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Sample records for electrical conductivity relaxation

  1. Electrical Conduction and Dielectric Relaxation in Ionically Conducting Glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Rahmathullah

    An experimental study was conducted to address a number of important topics relevant to the analysis and basic understanding of ionic transport in glass. Very precise electrical conductivity and relaxation measurements were carried out over the frequency range 10('-2) to 10('5) Hz and the temperature range -11 to 300(DEGREES)C for a series of glasses of molar composition 25{XNa(,2)O+(1 -X)K(,2)O}-5Al(,2)O(,3)-70SiO(,2) with 0.95 (LESSTHEQ) X (LESSTHEQ) 1. Sodium ion tracer diffusion data, obtained on these glasses in another laboratory, are also reported. Important results of the study are as follows: (1) The experimental plot of complex resistivity (rho)* was found not to be an arc of a circle with its center below the real axis, as suggested in the literature. Rather, it was found experimentally and shown theoretically that the (rho)* plot must approach the origin at high frequencies and intersect the real axis at low frequencies, in both cases at a 90(DEGREES) angle. (2) The functional form of the Arrhenius equation for temperature dependence of electrical conductivity of glass was investigated. The data analysis suggested that the pre-exponential term in the Arrhenius conductivity equation is temperature independent. (3) A critical test of Jonscher's so called "universal" law for the high frequency dielectric response was carried out. The curves predicted by the Jonscher's law for the frequency dependence of dielectric constant (epsilon)' and real part of complex conductivity (sigma)(DEGREES) did not fit the experimental data. (4) Tracer diffusion data have been compared with the electrical conductivity data to characterize the correlation effects on the Na('+) ion diffusion mechanism. (5) When one alkali in a glass is progressively replaced by another alkali, keeping the total alkali content constant, a pronounced minimum is obtained in the electrical conductivity as a function of composition. This phenomenon is known as the "mixed-alkali (MA) effect". The

  2. The Electrical Properties of Seawater (Including Conductivity Relaxation)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    expression for the carrier mobility can be obtained from the following equations (Reference 2) S•- <v> "and i d~v> m d•v + mg <v>= eE (3) where <v> is...electric field. Let <v> and E be time harmonic as ejft The solution of Equation (3) results in the following S- - e (4) 1+ J 1 4’ 59 Substituting this...constructed for this purpose. The following describes the experi- mental apparatus used and presents the results of the experiment. 4 21 - I

  3. On the dielectric relaxation of biological cell suspensions: the effect of the membrane electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Di Biasio, A; Cametti, C

    2011-06-01

    Due to the mismatch of the electrical parameters (the permittivity ϵ' and the electrical conductivity σ) of the membrane of a biological cell with the ones of the cytosol and the extracellular medium, biological cell suspensions are the site, under the influence of an external electric field, of large dielectric relaxations in the radiowave frequency range. However, a point still remains controversial, i.e., whether or not the value of membrane conductivity σ(s) might be extracted from the de-convolution of the dielectric spectra or otherwise if it would be more reasonable to assign to the membrane conductivity a value equal to zero. This point is not to be considered with superficiality since it concerns an a priori choice which ultimately influences the values of the electrical parameters deduced from this technique. As far as this point is concerned, the opinion of the researchers in this field diverges. We believe that, at least within certain limits, the membrane conductivity can be deduced from the shape of the relaxation spectra. We substantiate this thesis with two different examples concerning the first a suspension of human normal erythrocyte cells and the second a suspension of human lymphocyte cells. In both cases, by means of an accurate fitting procedure based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method for complex functions, we can evaluate the membrane conductivity σ(s) with its associated uncertainty. The knowledge of the membrane electrical conductivity will favor the investigation of different ion transport mechanisms across the cell membrane. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation of carrier localization with relaxation time distribution and electrical conductivity relaxation in silver-nanoparticle-embedded moderately doped polypyrrole nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Swarup; Dutta, Bula; Bhattacharya, Subhratanu

    2014-02-01

    The electrical conductivity relaxation in moderately doped polypyrrole and its nanocomposites reinforced with different proportion of silver nanoparticles was investigated in both frequency and time domain. An analytical distribution function of relaxation times is constructed from the results obtained in the frequency domain formalism and is used to evaluate the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) type decay function in the time domain. The thermal evolution of different relaxation parameters was analyzed. The temperature-dependent dc electrical conductivity, estimated from the average conductivity relaxation time is observed to depend strongly on the nanoparticle loading and follows Mott three-dimensional variable range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanism. The extent of charge carrier localization calculated from the VRH mechanism is well correlated to the evidences obtained from the structural characterizations of different nanostructured samples.

  5. Thermal history effects on electrical relaxation and conductivity for potassium silicate glass with low alkali concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, Paul W.; Hann, Raiford E.; Cooper, Alfred R.

    1993-01-01

    Electrical response measurements from 10 Hz to 100 kHz between 120 and 540 C were made on potassium-silicate glasses with alkali oxide contents of 2, 3, 5 and 10 mol percent. Low alkali content glasses were chosen in order to try to reduce the Coulombic interactions between alkali ions to the point that frozen structural effects from the glass could be observed. Conductivity and electrical relaxation responses for both annealed and quenched glasses of the same composition were compared. Lower DC conductivity (sigma(sub DC)) activation energies were measured for the quenched compared to the annealed glasses. The two glasses with the lowest alkali contents exhibited a non-Arrhenius concave up curvature in the log(sigma(sub DC)) against 1/T plots, which decreased upon quenching. A sharp decrease in sigma(sub DC) was observed for glasses containing K2O concentrations of 5 mol percent or less. The log modulus loss peak (M'') maximum frequency plots against 1/T all showed Arrhenius behavior for both annealed and quenched samples. The activation energies for these plots closely agreed with the sigma(sub DC) activation energies. A sharp increase in activation energy was observed for both series as the potassium oxide concentration decreased. Changes in the electrical response are attributed to structural effects due to different alkali concentrations. Differences between the annealed and quenched response are linked to a change in the distribution of activation energies (DAE).

  6. Microstructural effects on electrical conductivity relaxation in nanoscale ceria thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Masaru; Ramanathan, Shriram; Bojarczuk, Nestor A.; Guha, Supratik

    2009-05-07

    Microstructure evolution and electrical conductivity relaxation kinetics in highly textured and nanocrystalline dense ceria thin films ({approx}65 nm) are reported in this paper. Highly textured films were grown on sapphire c-plane substrates by molecular beam synthesis (MBS) with orientation relationship (111)CeO{sub 2}||(0001)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and [110]CeO{sub 2}||[1210]Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. No significant structural changes were observed in highly textured films even after extensive annealing at high temperature. In contrast to MBS grown films, ceria films grown by electron beam evaporation at room temperature had polycrystalline structure with {approx}10 nm grains, which grew to {approx}30 nm upon annealing at 1173 K. Grain growth kinetics was self-limiting and the out-of-plane orientation was found to be substrate dependent. From conductivity relaxation measurements, oxygen exchange rate in highly textured thin films was found to be much slower than that in polycrystalline films. The response time for highly textured films to changes in P(O{sub 2}) from 1.07x10{sup -12} to 5.43x10{sup -10} Pa at 1148 K was 0.65 s, whereas that for polycrystalline films was 0.13 s under identical conditions. From temperature dependent experiments, activation energy for relaxation time was found to be similar, suggesting similar rate-limiting mechanisms in polycrystalline and highly textured films. The results highlight the importance of near-surface defects in controlling kinetics of oxygen incorporation into nanostructured oxides. In a broader context, the results maybe of relevance to designing catalytic surfaces in solid state ionic devices such as fuel cells.

  7. Thermal relaxation, electrical conductivity, and charge diffusion in a hot QCD medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sukanya; Chandra, Vinod

    2016-08-01

    The response of electromagnetic (EM) fields that are produced in noncentral heavy-ion collisions to electromagnetically charged quark gluon plasma can be understood in terms of charge transport and charge diffusion in the hot QCD medium. This article presents a perspective on these processes by investigating the temperature behavior of the related transport coefficients, viz. electrical conductivity and the charge diffusion coefficients along with charge susceptibility. In the process of estimating them, thermal relaxation times for quarks and gluons have been determined first. These transport coefficients have been studied by solving the relativistic transport equation in the Chapman-Enskog method. For the analysis, 2 →2 , quark-quark, quark-gluon and gluon-gluon scattering processes are taken into account along with an effective description of hot QCD equations of state (EOSs) in terms of temperature dependent effective fugacities of quasiquarks (antiquarks) and quasigluons. Both improved perturbative hot QCD EOSs at high temperature and a lattice QCD EOS are included for the analysis. The hot QCD medium effects entering through the quasiparticle momentum distributions along with an effective coupling, are seen to have significant impact on the temperature behavior of these transport parameters along with the thermal relaxation times for the quasigluons and quasiquarks.

  8. Oxygen Transport Kinetics in Infiltrated SOFCs Cathode by Electrical Conductivity Relaxation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yihong; Gerdes, Kirk; Liu, Xingbo

    2013-07-01

    Infiltration has attracted increasing attention as an effective technique to modify SOFC cathodes to improve cell electrochemical performance while maintaining material compatibility and long-term stability. However, the infiltrated material's effect on oxygen transport is still not clear and detailed knowledge of the oxygen reduction reaction in infiltrated cathodes is lacking. In this work, the technique of electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR) is used to evaluate oxygen exchange in two common infiltrated materials, Ce{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9} and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}CoO{sub 3-δ}. The ECR technique is also used to examine the transport processes in a composite material formed with a backbone of La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-δ} and possessing a thin, dense surface layer composed of the representative infiltrate material. Both the surface oxygen exchange process and the oxygen exchange coefficient at infiltrate/LSCF interface are reported. ECR testing results indicate that the application of infiltrate under certain oxygen partial pressure conditions produces a measureable increase in the fitted oxygen exchange parameter. It is presently only possible to generate hypotheses to explain the observation. However the correlation between improved electrochemical performance and increased oxygen transport measured by ECR is reliably demonstrated. The simple and inexpensive ECR technique is utilized as a direct method to optimize the selection of specific infiltrate/backbone material systems for superior performance.

  9. Electrical Conductivity, Relaxation and the Glass Transition: A New Look at a Familiar Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, Paul W.; Cooper, Alfred R.; DeGuire, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    Annealed samples from a single melt of a 10 mol% K2O-90SiO2 glass were reheated to temperatures ranging from 450 to 800 C, held isothermally for 20 min, and then quenched in either air or a silicon oil bath. The complex impedance of both the annealed and quenched samples was measured as a function of temperature from 120 to 250 C using ac impedance spectroscopy from 1 Hz to 1 MHz. The dc conductivity, sigma(sub dc), was measured from the low frequency intercept of depressed semicircle fits to the complex impedance data. When the sigma(sub dc) at 150 C was plotted against soak temperature, the results fell into three separate regions that are explained in terms of the glass structural relaxation time, tau(sub S). This sigma(sub dc) plot provides a new way to look the glass transition range, Delta T(sub r). In addition, sigma(sub dc) was measured for different soak times at 550 C, from which an average relaxation time of 7.3 min was calculated. It was found that the size and position of the Delta T(sub r) is controlled by both the soak time and cooling rate.

  10. Electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation in p-type PVA/CuI polymer composite

    PubMed Central

    Makled, M.H.; Sheha, E.; Shanap, T.S.; El-Mansy, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    PVA/CuI polymer composite samples have been prepared and subjected to characterizations using FT-IR spectroscopy, DSC analysis, ac spectroscopy and dc conduction. The FT-IR spectral analysis shows remarkable variation of the absorption peak positions whereas DSC illustrates a little decrease of both glass transition temperature, Tg, and crystallization fraction, χ, with increasing CuI concentration. An increase of dc conductivity for PVA/CuI nano composite by increasing CuI concentration is recoded up to 15 wt%, besides it obeys Arhenuis plot with an activation energy in the range 0.54–1.32 eV. The frequency dependence of ac conductivity showed power law with an exponent 0.33 < s < 0.69 which predicts hopping conduction mechanism. The frequency dependence of both dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss obeys Debye dispersion relations in wide range of temperatures and frequency. Significant values of dipole relaxation time obtained which are thermally activated with activation energies in the range 0.33–0.87 eV. A significant value of hopping distance in the range 3.4–1.2 nm is estimated in agreement with the value of Bohr radius of the exciton. PMID:25685462

  11. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Philip B.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Drude's classical (1900) theory of electrical conduction, details the objections to and successes of the 1900 theory, and investigates the Quantum (1928) theory of conduction, reviewing its successes and limitations. (BT)

  12. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Philip B.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Drude's classical (1900) theory of electrical conduction, details the objections to and successes of the 1900 theory, and investigates the Quantum (1928) theory of conduction, reviewing its successes and limitations. (BT)

  13. Ionic conductivity and electrical relaxation of nanocrystalline scandia-stabilized c-zirconia using complex impedance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Manna, I.

    2008-07-01

    A solid solution of 8 mol% of scandia-stabilized cubic-zirconia (8ScSZ) has been prepared by co-precipitation technique. The synthesized powder has an average crystallite size ∼40 nm, surface area of 8.49 m 2/g, and agglomerated particle size of 150 nm. The activation energy of 8ScSZ has been calculated from impedance loss spectra; electrical modulus spectra are in the range of 0.90-1.30 eV. The frequency and temperature-dependent conductivities and impedance were measured in range of 50 Hz-1 MHz and 300-900 K, respectively. Complex impedance spectra, complex modulus formalism and complex conductivity spectra have been carefully analyzed in order to separate the grain, grain boundary and electrode-electrolyte effects. Analysis of ac impedance data using complex impedance indicates a typical negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) behavior of the materials. The intrinsic conductivity is mainly due to hopping of mobile ions among the available localized site. Relaxation time obtained from complex conductivity spectra are matched well with the impedance loss and modulus loss spectra. Impedance analysis suggests the presence of temperature-dependent electrical relaxation process in the material.

  14. Relaxation or breakup of a low-conductivity drop upon removal of a uniform dc electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanauze, Javier A.; Walker, Lynn M.; Khair, Aditya S.

    2016-07-01

    We quantify the dynamics of a prolate leaky dielectric drop upon removal of a uniform dc electric field. Experiments consisting of a castor oil drop suspended in silicone oil are compared against axisymmetric boundary integral computations that account for transient charging, or charge relaxation, of the interface. A temporal asymmetry between the drop deformation and relaxation processes is observed in the experiments and computations: The drop relaxes back to its spherical equilibrium shape faster than the time taken to achieve its steady-state deformation. During the deformation process, the electrical (Maxwell) stress deforms the drop along the direction of the applied field; it is counteracted by the capillary stress. During the relaxation process, i.e., after the field is removed, the electrical stress acts together with the capillary stress to quickly restore the drop back to equilibrium. This change in action of the electrical stress is responsible for the asymmetry between the drop deformation and relaxation. Notably, the electrical stress acts over the charge relaxation time scales of the fluids: Thus, counterintuitively, longer charging time scales yield faster drop relaxation. That is, the longer it takes for the interface to discharge, the faster the drop shape relaxes. We also present computational results for a drop that does not relax back to its initial spherical shape upon removal of the electric field; rather, the drop breaks up via an end-pinching mechanism.

  15. Electric Potential Surrounding Two Conducting Spheres: An Exercise for Advancing Student Understanding of the Method of Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Hugh; Chartrand, Bridget; Beach, John

    2016-03-01

    In undergraduate computational physics courses, the method of relaxation provides a well-established technique for obtaining solutions to Laplace's Equation. The technique's value stems from its accessibility and clear dependence on the properties of solutions to Laplace's Equation. We have created an exercise that allows students to develop an experiential understanding of the method of images and its connection to the properties of solutions to Laplace's Equation. The problem of two conducting spheres separated by a relatively small distance and maintained at fixed but distinct electric potentials is considered. Using the method of relaxation, students solve the problem in two-dimensions, three-dimensions with a Dirichlet condition on the outer boundary and three-dimensions using a Neumann condition on the outer boundary. At each step, the results are compared to a solution obtained using the method of images for a spherical conductor in an iterative fashion. Through this comparison, students gain insight into the significance of their choices for the solving the problem using the method of relaxation. We will discuss application of the relaxation method to this problem, validation by the method of images, and potential use in an undergraduate computational physics course.

  16. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  17. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  18. Surface Exchange and Bulk Diffusivity of LSCF as SOFC Cathode: Electrical Conductivity Relaxation and Isotope Exchange Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yihong; Gerdes, Kirk; Horita, Teruhisa; Liu, Xingbo

    2013-05-05

    The oxygen diffusion coefficient (D) and surface exchange coefficient (k) of a typical SOFC cathode material, La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) were characterized by both electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR) and oxygen isotope exchange (IE) methods. Conductivity relaxation experiments were conducted at 800°C for small step changes in partial pressure of oxygen (P{sub O{sub 2}} ), both decreasing and increasing, from 0.02 atm to 0.20 atm. The results revealed P{sub O{sub 2}} dependent hysteresis with the reduction process requiring more equilibration time than oxidation. Analysis of the experimental data indicated that the surface exchange coefficient is a function of the final oxygen partial pressure in an isothermal system. In addition, both forward and backward oxygen reduction reaction constants, which are vital for the fundamental understanding of SOFC cathode reaction mechanisms, are investigated based on the relationship between surface exchange coefficient and P{sub O{sub 2}} . The direct comparisons between the results from both ECR and IE were presented and the possible experimental errors in both methods were discussed.

  19. Complex impedance, dielectric relaxation and electrical conductivity studies of Ba1-xSrxTiO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbasset, A.; Sayouri S, S.; Abdi, F.; Lamcharfi, T.; Mrharrab, L.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we prepared series of Ba1-xSrxTiO3 (BSxT) powders, with different strontium concentrations (x = 0, 0.025, 0.75, 0.10, 0.125 and 0.15), by the sol-gel method. The variation of structure in the Ba1-xSrxTiO3 system was analyzed using XRD and Raman techniques. The field dependence of dielectric relaxation and conductivity was measured over a wide frequency range from room temperature to 400 °C. The activation energy, calculated from the thermal variation of the conductivity for different frequencies, showed that the Sr has significant effects on the properties of BaTiO3. Relaxation times extracted using the imaginary part of the complex impedance (Z’’(ω)) and the modulus (M’’(ω)) were also found to follow the Arrhenius law and showed an anomaly around the phase transition temperature.

  20. Dielectric relaxation and electrical conduction mechanism in A2HoSbO6 (A=Ba, Sr, Ca) Double Perovskite Ceramics: An impedance spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Saswata; Dutta, Alo; Sinha, T. P.

    2017-03-01

    The AC electrical properties of polycrystalline double perovskite oxides A2HoSbO6 (A=Ba, Sr, Ca; AHS) synthesized by solid state reaction technique has been explored by using impedance spectroscopic studies. The Rietveld refinement of the room temperature X-ray diffraction data show that Ba2HoSbO6 (BHS) has cubic phase and Sr2HoSbO6 (SHS) and Ca2HoSbO6 (CHS) crystallize in monoclinic phase. The samples show significant frequency dispersion in their dielectric properties. The polydispersive nature of the relaxation mechanism is explained by the modified Cole-Cole model. The scaling behavior of dielectric loss indicate the temperature independence of the relaxation mechanism. The magnitude of the activation energy indicates that the hopping mechanism is responsible for carrier transport in AHS. The frequency dependent conductivity spectra follow the double power law. Impedance spectroscopic data presented in the Nyquist plot (Z" versus Z‧) are used to identify an equivalent circuit along with to know the grain, grain boundary and interface contributions. The constant phase element (CPE) is used to analyze the experimental response of BHS, SHS and CHS comprehending the contribution of different microstructural features to the conduction process. The temperature dependent electrical conductivity shows a semiconducting behavior.

  1. Electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of AlN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, Halit; Bayrak, Turkan; Kizir, Seda; Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films were deposited at 200 °C, on p-type silicon substrates utilizing a capacitively coupled hollow-cathode plasma source integrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. The structural properties of AlN were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, by which we confirmed the hexagonal wurtzite single-phase crystalline structure. The films exhibited an optical band edge around ˜5.7 eV. The refractive index and extinction coefficient of the AlN films were measured via a spectroscopic ellipsometer. In addition, to investigate the electrical conduction mechanisms and dielectric properties, Al/AlN/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated, and current density-voltage and frequency dependent (7 kHz-5 MHz) dielectric constant measurements (within the strong accumulation region) were performed. A peak of dielectric loss was observed at a frequency of 3 MHz and the Cole-Davidson empirical formula was used to determine the relaxation time. It was concluded that the native point defects such as nitrogen vacancies and DX centers formed with the involvement of Si atoms into the AlN layers might have influenced the electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of the plasma-assisted ALD grown AlN films.

  2. Comments on ''Rigorous link between fluid permeability, electrical conductivity, and relaxation times for transport in porous media''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafarge, Denis

    1993-02-01

    Recently, Avellaneda and Torquato [Phys. Fluids A 3, 2529 (1991)] derived several expressions for both the static and dynamic permeability for flow through porous media, in terms of the characteristic viscous relaxation times. In this Brief Communication the focus is on the physical interpretation, Darcy's law is explicitly obtained, and a slightly misleading statement (which has no effect on the mathematics but may induce erroneous interpretations) is corrected.

  3. Dielectric relaxation of amides and tetrahydrofuran polar mixture in C6H6 from conductivity measurement under 9.90 GHz electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S.; Sit, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Dielectric relaxation studies of binary ( jk) polar mixtures of tetrahydrofuran with N-methyl acetamide, N, N-dimethyl acetamide, N-methyl formamide and N, N-dimethyl formamide dissolved in benzene(i) for different weight fractions ( w j k 's) of the polar solutes and mole fractions ( x j 's) of tetrahydrofuran at 25 ∘C are attempted by measuring the conductivity of the solution under 9.90 GHz electric field using Debye theory. The estimated relaxation time ( τ j k 's) and dipole moment ( μ j k 's) agree well with the reported values signifying the validity of the proposed methods. Structural and associational aspects are predicted from the plot of τ j k and μ j k against x j of tetrahydrofuran to arrive at solute-solute (dimer) molecular association upto x j =0.3 of tetrahydrofuran and thereafter solute-solvent (monomer) molecular association upto x j =1.0 for all systems except tetrahydrofuran + N, N-dimethyl acetamide.

  4. Effect of interfacial charge relaxation on conducting behavior of ZnO varistors under time varying electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao; Hu, Jun; He, Jinliang

    2017-05-01

    The conducting mechanism of ZnO varistors under the steady state has been well documented, but the corresponding time-dependent property was rarely studied. In this work, we proposed a physical model for analyzing the conducting behavior of a single ZnO grain boundary under pure ac fields. The established model mainly deals with the time-delay effect of the interfacial charge and its influence on the barrier height as well as the conducting process, which leads to a phase shift of the conduction current in advance of the applied voltage and an enhancement of the effective capacitance. To validate the model, the nonlinear conducting characteristics of ZnO varistors under pure ac fields were measured and the result agreed well with the model.

  5. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  6. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg [East Lansing, MI; Fischer, Anne [Arlington, VA; Bennett, Jason [Lansing, MI; Lowe, Michael [Holt, MI

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  7. Polymers that Conduct Electricity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Edward

    1983-01-01

    Although polymers are regarded as electrical insulators, it was discovered that they can be made to conduct electricity. This discovery has opened vast new practical and theoretical areas for exploration by physicists and chemists. Research studies with these conducting polymers and charge-transfer salts as well as possible applications are…

  8. Surface oxygen exchange properties of Sr doped La2NiO4+δ as SOFC cathode: Thin-film electrical conductivity relaxation investigation

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Bo; Li, Wenyuan; Zhang, Xinxin; ...

    2015-06-02

    La2-xSrxNiO4+δ dense films are prepared by a novel spray-modified pressing method. The surface reaction kinetics is investigated via electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR). The layer thickness, 5~10 μm, is much less than the characteristic length of lanthanum nickelates, resulting in surface-controlled situation and allowing more accurate fitting than the traditional pellets ECR on the surface exchange coefficient (k). k for LNO is 1.6×10-5 cm/s in 0.2 atm at 700°C. Sr doping impairs the exchange kinetics, and k of Sr40 is about one order of magnitude smaller than undoped one. Interstitial oxygen and Ni oxidation state are suggested the predominant roles inmore » determining surface kinetics. In conclusion, given the properties of the thin-film herein developed by spray-modified pressing is closer to those in practical porous electrode compared to pulsed laser deposited film in terms of preferential orientation and strain, it warrants the use of such a method in a variety of pertinent investigations.« less

  9. Anomalous electrical relaxation and polaron conduction in nano-crystalline Mn{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N. S. Krishna; Shahid, T. S.; Govindaraj, G.

    2015-06-24

    Nano-crystalline Mn{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and characterized with X-ray diffraction. Ac electrical impedance data are taken for the frequency range of 1Hz to 1MHz for various temperatures from 303K to 483K. The ac electrical conduction deviates from the Debye type relaxation which indicates polaron type conduction. In the present study unique anomalous relaxation function in time and frequency domain is used to investigate deviation from the Debye relaxation. The physical basis of anomalous or non-Debye process is explained in terms of change in Debye dipole μ{sub D}=ρr{sub D} of charge ρ into gρ due to the molecular charge interaction and defect disorder. This interaction shifts the Debye relaxation rate τ to a slow relaxation rate τ{sup g}. The fraction 0relaxation.

  10. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  11. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, Roger L.; Sylwester, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  12. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  13. Electrically conductive composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  14. Electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  15. Electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Jitendra P.; Bosak, Andrea L.; McPheeters, Charles C.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

  16. Relaxation Time and Conductivity at a Rural Station: Raicbur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, G. K.; Kandalgaonkar, S. S.; Sholapurkar, S. M.

    1991-08-01

    An examination of decay and growth rates of electric field near the ground during total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980 was made to study the electrical relaxation time and conductivity at Raichur. The Values obtained i.e., 1320 seconds and 67.1163 x 10-16 mhos m-1 of the two parameters were in fair agreement with the reported ones at the rural locations.

