odds of exposure to polypharmacy were

  12. Evaluation of the Relation between Deliberate Self-Harm Behavior and Childhood Trauma Experiences in Patients Admitted to a Secondary-Care Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic for Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    SAÇARÇELİK, Gülhazar; TÜRKCAN, Ahmet; GÜVELİ, Hülya; YEŞİLBAŞ, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and the features of deliberate self-harm (DSH) behavior in patients admitted to the psychiatric outpatient clinic for adolescents and young adults and also to detect the association between the act of DSH and childhood traumas. Method In this study, we included all patients who were admitted to the secondary-care psychiatric outpatient clinic for adolescents and young adults in Bakırkoy Research and Training Hospital Psychiatry, Neurology and Neurosurgery throughout a month. A sociodemographic data form, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), Childhood Abuse and Neglect Question List and the Deliberate Self-Harm and Intent Screening Form were applied to three hundred participants. Result The prevalence of DSH was 50.0% among the participants (56.8% for females and 28.8% for males). Childhood abuse was detected in 57.0% of all participants (60.4% of females and 46.6% of males). Among patients with act of DSH, the rate of childhood abuse was 71.3%, while it was 42.7% in the subjects without act of DSH. Conclusion DSH is a common behavior among adolescent psychiatric patients. It is more common in females than in males. The prevalence of experience of childhood abuse and neglect is remarkably high and is associated with self-harm behavior.

  13. Near-Falls in Elderly Community-Dwelling Blacks From Two Out-Patient Clinics in Harlem.

    PubMed

    Basler, Geraldine V; O'Connell, Kathleen A; Bundy, Kristen

    Near-falls are a frequent, but not commonly studied, occurrence in the elderly Black population and may be related to prospective falls. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of near-falls to demographic characteristics, use of assistive devices, gait, and physical activity levels in elderly Blacks. Community-dwelling, elderly Black patients aging 65 and older and attending two clinics of the Mount Sinai Hospital in Harlem in New York City were recruited. The number of near-falls during the past year was self-reported using the Elderly Falls Screening Test. The Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity was used to assess aerobic and anaerobic activity levels. Backward stepwise logistic regression was used to identify predictors of near-falls. A total of 120 elderly Black adults took part in the study. Prevalence of occasional or frequent near-falls was 52.5%. In the final trimmed model, time of the 5-m observed walk (OR = 1.41, p = .001) and being male (OR = 3.68, p = .02) were significant predictors of near-fall experiences. Future research needs to be done in elderly Black populations to determine what factors may contribute to men experiencing more near-falls and on the relation between near-falls and falls.

  14. Efficacy and safety of doxepin 6 mg in a four-week outpatient trial of elderly adults with chronic primary insomnia.

    PubMed

    Lankford, Alan; Rogowski, Roberta; Essink, Beal; Ludington, Elizabeth; Heith Durrence, H; Roth, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    The efficacy and safety of doxepin (DXP), a histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, was evaluated in elderly adults with sleep maintenance insomnia. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled outpatient trial. Elderly adults meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for primary insomnia were randomized to four weeks of nightly treatment with either DXP 6 mg (N=130) or placebo (PBO; N=124). Efficacy was assessed using patient self-report instruments and clinician ratings. Patient-reported endpoints included subjective total sleep time (sTST), subjective wake after sleep onset (sWASO), latency to sleep onset (LSO), sleep quality, and a Patient Global Impression scale (PGI). The primary endpoint was sTST at week 1. DXP 6 mg produced significantly more sTST and less sWASO at week 1 (both p-values <0.0001) than PBO. These significant improvements versus placebo were maintained at weeks 2-4 (all p-values <0.05). There were no significant differences in LSO for DXP 6 mg versus PBO. DXP 6 mg significantly improved sleep quality (weeks 1, 3, and 4, p<0.05) and several outcome-related parameters, including several items on the PGI, the severity and improvement items of the Clinician Global Impression scale (CGI; weeks 1 and 2) and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI; weeks 1-4), all versus PBO. There were no reports of anticholinergic effects (e.g., dry mouth) or memory impairment. The safety profile of DXP 6 mg was comparable to that of PBO. In elderly adults with insomnia, DXP 6 mg produced significant improvements in sleep maintenance, sleep duration, and sleep quality endpoints that were sustained throughout the trial. These data suggest that DXP 6 mg is effective for treating sleep maintenance insomnia and is well-tolerated in elderly adults with chronic primary insomnia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Reasons for Referral, Intervention Approaches and Demographic Characteristics of Clients with Intellectual Disability Attending Adult Psychiatric Outpatient Services in the Kingdom of Bahrain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey, I.; Al-Saihati, B. A.; Al-Haddad, M.; McClean, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relatively little information is available regarding the use of psychiatric services by individuals with intellectual disability (ID) in Arab countries. The current study aimed to identify (1) the reasons for referral; (2) demographic characteristics of individuals referred; (3) previous contact with child psychiatric services; (4)…

  16. Reasons for Referral, Intervention Approaches and Demographic Characteristics of Clients with Intellectual Disability Attending Adult Psychiatric Outpatient Services in the Kingdom of Bahrain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey, I.; Al-Saihati, B. A.; Al-Haddad, M.; McClean, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relatively little information is available regarding the use of psychiatric services by individuals with intellectual disability (ID) in Arab countries. The current study aimed to identify (1) the reasons for referral; (2) demographic characteristics of individuals referred; (3) previous contact with child psychiatric services; (4)…

  17. Likelihood of Nursing Home Referral for Fecally Incontinent Elderly Patients is Influenced by Physician Views on Nursing Home Care and Outpatient Management of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Nyrop, Kirsten A.; Grover, Madhusudan; Palsson, Olafur S.; Heymen, Steve; Palmer, Mary H.; Goode, Patricia S.; Whitehead, William E.; Busby-Whitehead, Jan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES (1) Characterize physicians’ management practices for fecal incontinence (FI) among elderly patients, (2) describe physician perceptions of the quality of care for FI provided in nursing homes (NH), and (3) identify physician views and attributes associated with referral of elderly patients with FI to a NH. DESIGN Cross-sectional. SETTING United States. PARTICIPANTS Physician members of the American Geriatrics Society. MEASUREMENTS Questionnaire pertaining to physician views on (1) their own FI management practices, (2) management of FI in NHs, and (3) referral of an elderly patient with FI to a NH. RESULTS Of the respondents (N=606), 54.1% reported screening for FI and 59.3% thought FI could be managed conservatively on an outpatient basis. Only 32.9% believed NHs provide good care for FI, and 27.1% believed NH care conditions exacerbate FI. Responding to a hypothetical vignette, 10.6% would probably or definitely refer an older adult patient with only FI to a NH, and 17.2% were uncertain about whether or not to refer. Logistic regression analysis identified physician characteristics associated with decreased likelihood of NH referral as the belief that FI can be managed conservatively, the belief that NHs provide poor care for FI, longer practice experience, and practicing in an academic medical center. CONCLUSION Most geriatricians believe FI can be managed conservatively and that NH provide poor care for FI. These beliefs plus longer years of practice and practice in an academic setting decrease the likelihood of referral to NH for patients with FI. PMID:21450249

  18. Reasons for referral, intervention approaches and demographic characteristics of clients with intellectual disability attending adult psychiatric outpatient services in the Kingdom of Bahrain.

    PubMed

    Grey, I; Al-Saihati, B A; Al-Haddad, M; McClean, B

    2015-02-01

    Relatively little information is available regarding the use of psychiatric services by individuals with intellectual disability (ID) in Arab countries. The current study aimed to identify (1) the reasons for referral; (2) demographic characteristics of individuals referred; (3) previous contact with child psychiatric services; (4) psychiatric diagnoses; (5) level of ID; (6) nature of interventions; and (7) patterns of medication usage in individuals attending a specialist psychiatric service for individuals with an ID in the Kingdom of Bahrain. Case file analysis was used. Files that recorded attendance at the specialist service within a specific calendar year were selected. A total of 537 files were available for review and 79 contained records indicating the individual had been seen within the year. The primary referral reason to adult psychiatric services was the presence of behavioural disturbance. Pharmacological intervention was the dominant treatment choice and no individual was recommended for psychological/behavioural intervention. Psychiatric diagnosis was not recorded in over 90% of cases. Services in the Kingdom of Bahrain for individuals with ID rely exclusively on pharmacological approaches for the treatment of behavioural disorders. Implications for best practice guidelines are discussed. © 2013 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Efficacy and Safety of Doxepin 1 mg and 3 mg in a 12-week Sleep Laboratory and Outpatient Trial of Elderly Subjects with Chronic Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Krystal, Andrew D.; Durrence, H. Heith; Scharf, Martin; Jochelson, Philip; Rogowski, Roberta; Ludington, Elizabeth; Roth, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    were no reports of memory impairment, complex sleep behaviors, anticholinergic effects, weight gain, or increased appetite. Conclusions: DXP 1 mg and 3 mg administered nightly to elderly chronic insomnia patients for 12 weeks resulted in significant and sustained improvements in most endpoints. These improvements were not accompanied by evidence of next-day residual sedation or other significant adverse effects. DXP also demonstrated improvements in both patient- and physician-based ratings of global insomnia outcome. The efficacy of DXP at the doses used in this study is noteworthy with respect to sleep maintenance and early morning awakenings given that these are the primary sleep complaints of the elderly. This study, the longest placebo-controlled, double-blind, polysomnographic trial of nightly pharmacotherapy for insomnia in the elderly, provides the best evidence to date of the sustained efficacy and safety of an insomnia medication in older adults. Citation: Krystal AD; Durrence HH; Scharf M; Jochelson P; Rogowski R; Ludington E; Roth T. Efficacy and safety of doxepin 1 mg and 3 mg in a 12-week sleep laboratory and outpatient trial of elderly subjects with chronic primary insomnia. SLEEP 2010;33(11):1553-1561. PMID:21102997

  20. Cut-off of anthropometry measurement and nutritional status among elderly outpatient in Indonesia: multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Setiati, Siti; Istanti, Rahmi; Andayani, Rejeki; Kuswardhani, R A Tuty; Aryana, I G P Suka; Putu, I Dewa; Apandi, M; Ichwani, Jusri; Soewoto, Sumarmi; Dinda, Rose; Mustika, Syifa

    2010-10-01

    To obtain the cut-off value of anthropometric measurements and nutritional status of elderly in Indonesia. A multicentre-cross sectional study was performed at 9 hospitals in Indonesia. The data collected comprises of samples characteristics, anthropometric measurements (weight, height, trisep, bisep, subscapular, suprailiac, and circumference of the hip, waist, arm, calf, and thigh), albumin value, MNA score and ADL Index of Barthel. A total of 702 subjects were collected. The average value of serum albumin is 4.28 g/dl, with 98% subjects had normal serum albumin (> 3.5 g/dl). The mean MNA score and BMI was 23.07 and 22.54 respectively. Most of subjects (56.70%) had risk of malnutrition based on MNA score, and 45.01% had normal nutritional status based on body mass index. Average value of several anthropometric measures (weight, stature, and body mass index; sub-scapular and supra-iliac skinfolds; thigh, calf, mid-arm, and waist circumferences) in various age groups in both groups of women and men were obtained. Cut-off values of various anthropometric indicators were also analyzed in this study with MNA as a gold standard. This study showed age related anthropometric measurement differences in both men and women aged 60 years and older.

  1. Factors predicting relapse in elderly patients with major depressive disorder treated with escitalopram in an outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Dolberg, Ornah; Larsson Lönn, Sara; Kvist, Kajsa

    2014-07-01

    We investigated which factors can best predict relapse in older patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who have achieved remission with escitalopram. A total of 405 patients who were 65 years or older with a primary diagnosis of MDD received 12 week, open-label escitalopram 10 or 20 mg/day. Patients in remission (MADRS ≤12) at Week 12 were randomized to 24 weeks of double-blind treatment with either placebo or escitalopram (fixed dose from Week 6). After randomization of 312 patients in remission, patients whose dose had been increased to 20 mg escitalopram after 2 weeks of open-label treatment had a high escitalopram relapse rate (16.7%) and a placebo relapse rate of 32.5% with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.2, whereas patients titrated to 20 mg escitalopram at Weeks 4 or 6 had a high placebo relapse rate (41.2%) and an escitalopram relapse rate of 5.7% with a HR = 8.9. A high placebo relapse rate was also observed for patients with a baseline MADRS below median, while low escitalopram relapse rates were characteristic of patients who had achieved remission by Week 6 or 8 (HR = 8.9), had a current depressive episode length below median, baseline MADRS below median (HR = 11.8), or received 10 mg for 12 weeks (HR = 6.3). A key limitation of the study was that some analyses were post-hoc and that none of the comparisons between complementary subgroups had nominal p-values <0.05. In this post-hoc analysis of elderly patients with MDD, several factors, including female gender, early remission, low baseline MADRS score, major depressive episode (MDE) duration, and escitalopram dosage, significantly affected the relapse rate after randomization to escitalopram or placebo.

  2. Adaptation and initial validation of the Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 Questionnaire (GAD-7) in an Arabic speaking Lebanese psychiatric outpatient sample.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Helen; Atoui, Mia; Hamadeh, Aya; Zeinoun, Pia; Nahas, Ziad

    2016-05-30

    The Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 (GAD-7) are short screening measures used in medical and community settings to assess depression and anxiety severity. The aim of this study is to translate the screening tools into Arabic and evaluate their psychometric properties in an Arabic-speaking Lebanese psychiatric outpatient sample. The patients completed the questionnaires, among others, prior to being evaluated by a clinical psychiatrist or psychologist. The scales' internal consistency and factor structure were measured and convergent and discriminant validity were established by comparing the scores with clinical diagnoses and the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire - MDD subset (PDSQ - MDD). Results showed that the PHQ-9 and GAD-7 are reliable screening tools for depression and anxiety and their factor structures replicated those reported in the literature. Sensitivity and specificity analyses showed that the PHQ-9 is sensitive but not specific at capturing depressive symptoms when compared to clinician diagnoses whereas the GAD-7 was neither sensitive nor specific at capturing anxiety symptoms. The implications of these findings are discussed in reference to the scales themselves and the cultural specificity of the Lebanese population.

  3. Agreement for depression diagnosis between DSM-IV-TR criteria, three validated scales, oncologist assessment, and psychiatric clinical interview in elderly patients with advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rhondali, Wadih; Freyer, Gilles; Adam, Virginie; Filbet, Marilène; Derzelle, Martine; Abgrall-Barbry, Gaelle; Bourcelot, Sophie; Machavoine, Jean-Louis; Chomat-Neyraud, Muriel; Gisserot, Olivier; Largillier, Rémi; Le Rol, Annick; Priou, Frank; Saltel, Pierre; Falandry, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression, a major outcome in cancer patients, is often evaluated by physicians relying on their clinical impressions rather than patient self-report. Our aim was to assess agreement between patient self-reported depression, oncologist assessment (OA), and psychiatric clinical interview (PCI) in elderly patients with advanced ovarian cancer (AOC). Methods This analysis was a secondary endpoint of the Elderly Women AOC Trial 3 (EWOT3), designed to assess the impact of geriatric covariates, notably depression, on survival in patients older than 70 years of age. Depression was assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale-30 (GDS), the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, the distress thermometer, the mood thermometer, and OA. The interview guide for PCI was constructed from three validated scales: the GDS, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, revised (DSM) criteria for depression were used as a gold standard. Results Out of 109 patients enrolled at 21 centers, 99 (91%) completed all the assessments. Patient characteristics were: mean age 78, performance status ≥2: 47 (47%). Thirty six patients (36%) were identified as depressed by the PCI versus 15 (15%) identified by DSM. We found moderate agreement for depression identification between DSM and GDS (κ=0.508) and PCI (κ=0.431) and high agreement with MADRS (κ=0.663). We found low or no agreement between DSM with the other assessment strategies, including OA (κ=−0.043). Identification according to OA (yes/no) resulted in a false-negative rate of 87%. As a screening tool, GDS had the best sensitivity and specificity (94% and 80%, respectively). Conclusion The use of validated tools, such as GDS, and collaboration between psychologists and oncologists are warranted to better identify emotional disorders in elderly women with AOC. PMID:26203235

  4. Agreement for depression diagnosis between DSM-IV-TR criteria, three validated scales, oncologist assessment, and psychiatric clinical interview in elderly patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Rhondali, Wadih; Freyer, Gilles; Adam, Virginie; Filbet, Marilène; Derzelle, Martine; Abgrall-Barbry, Gaelle; Bourcelot, Sophie; Machavoine, Jean-Louis; Chomat-Neyraud, Muriel; Gisserot, Olivier; Largillier, Rémi; Le Rol, Annick; Priou, Frank; Saltel, Pierre; Falandry, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Depression, a major outcome in cancer patients, is often evaluated by physicians relying on their clinical impressions rather than patient self-report. Our aim was to assess agreement between patient self-reported depression, oncologist assessment (OA), and psychiatric clinical interview (PCI) in elderly patients with advanced ovarian cancer (AOC). This analysis was a secondary endpoint of the Elderly Women AOC Trial 3 (EWOT3), designed to assess the impact of geriatric covariates, notably depression, on survival in patients older than 70 years of age. Depression was assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale-30 (GDS), the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, the distress thermometer, the mood thermometer, and OA. The interview guide for PCI was constructed from three validated scales: the GDS, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, revised (DSM) criteria for depression were used as a gold standard. Out of 109 patients enrolled at 21 centers, 99 (91%) completed all the assessments. Patient characteristics were: mean age 78, performance status ≥2: 47 (47%). Thirty six patients (36%) were identified as depressed by the PCI versus 15 (15%) identified by DSM. We found moderate agreement for depression identification between DSM and GDS (κ=0.508) and PCI (κ=0.431) and high agreement with MADRS (κ=0.663). We found low or no agreement between DSM with the other assessment strategies, including OA (κ=-0.043). Identification according to OA (yes/no) resulted in a false-negative rate of 87%. As a screening tool, GDS had the best sensitivity and specificity (94% and 80%, respectively). The use of validated tools, such as GDS, and collaboration between psychologists and oncologists are warranted to better identify emotional disorders in elderly women with AOC.

  5. Improved outcomes using brain SPECT-guided treatment versus treatment-as-usual in community psychiatric outpatients: a retrospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Thornton, John F; Schneider, Howard; McLean, Mary K; van Lierop, Muriel J; Tarzwell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans indirectly show functional activity via measurement of regional cerebral blood flow. Thirty patients at a community-based psychiatric clinic underwent brain SPECT scans. Changes in scoring of before-treatment and after-treatment scans correlated well with changes in patient Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores before treatment and after treatment. Patients were retrospectively matched with controls with similar diagnoses and pretreatment GAF scores, and those who underwent SPECT-guided treatment improved significantly more than the control patients.

  6. [Stepwise outpatient care].

    PubMed

    Valdes-Stauber, Juan; Vietz, Johannes; Kilian, Reinhold

    2015-05-01

    To assess possible differences in clinical, social, care, and satisfaction profile of patients treated by outpatient clinics or office based psychiatrists. The study sample consists of 100 patients of a psychiatric outpatient clinic and 100 patients treated by office based psychiatrists in the same catchment area. Patients were examined using standardized assessment instruments for severity of illness (HoNOS, CGI), general (GAF) and specific functional impairment (PSP), and satisfaction with psychiatric services (ZUF-8). Chi-square tests, univariate ANOVAs and stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were applied. Compared with patients treated by office based psychiatrists, patients treated by the outpatient clinic showed higher HoNOS and CGI scores, lower GAF and PSP scores, and had more often a disability pension, a legal guardianship, a schizophrenia diagnosis, suicide attempts, hospitalizations, and therapeutic contacts. However, there were no significant differences regarding care satisfaction. The assessed outpatient clinic met the German statutory criteria for its legitimation. However, care needs have to be specified in a better way, and the different care intensity as well as concrete interventions between both settings have to be specified more accurately. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. [What do Interpreters Cost? - A Retrospective Analysis of the Costs for Interpreters in Treatment of Refugees in a Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic in Berlin].

    PubMed

    Schreiter, Stefanie; Winkler, Johanna; Bretz, Joachim; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2016-09-01

    Clinical diagnostics of mental disorders especially among refugees and asylum seekers come with unique difficulties: language barriers, different forms of expression and concepts of the understanding of mental illness as well as a different cultural background. Therefore professional interpreters are needed but associated with a higher effort related to costs and time. We conducted a retrospective analysis of costs, which incurred by the use of professional interpreters in our outpatient clinic in Berlin, Germany, in the first quarter 2016 for the treatment of refugees and asylum seekers. The sample consisted of 110 refugees and asylum seekers; the highest costs in the use of interpreters incurred among Neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders (53.04%), especially Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (39.04%), as well as affective disorders (38.47%), especially major depressive episodes (25.23%). Our data point out the crucial need of a regulation of costs with regard to the service of professional interpreters in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. A 64-week, multicenter, open-label study of aripiprazole effectiveness in the management of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder in a general psychiatric outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Hong; Lin, Wei-Wen; Chen, Shao-Tsu; Chen, Kao-Ching; Chen, Kuang-Peng; Chiu, Nan-Ying; Huang, Chao; Chang, Ching-Jui; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Lai, Te-Jen

    2010-09-17

    To evaluate the overall long-term effectiveness of aripiprazole in patients with schizophrenia in a general psychiatric practice setting in Taiwan. This was a prospective, open-label, multicenter, post-market surveillance study in Taiwanese patients with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder requiring a switch in antipsychotic medication because current medication was not well tolerated and/or clinical symptoms were not well controlled. Eligible patients were titrated to aripiprazole (5-30 mg/day) over a 12-week switching phase, during which their previous medication was discontinued. Patients could then enter a 52-week, long-term treatment phase. Aripiprazole was flexibly dosed (5-30 mg/day) at the discretion of the treating physicians. Efficacy was assessed using the Clinical Global Impression scale Improvement (CGI-I) score, the Clinical Global Impression scale Severity (CGI-S) score, The Brief Psychiatry Rating Scale (BPRS), and the Quality of Life (QOL) scale, as well as Preference of Medicine (POM) ratings by patients and caregivers. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. A total of 245 patients were enrolled and switched from their prior antipsychotic medications, and 153 patients entered the 52-week extension phase. In all, 79 patients (32.2%) completed the study. At week 64, the mean CGI-I score was 3.10 and 64.6% of patients who showed response. Compared to baseline, scores of CGI-S, QOL, and BPRS after 64 weeks of treatment also showed significant improvements. At week 12, 65.4% of subjects and 58.9% of caregivers rated aripiprazole as better than the prestudy medication on the POM. The most frequently reported adverse events (AEs) were headache, auditory hallucinations and insomnia. A total of 13 patients (5.3%) discontinued treatment due to AEs. No statistically significant changes were noted with respect to fasting plasma glucose, lipid profile, body

  9. Psychiatric emergencies in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Borja, Ben; Borja, Czarina Santos; Gade, Swami

    2007-05-01

    Failure to recognize psychiatric conditions in any age group particularly in the elderly could lead to a very complicated clinical picture and may lead to increased health expenditures. Psychiatric emergencies can be secondary to numerous factors: geriatric depression and suicide, behavioral disturbance secondary to underlying organic conditions, substance abuse, elder abuse, and medication-induced adverse events. This article discusses mainly geriatric depression, elder abuse, and conditions emanating from iatrogenic causes.

  10. Impaired mobility, depressed mood, cognitive impairment and polypharmacy are independently associated with disability in older cancer outpatients: The prospective Physical Frailty in Elderly Cancer patients (PF-EC) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Pamoukdjian, Frederic; Aparicio, Thomas; Zelek, Laurent; Boubaya, Marouane; Caillet, Philippe; François, Veronique; de Decker, Laure; Lévy, Vincent; Sebbane, Georges; Paillaud, Elena

    2017-05-01

    To assess the prevalence of disability and the oncologic factors associated with disability in older outpatients with cancer. The Physical Frailty in Elderly Cancer patients (PF-EC) study (France) is a prospective bicentric observational cohort study. Two hundred and ninety outpatients with cancer were included. A cross-sectional analysis of oncologic factors and geriatric variables associated with disability that were collected using a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) was conducted. Disability was defined as impairment in activities of daily living (ADL) and/or instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), simplified to four items. Univariate and multivariate logistic models of disabled patients were performed. The three final multivariate models were compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC/ROC) of the logistic model. The mean age was 80.6years, and 51% of the patients were women with various types of cancer. The prevalence of disability was 67.6%. No oncologic factors (cancer site, cancer extension) were associated with disability. Impaired mobility, poor functional status, depressive mood, cognitive impairment and polypharmacy were independently associated with disability (P<0.05). The AUC/ROC of the final models was similar. Disability was highly prevalent in older cancer outpatients before cancer treatment but was not associated with oncologic factors. Impaired mobility, depressed mood, cognitive impairment and polypharmacy were the geriatric variables significantly and independently associated with disability. Identifying these factors prior to cancer treatment could enable the implementation of corrective actions to improve patient autonomy before treatment and during follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Frailty and the relationship between blood pressure and mortality in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes (Zwolle Outpatient Diabetes project Integrating Available Care-34).

    PubMed

    van Hateren, Kornelis J J; Hendriks, Steven H; Groenier, Klaas H; Bakker, Stephan J L; Bilo, Henk J G; Kleefstra, Nanne; Landman, Gijs W D

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to investigate whether adjustment for frailty influences the relationship of blood pressure with mortality in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients aged 60 years and older (n = 858) were selected from a prospective observational cohort study of primary care patients with T2DM. Frailty was defined as a score less than 80 on the subscale 'physical functioning' of the RAND-36 questionnaire. After median follow-up for 14 years, multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between blood pressure and (cardiovascular) mortality. Analyses were performed in strata according to the frailty level ('physical functioning' score <80 and ≥80) and were repeated for patients older than 75 years. Frailty was highly prevalent in our study population; 629 out of 858 patients (73%) fulfilled the criterion. For patients aged at least 60 years, the hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of a 10 mmHg increase in SBP and DBP for cardiovascular mortality in nonfrail patients were 1.38 (1.15-1.68%) and 1.60 (1.07-2.37%), respectively. No relationship was observed for frail patients. For the oldest frail elderly, the hazard ratios of SBP and DBP for all-cause mortality were 0.92 (0.87-0.98%) and 0.83 (0.73-0.93%), respectively. For the oldest nonfrail elderly, a positive relationship between SBP and all-cause mortality was observed. Frailty modifies the relationship between blood pressure and mortality in elderly patients with T2DM. Higher blood pressure was related to increased cardiovascular mortality in nonfrail patients, even in the oldest elderly, and to lower all-cause mortality in frail patients.