  17. Electrical conduction through DNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, S

    2011-09-01

    Several disorder parameters, inside the DNA molecule, lead to localization of charge carriers inside potential wells in the lowest unoccupied and highest occupied molecular orbits (LUMO and HOMO) which affects drastically the electrical conduction through the molecule, and demonstrates that the band carriers play an essential role in the conduction mechanism. So, a model is presented to shed light on the role of electrons of the LUMO in the electrical conduction through the DNA molecule. DC-, AC-conductivity and dielectric permittivity experimental data are well fitted with the presented model giving evidence that the free carriers in the LUMO and HOMO are responsible to make the DNA molecule conductor, insulator or semiconductor. The obtained results show that the localized charge carriers in the DNA molecule are characterized by four different types of relaxation phenomena which are thermally activated by corresponding four activation energies at 0.56 eV, 0.33 eV, 0.24 eV, and 0.05 eV respectively. Moreover, the calculations after the model, at room temperature, show that the time of the relaxation times of the current carriers are in the order of 5 × 10(-2)s, 1.74 × 10(-4)s, 5 × 10(-7)s, and 1.6 × 10(-10)s, respectively.

  18. Alternating-current conductivity and dielectric relaxation of bulk iodoargentate

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hai-Bao Yu, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Hong

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: The electric modulus shows single dielectric relaxation process in the measured frequency range. - Highlights: • The conduction mechanism is described by quantum mechanical tunneling model. • The applications of dielectric modulus give a simple method for evaluating the activation energy of the dielectric relaxation. • The [Ag{sub 2}I{sub 4}]{sup 2−}1-D chain and [Cu(en){sub 2}]{sup 2+} cation column form the layered stacks by hydrogen bond interactions. - Abstract: An inorganic-organic hybrid compound Cu(en){sub 2}Ag{sub 2}I{sub 4} (en = ethylenediamine) (1) was synthesized and single crystal structurally characterized. Along the [001] direction, the inorganic parts form an infinite 1-D chain and [Cu(en){sub 2}]{sup 2+} cations are separated by inorganic chain. The electrical conductivity and dielectric properties of 1 have been investigated over wide ranges of frequency. The alternating-current conductivities have been fitted to the Almond–West type power law expression with use of a single value of S. It is found that S values for 1 are nearly temperature-independent, which indicates that the conduction mechanism could be quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) model. The dielectric loss and electric modulus show single dielectric relaxation process. The activation energy obtained from temperature-dependent electric modulus compare with the calculated from the dc conductivity plots.

  19. Dielectric Relaxation Behavior and AC Electrical Conductivity Study of 2-(1,2-Dihydro-7-Methyl-2-Oxoquinoline-5-yl) Malononitrile (DMOQMN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nahass, M. M.; El-Zaidia, E. F. M.; Darwish, A. A. A.; Salem, G. F.

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric relaxation and alternative current conductivity of a new organic compound 2-(1,2-dihydro-7-methyl-2-oxoquinoline-5-yl) malononitrile (DMOQMN) have been investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) at room temperature reveals that DMOQMN samples have a polycrystalline structure of the triclinic system. The analysis of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss index suggested the dominant polarization is performed and the Maxwell-Wagner-Sillar type polarization is dominating at low frequency and high temperature. These results have been confirmed by the XRD and dielectric modulus. The estimated relaxation time and the activation energy are 9 × 10-13 s and 0.43 eV, respectively. Our results indicated that the conduction mechanism of DMOQMN is controlled by the correlation barrier hopping (CBH) model.

  20. Electrical conductive composite lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarchuk, Bruce J.; Wehrman, Ken A.; Yang Zhang, Teh-Shing Lee, Krishnagopalan, Gopal A.

    1995-01-01

    In power and electronic systems, electrical contact resistance is a major issue. For mechanical connections and sliding contacts, power losses and electrical noise are critical concerns. These issues are of particular interest to all industrial members of the Auburn CCDS. Research has been conducted to develop a variety of contact materials, both for solid lubricant films and composite paper lubricants. A combination of low electrical resistance, good lubricating properties, long wear-life, and low sliding electrical noise was achieved using a metal-cellulose composite paper with dichalcogenide powders entrapped in the porous paper matrix. Advancements in developing these conductive lubricants can increase contact lifetime and reliability in many space and terrestrial applications.

  1. Electrical Conductivity in Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Anil Kumar

    2003-03-01

    ABSTRACT In insulating solid(Plastic Sheet)of 0.73mm thickness, the conduction process was ohmic at low D.C. electric feilds, but the feild strength increased the conductivity became feild dependent at high feilds and it exhibited some conductivity and the variation in conduction current was none-ohmic.The mechanism of electron transfer between two metallic electrodes separated by insulating material has received considerable attention. The electron transfer current was studied on 0.73mm plastic sheet and(I-V),(log I-log V),(log J-E^1/2)and (log o- 1/T) relations have been studied and the value of slope,electronic dielectric constant and activation energy for nature of conduction mechanism and process have been determined.The electrical conductivity measurements were carried out at room temperature (32.5 celcius)under high D.C. electric feilds of the order of 10^6 volt/meter.The sample of insulator(plastic sheet) was sandwiched between the aluminium electrodes of designed experimental cell,The effect of very high varying feilds at 32.5 celcius temperature,the electrical conduction has been proposed on the data obtained.The non-ohmic behavior in the sample seemed to start at an electric feild 3x10^6 volt/meter.In this case on data obtained it was concluded that "SCHOTTKY EMISSION MECHANISM" has been proposed. The activation energy was calculated by plotting(log o-1/T)characterstics at running temperature and it was found 0.325ev which is less than 1.0,It confirms predominance of Electronic Conduction. I=current in ampere V=volt T=temperature O=conductivity

  2. Electrical Conductivity in Textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Copper is the most widely used electrical conductor. Like most metals, though, it has several drawbacks: it is heavy, expensive, and can break. Fibers that conduct electricity could be the solutions to these problems, and they are of great interest to NASA. Conductive fibers provide lightweight alternatives to heavy copper wiring in a variety of settings, including aerospace, where weight is always a chief concern. This is an area where NASA is always seeking improved materials. The fibers are also more cost-effective than metals. Expenditure is another area where NASA is always looking to make improvements. In the case of electronics that are confined to small spaces and subject to severe stress, copper is prone to breaking and losing connection over time. Flexible conductive fibers eliminate that problem. They are more supple and stronger than brittle copper and, thus, find good use in these and similar situations. While clearly a much-needed material, electrically conductive fibers are not readily available. The cost of new technology development, with all the pitfalls of troubleshooting production and the years of testing, and without the guarantee of an immediate market, is often too much of a financial hazard for companies to risk. NASA, however, saw the need for electrical fibers in its many projects and sought out a high-tech textile company that was already experimenting in this field, Syscom Technology, Inc., of Columbus, Ohio. Syscom was founded in 1993 to provide computer software engineering services and basic materials research in the areas of high-performance polymer fibers and films. In 1999, Syscom decided to focus its business and technical efforts on development of high-strength, high-performance, and electrically conductive polymer fibers. The company developed AmberStrand, an electrically conductive, low-weight, strong-yet-flexible hybrid metal-polymer YARN.

  3. Dipole Relaxation in an Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    Derives an expression for the orientational entropy of a rigid rod (electric dipole) from Boltzmann's equation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium. (Author/GS)

  4. Dipole Relaxation in an Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    Derives an expression for the orientational entropy of a rigid rod (electric dipole) from Boltzmann's equation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium. (Author/GS)

  5. Relaxation phenomena of binary polar liquid mixture in C6H6 from conductivity of solution measured at 10 GHz electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S.; Sit, S. K.

    2010-11-01

    The dielectric relaxation times τ jk 's and dipole moments µ jk 's of the binary ( jk) polar mixtures of N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) and pyridine dissolved in benzene ( i) are estimated using linear slope of σ jk ″ - σ ijk ' curves as well as ratio of slopes of σ ijk ″ - w jk and σ ijk ″ - w jk curves at w jk → 0 for different mole fractions τ jk 's of pyridine and experimental temperatures under 9.875 GHz electric field. The measured µ jk 's and τ jk 's agree well with the reported values validating the proposed methods. The solute-solute (dimer) molecular associations are inferred from the plot of τ jk - x j and µ jk - x j curves for x j = 0.0 to 0.5 of pyridine and thereafter solute-solvent (monomer) molecular association occurs. The theoretical µtheo's are calculated to predict solute-solute and solute-solvent molecular association. The µ jk - T curves are drawn to show elongation of bond angles and bond moments with temperatures. The thermodynamic energy parameters are calculated from Eyring's rate theory equations to know the molecular dynamics as well as to ascertain Debye-Smyth relaxation mechanism of the systems.

  6. Electrical conductive coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Givaja, Gonzalo; Amo-Ochoa, Pilar; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Zamora, Félix

    2012-01-07

    Coordination polymers are currently one of the hottest topics in Inorganic and Supramolecular Chemistry. This critical review summarizes the current state-of-the-art on electrical conductive coordination polymers (CPs), also named metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The data were collected following two sort criteria of the CPs structure: dimensionality and bridging ligands (151 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  7. Dielectric relaxation and hopping conduction in reduced graphite oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Guidan; Yu, Ji; Gu, Min; Tang, Tong B.

    2016-06-14

    Graphite oxide reduced by sodium borohydride was characterised and its electrical conduction investigated with impedance spectroscopy. Thermal dependence of electrical modulus (instead of permittivity, its inverse) was calculated from complex impedance spectra, an approach that prevents any peak in dielectric loss (imaginary component) from being swarmed by large dc conductivity. Two loss peaks appeared at each tested frequency, in a sample of either degree of reduction. The set of weaker peak should arise from the relaxation of some polar bonds, as proposed earlier by us. The stronger loss peaks may correspond to the hopping of conduction electrons; variable range hopping is also consistent with the observed thermal dependence of conductivity. However, nearer ambient temperature there is a change in mechanism, to band transport, with an activation energy of fairly similar values as derived from both loss peaks and conductivity.

  8. Electrically Conductive Porous Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth Alan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an electrically conductive membrane that can be configured to be used in fuel cell systems to act as a hydrophilic water separator internal to the fuel cell, or as a water separator used with water vapor fed electrolysis cells, or as a water separator used with water vapor fed electrolysis cells, or as a capillary structure in a thin head pipe evaporator, or as a hydrophobic gas diffusion layer covering the fuel cell electrode surface in a fuel cell.

  9. Electrically conductive alternating copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Aldissi, M.; Jorgensen, B.S.

    1987-08-31

    Polymers which are soluble in common organic solvents and are electrically conductive, but which also may be synthesized in such a manner that they become nonconductive. Negative ions from the electrolyte used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer are incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant. A further electrochemical step may be utilized to cause the polymer to be conductive. The monomer repeat unit is comprised of two rings, a pyrrole molecule joined to a thienyl group, or a furyl group, or a phenyl group. The individual groups of the polymers are arranged in an alternating manner. For example, the backbone arrangement of poly(furylpyrrole) is -furan-pyrrole-furan-pyrrole- furan-pyrrole. An alkyl group or phenyl group may be substituted for either or both of the hydrogen atoms of the pyrrole ring.

  10. Electrical and Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Guglielmo; Perfetti, Mauro

    After a Sect. 1.1 devoted to electrical conductivity and a section that deals with magnetic and dielectric losses ( 1.2 ), this chapter explores the theory of thermal conduction in solids. The examined categories of solids are: metals Sect. 1.3.2 , Dielectrics Sects. 1.3.3 and 1.3.4 and Nanocomposites Sect. 1.3.5 . In Sect. 1.3.6 the problem of thermal and electrical contact between materials is considered because contact resistance occurring at conductor joints in magnets or other high power applications can lead to undesirable electrical losses. At low temperature, thermal contact is also critical in the mounting of temperature sensors, where bad contacts can lead to erroneous results, in particular when superconductivity phenomena are involved.

  11. Electrical properties with relaxation through human blood

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, S.; Al-ameer, S. S.; Al-Magaishi, S. H.

    2010-01-01

    The present work aims to study the effects of the blood-microstructure on the electrical conduction from two different but correlated properties: Electrical and mechanical (viscosity), and to derive useful parameters for the evaluation of electrical conduction as a function of the blood viscosity. ac-conductivity and dielectric constant of normal and diabetic blood are measured in the frequency range 10 kHz–1 MHz at the room temperature. An empirical relation relating the resistivity and viscosity of the blood has been presented. The results show that a microfluidic device is a viable and simple solution for determination of electrical and rheological behaviors of blood samples. PMID:20686650

  12. Electrically Conductive Paints for Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.; Wolf, R. E.; Ray, C.

    1977-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop and test electrically conductive paint coatings for spacecraft. A wide variety of organic and inorganic coatings were formulated using conductive binders, conductive pigments, and similar approaches. Z-93, IITRI's standard specification inorganic thermal control coating, exhibits good electrical properties and is a very space-stable coating system. Several coatings based on a conductive pigment (antimony-doped tin oxide) in silicone and silicate binders offer considerable promise. Paint systems using commercially available conductive polymers also appear to be of interest, but will require substantial development. Evaluations were made based on electrical conductivity, paint physical properties, and the stability of spectral reflectance in space environment testing.

  13. Electrical conductivity of hot QCD matter.

    PubMed

    Cassing, W; Linnyk, O; Steinert, T; Ozvenchuk, V

    2013-05-03

    We study the electric conductivity of hot QCD matter at various temperatures T within the off-shell parton-hadron-string dynamics transport approach for interacting partonic, hadronic or mixed systems in a finite box with periodic boundary conditions. The response of the strongly interacting system in equilibrium to an external electric field defines the electric conductivity σ(0). We find a sizable temperature dependence of the ratio σ(0)/T well in line with calculations in a relaxation time approach for T(c)electric conductor than Cu or Ag (at room temperature).

  14. Electrical Conductivity of Hot QCD Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassing, W.; Linnyk, O.; Steinert, T.; Ozvenchuk, V.

    2013-05-01

    We study the electric conductivity of hot QCD matter at various temperatures T within the off-shell parton-hadron-string dynamics transport approach for interacting partonic, hadronic or mixed systems in a finite box with periodic boundary conditions. The response of the strongly interacting system in equilibrium to an external electric field defines the electric conductivity σ0. We find a sizable temperature dependence of the ratio σ0/T well in line with calculations in a relaxation time approach for Tcelectric conductor than Cu or Ag (at room temperature).

  15. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  16. Electrically Conductive Anodized Aluminum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Trung Hung

    2006-01-01

    Anodized aluminum components can be treated to make them sufficiently electrically conductive to suppress discharges of static electricity. The treatment was conceived as a means of preventing static electric discharges on exterior satin-anodized aluminum (SAA) surfaces of spacecraft without adversely affecting the thermal-control/optical properties of the SAA and without need to apply electrically conductive paints, which eventually peel off in the harsh environment of outer space. The treatment can also be used to impart electrical conductivity to anodized housings of computers, medical electronic instruments, telephoneexchange equipment, and other terrestrial electronic equipment vulnerable to electrostatic discharge. The electrical resistivity of a typical anodized aluminum surface layer lies between 10(exp 11) and 10(exp 13) Omega-cm. To suppress electrostatic discharge, it is necessary to reduce the electrical resistivity significantly - preferably to < or = 10(exp 9) Omega-cm. The present treatment does this. The treatment is a direct electrodeposition process in which the outer anodized surface becomes covered and the pores in the surface filled with a transparent, electrically conductive metal oxide nanocomposite. Filling the pores with the nanocomposite reduces the transverse electrical resistivity and, in the original intended outer-space application, the exterior covering portion of the nanocomposite would afford the requisite electrical contact with the outer-space plasma. The electrical resistivity of the nanocomposite can be tailored to a value between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 12) Omega-cm. Unlike electrically conductive paint, the nanocomposite becomes an integral part of the anodized aluminum substrate, without need for adhesive bonding material and without risk of subsequent peeling. The electrodeposition process is compatible with commercial anodizing production lines. At present, the electronics industry uses expensive, exotic

  17. Electrical conduction in polymer dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotts, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The use of polymer dielectrics with moderate resistivities could reduce or eliminate problems associated with spacecraft charging. The processes responsible for conduction and the properties of electroactive polymers are reviewed, and correlations drawn between molecular structure and electrical conductivity. These structure-property relationships led to the development of several new electroactive polymer compositions and the identification of several systems that have the requisite thermal, mechanical, environmental and electrical properties for use in spacecraft.

  18. Electrical Conductivity of Cryolite Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellner, P.; Grjotheim, K.; Kvande, H.

    1985-11-01

    This paper proposes an equation for the electrical conductivity of multicomponent cryolite-based mixtures. The equation is based on a physical model which assumes that the conductivity is proportional to the number density of the effective electric charges in the melt. The various authors in the available literature show a great discrepancy in conductivity data of cryolite-based melts. The equation based on the physical model enables determination of which set of data is preferable. Special consideration in this respect is given to the influence of magnesium flouride and lithium flouride additions to the melt.

  19. Electrical conductivity of chondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duba, AL; Didwall, E. M.; Burke, G. J.; Sonett, C. P.

    1987-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of samples of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous chondrites is 4 to 6 orders of magnitude greater than rock forming minerals such as olivine for temperatures up to 700 C. The remarkably high electrical conductivity of these meteorites is attributed to carbon at the grain boundaries. Much of this carbon is produced by pyrolyzation of hydrocarbons at temperatures in excess of 150 C. As the temperature increases, light hydrocarbons are driven off and a carbon-rich residue or char migrates to the grain boundaries enhancing electrical conductivity. Assuming that carbon was present at the grain boundaries in the material which comprised the meteorite parent bodies, the electrical heating of such bodies was calculated as a function of body size and solar distance during a hypothetical T-Tauri phase of the sun. Input conductivity data for the meteorite parent body were the present carbonaceous chondrite values for temperatures up to 840 C and the electrical conductivity values for olivine above 840 C.

  20. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  1. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  2. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  3. Fundamentals of ionic conductivity relaxation gained from study of procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride at ambient and elevated pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Swiety-Pospiech, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Hawelek, L.; Paluch, M.; Ngai, K. L.

    2012-04-01

    The pharmaceuticals, procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride, are glass-forming as well as ionically conducting materials. We have made dielectric measurements at ambient and elevated pressures to characterize the dynamics of the ion conductivity relaxation in these pharmaceuticals, and calorimetric measurements for the structural relaxation. Perhaps due to their special chemical and physical structures, novel features are found in the ionic conductivity relaxation of these pharmaceuticals. Data of conductivity relaxation in most ionic conductors when represented by the electric loss modulus usually show a single resolved peak in the electric modulus loss M″(f ) spectra. However, in procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride we find in addition another resolved loss peak at higher frequencies over a temperature range spanning across Tg. The situation is analogous to many non-ionic glass-formers showing the presence of the structural α-relaxation together with the Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation. Naturally the analogy leads us to name the slower and faster processes resolved in procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride as the primary α-conductivity relaxation and the secondary β-conductivity relaxation, respectively. The analogy of the β-conductivity relaxation in procaine HCl and procainamide HCl with JG β-relaxation in non-ionic glass-formers goes further by the finding that the β-conductivity is strongly related to the α-conductivity relaxation at temperatures above and below Tg. At elevated pressure but compensated by raising temperature to maintain α-conductivity relaxation time constant, the data show invariance of the ratio between the β- and the α-conductivity relaxation times to changes of thermodynamic condition. This property indicates that the β-conductivity relaxation has fundamental importance and is indispensable as the precursor of the α-conductivity relaxation, analogous to the relation found

  4. Modelling of diffusion and conductivity relaxation of oxide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    A two-dimensional square grain model has been applied to simulate simultaneously the diffusion process and relaxation of the dc conduction of polycrystalline oxide materials due to a sudden change of the oxygen partial pressure of the surrounding gas phase. The numerical calculations are performed by employing the finite element approach. The grains are squares of equal side length (average grain size) and the grain boundaries may consist of thin slabs of uniform thickness. An additional (space charge) layer adjacent to the grain boundary cores (thin slabs) either blocking (depletion layer) or highly conductive for electronic charge carriers may surround the grains. The electronic transport number of the mixed ionic-electronic conducting oxide ceramics may be close to unity (predominant electronic conduction). If the chemical diffusion coefficient of the neutral mobile component (oxygen) of the grain boundary core regions is assumed to be higher by many orders of magnitude than that in the bulk, the simulated relaxation curves for mass transport (diffusion) and dc conduction can deviate remarkably from each other. Deviations between the relaxation of mass transport and dc conduction are found in the case of considerably different electronic conductivities of grain boundary core regions, space charge layers, and bulk. On the contrary, the relaxation curves of mass transport and electronic conductivity are in perfect coincidence, when either effective medium diffusion occurs or the effective conductivity is unaffected by the individual conductivities of core regions and possible space charge layers, i.e. the grain boundary resistivity is negligible.

  5. Surface oxygen exchange properties of Sr doped La2NiO4+δ as SOFC cathode: Thin-film electrical conductivity relaxation investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Bo; Li, Wenyuan; Zhang, Xinxin; Liu, Xingbo

    2015-06-02

    La2-xSrxNiO4+δ dense films are prepared by a novel spray-modified pressing method. The surface reaction kinetics is investigated via electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR). The layer thickness, 5~10 μm, is much less than the characteristic length of lanthanum nickelates, resulting in surface-controlled situation and allowing more accurate fitting than the traditional pellets ECR on the surface exchange coefficient (k). k for LNO is 1.6×10-5 cm/s in 0.2 atm at 700°C. Sr doping impairs the exchange kinetics, and k of Sr40 is about one order of magnitude smaller than undoped one. Interstitial oxygen and Ni oxidation state are suggested the predominant roles in determining surface kinetics. In conclusion, given the properties of the thin-film herein developed by spray-modified pressing is closer to those in practical porous electrode compared to pulsed laser deposited film in terms of preferential orientation and strain, it warrants the use of such a method in a variety of pertinent investigations.

  6. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  7. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  8. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, Thomas E.; Spieker, David A.

    1985-03-19

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  9. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  10. Electrically conductive reticulated carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, A.P.; Clough, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports a new type of electrically conductive composite which offers advantageous properties and controlled processing. These new composites consist of a conductive open-celled, low-density, microcellular, carbonized foam filled with a nonconductive polymer or resin. The open-celled nature of the carbon foam provides a porous three-dimensional reticulated carbon structure. The large continuous-void volume can be readily filled with an insulating polymer or resin resulting in a three-dimensional conductive composite material. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Electrical Relaxation in Rare Earth Doped Cadmium Fluoride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    RD-A172 412 ELECTRICAL RELAXATION IN RARE EARTH DOPED CNANIUN idpi FLUORIDE (U NAVAL ACADEMY ANNAPOLIS ND DEPT OF PHYSICS J J FONTANELLA ET AL. Gi SEP...Doped Cadmium Fluoride by John J. Fontanella & Mary C. Wintersgill Prepared for Publication in Crystal Lattice Defects and Amorphous Materials U. S...Include Security Classification) Electrical Relaxation in Rare Earth Doped Cadmium Fluoride (Unclassified) 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) John J. Fontanella and

  12. Electrically conductive black optical paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, M. M.; Metzler, E. C.; Cleland, E. L.

    1983-01-01

    An electrically conductive flat black paint has been developed for use on the Galileo spacecraft which will orbit Jupiter in the late 1980s. The paint, designed for equipment operating in high-energy radiation fields, has multipurpose functions. Its electrical conductivity keeps differential charging of the spacecraft external surfaces and equipment to a minimum, preventing the buildup of electrostatic fields and arcing. Its flat black aspect minimizes the effects of stray light and unwanted reflectances, when used in optical instruments and on sunshades. Its blackness is suitable, also, for thermal control, when the paint is put on spacecraft surfaces. The paint has good adherence properties, as measured by tape tests, when applied properly to a surface. The electrically conductive paint which was developed has the following characteristics: an electrical resistivity of 5 x 10 to the 7th ohms per square; a visual light total reflectance of approximately 5 percent; an infrared reflectance of 0.13 measured over a spectrum from 10 to the (-5.5) power to 0.001 meter; a solar absorptivity, alpha-s, of 0.93, and a thermal emissivity, epsilon, of 0.87, resulting in an alpha-s/epsilon of 1.07. The formula for making the paint and the process for applying it are described.

  13. Electrically conductive thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shai, M. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A coating characterized by low thermal absorption, high thermal emittance and high electrical conductivity comprises: (1) a fired oxide pigment comprising a minor amount of aluminum oxide and a major amount of zinc oxide; (2) sufficient water to provide a mixture suitable for application to a substrate, is presented. The fired oxide pigment may further include a minor amount of cobalt oxide. The resulting coating is particularly useful for coating the surfaces of spacecraft and similar objects.