  12. [Outpatient emergencies].

    PubMed

    Rivallan, Armel; Le Nagard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The outpatient monitoring of patients sometimes involves emergency situations. In their practice, the nurses who visit the patient's home are confronted with the limits of their intervention. Faced with these delicate situations team coordination is a strength and the reactivity of the caregivers often contributes to a satisfactory outcome for the patient.

  13. [An analysis of medical expenses of outpatient service for the elderly at one health insurance society in Fukuoka prefecture--focused on medical service and concentration of medical expenses].

    PubMed

    Homan, M; Matsuda, S

    2001-09-01

    To determine the best way to reduce medical expenses of the elderly, we analyzed the aged outpatients' receipts covered by the Health and Medical Service Law for the Aged at one health insurance society in Fukuoka prefecture. We used 312 medical receipts during July, 1997. The proportion of frequency of each medical service was 89.7% for medications, 45.8% for laboratory tests and 26.3% for procedures. The proportion of expenses of each medical service was 38.3% for medications, 20.0% for examinations and 12.1% for laboratory tests. Medication is considered as one of the main causes of increasing medical expenses. As a result of multiple regression analysis, the number of consulting days, urinary and genital disorder, the number of diseases, home care, laboratory tests and prescriptions for outside pharmacies were detected as statistically significant factors associated with medical expenses. There was a concentration of medical expenses, i.e. about 10% of higher rank receipts consumed around 40% of total outpatients' expenses and included 6 of 10 home medical care receipts. One of the causes of expensive outpatients' medical expenses was medication. The separation of dispensary and prescription of drugs does not contribute to the reduction of medical expenses. In the higher rank of the expenses group, compared with the lower rank of the expenses group, the consultation days were longer, the number of diseases was greater and the proportions of expenses for procedures and home care were larger. Medical expenditures for patients receiving home medical care were higher than those of others, but home care should be compared with admissions. Because the insurance societies are now facing financial difficulties in Japan, analyzing the data of medical receipts is very important. During our analysis, we had to make an enormous effort to combine two data sources, because the receipts were made separately by clinics and pharmacies. It is strongly suggested that a

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Doxepin 1 mg and 3 mg in a 12-week Sleep Laboratory and Outpatient Trial of Elderly Subjects with Chronic Primary Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Krystal, Andrew D; Durrence, H Heith; Scharf, Martin; Jochelson, Philip; Rogowski, Roberta; Ludington, Elizabeth; Roth, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    to evaluate the efficacy and safety of doxepin 1 mg and 3 mg in elderly subjects with chronic primary insomnia. the study was a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial. Subjects meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for primary insomnia were randomized to 12 weeks of nightly treatment with doxepin (DXP) 1 mg (n = 77) or 3 mg (n = 82), or placebo (PBO; n = 81). Efficacy was assessed using polysomnography (PSG), patient reports, and clinician ratings. Objective efficacy data are reported for Nights (N) 1, 29, and 85; subjective efficacy data during Weeks 1, 4, and 12; and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale and Patient Global Impression (PGI) scale data after Weeks 2, 4, and 12 of treatment. Safety assessments were conducted throughout the study. DXP 3 mg led to significant improvement versus PBO on N1 in wake time after sleep onset (WASO; P < 0.0001; primary endpoint), total sleep time (TST; P < 0.0001), overall sleep efficiency (SE; P < 0.0001), SE in the last quarter of the night (P < 0.0001), and SE in Hour 8 (P < 0.0001). These improvements were sustained at N85 for all variables, with significance maintained for WASO, TST, overall SE, and SE in the last quarter of the night. DXP 3 mg significantly improved patient-reported latency to sleep onset (Weeks 1, 4, and 12), subjective TST (Weeks 1, 4, and 12), and sleep quality (Weeks 1, 4, and 12). Several global outcome-related variables were significantly improved, including the severity and improvement items of the CGI (Weeks 2, 4, and 12), and all 5 items of the PGI (Week 12; 4 items after Weeks 2 and 4). Significant improvements were observed for DXP 1 mg for several measures including WASO, TST, overall SE, and SE in the last quarter of the night at several time points. Rates of discontinuation were low, and the safety profiles were comparable across the 3 treatment groups. There were no significant next-day residual effects; additionally, there were no reports of memory impairment, complex

  15. Prescribing pattern of anti-epileptic drugs in an Italian setting of elderly outpatients: a population-based study during 2004–07

    PubMed Central

    Oteri, Alessandro; Trifirò, Gianluca; Gagliostro, Maria Silvia; Tari, Daniele Ugo; Moretti, Salvatore; Bramanti, Placido; Spina, Edoardo; Caputi, Achille Patrizio; Arcoraci, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The aims of the study were to assess the trend of older and newer anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in the elderly population and to analyze the effects of a health-policy intervention with regard to AED use in general practice in a setting in Southern Italy. METHODS Data were extracted from the ‘Caserta-1’ Local-Health-Unit Arianna database in the years 2004–07. Patients aged over 65 years, receiving at least one AED prescription and registered in the lists of 88 general practitioners, were selected. The use of older and newer AEDs was calculated as 1 year prevalence and incidence of use and defined daily dose (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants day−1. Sub-analyses by gender, age and indication of use were performed. RESULTS Most of AED users were treated because of neuropathic pain (64.8%). However, the main indication of use for older AEDs (57.8%) was epilepsy, whereas newer AEDs (79.5%) were used for neuropathic pain. Prevalence and incidence of newer AED use increased until 2006, followed by a reduction in 2007. Newer AEDs, particularly gabapentin and pregabalin, were used in the treatment of more patients than older AEDs. However phenobarbital, accounting for more than 50% of total AED volume, was the most prescribed medication during the entire study period. CONCLUSIONS An increasing use of AEDs has been observed during 2004–07, mostly due to the prescription of newer compounds for neuropathic pain. The fall in the use of newer AEDs during 2007 coincides with revised re-imbursement criteria for gabapentin and pregabalin. The large use of phenobarbital in the elderly should be considered in the light of a risk of adverse drug reactions. PMID:20840443

  16. Behaviour Profile of Hungarian Adolescent Outpatients with a Dual Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate…

  17. Behaviour Profile of Hungarian Adolescent Outpatients with a Dual Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate…

  18. Psychiatric rehabilitation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rössler, W; Drake, R E

    2017-01-19

    To describe the core elements of modern psychiatric rehabilitation. Based on selected examples we describe the discussion about values in mental health care with focus on Europe. We present outcome data from studies, which have tried to implement care structures based on this value discussion. In the second half of the 20th century, mental health care in all European and other high-income countries changed conceptually and structurally. Deinstitutionalisation reduced the number of psychiatric beds and transferred priority to outpatient care and community-based services, but community mental health programs developed differently across and within these countries. High-income countries in Europe continued to invest in costly traditional services that were neither evidence-based nor person-centered by emphasising inpatient services, sheltered group homes and sheltered workshops. We argue that evidence-based, person-centred, recovery-oriented psychiatric rehabilitation offers a parsimonious solution to developing a consensus plan for community-based care in Europe. The challenges to scaling up effective psychiatric rehabilitation services in high-income countries are not primarily a lack of resources, but rather a lack of political will and inefficient use and dysfunctional allocation of resources.

  19. Psychiatric Illness in Relation to Frailty in Community-Dwelling Elderly People without Dementia: A Report from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, Melissa K.; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether frailty, defined as the accumulation of multiple, interacting illnesses, impairments and disabilities, is associated with psychiatric illness in older adults. Five-thousand-six-hundred-and-seventy-six community dwellers without dementia were identified within the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, and self-reported…

  20. Psychiatric Illness in Relation to Frailty in Community-Dwelling Elderly People without Dementia: A Report from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, Melissa K.; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether frailty, defined as the accumulation of multiple, interacting illnesses, impairments and disabilities, is associated with psychiatric illness in older adults. Five-thousand-six-hundred-and-seventy-six community dwellers without dementia were identified within the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, and self-reported…

  1. Psychiatric diagnosis, psychiatric power and psychiatric abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, T

    1994-01-01

    Psychiatric abuse, such as we usually associate with practices in the former Soviet Union, is related not to the misuse of psychiatric diagnoses, but to the political power intrinsic to the social role of the psychiatrist in totalitarian and democratic societies alike. Some reflections are offered on the modern, therapeutic state's proclivity to treat adults as patients rather than citizens, disjoin rights from responsibilities, and thus corrupt the language of political-philosophical discourse. PMID:7996558

  2. Outpatient treatment of alcohol use disorders among subjects 60+ years: design of a randomized clinical trial conducted in three countries (Elderly Study).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kjeld; Bogenschutz, Michael P; Bühringer, Gerhard; Behrendt, Silke; Bilberg, Randi; Braun, Barbara; Ekstrøm, Claus Thorn; Forcehimes, Alyssa; Lizarraga, Christine; Moyers, Theresa B; Nielsen, Anette Søgaard

    2015-11-14

    The proportion of 60+ years with excessive alcohol intake varies in western countries between 6-16 % among men and 2-7 % among women. Specific events related to aging (e.g. loss of job, physical and mental capacity, or spouse) may contribute to onset or continuation of alcohol use disorders (AUD). We present the rationale and design of a multisite, multinational AUD treatment study for subjects aged 60+ years. 1,000 subjects seeking treatment for AUD according to DSM-5 in outpatient clinics in Denmark, Germany, and New Mexico (USA) are invited to participate in a RCT. Participants are randomly assigned to four sessions of Motivational Enhancement Treatment (MET) or to MET plus an add-on with eight sessions based on the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA), which include a new module targeting specific problems of older adults. A series of assessment instruments is applied, including the Form-90, Alcohol Dependence Scale, Penn Alcohol Craving Scale, Brief Symptom Inventory and WHO Quality of Life. Enrolment will be completed by April 2016 and data collection by April 2017. The primary outcome is the proportion in each group who are abstinent or have a controlled use of alcohol six months after treatment initiation. Controlled use is defined as maximum blood alcohol content not exceeding 0.05 % during the last month. Total abstinence is a secondary outcome, together with quality of life andcompliance with treatment. The study will provide new knowledge about brief treatment of AUD for older subjects. As the treatment is manualized and applied in routine treatment facilities, barriers for implementation in the health care system are relatively low. Finally, as the study is being conducted in three different countries it will also provide significant insight into the possible interaction of service system differences and related patient characteristics in predictionof treatment outcome. Clinical Trials.gov NCT02084173 , March 7, 2014.

  3. Does seasonal vaccination affect the clinical presentation of influenza among the elderly? A cross-sectional analysis in the outpatient setting in France, 2003-2014.

    PubMed

    Mosnier, Anne; Daviaud, Isabelle; Caini, Saverio; Berche, Hervé; Mansuy, Jean-Michel; van der Werf, Sylvie; Cohen, Jean Marie; Lina, Bruno

    2017-04-11

    Vaccine-induced protection against influenza is not optimal, however it has been suggested that the vaccine may reduce the severity of symptoms among those who develop illness despite being vaccinated. We tested this hypothesis within a countrywide, sentinel general practitioners-based surveillance system in France. We included 2277 individuals aged 65years or older (of whom 1293 had been vaccinated against influenza, 56.8%) who consulted a general practitioner because of an acute respiratory infection (ARI) during 2003-2014. All patients were taken a nasopharyngeal swab, and information was collected on demographic characteristics and symptoms at disease onset. All specimens were tested for respiratory viruses and, if positive for influenza, the virus type and subtype were determined. We compared the average maximum temperature and the frequency of each symptom, between non-vaccinated and vaccinated influenza patients. We then used logistic regression models to calculate the odds of presenting with each symptom between vaccinated vs. non-vaccinated patients, adjusting by age group, virus (sub)type and season. Overall, 675 ARI patients (29.6%) tested positive for influenza. The A(H3) virus caused the majority of cases (55.1%), followed by influenza B (22.9%), A not-subtyped (11.7%), and A(H1) (10.3%) viruses. Compared to non-vaccinated influenza patients, those who had been vaccinated had a slightly reduced maximum temperature and presented less frequently with myalgia, shivering and headache. In stratified analyses, the observed effect was limited to patients infected with A(H3) or type B viruses. After adjusting by age group, virus (sub)type and season, the difference remained statistically significant only for headache, which was less frequent among vaccinated individuals (odds ratio 0.69, 95% confidence intervals 0.48-0.98). In conclusion, the vaccine was found to be modestly associated with less severe clinical presentation of influenza among the elderly. Our

  4. Psychiatric Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Bayrakal, Sadi

    1972-01-01

    Dr. Bayrakal believes that the time has come for the family physician to deal with minor psychiatric disturbances in his office as well as psychiatric emergencies in the emergency department. The newly emerging medico-social philosophy of both the federal and provincial governments, he says, is giving greater responsibility and authority to the family physician in every area of medicine, including psychiatry. The author discusses major psychiatric emergencies (suicide, suicidal attempt, homicide, social scandal, as well as other psychiatric emergencies) on the ward including adolescent psychiatry. (The descriptions and treatment procedures are given on a concrete clinical level without theoretical overload.) In the family physician's work, psychological understanding is of profound importance. Giving him the added scope of psychiatric consideration to see the patient in bio-psycho-social totality will enable him to practice a more humanized form of medicine. PMID:20468779

  5. The role of sex and autonomy-connectedness in internalizing and externalizing personality pathology, coping and axis-I pathology: among psychiatric and healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Nathan; Croon, Marcel; Bekker, Marrie

    2017-06-01

    In the current study we investigated the relationship of sex and autonomy-connectedness with internalizing and externalizing personality disorder symptoms (PDS), coping and axis-I pathology in older age. A path model was tested which was based on neo-analytical object relation, attachment- and primary-personality theory, among 100 clinical and 106 non-clinical elderly. In line with our model, autonomy-connectedness (self-awareness and capacity of managing new situations) was strongly associated to internalizing PDS in both groups. In both groups, neither sex nor autonomy-connectedness predicted externalizing PDS. Sex, internalizing as well as externalizing PDS and reactive defensive coping were associated to axis-I psychopathology. We conclude that sex and autonomy-connectedness were, similarly as in adult populations, associated to internalizing PDS and axis-I pathology. Treatment of elderly with internalizing PDS and axis-I psychopathology should therefore focus on enhancing autonomy-connectedness.

  6. Psychiatric symptoms, social disablement and illness behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hurry, J; Bebbington, P E; Tennant, C

    1987-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the relationship between social performance and the use of medical services, and to what extent this is independent of clinical disorder. In a sample of adults living in Camberwell, South London, social disability and clinical disorder were both predictive of service use. Those subjects who were admitted to psychiatric day-patient or inpatient facilities were found to show the highest levels of both types of impairment, followed by psychiatric outpatients. People who had seen their general practitioner because of their 'nerves' were less impaired than those in touch with the specialist psychiatric services but had significantly poorer social performance and a higher level of clinical disorder than people not in contact with medical services at all. When the severity of clinical disorder was controlled, however, levels of social performance no longer discriminated between the different groups of service users, except that psychiatric outpatients remained significantly more socially disabled than the general practice group.

  7. Daylight saving time in psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, C M; Blake, F; Fossey, E; Adams, B

    1990-07-01

    It has been reported that the change in photoperiod induced by the occurrence of daylight saving time has an effect on psychiatric presentation. We therefore investigated the impact of daylight saving time in three conditions: (1) parasuicide presentations; (2) psychiatric outpatient contacts, and inpatient admissions; (3) registered suicides. Results indicate that neither the change in photoperiod nor the effect of a small change in circadian rhythm associated with daylight saving time has an effect on 'cases' in any of the three conditions.

  8. Elderly Mental Health: Needs*

    PubMed Central

    Parkar, Shubhangi R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights the mental health needs of the elderly. It tackles the issues of their institutionalisation and community care. Rapid urbanisation in Indian society throws up special problems in elderly care. There is great evidence of a raise in morbidity, mortality, hospitalisation and loss of functional status related to common mental disorders in the elderly patients. Overlap of depression and anxiety is very common with up to almost half of the elderly patients reporting significant depressive and anxiety symptoms. Also, depression is the most common psychiatric disorder in late life. Growth in the elderly population means a direct increase in age related diseases such as dementia and poor mental health outcomes such as depression, anxiety, suicide and serious constraints on the quality of life among elderly individuals. The need to identify new and unmet problem areas and develop efficient therapeutic outcomes for this special population is stressed. PMID:25838727

  9. Psychiatric characteristics of homicide defendants.

    PubMed

    Martone, Christine A; Mulvey, Edward P; Yang, Suzanne; Nemoianu, Andrei; Shugarman, Ryan; Soliman, Layla

    2013-09-01

    The authors examined the rate of mental disorders in an unselected sample of homicide defendants in a U.S. jurisdiction, seeking to identify psychiatric factors associated with offense characteristics and court outcomes. Defendants charged with homicide in a U.S. urban county between 2001 and 2005 received a psychiatric evaluation after arrest. Demographic, historical, and psychiatric variables as well as offense characteristics and legal outcomes were described. Bivariate analyses examined differences by age group and by race, and logistic models examined predictors of multiple victims, firearm use, guilty plea, and guilty verdict. Fifty-eight percent of the sample had at least one axis I or II diagnosis, most often a substance use disorder (47%). Axis I or II diagnoses were more common (78%) among defendants over age 40. Although 37% of the sample had prior psychiatric treatment, only 8% of the defendants with diagnosed axis I disorders had outpatient treatment during the 3 months preceding the homicide; African Americans were less likely than non-African Americans to be in treatment. African American males were more likely to use a firearm and to have a male victim. In exploratory analyses, psychiatric factors did not predict multiple victims, firearm use in the crime, or a guilty verdict. Rates of axis I disorders were lower than reported in previous studies. Few homicide defendants were in psychiatric treatment at the time of the crime, suggesting limited opportunities for prevention by mental health providers.

  10. Impulse control disorders in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Lut; Bican, Mehtap; Keskin, Necla

    2014-05-01

    There is no epidemiological study on the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in the elderly population. The studies on ICDs in elderly patients are limited and some of them are case reports about pathological gambling and kleptomania. The comorbidity of other psychiatric disorders makes diagnosis difficult and has negative effects on both treatment and the prognosis of ICDs. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of ICDs among elderly patients and to evaluate the related sociodemographic and clinical features. A total of 76 patients aged 60 and over who have been referred to our outpatient clinics in a one-year period were included in the study. A demographic data form was completed. The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) was used to determine axis I psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of ICDs was investigated by using the modified version of the Minnesota Impulse Disorders Interview (MIDI). Impulsivity was measured with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale Version 11 (BIS-11). The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) test was performed to evaluate the cognitive status of patients and to exclude the diagnosis of dementia. In addition, all patients completed Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90). The prevalence rate of at least one comorbid ICD in our sample was 17%. When patients with a diagnosis of ICDs not otherwise specified (ICD-NOS) were included, the prevalence rate increased to 22.4%. The most common ICD was intermittent explosive disorder (15.8%), followed by pathological gambling (9.2%). The majority of the sample was men (54%), married (80%), had a high school education (51%), and mid-level socioeconomic status (79%). The only statistically significant difference between the sociodemographic characteristics of patients with or without ICDs was gender. The lifetime prevalence of ICDs was 34.1% in men and 8.6% in women. The prevalence of childhood conduct disorder

  11. A CBT Approach to Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Kim J.

    2005-01-01

    During a psychiatric hospitalization of 5 to 10 days, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) strategies can be used for the management of inpatients and to support the transition to outpatient treatment. This format was chosen after several years of frustration dealing with crisis inpatient care. The use of CBT is well known, and it seemed that an…

  12. Factors affecting engagement of dual diagnosis patients in outpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Bogenschutz, M P; Siegfreid, S L

    1998-10-01

    This study examined factors associated with engagement in outpatient treatment of patients with dual diagnoses of psychiatric disorder and substance use disorder. The charts of all 57 patients referred to a dual diagnosis treatment program during a six-month period were reviewed, and data on patients' substance use diagnosis, psychiatric diagnosis, sex, ethnicity, and referral source were collected. Patients referred from inpatient treatment were more likely to attend three or more appointments at the dual diagnosis program than those referred from outpatient treatment. Substance of abuse interacted with both referral source and sex in predicting engagement.

  13. Treatment-Refractory Depression in the Elderly: An Audit of Primary Care Referrals to Psychiatric Services in Swindon, U.K.

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Patrick; Jones-Ritson, Mari; Bullock, Roger

    1999-01-01

    Background: Our objective was to audit primary care referrals for depression to assess prereferral quality of antidepressant treatment. Method: We performed a retrospective audit of referrals from primary care to the Department of Old Age Psychiatry in Swindon, Wiltshire, U.K., for a new episode of depression, excluding life-threatening cases, between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 1998. To determine if treatment before referral met criteria for an adequate trial, for audit purposes we defined an adequate trial as 8 weeks at maximal dose as specified by the British National Formulary. Results: A computer search identified 58 referrals: 33 cases were excluded—3 notes were unavailable for audit, 7 were wrongly coded, 8 were life-threatening, and 15 were non–primary care referrals. Of the 25 evaluable patients, 2 had had an adequate duration of treatment and 6 were taking maximal doses of antidepressants, but none was taking a dose for an adequate duration. Conclusion: Patients referred to secondary care for depression are often undertreated prior to referral, which may explain why the patients in this retrospective audit had failed to respond. Primary care physicians should be encouraged to use medication in elderly patients that requires little or no dose titration at high doses and for at least 8 weeks before considering the patient to be treatment refractory. PMID:15014671

  14. Treatment-Refractory Depression in the Elderly: An Audit of Primary Care Referrals to Psychiatric Services in Swindon, U.K.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Patrick; Jones-Ritson, Mari; Bullock, Roger

    1999-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Our objective was to audit primary care referrals for depression to assess prereferral quality of antidepressant treatment. METHOD: We performed a retrospective audit of referrals from primary care to the Department of Old Age Psychiatry in Swindon, Wiltshire, U.K., for a new episode of depression, excluding life-threatening cases, between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 1998. To determine if treatment before referral met criteria for an adequate trial, for audit purposes we defined an adequate trial as 8 weeks at maximal dose as specified by the British National Formulary. RESULTS: A computer search identified 58 referrals: 33 cases were excluded-3 notes were unavailable for audit, 7 were wrongly coded, 8 were life-threatening, and 15 were non-primary care referrals. Of the 25 evaluable patients, 2 had had an adequate duration of treatment and 6 were taking maximal doses of antidepressants, but none was taking a dose for an adequate duration. CONCLUSION: Patients referred to secondary care for depression are often undertreated prior to referral, which may explain why the patients in this retrospective audit had failed to respond. Primary care physicians should be encouraged to use medication in elderly patients that requires little or no dose titration at high doses and for at least 8 weeks before considering the patient to be treatment refractory.

  15. Chronic Venous Access in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Richard W.

    1986-01-01

    The use of chronic venous catheters has become routine in the management of neoplastic disease. If an anticipated result of diagnosis related grouping (DRG) reimbursement to hospitals is earlier patient discharge and reliance on more intensive outpatient management, concern about the safety and maintenance of such catheters in the outpatient elderly will become a more common issue. With careful patient selection and emphasis on catheter care, insertion of these catheters in the elderly is safe and reliable. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:3735452

  16. Psychiatric emergencies (part I): psychiatric disorders causing organic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Daini, S

    2013-02-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are conditions that mostly destabilize the already frenetic activity of the Emergency Department. Sometimes the emergency is clearly referable to primitive psychiatric illness. Other times, psychiatric and organic symptoms can independently coexist (comorbidity), or develop together in different conditions of substance abuse, including alcohol and prescription drugs. Differentiating between substance induced and pre-existing psychiatric disorder (dual diagnosis) may be difficult, other than controversial issue. Finally, an organic disease can hide behind a psychiatric disorder (pseudopsychiatric emergency). In this review (part I), psychiatric disorders that occur with organic symptoms are discussed. They include: (1) anxiety, conversion and psychosomatic disorders, and (2) simulated diseases. The physiologic mechanisms of the stress reaction, divided into a dual neuro-hormonal response, are reviewed in this section: (1) activation of the sympathetic nervous system and adrenal medulla with catecholamine production (rapid response), and (2) activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis with cortisol production (slow response). The concept of the fight-or-flight response, its adaptive significance and the potential evolution in paralyzing response, well showing by Yerkes-Dodson curve, is explained. Abnormal short- and long-term reactions to stress evolving toward well codified cluster of trauma and stressor-related disorders, including acute stress disorder, adjustment disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, are examined. A brief review of major psychiatric disorder and related behaviour abnormalities, vegetative symptoms and cognitive impairment, according to DMS IV-TR classification, are described. Finally, the reactive psychic symptoms and behavioral responses to acute or chronic organic disease, so called "somatopsychic disorders", commonly occurring in elderly and pediatric patients, are presented. The specific conditions of

  17. The quality of life of children and adolescents with ADHD undergoing outpatient psychiatric treatment: simple disorders of activity and attention and hyperkinetic conduct disorders in comparison with each other and with other diagnostic groups.

    PubMed

    Remschmidt, Helmut; Mattejat, Fritz

    2010-12-01

    (1) How does the quality of life of patients with ADHD treated in an ambulatory care setting compare to that of other patient groups in child and adolescent psychiatry? (2) Can differences in the quality of life be demonstrated between patients with simple disorders of activity and attention and those with hyperkinetic conduct disorders? (3) How does the quality of life in these patient groups change over one year of treatment? The Inventory for the Assessment of Life Quality in Children and Adolescents (Inventar zur Untersuchung der Lebensqualität von Kindern und Jugendlichen, ILK) was applied to a sample of 726 patients derived from nine different outpatient practices for child and adolescent psychiatry. Among them were 196 patients with a simple disorder of activity and attention and 64 with a hyperkinetic conduct disorder. A comparison between these two groups was the main aim of the study. The mean age of the patients in the sample (all diagnoses) was 8.7 ± 3 years. The two groups of hyperkinetic patients made up 35% of the overall sample, and both of them showed a marked male predominance. The hyperkinetic patients tended to have lower quality-of-life scores than patients in the other diagnostic groups. Longitudinal observation revealed improvements in the quality of life across all patient groups, but the patients with hyperkinetic disorders (both groups) improved the least. The parents of the hyperkinetic patients, too, reported suffering greater stress because of their children's condition than the parents of children with other types of disorders. The ILK instrument has test-metrical qualities that render it usable and capable of holding its own among other, comparable instruments. It can be used to assess the quality of life of children with various diagnoses. Children with ADHD tend to have the least favorable quality-of-life scores, yet they do show some degree of improvement in their quality of life after a year of treatment.

  18. [Social psychiatric service as a cornerstone of psychiatric community care].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, P; Tiggemann, H G

    1991-12-01

    Psychiatric care has gradually been shifting in Germany from its original inpatient basis to outpatient and complementary treatment. This shift of emphasis resulted in a transfer of psychiatry-political responsibility to communal bodies and hence also to communal public health services. Sociopsychiatric service ranks high in communal psychiatric care setups, since it promotes cooperation and helps to coordinate efforts in individual cases in respect of focal points on which such care is centered. For the future, an expert commission has suggested that the various institutions actively engaged in community psychiatric care should team up in each region. This applies in particular to mobile services visiting the patients in their homes, and to the offices providing contracts to sociopsychiatric services of public health offices. Despite positive outlooks there are also quite a few negative aspects of present-day practice. One of them is poor definition of tasks and functions of communal sociopsychiatric services, whereas another one are the unsatisfactory quantitative and qualitative means at their disposal. It is also too often overlooked that psychiatric patients and disabled persons are entitled to compensation insurance payments to promote their rehabilitation, as provided for by individual legislation in the various German laender. To tap these sources sufficiently well, sociopsychiatric services must be better equipped in every respect. The professional competence of social workers and physicians, as well as of the relevant staff, must be safeguarded by continuing education and specialist training measures.

  19. Analytic and Special Studies Reports; Utilization of Psychiatric Facilities by Children: Current Status, Trends, Implications. Mental Health Statistics, Series B, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Beatrice M.; And Others

    Data are presented concerning the total number of children served in psychiatric facilities and the utilization of specific facilities, including outpatient psychiatric clinics, state and county mental hospitals, private mental hospitals, inpatient psychiatric services of general hospitals, psychiatric day-night services, private psychiatric…

  20. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  1. [Psychiatric care in emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Puffer, E; Messer, T; Pajonk, F-G B

    2012-03-01

    Psychiatric emergency situations (PES) are frequent in emergency departments (EDs). There are, however, only few investigations that focus on the prevalence of these patients or on diagnostic and therapeutic standards. These PESs in EDs should be treated according to standards comparable to medically disabled patients. Thus it is necessary to learn more about the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities in EDs, about the procedures and the decision-making process whether these patients are transferred to further outpatient or inpatient treatment. A survey was conducted in EDs throughout Germany and 1,073 were contacted and asked to participate. The questionnaire consisted of questions concerning the size of the ED and of the hospital (e.g. number of patients and physicians), the prevalence of psychiatric disorders, the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities, standard procedures for dealing with PES and the method of care in six typical case reports. A total of 74 EDs participated (76% interdisciplinary EDs) with an average of 22,827 ± 12,303 patients per year in the ED. Psychiatry as a medical discipline was integrated into 10 EDs (14%) and psychiatric competence could be activated in 84% of EDs. Participating EDs reported prevalence rates of 15% mentally disordered patients and 9% of patients who required psychiatric diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Of the patients 2% presented after suicide attempts and 3% were considered to be aggressive. Approximately 50% of all PESs were related to substance abuse disorders. An average of 2.5 ± 4.2 (range 0-25) members of the medical and nursing staff were injured during a 1-year period by violent patients. Legal actions against the will of patients were initiated in 81% of EDs. Standardized diagnostic screening instruments or self-rating questionnaires were used in only four EDs. As standard procedures for the diagnostic work-up of psychiatric patients (medical clearance) physical examination, measurement of heart

  2. Identifying Outpatients with Entrenched Suicidal Ideation Following Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Stephen S.; Jobes, David A.; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Atkins, David C.; Janis, Karin; Chessen, Chloe E.; Landes, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify outpatients who experience entrenched suicidal ideation following inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Our findings suggest that the use of a suicidal ambivalence index score was helpful at discriminating those who reported significantly greater ratings of suicidal ideation across a 1-year period of…

  3. The Incidence of Heavy Drinking in a Community Mental Health Center's Outpatient Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Michael J.

    Research has shown that many psychiatric inpatients are alcoholics and that a significant number of these alcoholics are not being diagnosed or treated for their drinking problems. The incidence of heavy drinking among psychiatric outpatients and the extent to which psychotherapists are aware of their drinking behaviors were assessed. A…

  4. Psychiatric Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Edward; Zimmerman, Rick

    1978-01-01

    The California legislature enacted tight constraints on the use of psychosurgery and electroconvulsive therapy in 1974. In April 1976 a State Court of Appeals declared part of the law to be unconstitutional. In doing so, the court enunciated several principles for regulating medical procedures. It affirmed the inherent police powers which permit the state to safeguard the public, especially incompetent, involuntary or confined persons, with respect to intrusive and hazardous medical procedures and to procedures which affect thought or feeling. Although limited to legislation concerning two psychiatric procedures, the court's decision, and subsequently enacted legislation governing these procedures, has implications for other medical procedures and for other parts of the nation. PMID:664647

  5. [Somatic disorders in outpatient psychiatry: the added value of a standard physical examination during the intake of outpatients].

    PubMed

    van den Berg, K E M; Rijnders, C A Th; van Dam, A; van de Ven, A L M; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C M; Graafsma, S J

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that psychiatric patients often suffer from severe somatic problems, such as diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Up till now, research has concentrated almost exclusively on the inpatient setting, but there is strong evidence that the correlation also exists in psychiatric patients who are outpatients. In the Netherlands there are, as yet, no clear recommendations regarding a standard form of somatic screening for the outpatient population. A pilot study performed by GGz Breburg has shown that somatic screening (without a physical examination) gave substantial additional value to treatment planning. To investigate the added value that a physical examination can provide when new psychiatric patients are screened for aspects of somatic concern (ASC). Newly referred outpatients (n = 70) were screened somatically by means of a questionnaire and supplementary medical interview, and by laboratory tests and physical examination. If a somatic problem was found which had not been detected previously, the patient was referred back to to the general practitioner. At least one ASC was found in 81,4% of all patients. In 45,7% of all patients the asc had not been detected. 12% of all the newly discovered somatic problems were found exclusively via the physical examination. A physical examination provides substantial information and adds value to the somatic screening of psychiatric outpatients.

  6. Assessing Old Order Amish outpatients with the MCMI-III.

    PubMed

    Knabb, Joshua J; Vogt, Ronald G

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we examined Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III; Millon, 2009) characteristics in an Old Order Amish outpatient sample (n = 166), with a comparison group of Old Order Amish who were not receiving mental health treatment at the time of testing (n = 80). We also graphically compared the 2 Amish groups to a non-Amish psychiatric sample in the literature. Consistent with our hypotheses, the Old Order Amish outpatients scored significantly higher than the Old Order Amish comparison group on the majority of MCMI-III scales, with mostly medium effect sizes, suggesting that the MCMI-III is a useful personality instrument in discriminating between Old Order Amish clinical and nonclinical groups. In addition, the Amish outpatients scored similar to a non-Amish psychiatric sample in the literature on most personality scales. Future MCMI-III studies with the Amish are needed to replicate and generalize our findings.

  7. Geriatric forensics - Part 2 “Prevalence of elder abuse and their potential forensic markers among medical and dental patients”

    PubMed Central

    Mattoo, Khurshid A.; Garg, Rishabh; Kumar, Shalabh

    2015-01-01

    Context: This study is a continuation of the earlier studies and has been extended to investigate the potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Aims: To determine the prevalence of elder abuse in various outpatient departments (OPDs). To study the associated parameters related to the abuser and the abused. To determine the existence of potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Settings and Design: The subjects were randomly selected from the medical and the dental OPDs of the university. Materials and Methods: Eight hundred and thirty two elderly subjects in the age range 40-60 years were interviewed using a questionnaire to determine the existence of elder abuse. The subjects were investigated and examined for weight, nutrition and hydration, vital signs, habits, existing visual and auditory capabilities, medications, disclosure of wills/deeds, signs of depression, and documented cleanliness. The mini-mental state examination, the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Clock drawing test, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale were used to determine the potential forensic markers. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean values in percentage were determined by dividing the number of determined subjects by the total number of subjects for that parameter. Results: About 37% in medical and 41% in dental OPDs were found to have suffered from abuse, mostly in the age group 60-70 years. Females received more abuse and a combination of son and daughter-in-law constituted most abusers. Various potential markers of elder abuse and neglect investigated among the elder abuse victims included depression (89%), signs of improper feeding (83%), changes in personal hygiene (69%), need for medical/dental treatment (78%), medication misuse (67%), changes in wills/deeds (26%), decubiti (10%), bruises (17%), skin tears (27%), and confusion (23%). Conclusions: Elder abuse exists in one or more forms in both medical and dental OPDs among both males and females in all age groups. PMID:26816460

  8. Validation of the French version of the alcohol, smoking and substance involvement screening test (ASSIST) in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Substance use disorders seem to be an under considered health problem amongst the elderly. The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST), was developed by the World Health Organization to detect substance use disorders. The present study evaluates the psychometric properties of the French version of ASSIST in a sample of elderly people attending geriatric outpatient facilities (primary care or psychiatric facilities). Methods One hundred persons older than 65 years were recruited from clients attending a geriatric policlinic day care centre and from geriatric psychiatric facilities. Measures included ASSIST, Addiction Severity Index (ASI), Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI-Plus), Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), Revised Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire-Smoking (RTQ) and MiniMental State(MMS). Results Concurrent validity was established with significant correlations between ASSIST scores, scores from ASI, AUDIT, RTQ, and significantly higher ASSIST scores for patients with a MINI-Plus diagnosis of abuse or dependence. The ASSIST questionnaire was found to have high internal consistency for the total substance involvement along with specific substance involvement as assessed by Cronbach’s α, ranging from 0.66, to 0.89 . Conclusions The findings demonstrate that ASSIST is a valid screening test for identifying substance use disorders in elderly. PMID:22538114

  9. The Functional Competency of Elderly at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Barbara; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated functional competency to make informed decisions by elderly depressed and cognitively impaired psychiatric patients. Although depressed elderly patients did not appear to experience problems in informed consent process, cognitively impaired patients had difficulty understanding important aspects of consent information. Suggests that…

  10. Outpatient commitment and procedural due process.

    PubMed

    Player, Candice Teri-Lowe

    2015-01-01

    A large empirical literature on Kendra's Law has assessed the impact of court ordered outpatient treatment on outcomes such as treatment adherence, psychiatric hospitalization, quality of life, and treatment costs. Missing from the empirical literature, however, is a better understanding of procedural due process under Kendra's Law. Procedural due process concerns the safeguards that must be in place when governments deprive persons of their liberties, for example--notice, the right to a hearing and the right to appeal. This article reports the findings from a qualitative study of procedural due process and assisted outpatient treatment hearings under Kendra's Law. Attorneys reported significant barriers to effective advocacy on behalf of their clients. Further, despite the shift from a medical model of civil commitment to a judicial model in the 1970s, by and large judges continue to accord great deference to clinical testimony.

  11. Fitness to Drive of Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    De las Cuevas, Carlos; Sanz, Emilio J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Driving a motor vehicle could be central to the functional autonomy of patients with psychiatric illnesses. For patients, a driver's license could mean independence, the ability to care for themselves, and the freedom to travel when they wish. However, both psychiatric disorders and psychiatric drug treatments can produce changes in perception, information processing and integration, and psychomotor activity that can disturb and/or interfere with the ability to drive safely. Objective: To assess the fitness to drive of psychiatric outpatients in a sample representative of current clinical practice. Method: Cognitive functioning and psychomotor performance of 208 consecutive psychiatric outpatients treated in a community mental health center in the Canary Islands (Spain) were assessed in different clinical situations. The LNDETER 100 battery, an electronic assessment unit–based measurement that consists of 5 screenbased tests, was used to assess concentrated attention and resistance to monotony, multiple discriminative reactions and their correctness, anticipation of speed, bimanual coordination, and the decision making process and tendency to assume risk. The study was conducted from July 2007 to September 2007. Results: Of 208 patients, only 33 had scores compatible with the requirements of a driver's license, and 84% failed at least 1 of the required tests. Of patients with a driver's license who drive almost every day, 79.5% registered scores that would not allow obtaining or renewal of the license. None of the driving patients studied notified the traffic authorities that they had a psychiatric condition that may affect safe driving. No patient stopped driving, although 10% of them recognized that their ability to drive was somehow damaged. Conclusion: Guidance on how best to formulate and deliver recommendations on driving fitness in stable psychiatric patients is lacking and much needed. PMID:19158977

  12. Prevalence of the night eating syndrome in a psychiatric population.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Jennifer D; Allison, Kelly C; Crow, Scott; O'Reardon, John P; Berg, Kelly C; Galbraith, Juliette; Martino, Nicole S; Stunkard, Albert J

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of night eating syndrome and its comorbid psychopathology in a psychiatric population. The Night Eating Questionnaire was administered to 399 patients in two psychiatric outpatient clinics. Those scoring above 20 on the questionnaire (N=205) were assessed for night eating syndrome with a semistructured telephone interview. Chart reviews of all participants were performed to determine their psychiatric diagnoses and medications. Forty-nine participants (12.3%) met criteria for night eating syndrome. Greater rates of substance use disorders were found among patients diagnosed with night eating syndrome than among those without the syndrome. Obese patients were more likely than nonobese patients to manifest night eating syndrome. Night eating syndrome is prevalent among psychiatric clinic outpatients and is likely to co-occur with substance use disorders and obesity.

  13. [Psychiatric Emergencies in Psychiatric Hospitals in Germany].

    PubMed

    Schwerthöffer, Dirk; Beuys, David; Hamann, Johannes; Messer, Thomas; Pajonk, Frank-Gerald

    2016-10-01

    Objective: Psychiatric hospitals are confronted with high rates of psychiatric emergencies. There are, however, only few investigations that focus on psychiatric emergency care in German psychiatric hospitals, their supply structures and diagnostic and treatment standards. The aim of the survey was a systematic acquisition of the diagnostic and therapeutic approach in treating psychiatric emergencies in German psychiatric hospitals. Methods: We conducted a survey in psychiatric hospitals throughout Germany. The questionnaire consisted of questions concerning the structures of supply and diagnostic and therapeutic standards treating psychiatric emergencies. Results: 42 % of all admissions to German psychiatric hospitals were emergency admissions. More than 60 % of the patients in psychiatric emergency ambulances had to receive inpatient treatment. As standard procedures for medical clearing in psychiatric emergencies physical examination, measurement of heart rate and blood pressure and conducting certain laboratory tests and breath alcohol were named. The most common psychopharmacological agents for emergency situations were diazepam, lorazepam, haloperidol and zuclopenthixol. Conclusion: Diagnosing and treating psychiatric emergencies need more standardisation. More specific data is required to generate diagnostic and therapeutic standards. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. A Computerized Resource Retrieval System for a Comprehensive Psychiatric Facility

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Joy A.; Evanczuk, Karen J.; Coffman, Gerald A.

    1984-01-01

    The need to systematize the disposition process for psychiatric patients referred from the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic after an initial evaluation or treatment episode resulted in the development of a Computerized Resource Retrieval System. The system is designed to provide, through on-line displays, a listing of all outpatient treatment programs within WPIC and outside agencies providing social and mental health care services as well as information necessary to complete the referral with a minimum of confusion and red tape.

  15. The Geriatric Population and Psychiatric Medication

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sannidhya; Sareen, Himanshu; Trivedi, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    With improvement in medical services in the last few years, there has been a constant rise in the geriatric population throughout the world, more so in the developing countries. The elderly are highly prone to develop psychiatric disorders, probably because of age related changes in the brain, concomitant physical disorders, as well as increased stress in later life. Psychiatric disorders in this population may have a different presentation than in other groups and some of psychopathologies might be mistaken for normal age related changes by an unwary clinician. Therefore the need of the day is to train psychiatrists and physicians to better recognize and manage mental disorders in this age group. PMID:21327169

  16. PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES IN GENERAL HOSPITALS—A Report of the Northern California Psychiatric Society's Committee on the Need for Psychiatric Services in General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Clement O.

    1957-01-01

    A study made by a special committee appointed for the purpose by the Northern California Psychiatric Society found that a real need exists for local psychiatric services in general hospitals of the Northern California area. Such services can be provided readily—and in some communities are already available. A broad segment of the population looks to the general hospital to provide diagnosis and care and so enable the patient's prompt recovery from psychiatric disorders. The study further emphasizes the importance of such factors as a competent psychiatric chief, adequate staff and personnel and good planning in organizing inpatient and outpatient facilities and integrating treatment so that all the functions of the hospital are available to psychiatric patients. Granted these special considerations, the services can be provided more easily than many physicians, including some psychiatrists and administrators, suppose. PMID:13489496

  17. Price elasticity of demand for psychiatric consultation in a Nigerian psychiatric service.

    PubMed

    Esan, Oluyomi

    2016-12-01

    This paper addresses price elasticity of demand (PED) in a region where most patients make payments for consultations out of pocket. PED is a measure of the responsiveness of the quantity demanded of goods or services to changes in price. The study was done in the context of an outpatient psychiatric clinic in a sub -Saharan African country. The study was performed at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. Aggregate data were collected on weekly clinic attendance over a 24-month period October 2008 - September 2010 representing 12 months before, to 12months after a 67% increase in price of outpatient psychiatric consultation. The average weekly clinic attendance prior to the increase was compared to the average clinic attendance after the price increase. Arc-PED for consultation was also estimated. Clinic attendance dropped immediately and significantly in the weeks following the price increase. There was a 34.4% reduction in average weekly clinic attendance. Arc-PED for psychiatric consultation was -0.85. In comparison to reported PED on health care goods and services, this study finds a relatively high PED in psychiatric consultation following an increase in price of user fees of psychiatric consultation.

  18. Videophones for intensive case management of psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Nieves, J Edwin; Godleski, Linda S; Stack, Kathleen M; Zinanni, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    When visiting patients with serious mental illness at their homes, case managers carried a portable videophone. This was used to access the hospital clinical team via the home telephone line, when an acute clinical need arose in addressing questions related to medication management and treatment planning; travel was therefore avoided. In an acceptability study lasting 12 months, 24 patients received the supplemental videophone mental health service and 19 of them completed a satisfaction survey. Only one patient was not satisfied with the videophone treatment, while 74% of them were very satisfied. Specific areas of satisfaction concerned the savings of time and travel, assistance with medication questions and increased involvement in treatment. No patient reported any difficulty in using the equipment. Staff members were enthusiastic about the decrease in travel time and there were no complaints about the videophone process or encounters. During the study, 135 h of the case manager's time was saved by using the videophone for urgent access visits, equivalent to a saving of $4000 in salary costs. In addition, the patients saved 135 h in travel time. We believe that there are other potential uses of videophones for seriously mentally ill patients, including discharge planning, intensive post-discharge monitoring and transition to community life.

  19. SUITABILITY OF A SOCIO-ECONOMIC SCALE FOR HOSPITAL PSYCHIATRIC POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, A.; Shantha, G.B.; Balan, V.

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY The Socio-economic scale devised by Gupta and Sethi (1978) was applied to 737 urban cases registered in the psychiatric out-patient department of a general hospital during the period of one year. Correlation and regression co-efficients were calculated for education, income, occupation and total scores. The scale seemed to be suitable for hospital psychiatric population. PMID:21847287

  20. Postgraduate psychiatric training in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ratta-Apha, Woraphat; Sitdhiraksa, Nantawat; Saisavoey, Nattha; Lortrakul, Manote; Udomratn, Pichet

    2009-01-01

    In Thailand, after medical students graduated from medical schools, the general practitioners have to work for the government for at least three years. Then, they can enroll in postgraduate training program. Postgraduate training usually takes three to four years. All of the psychiatric training programs are supervised and monitored by the board of education of the Royal College of Psychiatrists of Thailand (RCPsychT). One of the missions of all training institutes is to prepare residents to be the high qualified psychiatrists to serve the mental well-being of Thai people. Additionally, they should teach the learners to be the leaders in academic and research fields in psychiatry. Currently, there are nine psychiatric training institutions in Thailand, most of which are running by university programs. The training program core curriculum composes of the compulsory rotations such as general psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry, neurology, consultation-liaison psychiatry, mental hospital psychiatry and addiction psychiatry. Moreover, the residents also have three months for elective in each program. The learning process includes practicing in an out-patient and in-patient unit under psychiatric staff supervision, individual and group supervision, case conference, journal club, book club and grand round etc. Research in field of psychiatry and social sciences is also compulsory for board examination. The RCPsychT approved two Certificate Diplomas including Diploma of Thai Board of Psychiatry, and Diploma of Thai Board of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. There are only nine psychiatric training institutes and only thirty to forty residents enrolled in these programs in each year. The compact and collaboration of all training institutes bring about the benefits in efficiency programs management by regular meeting of representatives from each institute. They keep the standard of training program to progress in the same vision and direction. Furthermore, residents

  1. Psychiatric nursing case management: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Herrick, Charlotte A; Bartlett, Robin

    2004-09-01

    This literature review examines the evolution of psychiatric nursing case management in the United States. Various models, both inpatient and outpatient, are described, along with the roles of the case manager in each setting. The development of clinical pathways to monitor and document outcomes in acute settings is examined, along with the difficulties in adapting them specifically to psychiatric nursing case management. The types of data collected and the use of outcomes to support programs for the mentally ill are reviewed. Finally, recommendations for psychiatric nursing case management are made to provide guidelines for the future.

  2. [Psychiatric occupational therapy practice in Shinshu University Hospital--collaboration with psychiatrist].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Fukushmima, Sachie; Kawano, Koujiro; Ohnishi, Ayumi; Ogiwara, Tomomi; Hagiwara, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Toru; Washizuka, Shinsuke; Amano, Naoji

    2011-01-01

    This report describes psychiatric occupational therapy practice and collaboration between occupational therapists and psychiatrists at Shinshu University Hospital. Collaboration with psychiatrists enables us to provide the following occupational therapy programs. (1) Individual occupational therapy approaches for patients at the early recovery stage in the psychiatric ward. (2) Psychoeducational interventions by a multi-disciplinary team (MDs, nurses, OTRs, PSWs, CPs). (3) Occupational therapy approaches used in combination with m-ECT for severe psychiatric disorders. (4) Recovery support programs for psychiatric outpatients. It is suggested that occupational therapists should collaborate with psychiatrists in order to facilitate rehabilitation services for people with psychiatric disorders.

  3. [Inhalant abusers and psychiatric symptoms].

    PubMed

    Okudaira, K; Yabana, T; Takahashi, H; Iizuka, H; Nakajima, K; Saito, A

    1996-01-01

    There are different opinions about the cause of chronic psychiatric symptoms observed in drug abusers between Japanese and foreign psychiatrists. The Japanese seem to recognize the chronic psychosis as the result of drug abuse. In the other hand, foreigners diagnose these cases as dual diagnosis of drug abuse and psychosis. Authors studied the problem in this research. One of the authors has examined 120 inhalant abusers of all, in- and out-patients in Kanagawa Prefectural Center of Psychiatry, Serigaya Hospital from 1991 to 1995. These patients were classified into three groups: psychosis group (23 patients), dependence group (51 patients) and abuse group (46 patients) according to their clinical courses and psychiatric symptoms. The psychosis group consists of patients who showed psychiatric symptoms such as hallucination, delusion and thought disturbance for long time after detoxification. The dependence group contains patients whose inhalant dependence was severe and met DSM-4 Diagnostic Criteria for Substance Dependence, but manifested no chronic psychiatric symptoms after detoxification. The patients belonging to abuse group were at the earlier stages of inhalant abuse and had no chronic psychiatric symptoms. The average age of the first inhalant abuse was 14.7 years old in the psychosis group, 14.8 years in the dependence group and 14.7 years in the abuse group. The average years of abuse was 9.0 years in the psychosis group, and 8.5 years in the dependence group. There was little difference between these two groups. The psychosis patients manifested chronic symptoms 5.7 years on average after the first abuse of inhalants. About one forth (26.1%) of the psychosis patients and only 5.9% of the dependence patients had family history of schizophrenia. The difference was statistically significant. These results suggest that chronic psychiatric symptoms are caused not only by inhalant abuse, but also by the genetic factors of psychosis of each patient. There have

  4. [Validation of geriatric depression scale in a general outpatient clinic].

    PubMed

    Paradela, Emylucy Martins Paiva; Lourenço, Roberto Alves; Veras, Renato Peixoto

    2005-12-01

    The Geriatric Depression Scale for screening depressive symptoms in the elderly has not been assessed in elderly outpatients who seek primary health care in Brazil. The objective was to determine the validity of the Short Scale for Major Depressive Episode or Dysthymia (GDS-15) in elderly outpatients. The scale was applied in 302 subjects with 65 years and older and then examined by an independent geriatrician, blinded to the results. Major depression and dysthymia were diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated at several cutoff values and a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve was plotted. The best equilibrium was at the cutoff value of 5/6 showing 81% sensitivity and 71% specificity; the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.79-0.91). The GDS-15 can be used for screening depressive symptoms in Brazilian elderly outpatients. The previously suggested cutoff value of 5/6 is adequate.

  5. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  6. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  7. Describing the health parameters of outpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Lora Humphrey

    2006-02-01

    Few studies have examined the physical health parameters of persons with schizophrenia. This pilot study describes the physical health and psychiatric symptoms in outpatients with schizophrenia. Participants (N = 11) were recruited from a population of persons with schizophrenia receiving care at an outpatient clinic in a Veterans Affairs hospital located in the southeast. Following the granting of medical clearance, data regarding sociodemographics and prescribed medications were collected via record review. Physical health parameters included 6-minute walking distance, body mass index, and percentage of body fat. Functional health status was measured using the Duke Health Profile. Psychiatric symptoms were measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. A trained research assistant performed all measures in private offices at the study site. Most participants met the criteria for being classified as overweight or obese and demonstrated poor aerobic fitness. More research is needed to examine responses of veterans with schizophrenia to interventions designed to improve physical health parameters.