  14. Electrical conductivity of ice VII

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Taku; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Yagi, Takehiko; Aoki, Katsutoshi

    2014-01-01

    It was discovered that a peak appears near a pressure of Pc = 10 GPa in the electrical conductivity of ice VII as measured through impedance spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) during the process of compression from 2 GPa to 40 GPa at room temperature. The activation energy for the conductivity measured in the cooling/heating process between 278 K and 303 K reached a minimum near Pc. Theoretical modelling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the origin of this unique peak is the transition of the major charge carriers from the rotational defects to the ionic defects. PMID:25047728

  15. Manganese olivine I: Electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Quan; Wang, Z.-C.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    1995-12-01

    To investigate the point defect chemistry and the kinetic properties of manganese olivine Mn2SiO4, electrical conductivity ( ’) of single crystals was measured along either the [100] or the [010] direction. The experiments were carried out at temperatures T=850 1200 °C and oxygen fugacities f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 11} - 10^2 atm under both Mn oxide ( MO) buffered and MnSiO3 ( MS) buffered conditions. Under the same thermodynamic conditions, charge transport along [100] is 2.5 3.0 times faster than along [010]. At high oxygen fugacities, the electrical conductivity of samples buffered against MS is ˜1.6 times larger than that of samples buffered against MO; while at low oxygen fugacities, the electrical conductivity is nearly identical for the two buffer cases. The dependencies of electrical conductivity on oxygen fugacity and temperature are essentially the same for conduction along the [100] and [010] directions, as well as for samples coexisting with a solid-state buffer of either MO or MS. Hence, it is proposed that the same conduction mechanisms operate for samples of either orientation in contact with either solid-state buffer. The electrical conductivity data lie on concave upward curves on a log-log plot of σ vs f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } , giving rise to two f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 11} - 10^2 regimes with different oxygen fugacity exponents. In the low-f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 11} - 10^2 regime left( {f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } < 10^{ - 7} {text{atm}}} right), the f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 11} - 10^2 exponent, m, is 0, the MnSiO3-activity exponent, q, is ˜0, and the activation energy, Q, is 45 kJ/mol. In the high f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 11} - 10^2 regime left( {f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } > 10^{ - 7} {text{atm}}} right), m=1/6, q=1/4 1/3, and Q=45 and 200 kJ/mol for T<1100 °C and T>1100 °C, respectively. Based on a comparison of experimental data with results from point defect chemistry calculations, it is

  16. Influence of SnO2 nanoparticles on the relaxation dynamics of the conductive processes in polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Swarup; Bhattacharya, Subhratanu

    2017-10-01

    The effect of stannic oxide (SnO2) nanoparticles on the electrical conductivity relaxation and distribution of relaxation times within the 4-Dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) doped polyaniline (Pani) was investigated using electrical impedance spectroscopy. A temperature dependent Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) type temporal relaxation function in the time domain was generated from the analysis of the frequency dependence of the dielectric modulus (imaginary component). The thermal evolution of the characteristics parameters of the KWW function was evaluated and using these parameters the temperature dependent average conductivity relaxation time and associated macroscopic conductivity of different samples were estimated. The study revealed that SnO2 nanoparticles within the polyaniline matrix induced faster relaxation of charge carriers that essentially enhanced the conductivity of the nanocomposite. The observed phenomena were well supported by the observed improvement of the localization length of the charge carriers within the nanocomposite.

  17. Dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behaviour of polyvinyl alcohol-HgSe quantum dot hybrid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Subhojyoti; Chatterjee, Sanat Kumar; Ghosh, Jiten; Meikap, Ajit Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Here we report a comparative study on the dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behaviour of pure polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and PVA-mercury selenide (HgSe) quantum dot hybrid films in the temperature range 298 K ⩽ T ⩽ 420 K and in the frequency range 100 Hz ⩽ f ⩽ 1 MHz. The prepared nanocomposite exhibits a larger dielectric constant as compared to the pure PVA. The real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constants were found to fit appreciably with the modified Cole-Cole equation, from which temperature-dependent values of the relaxation times, free charge carrier conductivity and space charge carrier conductivity were calculated. The relaxation time decreases with the quantum dot's inclusion in the PVA matrix and with an increase in temperature, whereas free charge carrier conductivity and space charge carrier conductivity increases with an increase in temperature. An increase in ac conductivity for the nanocomposites has also been observed, while the charge transport mechanism was found to follow the correlated barrier hopping model in both cases. An easy-path model with a suitable electrical equivalent circuit has been employed to analyse the temperature-dependent impedance spectra. The imaginary part of the complex electric modulus spectra exhibit an asymmetric nature and a non-Debye type of behaviour, which has been elucidated considering a generalized susceptibility function. The electric modulus spectra of the nanocomposite demonstrate a smaller amplitude and broader width, as compared to the pure PVA sample.

  18. Correlation of relaxation dynamics and conductivity spectra with cation constriction in ion-conducting glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, A.; Ghosh, A.

    2002-06-01

    Relaxation dynamics of Ag+ ions and scaling of the conductivity spectra in lead bismuthate glasses of different compositions have been investigated in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 2 MHz and in the temperature range from 83 K to just below glass transition temperature. We have observed that relaxation dynamics and the frequency exponent depend on the cation constriction. We have also observed that the scaling of the conductivity spectra obeys time-temperature superposition principle, but it is dependent on composition.

  19. Effect of low concentrations of carbon nanotubes on electric dipole relaxation in a polyurethane elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabenok, E. V.; Novikov, G. F.; Estrin, Ya. I.; Badamshina, E. R.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of small (up to 0.018 wt %) additions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the complex electric modulus M*= M' - jM″ and the spectrum of the relaxation times G(τ) of a cross-linked polyurethane elastomer containing ˜10 vol % of polyamide-6 dispersed in the polyurethane matrix and incompatible with it was studied. The measurements were conducted in the range of electric field frequencies 10-3-105 Hz at temperatures from 133 to 413 K. Based on the shape analysis of the M″( M') diagrams, the contributions of electric conductivity and dielectric relaxation to complex dielectric permittivity ɛ* = ɛ' - jɛ″ were separated and the effect of additions on α and β relaxation for both polyurethane and polyamide phases was analyzed in accordance with the peculiarities of phase-separated systems. The introduction of SWNTs in the composite affected the dielectric properties of the material; the maximum effect was observed at concentrations of 0.002-0.008 wt %; at higher SWNT concentrations, the scatter of data increased and did not allow us to evaluate the effect. The effect of SWNTs on G(τ) in the main phase was opposite to that in the polyamide phase. In the temperature range of α relaxation of the polyurethane phase, the relaxation times increased after the introduction of SWNTs evidently because of the decrease in the free volume that determines the α relaxation times of polyurethane. In contrast, for the polyamide phase in the range of α relaxation, the relaxation times decreased after the introduction of SWNTs. The results agree with the literature data on the effect of ultrasmall SWNT concentrations on the physicomechanical characteristics of the polyurethane elastomer and its electric conductivity.

  20. Electrical conductivity in silicon nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Nordberg, E. P.; Park, B.-N.; Celler, G. K.; Knezevic, I.; Evans, P. G.; Eriksson, M. A.; Lagally, M. G.

    2006-09-01

    Silicon nanomembranes (SiNMs) are very thin, large, free-standing or free-floating two-dimensional (2D) single crystals that can variously be flat, rolled into tubes, or made into any number of odd shapes, cut into millions of identical wires, used as conformal sheets, or chopped into tiny pieces. Because SiNMs are mostly surface or interface and little bulk, they have very interesting properties. We describe electrical conductivity in SiNMs. Because of trap states at the Si/SiO2 interface, bulk dopants become irrelevant to electronic transport when the membrane is thin enough. Replacing the oxide at one interface with the clean-Si surface reconstruction dramatically increases the nanomembrane conductivity. We provide a model for this behaviour. The dimer reconstruction surface states provide a means of 'surface doping'. Other materials with proper highest-occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) or lowest-unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) bands, when deposited on the Si surface, should produce the same conductivity effect, affording a broad opportunity for membrane-based sensors.

  1. Electrical Conduction in Thin Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Anil Kumar, , Dr.

    2003-10-01

    ABSTRACT: The study of Conduction mechanism in Insulator(Mica)of thickness from 20-80 microns has been carried out.The effect of varying electrical fields upto 50 MV/m at room temperature were studied.A sample of thickness 80 microns exibits non-linear behavior at fields beyond 24 MV/m. Other sample of thickness 50 microns,40 microns and 20 microns exibit linear behavior at low fields.On increasing the field furthur a sharp rise in current is obersved. Eventually at fields beyond 20 MV/m,the current does not continue to rise sharply and the rate of increase slow down very much.The log J-log V characterstics were obtained for various samples.For a sample of thickness of 20 microns,there are three distinct regions were found, having different slopes.The slope the second region indicates a square law dependence.The studies with these Mica films indicated different conduction processes at different field strenght.At field,ranging from(10-20)MV/m, the current was found to be SPACE-CHARGE LIMITED,due to shallow trapping of electrons.Beyond this field,however,at room temperature,the current did not show as sharp a rise as it should in case of an insulator caontaining shallow traps.This behavior has been attributed to the electron- phonon interactions.At higher temperature the current increased with fields as in the case of an insulator contaning shallow traps.A SPACE-CHARGE LIMITED CONDUCTION MECHANISM due to shallow traping of electrons has been suggested.This has been undertaken in view of growing interest and application of integrated circuitry.

  2. Dynamical electrical conductivity of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Luxmi; Singh, Navinder

    2017-06-01

    For graphene (a Dirac material) it has been theoretically predicted and experimentally observed that DC resistivity is proportional to T 4 when the temperature is much less than Bloch-Grüneisen temperature ({{ \\Theta }\\text{BG}} ) and T-linear in the opposite case (T\\gg {{ \\Theta }\\text{BG}} ). Going beyond this case, we investigate the dynamical electrical conductivity in graphene using the powerful method of the memory function formalism. In the zero frequency regime, we obtain the above mentioned behavior which was previously obtained using the Bloch-Boltzmann kinetic equation. In the finite frequency regime, we obtain several new results: (1) the generalized Drude scattering rate, in the zero temperature limit, shows {ω4} behavior at low frequencies (ω \\ll {{k}\\text{B}}{{ \\Theta }\\text{BG}}/\\hbar ) and saturates at higher frequencies. We also observed the Holstein mechanism, however, with different power laws from that in the case of metals; (2) at higher frequencies, ω \\gg {{k}\\text{B}}{{ \\Theta }\\text{BG}}/\\hbar , and higher temperatures T\\gg {{ \\Theta }\\text{BG}} , we observed that the generalized Drude scattering rate is linear in temperature. In addition, several other results are also obtained. With the experimental advancement of this field, these results should be experimentally tested.

  3. Ionic Conductivity And Structural Relaxation Studies on Lithium Niobophosphate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Dabas, Prashant; Hariharan, K.

    2011-07-15

    Niobium pentoxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) increases the chemical and thermal stability of otherwise hygroscopic alkali phosphate glasses and also enhances the conduction characteristics. Ion dynamics and structural relaxation have been investigated for mol%50Li{sub 2}0-45P{sub 2}0{sub 5}-5Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The non-linearity parameter 'x' in the Tool-Narayanaswamy model is evaluated using the dependence of fictive and glass transition temperatures on the cooling and heating rates.

  4. Preparation of Electrically Conductive Polymeric Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encinas, J. C.; Castillo-Ortega, M. M.; Rodríguez, F.; Castaño, V. M.

    2015-10-01

    Cellulose acetate porous membranes, coated with polyaniline, were chemically modified with polyelectrolytes to produce films of varying and controlled porosity and electrical conductivity. The highest electrical conductivity was obtained in membranes prepared with poly(styrene sulfonate) with large pore sizes. The electrical properties as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images are discussed.

  5. Effective electrical conductivity of a nonuniform plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    A simple nonuniformity model for calculating effective electrical conductivity and Hall parameter is proposed. The model shows that the effective conductivity can be significantly reduced by nonuniformities in the Hall parameter, even if the local conductivity is uniform.

  6. Electrical Conductivity of Ferritin Proteins by Conductive AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Degao; Watt, Gerald D.; Harb, John N.; Davis, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on single apoferritin and holoferritin molecules by conductive atomic force microscopy. Conductivity of self-assembled monolayer films of ferritin molecules on gold surfaces was also measured. Holoferritin was 5-25 times more conductive than apoferritin, indicating that for holoferritin most electron-transfer goes through the ferrihydrite core. With 1 V applied, the average electrical currents through single holoferritin and apoferritin molecules were 2.6 PA and 0.19 PA, respectively.

  7. Electrical Conductivity of Ferritin Proteins by Conductive AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Degao; Watt, Gerald D.; Harb, John N.; Davis, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on single apoferritin and holoferritin molecules by conductive atomic force microscopy. Conductivity of self-assembled monolayer films of ferritin molecules on gold surfaces was also measured. Holoferritin was 5-25 times more conductive than apoferritin, indicating that for holoferritin most electron-transfer goes through the ferrihydrite core. With 1 V applied, the average electrical currents through single holoferritin and apoferritin molecules were 2.6 PA and 0.19 PA, respectively.

  8. Electrical Relaxation in Calcium Fluoride Doped with Thorium and Zirconium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    9, 1055 (1976). 4. M. Ouwerkerk , F. F. Veldkamp, N. H. Andersen, and J . Schoonman, Solid State Ionics, 16, 125 (1985). 5. S. F. Matar, J . M. Reau, P...AD-Al?2 366 ELECTRICAL RELAXATION IN CALCIUM FLUORIDE DOPED WITH L1/ THORIUM AND ZIRCONIUM(U) NAYRL ACADEMY ANNAPOLIS MD DEPT OF PHYSICS J J ...Fluoride Doped with Thorium and Zirconium by John J . Fontanella & Mary C. Wintersgill Prepared for Publication in Crystal Lattice Defects and Amorphous

  9. Mechanism of conductivity relaxation in liquid and polymeric electrolytes: Direct link between conductivity and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gainaru, Catalin P.; Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmund ; Stacy, Eric W.; Bocharova, Vera; Gobet, Mallory; Holt, Adam P.; Saito, Tomonori; Greenbaum, Steve; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Oak Ridge National Lab. , Oak Ridge, TN

    2016-09-28

    Combining broadband impedance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and nuclear magnetic resonance we analyzed charge and mass transport in two polymerized ionic liquids and one of their monomeric precursors. In order to establish a general procedure for extracting single-particle diffusivity from their conductivity spectra, we critically assessed several approaches previously employed to describe the onset of diffusive charge dynamics and of the electrode polarization in ion conducting materials. Based on the analysis of the permittivity spectra, we demonstrate that the conductivity relaxation process provides information on ion diffusion and the magnitude of cross-correlation effects between ionic motions. A new approach is introduced which is able to estimate ionic diffusivities from the characteristic times of conductivity relaxation and ion concentration without any adjustable parameters. Furthermore, this opens the venue for a deeper understanding of charge transport in concentrated and diluted electrolyte solutions.

  10. Mechanism of conductivity relaxation in liquid and polymeric electrolytes: Direct link between conductivity and diffusivity

    DOE PAGES

    Gainaru, Catalin P.; Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmund; Stacy, Eric W.; ...

    2016-09-28

    Combining broadband impedance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and nuclear magnetic resonance we analyzed charge and mass transport in two polymerized ionic liquids and one of their monomeric precursors. In order to establish a general procedure for extracting single-particle diffusivity from their conductivity spectra, we critically assessed several approaches previously employed to describe the onset of diffusive charge dynamics and of the electrode polarization in ion conducting materials. Based on the analysis of the permittivity spectra, we demonstrate that the conductivity relaxation process provides information on ion diffusion and the magnitude of cross-correlation effects between ionic motions. A new approach ismore » introduced which is able to estimate ionic diffusivities from the characteristic times of conductivity relaxation and ion concentration without any adjustable parameters. Furthermore, this opens the venue for a deeper understanding of charge transport in concentrated and diluted electrolyte solutions.« less

  11. Mechanism of conductivity relaxation in liquid and polymeric electrolytes: Direct link between conductivity and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gainaru, Catalin P.; Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmund ; Stacy, Eric W.; Bocharova, Vera; Gobet, Mallory; Holt, Adam P.; Saito, Tomonori; Greenbaum, Steve; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Oak Ridge National Lab. , Oak Ridge, TN

    2016-09-28

    Combining broadband impedance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and nuclear magnetic resonance we analyzed charge and mass transport in two polymerized ionic liquids and one of their monomeric precursors. In order to establish a general procedure for extracting single-particle diffusivity from their conductivity spectra, we critically assessed several approaches previously employed to describe the onset of diffusive charge dynamics and of the electrode polarization in ion conducting materials. Based on the analysis of the permittivity spectra, we demonstrate that the conductivity relaxation process provides information on ion diffusion and the magnitude of cross-correlation effects between ionic motions. A new approach is introduced which is able to estimate ionic diffusivities from the characteristic times of conductivity relaxation and ion concentration without any adjustable parameters. Furthermore, this opens the venue for a deeper understanding of charge transport in concentrated and diluted electrolyte solutions.

  12. Dielectric relaxation and alternating current conductivity of lanthanum, gadolinium, and erbium-polyvinyl alcohol doped films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanafy, Taha A.

    2012-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum dielectric constant, ɛ', loss tangent, tan(δ), electric modulus, M*, and ac conductivity, σac, of pure polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as well as La-, Gd-, and Er-PVA doped samples have been carried out. The dielectric properties have been studied in the temperature and frequency ranges; 300-450 K and 1 kHz-4 MHz, respectively. FTIR measurements reveal that La3+, Gd3+, and Er3+ ions form complex configuration within PVA structure. Two relaxation processes, namely, ρ and α were observed in pure PVA sample. The first process is due to the interfacial or Maxwell-Wagner-Sillers polarization. The second one is related to the micro-Brownian motion of the main chains. For doped PVA samples, α-relaxation process splits into αa and αc. This splitting is due to the segmental motion in the amorphous (αa) and crystalline (αc) phases of PVA matrix. Electric modulus analysis was discussed to understand the mechanism of the electrical transport process. The behavior of ac conductivity for all PVA samples indicates that the conduction mechanism is correlated barrier hopping.

  13. Electrical control of optical emitter relaxation pathways enabled by graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielrooij, K. J.; Orona, L.; Ferrier, A.; Badioli, M.; Navickaite, G.; Coop, S.; Nanot, S.; Kalinic, B.; Cesca, T.; Gaudreau, L.; Ma, Q.; Centeno, A.; Pesquera, A.; Zurutuza, A.; de Riedmatten, H.; Goldner, P.; García de Abajo, F. J.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Koppens, F. H. L.

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the energy flow processes and the associated energy relaxation rates of a light emitter is of fundamental interest and has many applications in the fields of quantum optics, photovoltaics, photodetection, biosensing and light emission. Advanced dielectric, semiconductor and metallic systems have been developed to tailor the interaction between an emitter and its environment. However, active control of the energy flow from an emitter into optical, electronic or plasmonic excitations has remained challenging. Here, we demonstrate in situ electrical control of the relaxation pathways of excited erbium ions, which emit light at the technologically relevant telecommunication wavelength of 1.5 μm. By placing the erbium at a few nanometres distance from graphene, we modify the relaxation rate by more than a factor of three, and control whether the emitter decays into electron-hole pairs, emitted photons or graphene near-infrared plasmons, confined to <15 nm from the graphene sheet. These capabilities to dictate optical energy transfer processes through electrical control of the local density of optical states constitute a new paradigm for active (quantum) photonics and can be applied using any combination of light emitters and two-dimensional materials.

  14. Electrically conductive connection for an electrode

    DOEpatents

    Hornack, Thomas R.; Chilko, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    An electrically conductive connection for an electrode assembly of an electrolyte cell in which aluminum is produced by electrolysis in a molten salt is described. The electrode assembly comprises an electrode flask and a conductor rod. The flask has a collar above an area of minimum flask diameter. The electrically conductive connection comprises the electrode flask, the conductor rod and a structure bearing against the collar and the conductor rod for pulling the conductor rod into compressive and electrical contact with the flask.

  15. 3D Electron Spin Relaxation Control by Electric Field in Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie, Xavier

    2012-02-01

    We have measured the electron spin relaxation time in (111)-oriented GaAs quantum wells by time-resolved photoluminescence. By embedding the QWs in a PIN or NIP structure we demonstrate the tuning of the conduction band spin splitting and hence the spin relaxation time with an applied external electric field applied along the growth z direction . The application of an external electric field of 50 kV/cm yields a two-order of magnitude increase of the spin relaxation time which can reach values larger than 30 ns; this is a consequence of the electric field tuning of the spin-orbit conduction band splitting which can almost vanish when the Rashba term compensates exactly the Dresselhaus one [1]. The spin quantum beats measurements under transverse magnetic field prove that the D'Yakonov-Perel (DP) spin relaxation time is not only increased for the Sz electron spin component but also for both Sx and Sy. These results contrast drastically with the (001) and (110) quantum wells.The role of the cubic Dresselhaus terms on the spin relaxation anisotropy will finally be discussed. The tuning or suppression of the DP electron spin relaxation demonstrated here for GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells grown on (111) substrates is also possible in many other III-V and II-VI zinc-blende nanostructures since the principle relies only on symmetry considerations. [4pt] [1] A. Balocchi, Q. H. Duong, P. Renucci, B. L. Liu, C. Fontaine, T. Amand, D. Lagarde, and X. Marie, Phys. Rev. Lett 107, 136604(2011)

  16. Thermal annealing-induced electric dipole relaxation in natural alexandrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalvi, Rosa M. Fernandes; Li, Maximo Siu; Scalvi, Luis V. A.

    2005-02-01

    Electrical properties of natural alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr3+) are investigated by the thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) technique. Samples are submitted to consecutive annealing processes and TSDC is carried out after each annealing, yielding bands with different parameters. These bands are fitted by a continuous distribution of relaxation parameters: activation energy and pre-exponential factor of the Arrhenius equation. It has been observed that annealing influences the dipole relaxation behavior, since it promotes a modification of Fe3+ and Cr3+ impurity distributions on sites of distinct symmetry: Al1 and Al2. In order to have a reference for comparison, TSDC is also carried out on a synthetic alexandrite sample, where the only impurity present is Cr3+ ion.

  17. Electrical conductivity of ferritin proteins by conductive AFM.

    PubMed

    Xu, Degao; Watt, Gerald D; Harb, John N; Davis, Robert C

    2005-04-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on single apoferritin and holoferritin molecules by conductive atomic force microscopy. Conductivity of self-assembled monolayer films of ferritin molecules on gold surfaces was also measured. Holoferritin was 5-15 times more conductive than apoferritin, indicating that for holoferritin most electron-transfer goes through the ferrihydrite core. With 1 V applied, the average electrical currents through single holoferritin and apoferritin molecules were 2.6 pA and 0.19 pA, respectively.

  18. Electrically conductive polyimides containing silver trifluoroacetylacetonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rancourt, James D. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Caplan, Maggie L. (Inventor); St. Clair, Anne K. (Inventor); Taylor, Larry T. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Polyimides with enhanced electrical conductivity are produced by adding a silver ion-containing additive to the polyamic acid resin formed by the condensation of an aromatic dianhydride with an aromatic diamine. After thermal treatment the resulting polyimides had surface conductivities in the range of 1.7.times.10.sup.-3 4.5 .OMEGA..sup.-1 making them useful in low the electronics industry as flexible, electrically conductive polymeric films and coatings.

  19. Electrically conductive proppant and methods for detecting, locating and characterizing the electrically conductive proppant

    DOEpatents

    Cannan, Chad; Bartel, Lewis; Palisch, Terrence; Aldridge, David

    2015-01-13

    Electrically conductive proppants and methods for detecting, locating, and characterizing same are provided. The electrically conductive proppant can include a substantially uniform coating of an electrically conductive material having a thickness of at least 500 nm. The method can include injecting a hydraulic fluid into a wellbore extending into a subterranean formation at a rate and pressure sufficient to open a fracture therein, injecting into the fracture a fluid containing the electrically conductive proppant, electrically energizing the earth at or near the fracture, and measuring three dimensional (x, y, and z) components of electric and magnetic field responses at a surface of the earth or in an adjacent wellbore.

  20. Calibration-free electrical conductivity measurements for highly conductive slags

    SciTech Connect

    MACDONALD,CHRISTOPHER J.; GAO,HUANG; PAL,UDAY B.; VAN DEN AVYLE,JAMES A.; MELGAARD,DAVID K.

    2000-05-01

    This research involves the measurement of the electrical conductivity (K) for the ESR (electroslag remelting) slag (60 wt.% CaF{sub 2} - 20 wt.% CaO - 20 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) used in the decontamination of radioactive stainless steel. The electrical conductivity is measured with an improved high-accuracy-height-differential technique that requires no calibration. This method consists of making continuous AC impedance measurements over several successive depth increments of the coaxial cylindrical electrodes in the ESR slag. The electrical conductivity is then calculated from the slope of the plot of inverse impedance versus the depth of the electrodes in the slag. The improvements on the existing technique include an increased electrochemical cell geometry and the capability of measuring high precision depth increments and the associated impedances. These improvements allow this technique to be used for measuring the electrical conductivity of highly conductive slags such as the ESR slag. The volatilization rate and the volatile species of the ESR slag measured through thermogravimetric (TG) and mass spectroscopy analysis, respectively, reveal that the ESR slag composition essentially remains the same throughout the electrical conductivity experiments.

  1. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  2. Electrically Conductive Polyimide Films Containing Gold Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplan, Maggie L.; Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.

    1994-01-01

    Polyimide films exhibiting high thermo-oxidative stability and including electrically conductive surface layers containing gold made by casting process. Many variations of basic process conditions, ingredients, and sequence of operations possible, and not all resulting versions of process yield electrically conductive films. Gold-containing layer formed on film surface during cure. These metallic gold-containing polyimides used in film and coating applications requiring electrical conductivity, high reflectivity, exceptional thermal stability, and/or mechanical integrity. They also find commercial potential in areas ranging from thin films for satellite antennas to decorative coatings and packaging.

  3. Electrically Conductive Polyimide Films Containing Gold Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplan, Maggie L.; Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.

    1994-01-01

    Polyimide films exhibiting high thermo-oxidative stability and including electrically conductive surface layers containing gold made by casting process. Many variations of basic process conditions, ingredients, and sequence of operations possible, and not all resulting versions of process yield electrically conductive films. Gold-containing layer formed on film surface during cure. These metallic gold-containing polyimides used in film and coating applications requiring electrical conductivity, high reflectivity, exceptional thermal stability, and/or mechanical integrity. They also find commercial potential in areas ranging from thin films for satellite antennas to decorative coatings and packaging.