  8. Risk of Criminal Victimisation in Outpatients with Common Mental Health Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Meijwaard, Sabine C.; Kikkert, Martijn; de Mooij, Liselotte D.; Lommerse, Nick M.; Peen, Jaap; Schoevers, Robert A.; Van, Rien; de Wildt, Wencke; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Dekker, Jack J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Crime victimisation is a serious problem in psychiatric patients. However, research has focused on patients with severe mental illness and few studies exist that address victimisation in other outpatient groups, such as patients with depression. Due to large differences in methodology of the studies that address crime victimisation, a comparison of prevalence between psychiatric diagnostic groups is hard to make. Objectives of this study were to determine and compare one-year prevalence of violent and non-violent criminal victimisation among outpatients from different diagnostic psychiatric groups and to examine prevalence differences with the general population. Method Criminal victimisation prevalence was measured in 300 outpatients living in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with outpatients with depressive disorder (n = 102), substance use disorder (SUD, n = 106) and severe mental illness (SMI, n = 92) using a National Crime Victimisation Survey, and compared with a matched general population sample (n = 10865). Results Of all outpatients, 61% reported experiencing some kind of victimisation over the past year; 33% reported violent victimisation (3.5 times more than the general population) and 36% reported property crimes (1.2 times more than the general population). Outpatients with depression (67%) and SUD (76%) were victimised more often than SMI outpatients (39%). Younger age and hostile behaviour were associated with violent victimisation, while being male and living alone were associated with non-violent victimisation. Moreover, SUD was associated with both violent and non-violent victimisation. Conclusion Outpatients with depression, SUD, and SMI are at increased risk of victimisation compared to the general population. Furthermore, our results indicate that victimisation of violent and non-violent crimes is more common in outpatients with depression and SUD than in outpatients with SMI living independently in

  9. [Kinshicho Model for Community Care by Multifunctional Vertical Integration of Psychiatric Care].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The future of psychiatric community care in Japan requires a medical team for outpatient care to offer support and take responsibility for a region; respecting human rights and supporting high risk patients who have concluded a long-period of hospitalized or repeated involuntary commitment, and for people who suffer from social withdraws over a long period of time. There are over 3,000 private psychiatric outpatient clinics in Japan. Over 400 of them are multifunctional psychiatric outpatient clinics that provide daycare services and outreach activities. In the future, if systematized those clinics entrusted by an administrative organ with performing as a "community mental health center". Multifunctional vertical integration of psychiatric care is possible in Japan to create a catchment area with 24 hours phone service and continued free access.

  10. Psychiatrists and psychiatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Torrey, William C; Green, Ronald L; Drake, Robert E

    2005-05-01

    Interventions that focus directly on functional impairments related to mental illnesses are termed psychiatric rehabilitation. Research demonstrates that rehabilitation services are increasingly able to help adults with psychiatric disabilities achieve the functional outcomes they desire, particularly in the areas of housing and employment. To support the community lives of adults with severe mental illnesses, psychiatrists must stay current with advances in this field and know how to integrate psychiatric rehabilitation with other interventions. This article reviews the concept of psychiatric rehabilitation, current approaches in the field, the psychiatrist's role in these services, and implications for psychiatric training and continuing education.

  11. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND SLEEP

    PubMed Central

    Krystal, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Psychiatric disorders and sleep are related in important ways. In contrast to the longstanding view of this relationship which viewed sleep problems as symptoms of psychiatric disorders, there is growing experimental evidence that the relationship between psychiatric disorders and sleep is complex and includes bi-directional causation. In this article we provide the evidence that supports this point of view, reviewing the data on the sleep disturbances seen in patients with psychiatric disorders but also reviewing the data on the impact of sleep disturbances on psychiatric conditions. Although much has been learned about the psychiatric disorders-sleep relationship, additional research is needed to better understand these relationships. This work promises to improve our ability to understand both of these phenomena and to allow us to better treat the many patients with sleep disorders and with psychiatric disorders. PMID:23099143

  12. Outpatient therapeutic nuclear oncology.

    PubMed

    Turner, J Harvey

    2012-05-01

    In the beginning, nuclear medicine was radionuclide therapy, which has evolved into molecular tumour-targeted control of metastatic cancer. Safe, efficacious, clinical practice of therapeutic nuclear oncology may now be based upon accurate personalised dosimetry by quantitative gamma SPECT/CT imaging to prescribe tumoricidal activities without critical organ toxicity. Preferred therapy radionuclides possess gamma emission of modest energy and abundance to enable quantitative SPECT/CT imaging for calculation of the beta therapy dosimetry, without radiation exposure risk to hospital personnel, carers, family or members of the public. The safety of outpatient radiopharmaceutical therapy of cancer with Iodine-131, Samarium-153, Holmium-166, Rhenium-186, Rhenium-188, Lutetium-177 and Indium-111 is reviewed. Measured activity release rates and radiation exposure to carers and the public are all within recommendations and guidelines of international regulatory agencies and, when permitted by local regulatory authorities allow cost-effective, safe, outpatient radionuclide therapy of cancer without isolation in hospital.

  13. Optimal outpatient appointment scheduling.

    PubMed

    Kaandorp, Guido C; Koole, Ger

    2007-09-01

    In this paper optimal outpatient appointment scheduling is studied. A local search procedure is derived that converges to the optimal schedule with a weighted average of expected waiting times of patients, idle time of the doctor and tardiness (lateness) as objective. No-shows are allowed to happen. For certain combinations of parameters the well-known Bailey-Welch rule is found to be the optimal appointment schedule.

  14. DISPO Advisor: Expert System for Psychiatric Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Patrick; Barta, Wendy

    1988-01-01

    An expert system was designed to assist psychiatric residents at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. This microcomputer based decision support system helps residents find the proper disposition for patients who come to the emergency room. The system uses an inexpensive, commercially available expert system shell, VP-EXPERT by Paperback Software, to match patients with inpatient and outpatient resources appropriate to their needs. The inference engine uses both forward and backward chaining, and interfaces with data stored in DBase III files. The system is currently in daily use by residents.

  15. SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-0840 TITLE: SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0840 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population 5b. GRANT...ulcers (PrUs) have primarily been identified by research conducted in elderly and nursing home populations , or in the Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Model

  16. Psychiatric morbidity in prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sandeep Kumar; Singh, Paramjit; Gargi, Parshotam D.; Goyal, Samta; Garg, Aseem

    2011-01-01

    Context: The prevalence of psychiatric illness in correctional settings is significantly elevated, with higher than community rates reported for most mental disorders. Aims: (1) To examine the socio-demographic profile of convicted prisoners. (2) To evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in convicted prisoners. Materials and Methods: 500 convicts were assessed for psychiatric morbidity with the help of (a) Socio-demographic proforma, (b) Pareek Udai and Trivedi G's socio-economic status scale (rural) (household schedule), (c) Kuppuswamy's economic status scale (urban) and (d) Present State Examination (PSE). Results: 23.8% of the convicted prisoners were suffering from psychiatric illness excluding substance abuse. 56.4% of the prisoners had history of substance abuse / dependence prior to incarceration. Conclusions: The results suggest that a substantial burden of psychiatric morbidity exists in the prison population of India and the burden of psychiatric illness in this vulnerable and marginalized population poses a serious challenge to psychiatrists. PMID:22135446

  17. Psychiatric Aspects of Dementia.

    PubMed

    Onyike, Chiadi U

    2016-04-01

    The psychiatric aspects of dementia are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to distress, disability, and care burden, and, thus, are of increasing interest to practicing neurologists. This article examines how psychiatric disorders are entwined with dementia and describes the predictive, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications of the psychiatric symptoms of dementia. Psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and schizophrenia, are associated with higher risk for late-life dementia. Psychiatric phenomena also define phenotypes such as frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, cause distress, and amplify dementia-related disabilities. Management requires a multidisciplinary team, a problem-solving stance, programs of care, and pharmacologic management. Recent innovations include model programs that provide structured problem-solving interventions and tailored in-home care. There is new appreciation of the complexity of the relationship between psychiatric disorders and dementia as well as the significance of this relationship for treatment, community services, and research.

  18. Psychiatric Aspects of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Onyike, Chiadi U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review: The psychiatric aspects of dementia are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to distress, disability, and care burden, and, thus, are of increasing interest to practicing neurologists. This article examines how psychiatric disorders are entwined with dementia and describes the predictive, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications of the psychiatric symptoms of dementia. Recent Findings: Psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and schizophrenia, are associated with higher risk for late-life dementia. Psychiatric phenomena also define phenotypes such as frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, cause distress, and amplify dementia-related disabilities. Management requires a multidisciplinary team, a problem-solving stance, programs of care, and pharmacologic management. Recent innovations include model programs that provide structured problem-solving interventions and tailored in-home care. Summary: There is new appreciation of the complexity of the relationship between psychiatric disorders and dementia as well as the significance of this relationship for treatment, community services, and research. PMID:27042910

  19. Protective factors against suicide among young-old Chinese outpatients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Jen; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Lee, Shwu-Hua; Lee, Hsiu-Lan

    2014-04-16

    Suicide is common among the elderly worldwide. However, no literature could be found on the beliefs/expectations that protect young-old people from attempting suicide. The purpose of this study was to explore young-old outpatients' reasons for not killing themselves in Taiwan. Data for this qualitative descriptive study were extracted from a large research series. From the 83 elderly outpatients in the original sample, 31 were chosen for this study because they were young-old (65-74 years old) and from two randomly selected medical centers in northern Taiwan. Data on participants' reasons for not killing themselves in unhappy situations were collected in individual interviews using a semi-structured guide and analyzed by content analysis. Analysis of interview data identified six major themes: satisfied with one's life, suicide cannot resolve problems, fear of humiliating one's children, religious beliefs, never thought about suicide, and living in harmony with nature. These identified protective factors (reasons for living) could be added to suicide-prevention programs for the elderly. Our findings may also serve as a reference for geriatric researchers in western countries with increasing numbers of elderly ethnic minority immigrants.

  20. [The matter: No psychiatrization].

    PubMed

    Pisa, Hugo

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety, sadness, worries, fears, irritability, fatigue, tedium, are situations that life confront us with. They don't qualify as psychiatric disorders, but nevertheless they are treated as though. We refer to the psychiatrization of daily life. The aim of this article is to prevent such psychiatrization. To support this assertion, we are going to develop different aspects tending to explain the origins of the patient's demands and the answers given by the psychiatrist. A critical reflection of our practice is proposed.

  1. Pathological narcissism and somatic symptoms among men and women attending an outpatient mental health clinic.

    PubMed

    Kealy, David; Tsai, Michelle; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2016-09-01

    To explore the relationship between types of pathological narcissism and somatic symptoms among psychiatric outpatients. Patients (N = 95) completed measures of somatic symptoms, narcissistic grandiosity and vulnerability, and psychiatric symptoms. Relationships among variables were analysed using t-tests and correlations, controlling for psychiatric distress. Somatic symptoms were positively associated with two types of narcissistic dysfunction. Among women there was a positive association between somatic symptoms and narcissistic vulnerability, but not grandiosity. Among men, somatic symptoms were positively associated with narcissistic grandiosity, but not vulnerability. The connection between narcissistic pathology and somatic symptom severity appears to differ based on gender. Further research is needed to confirm and extend this preliminary finding.

  2. Healthcare website design for the elderly: improving usability.

    PubMed

    Ownby, Raymond L; Czaja, Sara J

    2003-01-01

    Research shows that the elderly often use the Internet to search for healthcare information. Other studies show that many widely-implemented features of web site design may interfere with elders' ability to access the information they seek. This poster will illustrate principles of elder-friendly web site design by presenting a demonstration web site that provides information about neurological and psychiatric conditions for adults 50 years of age and older

  3. Outpatient Pain Rehabilitation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph J

    2006-01-01

    Outpatient pain rehabilitation programs that include an interdisciplinary approach have been shown to be effective treatments for patients with chronic pain. The objectives of this article are to describe the common interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation programs available, the appropriate indications for use, the components of typical pain rehabilitation programs, the short-term and long-term success rates, the costs of attending these programs, and the significant societal costs of those patients who do not complete these programs and do not return to work. PMID:16789457

  4. Attitudes of elderly patients and their families toward physician-assisted suicide.

    PubMed

    Koenig, H G; Wildman-Hanlon, D; Schmader, K

    1996-10-28

    To examine and compare attitudes of elderly outpatients and their families toward physician-assisted suicide (PAS), explore sociodemographic and health correlates of these attitudes, assess family members' ability to predict patients' attitudes toward PAS, and determine family members' ability to agree on these predictions. Elderly patients with medical and psychiatric problems (n = 168; mean age, 75.8 years) who were attending a geriatrics specialty clinic, along with accompanying family members (n = 146), were systematically surveyed on their attitudes toward PAS in case of terminal illness, chronic illness, and mental incompetence. Relatives were also asked to predict patients' responses to items on the questionnaire. Patients and relatives were blinded to each others' responses. Favorable attitudes toward PAS were reported by 39.9% of the patients and 59.3% of the relatives (P < .001) in case of terminal illness, 18.2% and 25.3%, respectively, in case of chronic illness, 13.5% and 15.4%, respectively, in case of mental incompetence, and 34.0% and 55.6% (P < .001), respectively, for legalization of PAS. Family members showed a marginal ability to predict patients' attitudes toward PAS with kappa values of agreement that ranged from 0.09 to 0.41. Family members also had difficulty agreeing with each other on how they thought patients would respond (range of kappa values, 0.18-0.47). Patients who opposed PAS were women, black individuals, and those with less education, low incomes, and dementia or cognitive impairment. While many frail elderly patients favored PAS in cases of terminal illness, the proportion that opposed it was significantly higher than that among relatives; relatives, in turn, displayed only a marginal ability either to predict patients' attitudes or to agree among themselves. Patients who oppose PAS represent a particularly vulnerable element of society (elderly persons, women, black individuals, and poor, uneducated, and demented persons), and

  5. Perceptions Among Psychiatric Staff of Creating a Therapeutic Alliance With Patients on Community Treatment Orders.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Susanne; Fridlund, Bengt

    2016-10-01

    A therapeutic alliance with a continuing collaboration between a patient and psychiatric staff is a resource for helping patients cope with the demands of coercive legislation. Knowledge exists describing coercion in inpatient care while the knowledge regarding the perceptions of creating a therapeutic alliance with patients on Community Treatment Orders (CTO) among psychiatric staff is scarce. To describe perceptions among psychiatric staff of creating a therapeutic alliance with patients on CTOs, an exploratory design using a phenomenographic method was employed. Thirteen semi-structured audio-taped interviews were conducted with psychiatric staff responsible for patients on CTOs. The staff worked in five different outpatient clinics and the interviews were conducted at their workplaces. The analysis resulted in in four metaphors: the persevering psychiatric staff, the learning psychiatric staff, the participating psychiatric staff, and the motivating psychiatric staff. Patients on CTOs were more time-consuming for psychiatric staff in care and treatment. Long-term planning is required in which the creation of a therapeutic alliance entails the patient gradually gaining greater self-awareness and wanting to visit the outpatient clinic. The professional-patient relationship is essential and if a therapeutic alliance is not created, the patient's continued care and treatment in the community is vulnerable.

  6. Pediatric outpatient anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hannallah, R S

    1987-02-01

    Successful anesthetic management of children undergoing outpatient surgery requires that the surgeon and anesthesiologist be actively involved in all aspects of management. Guidelines should be established in consultation with the surgeons, nurses, and administrators to ensure proper selection and preoperative preparation of patients. The psychological evaluation and preparation of children, and the use of pharmacologic premedication when indicated, will ensure a pleasant experience for all involved. The anesthesiologist should choose a specific anesthetic agent and a technique that are appropriate for each individual child. Use of "routine" induction techniques is rarely, if ever, appropriate. Early ambulation and discharge are very desirable in outpatients. Long-acting drugs and techniques that are associated with excessive drowsiness or nausea and vomiting should not be utilized. Special attention must be paid to the analgesic requirements of the child. Regional blocks should be used whenever possible to supplement "light" general anesthesia and to limit the need for narcotics during recovery. Specific criteria for discharge ensure the safety and protection of the child and staff.

  7. Emergency department visits by adults for psychiatric medication adverse events.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Lee M; Daubresse, Matthew; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Alexander, G Caleb; Budnitz, Daniel S

    2014-09-01

    In 2011, an estimated 26.8 million US adults used prescription medications for mental illness. To estimate the numbers and rates of adverse drug event (ADE) emergency department (ED) visits involving psychiatric medications among US adults between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2011. Descriptive analyses of active, nationally representative surveillance of ADE ED visits using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-Cooperative Adverse Drug Event Surveillance system and of drug prescribing during outpatient visits using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Medical records from national probability samples of ED and outpatient visits by adults 19 years or older were reviewed and analyzed. Antidepressants, antipsychotics, lithium salts, sedatives and anxiolytics, and stimulants. National estimates of ADE ED visits resulting from therapeutic psychiatric medication use and of psychiatric medication ADE ED visits per 10,000 outpatient visits at which psychiatric medications were prescribed. From 2009 through 2011, there were an estimated 89,094 (95% CI, 68,641-109,548) psychiatric medication ADE ED visits annually, with 19.3% (95% CI, 16.3%-22.2%) resulting in hospitalization and 49.4% (95% CI, 46.5%-52.4%) involving patients aged 19 to 44 years. Sedatives and anxiolytics, antidepressants, antipsychotics, lithium salts, and stimulants were implicated in an estimated 30,707 (95% CI, 23,406-38,008), 25,377 (95% CI, 19,051-31,704), 21,578 (95% CI, 16,599-26,557), 3620 (95% CI, 2311-4928), and 2779 (95% CI, 1764-3794) respective ADE ED visits annually. Antipsychotics and lithium salts were implicated in 11.7 (95% CI, 10.1-13.2) and 16.4 (95% CI, 13.0-19.9) ADE ED visits per 10,000 outpatient prescription visits, respectively, compared with 3.6 (95% CI, 3.2-4.1) for sedatives and anxiolytics, 2.9 (95% CI, 2.3-3.5) for stimulants, and 2.4 (95% CI, 2.1-2.7) for antidepressants. The commonly used

  8. Prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shyam Chand; Nanda, Satyan; Tripathi, Adarsh; Sawlani, Kamal Kumar; Gupta, Kamlesh Kumar; Himanshu, D; Verma, Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Psychiatric disorders, especially anxiety and depression have been reported to have an increased prevalence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but there is a paucity of data from India. Aims and Objectives: Aim of our study is to study the frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients and their correlation with severity of COPD, as per global initiative for obstructive lung disease guidelines. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital (King George's Medical University). A total of 74 COPD patients were included in this study and compared with 74 controls. The diagnosis and severity of COPD were assessed by spirometry. Psychiatric comorbidities were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview questionnaire. Results: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in COPD patients (28.4%) as compared to controls (2.7%). As regards to severity, the frequency was significantly increased in severe and very severe COPD. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients increased significantly with the increase in duration of symptoms being present in 67% of patients with duration of symptoms more than 10 years and only 23% of patients with duration of symptoms ≤5 years. Conclusion: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities is increased in COPD patients as compared to controls. We recommend that all patients with COPD should be screened for psychiatric comorbidity, if any. PMID:27051106

  9. [Addictive behavior among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Menecier, Pascal; Fernandez, Lydia

    2012-12-01

    Addictive behavior still persists among the elderly, mainly concerning substance abuse, such as alcohol, tobacco or psychotropic drugs and addictive practices such as gambling. Illegal substances or cyber-addictions appear much less often. The environment (place of residence or care) and/or economic factors may influence behavior and practices. The incidence of somatic illness or psychiatric disorders, such as cognitive impairment among the elderly patients, complicates even further the presentation of addictive disorders and their treatment. The age factor does not seem to lessen the suffering felt by the patient and care is required in an equal manner for all ages. Prevention (maintenance of personal autonomy and quality of life throughout the ageing process) plays an essential role along with the offer of care. The lack of scientific data such as the absence of validation for adult care among the elderly, leave wide scope for epidemiological, clinical and theoretical research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    MedlinePlus

    ... More... Home Getting Started National Resource Center on Psychiatric Advance Directives - Getting Started Getting Started Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) are relatively new legal instruments ...

  11. Stability and Change in Personality Disorder Symptoms in 1-Year Follow-up of Depressed Adolescent Outpatients.

    PubMed

    Strandholm, Thea; Kiviruusu, Olli; Karlsson, Linnea; Pankakoski, Maiju; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Marttunen, Mauri

    2017-01-01

    We investigated stability and change in personality disorder (PD) symptoms and whether depression severity, comorbid clinical psychiatric disorders, and social support predict changes in personality pathology among adolescent outpatients. The 1-year outcome of PD symptoms among consecutive adolescent psychiatric outpatients with depressive disorders (N = 189) was investigated with symptom count of depression, comorbid psychiatric disorders, and perceived social support as predictors. An overall decrease in PD symptoms in most PD categories was observed. Decreases in depression severity and in number of comorbid diagnoses correlated positively with decreases in PD symptoms of most PD categories. Social support from close friends predicted a decrease in schizotypal and narcissistic, whereas support from family predicted a decrease in paranoid symptoms. Our results suggest that among depressed adolescent outpatients, PD symptoms are relatively unstable, changes co-occuring with changes/improvement in overall psychopathology. Social support seems a possibly effective point for intervention efforts regarding positive outcome of PD symptoms.

  12. [Outpatient care for urological patients].

    PubMed

    Kul'chitskiĭ, V V

    1999-01-01

    The presence of adequately equipped surgical unit in outpatient clinics provides surgical aid to more patients with urological diseases. Preoperative preparation, aseptic and antiseptic measures, local anesthesia were routine. 64 operations for phimosis, condylomatous growth of the foreskin, hydrocele, cyst of the epididymis and spermatic cord, chronic epididymitis, short frenulum of the prepuce were performed in outpatient setting. Recovery lasted as usual.

  13. Regional Correlates of Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ala-Nikkola, Taina; Pirkola, Sami; Kaila, Minna; Saarni, Samuli I; Joffe, Grigori; Kontio, Raija; Oranta, Olli; Sadeniemi, Minna; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2016-12-05

    Current reforms of mental health and substance abuse services (MHS) emphasize community-based care and the downsizing of psychiatric hospitals. Reductions in acute and semi-acute hospital beds are achieved through shortened stays or by avoiding hospitalization. Understanding the factors that drive the current inpatient treatment provision is essential. We investigated how the MHS service structure (diversity of services and balance of personnel resources) and indicators of service need (mental health index, education, single household, and alcohol sales) correlated with acute and semi-acute inpatient treatment provision. The European Service Mapping Schedule-Revised (ESMS-R) tool was used to classify the adult MHS structure in southern Finland (population 1.8 million, 18+ years). The diversity of MHS in terms of range of outpatient and day care services or the overall personnel resourcing in inpatient or outpatient services was not associated with the inpatient treatment provision. In the univariate analyses, sold alcohol was associated with the inpatient treatment provision, while in the multivariate modeling, only a general index for mental health needs was associated with greater hospitalization. In the dehospitalization process, direct resource re-allocation and substituting of inpatient treatment with outpatient care per se is likely insufficient, since inpatient treatment is linked to contextual factors in the population and the health care system. Mental health services reforms require both strategic planning of service system as a whole and detailed understanding of effects of societal components.

  14. Regional Correlates of Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ala-Nikkola, Taina; Pirkola, Sami; Kaila, Minna; Saarni, Samuli I.; Joffe, Grigori; Kontio, Raija; Oranta, Olli; Sadeniemi, Minna; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Current reforms of mental health and substance abuse services (MHS) emphasize community-based care and the downsizing of psychiatric hospitals. Reductions in acute and semi-acute hospital beds are achieved through shortened stays or by avoiding hospitalization. Understanding the factors that drive the current inpatient treatment provision is essential. We investigated how the MHS service structure (diversity of services and balance of personnel resources) and indicators of service need (mental health index, education, single household, and alcohol sales) correlated with acute and semi-acute inpatient treatment provision. The European Service Mapping Schedule-Revised (ESMS-R) tool was used to classify the adult MHS structure in southern Finland (population 1.8 million, 18+ years). The diversity of MHS in terms of range of outpatient and day care services or the overall personnel resourcing in inpatient or outpatient services was not associated with the inpatient treatment provision. In the univariate analyses, sold alcohol was associated with the inpatient treatment provision, while in the multivariate modeling, only a general index for mental health needs was associated with greater hospitalization. In the dehospitalization process, direct resource re-allocation and substituting of inpatient treatment with outpatient care per se is likely insufficient, since inpatient treatment is linked to contextual factors in the population and the health care system. Mental health services reforms require both strategic planning of service system as a whole and detailed understanding of effects of societal components. PMID:27929403

  15. Elderly sexual offenders: two unusual cases.

    PubMed

    Carabellese, Felice; Candelli, Chiara; Vinci, Francesco; Tamma, Manuela; Catanesi, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe two cases of sexual abuse by elderly subjects for which the Judge commissioned an expert psychiatric-forensic opinion. The elderly are generally believed to commit nonviolent crimes, whereas the two cases we observed feature forcible rape committed by elderly offenders, who showed no form of mental disease and had rationally planned their offense. They had never previously committed similar acts and had no history of homosexuality; both had been married for many years before the death of their wives and had adult children. Finally, no previous episodes of rape emerged in their personal histories during interrogations. The sociocultural context in which the crimes were committed was identical and arouses interest as regards both the method employed and how the crimes were discovered. The legal authorities then commissioned accurate investigations including medicolegal and psychiatric-forensic evaluations of the offenders and their victims. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Outpatient Mental Health Services in Mozambique: Use and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Bradley H; Cumbe, Vasco; Raunig-Berhó, Manuela; Rao, Deepa; Kohrt, Brandon A; Stergachis, Andy; Napúa, Manuel; Sherr, Kenneth

    2016-06-01

    To describe current outpatient mental health service use and treatments in Mozambique, the authors reviewed registry entries for 2,071 outpatient psychiatric visits at the Beira Central Hospital in Sofala Province from January 2012 to September 2014. Service use was most common for schizophrenia, followed by epilepsy, delirium, and organic behavioral disorders. Only 3% of consultations for schizophrenia were first-visit patients. Treatment seeking among women was more likely for mood and neurotic disorders and less likely for substance use disorders and epilepsy. First-generation antipsychotics, most often paired with promethazine, dominated treatment regimens. Evidence-based reforms are needed to improve identification of mood disorders and broaden care beyond severe mental disorders.

  17. [Characteristics of forensic patients assigned to forensic outpatient treatment].

    PubMed

    Bulla, Jan; Ross, T; Hoffmann, K; Querengässer, J

    2015-01-01

    In the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg an administrative regulation specifies which patients should be assigned to forensic outpatient treatment. Empirically, little is known about the clinical and criminological factors supporting these decisions. A complete survey of forensic inpatients in Baden-Württemberg was undertaken. From 476 patients released from unlimited detention (§ 63 StGB) 235 (45.6 %) received a court order for forensic aftercare between 2009 and 2012. Social, forensic, and psychiatric history differed only slightly compared with patients not assigned. Schizophrenia as diagnosis was overrepresented, personality disorder and paraphilia underrepresented. Both groups differed most with respect to the duration of detention. The decision for forensic outpatient treatment seems to be determined by process variables of inpatient treatment but not by criminological risk factors. This contradicts the R-N-R principles by Andrews and Bonta. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Psychiatric Prescribers' Experiences With Doctor Shoppers.