  4. Dielectric Investigation of Parylene D Thin Films: Relaxation and Conduction Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mokni, M; Kahouli, A; Jomni, F; Garden, J-L; André, E; Sylvestre, A

    2015-09-03

    Parylene is a generic name indicating a family of polymers with the basic chemical structure of poly-p-xylylene. Parylene N and Parylene C are the most popular for applications. Curiously, Parylene D (poly( dichloro-p-xylylene), (C8H6Cl2)) was forgotten for applications. This report is the consequence of a later availability of a commercial dimer of Parylene D and also to the recent advent of fluorinated Parylenes allowing extending applications at higher temperatures. In our work, from a dielectric analysis, we present the potentialities of Parylene D for applications particularly interesting for integration in organic field-effect transistors. Dielectric and electrical properties, macromolecular structures, and dynamics interaction with electric field as a function of frequency and temperature are studied in 5.8 μm thick Parylene D grown by chemical vapor deposition. More exactly, the dielectric permittivity, the dissipation factor, the electrical conductivity, and the electric modulus of Parylene D were investigated in a wide temperature and frequency ranges from -140 to +350 °C and from 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz, respectively. According to the temperature dependence of the dielectric permittivity, Parylene D has two different dielectric responses. It is retained as a nonpolar material at very low temperature (like Parylene N) and as a polar material at high temperature (like parylene C). The dissipation factor shows the manifestation of two relaxations mechanisms: γ and β at very low and high temperatures, respectively. The γ relaxation is assigned to the local motions of the C-H end of the chains when the cryogenic temperature range is approached. A broad peak in tan δ is assigned to the β relaxation. It corresponds to rotational motion of some polar C-Cl groups. For temperature above 260 °C a mechanism of Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars polarization at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces was identified with two activation energies of Ea1 = 2.12 eV and Ea2 = 3.8 e

  5. Electrically conducting polymers for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Gaier, James R.; Good, Brian S.; Sharp, G. R.; Meador, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Current research on electrically conducting polymers from 1974 to the present is reviewed focusing on the development of materials for aeronautic and space applications. Problems discussed include extended pi-systems, pyrolytic polymers, charge-transfer systems, conductive matrix resins for composite materials, and prospects for the use of conducting polymers in space photovoltaics.

  6. Electrically conducting polymers for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Gaier, James R.; Good, Brian S.; Sharp, G. R.; Meador, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Current research on electrically conducting polymers from 1974 to the present is reviewed focusing on the development of materials for aeronautic and space applications. Problems discussed include extended pi-systems, pyrolytic polymers, charge-transfer systems, conductive matrix resins for composite materials, and prospects for the use of conducting polymers in space photovoltaics.

  7. Relaxation Dynamics of Ferroelectric Liquid Crystals in Pulsed Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudreyko, A. A.; Migranov, N. G.; Migranova, D. N.

    2016-11-01

    In this contribution we report a theoretical study of relaxation processes in surface-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystals with spontaneous polarization. The influence of pulsed electric field on the behavior of ferroelectric liquid crystal in the SmC* phase, which is placed in a thin cell with strong anchoring of SmC* molecules with the boundary substrate, is studied. In the vicinity of the substrate interface, temporal dependence of the azimuthal motion of the director induced by electric field is obtained. The response to the external distortion of ferroelectric liquid crystal confined between two microstructured substrates is the occurrence of periodic temporal formation of solitons connected with the distortion of the director field n in the sample bulk. The interplay between microstructured substrates and director distribution of the ferroelectric SmC* phase is explained by the Frenkel-Kontorova model for a chain of atoms, but adapted for the continuum problem.

  8. [Myocardial infarction after conduction electrical weapon shock].

    PubMed

    Ben Ahmed, H; Bouzouita, K; Selmi, K; Chelli, M; Mokaddem, A; Ben Ameur, Y; Boujnah, M R

    2013-04-01

    Controversy persists over the safety of conducted electrical weapons, which are increasingly used by law enforcement agencies around the world. We report a case of 33-year-old man who had an acute inferior myocardial infarction after he was shot in the chest with an electrical weapon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Anomalous electrical conductivity of nanoscale colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Suman; Padhy, Sourav

    2008-10-28

    The electrical conductivity of colloidal suspensions containing nanoscale conducting particles is nontrivially related to the particle volume fraction and the electrical double layer thickness. Classical electrochemical models, however, tend to grossly overpredict the pertinent effective electrical conductivity values, as compared to those obtained under experimental conditions. We attempt to address this discrepancy by appealing to the complex interconnection between the aggregation kinetics of the nanoscale particles and the electrodynamics within the double layer. In particular, we model the consequent alterations in the effective electrophoretic mobility values of the suspension by addressing the fundamentals of agglomeration-deagglomeration mechanisms through the pertinent variations in the effective particulate dimensions, solid fractions, as well as the equivalent suspension viscosity. The consequent alterations in the electrical conductivity values provide a substantially improved prediction of the corresponding experimental findings and explain the apparent anomalous behavior predicted by the classical theoretical postulates.

  10. Estimating electrical conductivity tensors of biological tissues using microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Gilboa, Elad; La Rosa, Patricio S; Nehorai, Arye

    2012-10-01

    Finding the electrical conductivity of tissue is highly important for understanding the tissue's structure and functioning. However, the inverse problem of inferring spatial conductivity from data is highly ill-posed and computationally intensive. In this paper, we propose a novel method to solve the inverse problem of inferring tissue conductivity from a set of transmembrane potential and stimuli measurements made by microelectrode arrays (MEA). We first formalize the discrete forward model of transmembrane potential propagation, based on a reaction-diffusion model with an anisotropic inhomogeneous electrical conductivity-tensor field. Then, we propose a novel parallel optimization algorithm for solving the complex inverse problem of estimating the electrical conductivity-tensor field. Specifically, we propose a single-step approximation with a parallel block-relaxation optimization routine that simplifies the joint tensor field estimation problem into a set of computationally tractable subproblems, allowing the use of efficient standard optimization tools. Finally, using numerical examples of several electrical conductivity field topologies and noise levels, we analyze the performance of our algorithm, and discuss its application to real measurements obtained from smooth-muscle cardiac tissue, using data collected with a high-resolution MEA system.

  11. Dielectric relaxations and alternating current conductivity in manganese substituted cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kolekar, Y. D.; Sanchez, L. J.; Ramana, C. V.

    2014-04-14

    Manganese (Mn) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2-x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFMO) have been synthesized by the solid state reaction method and their dielectric properties and ac conductivity have been evaluated as a function of applied frequency and temperature. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFMO crystallize in the inverse cubic spinel phase with a lattice constant ∼8.38 Å. Frequency dependent dielectric measurements at room temperature obey the modified Debye model with relaxation time of 10{sup −4} s and spreading factor of 0.35(±0.05). The frequency (20 Hz–1 MHz) and temperature (T = 300–900 K) dependent dielectric constant analyses indicate that CFMO exhibit two dielectric relaxations at lower frequencies (1–10 kHz), while completely single dielectric relaxation for higher frequencies (100 kHz–1 MHz). The dielectric constant of CFMO is T-independent up to ∼400 K, at which point increasing trend prevails. The dielectric constant increase with T > 400 K is explained through impedance spectroscopy assuming a two-layer model, where low-resistive grains separated from each other by high-resistive grain boundaries. Following this model, the two electrical responses in impedance formalism are attributed to the grain and grain-boundary effects, respectively, which also satisfactorily accounts for the two dielectric relaxations. The capacitance of the bulk of the grain determined from impedance analyses is ∼10 pF, which remains constant with T, while the grain-boundary capacitance increases up to ∼3.5 nF with increasing T. The tan δ (loss tangent)-T also reveals the typical behavior of relaxation losses in CFMO.

  12. Electrically conductive connection for an electrode

    DOEpatents

    Hornack, T.R.; Chilko, R.J.

    1986-09-02

    An electrically conductive connection for an electrode assembly of an electrolyte cell in which aluminum is produced by electrolysis in a molten salt is described. The electrode assembly comprises an electrode flask and a conductor rod. The flask has a collar above an area of minimum flask diameter. The electrically conductive connection comprises the electrode flask, the conductor rod and a structure bearing against the collar and the conductor rod for pulling the conductor rod into compressive and electrical contact with the flask. 2 figs.

  13. High electrical conductivity in upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    In a joint study by geophysicists at two national laboratories, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, it was concluded that upper-mantle rocks may have relatively high electrical conductivity, presumably because of small amounts of carbon situated along grain boundaries. This impurity conductivity is similar to values determined in the laboratory for low-grade oil shale during pyrolysis. The residual char has electrical conductivity of 10-1 to 10-2 S/m, which is as much as 106 greater than the conductivity of unpyrolized low-grade oil shale (T. Shankland and A. Duba, Carbon-enhanced electrical conductivity in rocks (abstract), Eos, 63, 438, 1982). This much is known; the implications follow.

  14. Contact-independent electrical conductance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Mentzel, Tamar S.; MacLean, Kenneth; Kastner, Marc A.; Ray, Nirat

    2017-01-24

    Electrical conductance measurement system including a one-dimensional semiconducting channel, with electrical conductance sensitive to electrostatic fluctuations, in a circuit for measuring channel electrical current. An electrically-conductive element is disposed at a location at which the element is capacitively coupled to the channel; a midpoint of the element aligned with about a midpoint of the channel, and connected to first and second electrically-conductive contact pads that are together in a circuit connected to apply a changing voltage across the element. The electrically-conductive contact pads are laterally spaced from the midpoint of the element by a distance of at least about three times a screening length of the element, given in SI units as (K.di-elect cons..sub.0/e.sup.2D(E.sub.F)).sup.1/2, where K is the static dielectric constant, .di-elect cons..sub.0 is the permittivity of free space, e is electron charge, and D(E.sub.F) is the density of states at the Fermi energy for the element.

  15. AC conductivity and dielectric relaxation in Ba(Sm 1/2Nb 1/2)O 3 ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pritam; Singh, B. P.; Sinha, T. P.; Singh, N. K.

    2011-01-01

    The complex perovskite oxide a barium samarium niobate (BSN) synthesized by solid-state reaction technique has single phase with cubic structure. The scanning electron micrograph of the sample shows the average grain size of BSN∼1.22 μm. The field dependence of dielectric response and loss tangent were measured in the temperature range from 323 to 463 K and in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 1 MHz. The complex plane impedance plots show the grain boundary contribution for higher value of dielectric constant in the low frequency region. An analysis of the dielectric constant ( ε‧) and loss tangent (tan δ) with frequency was performed assuming a distribution of relaxation times as confirmed by the scaling behaviour of electric modulus spectra. The low frequency dielectric dispersion corresponds to DC conductivity. The logarithmic angular frequency dependence of the loss peak is found to obey the Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 0.71 eV. The frequency dependence of electrical data is also analyzed in the framework of conductivity and electric modulus formalisms. Both these formalisms show qualitative similarities in relaxation times. The scaling behaviour of imaginary part of electric modulus M″ and dielectric loss spectra suggest that the relaxation describes the same mechanism at various temperatures in BSN. All the observations indicate the polydispersive relaxation in BSN.

  16. Electrical conductivity of the continental crust

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, P.W.J.; Vine, F.J. |

    1994-11-01

    Geophysical measurements indicate that the Earth`s continental lower crust has a high electrical conductivity for which no simple cause has been found. Explanation usually relies on either saline fluids saturating the pores, or interconnected highly conducting minerals such as graphite, Fe/Ti oxides and sulfides, providing conducting pathways. Attempts in the laboratory to clarify the problem have, hitherto, been unable to recreate conditions likely to be present at depth by controlling the confining pressure and pore fluid pressure applied to a rock saturated with saline fluids at temperatures between 270 C and 1000 C. Here we report conductivity data obtained using a cell designed to make such measurements on rocks saturated with saline fluids. Our results show that the conductivity of saturated samples of acidic rocks is explicable entirely in terms of conduction through the pore fluid whereas the conductivity of saturated basic rocks requires the presence of an additional conduction mechanism(s). We have used the experimental data to construct electrical conductivity/depth profiles for the continental crust, which, when compared with profiles obtained from magnetotelluric observations, demonstrate that a mid to lower crust composed of amphibolite saturated with 0.5 M NaCl shows electrical conductivities sufficient to explain conductivity/depth profiles for the continental crust inferred from geophysical measurements.

  17. Electrically conductive, thermally insulating cryogenic current leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A. (Inventor); Hooker, Matthew W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An electrically conductive, thermally insulating current lead assembly has been developed for cryogenic systems. This lead assembly consists of thick film elements of high temperature superconductive materials deposited onto a low thermal conductivity substrate. The superconductor elements provide current transport but minimize heat transfer. The substrate provides the mechanical durability necessary for cryogenic and other environments.

  18. Electrical conductivity of acidic chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Hiroshi; Peters, Ernest; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Park, Sung Kook; Aoki, Masami

    1988-02-01

    The electrical conductivities of aqueous solutions in the system HCl-MCln (where M = K, Na, Mg, Ni, or Cd) were measured at different temperatures. The equivalent electrical conductivity of H+ was calculated on the basis of simple assumptions for these solutions, and show an inverse relationship with water activity in these solutions. The results obtained by varying temperatures, solute ratios, and ionic strength on the electrical conductivity were found to be consistent with a proton jump mechanism for the H+ ion, where the activity of water is the most significant parameter affecting its equivalent conductance, and a viscous (Stokes’ law) drag mechanism (i.e., Walden’s rule is obeyed) for other ions found in acidic solutions.

  19. The electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of metallic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraga, Luis; Henriquez, Ricardo; Bravo, Sergio; Solis, Basilio

    2017-03-01

    Proceeding from exact solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation, we present formulas for the electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of single-crystalline cylindrical nanotubes. The effects of surface scattering are taken into account by introducing different specularity parameters at the inner and outer surfaces. For small values of the inner diameter, these formulas reduce to the respective expressions for cylindrical nanowires. It is found that the existing measurements of the resistivity of nanotubes (Venkata Kamalakar and Raychaudhuri, New J. Phys. 14, 043032 (2012)) can be accurately described by this formalism.

  20. Making Complex Electrically Conductive Patterns on Cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Andrew; Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Lin, Greg Y.; Scully, Robert C.; Trevino, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A method for automated fabrication of flexible, electrically conductive patterns on cloth substrates has been demonstrated. Products developed using this method, or related prior methods, are instances of a technology known as 'e-textiles,' in which electrically conductive patterns ar formed in, and on, textiles. For many applications, including high-speed digital circuits, antennas, and radio frequency (RF) circuits, an e-textile method should be capable of providing high surface conductivity, tight tolerances for control of characteristic impedances, and geometrically complex conductive patterns. Unlike prior methods, the present method satisfies all three of these criteria. Typical patterns can include such circuit structures as RF transmission lines, antennas, filters, and other conductive patterns equivalent to those of conventional printed circuits. The present method overcomes the limitations of the prior methods for forming the equivalent of printed circuits on cloth. A typical fabrication process according to the present method involves selecting the appropriate conductive and non-conductive fabric layers to build the e-textile circuit. The present method uses commercially available woven conductive cloth with established surface conductivity specifications. Dielectric constant, loss tangent, and thickness are some of the parameters to be considered for the non-conductive fabric layers. The circuit design of the conductive woven fabric is secured onto a non-conductive fabric layer using sewing, embroidery, and/or adhesive means. The portion of the conductive fabric that is not part of the circuit is next cut from the desired circuit using an automated machine such as a printed-circuit-board milling machine or a laser cutting machine. Fiducials can be used to align the circuit and the cutting machine. Multilayer circuits can be built starting with the inner layer and using conductive thread to make electrical connections between layers.

  1. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Scott, Donald G.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  2. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Scott, D.G.

    1984-06-25

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal 10 borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  3. Electrical conductivity of individual polypyrrole microtube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yun-Ze; Xiao, Hong-Mei; Chen, Zhao-Jia; Wan, Mei-Xiang; Jin, Ai-Zi; Gu, Chang-Zhi

    2004-11-01

    Conducting microtubes (0.4-0.5μm in outer diameter) made of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with p-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA) were synthesized by a self-assembly method. We report the electrical conductivity of an individual PPy microtube, on which a pair of platinum micro-leads was fabricated by focused ion beam deposition. The measured room-temperature conductivity of the individual PPy microtube was 0.29S/cm, which is comparable to that of template-synthesized PPy micro/nanotubes. The temperature dependence of conductivity of the individual microtube follows the three-dimensional variable-range hopping (3D VRH) model.

  4. Pressure dependence of electrical conductivity in forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Takashi; Zhang, Baohua; Rhymer, Brandon; Zhao, Chengcheng; Fei, Hongzhan

    2017-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of dry forsterite has been measured in muli-anvil apparatus to investigate the pressure dependence of ionic conduction in forsterite. The starting materials for the conductivity experiments were a synthetic forsterite single crystal and a sintered forsterite aggregate synthesized from oxide mixture. Electrical conductivities were measured at 3.5, 6.7, 9.6, 12.1, and 14.9 GPa between 1300 and 2100 K. In the measured temperature range, the conductivity of single crystal forsterite decreases in the order of [001], [010], and [100]. In all cases, the conductivity decreases with increasing pressure and then becomes nearly constant for [100] and [001] and slightly increases above 7 GPa for [010] orientations and a polycrystalline forsterite sample. Pressure dependence of forsterite conductivity was considered as a change of the dominant conduction mechanism composed of migration of both magnesium and oxygen vacancies in forsterite. The activation energy (ΔE) and activation volume (ΔV) for ionic conduction due to migration of Mg vacancy were 1.8-2.7 eV and 5-19 cm3/mol, respectively, and for that due to O vacancy were 2.2-3.1 eV and -1.1 to 0.3 cm3/mol, respectively. The olivine conductivity model combined with small polaron conduction suggests that the most part of the upper mantle is controlled by ionic conduction rather than small polaron conduction. The previously observed negative pressure dependence of the conductivity of olivine with low iron content (Fo90) can be explained by ionic conduction due to migration of Mg vacancies, which has a large positive activation volume.

  5. Thermal and electrical contact conductance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansciver, S. W.; Nilles, M.

    1985-01-01

    Prediction of electrical and thermal contact resistance for pressed, nominally flat contacts is complicated by the large number of variables which influence contact formation. This is reflected in experimental results as a wide variation in contact resistances, spanning up to six orders of magnitude. A series of experiments were performed to observe the effects of oxidation and surface roughness on contact resistance. Electrical contact resistance and thermal contact conductance from 4 to 290 K on OFHC Cu contacts are reported. Electrical contact resistance was measured with a 4-wire DC technique. Thermal contact conductance was determined by steady-state longitudinal heat flow. Corrections for the bulk contribution ot the overall measured resistance were made, with the remaining resistance due solely to the presence of the contact.

  6. Stay connected: Electrical conductivity of microbial aggregates.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Lesnik, Keaton Larson; Liu, Hong

    2017-11-01

    The discovery of direct extracellular electron transfer offers an alternative to the traditional understanding of diffusional electron exchange via small molecules. The establishment of electronic connections between electron donors and acceptors in microbial communities is critical to electron transfer via electrical currents. These connections are facilitated through conductivity associated with various microbial aggregates. However, examination of conductivity in microbial samples is still in its relative infancy and conceptual models in terms of conductive mechanisms are still being developed and debated. The present review summarizes the fundamental understanding of electrical conductivity in microbial aggregates (e.g. biofilms, granules, consortia, and multicellular filaments) highlighting recent findings and key discoveries. A greater understanding of electrical conductivity in microbial aggregates could facilitate the survey for additional microbial communities that rely on direct extracellular electron transfer for survival, inform rational design towards the aggregates-based production of bioenergy/bioproducts, and inspire the construction of new synthetic conductive polymers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrical conductivity of polyazomethine/fullerene C60 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, Sergei; Podshivalov, Aleksandr; Kostromin, Sergei; Asandulesa, Mihai; Cozan, Vasile

    2017-02-01

    We prepared the polyazomethine/fullerene C60 nanocomposites varying in C60 loading. With a broadband dielectric relaxation spectrometer, we measured their electrical conductivity σm being a sum of dc conductivity σdc and ac conductivity σac. A small C60 content (0.25 and 0.5 wt.%) was shown to decrease σdc, whereas a larger amount of C60 (2.5 wt.%) was found to increase σdc of the nanocomposite. The temperature dependences of σac were described with the Arrhenius equation, while the frequency dependences of σac were characterized with a power function. The correlated barrier hopping was accepted as the most suitable mechanism to explain the σac behavior of the nanocomposites.

  8. Thermophysical Properties of Liquid Te: Density, Electrical Conductivity, and Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Su, C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Scripa, R. N.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.

    2004-01-01

    The thermophysical properties of liquid Te, namely, density, electrical conductivity, and viscosity, were determined using the pycnometric and transient torque methods from the melting point of Te (723 K) to approximately 1150 K. A maximum was observed in the density of liquid Te as the temperature was increased. The electrical conductivity of liquid Te increased to a constant value of 2.89 x 10(exp 5 OMEGA-1m-1) as the temperature was raised above 1000 K. The viscosity decreased rapidly upon heating the liquid to elevated temperatures. The anomalous behaviors of the measured properties are explained as caused by the structural transitions in the liquid and discussed in terms of Eyring's and Bachiskii's predicted behaviors for homogeneous liquids. The Properties were also measured as a function of time after the liquid was coded from approximately 1173 or 1123 to 823 K. No relaxation phenomena were observed in the properties after the temperature of liquid Te was decreased to 823 K, in contrast to the relaxation behavior observed for some of the Te compounds.

  9. Thermophysical Properties of Liquid Te: Density, Electrical Conductivity, and Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Su, C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Scripa, R. N.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.

    2004-01-01

    The thermophysical properties of liquid Te, namely, density, electrical conductivity, and viscosity, were determined using the pycnometric and transient torque methods from the melting point of Te (723 K) to approximately 1150 K. A maximum was observed in the density of liquid Te as the temperature was increased. The electrical conductivity of liquid Te increased to a constant value of 2.89 x 10(exp 5 OMEGA-1m-1) as the temperature was raised above 1000 K. The viscosity decreased rapidly upon heating the liquid to elevated temperatures. The anomalous behaviors of the measured properties are explained as caused by the structural transitions in the liquid and discussed in terms of Eyring's and Bachiskii's predicted behaviors for homogeneous liquids. The Properties were also measured as a function of time after the liquid was coded from approximately 1173 or 1123 to 823 K. No relaxation phenomena were observed in the properties after the temperature of liquid Te was decreased to 823 K, in contrast to the relaxation behavior observed for some of the Te compounds.

  10. Electrical conduction of a XLPE nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Jun; Sim, Jae-Yong; Lim, Kee-Joe; Nam, Jin-Ho; Park, Wan-Gi

    2014-07-01

    The resistivity, breakdown strength, and formation of space charges are very important factors for insulation design of HVDC cable. It is known that a nano-sized metal-oxide inorganic filler reduces the formation of space charges in the polymer nanocomposite. Electrical conduction of cross-linked polyethylene(XLPE) nanocomposite insulating material is investigated in this paper. The conduction currents of two kinds of XLPE nanocomposites and XLPE without nano-filler were measured at temperature of 303 ~ 363 K under the applied electric fields of 10 ~ 50 kV/mm. The current of the nanocomposite specimen is smaller than that of XLPE specimen without nano-filler. The conduction mechanism may be explained in terms of Schottky emission and multi-core model.

  11. Pulsed electrical discharge in conductive solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, V. A.; Vasilyak, L. M.; Vetchinin, S. P.; Pecherkin, V. Ya; Son, E. E.

    2016-09-01

    Electrical discharge in a conductive solution of isopropyl alcohol in tap water (330 μ S cm-1) has been studied experimentally applying high voltage millisecond pulses (rise time  ˜0.4 μ \\text{s} , amplitude up to 15 kV, positive polarity) to a pin anode electrode. Dynamic current-voltage characteristics synchronized with high-speed images of the discharge were studied. The discharge was found to develop from high electric field region in the anode vicinity where initial conductive current with density  ˜100 A cm-2 results in fast heating and massive nucleation of vapor bubbles. Discharges in nucleated bubbles then produce a highly conductive plasma region and facilitate overheating instability development with subsequent formation of a thermally ionized plasma channel. The measured plasma channel propagation speed was 3-15 m s-1. A proposed thermal model of plasma channel development explains the low observed plasma channel propagation speed.

  12. Imaging of cardiac electrical excitation conduction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D F; Jiang, S Q; Zhu, J C; Zhao, C; Yan, Y R; Gronemeyer, D; Van Leeuwen, P

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiple time windows beamformer (MTWB) method of solving the inverse problem of magnetic field and non-invasively imaging the cardiac electrical excitation conduction using the magnetocardiac signals acquired by a 61-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The MTWB constructs spatial filters for each location in source space, one for each component of the source moment based on the distributed source model, and estimates the cardiac equivalent current sources. The output of spatial filters is the source strength estimated in three-dimensional space and the weight matrix calculated with magnetocardiac signals in multiple time windows. A signal subspace projection technique is used to suppress noise. Then, the characteristics of cardiac electrical excitation conduction among two healthy subjects and two coronary vessel stenosis (CVS) patients are extracted from reconstructed current sources with maximum strength at each instant during QRS complex and ST-T segment, and a series of two-dimensional cardiac electrical excitation conduction maps (EECM) are obtained. It is demonstrated that two healthy subjects are of similar and the stronger electrical activities than those of two CVS patients. This technique can be used as an effective tool for the diagnosis of heart diseases.

  13. Dielectric and conductivity relaxation in AgI doped silver selenite superionic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, B.; Ghosh, A.

    2010-10-15

    Non-Debye relaxation in superionic AgI-Ag{sub 2}O-SeO{sub 2} glasses has been investigated as a function of frequency and temperature. The experimental data have been analyzed in the framework of complex dielectric permittivity and complex electric modulus formalisms. The dielectric permittivity data have been well interpreted using the Havriliak-Negami function. The electric modulus data have been analyzed by invoking Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function and various parameters describing the relaxation mechanism have been obtained. The temperature and compositional variation in relaxation times and the activation energy, obtained from dielectric permittivity as well as from electric modulus data, have been compared. The low value of stretched exponential parameter implies a highly nonexponential nature of relaxation and is attributed to the correlated ionic motion. The values of the stretched exponential parameter are observed to be independent of temperature as well as composition. Different scaling formalisms have been applied to understand the temperature and compositional dependence of the relaxation mechanism. The scaling of dielectric loss spectra and electric modulus spectra results in master curves, which signifies that the relaxation mechanism is independent of temperature as well as composition.