    PubMed

    Worley, Julie; Johnson, Mary; Karnik, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Doctor shopping is a primary method of prescription medication diversion. After opioids, benzodiazepines and stimulants are the next most common prescription medications used nonmedically. Studies have shown that patients who engage in doctor shopping find it fun, exciting, and easy to do. There is a lack of research on the prescriber's perspective on the phenomenon of doctor shopping. This study investigates the experiences of prescribers in psychiatry with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Fifteen prescribers including psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners working in outpatient psychiatry were interviewed to elicit detailed information about their experiences with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Themes found throughout the interview were that psychiatric prescribers' experience with patients who engage in doctor shopping includes (a) detecting red flags, (b) negative emotional responding, (c) addressing the patient and the problem, and (d) inconsistently implementing precautions. When red flags were detected when prescribing controlled drugs, prescribers in psychiatry experienced both their own negative emotional responses such as disappointment and resentment as well as the negative emotions of the patients such as anger and other extreme emotional responses. Psychiatric prescribers responded to patient's doctor shopping in a variety of ways such as changing their practice, discharging the patients or taking steps to not accept certain patients identified as being at risk for doctor shopping, as well as by talking to the patient and trying to offer them help. Despite experiencing doctor shopping, the prescribers inconsistently implemented precautionary measures such as checking prescription drug monitoring programs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. [Problems and strategies in the treatment of mental disorders in elderly patients with physical illness].

    PubMed

    Wada, H

    2000-11-01

    There is a high prevalence of mental disorders in the community population of older adults, especially in medical treatment facilities. Therefore, clinicians who treat geriatric patients cannot neglect the psychiatric vulnerability of the elderly population. The fragility of psychological functioning of the elderly is caused not only by psychological contributors, such as various kinds of experiences of loss, but also by biological factors such as decreases in neurotransmitters and in the number of neurons. Another point geriatric clinicians should pay attention to is the powerful mind-body connection in the elderly. Recent psychoneuroimmunological research demonstrates that depression or other types of emotional stress damages the immune system, which can induce some physical diseases. This is especially true for the elderly, who have weakened cell-mediated immune function and are more susceptible to influence by the damaged immune function caused by such psychiatric dysfunction. Also, depression in the elderly can often lead to malnutrition or dehydration, which can induce various kinds of physical illness. On the other hand, physical illness in the elderly can induce depression, because of the psychological vulnerability of the elderly. Due to the strong mind-body connection in the elderly, the availability of psychiatric care is essential. When providing psychiatric care for the elderly, the clinician should attend to all symptoms, not minimizing the importance of biological treatment, while also trying to support the elderly patients psychologically through acceptance of their need for interdependency and respect for their narcissism.

  20. Psychiatric disorders in cancer patients at a university hospital in Japan: descriptive analysis of 765 psychiatric referrals.

    PubMed

    Tada, Yukio; Matsubara, Mei; Kawada, Satoshi; Ishida, Mayumi; Wada, Makoto; Wada, Tomomi; Onishi, Hideki

    2012-03-01

    In cancer patients, adjustment disorders, delirium and depression have been identified as common psychiatric disorders. Although a comparable result was reported in the National Cancer Center in Japan, the nature of patients in that hospital may differ from that in local hospitals. There is a possibility to expand the findings of psycho-oncology by evaluation of the data from a local university hospital and comparison with the National Cancer Center data. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of cancer patients who were referred to the Department of Psycho-Oncology at Saitama Medical University International Medical Center. We identified their characteristics and psychiatric diagnoses and compared these with the National Cancer Center data. During the study period, 765 cancer patients were referred. The numbers of inpatients and outpatients were almost the same. The most common psychiatric diagnosis was adjustment disorders (24%), followed by delirium (16%) and then major depressive disorder (12%). The rank of these three was the same as that at the National Cancer Center. Outpatients constituted more than 80% of the patients with major depressive disorder. The proportion of cancer patients with schizophrenia in this study (4.3%) was higher than that in the National Cancer Center (1.6%). This study revealed basic information about the consultation data of cancer patients at a local university hospital in Japan. The importance of communication with outpatients was suggested. It seems that cancer treatment for patients with schizophrenia in a local hospital is also important.

  1. Psychiatric disorders and urbanization in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Jack; Peen, Jaap; Koelen, Jurrijn; Smit, Filip; Schoevers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies over the last decade have supplied growing evidence of an association between urbanization and the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to examine the link between levels of urbanization and 12-month prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in a nationwide German population study, controlling for other known risk factors such as gender, social class, marital status and the interaction variables of these factors with urbanization. Methods The Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI) was used to assess the prevalence of mental disorders (DSM-IV) in a representative sample of the German population (N = 4181, age: 18–65). The sample contains five levels of urbanization based on residence location. The epidemiological study was commissioned by the German Ministry of Research, Education and Science (BMBF) and approved by the relevant Institutional Review Board and ethics committee. Written informed consent was obtained for both surveys (core survey and Mental Health Supplement). Subjects did not get any financial compensation for their study participation. Results Higher levels of urbanization were linked to higher 12-month prevalence rates for almost all major psychiatric disorders (with the exception of substance abuse and psychotic disorders). The weighted prevalence percentages were highest in the most urbanized category. Alongside urbanization, female gender, lower social class and being unmarried were generally found to be associated with higher levels of psychopathology. The impact of urbanization on mental health was about equal (for almost all major psychiatric disorders) in young people and elderly people, men and women, and in married and single people. Only people from a low social class in the most urbanized settings had more somatoform disorders, and unmarried people in the most urbanized settings had more anxiety disorders. Conclusion Psychiatric disorders are more prevalent among the

  2. Psychiatric liability: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1998-07-01

    Psychiatric health care providers' liability extends from clinical cases--medication errors, misdiagnosis, etc.--to particular issues unique to the mental health setting. Part 1 discusses lawsuits common to this setting.

  3. Psychiatric liability: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1998-08-01

    Psychiatric health care providers' liability extends from clinical cases--medication errors, misdiagnosis, etc.--to particular issues unique to the mental health care setting. Part 2 continues discussion begun in the July issue of lawsuits common to this setting.

  4. Neuroinflammation and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in psychiatric illness. While systemic autoimmune diseases are well-documented causes of neuropsychiatric disorders, synaptic autoimmune encephalitides with psychotic symptoms often go under-recognized. Parallel to the link between psychiatric symptoms and autoimmunity in autoimmune diseases, neuroimmunological abnormalities occur in classical psychiatric disorders (for example, major depressive, bipolar, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorders). Investigations into the pathophysiology of these conditions traditionally stressed dysregulation of the glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems, but the mechanisms causing these neurotransmitter abnormalities remained elusive. We review the link between autoimmunity and neuropsychiatric disorders, and the human and experimental evidence supporting the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in selected classical psychiatric disorders. Understanding how psychosocial, genetic, immunological and neurotransmitter systems interact can reveal pathogenic clues and help target new preventive and symptomatic therapies. PMID:23547920

  5. American Psychiatric Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical Students International close menu Psychiatrists Education Practice Cultural Competency Awards & Leadership Opportunities Advocacy & APAPAC Meetings ...

  6. Low self-esteem and psychiatric patients: Part I – The relationship between low self-esteem and psychiatric diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Silverstone, Peter H; Salsali, Mahnaz

    2003-01-01

    Background The objective of the current study was to determine the prevalence and the degree of lowered self-esteem across the spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Method The present study was carried out on a consecutive sample of 1,190 individuals attending an open-access psychiatric outpatient clinic. There were 957 psychiatric patients, 182 cases with conditions not attributable to a mental disorder, and 51 control subjects. Patients were diagnosed according to DSM III-R diagnostic criteria following detailed assessments. At screening, individuals completed two questionnaires to measure self-esteem, the Rosenberg self-esteem scale and the Janis and Field Social Adequacy scale. Statistical analyses were performed on the scores of the two self-esteem scales. Results The results of the present study demonstrate that all psychiatric patients suffer some degree of lowered self-esteem. Furthermore, the degree to which self-esteem was lowered differed among various diagnostic groups. Self-esteem was lowest in patients with major depressive disorder, eating disorders, and substance abuse. Also, there is evidence of cumulative effects of psychiatric disorders on self-esteem. Patients who had comorbid diagnoses, particularly when one of the diagnoses was depressive disorders, tended to show lower self-esteem. Conclusions Based on both the previous literature, and the results from the current study, we propose that there is a vicious cycle between low self-esteem and onset of psychiatric disorders. Thus, low self-esteem increases the susceptibility for development of psychiatric disorders, and the presence of a psychiatric disorder, in turn, lowers self-esteem. Our findings suggest that this effect is more pronounced with certain psychiatric disorders, such as major depression and eating disorders. PMID:12620127

  7. [THE MATTER: NO PSYCHIATRIZATION].

    PubMed

    Pisa, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety, sadness, worries, fears, irritability, fatigue, tedium, are situations that life confront us with. They don't qualify as psy- chiatric disorders, but nevertheless they are treated as though. We refer to the psychiatrization of daily life. The aim of this article is to prevent such psychiatrization. To support this assertion, we are going to develop different aspects tending to explain the origins of the patient's demands and the answers given by the psychiatrist. A critical reflection of our practice is proposed.

  8. Pulmonary Embolism Following Outpatient Vasectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Frank E.; Farooqi, Bilal; Moore, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic events have several known major risk factors such as prolonged immobilization or major surgery. Pulmonary embolism has rarely been reported after an outpatient vasectomy was completed. We present the rare case of a healthy 32-year-old Caucasian male with no known risk factors who presented with pleuritic chest pain 26 days after his outpatient vasectomy was performed. Subsequently, he was found to have a pulmonary embolism as per radiological imaging. We explore the association between outpatient vasectomies and venous thromboembolic events. A review of the literature is also included. PMID:26989373

  9. Psychiatric disorders and sleep issues.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Eliza L

    2014-09-01

    Sleep issues are common in people with psychiatric disorders, and the interaction is complex. Sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, can precede and predispose to psychiatric disorders, can be comorbid with and exacerbate psychiatric disorders, and can occur as part of psychiatric disorders. Sleep disorders can mimic psychiatric disorders or result from medication given for psychiatric disorders. Impairment of sleep and of mental health may be different manifestations of the same underlying neurobiological processes. For the primary care physician, key tools include recognition of potential sleep effects of psychiatric medications and familiarity with treatment approaches for insomnia in depression and anxiety.

  10. Psychiatric morbidity in prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Daria, Usha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prisoners are having high percentage of psychiatric disorders. Majority of studies done so far on prisoners are from Western countries and very limited studies from India. Aim: Study socio-demographic profile of prisoners of a central jail and to find out current prevalence of psychiatric disorders in them. Materials and Methods: 118 prisoners were selected by random sampling and interviewed to obtain socio-demographic data and assessed on Indian Psychiatric Interview Schedule (IPIS) with additional required questions to diagnose psychiatric disorders in prisoners. Results: Mean age of prisoners was 33.7 years with 97.5% males, 57.6% from rural areas and 65.3% were married. Average education in studied years was 6.6 years and 50.8% were unskilled workers. 47.4% were murderers while 20.3% of drugs related crimes. 47.5% were convicted and history of criminal behavior in family was in 32.2% prisoners. Current prevalence of psychiatric disorders was 33%. Psychotic, depressive, and anxiety disorders were seen in 6.7%, 16.1%, and 8.5% prisoners respectively. 58.8% had history of drug abuse/dependence prior to imprisonment. Conclusion: One prison of Hadoti region of Rajasthan is full of people with mental-health problems who collectively generate significant levels of unmet psychiatric treatment need. Prisons are detrimental to mental-health. Beginning of reforms is the immediate need. PMID:24459308

  11. Monitoring Outpatient Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Each year, health care costs for managing chronically ill patients increase as the life expectancy of Americans continues to grow. To handle this situation, many hospitals, doctors practices, and home care providers are turning to disease management, a system of coordinated health care interventions and communications, to improve outpatient care. By participating in daily monitoring programs, patients with congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions requiring significant self-care are facing fewer emergency situations and hospitalizations. Cybernet Medical, a division of Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Cybernet Systems Corporation, is using the latest communications technology to augment the ways health care professionals monitor and assess patients with chronic diseases, while at the same time simplifying the patients interaction with technology. Cybernet s newest commercial product for this purpose evolved from research funded by NASA, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The research focused on the physiological assessment of astronauts and soldiers, human performance evaluation, and human-computer interaction. Cybernet Medical's MedStar Disease Management Data Collection System is an affordable, widely deployable solution for improving in-home-patient chronic disease management. The system's battery-powered and portable interface device collects physiological data from off-the-shelf instruments.

  12. Suicide risk and psychiatric comorbidity in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Maurizio; Innamorati, Marco; Trovarelli, Sara; Narcisi, Alessandra; Bellini, Samantha; Orsini, Diego; Forte, Alberto; Erbuto, Denise; Botti, Elisabetta; Lamis, Dorian A; Girardi, Paolo; Costanzo, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    To examine the occurrence of stressful life events, psychological comorbidity and suicide risk in patients with psoriasis or other dermatological conditions. Consecutive adult outpatients with psoriasis or other dermatological conditions completed a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Hamilton scales for depression and anxiety. The study included 157 patients (91 with psoriasis; 66 with other conditions [melanoma; allergy]). Patients with psoriasis were significantly more likely to have experienced major life events in the 12 months before diagnosis, have had a psychiatric diagnosis and to have experienced past suicidal ideation than patients with other dermatological conditions. Patients with psoriasis have an increased risk of psychiatric comorbidities, suicidal ideation, and long-term course of the disease compared with patients who have other dermatological conditions. Psychiatric assessment is highly recommended in patients with psoriasis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Clinical features of elderly chronic urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Ga-Young; Kim, Mi-Yea; Yoo, Hye-Soo; Nahm, Dong-Ho; Ye, Young-Min; Shin, Yoo-Seob

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic urticaria (CU) is defined as itchy wheals lasting 6 weeks or more. As the aged population increases worldwide, it is essential to identify the specific features of this disease in the elderly population. Methods We investigated the prevalence and clinical features of CU in elderly patients. Medical records of 837 CU patients from the outpatient Allergy Clinic of Ajou University Hospital, Korea were analyzed retrospectively. Patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria according to the EAACI/GA2LEN/EDF/WAO guidelines were included. Patients older than 60 years were defined as elderly. Results Of the 837 patients, 37 (4.5%) were elderly. In elderly versus nonelderly CU patients, the prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) was significantly higher (37.8% vs. 21.7%, respectively; p = 0.022), while that of aspirin intolerance was lower (18.9% vs. 43.6%, respectively; p = 0.003) in terms of comorbid conditions. The prevalences of serum specific immunoglobulin E antibodies to staphylococcal enterotoxin A and staphylococcal enterotoxin B were considerably higher in elderly CU patients with AD than in those without AD (37.5% vs. 0%, respectively). Conclusions Elderly patients with CU had a higher prevalence of AD. Therefore, there is a need to recognize the existence of AD in elderly CU patients. PMID:25378979

  14. When the safe place does not protect: reports of victimisation and adverse experiences in psychiatric institutions.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Mesquita, Cristina; da Costa Maia, Ângela

    2016-12-01

    Psychiatric patients report higher levels of victimisation and are at risk for further victimisation in different contexts, such as psychiatric institutions. Studies in this field tend to focus on hospital staff as victims, experiencing classic forms of victimisation (e.g. physical assault, threats, verbal abuse), through qualitative studies. This is a quantitative retrospective study that aims to know the occurrence of psychiatric victimisation and other adverse experiences in Portuguese psychiatric patients. Ninety-five psychiatric patients, between 20 and 79 years old (M - 45.18, SD - 13.06), with a history of psychiatric hospitalisation answered the Experiences in Psychiatric Institution Inventory. Participants were recruited in four psychiatric hospitals. Inpatients were approached during their hospitalisation; outpatients were approached in scheduled appointment days. Only 23 (24.2%) participants reported no victimisation. Total Experiences of Self varied from 0 to 7 (M - 1.75, SD - 1.72), Total Witnessed Experiences varied from 0 to 7 (M - 1.17, SD - 1.64), and Total Global Experiences varied from 0 to 14 (M - 2.92, SD - 3.01). These results show that victimisation and adverse experiences in psychiatric contexts are frequent and go beyond classic forms of victimisation. A deeper knowledge of these experiences and their impact in the mental health of psychiatric patients may promote quality of care provided and lead to more effective treatments, thus reducing the number and length of hospitalisations, and the financial burden for public health services.

  15. What do outpatients with schizophrenia and mood disorders want to learn about their illness?

    PubMed

    Hallett, Claudia; Gupta, Sonali; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Psychiatric patients currently have access to a plethora of information about their illness. However, little systematic research has explored what psychiatric patients would like to learn about their illness. This study addressed the knowledge gap by asking outpatients with schizophrenia and mood disorders what they wished to learn about their illness and how they preferred to learn this information. An exploratory survey of psychiatric outpatients was conducted between April 2011 and June 2012. A total of 202 outpatients with a diagnosis of either schizophrenia or related disorder (ICD-10 codes F20-F29) (N=106) or mood disorder (ICD-10 codes F30-F39) (N=96) were interviewed after routine meetings with their psychiatrist. Interviews were conducted with open- and closed-ended questions in outpatient clinics across East London, United Kingdom. Open-ended questions were analyzed qualitatively, and closed-ended questions were analyzed quantitatively. Over two-thirds of psychiatric outpatients (68%) reported that they would like to learn more about their illness. Overall, patients' wishes for learning were heterogeneous. However, both diagnostic groups ranked "the cause of the illness" as their top information need. Most patients preferred to learn through one-to-one conversations with their psychiatrist (schizophrenia, 92%; mood disorder, 84%). In regard to educating patients about their illness, there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Health care professionals need to be sensitive to individual learning preferences, which vary and can include group-based approaches. The results have implications for the training of psychiatrists. In particular, psychiatrists need to be equipped to address patients' questions about the cause of the illness.

  16. Features of Potentially Reversibile Dementia in Elderly Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric B.; Canfield, Connie G.; Chinn, Nina M.; Reifler, Burton V.; Sumi, Shuzo M.

    1986-01-01

    A standardized evaluation was carried out in two separate groups of patients with dementia to determine the features that characterize those with potentially reversible or treatable dementia. In both groups, Alzheimer's-type dementia was the most common diagnosis (65% and 70%); the most common cause of potentially reversible cognitive impairment was medication toxicity. In both groups, patients with potentially reversible dementia had a shorter duration of symptoms, less severe dementia and used more prescription drugs. Because of this association, these features may be considered risk factors but are not distinguishing or diagnostic features of patients with potentially reversible dementia. Other, previously undetected, treatable illnesses not often considered in the differential diagnosis of potentially reversible or treatable dementia were also prevalent in these patients. PMID:3788133

  17. Elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Benton, D; Marshall, C

    1991-11-01

    Elder abuse encompasses physical, psychological, and financial abuse and also includes the violation of an individual's rights, or social abuse. Detection of elder abuse is often obstructed by the denial or shame of the abused older adult and the denial or improper assessment by health care professionals. The ethical struggle professionals face when they suspect abuse may also impede assessment or intervention. Preliminary data on etiologic factors related to elder abuse suggest that misinformation, the caregiver's lack of understanding of the needs of older adults, social isolation, a history of dysfunctional family relationships, and the psychopathologic factors of the caregiver are salient factors for understanding elder abuse. In addition, caregiver burden related to the care of the impaired elder and other external life events is a risk factor for elder abuse. Self-neglect is the type of elder abuse most often reported and the most difficult to handle, because older adults have a right to refuse services. Home care providers often face practical and ethical dilemmas in cases of self-neglect. When making an assessment for elder abuse, it is best to use a multidisciplinary approach. In addition to physical indicators (bruises, malnutrition, fractures), attention must be paid to the social, family, and sexual history of the patient. The psychological history of the patient and caregiver is also important. Reporting laws exist in all states, and health care practitioners must become familiar with the laws in their states. Awareness of elder abuse by professionals working in home care is essential, because the failure to detect abuse can interfere with interventions and in some cases lead to death.

  18. Nutraceuticals in psychiatric practice.

    PubMed

    Chiappedi, Matteo; de Vincenzi, Silvia; Bejor, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    Nutraceuticals can be defined as food components or active principles present in aliments which have positive effects for health and quality of life, including preventing or treating disorders. Herbal and "natural" food supplements are increasingly used to treat different psychiatric disorders, often as "self-prescribed" therapies. With factors such as chronic illness, poor health, emotional distress, and quality of life influencing the desire for complementary medicine, patients with comorbid medical and psychiatric problems seem likely to turn to this approach. We reviewed the most commonly used herbal and dietary supplements for which a certain efficacy on psychiatric symptoms or disorders has been claimed, checking current Pubmed-indexed literature (the most important being St. John's wort, Omega-3 fatty acids, valerian, Kava, Ginkgo, folate, B vitamins, S-Adenosylmethionine, inositol, alfa-lactoalbumin and passionflower). There is evidence of efficacy for some of these herbs an supplements, proved also by Cochrane's meta-analysis. However many different areas (including efficacy, tolerability, optimal dosing, adequate shelf life, drug and non-pharmacological interactions) need to be thoroughly studied; moreover political decisions need to be scientifically guided in order to best serve psychiatric patients' interests and to prevent using of expensive and sometimes un-useful therapies. This implies that a scientific strategy is needed to rule out any third-part economical interest which could in any way influence therapeutic choices. The article presents some promising patents on nutraceuticals in psychiatric practice.

  19. Abortion and psychiatric practice.

    PubMed

    Stotland, Nada L

    2003-03-01

    The subject of abortion is fraught with politics, emotions, and misinformation. A widespread practice reaching far back in history, abortion is again in the news. Psychiatry sits at the intersection of the religious, ethical, psychological, sociological, medical, and legal facets of the abortion issue. Although the religions that forbid abortion are more prominent in the media, many religions have more liberal approaches. While the basic right to abortion has been upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court, several limitations have been permitted, including parental notification or consent (with the possibility of judicial bypass) for minors, waiting periods, and mandatory provision of certain, sometimes biased, information. Before the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion in 1973, many women were maimed or killed by illegal abortions, and psychiatrists were sometimes asked to certify that abortions were justified on psychiatric grounds. Currently, there are active attempts to convince the public and women considering abortion that abortion frequently has negative psychiatric consequences. This assertion is not borne out by the literature: the vast majority of women tolerate abortion without psychiatric sequelae. The psychiatric outcome of abortion is best when patients are able to make autonomous, supported decisions. Psychiatrists need to know the medical and psychiatric facts about abortion. Psychiatrists can then help patients prevent unwanted pregnancies, make informed decisions consonant with their own values and circumstances when they become pregnant, and find appropriate social and medical resources whatever their decisions may be.

  20. Impression Management in the Psychiatric Interview: Quality, Style, and Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Mark; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The ability of 24 Veterans Administration Day Treatment Center psychiatric outpatients to vary intentionally their degree of apparent psychopathology during structured interviews was studied. Patients defined as sick presenters behaved in a significantly more pathological manner during an interview preceded by "fake sick" instructions than they…

  1. Psychometric Properties of the Aggression Questionnaire in Dutch Violent Forensic Psychiatric Patients and Secondary Vocational Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsveld, Ruud H. J.; Muris, Peter; Kraaimaat, Floris W.; Meesters, Cor

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a Dutch version of Buss and Perry's Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) were examined in a sample of violent forensic psychiatric inpatients and outpatients and a sample of secondary vocational students. The internal consistency, interitem correlations, and item--scale correlations of the subscales Physical Aggression,…

  2. Psychometric Properties of the Aggression Questionnaire in Dutch Violent Forensic Psychiatric Patients and Secondary Vocational Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsveld, Ruud H. J.; Muris, Peter; Kraaimaat, Floris W.; Meesters, Cor

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a Dutch version of Buss and Perry's Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) were examined in a sample of violent forensic psychiatric inpatients and outpatients and a sample of secondary vocational students. The internal consistency, interitem correlations, and item--scale correlations of the subscales Physical Aggression,…

  3. Psychiatric Impairment among Adolescents Engaging in Different Types of Deliberate Self-Harm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Colleen M.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Miller, Alec L.; Turner, J. Blake

    2008-01-01

    This retrospective chart review study of 227 participants examined the psychiatric profiles of outpatient adolescents ages 12 to 19 years (M = 15.08 years, SD = 1.72 years) engaging in different types of deliberate self-harm (DSH) behaviors. Participants were divided into four groups: no deliberate self-harm (NoDSH; n = 119), nonsuicidal…

  4. Psychiatric Education for Primary Care: A Pilot Study of Needs of Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Cole, Steven A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A study of medical outpatients indicates high incidence of probable emotional disorder, limited physician diagnosis or record of these problems, limited patient knowledge of diagnosis or management plan, and little inquiry by physicians about personal problems. The results form the basis for a psychiatric education program. (Author/MSE)

  5. Psychiatric Impairment among Adolescents Engaging in Different Types of Deliberate Self-Harm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Colleen M.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Miller, Alec L.; Turner, J. Blake

    2008-01-01

    This retrospective chart review study of 227 participants examined the psychiatric profiles of outpatient adolescents ages 12 to 19 years (M = 15.08 years, SD = 1.72 years) engaging in different types of deliberate self-harm (DSH) behaviors. Participants were divided into four groups: no deliberate self-harm (NoDSH; n = 119), nonsuicidal…

  6. Psychiatric Education for Primary Care: A Pilot Study of Needs of Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Cole, Steven A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A study of medical outpatients indicates high incidence of probable emotional disorder, limited physician diagnosis or record of these problems, limited patient knowledge of diagnosis or management plan, and little inquiry by physicians about personal problems. The results form the basis for a psychiatric education program. (Author/MSE)

  7. Protective factors against suicide among young-old Chinese outpatients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Suicide is common among the elderly worldwide. However, no literature could be found on the beliefs/expectations that protect young-old people from attempting suicide. The purpose of this study was to explore young-old outpatients’ reasons for not killing themselves in Taiwan. Method Data for this qualitative descriptive study were extracted from a large research series. From the 83 elderly outpatients in the original sample, 31 were chosen for this study because they were young-old (65–74 years old) and from two randomly selected medical centers in northern Taiwan. Data on participants’ reasons for not killing themselves in unhappy situations were collected in individual interviews using a semi-structured guide and analyzed by content analysis. Results Analysis of interview data identified six major themes: satisfied with one’s life, suicide cannot resolve problems, fear of humiliating one’s children, religious beliefs, never thought about suicide, and living in harmony with nature. Conclusion These identified protective factors (reasons for living) could be added to suicide-prevention programs for the elderly. Our findings may also serve as a reference for geriatric researchers in western countries with increasing numbers of elderly ethnic minority immigrants. PMID:24739419

  8. Family-centered Care in the Outpatient General Psychiatry Clinic.

    PubMed

    Heru, Alison M

    2015-09-01

    Although family research supports family-centered care for all medical specialties, the benefit of family-centered care has not been fully realized in outpatient practice. Physicians, including psychiatrists, are not routinely taught how to work with families and may not be aware of the evidence-base for family interventions. However, some medical specialties, such as family medicine and palliative care, have a clinical practice that routinely includes the family. Clinicians working in medical clinics, such as diabetes clinics, know that successful management of chronic illness requires family involvement. Psychiatric clinics, such as The Family Center for Bipolar Disorder at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City, also have a family-centered practice and show improved patient outcomes. This article provides guidelines, including clinical interview questions, to help psychiatrists practice family-centered care, either in a private office or in a general psychiatric outpatient clinic. The guidelines include questions that identify when to seek an in-depth family assessment or consultation. Family-centered care will become more useful when health care reimbursement focuses on patient outcome.