  14. Fluctuation-enhanced electric conductivity in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe; Nonaka, Andrew J; Bell, John B; Donev, Aleksandar; Garcia, Alejandro L

    2017-09-26

    We analyze the effects of an externally applied electric field on thermal fluctuations for a binary electrolyte fluid. We show that the fluctuating Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations for charged multispecies diffusion coupled with the fluctuating fluid momentum equation result in enhanced charge transport via a mechanism distinct from the well-known enhancement of mass transport that accompanies giant fluctuations. Although the mass and charge transport occurs by advection by thermal velocity fluctuations, it can macroscopically be represented as electrodiffusion with renormalized electric conductivity and a nonzero cation-anion diffusion coefficient. Specifically, we predict a nonzero cation-anion Maxwell-Stefan coefficient proportional to the square root of the salt concentration, a prediction that agrees quantitatively with experimental measurements. The renormalized or effective macroscopic equations are different from the starting PNP equations, which contain no cross-diffusion terms, even for rather dilute binary electrolytes. At the same time, for infinitely dilute solutions the renormalized electric conductivity and renormalized diffusion coefficients are consistent and the classical PNP equations with renormalized coefficients are recovered, demonstrating the self-consistency of the fluctuating hydrodynamics equations. Our calculations show that the fluctuating hydrodynamics approach recovers the electrophoretic and relaxation corrections obtained by Debye-Huckel-Onsager theory, while elucidating the physical origins of these corrections and generalizing straightforwardly to more complex multispecies electrolytes. Finally, we show that strong applied electric fields result in anisotropically enhanced "giant" velocity fluctuations and reduced fluctuations of salt concentration.

  15. Macrophages Facilitate Electrical Conduction in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Hulsmans, Maarten; Clauss, Sebastian; Xiao, Ling; Aguirre, Aaron D; King, Kevin R; Hanley, Alan; Hucker, William J; Wülfers, Eike M; Seemann, Gunnar; Courties, Gabriel; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Sun, Yuan; Savol, Andrej J; Sager, Hendrik B; Lavine, Kory J; Fishbein, Gregory A; Capen, Diane E; Da Silva, Nicolas; Miquerol, Lucile; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Naxerova, Kamila; Mitchell, Richard N; Brown, Dennis; Libby, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K; Kohl, Peter; Vinegoni, Claudio; Milan, David J; Ellinor, Patrick T; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2017-04-20

    Organ-specific functions of tissue-resident macrophages in the steady-state heart are unknown. Here, we show that cardiac macrophages facilitate electrical conduction through the distal atrioventricular node, where conducting cells densely intersperse with elongated macrophages expressing connexin 43. When coupled to spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes via connexin-43-containing gap junctions, cardiac macrophages have a negative resting membrane potential and depolarize in synchrony with cardiomyocytes. Conversely, macrophages render the resting membrane potential of cardiomyocytes more positive and, according to computational modeling, accelerate their repolarization. Photostimulation of channelrhodopsin-2-expressing macrophages improves atrioventricular conduction, whereas conditional deletion of connexin 43 in macrophages and congenital lack of macrophages delay atrioventricular conduction. In the Cd11b(DTR) mouse, macrophage ablation induces progressive atrioventricular block. These observations implicate macrophages in normal and aberrant cardiac conduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Hiroshi; Peters, Ernest; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Park, Sung Kook

    1987-03-01

    The electrical conductivities of the aqueous solution system of H2SO4-MSO4 (involving ZnSO4, MgSO4, Na2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4), reported by Tozawa et al., were examined in terms of a (H2O) and H+ ion concentration. The equations to compute the concentrations of various species in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions containing metal sulfates were derived for a typical example of the H2SO4-ZnSO4-MgSO4-(Na2SO4)-H2O system. It was found that the H+ ion concentrations in concentrated sulfuric acid solutions corresponding to practical zinc electrowinning solutions are very high and remain almost constant with or without the addition of metal sulfates. The addition of metal sulfates to aqueous sulfuric acid solution causes a decrease in electrical conductivity, and this phenomenon is attributed to a decrease in water activity, which reflects a decrease in the amount of free water. The relationship between conductivity and water activity at a constant H+ ion concentration is independent of the kind of sulfates added. On the other hand, any increase in H+ ion concentration results in an increase in electrical conductivity. A novel method for the prediction of electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution is proposed that uses the calculated data of water activity and the calculated H+ ion concentration. Also, the authors examined an extension of the Robinson-Bower equation to calculate water activity in quarternary solutions based on molarity instead of molality, and found that such calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with those determined experimentally by a transpiration method.

  17. Electrically Conductive Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Campbell, Michael G; Dincă, Mircea

    2016-03-07

    Owing to their outstanding structural, chemical, and functional diversity, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted considerable attention over the last two decades in a variety of energy-related applications. Notably missing among these, until recently, were applications that required good charge transport coexisting with porosity and high surface area. Although most MOFs are electrical insulators, several materials in this class have recently demonstrated excellent electrical conductivity and high charge mobility. Herein we review the synthetic and electronic design strategies that have been employed thus far for producing frameworks with permanent porosity and long-range charge transport properties. In addition, key experiments that have been employed to demonstrate electrical transport, as well as selected applications for this subclass of MOFs, will be discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Electrically conductive palladium containing polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. T.; St.clair, A. K.; Carver, V. C.; Furtsch, T. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight, high temperature resistant, electrically conductive, palladium containing polyimide films and methods for their preparation are described. A palladium (II) ion-containing polyamic acid solution is prepared by reacting an aromatic dianhydride with an equimolar quantity of a palladium II ion-containing salt or complex and the reactant product is cast as a thin film onto a surface and cured at approximately 300 C to produce a flexible electrically conductive cyclic palladium containing polyimide. The source of palladium ions is selected from the group of palladium II compounds consisting of LiPdCl4, PdS(CH3)2Cl2Na2PdCl4, and PdCl2. The films have application to aerodynamic and space structures and in particular to the relieving of space charging effects.

  19. Electrically conducting polyimide film containing tin complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor); Ezzell, Stephen A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a thermally-stable SnO2-surfaced polyimide film wherein the electrical conductivity of the SnO2 surface is within the range of about 3.0 x 10(exp -3) to about 1 x 10(exp -2) ohms(exp -1). Also disclosed is a method of preparing this film from a solution containing a polyamic acid and SnCl4 (DMSO)2.

  20. Electrically conducting polyimide film containing tin complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Anne K. (Inventor); Ezzell, Stephen A. (Inventor); Taylor, Larry T. (Inventor); Boston, Harold G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a thermally-stable SnO.sub.2 -surfaced polyimide film wherein the electrical conductivity of the SnO.sub.2 surface is within the range of about 3.0.times.10.sup.-3 to about 1.times.10.sup.-2 ohms.sup.-1,. Also disclosed is a method of preparing this film from a solution containing a polyamic acid and SnCl.sub.4 (DMSO).sub.2.

  1. Damage Detection in Electrically Conductive Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Todd A.

    2002-12-01

    High-technology systems are in need of structures that perform with increased functionality and a reduction in weight, while simultaneously maintaining a high level of performance and reliability. To accomplish this, structural elements must be designed more efficiently and with increased functionality, thereby creating multifunctional structures (MFS). Through the addition of carbon fibers, nanotubes, or particles, composite structures can be made electrically conductive while simultaneously increasing their strength and stiffness to weight ratios. Using the electrical properties of these structures for the purpose of damage detection and location for health and usage monitoring is of particular interest for aerospace structures. One such method for doing this is Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). With EIT, an electric current is applied through a pair of electrodes and the electric potential is recorded at other monitoring electrodes around the area of study. An inverse solution of the governing Maxwell equations is then required to determine the conductivities of discrete areas within the region of interest. However, this method is nearly ill-posed and computationally intensive as it focuses on imaging small changes in conductivity within the region of interest. For locating damage in a medium with an otherwise homogeneous conductivity, an alternative approach is to search for parameters such as the damage location and size. Towards those ends, this study develops an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to determine the state of an electrically conductive region based on applied reference current and electrical potentials at electrodes around the periphery of the region. A significant benefit of the ANN approach is that once trained, the solution of an inverse problem does not require costly computations of the inverse problem. This method also takes advantage of the pattern recognition abilities of neural networks and is a robust solution method in the presence

  2. Conduction block in novel cardiomyocyte electrical conduction line by photosensitization reaction.

    PubMed

    Kurotsu, Mariko; Ogawa, Emiyu; Arai, Tsunenori

    2014-01-01

    We developed a novel cardiomyocyte electrical conduction line. We studied electrical conduction block by extra-cellular photosensitization reaction with this conduction line to study electrical blockade by the photosensitization reaction in vitro.

  3. Electric conductance of highly selective nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Yariv, Ehud

    2013-05-01

    We consider electric conductance through a narrow nanochannel in the thick-double-layer limit, where the space-charge Debye layers adjacent to the channel walls overlap. At moderate surface-charge densities the electrolyte solution filling the channel comprises mainly of counterions. This allows to derive an analytic closed-form approximation for the channel conductance, independent of the salt concentration in the channel reservoirs. The derived expression consists of two terms. The first, representing electromigratory transport, is independent of the channel depth. The second, representing convective transport, depends upon it weakly.

  4. DC electrical conductivity study of cerium doped conducting glass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barde, R. V.; Waghuley, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    The glass samples of composition 60V2O5-5P2O5-(35-x)B2O3-xCeO2, (1 ≤ x ≤ 5) were prepared by the conventional melt quench method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The glass transition temperature and crystallization temperature determined from TG-DTA analysis. The DC electrical conductivity has been carried out in the temperature range 303-473 K. The maximum conductivity and minimum activation energy were found to be 0.039 Scm-1 and 0.15 eV at 473 K for x=1, respectively.

  5. Electrical performance of conductive suits. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hotte, P.W.; Gela, G.

    1995-03-01

    Conductive suits are used in live working to shield the wearer from electric field and to prevent currents from flowing in the wearer`s body. This report is an account of work performed in 1986--1987 to explore the performance characteristics of conductive suits, to investigate suit resistance measuring methods, to analyze the mechanisms responsible for unexpected variations in suit resistance, to relate actual in-service conditions with the test conditions, and to propose appropriate test methods. The mechanisms of suit and body current generation are described. Suit and body current magnitudes are evaluated and applied to a suit and body resistance model to predict the dependence of body current on suit resistance. The properties of present-day conductive suit materials are studied in relation to previous findings that their resistance reduces as measuring current increases. The suit resistance is also affected by movement, exhibits hysteresis-type characteristics, and is sensitive to the method of making electrical contact with the suit during measurement. A mechanism is proposed to explain these properties. It is suggested that acceptable resistance measurements could be obtained by using appropriate methods. The results of tests conducted to investigate the behavior of the effective resistance when a suit is exposed to a strong electric field, are reported. These results show that the resistance of high resistance suits can be drastically reduced in strong fields. Although the original work was conducted several years ago, little additional fundamental research progress has been made since. At the time of publication of this report, the entire work was reviewed, and findings and conclusions which are still applicable to present-day suits are summarized. Recommendations for future work are also presented.

  6. A Novel Method for Measuring Electrical Conductivity of High Insulating Oil Using Charge Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. Q.; Qi, P.; Wang, D. S.; Wang, Y. D.; Zhou, W.

    2016-05-01

    For the high insulating oil, it is difficult to measure the conductivity precisely using voltammetry method. A high-precision measurementis proposed for measuring bulk electrical conductivity of high insulating oils (about 10-9--10-15S/m) using charge decay. The oil is insulated and charged firstly, and then grounded fully. During the experimental procedure, charge decay is observed to show an exponential law according to "Ohm" theory. The data of time dependence of charge density is automatically recorded using an ADAS and a computer. Relaxation time constant is fitted from the data using Gnuplot software. The electrical conductivity is calculated using relaxation time constant and dielectric permittivity. Charge density is substituted by electric potential, considering charge density is difficult to measure. The conductivity of five kinds of oils is measured. Using this method, the conductivity of diesel oil is easily measured to beas low as 0.961 pS/m, as shown in Fig. 5.

  7. Electrical Conductance and Reversible Conductance Switching in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Bert

    2009-03-01

    A technology is demonstrated to fabricate reliable molecular metal-molecule-metal junctions with unprecedented device diameters up to 100 μm. The yield of these molecular junctions is close to unity. Stability investigations have shown a shelf life of years and no deterioration upon cycling. Key ingredients are the use of a conducting polymer layer (PEDOT:PSS) sandwiched between the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and the top electrode to prevent electrical shorts, and processing in lithographically defined vertical interconnects (vias) to prevent both parasitic currents and interaction between the environment and the SAM [1--3]. Furthermore, a fully functional solid-state molecular electronic switch is manufactured by conventional processing techniques. The molecular switch is based on a monolayer of photochromic diarylethene molecules sandwiched between two electrodes. The monolayer reversibly switches the conductance by more than one order of magnitude between the two conductance states via optical addressing. This bidirectional conductance switch operates as an electronic ON/OFF switch and as a reprogrammable data storage unit that can be optically written and electronically read [4]. [4pt] [1] Nature, 441, 69--72 (2006). [0pt] [2] Proc. Natl Acad. Sci USA, 104, 11161-11167 (2007). [0pt] [3] Nature Nanotechn., 3, December issue (2008) [0pt] [4] Adv. Mater. 20, 1467--1473.

  8. The electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts

    SciTech Connect

    Meihui Wang

    1992-06-01

    The sodium polysulfide melt has been described by a macroscopic model. This model considers the melt to be composed of sodium cations, monosulfide anions, and neutral sulfur solvent. The transport equations of concentrated-solution theory are used to derived the governing equations for this binaryelectrolyte melt model. These equations relate measurable transport properties to fundamental transport parameters. The focus of this research is to measure the electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts and calculate one of fundamental transport parameters from the experimental data. The conductance cells used in the conductivity measurements are axisymmetric cylindrical cells with a microelectrode. The electrode effects, including double-layer capacity, charge transfer resistance, and concentration overpotential, were minimized by the use of the alternating current at an adequately high frequency. The high cell constants of the conductance cells not only enhanced the experimental accuracy but also made the electrode effects negligible. The electrical conductivities of sodium polysulfide Na{sub 2}S{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 5} were measured as a function of temperature (range: 300 to 360{degree}C). Variations between experiments were only up to 2%. The values of the Arrhenius activation energy derived from the experimental data are about 33 kJ/mol. The fundamental transport parameter which quantifies the interaction within sodium cations and monosulfide anions are of interest and expected to be positive. Values of it were calculated from the experimental conductivity data and most of them are positive. Some negative values were obtained probably due to the experimental errors of transference number, diffusion coefficient, density or conductivity data.

  9. The electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts

    SciTech Connect

    Meihui Wang.

    1992-06-01

    The sodium polysulfide melt has been described by a macroscopic model. This model considers the melt to be composed of sodium cations, monosulfide anions, and neutral sulfur solvent. The transport equations of concentrated-solution theory are used to derived the governing equations for this binaryelectrolyte melt model. These equations relate measurable transport properties to fundamental transport parameters. The focus of this research is to measure the electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts and calculate one of fundamental transport parameters from the experimental data. The conductance cells used in the conductivity measurements are axisymmetric cylindrical cells with a microelectrode. The electrode effects, including double-layer capacity, charge transfer resistance, and concentration overpotential, were minimized by the use of the alternating current at an adequately high frequency. The high cell constants of the conductance cells not only enhanced the experimental accuracy but also made the electrode effects negligible. The electrical conductivities of sodium polysulfide Na{sub 2}S{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 5} were measured as a function of temperature (range: 300 to 360{degree}C). Variations between experiments were only up to 2%. The values of the Arrhenius activation energy derived from the experimental data are about 33 kJ/mol. The fundamental transport parameter which quantifies the interaction within sodium cations and monosulfide anions are of interest and expected to be positive. Values of it were calculated from the experimental conductivity data and most of them are positive. Some negative values were obtained probably due to the experimental errors of transference number, diffusion coefficient, density or conductivity data.

  10. Dielectric relaxation and electric modulus of polyvinyl alcohol-Zinc oxide composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Shital; Dhokne, Ragini; Moharil, Sanjiv

    2017-05-01

    A systematic study of AC electrical properties and dielectric relaxation of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)- zinc oxide (ZnO) composite films has been presented in the frequency range 1 Hz-100 kHz when temperature changes from 288 K-353 K. The films were characterized for structural analysis by x-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) attached with EDAX and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structural investigation confirms the presence of ZnO in PVA polymer. The incorporation of ZnO particles into PVA matrix enhances the AC conductivity and temperature dependence of them obeys the Jonscher’s universal power law. The frequency exponent which depends on temperature suggests the CBH (correlated barrier hopping) mechanism; is dominent mechanism in the composite film. The real and imaginary part of dielectric constant shows dispersion at low frequencies and decreased at high frequencies which may be ascribed to interfacial or electrode polarization. The temperature dependence of \\varepsilon {{}\\prime} follows the Debye model. At low frequency, the values of a real part of the electric modulus ({{M}\\prime} ) remains almost zero at all temperature except at 288 K and 303 K temperature due to viscous nature of polymer at low temperatures. The dielectric relaxation time was extracted from a plot of frequency dependence of {{M}\\prime \\prime} at different temperature and it is found to decrease with temperature resulting in the enhancement of AC conductivity.

  11. Electrically Conductive Metal Nanowire Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaoxiong

    This thesis investigates electrically conductive polymer nanocomposites formulated with metal nanowires for electrostatic discharge and electromagnetic interference shielding. Copper nanowires (CuNWs) of an average length of 1.98 mum and diameter of 25 +/- 4 nm were synthesized. The oxidation reaction of the CuNWs in air can be divided into two stages at weight of 111.2% on TGA curves. The isoconversional activation energies determined by Starink method were used to fit the different master plots. Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation gave the best fit. The surface atoms of the CuNWs are the sites for the random nucleation and the crystallite strain in the CuNWs is the driving force for the growth of nuclei mechanism during the oxidation process. To improve the anti-oxidation properties of the CuNWs, silver was coated onto the surface of the CuNWs in Ag-amine solution. The prepared silver coated CuNWs (AgCuNWs) with silver content of 66.52 wt. %, diameter of 28--33 nm exhibited improved anti-oxidation behavior. The electrical resistivity of the AgCuNW/low density polyethylene (LDPE) nanocomposites is lower than that of the CuNW/LDPE nanocomposites with the same volume percentage of fillers. The nanocomposites formulated with CuNWs and polyethylenes (PEs) were compared to study the different interaction between the CuNWs and the different types of PE matrices. The electrical conductivity of the different PE matrices filled with the same concentrations of CuNWs correlated well with the level of the CuNW dispersion. The intermolecular force and entanglement resulting from the different macromolecular structures such as molecular weight and branching played an important role in the dispersion, electrical properties and rheological behaviour of the CuNW/PE nanocomposites. Ferromagnetic polycrystalline nickel nanowires (NiNWs) were synthesized with uniform diameter of ca. 38 nm and an average length of 2.68 mum. The NiNW linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE

  12. Electrical conductivity of water-bearing magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, F.

    2003-04-01

    Phase diagrams and chemical analyzes of crystals and glass inclusions of erupted lavas tell us that most explosive volcanic eruptions were caused by extremely water-rich pre-eruptive conditions. Volcanologists estimate volcanic hazards by the pre-eruptive water content of lavas erupted in the past and they hypothesize that future eruptions should show similar features. Alternatively, the development of methods allowing direct estimation of water content of magmas stored in the Earth’s interior would have the advantage of providing direct constraints about upcoming rather than past eruptions. Geoelectrical sounding, being the most sensitive probe to the chemical state of the Earth’s interior, seems a promising tool providing that its interpretation is based on relevant laboratory constraints. However, the current database of electrical conductivity of silicate melt merely constrains anhydrous composition. We have therefore undertaken an experimental program aiming at elucidating the effect of water on the electrical conductivity of natural magmas. Measurements (impedance spectroscopy) are performed using a two electrodes set-up in an internally heated pressure vessel. The explored temperature and pressure range is 25-1350°C and 0.1-400MPa. The material used is a natural rhyolitic obsidian. Hydration of this rhyolite is first performed in Pt capsules with 0.5, 1, 2 and 6wt% of water. In a second step, the conductivity measurements are performed at pressure and temperature in a modified Pt capsule. One end of the capsule is arc-welded whereas the other end is closed with the help of a BN cone and cement through which an inner electrode is introduced in the form a Pt wire. The capsule is used as outer electrode. The electrical cell has therefore a radial geometry. The rhyolite is introduced in the cell in the form of a cylinder drilled in the previously hydrated glass. At dwell condition, the melt is sandwiched between two slices of quartz avoiding any deformation

  13. Inductive Measurement of Plasma Jet Electrical Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Matthew W.; Hawk, Clark W.; Litchford, Ron J.

    2005-01-01

    An inductive probing scheme, originally developed for shock tube studies, has been adapted to measure explosive plasma jet conductivities. In this method, the perturbation of an applied magnetic field by a plasma jet induces a voltage in a search coil, which, in turn, can be used to infer electrical conductivity through the inversion of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. A 1-inch diameter probe was designed and constructed, and calibration was accomplished by firing an aluminum slug through the probe using a light-gas gun. Exploratory laboratory experiments were carried out using plasma jets expelled from 15-gram high explosive shaped charges. Measured conductivities were in the range of 3 kS/m for unseeded octol charges and 20 kS/m for seeded octol charges containing 2% potassium carbonate by mass.

  14. Universality of DC electrical conductivity from holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xian-Hui; Sin, Sang-Jin; Wu, Shao-Feng

    2017-04-01

    We propose a universal formula of dc electrical conductivity in rotational- and translational-symmetries breaking systems via the holographic duality. This formula states that the ratio of the determinant of the dc electrical conductivities along any spatial directions to the black hole area density in zero-charge limit has a universal value. As explicit illustrations, we give several examples elucidating the validation of this formula: We construct an anisotropic black brane solution, which yields linear in temperature for the in-plane resistivity and insulating behavior for the out-of-plane resistivity; We also construct a spatially isotropic black brane solution that both the linear-T and quadratic-T contributions to the resistivity can be realized. 1). For Z (ϕ) = 1 and d ≥ 3, isotropic black branes in the AdS space cannot be utilized to realize linear temperature resistivity in the zero-charges limit. Nevertheless, anisotropic black branes are good candidates in model-building of holographic strange metals. 2). For d + 1-dimensional spatially isotropic Lifshitz black holes with Z (ϕ) = 1 in the absence of hyperscaling violation, this relation indicates that σii|qi=0 =[ 4 π / (d + z - 1) ] d - 3T (d - 3) / z, which is consistent with what obtained in Refs. [23,24] based on a universal scaling relation hypothesis: σ (ω = 0) =T (d - 3) / z Θ (0), where z is a dynamical critical exponent and Θ (ω) is a frequency dependent function. 3). This relation applies to shear viscosity-bound and electrical conductivity-bound violated systems, for example, systems considered in [20,25,26]. In [27], the authors conjectured that for the case d = 3, there exists a lower bound of dc electrical conductivity ∏iσii > 1. But it was soon found that this bound can be violated by a special coupling between the linear axion fields and the U (1) gauge field [25,26]. The structure of this paper is organized as follows. In section 2, we present our main results by writing

  15. Analysis of conductivity and dielectric spectra of Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 with coupled Cole-Cole type anomalous relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. S. K.; Shahid, T. S.; Govindaraj, G.

    2016-05-01

    Most of the crystalline materials seldom show a well-defined dielectric loss peak due to domination of dc conductivity contribution, but effects of loss peaks are seen at high frequencies. Ac electrical data of nano-crystalline Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 synthesised by chemical co-precipitation method show such behaviour. Properly combined and formulated conduction and dielectric relaxation functions are required for such materials. Cole-Cole type relaxation function in the combined conduction and dielectric process is formulated for complex resistivity ρ*(ω), complex permittivity ε*(ω), complex conductivity σ*(ω) and complex electric modulus M*(ω). Conduction and dielectric relaxation are linked to Jonscher's idea of 'pinned dipole' and 'free dipole' to understand the relaxation dynamics. The physical parameters of 'pinned dipole' and 'free dipole' formalism are unique for all representations like ρ*(ω), ε*(ω), σ*(ω) and M*(ω). 'Pinned dipole' relaxation time τc related to conduction process and 'free dipole' relaxation time τd related to dielectric process show Arrhenius behaviour with the same activation energy. Correlation of dc conductivity σc with τc and τd indicates the coupled dynamics of 'pinned dipole' and 'free dipole'. Time-temperature scaling of conduction and dielectric relaxation reveals that the mechanism of coupled dynamics of 'pinned dipole' and 'free dipole' is temperature independent. Hopping of charge carriers with dynamics of disordered cation distribution of host matrix generates a coupled conduction and dielectric relaxation in Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4.

  16. The relaxation of a prolate leaky dielectric drop in a uniform DC electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khair, Aditya; Lanauze, Javier; Walker, Lynn

    2015-11-01

    We quantify the relaxation of a prolate leaky dielectric drop upon removal of a uniform DC electric field. Experiments consisting of a castor oil drop suspended in a silicone oil are compared against boundary integral simulations that account for transient charging of the interface. Charge relaxation causes a marked asymmetry in the drop evolution during deformation and relaxation. In particular, during relaxation a prolate to oblate shape transition is observed before the drop recovers its equilibrium spherical shape. Furthermore, the high field strengths utilized in the experiments yield a fast drop relaxation in comparison with the transient development towards the steady deformation. The storage and release of capacitive energy and capillary energy is then quantified during deformation and relaxation, respectively. Finally, we present computational results for a drop that does not relax back to its initial spherical shape upon removal of the field; rather, the drop breaks up.

  17. Electrical Conductivity Mechanism in Unconventional Lead Vanadate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, F.; Merazga, A.; Montaser, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Lead vanadate glasses of the system (V2O5)_{1-x}(PbO)x with x = 0.4, 0.45, 0.5, 0.55, 0.6 have been prepared by the press-quenching technique. The dc (σ (0)) and ac (σ (ω )) electrical conductivities were measured in the temperature range from 150 to 420 K and the frequency range from 102 to 106 Hz. The electrical properties are shown to be sensitive to composition. The experimental results have been analyzed within the framework of different models. The dc conductivity is found to be proportional to Tp with the exponent p ranging from 8.2 to 9.8, suggesting that the transport is determined by a multi-phonon process of weak electron-lattice coupling. The ac conductivity is explained by the percolation path approximation (PPA). In this model, σ (ω ) is closely related to the σ (0) and fitting the experimental data produces a dielectric relaxation time τ in good agreement with the expected value in both magnitude and temperature dependence.

  18. Numerical recovery of certain discontinuous electrical conductivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt

    1991-01-01

    The inverse problem of recovering an electrical conductivity of the form Gamma(x) = 1 + (k-1)(sub Chi(D)) (Chi(D) is the characteristic function of D) on a region omega is a subset of 2-dimensional Euclid space from boundary data is considered, where D is a subset of omega and k is some positive constant. A linearization of the forward problem is formed and used in a least squares output method for approximately solving the inverse problem. Convergence results are proved and some numerical results presented.

  19. Electrical Conductivity Calculations from the Purgatorio Code

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S B; Isaacs, W A; Sterne, P A; Wilson, B G; Sonnad, V; Young, D A

    2006-01-09

    The Purgatorio code [Wilson et al., JQSRT 99, 658-679 (2006)] is a new implementation of the Inferno model describing a spherically symmetric average atom embedded in a uniform plasma. Bound and continuum electrons are treated using a fully relativistic quantum mechanical description, giving the electron-thermal contribution to the equation of state (EOS). The free-electron density of states can also be used to calculate scattering cross sections for electron transport. Using the extended Ziman formulation, electrical conductivities are then obtained by convolving these transport cross sections with externally-imposed ion-ion structure factors.

  20. Modeling liver electrical conductivity during hypertonic injection.

    PubMed

    Castellví, Quim; Sánchez-Velázquez, Patricia; Moll, Xavier; Berjano, Enrique; Andaluz, Anna; Burdío, Fernando; Bijnens, Bart; Ivorra, Antoni

    2017-05-30

    Metastases in the liver frequently grow as scattered tumor nodules that neither can be removed by surgical resection nor focally ablated. Previously, we have proposed a novel technique based on irreversible electroporation that may be able to simultaneously treat all nodules in the liver while sparing healthy tissue. The proposed technique requires increasing the electrical conductivity of healthy liver by injecting a hypersaline solution through the portal vein. Aiming to assess the capability of increasing the global conductivity of the liver by means of hypersaline fluids, here, it is presented a mathematical model that estimates the NaCl distribution within the liver and the resulting conductivity change. The model fuses well-established compartmental pharmacokinetic models of the organ with saline injection models used for resuscitation treatments, and it considers changes in sinusoidal blood viscosity because of the hypertonicity of the solution. Here, it is also described a pilot experimental study in pigs in which different volumes of NaCl 20% (from 100 to 200 mL) were injected through the portal vein at different flow rates (from 53 to 171 mL/minute). The in vivo conductivity results fit those obtained by the model, both quantitatively and qualitatively, being able to predict the maximum conductivity with a 14.6% average relative error. The maximum conductivity value was 0.44 second/m, which corresponds to increasing 4 times the mean basal conductivity (0.11 second/m). The results suggest that the presented model is well suited for predicting on liver conductivity changes during hypertonic saline injection. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Potential of mean force for electrical conductivity of dense plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Starrett, C. E.

    2017-09-28

    The electrical conductivity in dense plasmas can be calculated with the relaxation-time approximation provided that the interaction potential between the scattering electron and the ion is known. To date there has been considerable uncertainty as to the best way to define this interaction potential so that it correctly includes the effects of ionic structure, screening by electrons and partial ionization. The current approximations lead to significantly different results with varying levels of agreement when compared to bench-mark calculations and experiments. Here, we present a new way to define this potential, drawing on ideas from classical fluid theory to define amore » potential of mean force. This new potential results in significantly improved agreement with experiments and bench-mark calculations, and includes all the aforementioned physics self-consistently.« less

  2. NOVEL GRAPHITE SALTS AND THEIR ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, N.; McCarron, E.M.; McQuillan, B.W.; Thompson, T.E.

    1980-02-01

    A set of novel first stage graphite salts of general formula C{sub 8}{sup +}MF{sub 6}{sup -} has been prepared (M = Os, Ir, As). Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies indicate that these salts are hexagonal with a {approx} 4.9 and c {approx} 8.1 {angstrom}. The unit cell volume indicates that the anions are closely packed in the galleries. Platinum hexafluoride, which is the most powerful oxidizer of the third transition series, forms a first stage compound, which analytical, structural, and magnetic studies establish as C{sub 12}{sup 2+}PtF{sub 6}{sup 2-}. In this salt the anions are not close packed, but the electron withdrawal from the graphite planes is greater than for the C{sub 8}{sup +}MF{sub 6}{sup -} series. The variation in the electrical conductivity (in the a-b plane), as a function of composition, has been investigated with the OsF{sub 6}, IrF{sub 6}, PtF{sub 6} and AsF{sub 5} intercalates. For OsF{sub 6} and IrF{sub 6}, the conductance per plane of graphite is found to be a maximum at approximately C{sub 24}MF{sub 6} (second stage); the conductivity being an order of magnitude greater than that of the parent material. Intercalation beyond C{sub 24}MF{sub 6} leads to a marked decrease in conductivity. C{sub 8}MF{sub 6} is comparable in conductivity with the parent graphite. This behavior contrasts with the graphite/AsF{sub 5} system in which a steady increase in conductance per graphite plane with increasing AsF{sub 5} content is observed. For the PtF{sub 6} system, the second as well as the first stage materials are poorly conducting.

  3. Electrical-conductivity testing of latex gloves

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, J.F.; Salazar, J.A.; Trujillo, A.G.; Harris, T.; Berardinelli, S.P.

    1994-11-01

    There is an increasing awareness in the healthcare field that gloves worn for protection from hazards associated with body fluids do not always afford the protection desired. Gloves may have defects, such as holes, as they come from the manufacturer or distributor, or they may become defective during storage or use. While the numbers vary widely, failure rates for new gloves, defined as detectable holes in gloves prior to use, for unused examination gloves are reported as high as 58%. Rates as high as 7% have been reported for sterile latex gloves. Incidences of breaching the latex barrier during use vary with procedure but have been reported as high as 50%. In recent years, a number of devices have been developed to detect holes in latex gloves as they are being worn. Detection of increased electrical conductivity that takes place through the holes in the gloves is used to activate an audible alarm. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the validity of this method for hole detection. This evaluation was accomplished with both basic laboratory equipment and commercially available instruments. We did not evaluate or critically compare the individual devices. We also investigated the use of electrical conductivity as a quality assurance (QA) procedure, and the degradation of latex gloves due to storage and exposure to laboratory atmospheres and disinfectants.

  4. Variable thermal properties and thermal relaxation time in hyperbolic heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Mcrae, D. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Numerical solutions were obtained for a finite slab with an applied surface heat flux at one boundary using both the hyperbolic (MacCormack's method) and parabolic (Crank-Nicolson method) heat conduction equations. The effects on the temperature distributions of varying density, specific heat, and thermal relaxation time were calculated. Each of these properties had an effect on the thermal front velocity (in the hyperbolic solution) as well as the temperatures in the medium. In the hyperbolic solutions, as the density or specific heat decreased with temperature, both the temperatures within the medium and the thermal front velocity increased. The value taken for the thermal relaxation time was found to determine the 'hyperbolicity' of the heat conduction model. The use of a time dependent relaxation time allowed for solutions where the thermal energy propagated as a high temperature wave initially, but approached a diffusion process more rapidly than was possible with a constant large relaxation time.

  5. Interpreting equilibrium-conductivity and conductivity-relaxation measurements to establish thermodynamic and transport properties for multiple charged defect conducting ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huayang; Ricote, Sandrine; Coors, W Grover; Kee, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A model-based interpretation of measured equilibrium conductivity and conductivity relaxation is developed to establish thermodynamic, transport, and kinetics parameters for multiple charged defect conducting (MCDC) ceramic materials. The present study focuses on 10% yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BZY10). In principle, using the Nernst-Einstein relationship, equilibrium conductivity measurements are sufficient to establish thermodynamic and transport properties. However, in practice it is difficult to establish unique sets of properties using equilibrium conductivity alone. Combining equilibrium and conductivity-relaxation measurements serves to significantly improve the quantitative fidelity of the derived material properties. The models are developed using a Nernst-Planck-Poisson (NPP) formulation, which enables the quantitative representation of conductivity relaxations caused by very large changes in oxygen partial pressure.

  6. Effect of pressure on decoupling of ionic conductivity from structural relaxation in hydrated protic ionic liquid, lidocaine HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiety-Pospiech, A.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Hensel-Bielowka, S.; Pionteck, J.; Paluch, M.

    2013-05-01

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy and pressure-temperature-volume methods are employed to investigate the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the conductivity relaxation time (τσ), both in the supercooled and glassy states of protic ionic liquid lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate. Due to the decoupling between the ion conductivity and structural dynamics, the characteristic change in behavior of τσ(T) dependence, i.e., from Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-like to Arrhenius-like behavior, is observed. This crossover is a manifestation of the liquid-glass transition of lidocaine HCl. The similar pattern of behavior was also found for pressure dependent isothermal measurements. However, in this case the transition from one simple volume activated law to another was noticed. Additionally, by analyzing the changes of conductivity relaxation times during isothermal densification of the sample, it was found that compression enhances the decoupling of electrical conductivity from the structural relaxation. Herein, we propose a new parameter, dlogRτ/dP, to quantify the pressure sensitivity of the decoupling phenomenon. Finally, the temperature and volume dependence of τσ is discussed in terms of thermodynamic scaling concept.

  7. Conductivity analysis of epoxy/carbon nanotubes composites by dipole relaxation and hopping models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Airton; Pezzin, Sergio H.; Farias, Heric Denis; Becker, Daniela; Bello, Roger H.; Coelho, Luiz A. F.

    2016-10-01

    In this study it was used a numerical technique of successive approximations to estimate parameters of a conductivity model that includes the hopping process and the dipole relaxation for the purpose of describing the behavior of the conductivity measured on nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes in epoxy resin in the range of frequency of 100 Hz to 40 MHz. Two relaxation bands were detected, one with a response below 10 kHz and one above 10 MHz. For the first band, it was observed that the nanocomposites become more conductive, and its conductivity less temperature dependent, as the nanotube content increases. The second band is characterized by a large spread in relaxation time. The results show that the percolation threshold is below 0.15 vol% and that 'ac' hopping is the main transport process above 100 kHz, becoming dominant with respect to percolation at higher temperatures (>340 K).

  8. Interface bond relaxation on the thermal conductivity of Si/Ge core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Weifeng; He, Yan; Ouyang, Gang; Sun, Changqing

    2016-01-15

    The thermal conductivity of Si/Ge core-shell nanowires (CSNWs) is investigated on the basis of atomic-bond-relaxation consideration and continuum mechanics. An analytical model is developed to clarify the interface bond relaxation of Si/Ge CSNWs. It is found that the thermal conductivity of Si core can be modulated through covering with Ge epitaxial layers. The change of thermal conductivity in Si/Ge CSNWs should be attributed to the surface relaxation and interface mismatch between inner Si nanowire and outer Ge epitaxial layer. Our results are in well agreement with the experimental measurements and simulations, suggesting that the presented method provides a fundamental insight of the thermal conductivity of CSNWs from the atomistic origin.

  9. [Mathematical modeling of measuring the hydraulic conductivity of roots by the relaxation method].

    PubMed

    Logvenkov, S A

    2011-01-01

    The continuum model of radial mass transfer in plant roots developed previously has been used for processing the nonstationary experiments aimed at the determination of the root hydraulic conductivity. It is shown that, in contrast to compartmental models, our model allows one to describe the shape of the relaxation curve, in particular to separate segments with different relaxation times. It has been found that, for correctly determining the hydraulic conductivity, the method of data processing should be modified. A method for estimating the extracellular to intracellular conductivity ratio has been proposed.

  10. Anisotropy of electrical conductivity in dry olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Du Frane, W L; Roberts, J J; Toffelmier, D A; Tyburczy, J A

    2005-04-13

    [1] The electrical conductivity ({sigma}) was measured for a single crystal of San Carlos olivine (Fo{sub 89.1}) for all three principal orientations over oxygen fugacities 10{sup -7} < fO{sub 2} < 10{sup 1} Pa at 1100, 1200, and 1300 C. Fe-doped Pt electrodes were used in conjunction with a conservative range of fO{sub 2}, T, and time to reduce Fe loss resulting in data that is {approx}0.15 log units higher in conductivity than previous studies. At 1200 C and fO{sub 2} = 10{sup -1} Pa, {sigma}{sub [100]} = 10{sup -2.27} S/m, {sigma}{sub [010]} = 10{sup -2.49} S/m, {sigma}{sub [001]} = 10{sup -2.40} S/m. The dependences of {sigma} on T and fO{sub 2} have been simultaneously modeled with undifferentiated mixed conduction of small polarons and Mg vacancies to obtain steady-state fO{sub 2}-independent activation energies: Ea{sub [100]} = 0.32 eV, Ea{sub [010]} = 0.56 eV, Ea{sub [001]} = 0.71 eV. A single crystal of dry olivine would provide a maximum of {approx}10{sup 0.4} S/m azimuthal {sigma} contrast for T < 1500 C. The anisotropic results are combined to create an isotropic model with Ea = 0.53 eV.

  11. Sintering Behavior and Effect of Silver Nanowires on the Electrical Conductivity of Electrically Conductive Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Xie, H; Xiong, N N; Wang, Y H; Zhao, Y Z; Li, J Z

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, two kinds of silver nanowires with a 160 nm average diameter ranging from 30 to 90 µm length and a 450 nm average diameter up to 100 µm length were successfully synthesized by a polyol process with FeCl3 and Na₂S as reaction inhibitor, respectively. The experimental results indicate that the morphologies and sintering behaviors of both of silver nanowires are impacted by glutaric acid and sintering temperature. The isotropically conductive adhesives (ICAs) filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires as hybrid fillers were fabricated and the electrical properties were investigated based on the fraction of the silver nanowires of the total of silver fillers and the curing temperature, etc. The in situ monitoring the variation in electrical resistance of the ICAs explores that silver nanowires have influence on the curing behavior of the ICAs. Silver nanowires synthesized with Na2S as reaction inhibitor and treated with glutaric acid can significantly improve the electrical conductivity of the ICAs in the case of the low loading of silver fillers in the appropriate proportion range of the weight ratio of micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires, primarily as a result of connecting effect. When the loading of silver fillers in the ICAs is high, the electrical conductivity is also enhanced slightly in the case of the proper fraction of silver nanowires of the total of silver fillers. The effect of the curing temperature on the electrical conductivity relates to the fraction of silver nanowires and the total loading of silver fillers. The electrical conductivity of the ICAs filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires synthesized with FeCl₃ as reaction inhibitor is greatly damaged, indicating that the size of silver nanowires also is one of main factor to impact the electrical conductivity of the ICAs doped with silver nanowires. The electrical property of the ICAs filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver

  12. Electrical conductivity of PFPA functionalized graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachinda, P.; Evans, D.; Solanki, R.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modification of graphene by covalently functionalizing its surface potentially allows a wider flexibility in engineering electronic structure, in particular the local density of states of the carbon atoms bound to the modifier that can result in opening of the band gap. Such binding can involve covalent hydrogenation of graphene to modify hybridization of carbon atoms from sp2 to sp3 geometry [1-3]. Methods have also been developed to functionalize graphene covalently with molecular species [4-8]. Among these, perfluorophenylazide (PFPA) functionalization of graphene is well-developed using a nitrene intermediate. Films of this molecule also act as adhesion layers that allow production of long ribbons of exfoliated graphene [7-9]. We have developed a theory to predict electrical properties of PFPA functionalized graphene and compared it to experimental results. Conductivity of these PFPA functionalized ribbons of exfoliated graphene show good agreement with our theory.

  13. Nuclear relaxation in an electric field enables the determination of isotropic magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that in contrast to the case of nuclear relaxation in a magnetic field B, simultaneous application of the magnetic field B and an additional electric field E causes transverse relaxation of a spin-1/2 nucleus with the rate proportional to the square of the isotropic part of the magnetic shielding tensor. This effect can contribute noticeably to the transverse relaxation rate of heavy nuclei in molecules that possess permanent electric dipole moments. Relativistic quantum mechanical computations indicate that for 205Tl nucleus in a Pt-Tl bonded complex, Pt(CN)5Tl, the transverse relaxation rate induced by the electric field is of the order of 1 s-1 at E = 5 kV/mm and B = 10 T.

  14. Electrical conductivity and modulus formulation in zinc modified bismuth boro-tellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhankhar, Sunil; Kundu, R. S.; Dult, Meenakshi; Murugavel, S.; Punia, R.; Kishore, N.

    2016-09-01

    The ac conductivity of zinc modified tellurium based quaternary glasses having composition 60 TeO2-10 B2O3-(30 - x) Bi2O3-x ZnO; x = 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 has been investigated in the frequency range 10-1-105 Hz and in temperature range 483-593 K. Frequency and temperature dependent ac conductivity found to obey Jonscher power law modified by Almond-West. DC conductivity, crossover frequency and frequency exponent have been estimated from the fitting of the experimental data of conductivity with Jonscher power law modified by Almond-West. The ac conductivity and its frequency exponent have been analyzed by various theoretical models. In presently studied glasses ac conduction takes place via tunneling of overlapping large polaron tunneling. Activation energy is found to be increased with increase in zinc content and dc conduction takes place via variable range hopping proposed by Mott with some modification suggested by Punia et al. The value of the stretched exponent ( β) obtained by fitting of M^' ' }} reveals the presence of non-Debye type relaxation. Scaling spectra of ac conductivity and electric modulus collapse into a single master curve for all compositions and temperatures, reveals the presence of composition and temperature independent conduction and relaxation process in these glasses. Activation energy of conduction ( W) and electric modulus ( E R ) are nearly equal, indicating that polaron have to overcome the same energy barrier during conduction as well as relaxation processes.

  15. NMP, Electrical Relaxation, and High Pressure Electrical Conductivity in Ion Conducting Polymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Power Sources Division 111 Chapel Street Crane, Indiana 47522 Newton, Massachusetts 02158 S. Ruby Dr. Aaron Wold DOE (STOR) Department of Chemistry M.S...Physics University of Puerto Rico Washington State University Rio Piedras , Puerto Rico 00931 Pullman, Washington 99164 Dr. Joseph Gordon, II Dr. Carl

  16. The electrical conductance growth of a metallic granular packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Zorica M.; Cvetković, Milica; Šćepanović, Julija R.; Lončarević, Ivana; Budinski-Petković, Ljuba; Vrhovac, Slobodan B.

    2017-06-01

    We report on measurements of the electrical conductivity on a two-dimensional packing of metallic disks when a stable current of 1 mA flows through the system. At low applied currents, the conductance σ is found to increase by a pattern σ( t) = σ ∞ - Δσ E α [ - ( t/ τ) α ], where E α denotes the Mittag-Leffler function of order α ∈ (0,1). By changing the inclination angle θ of the granular bed from horizontal, we have studied the impact of the effective gravitational acceleration g e ff = gsin θ on the relaxation features of the conductance σ( t). The characteristic timescale τ is found to grow when effective gravity g e ff decreases. By changing both the distance between the electrodes and the number of grains in the packing, we have shown that the long term resistance decay observed in the experiment is related to local micro-contacts rearrangements at each disk. By focusing on the electro-mechanical processes that allow both creation and breakdown of micro-contacts between two disks, we present an approach to granular conduction based on subordination of stochastic processes. In order to imitate, in a very simplified way, the conduction dynamics of granular material at low currents, we impose that the micro-contacts at the interface switch stochastically between two possible states, "on" and "off", characterizing the conductivity of the micro-contact. We assume that the time intervals between the consecutive changes of state are governed by a certain waiting-time distribution. It is demonstrated how the microscopic random dynamics regarding the micro-contacts leads to the macroscopic observation of slow conductance growth, described by an exact fractional kinetic equations.

  17. Microstructure, electrical conductivity and modulus spectra of CdI2 doped nanocomposite-electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Ranadip; Roy, Debasish; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2017-02-01

    Ionic conductivity and dielectric behavior of Ag2O-CdI2-CdO nanocomposite system have been studied. X-ray diffraction has been carried out to obtain the crystallite sizes and the growth of CdO dispersed in glass-matrices. Total conductivity of them shows thermally activated nature. It is observed that total conductivity decreases and corresponding activation energy for conduction follows opposite behavior. The high-frequency ac conductivity may correspond to a nonrandom, correlated and sub-diffusive motion of Ag+ ions. Conductivity relaxation time is found to increase. The nature of scaling of the conductivity as well as modulus spectra indicates that the electrical relaxation of Ag+ is temperature independent but depends upon composition.

  18. Photovoltaic device having light transmitting electrically conductive stacked films

    DOEpatents

    Weber, Michael F.; Tran, Nang T.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Gilbert, James R.; Aspen, Frank E.

    1990-07-10

    A light transmitting electrically conductive stacked film, useful as a light transmitting electrode, including a first light transmitting electrically conductive layer, having a first optical thickness, a second light transmitting layer, having a second optical thickness different from the optical thickness of the first layer, and an electrically conductive metallic layer interposed between and in initimate contact with the first and second layers.

  19. Electrical resistance relaxation induced by high pressure in single crystals of YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Vovk, R. V.; Vovk, N. R.

    2013-06-01

    An effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the electrical resistance in the ab-plane of single crystals of YBa2Cu3O7-δ with oxygen deficiency is investigated. It is found that the temperature dependence of the electrical resistance is determined by the fluctuation conductivity near Tc and by the scattering of electrons by phonons in a normal state. A high pressure causes the redistribution of labile oxygen, increasing a phase separation. The depressuriazation is accompanied by relaxation processes in both the phonon and the electronic subsystems, the characteristic times of which are significantly different from each other.

  20. Chapter A6. Section 6.3. Specific Electrical Conductance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radtke, Dean B.; Davis, Jerri V.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductance is a measure of the capacity of a substance to conduct an electrical current. The specific electrical conductance (conductivity) of water is a function of the types and quantities of dissolved substances it contains, normalized to a unit length and unit cross section at a specified temperature. This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) describes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) guidance and protocols for measurement of conductivity in ground and surface waters.

  1. Magnetic flowmeter for electrically conductive liquid

    DOEpatents

    Skladzien, Stanley B.; Raue, Donald J.

    1982-01-01

    A magnetic flowmeter includes first and second tube sections each having ls of non-magnetic material. The first tube is suitably connected to a process for passing a flow of an electrically conductive fluid to be measured. The second tube is established as a reference containing a still medium and is maintained at the same temperature as the first tube. A rotatable magnet assembly is disposed between the two tubes with at least two magnets attached to radially extending arms from a central shaft. Each magnet includes an air gap suitably sized to pass astraddle the diameter along a portion of the length of each of the two tubes. The magnets are provided in matched pairs spaced 180.degree. apart such that signals will be simultaneously generated in signal leads attached to each of the two tubes. By comparing the signals from the two tubes and varying the rotating speed of the magnet assembly until the signals are equal, or attain a maximum, the flow velocity of the fluid within the first tube can be determined. Through temperature monitoring and appropriate heaters, the two tubes are maintained at the same temperature.

  2. Magnetic flowmeter for electrically conductive liquid

    DOEpatents

    Skladzien, S.B.; Raue, D.J.

    1980-08-18

    A magnetic flowmeter includes first and second tube sections each having walls of non-magnetic material. The first tube is suitably connected to a process for passing a flow of an electrically conductive fluid to be measured. The second tube is established as a reference containing a still medium and is maintained at the same temperature as the first tube. A rotatable magnet assembly is disposed between the two tubes with at least two magnets attached to radially extending arms from a central shaft. Each magnet includes an air gap suitably sized to pass astraddle the diameter along a portion of the length of each of the two tubes. Two magnets are provided in matched pairs spaced 180/sup 0/ apart such that signals will be simultaneously generated in signal leads attached to each of the two tubes. By comparing the signals from the two tubes and varying the rotating speed of the magnet assembly until the signals are equal, or attain a maximum, the flow velocity of the fluid within the first tube can be determined. Through temperature monitoring and appropriate heaters, the two tubes are maintained at the same temperature.

  3. New method for electrical conductivity temperature compensation.

    PubMed

    McCleskey, R Blaine

    2013-09-03

    Electrical conductivity (κ) measurements of natural waters are typically referenced to 25 °C (κ25) using standard temperature compensation factors (α). For acidic waters (pH < 4), this can result in a large κ25 error (δκ25). The more the sample temperature departs from 25 °C, the larger the potential δκ25. For pH < 4, the hydrogen ion transport number becomes substantial and its mode of transport is different from most other ions resulting in a different α. A new method for determining α as a function of pH and temperature is presented. Samples with varying amounts of H2SO4 and NaCl were used to develop the new α, which was then applied to 65 natural water samples including acid mine waters, geothermal waters, seawater, and stream waters. For each sample, the κ and pH were measured at several temperatures from 5 to 90 °C and κ25 was calculated. The δκ25 ranged from -11 to 9% for the new method as compared to -42 to 25% and -53 to 27% for the constant α (0.019) and ISO-7888 methods, respectively. The new method for determining α is a substantial improvement for acidic waters and performs as well as or better than the standard methods for circumneutral waters.

  4. New Method for Electrical Conductivity Temperature Compensation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2013-01-01

    Electrical conductivity (κ) measurements of natural waters are typically referenced to 25 °C (κ25) using standard temperature compensation factors (α). For acidic waters (pH < 4), this can result in a large κ25 error (δκ25). The more the sample temperature departs from 25 °C, the larger the potential δκ25. For pH < 4, the hydrogen ion transport number becomes substantial and its mode of transport is different from most other ions resulting in a different α. A new method for determining α as a function of pH and temperature is presented. Samples with varying amounts of H2SO4 and NaCl were used to develop the new α, which was then applied to 65 natural water samples including acid mine waters, geothermal waters, seawater, and stream waters. For each sample, the κ and pH were measured at several temperatures from 5 to 90 °C and κ25 was calculated. The δκ25 ranged from −11 to 9% for the new method as compared to −42 to 25% and −53 to 27% for the constant α (0.019) and ISO-7888 methods, respectively. The new method for determining α is a substantial improvement for acidic waters and performs as well as or better than the standard methods for circumneutral waters.