  9. Assessing anxious features in depressed outpatients

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Bernstein, Ira H.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Morris, David; Alpert, Jonathan; Warden, Diane; Luther, James F.; Kornstein, Susan G.; Biggs, Melanie M.; Fava, Maurizio; Rush, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Both the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) and 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology – Clinician-rated (IDS-C30) contain a subscale that assesses anxious symptoms. We used classical test theory and item response theory methods to assess and compare the psychometric properties of the two anxiety subscales (HRSDANX and IDS-CANX) in a large sample (N = 3453) of outpatients with non-psychotic major depressive disorder in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. Approximately 48% of evaluable participants had at least one concurrent anxiety disorder by the self-report Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (PDSQ). The HRSDANX and IDS-CANX were highly correlated (r = 0.75) and both had moderate internal consistency given their limited number of items (HRSDANX Cronbach’s alpha = 0.48; IDS-CANX Cronbach’s alpha = 0.58). The optimal threshold for ascribing the presence/absence of anxious features was found at a total score of eight or nine for the HRSDANX and seven or eight for the IDS-CANX. It would seem beneficial to delete item 17 (loss of insight) from the HRSDANX as it negatively correlated with the scale’s total score. Both the HRSDANX and IDS-CANX subscales have acceptable psychometric properties and can be used to identify anxious features for clinical or research purposes. PMID:22057975

  10. Elder Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... or nursing homes. The mistreatment may be Physical, sexual, or emotional abuse Neglect or abandonment Financial abuse - stealing of money or belongings Possible signs of elder abuse include unexplained bruises, burns, and ...

  11. Elderly Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview (continued) • One of the leading causes of suicide among the elderly is depression; often undiagnosed and/or untreated. Risk Factors The act of completing suicide is rarely preceded by only one cause or ...

  12. Perinatal psychiatric episodes: a population-based study on treatment incidence and prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Munk-Olsen, T; Maegbaek, M L; Johannsen, B M; Liu, X; Howard, L M; di Florio, A; Bergink, V; Meltzer-Brody, S

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal psychiatric episodes comprise various disorders and symptom severity, which are diagnosed and treated in multiple treatment settings. To date, no studies have quantified the incidence and prevalence of perinatal psychiatric episodes treated in primary and secondary care, which we aimed to do in the present study. We designed a descriptive prospective study and included information from Danish population registers to study first-time ever and recurrent psychiatric episodes during the perinatal period, including treatment at psychiatric facilities and general practitioners (GPs). This was done for all women who had records of one or more singleton births from 1998 until 2012. In total, we had information on 822 439 children born to 491 242 unique mothers. Results showed first-time psychiatric episodes treated at inpatient facilities were rare during pregnancy, but increased significantly shortly following childbirth (0.02 vs 0.25 per 1000 births). In comparison, first-time psychiatric episodes treated at outpatient facilities were more common, and showed little variation across pregnancy and postpartum. For every single birth resulting in postpartum episodes treated at inpatient psychiatric facilities, 2.5 births were followed by an episode treated at outpatient psychiatric facility and 12 births by GP-provided pharmacological treatment. We interpret our results the following way: treated severe and moderate psychiatric disorders have different risk patterns in relation to pregnancy and childbirth, which suggests differences in the underlying etiology. We further speculate varying treatment incidence and prevalence in pregnancy vs postpartum may indicate that the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 peripartum specifier not adequately describes at-risk periods across moderate and severe perinatal psychiatric episodes. PMID:27754485

  13. Psychiatric disorders and menopause symptoms in Brazilian women.

    PubMed

    Barazzetti, Lidiane; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Garcez, Anderson da Silva; Mendes, Karina Giane; Theodoro, Heloísa; Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the association between minor psychiatric disorders and menopause symptoms and their associated factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 615 women aged 40 to 65 years treated in a public menopause and gynecological outpatient clinic in the South Region of Brazil. Minor psychiatric disorders were assessed using the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) and menopause symptoms using the Menopause Rating Scale. Score for menopause symptoms was categorized into three levels of symptoms: mild, moderate, and severe. Multivariate analyses used ordinal logistic regression. The prevalence of mild, moderate, and severe menopause symptoms was 34.1% (95% CI 30.3-37.9), 29.6% (95% CI 25.8-33.1), and 36.3% (95% CI 32.4-40.0), respectively. The overall prevalence of minor psychiatric disorders was 66.6% (95% CI 62.8-70.3). After adjustment, the odds ratio (OR) of the occurrence of menopause symptoms were approximately eight times higher in women relating minor psychiatric disorders compared with those without such disorders (OR = 7.76; 95% CI 5.27-11.44). The following factors were also associated with the menopause symptoms: women older than 50 years, living with a partner, lower educational level, smokers, larger number of pregnancies, obese, and those using psychotropic and/or postmenopause medication. The minor psychiatric disorders exhibited strong association with the presence of menopause symptoms independently of sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive factors, and of use of psychotropic medication.

  14. The base for exposure treatment in agoraphobia: some indicators for nurse therapists and community psychiatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Gournay, K J

    1991-01-01

    This study examines, using a randomised control trial, the question of the optimum base for exposure treatment with agoraphobic clients. The results have relevance for community psychiatric nurses and nurse behaviour therapists working with such problems and indeed for other behavioural practitioners. While the results confirm the already extensive evidence for the efficacy of exposure in vivo for agoraphobic clients, the results show that in general there is no difference between outcome of treatment delivered from the patient's own home and the out-patient clinic. There are, however, a small number of clients who will not attend psychiatric out-patient clinics for treatment but who will subsequently do well with home-based treatment. The reasons for the experimental findings and implications for psychiatric nurses are discussed.

  15. Substituted decision making: elder guardianship.

    PubMed

    Leatherman, Martha E; Goethe, Katherine E

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this column is to help experienced clinicians navigate the judicial system when they are confronted with requests for capacity evaluations that involve guardianship (conservatorship). The interface between the growing elderly medical population and increasing requests for substituted decision making is becoming more complex. This column will help practicing psychiatrists understand the medical, legal, and societal factors involved in adult guardianship. Such understanding is necessary in order to effectively perform guardianship evaluations and adequately inform courts, patients, and families about the psychiatric diagnoses central to substituted decision making.

  16. Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, a number of components related to psychiatric diagnosis have come under criticism for their inaccuracies and inadequacies. Neurobiologists and anthropologists have particularly criticized the rigidity of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis –composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress—as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. PMID:23816860

  17. Cannabis and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Loga, Slobodan; Loga-Zec, Svjetlana; Spremo, Mira

    2010-06-01

    There are connection between use of cannabis and many psychiatric disturbances in adolescents, especially "cannabis psychosis", depression, panic attacks and suicide. Negative effects could occur either as a result of a specific pharmacological effect of cannabis, or as the result of stressful experiences during the intoxication of cannabis in young people. Potentially is very dangerous high frequency suicidal ideation among cannabis users.

  18. Usefulness of internet in adolescent mental health outpatient care.

    PubMed

    Kurki, M; Koivunen, M; Anttila, M; Hätönen, H; Välimäki, M

    2011-04-01

    Internet has become increasingly common in adolescents' daily lives and also in health care. However, there is still need to explore how nurses perceive its use as a part of adolescents' treatment. This explorative qualitative study aim was to explore how nurses perceive the usefulness of Internet in adolescents' outpatient care in mental health. The data were collected among nurses (n=12) working in two psychiatric adolescent outpatient clinics in university central hospitals in Finland. The data were collected in focus group interviews and analysed using inductive content analysis. The analysis showed that Internet use could promote the care process of adolescents with depression by supporting their self-reflection and self-management, enhancing nurses' understanding of adolescents' daily lives and facilitating nurse-adolescent interaction. Disadvantages identified among nurses were fear of role changes in the nurse-adolescent interaction, changes in the intervention, when Internet might be a third party in the face-to-face interaction and negative effects of Internet on adolescents. Facilitators in the use of Internet were nurses' positive attitude to Internet, knowledge and experiences of Internet usage. Nurses' negative attitude to Internet and lack of training and instructions were seen as barriers in promoting the successful utilization of Internet among adolescents with depression in outpatient care. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  19. The role of problem drinking in psychiatric admissions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, L A

    1995-03-01

    Although problem drinkers are over-represented in psychiatric treatment populations throughout the United States, it is unclear whether this is primarily due to difficulties in differentially diagnosing alcohol and mental problems and to high rates of comorbidity, or to factors unique to help-seeking for alcohol problems. This article examines the role that alcohol problems play in treatment entry to inpatient and outpatient mental health agencies, considering the potential roles of a drinking problem both as a condition perceived by the sufferer to require a psychiatrist's help, and as a source of social disruption that activates others to encourage mental health treatment. Analysis focuses on comparing samples of newly admitted patients in a community mental health system and untreated individuals with high levels of psychiatric symptoms living in the same community. Experiencing the adverse social consequences of a drinking problem, holding the belief that drinking has caused one's psychological problems, and having prior experiences in mental health treatment for a drinking problem are factors found to be positively associated with psychiatric admissions, while heavier drinking and dependence symptoms are not. Further analysis of events precipitating psychiatric admission suggests that an important role for the mental health system vis à vis alcohol problems is to contain social disruptions attributable to problem drinking in the community. Alcohol-related psychiatric admissions are found to have more frequently involved public disruptions, to have elicited police or court referrals, and to have more often resulted in the client's going to a locked hospital ward, as opposed to a mental health outpatient clinic.

  20. The factor structure of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (expanded version) in a sample of forensic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Janneke; Vuijk, Pieter Jelle; Harte, Joke M; Smit, Bettine L; Nijman, Henk; Scherder, Erik J A

    2015-06-01

    Severe behavioral problems, aggression, unlawful behavior, and uncooperativeness make the forensic psychiatric population both hard to treat and study. To fine-tune treatment and evaluate results, valid measurement is vital. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale-Extended (BPRS-E) is a widely used scale for assessing psychiatric symptoms, with a stable factor structure over various patient groups. For the first time, its usefulness for forensic psychiatric patients was studied by means of an exploratory factor analysis on 302 patients in a penitentiary psychiatric center. A five-factor solution fitted the data best and showed large overlap with previous research done in both in- and outpatient populations with schizophrenia and mixed diagnoses. Around 45% of the patients did not fully comply. Items relying most on self-report caused the most non-adherence, possibly because of difficulty with verbalizing distress. These items loaded on the factors psychosis and affect. The BPRS-E is a suitable instrument for forensic use. Future research and clinical practice should focus on alignment with forensic patients to improve measurement, understanding, and eventually therapeutic interventions.

  1. European Elder (Elderberry)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common Names: European elder, black elder, elderberry, elder flower, sambucus Latin Name: Sambucus nigra Background European elder ... Saxon word “aeld,” meaning fire. The terms “elder flower” and “elderberry” may refer to either European elder ...

  2. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  3. [The reform of psychiatric care in Poland--2001].

    PubMed

    Puzyński, Stanisław; Langiewicz, Wanda; Pietrzykowska, Bozena

    2002-01-01

    Both positive and negative effects of the reform of the health care financing system are noted. Low prices offered by Sickness Funds for particular services (a bed-day, a visit) should be regarded as a negative effect of the reform. Particularly insufficient were the prices of services in some specialised psychiatric wards and in outpatient clinics. Prices in many community-based psychiatric facilities were also considerably underestimated. Undoubtedly, the reform has led to positive changes in the organization of inpatient care. These changes include: further reduction of beds in large hospitals organisational structure as well as a marked increase in the number of psychiatric wards at general hospitals, which should be the key units of psychiatric inpatient care. Increase in the number of day hospitals is another positive effect of the reform. The programme of psychiatric care transformation is presented mostly in the Mental Health Programme. The main goal of this programme is to ensure appropriate care for the mentally disordered people, namely comprehensive and accessible health care as well as other forms of help and and support necessary for living in family and in society. This goal will be accomplished by health care and other forms of help mentioned in the Mental Health Act and in the Social Help Act. Community-based model of psychiatric care is the key element of this system. Also, the Programme states desired accessibility rates for staff, number of beds and number of particular forms of psychiatric and alcohol treatment care. Separate rates for adult and children/youth population have been elaborated.

  4. Stress, gender, cognitive impairment, and outpatient physician use in later life.

    PubMed

    Krause, N

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to look at the interface between stressful life events, gender, cognitive impairment, and the use of outpatient physician services among older adults. A theoretical rationale is presented, suggesting that older men who are suffering from either mild or moderate levels of cognitive impairment are especially likely to use outpatient physician services when they are confronted by undesirable stressful events. Analyses with data provided by a nationwide sample of elderly people provide support for this complex three-way interaction.

  5. Dissociative disorders in acute psychiatric inpatients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chui-De; Meg Tseng, Mei-Chih; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Ross, Colin A

    2017-04-01

    Dissociative disorders have been documented to be common psychiatric disorders which can be detected reliably with standardized diagnostic instruments in North American and European psychiatric inpatients and outpatients (20.6% and 18.4%, respectively). However, there are concerns about their cross-cultural manifestations as an apparently low prevalence rate has been reported in East Asian inpatients and outpatients (1.7% and 4.9%, respectively). It is unknown whether the clinical profile of dissociative disorders in terms of their core symptomatic clusters, associated comorbid disorders, and environmental risk factors that has emerged in western clinical populations can also be found in non-western clinical populations. A standardized structured interview for DSM-IV dissociative disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, and a history of interpersonal victimization was administered in a sample of Taiwanese acute psychiatric inpatients. Our results showed that 19.5% of our participants met criteria for a DSM-IV dissociative disorder, mostly dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. More importantly, the western clinical profile of dissociative disorders also characterized our patients, including a poly-symptomatic presentation and a history of interpersonal trauma in both childhood and adulthood. Our results lend support to the conclusion that cross-cultural manifestations of dissociative pathology in East Asia are similar to those in North America and Europe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dissociative disorders in the psychiatric emergency ward.

    PubMed

    Sar, Vedat; Koyuncu, Ahmet; Ozturk, Erdinc; Yargic, L Ilhan; Kundakci, Turgut; Yazici, Ahmet; Kuskonmaz, Ekrem; Aksüt, Didem

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dissociative disorders among emergency psychiatric admissions. Forty-three of the 97 consecutive outpatients admitted to the psychiatric emergency unit of a university hospital were screened using the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). Seventeen (39.5% of the 43 evaluated) patients with a DES score above 25.0 were then interviewed with the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the Structured Clinical Interview for Dissociative Disorders. Fifteen emergency unit patients (34.9% of the 43 evaluated participants) were diagnosed as having a dissociative disorder. Six (14.0%) patients had dissociative identity disorder, 6 (14.0%) had dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, and 3 (7.0%) had dissociative amnesia. The average DES score of dissociative patients was 43.7. A majority of them had comorbid major depression, somatization disorder, and borderline personality disorder. Most of the patients with dissociative disorder reported auditory hallucinations, symptoms associated with psychogenic amnesia, flashback experiences, and childhood abuse and/or neglect. Dissociative disorders constitute one of the diagnostic groups with high relevance in emergency psychiatry.

  7. [Psychiatric comorbidities with tobacco-related disorders].

    PubMed

    Mühlig, S; Andreas, S; Batra, A; Petersen, K U; Hoch, E; Rüther, T

    2016-01-01

    The coincidence of tobacco smoking and psychiatric disorders is of great epidemiological and therapeutic importance. Tobacco smoking by people with mental disorders leads to disproportionately high somatic health risks, an adverse clinical course, poorer clinical outcomes and reduced quality of life (QoL). The etiological causes of the high comorbidity between smoking and mental disorders are still unclear: currently, tobacco smoking is discussed as being either the consequence or contributory cause of psychological disorders or both disorders share common antecedents and interactions. Psychiatric patients are motivated to quit and smoking cessation is not generally less effective with smokers with mental disorders than with mentally healthy individuals. Specific smoking cessation programs in the inpatient and outpatient settings are time-consuming and complex but effective. Within the framework of the current S3 guidelines the international evidence has been updated and transformed into treatment guidelines following an elaborate consensus process. Basically the same interventional measures should be used as with mentally healthy individuals; however, smokers with a psychological comorbidity often need more intensive adjuvant psychotherapeutic interventions and often need pharmaceutical support, (bupropion, varenicline and nicotine replacement therapy). Due to the overall unsatisfactory findings the treatment guidelines are partially based on clinical consensus decisions. In this field, a considerable need for research has been determined.

  8. Behaviour profile of Hungarian adolescent outpatients with a dual diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate and profound ID subsamples. Significantly higher means were found in the self-injury/stereotyped behaviour/summarized scale categories both in the frequency and severity of symptoms in the more disabled groups against the samples having milder IQ impairment. Adolescents with a dual diagnosis showed much higher BPI scale means than an adult residential ID sample. ADHD and emotional disorders were the most frequent psychiatric diagnostic comorbidities of ID (20.67% and 11.73%). Academic achievement disorder, depression and psychosis had low occurrences (3.35, 2.23 and 1.17%, respectively) but showed convergency with other authors' data. The comorbid emotional disorders may create challenges for the care of the mildly intellectually disabled group. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating health care services from the perspective of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Shank, M D; Rupich, R C; Griffin, M G; Avioli, L V

    1992-01-01

    The increasingly important over-50 age group continues to grow, presenting a unique segment for health care marketers. The present study examines the elderly's expectations and perceptions of service quality, exploring the relationship between service quality and age. In addition, the study investigates the relationship between the image of an out-patient clinic and the perceived level of service quality. The findings suggest that the elderly expect more information and more personalized attention from the multiple health care providers associated with each service encounter. Implications for exceeding the elderly's expectation of service quality and future research directions are also presented.

  10. All-Cause Mortality in Women With Severe Postpartum Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Johannsen, Benedicte Marie Winther; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Bergink, Veerle; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Munk-Olsen, Trine

    2017-01-01

    Objective The postpartum period is associated with a high risk of psychiatric episodes. The authors studied mortality in women with first-onset severe psychiatric disorders following childbirth and compared their mortality rates with those in women from the background population including other female psychiatric patients (mothers and childless women). Method In a register-based cohort study with linked information from Danish population registers, the authors identified women with first psychiatric inpatient or outpatient contacts 0–3 months postpartum. The main outcome measure was mortality rate ratios (MRRs): deaths from natural causes (diseases and medical conditions) or unnatural causes (suicides, accidents, and homicides). The cohort included 1,545,857 women representing 68,473,423 person-years at risk. Results In total, 2,699 women had first-onset psychiatric disorders 0–3 months postpartum, and 96 of these died during follow-up. Women with postpartum psychiatric disorders had a higher MRR (3.74; 95% CI=3.06–4.57) than non-postpartum-onset mothers (MRR=2.73; 95% CI=2.67–2.79) when compared with mothers with no psychiatric history. However, childless women with psychiatric diagnoses had the highest MRR (6.15; 95% CI=5.94–6.38). Unnatural cause of death represented 40.6% of fatalities among women with postpartum psychiatric disorders, and within the first year after diagnosis, suicide risk was drastically increased (MRR=289.42; 95% CI=144.02–581.62) when compared with mothers with no psychiatric history. Conclusions Women with severe postpartum psychiatric disorders had increased MRRs compared with mothers without psychiatric diagnoses, and the first year after diagnosis represents a time of particularly high relative risk for suicide in this vulnerable group. PMID:26940804

  11. Language disorders and attention deficit disorders in young children referred for psychiatric services: analysis of prevalence and a conceptual synthesis.

    PubMed

    Love, A J; Thompson, M G

    1988-01-01

    Nearly two-thirds of a group of preschool children referred for psychiatric outpatient services were found to have language disorders when assessed by standardized procedures, a higher number than reported in previous studies. Significant interrelationships between language disorders and attention deficit disorders were found. Analyses of prevalence rates, gender ratios, and selected psychosocial factors led to reformulation of approaches to assessment and treatment of young children with severe psychiatric problems.

  12. Socio-psychological mediators of the relationship between behavioral health stigma and psychiatric symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Bronwyn A; Mohatt, Nathaniel Vincent; Prince, Dana M; Thompson, Azure B; Matlin, Samantha L; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2017-05-01

    The stigma associated with mental illness or addiction is significantly and positively related to psychiatric symptoms. According to Modified Labeling Theory, several processes should mediate this relationship, including rejection experiences, stigma management (secrecy coping), and social support. In the first comprehensive test of this theory, we examined a serial mediation model on three waves of data from 138 adults receiving outpatient behavioral health treatment. Participants were recruited from outpatient behavioral health clinics in a large northeastern city in the United States and completed interviews that assessed stigma, rejection experiences, stigma management, social support, and psychiatric symptoms. There was a direct effect between stigma and psychiatric symptoms and an indirect effect in which perceived rejection, secrecy coping and social support sequentially and longitudinally intervened in the stigma and psychiatric symptom relationship. Higher perceptions of stigma predicted more rejection experiences, which marginally increased secrecy coping and decreased social support. In turn, decreased social support increased psychiatric symptoms. We provide support for Modified Labeling Theory and the clinical utility of specific mediators in the relationship between stigma and psychiatric symptoms among adults in behavioral health treatment living in urban settings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Unnatural causes of death and suicide among former adolescent psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Kim, Chang Yoon; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2013-02-01

    Compared with the general population, adolescent psychiatric patients are subject to premature death from all causes, but suicide-specific mortality rates in this population have not been carefully investigated. Therefore, we examined the high mortality due to unnatural causes, particularly suicide, using standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) relative to sex, diagnosis, and type of psychiatric service. A total of 3,029 patients aged 10-19 years presented to the outpatient clinic of a general hospital in Seoul, Korea, or were admitted to that hospital for psychiatric disorders from January 1995 to December 2006. Unnatural causes mortality risk and suicide mortality risk in these patients were compared with those in sex- and age-matched subjects from the general Korean population. The SMR for unnatural causes was 4.6, and for suicide it was 7.8. Female subjects, the young, and inpatients had the highest risks for unnatural causes of death or suicide. Among the different diagnostic groups, patients with psychotic disorders, affective disorders, and personality disorders had significantly increased SMRs for unnatural causes, and those with psychotic disorders, affective disorders, and disruptive behavioral disorders had significantly increased SMRs for suicide. The risks of unnatural death and suicide are high in adolescent psychiatric inpatients in Korea, but not as high in adolescent outpatients. Effective preventative measures are required to reduce suicide mortality in adolescent psychiatric patients, particularly female patients admitted for general psychiatric care. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Outpatient mastectomy: clinical, payer, and geographic influences.

    PubMed

    Case, C; Johantgen, M; Steiner, C

    2001-10-01

    To determine (1) the use of outpatient services for all surgical breast procedures for breast cancer and (2) the influence of payer and state on the use of outpatient services for complete mastectomy in light of state and federal length-of-stay managed care legislation. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project representing all discharges from hospitals and ambulatory surgery centers for five states (Colorado, Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, and New York) and seven years (1990-96). Longitudinal, cross-sectional analyses of all women undergoing inpatient and outpatient complete mastectomy (CMAS), subtotal mastectomy (STMAS), and lumpectomy (LUMP) for cancer were employed. Total age-adjusted rates and percentage of outpatient CMAS, STMAS, and LUMP were compared. Independent influence of state and HMO payer on likelihood of receiving an outpatient CMAS was determined from multivariate models, adjusting for clinical characteristics (age < 50 years, comorbidity, metastases, simple mastectomy, breast reconstruction) and hospital characteristics (teaching, ownership, urban). In 1993, 1 to 2 percent of CMASs were outpatient in all states. By 1996, 8 percent of CMASs were outpatient in Connecticut, 13 percent were outpatient in Maryland, and 22 percent were outpatient in Colorado. In comparison, LUMPs were 78 to 88 percent outpatient, and by 1996, 43 to 72 percent of STMASs were outpatient. In 1996, women were 30 percent more likely to receive an outpatient CMAS in New York, 2.5 times more likely in Connecticut, 4.7 times more likely in Maryland, and 8.6 times more likely in Colorado compared to New Jersey. In addition, women with Medicare, Medicaid, or private commercial insurance were less likely to receive an outpatient CMAS compared to women with an HMO payer. LUMP is an outpatient procedure, and STMAS is becoming primarily outpatient. CMAS, while still primarily inpatient, is increasingly outpatient in some states. Although clinical characteristics remain important

  15. Psychiatric comorbidities in movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Puga, Adán; Villafuerte, Gabriel; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2017-07-06

    Psychiatric comorbidities are common in movement disorders. This review provides a practical approach to help clinicians to recognize psychiatric disorders in the most frequent movement disorders. However, the extent of neurodegeneration, as well as the impact of medications with considerable CNS effects, influences the diverse psychiatric presentations that, in turn, are influenced by the stress of living with a movement disorder. Depression, anxiety, and psychosis are the most common psychiatric comorbidities in movement disorders and of the medications used to treat the motor disturbances. These psychiatric problems impair patients' functioning throughout the course of the chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the direct connection between brain dysfunction and psychiatric symptoms, there is hope that understanding the psychiatric comorbidities in movement disorders will lead to a better quality-of-life.