  5. Ionic conductivity and dielectric relaxation in Y doped La2Mo2O9 oxide-ion conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, T.; Ghosh, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we have studied electrical conductivity and dielectric properties of polycrystalline La2-xYxMo2O9 (0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) compounds in the temperature range from 358 K to 1088 K and the frequency range from 10 Hz to 3 GHz. The bulk and grain boundary contributions to the overall conductivity of these compounds show Arrhenius type behavior at low temperatures. The random free-energy barrier model has been used to analyze the frequency dependence of the conductivity. The charge carrier relaxation time and its activation energy have been determined from the analysis of the conductivity spectra using this model. The results obtained from the random free-energy barrier model satisfy Barton-Nakajima-Namikawa relation. The conduction mechanism has been also predicted using random free-energy barrier model and the scaling formalism. We have observed that the dielectric relaxation peaks arise from the diffusion of oxygen ions via vacancies.

  6. Temporal stability of electrical conductivity in a sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera-Parrilla, Aura; Brevik, Eric C.; Giráldez, Juan V.; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2016-07-01

    Understanding of soil spatial variability is needed to delimit areas for precision agriculture. Electromagnetic induction sensors which measure the soil apparent electrical conductivity reflect soil spatial variability. The objectives of this work were to see if a temporally stable component could be found in electrical conductivity, and to see if temporal stability information acquired from several electrical conductivity surveys could be used to better interpret the results of concurrent surveys of electrical conductivity and soil water content. The experimental work was performed in a commercial rainfed olive grove of 6.7 ha in the `La Manga' catchment in SW Spain. Several soil surveys provided gravimetric soil water content and electrical conductivity data. Soil electrical conductivity values were used to spatially delimit three areas in the grove, based on the first principal component, which represented the time-stable dominant spatial electrical conductivity pattern and explained 86% of the total electrical conductivity variance. Significant differences in clay, stone and soil water contents were detected between the three areas. Relationships between electrical conductivity and soil water content were modelled with an exponential model. Parameters from the model showed a strong effect of the first principal component on the relationship between soil water content and electrical conductivity. Overall temporal stability of electrical conductivity reflects soil properties and manifests itself in spatial patterns of soil water content.

  7. Conductivity-Relaxation Relations in Nanocomposite Polymer Electrolytes Containing Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Shojaatalhosseini, Mansoureh; Elamin, Khalid; Swenson, Jan

    2017-10-04

    In this study, we have used nanocomposite polymer electrolytes, consisting of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), δ-Al2O3 nanoparticles, and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesolfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt (with 4 wt % δ-Al2O3 and PEO:Li ratios of 16:1 and 8:1), and added different amounts of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesolfonyl)imide (BMITFSI). The aim was to elucidate whether the ionic liquid is able to dissociate the Li-ions from the ether oxygens and thereby decouple the ionic conductivity from the segmental polymer dynamics. The results from DSC and dielectric spectroscopy show that the ionic liquid speeds up both the segmental polymer dynamics and the motion of the Li(+) ions. However, a close comparison between the structural (α) relaxation process, given by the segmental polymer dynamics, and the ionic conductivity shows that the motion of the Li(+) ions decouples from the segmental polymer dynamics at higher concentrations of the ionic liquid (≥20 wt %) and instead becomes more related to the viscosity of the ionic liquid. This decoupling increases with decreasing temperature. In addition to the structural α-relaxation, two more local relaxation processes, denoted β and γ, are observed. The β-relaxation becomes slightly faster at the highest concentration of the ionic liquid (at least for the lower salt concentration), whereas the γ-relaxation is unaffected by the ionic liquid, over the whole concentration range 0-40 wt %.

  8. The electrical conductivity of polycrystalline metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraga, Luis; Arenas, Claudio; Henriquez, Ricardo; Bravo, Sergio; Solis, Basilio

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline metallic films by means of a semi-numerical procedure that provides solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation, that are essentially exact, by summing over classical trajectories according to Chambers' method. Following Mayadas and Shatzkes (MS), grain boundaries are modeled as an array of parallel plane barriers situated perpendicularly to the direction of the current. Alternatively, according to Szczyrbowski and Schmalzbauer (SS), the model consists in a triple array of these barriers in mutual perpendicular directions. The effects of surface roughness are described by means of Fuchs' specularity parameters. Following SS, the scattering properties of grain boundaries are taken into account by means of another specularity parameter and a probability of coherent passage. The difference between the sum of these and one is the probability of diffuse scattering. When this formalism is compared with the approximate formula of Mayadas and Shatzkes (Phys. Rev. B 1, 103 (1986)) it is shown that the latter greatly overestimates the film resistivity over most values of the reflectivity of the grain boundaries. The dependence of the conductivity of thin films on the probability of coherent passage and grain diameters is examined. In accordance with MS we find that the effects of disorder in the distribution of grain diameters is quite small. Moreover, we find that it is not safe to neglect the effects of the scattering by the additional interfaces created by stacked grains. However, when compared with recent resitivity-thickness data, it is shown that all three formalisms can provide accurate fits to experiment. In addition, it is shown that, depending on the respective reflectivities and distance from a surface, some of these interfaces may increase or diminish considerably the conductivity of the sample. As an illustration of this effect, we show a tentative fit of resistivity data of gold films measured by

  9. Clarification of the measurement of surface spin relaxation via conduction electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigler, D. M.; Schultz, S.

    1982-12-01

    We clarify the parameterization of the probability of transverse conduction electron spin relaxation. ɛ, at the surface of a metal. Using Walker's boundary condition on the transverse spin magnetization, we have calculated the ɛ and thickness dependence of the spin resonance linewidth. The results are discussed in simple physical terms. The recent work of Allam and Vigouroux is shown to contain errors.

  10. Ion conduction and relaxation in PEO-LiTFSI-Al2O3 polymer nanocomposite electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Ghosh, A.

    2015-05-01

    Ion conduction and relaxation in PEO-LiTFSI-Al2O3 polymer nanocomposite electrolytes have been studied for different concentrations of Al2O3 nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetric studies show that the maximum amorphous phase of PEO is observed for PEO-LiTFSI embedded with 5 wt. % Al2O3. The maximum ionic conductivity ˜3.3 × 10-4 S cm-1 has been obtained for this composition. The transmission electron microscopic image shows a distribution of Al2O3 nanoparticles in all compositions with size of <50 nm. The temperature dependence of the ionic conductivity follows Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher nature, indicating a strong coupling between ionic and polymer chain segmental motions. The scaling of the ac conductivity implies that relaxation dynamics follows a common mechanism for different temperatures and Al2O3 concentrations. The imaginary modulus spectra are asymmetric and skewed toward the high frequency sides of the maxima and analyzed using Havriliak-Negami formalism. The temperature dependence of the relaxation time obtained from modulus spectra also exhibits Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher nature. The values of the stretched exponent obtained from Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts fit to the modulus data are fairly low, suggesting highly non-exponential relaxation for all concentrations of Al2O3 in these electrolytes.

  11. Chirality-sensitive effects induced by nuclear relaxation in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Two effects induced by the interaction between an electric field E and a permanent electric dipole moment 𝝁𝒆 of a chiral molecule placed in a magnetic field B are discussed as follows: (i) a spin-1/2 nucleus relaxes faster and the increase in the relaxation rate is the same for both enantiomers and (ii) in a two-spin system a cross correlation between the dipole-dipole relaxation mechanism and the interaction between nuclear magnetic shielding and the dipole moment 𝝁𝒆 enables the direct discrimination between the enantiomers. The former effect is too small in magnitude to be observed experimentally. For detection of the latter, an experimental procedure based on the application of an electric field oscillating at a frequency equal to the difference between the spin-precession frequencies of two heteronuclear spins is proposed.

  12. Anomalous Electrical Conductivity Behavior at Elevated Pressure in the Protic Ionic Liquid Procainamide Hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Roland, C. M.; Swiety-Pospiech, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Paluch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Using broadband dielectric spectroscopy, we investigated the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the conductivity relaxation time τσ of the supercooled protic ionic liquid, procainamide hydrochloride, a common pharmaceutical. The pressure dependence of τσ exhibited anomalous behavior in the vicinity of the glass transition Tg, manifested by abrupt changes in activation volume. This peculiar behavior, paralleling the change in temperature dependence of τσ near Tg, is a manifestation of the decoupling between electrical conductivity and structural relaxation. Although the latter effectively ceases in the glassy state, free ions retain their mobility but with a reduced sensitivity to thermodynamic changes. This is the first observation of decoupling of ion migration from structural relaxation in a glassy conductor by isothermal densification.

  13. Dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behavior of carboxyl functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/poly (vinyl alcohol) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrin, Sayed; Deshpande, V. D.

    2017-03-01

    We study the dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behavior of MWCNT-COOH/Polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposite films in the temperature (T) range 303-423 K and in the frequency (f) range 0.1 Hz-1 MHz. The dielectric constant increases with an increase in temperature and also with an increase in MWCNT-COOH loading into the polymer matrix, as a result of interfacial polarization. The permittivity data were found to fit well with the modified Cole-Cole equation. Temperature dependent values of the relaxation times, free charge carrier conductivity and space charge carrier conductivity were extracted from the equation. An observed increment in the ac conductivity for the nanocomposites was analysed by a Jonscher power law which suggests that the correlated barrier hopping is the dominant charge transport mechanism for the nanocomposite films. The electric modulus study revealed deviations from ideal Debye-type behavior which are explained by considering a generalized susceptibility function. XRD and DSC results show an increase in the degree of crystallinity.

  14. Proton-irradiation-induced anomaly in the electrical conductivity of a hydrogen-bonded ferroelastic system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui; Lee, Kwang-Sei

    2009-11-01

    An anomalous abrupt drop in the electrical conductivity has been observed at the ferroelastic phase transition of a proton-irradiated system of hydrogen-bonded TlH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. As a result of the high-resolution {sup 31}P NMR chemical-shift measurements, distinct changes in the atomic displacements due to the irradiation were identified in the ferroelastic and paraelastic phases. Besides, {sup 1}H NMR spin-spin relaxation measurements revealed a change due to the irradiation in the proton dynamics at the ferroelastic phase transition, apparently accounting for the much-reduced electrical conductivity in the paraelastic phase of the irradiated system.

  15. Synthesis and electrical conductivity of multilayer silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, P. E-mail: bruno.grandidier@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Bruhn, T.; Capiod, P.; Berthe, M.; Grandidier, B. E-mail: bruno.grandidier@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Resta, A.; De Padova, P.; Le Lay, G.

    2014-01-13

    The epitaxial growth and the electrical resistance of multilayer silicene on the Ag(111) surface has been investigated. We show that the atomic structure of the first silicene layer differs from the next layers and that the adsorption of Si induces the formation of extended silicene terraces surrounded by step bunching. Thanks to the controlled contact formation between the tips of a multiple probe scanning tunneling microscope and these extended terraces, a low sheet resistance, albeit much higher than the electrical resistance of the underlying silver substrate, has been measured, advocating for the electrical viability of multilayer silicene.

  16. Conducting polymers as electron glasses: surface charge domains and slow relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Ortuño, Miguel; Escasain, Elisa; Lopez-Elvira, Elena; Somoza, Andres M.; Colchero, Jaime; Palacios-Lidon, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    The surface potential of conducting polymers has been studied with scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. The results show that this technique can become an excellent tool to really ‘see’ interesting surface charge interaction effects at the nanoscale. The electron glass model, which assumes that charges are localized by the disorder and that interactions between them are relevant, is employed to understand the complex behavior of conducting polymers. At equilibrium, we find surface potential domains with a typical lateral size of 50 nm, basically uncorrelated with the topography and strongly fluctuating in time. These fluctuations are about three times larger than thermal energy. The charge dynamics is characterized by an exponentially broad time distribution. When the conducting polymers are excited with light the surface potential relaxes logarithmically with time, as usually observed in electron glasses. In addition, the relaxation for different illumination times can be scaled within the full aging model. PMID:26911652

  17. Ultra-broad-band electrical spectroscopy of soils and sediments—a combined permittivity and conductivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewer, M.; Günther, T.; Igel, J.; Kruschwitz, S.; Martin, T.; Wagner, N.

    2017-09-01

    We combined two completely different methods measuring the frequency-dependent electrical properties of moist porous materials in order to receive an extraordinary large frequency spectrum. In the low-frequency (LF) range, complex electrical resistivity between 1 mHz and 45 kHz was measured for three different soils and sandstone, using the spectral induced polarization (SIP) method with a four electrode cell. In the high-frequency (HF) radio to microwave range, complex dielectric permittivity was measured between 1 MHz and 10 GHz for the same samples using dielectric spectroscopy by means of the coaxial transmission line technique. The combined data sets cover 13 orders of magnitude and were transferred into their equivalent expressions: the complex effective dielectric permittivity and the complex effective electrical conductivity. We applied the Kramers-Kronig relation in order to justify the validity of the data combination. A new phenomenological model that consists of both dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity terms in a Debye- and Cole-Cole-type manner was fitted to the spectra. The combined permittivity and conductivity model accounts for the most common representations of the physical quantities with respect to the individual measuring method. A maximum number of four relaxation processes was identified in the analysed frequency range. Among these are the free water and different interfacial relaxation processes, the Maxwell-Wagner effect, the counterion relaxation in the electrical double layer and the direct-current electrical conductivity. There is evidence that free water relaxation does not affect the electrical response in the SIP range. Moreover, direct current conductivity contribution (bulk and interface) dominates the losses in the HF range. Interfacial relaxation processes with relaxations in the HF range are broadly distributed down to the LF range. The slowest observed process in the LF range has a minor contribution to the HF

  18. Radiation Fluence dependent variation in Electrical conductivity of Cu nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlawat, Devender; Chauhan, R. P.; Sonkawade, R. G.

    2011-07-15

    Electrical conductivity of Cu nanowires varies with diameter of nanowires. However, keeping the diameter of nanowires constant, a variation in their electrical conductivity is observed after they irradiated with gamma rays and neutrons. On the basis of I-V characteristics drawn at room temperature, decrease in the conductivity of Cu nanowires is observed, as compared to that of pristine nanowires.

  19. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Peng, Bin; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu; Budil, David; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian

    2016-01-01

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  20. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Sun, Nian; Peng, Bin; Liu, Ming; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu; Budil, David; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.

    2016-01-04

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  1. Method of forming an electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Ashtead, GB

    2011-11-22

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  2. Light-induced relaxation of the metastable conductivity of undoped a-Si:H films illuminated at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kurova, I. A.; Ormont, N. N.

    2015-05-15

    The kinetics of relaxation of the light-induced (at a temperature above 140°C) dark conductivity of undoped a-Si:H films is studied. The calculated time dependences of the relaxation rate of the dark conductivity are analyzed under the assumption that the thermal rates of the generation and relaxation of metastable defects formed by preliminary illumination are independent of illumination. It is shown that the features of the kinetics of the relaxation rates of dark conductivity under illumination are determined by the presence of light-induced processes of the relaxation and generation of slowly relaxing metastable defects whose energy levels are located in the upper half of the band gap.

  3. Dielectric properties and electrical conductivity of flat micronic graphite/polyurethane composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushch, Artyom; Macutkevic, Jan; Kuzhir, Polina P.; Banys, Juras; Fierro, Vanessa; Celzard, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Results of broadband dielectric spectroscopy of flat micronic graphite (FMG)/polyurethane (PU) resin composites are presented in a wide temperature range (25-450 K). The electrical percolation threshold was found to lie between 1 and 2 vol. % of FMG. Above the percolation threshold, the composites demonstrated a huge hysteresis of properties on heating and cooling from room temperature up to 450 K, along with extremely high values of dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity. Annealing proved to be a very simple but powerful tool for significantly improving the electrical properties of FMG-based composites. In order to explain this effect, the distributions of relaxation times were calculated by the complex impedance formalism. Below room temperature, both dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity exhibited a very low temperature dependence, mainly caused by the different thermal properties of FMG and pure PU matrix.

  4. Non-Contact Electrical Conductivity Measurement Technique for Molten Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A non-contact technique of measuring the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) of conducting liquids while they are levitated by the high temperature electrostatic levitator in a high vacuum is reported.

  5. Non-Contact Electrical Conductivity Measurement Technique for Molten Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A non-contact technique of measuring the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) of conducting liquids while they are levitated by the high temperature electrostatic levitator in a high vacuum is reported.

  6. Wet method for measuring starch gelatinization temperature using electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Morales-Sanchez, E; Figueroa, J D C; Gaytan-Martínez, M

    2009-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a method for obtaining the gelatinization temperature of starches by using electrical conductivity. Native starches from corn, rice, potato, and wheat were prepared with different proportions of water and heated from room temperature to 90 degrees C, in a device especially designed for monitoring the electrical conductivity as a function of temperature. The results showed a linear trend of the electrical conductivity with the temperature until it reaches the onset gelatinization temperature. After that point, the electrical conductivity presented an increment or decrement depending on the water content in the sample and it was related to starch swelling and gelatinization phenomena. At the end gelatinization temperature, the conductivity becomes stable and linear, indicating that there are no more changes of phase. The starch gelatinization parameter, which was evaluated in the 4 types of starches using the electrical conductivity, was compared with those obtained by using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The onset temperature at which the electrical conductivity increased or decreased was found to be similar to that obtained by DSC. Also, the final temperature at which the electrical conductivity returned to linearity matched the end gelatinization temperature of the DSC. Further, a wet method for measuring the onset, peak, and end gelatinization temperatures as a function of temperature using the electrical conductivity curves is presented for a starch-water suspension.

  7. Lithium ionic conduction and relaxation dynamics of spark plasma sintered Li5La3Ta2O12 garnet nanoceramics.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohamad M

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, nanoceramics of Li5La3Ta2O12 (LLT) lithium ion conductors with the garnet-like structure are fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique at different temperatures of 850°C, 875°C, and 900°C (SPS-850, SPS-875, and SPS-900). The grain size of the SPS nanoceramics is in the 50 to 100 nm range, indicating minimal grain growth during the SPS experiments. The ionic conduction and relaxation properties of the current garnets are studied by impedance spectroscopy (IS) measurements. The SPS-875 garnets exhibit the highest total Li ionic conductivity of 1.25 × 10(-6) S/cm at RT, which is in the same range as the LLT garnets prepared by conventional sintering technique. The high conductivity of SPS-875 sample is due to the enhanced mobility of Li ions by one order of magnitude compared to SPS-850 and SPS-900 ceramics. The concentration of mobile Li(+) ions, n c, and their mobility are estimated from the analysis of the conductivity spectra at different temperatures. n c is found to be independent of temperature for the SPS nanoceramics, which implies that the conduction process is controlled by the Li(+) mobility. Interestingly, we found that only a small fraction of lithium ions of 3.9% out of the total lithium content are mobile and contribute to the conduction process. Moreover, the relaxation dynamics in the investigated materials have been studied through the electric modulus formalism.

  8. The electrical properties and relaxation behavior of AgNb1/2Ta1/2O3 ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K. Ganga; Niranjan, Manish K.; Asthana, Saket

    2017-02-01

    Polycrystalline AgNb1/2Ta1/2O3 powder was prepared by solid state reaction method. Preliminary x-ray diffractogram analysis of some aspects of crystal structure showed that a single phase compound formed exhibiting a monoclinic system. Impedance spectroscopy showed the presence of both bulk and grain boundary effects in the material. The relaxation behavior was studied by fitting electric modulus with Bergman function confirms us the existence of non-Debye type of relaxation the material. The ac conductivity spectrum obeyed Funke's double power law and fitting in results, the hopping parameters n1,n2 were indicating the existence of small and large range polaron hopping in the material. The band gap of the material 3.02 eV measured by using UV visible spectroscopy.

  9. Electrical conductivity measurements of nanofluids and development of new correlations.

    PubMed

    Konakanchi, Hanumantharao; Vajjha, Ravikanth; Misra, Debasmita; Das, Debendra

    2011-08-01

    In this study the electrical conductivity of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), silicon dioxide (SiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles dispersed in propylene glycol and water mixture were measured in the temperature range of 0 degrees C to 90 degrees C. The volumetric concentration of nanoparticles in these fluids ranged from 0 to 10% for different nanofluids. The particle sizes considered were from 20 nm to 70 nm. The electrical conductivity measuring apparatus and the measurement procedure were validated by measuring the electrical conductivity of a calibration fluid, whose properties are known accurately. The measured electrical conductivity values agreed within +/- 1% with the published data reported by the manufacturer. Following the validation, the electrical conductivities of different nanofluids were measured. The measurements showed that electrical conductivity of nanofluids increased with an increase in temperature and also with an increase in particle volumetric concentration. For the same nanofluid at a fixed volumetric concentration, the electrical conductivity was found to be higher for smaller particle sizes. From the experimental data, empirical models were developed for three nanofluids to express the electrical conductivity as functions of temperature, volumetric concentration and the size of the nanoparticles.

  10. Electrical conductivity of carbon-nanotube/cellulose composite paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Tomo; Sano, Eiichi; Imai, Masanori; Akiyama, Kousuke

    2010-03-01

    We fabricated multiwalled carbon-nanotube/cellulose composite papers and measured their temperature dependences of electrical conductivity. The dependences were described with the Sheng's fluctuation-induced tunneling (FIT) model. A possible mechanism of the electrical conduction in the composite paper was discussed in the context of the FIT model.

  11. Electrically conducting ternary amorphous fully oxidized materials and their application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giauque, Pierre (Inventor); Nicolet, Marc (Inventor); Gasser, Stefan M. (Inventor); Kolawa, Elzbieta A. (Inventor); Cherry, Hillary (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Electrically active devices are formed using a special conducting material of the form Tm--Ox mixed with SiO2 where the materials are immiscible. The immiscible materials are forced together by using high energy process to form an amorphous phase of the two materials. The amorphous combination of the two materials is electrically conducting but forms an effective barrier.

  12. Electrical and optical conductivities of hole gas in p-doped bulk III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawrie, Alestin; Halder, Pushpajit; Ghosh, Barun; Ghosh, Tarun Kanti

    2016-09-01

    We study electrical and optical conductivities of hole gas in p-doped bulk III-V semiconductors described by the Luttinger Hamiltonian. We provide exact analytical expressions of the Drude conductivity, inverse relaxation time for various impurity potentials, Drude weight, and optical conductivity in terms of the Luttinger parameters γ1 and γ2. The back scattering is completely suppressed as a result of the helicity conservation of the heavy and light hole states. The energy dependence of the relaxation time for the hole states is different from the Brooks-Herring formula for electron gas in n-doped semiconductors. We find that the inverse relaxation time of heavy holes is much less than that of the light holes for Coulomb-type and Gaussian-type impurity potentials and vice-versa for a short-range impurity potential. The Drude conductivity increases non-linearly with the increase in the hole density. The exponent of the density dependence of the conductivity is obtained in the Thomas-Fermi limit. The Drude weight varies linearly with the density even in the presence of the spin-orbit coupling. The finite-frequency optical conductivity goes as √{ ω} , and its amplitude strongly depends on the Luttinger parameters. The Luttinger parameters can be extracted from the optical conductivity measurement.

  13. Electric conductivity and Hall conductivity of the QGP in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bohao

    2017-08-01

    Due to its relevance for the characterization of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, conductivity is among the most important transport coefficients of QGP. By employing kinetic theory and the Kubo formula, we present a general derivation of electric and Hall conductivity of relativistic quark-gluon gas in the magnetic field. Furthermore, we investigate the temperature dependence of electric conductivity and Hall conductivity of QGP in magnetic field. We find that presence of the magnetic field leads to a decrease of the electric conductivity, especially at low temperatures. Finally, we present the relationship between conductivity and the polarization tensor of QGP.

  14. Factors involved in the relaxation of female pig urethra evoked by electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Werkström, V.; Persson, K.; Ny, L.; Bridgewater, M.; Brading, A. F.; Andersson, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    1. Non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxations induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were studied in pig isolated urethra. The mechanism for relaxation was characterized by measurement of cyclic nucleotides and by study of involvement of different subsets of voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs). 2. EFS evoked frequency-dependent and tetrodotoxin-sensitive relaxations in the presence of propranolol (1 microM), phentolamine (1 microM) and scopolamine (1 microM). At low frequencies (< 12 Hz), relaxations were rapid, whereas at high (> 12 Hz) frequencies distinct biphasic relaxations were evoked. The latter consisted of a rapidly developing first phase followed by a more long-lasting second phase. 3. Treatment with the NO-synthesis inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG; 0.3 mM) inhibited relaxations at low frequencies of stimulation. At high frequencies (> 12 Hz) only the first relaxation phase was affected. 4. Measurement of cyclic nucleotides in preparations subjected to continuous nerve-stimulation, revealed an increase in guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) levels from 1.3 +/- 0.3 to 3.0 +/- 0.4 pmol mg-1 protein (P < 0.01). In the presence of L-NOARG, there was a significant decrease in cyclic GMP content to control. However, there was no increase in cyclic GMP content in response to EFS. Levels of cyclic AMP remained unchanged following EFS. 5. Treatment with the N-type VOCC-inhibitor, omega-conotoxin GVIA (0.1 microM) reduced NO-dependent relaxations, the effect being most pronounced at low frequencies (1-4 Hz) of stimulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8564225

  15. Electrical conductivity measurements from the STRATCOM 8 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. D.; Ho, K. J.; Half, L. C.; Croskey, C. L.; Olsen, R. O.

    1978-01-01

    A blunt probe experiment for measuring electrical conductivity was flown with the STRATCOM 8 instrument package. Data were obtained by the instrument throughout the entire measurement period. A preliminary analysis of the data indicates an enhancement in conductivity associated with the krypton discharge ionization lamp, particularly in negative conductivity. The conductivity values and their altitude dependence are consistent with previous balloon and rocket results.