  16. Correlates of self-stigma among outpatients with mental illness in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adewuya, Abiodun O; Owoeye, Adekile O; Erinfolami, A O; Ola, Bolanle A

    2011-07-01

    Studies in this region have all been limited to public stigma whereas little is known about the extent of self-stigma. To assess the extent, domains and correlates of self-stigma among psychiatric outpatients in Lagos, Nigeria. Psychiatric outpatients (n = 342) from three centres completed a modified version of the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale (ISMI) as a measure of their self-stigma. They were also evaluated for various sociodemographic and clinical related variables. A total of 74 (n = 21.6%) patients were classified as having 'high self-stigma'. The correlates of high self-stigma included unemployment (OR 3.85, 95% CI 2.55-7.00), poor social support (OR 10.82, 95% CI 4.85-24.84), longer duration of illness (OR 10.35, 95% CI 4.36-25.78) and having full insight into the illness (OR 4.23, 95% CI 2.16-8.76). Self-stigma is a common phenomenon in psychiatric outpatients in this environment. The present anti-stigma programmes must extend to regions of sub-Saharan Africa and incorporate self-stigma as a matter of priority.

  17. Diagnosis of probable psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in the outpatient clinic: does gender matter?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alissa A; Preston, Julie; Scott, Rod C; Bujarski, Krzysztof A

    2013-11-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs) are paroxysmal events of altered behavior that outwardly resemble epilepsy but are caused by psychiatric disease. The diagnosis of probable PNESs can be made in the outpatient clinic prior to video-EEG monitoring by identification of specific PNES predictors and specific elements of seizure semiology from the clinical history. Since psychiatric disease may have distinct mechanisms between women and men, the objective of this study was to determine if gender-specific differences exist in PNES predictors and PNES semiology. Such differences could be used to optimize the accuracy of outpatient diagnosis of probable PNESs. Medical records of male and female patients with video-EEG diagnosis of definite PNESs were retrospectively reviewed for occurrence of PNES predictors. In addition, PNES semiology was analyzed de novo from video-EEG records and categorized into previously established semiology clusters. Eighty-six patients were included in the analysis (59 women and 27 men). We found significantly lower rates of reported physical and sexual abuse, lower rates of previous psychiatric diagnosis, and lower rates of chronic pain in male patients with no significant differences in rates of other PNES predictors. Furthermore, we found no difference in PNES semiology between men and women, with both groups experiencing similar rates of major motor, minor motor, and nonmotor semiology. In conclusion, our results lend support to the idea that distinct risk factor criteria but similar semiology criteria should be used for the diagnosis of probable PNESs in the outpatient clinic in men and women. © 2013.

  18. Treatment for Cigarette Smoking Among Depressed Mental Health Outpatients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sharon M.; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Prochaska, Judith J.; Eisendrath, Stuart; Rossi, Joseph S.; Redding, Colleen A.; Rosen, Amy B.; Meisner, Marc; Humfleet, Gary L.; Gorecki, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. Using a brief contact control, we tested the efficacy of a staged care intervention to reduce cigarette smoking among psychiatric patients in outpatient treatment for depression. Methods. We conducted a randomized clinical trial that included assessments at baseline and at months 3, 6, 12, and 18. Three hundred twenty-two patients in mental health outpatient treatment who were diagnosed with depression and smoked ≥1 cigarette per day participated. The desire to quit smoking was not a prerequisite for participation. Staged care intervention participants received computerized motivational feedback at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months and were offered a 6-session psychological counseling and pharmacological cessation treatment program. Brief contact control participants received a self-help guide and referral list of local smoking-treatment providers. Results. As we hypothesized, abstinence rates among staged care intervention participants exceeded those of brief contact control participants at months 12 and 18. Significant differences favoring staged care intervention also were found in occurrence of a quit attempt and stringency of abstinence goal. Conclusion. The data suggest that individuals in psychiatric treatment for depression can be aided in quitting smoking through use of staged care interventions and that smoking cessation interventions used in the general population can be implemented in psychiatric outpatient settings. PMID:17008577

  19. Salaries in psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pope, D W

    1989-01-01

    The National Association of Private Psychiatric Hospitals has been surveying hospitals for the past several years. This paper focuses on the salary levels and average annual rates of increase for a few selected positions. Comparisons are made with data from surveys covering similar positions in other settings and with the Consumer Price Index. Annual rates of increase are reported for five- and ten-year periods.

  20. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 APA*

  1. Psychiatric symptoms, quality of life, and HIV status among people using opioids in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Alethea; Blokhina, Elena; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Zvartau, Edwin; Schottenfeld, Richard; Chawarski, Marek

    2017-03-01

    The Russian Federation is experiencing a very high rate of HIV infection among people who inject drugs (PWID). However, few studies have explored characteristics of people with co-occurring opioid use disorders and HIV, including psychiatric symptom presentations and how these symptoms might relate to quality of life. The current study therefore explored a.) differences in baseline psychiatric symptoms among HIV+ and HIV- individuals with opioid use disorder seeking naltrexone treatment at two treatment centers in Saint Petersburg, Russia and b.) associations between psychiatric symptom constellations and quality of life. Participants were 328 adults enrolling in a randomized clinical trial evaluating outpatient treatments combining naltrexone with different drug counseling models. Psychiatric symptoms and quality of life were assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory and The World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF, respectively. Approximately 60% of participants were HIV+. Those who were HIV+ scored significantly higher on BSI anxiety, depression, psychoticism, somatization, paranoid ideation, phobic anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and GSI indexes (all p<0.05) than those HIV-. A K-means cluster analysis identified three distinct psychiatric symptom profiles; the proportion of HIV+ was significantly greater and quality of life indicators were significantly lower in the cluster with the highest psychiatric symptom levels. Higher levels of psychiatric symptoms and lower quality of life indicators among HIV+ (compared to HIV-) individuals injecting drugs support the potential importance of combining interventions that target improving psychiatric symptoms with drug treatment, particularly for HIV+ patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of non-adherence among psychiatric patients in Jordan, a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mukattash, Tareq L; Alzoubi, Karem H; Abu El-Rub, Ejlal; Jarab, Anan S; Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Khdour, Maher; Shara, Mohd; Al Hamarneh, Yazid N

    2016-05-01

    It has been estimated that up to 50% of any patient population is at least partially non-adherent to their prescribed treatment. Identifying barriers to adherence is required to develop effective interventions for psychiatric patients. To explore the prevalence and factors of non-adherence among psychiatric patients present at four psychiatric clinics. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. A sample of psychiatric patients attending outpatient psychiatric clinics was enrolled between March and April 2011. A total of 243 psychiatric patients took part in this study with the majority of patients (92.5%) being prescribed more than one psychiatric disorder. The majority (64.2%) of the patients was classified as non-adherent according to the Morisky adherence questionnaire and forgetfulness was the most prevalent reason for that. Non-adherence is a common and important issue among psychiatric patients. Polypharmacy, safety concerns and lack of insight towards the prescribed treatment were reported as the main reasons of non-adherence. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. [Social welfare in the care of chronically ill psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Seyde, T

    2000-09-01

    The article shows the development of the long-stay departments at the psychiatric hospitals in Eastern Germany from the perspective of a local government. Against the apparently increasing scepticism of concepts of de-institutionalisation, the example of the city Leipzig is used to show how the process of reintegrating residents of long-stay institutions can be supported, and how decentralized out-patient psychosocial services--which can also be used by the community inhabitants--can be built up at the same time. Reference is also made to the well-developed out-patient services and clearly structured treatment offers for the inpatient sector which have already existed in the city before the political changes in Eastern Germany. Further, the role of the local Social Welfare Office in the realization of de-institutionalisation projects will be outlined.

  4. A Fiscal Intermediary Based on Needs Assessment to Support a Managed Care Approach to Outpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Care at BAMC.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-05

    OUTPATIENT CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY CARE AT BAMC 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) SMITH, THOMAS CLARK III 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 114...construct a patient profile for child and adolescent 20. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21. ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION QIUNCLASSIFIED...1 9, 4 13311WP A FISCAL INTERMEDIARY BASED NEEDS ASSESSMENT TO SUPPORT A MANAGED CARE APPROACH TO OUTPATIENT CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC CARE AT

  5. Elderly cancer patients' psychopathology: a systematic review: aging and mental health.

    PubMed

    Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Gennimata, Vassiliki; Mystakidou, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    This review of the literature on elderly cancer patients and their psychiatric disorders was undertaken to determine the extent of the problem. It consists of articles with elderly cancer patients. Keyword terms included "cancer", "elderly", "aging", "geriatric", "psychiatric disorders", "psychiatric symptoms", "psychological problems", "aged >60 years", "sucidal ideation, geriatric, cancer", "suicide geriatric cancer". We conducted searches on the following databases: PubMed; PsychINFO (1980-2013); finally, 102 publications were suitable for the current review. Depression in elderly cancer patients is the most common disorder in elderly cancer patients associated with disability, morbidity and mortality. Anxiety disorders may be less frequent in geriatric patients; however, it seemed to be a major problem in late life. Psychiatric disorders are common in geriatric patients with cancer especially at advanced stages of the disease. In addition, health care professionals can help provide treatment and emotional support. Future research should aim to provide data about the real prevalence and severity of psychiatric disorders in elderly patients with cancer, for the improvement of patients' quality of life and their caregivers.

  6. Depressive Symptoms and Associated Factors in Institutionalized Elderly.

    PubMed

    Jerez-Roig, Javier; de Oliveira, Nayara Priscila Dantas; de Lima Filho, Bartolomeu Fagundes; de Farias Bezerra, Maria Amanda; Matias, Monayane Grazielly Leite; Ferreira, Lidiane Macedo; Dos Santos Amaral, Fabienne Louise Juvêncio; Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra; Lima, Kenio Costa

    2016-01-01

    Background/Study Context: Depression is a common psychiatric disorder in the elderly that leads to a decrease in quality of life and functional impairment, among other health problems. The study of depressive symptoms in institutionalized elderly is scarce in Latin America and can contribute to plan prevention and treatment actions in order to improve health conditions for the residents as well as quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms and identify its associated factors in institutionalized elderly.

  7. Isolated Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Lucy Rose; And Others

    The Minnesota Senior Study, the first statewide survey of the elderly in nearly 20 years, was based on a telephone survey with a statewide sample of 1,500 non-institutionalized Minnesotans age 60 and older. Substantial numbers of Minnesotans age 60-plus were found to have low social contacts. Five percent, or about 33,000 older Minnesotans, fell…

  8. America's Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soldo, Beth J.; Agree, Emily M.

    1988-01-01

    The older population in the United States grew twice as fast as the rest of the population in the last 20 years. This growth is expected to accelerate early in the next century as the large baby-boom cohorts move through middle age and become elderly. Substantial improvements in life expectancy at all ages, particularly at extreme old age, mean…

  9. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Adult Outpatients With Bipolar Disorder or Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Boerman, Remco; Cohen, Dan; Schulte, Peter F J; Nugter, Annet

    2016-12-01

    Several studies show an association between schizophrenia and low levels of vitamin D. To date, there are only few studies about the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with bipolar disorder. We hypothesized that vitamin D deficiency is less common among patients with bipolar disorder than among patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. A second hypothesis is that vitamin D deficiency is more prevalent among patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorders than among the general Dutch population.Most studies have been conducted with hospitalized patients; in this study, we only included outpatients. All outpatients of a center for bipolar disorders and all outpatients of 3 flexible assertive community treatment teams were asked to participate in this cross-sectional study. We included 118 patients with bipolar disorder and 202 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Vitamin D levels were deficient in 30.3% (95% confidence interval, 25.5-35.6) of the cases. The type of psychiatric disorder was not a predictor of vitamin D deficiency. The absolute difference in risk of deficiency between the study population and the Dutch Caucasian population was 23.8% (95% confidence interval, 18.3%-29.3%). In this study, vitamin D deficiency was 4.7 times more common among outpatients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder than among the Dutch general population.Given the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, we believe that outpatients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder should be considered at risk of having low levels of vitamin D. Annual measurement of vitamin D levels in psychiatric outpatients with these disorders seems to be justified to maintain bone health, muscle strength, and to prevent osteoporosis.

  10. A liturgical journey at Wesley Woods: worship experiences within an inpatient geriatric psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Clark, P Y

    1993-01-01

    Provides guidance to caregivers who hope to assist mentally ill elderly people in their spiritual development. Describes a particular therapeutic milieu, a theological rationale, and a worship program intended to meet the liturgical needs of aging people admitted as psychiatric inpatients. Includes clinical vignettes to illustrate what was learned in the implementation of this particular worship program.

  11. Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program: Hospital-Based Stroke Outpatient Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rice, Danielle; Janzen, Shannon; McIntyre, Amanda; Vermeer, Julianne; Britt, Eileen; Teasell, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have considered the effectiveness of outpatient rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a hospital-based interdisciplinary outpatient stroke rehabilitation program with respect to physical functioning, mobility, and balance. The Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program provides a hospital-based interdisciplinary approach to stroke rehabilitation in Southwestern Ontario. Outcome measures from physiotherapy and occupational therapy sessions were available at intake and discharge from the program. A series of paired sample t-tests were performed to assess patient changes between time points for each outcome measure. A total of 271 patients met the inclusion criteria for analysis (56.1% male; mean age = 62.9 ± 13.9 years). Significant improvements were found between admission and discharge for the Functional Independence Measure, grip strength, Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment, two-minute walk test, maximum walk test, Timed Up and Go, Berg Balance Scale, and one-legged stance (P < .003 for all). The findings indicate that an interdisciplinary rehabilitation program was effective at improving the physical functioning, mobility, and balance of individuals after a stroke. A hospital-based, stroke-specific rehabilitation program should be considered when patients continue to experience deficits after inpatient rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Pervasive refusal syndrome is a severe child psychiatric disorder].

    PubMed

    Hulgaard, Ditte; Wacher, Jeanette; Dehlholm-Lambertsen, Gitte

    2015-10-26

    Pervasive refusal syndrome (PRS) is a severe, pervasive and potentially life-threatening disorder, which was first de--scribed in 1991, as a syndrome of child psychiatric disorder. Little has been written about PRS. We report a case story of a ten-year-old boy developing all symptoms of PRS, including inability to eat, move or speak. Psychopharmacological treat-ment was not successful. Full rehabilitation was reported after a period of inpatient treatment and outpatient follow-up. Different aetiological factors for PRS have been proposed. A number of these are presented in the case story.

  13. Word use of outpatients with a personality disorder and concurrent or previous major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Molendijk, Marc L; Bamelis, Lotte; van Emmerik, Arnold A P; Arntz, Arnoud; Haringsma, Rimke; Spinhoven, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In a recent study, Rude, Gortner, and Pennebaker (2004) found word use to be related to depression and vulnerability to depression in the essays of college students. We sought to replicate and extend these findings in a clinical sample. Written essays of 304 psychiatric outpatients with a personality disorder and a mixed psychiatric profile on DSM-IV axis-I and 108 healthy controls were examined with word count software. Data on the tendency to be discrepant about the current self compared to a more ideal self were also gathered. We found that psychiatric outpatients in general used more words referring to the self and negative emotion words and fewer positive emotion words, compared to healthy controls. However, word-use proved unrelated to depression specifically. Actual-ideal self discrepancies were related to patient status and to current depression. Contrary to our hypothesis, these discrepancies did not correlate with the use of words referring to the self. We conclude that the negative content and self-focus of written essays and high levels of discrepancy reflect a negative thinking style that is common to a range of psychiatric disorders rather than being specific to depression.

  14. Temperature effects on outpatient visits of respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yu-Kai

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated the risk of outpatient visits for respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction not elsewhere classified (CAO) associated with ambient temperatures and extreme temperature events from 2000 to 2008 in Taiwan. Based on geographical and socioeconomics characteristics, this study divided the whole island into seven areas. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the area-disease-specific cumulative relative risk (RR), and random-effect meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled RR of outpatient visits, from lag 0 to lag 7 days, associated with daily temperature, and added effects of prolonged extreme heat and cold for population of all ages, the elderly and younger than 65 years. Pooled analyses showed that younger population had higher outpatient visits for exposing to low temperature of 18 °C, with cumulative 8-day RRs of 1.36 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.31-1.42) for respiratory diseases, 1.10 (95 % CI 1.03-1.18) for asthma, and 1.12 (95 % CI 1.02-1.22) for CAO. The elderly was more vulnerable to high temperature of 30 °C with the cumulative 8-day RR of 1.08 (95 % CI 1.03-1.13) for CAO. Elevated outpatient visits for all respiratory diseases and asthma were associated with extreme heat lasting for 6 to 8 days. On the contrary, the extreme cold lasting more than 8 days had significant negative association with outpatient visits of all respiratory diseases. In summary, elderly patients of respiratory diseases and CAO are vulnerable to high temperature. Cold temperature is associated with all types of respiratory diseases for younger patients.

  15. Temperature effects on outpatient visits of respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yu-Kai

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated the risk of outpatient visits for respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction not elsewhere classified (CAO) associated with ambient temperatures and extreme temperature events from 2000 to 2008 in Taiwan. Based on geographical and socioeconomics characteristics, this study divided the whole island into seven areas. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the area-disease-specific cumulative relative risk (RR), and random-effect meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled RR of outpatient visits, from lag 0 to lag 7 days, associated with daily temperature, and added effects of prolonged extreme heat and cold for population of all ages, the elderly and younger than 65 years. Pooled analyses showed that younger population had higher outpatient visits for exposing to low temperature of 18 °C, with cumulative 8-day RRs of 1.36 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.31-1.42) for respiratory diseases, 1.10 (95 % CI 1.03-1.18) for asthma, and 1.12 (95 % CI 1.02-1.22) for CAO. The elderly was more vulnerable to high temperature of 30 °C with the cumulative 8-day RR of 1.08 (95 % CI 1.03-1.13) for CAO. Elevated outpatient visits for all respiratory diseases and asthma were associated with extreme heat lasting for 6 to 8 days. On the contrary, the extreme cold lasting more than 8 days had significant negative association with outpatient visits of all respiratory diseases. In summary, elderly patients of respiratory diseases and CAO are vulnerable to high temperature. Cold temperature is associated with all types of respiratory diseases for younger patients.

  16. First report from the Swedish National Forensic Psychiatric Register (SNFPR).

    PubMed

    Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Hassing, Linda B; Lindqvist, Ann-Sophie; Andersson, Hans; Eriksson, Lars; Hanson, Frances Hagelbäck; Möller, Nina; Nilsson, Thomas; Hofvander, Björn; Anckarsäter, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, the present register is the only nationwide forensic psychiatric patient register in the world. The aim of this article is to describe the content of the Swedish National Forensic Psychiatric Register (SNFPR) for Swedish forensic patients for the year 2010. The subjects are individuals who, in connection with prosecution due to criminal acts, have been sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment in Sweden. The results show that in 2010, 1476 Swedish forensic patients were assessed in the SNFPR; 1251 (85%) were males and 225 (15%) were females. Almost 60% of the patients had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, with a significantly higher frequency among males than females. As many as 70% of the patients had a previous history of outpatient psychiatric treatment before becoming a forensic psychiatric patient, with a mean age at first contact with psychiatric care of about 20 years old for both sexes. More than 63% of the patients had a history of addiction, with a higher proportion of males than females. Furthermore, as many as 38% of all patients committed crimes while under the influence of alcohol and/or illicit drugs. This was more often the case for men than for women. Both male and female patients were primarily sentenced for crimes related to life and death (e.g., murder, assault). However, there were more females than males in treatment for general dangerous crimes (e.g., arson), whereas men were more often prosecuted for crimes related to sex. In 2010, as many as 70% of all forensic patients in Sweden had a prior sentence for a criminal act, and males were prosecuted significantly more often than females. The most commonly prescribed pharmaceuticals for both genders were antipsychotics, although more women than men were prescribed other pharmaceuticals, such as antidepressants, antiepileptics, and anxiolytics. The result from the present study might give clinicians an opportunity to reflect upon and challenge their

  17. Psychiatric comorbidity measures as predictors of retention in drug abuse treatment programs.

    PubMed Central

    Broome, K M; Flynn, P M; Simpson, D D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine lifetime and current psychiatric comorbidity measures as predictors of drug abuse treatment retention, and to test the generalizability of results across treatment agencies in diverse settings and with varying practices. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The national Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies (DATOS), a longitudinal study of clients from 96 treatment agencies in 11 U.S. cities. STUDY DESIGN: The design is naturalistic and uses longitudinal analysis of treatment retention in long-term residential, outpatient drug-free, and outpatient methadone treatment modalities; client background (including psychiatric comorbidity) and program service provision are predictors. Clinical thresholds for adequate treatment retention were 90 days for long-term residential and outpatient drug-free, and 360 days for outpatient methadone. Psychiatric indicators included lifetime DSM-III-R diagnoses of depression/anxiety and antisocial personality, and dimensional measures of current symptoms for depression and hostility. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: Data include structured interviews with clients, a survey of treatment program administrators, and program discharge records. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Dimensional measures of current psychiatric symptoms emerged as better predictors than lifetime DSM-III-R diagnoses. In addition, the predictive association of hostility with retention varied significantly across treatment agencies, both in the long-term residential and outpatient drug-free modalities. Other notable findings were that on-site mental health services in long-term residential programs were associated with better retention for clients with symptoms of hostility. CONCLUSIONS: Assessment issues and stability of results across programs are important considerations for treatment research and practice. PMID:10445903

  18. Psychiatric patients' vulnerability in the wake of the September 11th terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Franklin, C Laurel; Young, Diane; Zimmerman, Mark

    2002-12-01

    The September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks led to speculation about the vulnerability of psychiatric patients to psychological distress following such events. This study examined the impact of national terrorist attacks on psychiatric and medical outpatients living approximately 150 to 200 miles from the attack sites (N = 308). Two to 3 weeks following 9/11, patients were given questionnaires assessing background information, healthcare service utilization, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Psychiatric patients (33%) were significantly more likely than medical patients (13%) to report distressing symptoms meeting criteria for PTSD (except for the duration criterion) despite no differences in learning about the attacks or personal involvement with the victims. Patients meeting PTSD criteria were more likely to schedule an appointment to speak with their physician about their reactions. Psychiatric patients not directly impacted by the 9/11 terrorist attacks are at increased risk for experiencing distressing symptoms following national terrorist attacks.

  19. Treatment of four psychiatric emergencies in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bienvenu, O Joseph; Neufeld, Karin J; Needham, Dale M

    2012-09-01

    To review the diagnosis and management of four selected psychiatric emergencies in the intensive care unit: agitated delirium, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, serotonin syndrome, and psychiatric medication overdose. Review of relevant medical literature. Standardized screening for delirium should be routine. Agitated delirium should be managed with an antipsychotic and, possibly, dexmedetomidine in treatment-refractory cases. Delirium management should also include ensuring a calming environment and adequate pain control, minimizing benzodiazepines and anticholinergics, normalizing the sleep-wake cycle, providing sensory aids as required, and providing early physical and occupational therapy. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome should be treated by discontinuing dopamine blockers, providing supportive therapy, and possibly administering medications (benzodiazepines, dopamine agonists, and/or dantrolene) or electroconvulsive therapy, if indicated. Serotonin syndrome should be treated by discontinuing all serotonergic agents, providing supportive therapy, controlling agitation with benzodiazepines, and possibly administering serotonin2A antagonists. It is often unnecessary to restart psychiatric medications upon which a patient has overdosed in the intensive care unit, though withdrawal syndromes should be prevented, and communication with outpatient prescribers is vital. Understanding the diagnosis and appropriate management of these four psychiatric emergencies is important to provide safe and effective care in the intensive care unit.

  20. Elders Health Empowerment Scale

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Empowerment refers to patient skills that allow them to become primary decision-makers in control of daily self-management of health problems. As important the concept as it is, particularly for elders with chronic diseases, few available instruments have been validated for use with Spanish speaking people. Objective: Translate and adapt the Health Empowerment Scale (HES) for a Spanish-speaking older adults sample and perform its psychometric validation. Methods: The HES was adapted based on the Diabetes Empowerment Scale-Short Form. Where "diabetes" was mentioned in the original tool, it was replaced with "health" terms to cover all kinds of conditions that could affect health empowerment. Statistical and Psychometric Analyses were conducted on 648 urban-dwelling seniors. Results: The HES had an acceptable internal consistency with a Cronbach's α of 0.89. The convergent validity was supported by significant Pearson's Coefficient correlations between the HES total and item scores and the General Self Efficacy Scale (r= 0.77), Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale (r= 0.69) and Making Decisions Empowerment Scale (r= 0.70). Construct validity was evaluated using item analysis, half-split test and corrected item to total correlation coefficients; with good internal consistency (α> 0.8). The content validity was supported by Scale and Item Content Validity Index of 0.98 and 1.0, respectively. Conclusions: HES had acceptable face validity and reliability coefficients; which added to its ease administration and users' unbiased comprehension, could set it as a suitable tool in evaluating elder's outpatient empowerment-based medical education programs. PMID:25767307

  1. The development of outpatient milestones.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Donald E

    2014-06-01

    The Milestones work group sought to establish a baseline of expected competence development across the six core competencies. The subcompetencies and milestones reflect the committee's work with input from ABPN, AADPRT, and AAP. They are intended to serve not only as consistent markers of progress nationwide but also as a basis by which individual programs can build their own milestones that reflect unique qualities of any given learning environment. The Milestones work group anticipates that iterative changes will be made as the milestones are broadly implemented. In anticipating the implementation of outpatient milestones, the committee will be particularly interested to how effectively psychotherapy milestones will be captured through the combination of outpatient evaluations and other data points captured in the program director's semiannual evaluation.

  2. Simulation analysis of an outpatient services facility.

    PubMed

    Levy, J L; Watford, B A; Owen, V T

    1989-11-01

    Anderson Memorial Hospital in Anderson, South Carolina is in the process of constructing a new Outpatient Services Center. The Outpatient Services Center will combine existing outpatient services within the hospital and offsite services at the Outpatient Diagnostic Center. A simulation model of the proposed facility has been developed based on historical data. The information obtained from the simulation model includes the analysis of outpatient services utilization, patient waiting and flow times, and service area queue sizes. This information has been used to determine minimum facility design requirements, such as waiting room size, based on the expected demands.

  3. Caring conversations - psychiatric patients' narratives about suffering.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Lennart; Lindström, Unni A

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this study was to increase and deepen the understanding of how psychiatric patients in conversations with nurses narrate their experience of suffering. Data were obtained in the years 2001-2002 by audio recording of 20 individual caring conversations between eight patients and three psychiatric nurses at a psychiatric outpatient unit in Sweden. Before the data were gathered the study was approved by a local research ethics committee. The methodology is inspired by the hermeneutics of Paul Ricoeur. The data is given a naïve reading which is followed by two structural analyses which explain the text. Finally, the structural analyses and the pre-understanding are confronted in a critical reflection. In the patients' narratives, suffering was at first concealed under a façade that helps the patient to cope with suffering and with shame. As they moved along to a turning point, something happened that made them able to risk everything, i.e. their very selves, but also gave them the possibility of regaining vital parts of themselves that where lost when the façade was constructed. As they took the suffering upon themselves, they grew to be fully visible as human beings and healing was possible as a re-establishment of the interpersonal bridge. This not only meant that the sufferer became open for relationships with others or an abstract other, but also that an opening in the relationship with themselves occurred. If psychiatric patients are allowed to narrate freely they develop different plot structures, which can either hide or reveal suffering. Patients who could establish an answer to the why-question of suffering could also interpret their suffering in a way that enabled growth and reconciliation. In order to do so, they had to abandon the shelter of the façade and confront suffering and shame. This turning point opened them up to life-sustaining relationships with themselves as well as with abstract and concrete others.

  4. Hyperglycemia associated dissociative fugue (organic dissociative disorder) in an elderly.

    PubMed

    Ram, Dushad; Ashoka, H G; Gowdappa, Basavnna

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes is known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, and cognitive impairment. However, dissociative syndrome has not been reported so far. Here we are reporting a case of repeated dissociative fugue associated with hyperglycemia, in an elderly with type II diabetes. Possible neurobiological mechanism has been discussed.

  5. Hyperglycemia associated dissociative fugue (organic dissociative disorder) in an elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Dushad; Ashoka, H. G; Gowdappa, Basavnna

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes is known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, and cognitive impairment. However, dissociative syndrome has not been reported so far. Here we are reporting a case of repeated dissociative fugue associated with hyperglycemia, in an elderly with type II diabetes. Possible neurobiological mechanism has been discussed. PMID:26286620

  6. [Outpatient rheumatologic treatment in Germany].

    PubMed

    Edelmann, E

    2014-03-01

    Outpatient rheumatologic treatment in Germany is managed by rheumatologists in private practice (n = 557), by authorized rheumatism outpatient centers (n = 116), by rheumatism centers according to §116b (n = 43) and by university outpatient departments. A total number of 975 rheumatologists were registered by the end of 2012 of whom approximately 830 were active in outpatient care. With this number of rheumatologists Germany is in the middle range in comparison to eight industrial nations including the USA. This number is not sufficient to provide adequate medical care and the consequences are too long waiting times for an appointment with a rheumatologist. Statistical data of the Kassenärztliche Bundesvereinigung (KBV, National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians) showed 688,000 general insurance patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As some 68.9 % of the population are in this insurance scheme there are some 770,000 RA patients in Germany (almost 1 % of the population). One way to improve rheumatology care in spite of the lack of rheumatologists could be special agreements with the general health insurance providers to improve cooperation and division of responsibilities between rheumatologists and general practitioners, to implement patient education, tighter control and treat to target in rheumatology care. Another way could be a new treatment level called "ambulant specialist care", with no budget for medical care and no budget for the number of patients treated and therefore the chance for rheumatologists to treat more patients and have a better income. To achieve that more young doctors receive approval as a specialist in rheumatology, more chairs of rheumatology at universities and a nationwide stipendium for training assistants are needed.

  7. Purinergic system in psychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Cheffer, A; Castillo, A R G; Corrêa-Velloso, J; Gonçalves, M C B; Naaldijk, Y; Nascimento, I C; Burnstock, G; Ulrich, H

    2017-09-26

    Psychiatric disorders are debilitating diseases, affecting >80 million people worldwide. There are no causal cures for psychiatric disorders and available therapies only treat the symptoms. The etiology of psychiatric disorders is unknown, although it has been speculated to be a combination of environmental, stress and genetic factors. One of the neurotransmitter systems implicated in the biology of psychiatric disorders is the purinergic system. In this review, we performed a comprehensive search of the literature about the role and function of the purinergic system in the development and predisposition to psychiatric disorders, with a focus on depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, anxiety and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. We also describe how therapeutics used for psychiatric disorders act on the purinergic system.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 26 September 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.188.

  8. Liver Illness and Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Paul; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Girard, Murielle; Jacques, Jérémie; Nubukpo, Philippe; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with psychiatric disorders are usually more exposed to multiple somatic illnesses, including liver diseases. Specific links are established between psychiatric disorders and alcohol hepatitis, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C in the population as a whole, and specifically in drug abusers. Metabolic syndrome criteria, and associated steatosis or non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH) are frequent in patients with chronic psychiatric disorders under psychotropic drugs, and should be screened. Some psychiatric medications, such as neuroleptics, mood stabilizers, and a few antidepressants, are often associated with drug-induced liver injury (DILI). In patients with advanced chronic liver diseases, the prescription of some specific psychiatric treatments should be avoided. Psychiatric disorders can be a limiting factor in the decision-making and following up for liver transplantation. PMID:28123443

  9. Severity of pre-existing psychiatric illness and response to the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Funayama, Michitaka; Mizushima, Jin

    2013-10-01

    Reports have described how psychiatric patients respond to disasters. However, previous reports on the response depending on diagnostic categories have provided no clear consensus. Here we analyzed response to the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011, among psychiatric patients in light of severity of pre-existing psychiatric illness. We studied psychiatric change among a population of psychiatric outpatients in Tochigi prefecture, located ~160 km (~100 miles) southeast of the Fukushima nuclear power plant, in an area that suffered moderate damage from the earthquake and radiation. A total of 294 psychiatric outpatients was assessed using the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF-F). A change of ≥10 points in the GAF-F score was counted as a change in symptoms. The data were stratified by disease category, gender, and GAF-F score and analyzed using the Fisher's exact test. In the 2 months after the earthquake, 5.4% of patients showed evidence of a change in symptoms, with 4.1% worsening and 1.4% improving. Compared with patients having a GAF-F score ≤50, significantly more patients with a score >50 showed evidence of worsening symptoms. No significant difference was found with respect to gender or diagnostic category for patients with worsened or improved symptoms. Our findings reveal that a relatively small percent of patients with pre-existing psychiatric diseases showed evidence of a change in symptoms and that patients with mild-to-moderate psychiatric illness are potentially vulnerable to the impacts of a natural disaster. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lamotrigine in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jennifer G; Gitlin, Michael J; Altshuler, Lori L

    2013-07-01

    Owing to the prevalence of medication side effects and treatment resistance, prescribers often consider off-label uses of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved agents for the treatment of persistent symptoms. The authors review the available literature on the FDA-approved and non-FDA-approved uses of lamotrigine in adults with psychiatric disorders. We used PubMed, MEDLINE, and a hand search of relevant literature to find studies published between 1990 and 2012 and available in English language. The following keywords were searched: lamotrigine, psychiatric, mood disorders, depression, personality disorders, anxiety, schizophrenia, side effects, and rash. Data were selected from 29 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). When RCTs were not available, open-label trials (6), retrospective case reviews (10), and case series (4) were summarized. We extracted results of monotherapy and augmentation trials of lamotrigine on primary and secondary outcome measures. Lamotrigine is generally well tolerated, with the best evidence for the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder, particularly in prevention of depressive episodes. In acute bipolar depression, meta-analyses suggested a modest benefit, especially for more severely depressed subjects, with switch rates similar to placebo. In unipolar depression, double-blind RCTs noted benefit on subsets of symptoms and improved response in more severely depressed subjects. Data are limited but promising in borderline personality disorder. Use of lamotrigine in schizophrenia and anxiety disorders has little supportive evidence. Lamotrigine is recommended in bipolar maintenance when depression is prominent. It also has a role in treating acute bipolar depression and unipolar depression, though the latter warrants more research. Data are too limited in other psychiatric disorders to recommend its use at this time. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  11. [Psychiatric complications of abortion].

    PubMed

    Gurpegui, Manuel; Jurado, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The psychiatric consequences of induced abortion continue to be the object of controversy. The reactions of women when they became aware of conception are very variable. Pregnancy, whether initially intended or unintended, may provoke stress; and miscarriage may bring about feelings of loss and grief reaction. Therefore, induced abortion, with its emotional implications (of relief, shame and guilt) not surprisingly is a stressful adverse life event. METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS: There is agreement among researchers on the need to compare the mental health outcomes (or the psychiatric complications) with appropriate groups, including women with unintended pregnancies ending in live births and women with miscarriages. There is also agreement on the need to control for the potential confounding effects of multiple variables: demographic, contextual, personal development, previous or current traumatic experiences, and mental health prior to the obstetric event. Any psychiatric outcome is multi-factorial in origin and the impact of life events depend on how they are perceived, the psychological defence mechanisms (unconscious to a great extent) and the coping style. The fact of voluntarily aborting has an undeniable ethical dimension in which facts and values are interwoven. No research study has found that induced abortion is associated with a better mental health outcome, although the results of some studies are interpreted as or Some general population studies point out significant associations with alcohol or illegal drug dependence, mood disorders (including depression) and some anxiety disorders. Some of these associations have been confirmed, and nuanced, by longitudinal prospective studies which support causal relationships. With the available data, it is advisable to devote efforts to the mental health care of women who have had an induced abortion. Reasons of the woman's mental health by no means can be invoked, on empirical bases, for

  12. [Psychiatric and Psychotherapeutic Care of Refugees by Reference of a Large Psychiatric Care Hospital in Western Germany].

    PubMed

    Schaffrath, Jonas; Schmitz-Buhl, Mario; Gün, Ali Kemal; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne

    2017-04-01

    Medical and psychological care of refugees is among the most important current challenges in German health politics. Work with patients from this heterogeneous group who have often faced severe stress before, during and after their migration is currently based on a thin data foundation. Based on introductory information on current knowledge concerning psychiatric morbidity of refugees this article presents the psychiatric care of refugees at LVR Clinics Cologne - a psychiatric specialty hospital situated in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. A sample of 239 cases of refugee patients who were referred to in- and outpatient departments of the LVR Clinics Cologne between April 2015 and March 2016 are evaluated in respect of diagnoses, admission modalities and socio-demographic variables. The majority of principal diagnoses (40.2%) belong to the group of stress-related and somatoform disorders (F4 in ICD-10). Mood disorders (F3 in ICD-10) represented 31.0%, followed by mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use (F1 in ICD-10) with 15.1%. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was the most prevalent diagnose (13.0%). Among the 29 countries of the patients' origin Afghanistan (10,0%), Serbia (9.6%) and Kosovo (8.8%) were the most abundant. The diagnoses and the high rate of acute psychiatric events reflect the massive psychological pressure of the patients. The important role of interpreters and mediators specialized in language and integration in the treatment process is emphasized. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Outpatient clinic referrals and their outcome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, F M; Hoare, T; Gilmour, H

    1992-03-01

    A cohort of 392 patients referred to six outpatient clinics by general practitioners during 1987 with diagnoses of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, peripheral vascular disease, psoriasis or eczema, were studied from the time of their first attendance until up to two years later. Six consultant clinics were studied in the three specialties: rheumatology, vascular surgery and dermatology. For each specialty a clinic in both a teaching hospital and a district general hospital were included. The cohort members were predominantly middle-aged or elderly people, with a greater proportion of women, except at the vascular surgery clinic where 65% of patients were men. The 392 patients made a total of 936 visits (median two, range one-eight) during the study period; 91 patients were still attending up to two years after the first visit. Patients referred by their general practitioner for therapy were less likely to be discharged than those referred for other reasons. The principal reason for continuing attendance as perceived by patients, general practitioners and hospital doctors was the necessity for consultant supervision, although agreement was far from complete in individual cases. Junior staff tended to see a higher proportion of patients at follow-up visits than did consultants, and were found to have lower discharge rates than consultants. Analyses of data showed that at the first visit, diagnosis, disease severity and the grade of doctor seeing the patient in the clinic was significantly associated with patient discharge at the P < 0.05 level of significance. Patients considered that their visits had produced improvement in their condition in 38% of cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. [Rules for psychiatric emergency hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Pichené, Catherine

    2003-06-01

    The author describe how psychiatric emergencies are dealt with in France. Emergency rooms can admit these patients 24 hours a day particularly somato-psychiatric emergencies as well as situations of existential crisis. Many psychiatric hospitals have also designed a 24 hours a day response to emergencies but with a great diversity depending on local situations. Free-will hospitalization is the most common response but some situations can require commitment to a psychiatric hospital. The author describes in details the enforcement of the law in the case of hospitalization without patients's consent.

  15. Violent psychiatric patients: a study.

    PubMed

    Kermani, E J

    1981-04-01

    In a study of fifty-three violent psychiatric patients in a psychiatric hospital setting, it was found that there are two distinct major groups of violent patients--one of patients with a long history of antisocial behavior who are often chronically homicidal and suicidal, and another of patients who neither have a history of destructive behavior nor exhibit homicidal or suicidal tendencies. The latter become acutely assaultive only during the course of psychiatric illness. The personality traits and background associated with these two groups offer additional contrasts. Each group presents different problems and, of major importance to the psychiatric practioner, each group requires different management.

  16. Psychiatric rehabilitation interventions: a review.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Marianne; Anthony, William A

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation has become accepted by the mental health field as a legitimate field of study and practice. Over the last several decades various psychiatric rehabilitation programme models and procedures have been developed, evaluated and disseminated. At the same time the process of psychiatric rehabilitation has been specified and its underlying values and practitioner technology articulated. This review describes the psychiatric rehabilitation process and in so doing differentiates psychosocial interventions that can be classified as psychiatric rehabilitation interventions from other psychosocial interventions. Furthermore, the major psychiatric rehabilitation interventions are examined within a framework of the psychiatric rehabilitation process with a review of their evidence. The review concludes that psychiatric rehabilitation interventions are currently a mixture of evidence-based practices, promising practices and emerging methods that can be effectively tied together using the psychiatric rehabilitation process framework of helping individuals with serious mental illnesses choose, get and keep valued roles, and together with complementary treatment orientated psychosocial interventions, provide a broad strategy for facilitating recovery.

  17. What is Elder Abuse?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Links National Elder Abuse Incidence Study Domestic Violence in Later Life What If I Suspect ... Demonstrations (PPHF) Elder Justice Innovation Grants Late Life Domestic Violence World Elder Abuse Awareness Day State Grants ...

  18. Elderly people. Old testament.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M; Roberts, E

    2000-02-03

    Primary care groups need to address the needs of elderly people. Elderly people and their carers should be consulted about services. Elderly service users can be enthusiastic participants in consultation initiatives.

  19. Expanding the Scope of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy: Evidence for Effectiveness in a Heterogeneous Psychiatric Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Sheryl M.; Bieling, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions (e.g., MBSR; Kabat-Zinn, 1990; MBCT; Segal, Williams, & Teasdale, 2002) have demonstrated effectiveness in a number of distinct clinical populations. However, few studies have evaluated MBCT within a heterogeneous group of psychiatric adult outpatients. This study examined whether a wider variety of patients…

  20. Prevalence and illness beliefs of sleep paralysis among Chinese psychiatric patients in China and the United States.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Albert; Xu, Yong; Chang, Doris F

    2005-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence and illness beliefs of sleep paralysis (SP) among Chinese patients in a psychiatric out-patient clinic, consecutive Chinese/Chinese-American patients who attended psychiatric out-patient clinics in Boston and Shanghai were asked about their lifetime prevalence, personal experience and perceptions regarding the causes, precipitating factors, consequences, and help-seeking of SP. During the 4-month study period, 42 non-psychotic psychiatric out-patients from the Boston site and 150 patients from the Shanghai site were interviewed. The prevalence of SP was found to be 26.2% in Boston and 23.3% in Shanghai. Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or panic disorder reported a higher prevalence of SP than did patients without these disorders. Patients attributed SP to fatigue, stress, and other psychosocial factors. Although the experience has traditionally been labeled 'ghost oppression' among the Chinese, only two patients, one from each site, endorsed supernatural causes of their SP. Sleep paralysis is common among Chinese psychiatric out-patients. The endorsement of supernatural explanations for SP is rare among contemporary Chinese patients.

  1. Effects of Positive and Negative Reinforcement on Daily Living Skills in Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Community Residences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Matthew R.; Motta, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Examined contingent positive and negative reinforcement and adaptive behavior and mood among 36 chronic, psychiatric outpatients who received either contingent positive token reinforcement to improve daily living skills, negative reinforcement procedure based on removal of free-tokens, or no treatment. Found significant differences between control…

  2. Expanding the Scope of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy: Evidence for Effectiveness in a Heterogeneous Psychiatric Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Sheryl M.; Bieling, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions (e.g., MBSR; Kabat-Zinn, 1990; MBCT; Segal, Williams, & Teasdale, 2002) have demonstrated effectiveness in a number of distinct clinical populations. However, few studies have evaluated MBCT within a heterogeneous group of psychiatric adult outpatients. This study examined whether a wider variety of patients…

  3. Adequacy of Antidepressant Treatment by Psychiatric Residents: The Antidepressant Treatment History Form as a Possible Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dew, Rachel Elizabeth; Kramer, Stephen I.; McCall, W. Vaughn

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Facility in psychopharmacology is a major goal of psychiatric residency. This study assesses the adequacy of pharmacotherapy provided to depressed patients in a resident clinic. Methods: Charts of all 285 patients seen in an outpatient triage clinic during 2000 were reviewed. One hundred twelve patients had diagnoses of major…

  4. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition Short Form for Index and IQ Scores in a Psychiatric Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Bruce K.; Girard, Todd A.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2007-01-01

    An eight-subtest short form (SF8) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition (WAIS-III), maintaining equal representation of each index factor, was developed for use with psychiatric populations. Data were collected from a mixed inpatient/outpatient sample (99 men and 101 women) referred for neuropsychological assessment. Psychometric…

  5. Adequacy of Antidepressant Treatment by Psychiatric Residents: The Antidepressant Treatment History Form as a Possible Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dew, Rachel Elizabeth; Kramer, Stephen I.; McCall, W. Vaughn

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Facility in psychopharmacology is a major goal of psychiatric residency. This study assesses the adequacy of pharmacotherapy provided to depressed patients in a resident clinic. Methods: Charts of all 285 patients seen in an outpatient triage clinic during 2000 were reviewed. One hundred twelve patients had diagnoses of major…

  6. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition Short Form for Index and IQ Scores in a Psychiatric Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Bruce K.; Girard, Todd A.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2007-01-01

    An eight-subtest short form (SF8) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition (WAIS-III), maintaining equal representation of each index factor, was developed for use with psychiatric populations. Data were collected from a mixed inpatient/outpatient sample (99 men and 101 women) referred for neuropsychological assessment. Psychometric…

  7. Trends of indigenous healing among people with psychiatric disorders: comparative study of Arabic and Kurdish ethnicities in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Twana Abdulrahman; Saeed, Banaz Adnan; Farhan, Hafidh Muhammed; Aziz, Rosh Rauf

    2015-02-01

    Indigenous healing is commonly practiced in Middle East. Little is known about trends of indigenous therapies among patients with psychiatric disorders in Iraq. To determine and compare rates and predictors of indigenous healings by individuals with psychiatric disorders, and the practiced rituals among Arabic and Kurdish ethnicities in Iraq, patients aged 18 year and older attending outpatients in Erbil and Najaf were assessed for their prior contacts with indigenous healers. About 48.9 % had indigenous healer's consultations before visiting their psychiatrists; the figure was three times higher among Arabs than Kurds. Higher consultation rate was detected among younger and less formally educated patients. Fourteen types of religious therapeutic rituals have been practiced. Indigenous healing is widespread in Iraq. It is more common among Arabs, younger and less educated people with psychiatric disorders. Participants consider indigenous healing for their psychiatric more than non-psychiatric disorders.

  8. Sensitivity and specificity of the Major Depression Inventory in outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Cuijpers, Pim; Dekker, Jack; Noteboom, Annemieke; Smits, Niels; Peen, Jaap

    2007-01-01

    Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI) is a new, brief, self-report measure for depression based on the DSM-system, which allows clinicians to assess the presence of a depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV, but also to assess the severity of the depressive symptoms. Methods We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and psychometric qualities of the MDI in a consecutive sample of 258 psychiatric outpatients. Of these patients, 120 had a mood disorder (70 major depression, 49 dysthymia). A total of 139 subjects had a comorbid axis-I diagnosis, and 91 subjects had a comorbid personality disorder. Results Crohnbach's alpha of the MDI was a satisfactory 0.89, and the correlation between the MDI and the depression subscale of the SCL-90 was 0.79 (p < .001). Subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD) had a significantly higher MDI score than subjects with anxiety disorders (but no MDD), dysthymias, bipolar, psychotic, other neurotic disorders, and subjects with relational problems. In ROC analysis we found that the area under the curve was 0.68 for the MDI. A good cut-off point for the MDI seems to be 26, with a sensitivity of 0.66, and a specificity of 0.63. The indication of the presence of MDD based on the MDI had a moderate agreement with the diagnosis made by a psychiatrist (kappa: 0.26). Conclusion The MDI is an attractive, brief depression inventory, which seems to be a reliable tool for assessing depression in psychiatric outpatients. PMID:17688685

  9. Lack of Association between Toxocara Exposure and Suicide Attempts in Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Toxocara may affect the central nervous system. A high seroprevalence of Toxocara infection has been reported in psychiatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report about an association of Toxocara infection with suicide attempts. Therefore, we sought to determine whether Toxocara exposure is associated with suicide attempts in psychiatric patients. We studied 282 psychiatric outpatients (156 with suicide attempts and 126 without suicide attempts). Sera of patients were analyzed for the presence of anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies by using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. One of the 156 (0.6%) suicide attempters and 1 (0.8%) of the 126 controls were positive for anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies (OR = 0.80; 95% CI: 0.04–13.02; P = 1.00). Toxocara seropositivity was significantly higher (P = 0.01) in male patients with consumption of raw dried goat meat than male patients without this consumption. Results suggest that Toxocara exposure is not associated with suicide attempts in psychiatric outpatients in Durango City, Mexico. However, further studies with larger samples sizes to confirm our results should be conducted. Too few patients were seropositive to assess further associations of Toxocara exposure with sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of the psychiatric patients. PMID:26483971

  10. [Empathy fatigue and psychiatric care of the elderly].

    PubMed

    Hazif-Thomas, Cyril; Thomas, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is one of the qualities which enable caregivers to develop high quality care. The circumstances of professional practice such as pressure and lack of time can see this quality pushed to one side. The risk of burnout is all the greater as empathy alone does not protect caregivers from submitting themselves to their hierarchy. Compassion, on the other hand, enables caregivers to actively take on their responsibilities. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Family Burden of Demented and Depressed Elderly Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptzin, Benjamin; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Found no significant differences in burden for relatives of demented and depressed patients admitted to geriatric psychiatry inpatient unit. Although at follow-up depressed patients were more improved than demented patients, their caregivers did not experience any greater decrease in burden. Families of depressed patients may require as much…

  12. Recurrent psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, G.; Denault, S.

    1978-01-01

    Undue emphasis has been placed on rising rates of readmission to psychiatric facilities. After a decade of preoccupation with discharge rates, readmission statistics have been singled out in the last 15 years as the key factor for assessing hospital effectiveness. A study of a group of patients at high risk for recurrent hospitalization revealed that these patients were characterized more by features relating to environmental supports than by diagnosis. The operational definition for recurrent hospitalization (five or more admissions during the 2-year period preceding the latest admission) was effective in identifying this group; this is the first reported instance in which the definition has specified a certain number of admissions within a time-limited period. The findings of this study, as well as of an analysis of case histories and consumer opinion, led to the design of a pilot program for persons undergoing recurrent hospitalization. Readmission statistics are useless or misleading as measures of hospital effectiveness and efficiency; what matters is the way the former patients function in the community after discharge. Rather than simply trying to reduce the readmission rate psychiatric facilities should be examining the types of persons who are hospitalized recurrently to develop programs aimed at improving the functioning of these people in the community. PMID:630483

  13. Fibromyalgia and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Fietta, Pierluigi; Fietta, Pieranna; Manganelli, Paolo

    2007-08-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common and polymorphic syndrome, characterized by long-lasting, widespread musculoskeletal pain, in the presence of 11 or more tender points located at specific anatomical sites. A heterogeneous series of disturbances, mainly involving autonomic, neuroendocrine and neuropsychic systems, is usually present. Even if subjective, the chronic psychophysical suffering state of FM adversely affects the patient's quality of life, performance and mood. Cognitive behavioural therapy and antidepressant drugs are useful in FM treatment, suggesting a close link between the syndrome and psychiatric, psychological and behavioural factors. Our aim was to evaluate the personality profiles of FM patients, as well as the aggregation and relationships between FM and psychiatric disorders (PD), reviewing the available evidences in current literature on this comorbidity. Personality variables associated with psychological vulnerability are frequent in FM patients. Personality disorders are rarely reported. Compared with controls, FM patients show a significantly higher prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders, reported in 20-80% and 13-63.8% of cases, respectively. This high variability may depend on the psychosocial characteristics of patients, since most of the studies were performed on tertiary care consulting patients, however, even referring to the lower percentages, the occurrence of PD is significantly higher in FM subjects compared to the general population (7%). Moreover, elevated frequencies of PD have been detected in relatives of FM patients. The FM/PD aggregation suggests a common physiopathology, and alterations of neurotransmitter systems may constitute the shared underlying factor.

  14. Prescribing at the hospital-general practice interface. I: Hospital outpatient dispensing policies in England.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, P; Sibbald, B; Raftery, J; Anderson, S; Freeling, P

    1992-01-04

    To describe the outpatient dispensing policies of major acute hospitals in England. Postal questionnaire survey in November 1990. All (278) major acute hospitals in England with more than 250 beds, excluding maternity, paediatric, or psychiatric hospitals; nine hospitals declined. Hospital chief pharmacists. Current dispensing policy and exceptions to it; when the policy was formed; and who was involved in its formation. Completed questionnaires were received from 200 (72%) of the hospitals approached. The quantities of drugs dispensed to outpatients ranged from zero in 12 hospitals to unlimited amounts in nine; nearly half (92) dispensed a 14 days' supply of drugs. The greater the restriction on outpatient dispensing, the more recently the policy had been introduced (chi 2 for trend = 7.15; df = 1; p less than 0.01). Permissible exceptions to the policy included the consultant's specific request (134 hospitals), difficulty in obtaining drugs in the community (102), urgent need for start of tre