  16. Electrically conductive lines on cellulose nanopaper for flexible electrical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Kim, Changjae; Nogi, Masaya; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2013-09-01

    Highly conductive circuits are fabricated on nanopapers composed of densely packed 15-60 nm wide cellulose nanofibers. Conductive materials are deposited on the nanopaper and mechanically sieved through the densely packed nanofiber networks. As a result, their conductivity is enhanced to the level of bulk silver and LED lights are successfully illuminated via these metallic conductive lines on the nanopaper. Under the same deposition conditions, traditional papers consisting of micro-sized pulp fibers produced very low conductivity lines with non-uniform boundaries because of their larger pore structures. These results indicate that advanced, lightweight and highly flexible devices can be realized on cellulose nanopaper using continuous deposition processes. Continuous deposition on nanopaper is a promising approach for a simple roll-to-roll manufacturing process.

  17. Variable Anisotropic Brain Electrical Conductivities in Epileptogenic Foci

    PubMed Central

    Mandelkern, M.; Bui, D.; Salamon, N.; Vinters, H. V.; Mathern, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Source localization models assume brain electrical conductivities are isotropic at about 0.33 S/m. These assumptions have not been confirmed ex vivo in humans. This study determined bidirectional electrical conductivities from pediatric epilepsy surgery patients. Electrical conductivities perpendicular and parallel to the pial surface of neocortex and subcortical white matter (n = 15) were measured using the 4-electrode technique and compared with clinical variables. Mean (±SD) electrical conductivities were 0.10 ± 0.01 S/m, and varied by 243% from patient to patient. Perpendicular and parallel conductivities differed by 45%, and the larger values were perpendicular to the pial surface in 47% and parallel in 40% of patients. A perpendicular principal axis was associated with normal, while isotropy and parallel principal axes were linked with epileptogenic lesions by MRI. Electrical conductivities were decreased in patients with cortical dysplasia compared with non-dysplasia etiologies. The electrical conductivity values of freshly excised human brain tissues were approximately 30% of assumed values, varied by over 200% from patient to patient, and had erratic anisotropic and isotropic shapes if the MRI showed a lesion. Understanding brain electrical conductivity and ways to non-invasively measure them are probably necessary to enhance the ability to localize EEG sources from epilepsy surgery patients. PMID:20440549

  18. Low Dimensional String-like Relaxation Underpins Superionic Conduction in Fluorites and Related Structures.

    PubMed

    Annamareddy, Ajay; Eapen, Jacob

    2017-03-27

    Among the superionic conductors that show a Faraday transition - the continuous increase in the ionic conductivity over a range of temperatures - the fluorite structures have enjoyed incisive examinations over the past four decades; yet the fundamental nature of superionicity has remained largely inconclusive. Departing from the traditional quasi-static defect framework, we provide weighty evidence for string-like dynamical structures that govern the fast ion conduction process in fluorites. We show that lower temperatures encourage the growth of longer but slowly relaxing strings and vice-versa - a direct manifestation of heterogeneous dynamics. Remarkably, the ionic conductivity is inversely correlated to the lifetime of the ions that participate in the strings and not explicitly to the ion population. Our analysis methodology, which resolves a long-standing disagreement on defect structures and the mechanism of ionic transport in fcc fluorite structures, is well-positioned to describe the dynamics of low dimensional conduction in a larger class of superionic conductors.

  19. Electrical Conductivity Measurement of Nonideal Carbon Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    conductivity as a function of density and temperature. The pressure and temperature were determined with the aid of SESAME -tabulated equation of state ( EOS ...samples in which the SESAME EOS database was a necessary part of the analysis. Using the present technique, we do not require the use of a tabulated...obtain an estimate of temperature, we can refer our data to the EOS for carbon-a7830 in the SESAME database. We have inserted our measurements for

  20. Hot-electron effect in spin relaxation of electrically injected electrons in intrinsic Germanium.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Wu, M W

    2015-07-01

    The hot-electron effect in the spin relaxation of electrically injected electrons in intrinsic germanium is investigated by the kinetic spin Bloch equations both analytically and numerically. It is shown that in the weak-electric-field regime with E ≲ 0.5 kV cm(-1), our calculations have reasonable agreement with the recent transport experiment in the hot-electron spin-injection configuration (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 257204). We reveal that the spin relaxation is significantly enhanced at low temperature in the presence of weak electric field E ≲ 50 V cm(-1), which originates from the obvious center-of-mass drift effect due to the weak electron-phonon interaction, whereas the hot-electron effect is demonstrated to be less important. This can explain the discrepancy between the experimental observation and the previous theoretical calculation (2012 Phys. Rev. B 86 085202), which deviates from the experimental results by about two orders of magnitude at low temperature. It is further shown that in the strong-electric-field regime with 0.5 ≲ E ≲ 2 kV cm(-1), the spin relaxation is enhanced due to the hot-electron effect, whereas the drift effect is demonstrated to be marginal. Finally, we find that when 1.4 ≲ E ≲ 2 kV cm(-1) which lies in the strong-electric-field regime, a small fraction of electrons (≲5%) can be driven from the L to Γ valley, and the spin relaxation rates are the same for the Γ and L valleys in the intrinsic sample without impurity. With the negligible influence of the spin dynamics in the Γ valley to the whole system, the spin dynamics in the L valley can be measured from the Γ valley by the standard direct optical transition method.

  1. Role of semiconductivity and ion transport in the electrical conduction of melanin

    PubMed Central

    Mostert, Albertus B.; Powell, Benjamin J.; Pratt, Francis L.; Hanson, Graeme R.; Sarna, Tadeusz; Gentle, Ian R.; Meredith, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Melanins are pigmentary macromolecules found throughout the biosphere that, in the 1970s, were discovered to conduct electricity and display bistable switching. Since then, it has been widely believed that melanins are naturally occurring amorphous organic semiconductors. Here, we report electrical conductivity, muon spin relaxation, and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of melanin as the environmental humidity is varied. We show that hydration of melanin shifts the comproportionation equilibrium so as to dope electrons and protons into the system. This equilibrium defines the relative proportions of hydroxyquinone, semiquinone, and quinone species in the macromolecule. As such, the mechanism explains why melanin at neutral pH only conducts when “wet” and suggests that both carriers play a role in the conductivity. Understanding that melanin is an electronic-ionic hybrid conductor rather than an amorphous organic semiconductor opens exciting possibilities for bioelectronic applications such as ion-to-electron transduction given its biocompatibility. PMID:22615355

  2. Role of semiconductivity and ion transport in the electrical conduction of melanin.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Albertus B; Powell, Benjamin J; Pratt, Francis L; Hanson, Graeme R; Sarna, Tadeusz; Gentle, Ian R; Meredith, Paul

    2012-06-05

    Melanins are pigmentary macromolecules found throughout the biosphere that, in the 1970s, were discovered to conduct electricity and display bistable switching. Since then, it has been widely believed that melanins are naturally occurring amorphous organic semiconductors. Here, we report electrical conductivity, muon spin relaxation, and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of melanin as the environmental humidity is varied. We show that hydration of melanin shifts the comproportionation equilibrium so as to dope electrons and protons into the system. This equilibrium defines the relative proportions of hydroxyquinone, semiquinone, and quinone species in the macromolecule. As such, the mechanism explains why melanin at neutral pH only conducts when "wet" and suggests that both carriers play a role in the conductivity. Understanding that melanin is an electronic-ionic hybrid conductor rather than an amorphous organic semiconductor opens exciting possibilities for bioelectronic applications such as ion-to-electron transduction given its biocompatibility.

  3. Electrical safety of conducted electrical weapons relative to requirements of relevant electrical standards.

    PubMed

    Panescu, Dorin; Nerheim, Max; Kroll, Mark

    2013-01-01

    TASER(®) conducted electrical weapons (CEW) deliver electrical pulses that can inhibit a person's neuromuscular control or temporarily incapacitate. TASER X26, X26P, and X2 are among CEW models most frequently deployed by law enforcement agencies. The X2 CEW uses two cartridge bays while the X26 and X26P CEWs have only one. The TASER X26P CEW electronic output circuit design is equivalent to that of any one of the two TASER X2 outputs. The goal of this paper was to analyze the nominal electrical outputs of TASER X26, X26P, and X2 CEWs in reference to provisions of several international standards that specify safety requirements for electrical medical devices and electrical fences. Although these standards do not specifically mention CEWs, they are the closest electrical safety standards and hence give very relevant guidance. The outputs of two TASER X26 and two TASER X2 CEWs were measured and confirmed against manufacturer and other published specifications. The TASER X26, X26P, and X2 CEWs electrical output parameters were reviewed against relevant safety requirements of UL 69, IEC 60335-2-76 Ed 2.1, IEC 60479-1, IEC 60479-2, AS/NZS 60479.1, AS/NZS 60479.2 and IEC 60601-1. Prior reports on similar topics were reviewed as well. Our measurements and analyses confirmed that the nominal electrical outputs of TASER X26, X26P and X2 CEWs lie within safety bounds specified by relevant requirements of the above standards.

  4. Assembly for electrical conductivity measurements in the piston cylinder device

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Heather Christine [Dublin, CA; Roberts, Jeffrey James [Livermore, CA

    2012-06-05

    An assembly apparatus for measurement of electrical conductivity or other properties of a sample in a piston cylinder device wherein pressure and heat are applied to the sample by the piston cylinder device. The assembly apparatus includes a body, a first electrode in the body, the first electrode operatively connected to the sample, a first electrical conductor connected to the first electrode, a washer constructed of a hard conducting material, the washer surrounding the first electrical conductor in the body, a second electrode in the body, the second electrode operatively connected to the sample, and a second electrical conductor connected to the second electrode.

  5. Effect of EC & LiCF3SO3 on conductivity and relaxation in PVA-PEO blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joge, Prajakta; Kanchan, D. K.; Sharma, Poonam; Gondaliya, Nirali

    2013-02-01

    PVA-PEO-EC-LiCF3SO3 blend system has been prepared using solution cast technique wherein, plasticizer (Ethylene Carbonate (EC)) and salt (Lithium Trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiCF3SO3)) concentrations are varied. The conductivity studies are carried out using impedance spectroscopic analysis. The relaxation time is obtained using frequency dependent (Z"/Z"max) plot. A comparative study between conductivity (σ) and conductivity relaxation time (τ) has been carried out.

  6. Synthesis of novel electrically conducting polymers: Potential conducting Langmuir-Blodgett films and conducting polymers on defined surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmer, Hans

    1993-01-01

    Based on previous results involving thiophene derived electrically conducting polymers in which it was shown that thiophene, 3-substituted thiophenes, furans, and certain oligomers of these compounds showed electrical conductivity after polymerization. The conductivity was in the order of up to 500 S/cm. In addition, these polymers showed conductivity without being doped and most of all they were practically inert toward ambient conditions. They even could be used in aqueous media. With these findings as a guide, a number of 3-long-chain-substituted thiophenes and 1-substituted-3-long-chain substituted pyrrols were synthesized as monomers for potential polymeric electrically conducting Langmuir-Blodgett films.

  7. Simulation of partial discharges in conducting and non-conducting electrical tree structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, J. V.; Dodd, S. J.

    2001-04-01

    Electrical treeing is of interest to the electrical generation, transmission and distribution industries as it is one of the causes of insulation failure in electrical machines, switchgear and transformer bushings. Previous experimental investigations of electrical treeing in epoxy resins have found evidence that the tree structures formed were either electrically conducting or non-conducting, depending on whether the epoxy resin was in a flexible state (above its glass transition temperature) or in the glassy state (below its glass transition temperature). In this paper we extend an existing model, of partial discharges within an arbitrarily defined non-conducting electrical tree structure, to the case of electrical conducting trees. With the inclusion of tree channel conductivity, the partial discharge model could simulate successfully the experimentally observed partial discharge activity occurring in trees grown in both the flexible and glassy epoxy resins. This modelling highlights a fundamental difference in the mechanism of electrical tree growth in flexible and glassy epoxy resins. The much lower resistivities of the tree channels grown in the glassy epoxy resins may be due to conducting decomposition (carbonized) products condensing on the side walls of the existing channels, whereas, in the case of non-conducting tree channels, subsequent discharges within the main branches lead to side-wall erosion and a consequent widening of the tubules. The differing electrical characteristics of the tree tubules also have consequences for the development of diagnostic tools for the early detection of pre-breakdown phenomena.

  8. Local electric conductive property of Si nanowire models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yuji; Senami, Masato; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2012-12-01

    Local electric conductive properties of Si nanowire models are investigated by using two local electric conductivity tensors, {{σ }limits^{leftrArr }}_{ext}(r) and {{σ }limits^{leftrArr }}_{int}(r), defined in Rigged QED. It is emphasized that {{σ }limits^{leftrArr }}_{int}(r) is defined as the response of electric current to the actual electric field at a specific point and does not have corresponding macroscopic physical quantity. For the Si nanowire models, there are regions which show complicated response of electric current density to electric field, in particular, opposite and rotational ones. Local conductivities are considered to be available for the study of a negative differential resistance (NDR), which may be related to this opposite response. It is found that {{σ }limits^{leftrArr }}_{int}(r) shows quite different pattern from {{σ }limits^{leftrArr }}_{ext}(r), local electric conductivity defined for the external electric field. The effects of impurities are also studied by using the model including a Ge atom, in terms of the local response to electric field. It is found that the difference from the pristine model is found mainly around the Ge atom.

  9. Dielectric relaxation and conduction mechanisms in sprayed TiO2 thin films as a function of the annealing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juma, Albert; Acik, Ilona Oja; Mere, Arvo; Krunks, Malle

    2016-04-01

    The electrical properties of TiO2 thin films deposited by chemical spray pyrolysis onto Si substrates were investigated in the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) configuration using current-voltage characteristics and impedance spectroscopy. The electrical properties were analyzed in relation to the changes in microstructure induced during annealing in air up to a temperature of 950 °C. Anatase to rutile transformation started after annealing at 800 °C, and at 950 °C, only the rutile phase was present. The dielectric relaxation strongly depended upon the microstructure of TiO2 with the dielectric constant for the anatase phase between 45 and 50 and that for the rutile phase 123. Leakage current was reduced by three orders of magnitude after annealing at 700 °C due to the densification of the TiO2 film. A double-logarithmic plot of the current-voltage characteristics showed a linear relationship below 0.12 V consistent with Ohmic conduction, while space-charge-limited conduction mechanism as described by Child's law dominated for bias voltages above 0.12 V.

  10. Percolation of open grain boundaries and change in electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical experiments were conducted on the percolation of open grain boundaries to study the percolation threshold and evolution of connectivity. Open grain boundaries are a major component of pores in crustal materials. Electrical conductivity and permeability are highly sensitive to the connectivity of open brain boundaries. The length and size of the largest cluster was surveyed in a 3D array of cubic grains for various fractions of open grain boundary. For sufficiently large size of array, the percolation threshold was found to be 0.25. If more than 25% of grain boundaries are open, an interconnected network of open grain boundaries is formed. If the aggregate is saturated with brine, the electrical conduction can occur through open grain boundaries. The connectivity of open grain boundaries steeply increases to 1 around the threshold. The electrical conductivity is also expected to increase steeply. The crack density parameter for the percolation threshold is estimated to be 0.1. The large change in electrical conductivity for a small change in crack density parameter is thus expected around crack density parameter of 0.1. Simultaneous measurements on elastic wave velocity and electrical conductivity in a brine saturated granitic rock (Watanabe and Higuchi, 2015) showed a steep change in electrical conductivity around the crack density parameter of 0.1. XCT images show that open grain boundaries are the dominant pores in the sample. The steep change in conductivity must thus be related to the percolation of open grain boundaries.

  11. Anisotropic ion diffusivity in intervertebral disc: an electrical conductivity approach.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alicia; Yao, Hai; Brown, Mark D; Yong Gu, Wei

    2006-11-15

    Investigation of the transport behavior of ions in intervertebral disc using an electrical conductivity method. To determine the electrical conductivity and ion diffusivity of nucleus pulposus and anulus fibrosus in 3 major directions (axial, circumferential, and radial). Knowledge of diffusivity of small molecules is important for understanding nutrition supply in intervertebral disc and disc degeneration. However, little is known on the anisotropic behaviors of ion diffusivity and of electrical conductivity in intervertebral disc. Electrical conductivity measurement was performed on 24 axial, circumferential, and radial anulus fibrosus specimens and 24 axial nucleus pulposus specimens from bovine coccygeal discs. The diffusivity of Na and Cl were estimated by the analysis of conductivity data. The electrical conductivity (mean +/- standard deviation; n = 24) of the bovine anulus fibrosus was 4.70 +/- 1.08 mS/cm in the axial, 2.86 +/- 0.83 mS/cm in the radial, and 4.38 +/- 1.25 mS/cm in the circumferential direction. For nucleus pulposus, the electrical conductivity (mean +/- standard deviation; n = 24) was 8.95 +/- 0.89 mS/cm. The mean value for nucleus pulposus was significantly higher than that of anulus fibrosus (t test, P < 0.05). For anulus fibrosus, the conductivity in the radial direction was significantly lower than in axial or circumferential directions. Similar trends were found for both Na and Cl diffusivities. Both electrical conductivity and ion diffusivity were highly sensitive to water content. Electrical conductivity and ion diffusivity of anulus fibrosus are anisotropic.

  12. Temperature dependence of electrical conductivity and lunar temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olhoeft, G. R.; Strangway, D. W.; Sharpe, H.; Frisillo, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Metallic conduction mechanicsms are probably not important in lunar materials because of the small amounts of free metal and metallic oxides present. This is confirmed by the extremely low conductivities measured to date and the fact that the conductivity increases with temperature. The major conduction mechanicsm appears to be ionic. This conduction mechanism is very strongly controlled by temperature, by deviations from stoichiometry, by electric field strengths, and by oxygen fugacity.

  13. Effect of Ligament Morphology on Electrical Conductivity of Porous Silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuruzi, Abu Samah; Mazulianawati, Majid Siti

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the effect of ligament morphology on electrical conductivity of open cell porous silver (Ag). Porous Ag was formed when silver nanoparticles in an organic phase were annealed at 150°C for durations ranging from 1 to 5 min. Electrical conductivity of porous Ag was about 20% of bulk value after 5 min annealing. Porous Ag was modeled as a collection of Kelvin cell (truncated octahedrons) structures comprised of conjoined conical ligaments and spherical vertices. An analytical expression for electrical conductivity was obtained. Electrical conductivity normal to hexagonal faces of the unit cell was computed. Our model indicates contribution of grain boundary to electrical resistance increases significantly after the first minute of annealing and plateaus thereafter. Using experimental electrical conductivity data as an input, the model suggests that the ratio, n, of surfaces of one half of a conjoined cone ligament is between 0.7 and 1.0. Average deviation from experimentally determined relative electrical conductivity, Δ σ r, was minimal when n = 0.9.

  14. Electrical Conductivity in a Mixed-Species Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Joanne; Nevin, Kelly P.; Franks, Ashley E.; Tuominen, Mark T.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens can form electrically conductive biofilms, but the potential for conductivity through mixed-species biofilms has not been examined. A current-producing biofilm grown from a wastewater sludge inoculum was highly conductive with low charge transfer resistance even though microorganisms other than Geobacteraceae accounted for nearly half the microbial community. PMID:22706052

  15. Manipulating connectivity and electrical conductivity in metallic nanowire networks.

    PubMed

    Nirmalraj, Peter N; Bellew, Allen T; Bell, Alan P; Fairfield, Jessamyn A; McCarthy, Eoin K; O'Kelly, Curtis; Pereira, Luiz F C; Sorel, Sophie; Morosan, Diana; Coleman, Jonathan N; Ferreira, Mauro S; Boland, John J

    2012-11-14

    Connectivity in metallic nanowire networks with resistive junctions is manipulated by applying an electric field to create materials with tunable electrical conductivity. In situ electron microscope and electrical measurements visualize the activation and evolution of connectivity within these networks. Modeling nanowire networks, having a distribution of junction breakdown voltages, reveals universal scaling behavior applicable to all network materials. We demonstrate how local connectivity within these networks can be programmed and discuss material and device applications.

  16. Relaxation time and excess entropy in viscous liquids: Electric field versus temperature as control parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richert, Ranko

    2017-02-01

    On the basis of adiabatic calorimetry data and results obtained from dielectric relaxation studies in the presence of a high static electric field, the effects of temperature and electric field induced changes of the excess entropy are compared for the same sample: supercooled cresolphthalein dimethylether. A field induced reduction of the excess entropy by 45 mJ K-1 mol-1 at constant temperature increases the structural relaxation time by 0.75%, while the same entropy change originating from lowering the temperature at constant field increases the time constant by 3.5%. Therefore, there is no simple link connecting excess entropy and relaxation time that is independent of the control parameter that is used to modify the entropy. A consequence is that the Adam-Gibbs approach does not provide a quantitative prediction for how the dynamics of liquids depend on the electric field, and, more generally, on excess entropy. This work compares the dynamics for temperature versus field induced changes of isobaric excess entropy, thereby eliminating previous uncertainties arising from isochoric versus isobaric conditions and from unknown relations between thermodynamic, excess, and configurational entropies.

  17. Electrical conductivity of hydrous andesitic melts pertinent to subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuan; Li, Bin; Ni, Huaiwei; Mao, Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Andesitic magmatism and rocks are widespread at convergent plate boundaries. Electrically conductive bodies beneath subduction zone arc volcanoes, such as the Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia, may correspond to active reservoirs of H2O-bearing andesitic magma. Laboratory measurements of electrical conductivity of hydrous andesitic melts are required to constrain the physicochemical conditions of these magma reservoirs in combination with magnetotelluric data. This experimental study investigates electrical conductivity of andesitic melts with 0.01-5.9 wt % of H2O at 1164-1573 K and 0.5-1.0 GPa in a piston cylinder apparatus using sweeping-frequency impedance spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of andesitic melt increases with increasing temperature and H2O concentration but decreases with pressure. Across the investigated range of H2O concentration, electrical conductivity varies by 1.2-2.4 log units, indicating stronger influence of H2O for andesitic melt than for rhyolitic and dacitic melts. Using the Nernst-Einstein equation, the principal charge carrier is inferred to be Na in anhydrous melt but divalent cations in hydrous andesitic melts. The experimental data are regressed into a general electrical conductivity model for andesitic melt accounting for the pressure-temperature-H2O dependences altogether. Modeling results show that the conductive layer at >20 km depths beneath the surface of the Uturuncu Volcano could be interpreted by the presence of less than 20 vol % of H2O-rich andesitic melt (with 6-9 wt % H2O).

  18. Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.; Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

  19. Electrically conductive articles and processes for their fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Mir, J.M.; Hung, L.S.

    1991-01-29

    This patent describes a electrically conductive articles and processes for their fabrication. They comprise a refractory substrate, a flexible electrically conductive crystalline cuprate layer, a release layer interposed between the flexible conductive cuprate layer and the substrate, the release layer being comprised of at least on of the metals of groups 8 to 11 and periods 5 and 6 of the periodic table of elements, a flexible organic film, and means for adhesively bonding the flexible organic film to the flexible conductive cuprate layer, so that the release layer, the flexible conductive cuprate layer, the adhesive bonding means and the flexible organic film can be stripped from the refractory substrate to form a flexible electrically conductive article.

  20. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1972-01-01

    Process for determining thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials is described. Characteristics of materials are identified and used in development of mathematical models. Limitations of method are examined.

  1. Electrical conductivity of rocks at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkhomenko, E. I.; Bondarenko, A. T.

    1986-01-01

    The results of studies of the electrical conductivity in the most widely distributed types of igneous rocks, at temperatures of up to 1200 C, at atmospheric pressure, and also at temperatures of up to 700 C and at pressures of up to 20,000 kg/sq cm are described. The figures of electrical conductivity, of activaation energy and of the preexponential coefficient are presented and the dependence of these parameters on the petrochemical parameters of the rocks are reviewed. The possible electrical conductivities for the depository, granite and basalt layers of the Earth's crust and of the upper mantle are presented, as well as the electrical conductivity distribution to the depth of 200 to 240 km for different geological structures.

  2. Measurement of Electrical Conductivity for a Biomass Fire

    PubMed Central

    Mphale, Kgakgamatso; Heron, Mal

    2008-01-01

    A controlled fire burner was constructed where various natural vegetation species could be used as fuel. The burner was equipped with thermocouples to measure fuel surface temperature and used as a cavity for microwaves with a laboratory quality 2-port vector network analyzer to determine electrical conductivity from S-parameters. Electrical conductivity for vegetation material flames is important for numerical prediction of flashover in high voltage power transmission faults research. Vegetation fires that burn under high voltage transmission lines reduce flashover voltage by increasing air electrical conductivity and temperature. Analyzer determined electrical conductivity ranged from 0.0058 - 0.0079 mho/m for a fire with a maximum temperature of 1240 K. PMID:19325812

  3. Measurement of electrical conductivity for a biomass fire.

    PubMed

    Mphale, Kgakgamatso; Heron, Mal

    2008-08-01

    A controlled fire burner was constructed where various natural vegetation species could be used as fuel. The burner was equipped with thermocouples to measure fuel surface temperature and used as a cavity for microwaves with a laboratory quality 2-port vector network analyzer to determine electrical conductivity from S-parameters. Electrical conductivity for vegetation material flames is important for numerical prediction of flashover in high voltage power transmission faults research. Vegetation fires that burn under high voltage transmission lines reduce flashover voltage by increasing air electrical conductivity and temperature. Analyzer determined electrical conductivity ranged from 0.0058 - 0.0079 mho/m for a fire with a maximum temperature of 1240 K.

  4. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity of soda-lime glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunnell, L. Roy; Vertrees, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this educational exercise was to demonstrate the difference between the electrical conductivity of metals and ceramics. A list of the equipment and supplies and the procedure for the experiment are presented.

  5. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity of soda-lime glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunnell, L. Roy; Vertrees, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this educational exercise was to demonstrate the difference between the electrical conductivity of metals and ceramics. A list of the equipment and supplies and the procedure for the experiment are presented.

  6. Electrical Circuit Analogues of Thermal Conduction and Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlin, D. H.; Fullarton, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    After briefly reviewing equations of conduction and diffusion, and voltage and charge in electrical circuits, a simple experiment is given that allows students practical experience in a theoretical realm of physics. (MDR)

  7. Surface Roughness Influence on Eddy Current Electrical Conductivity Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    presented on shot peened pure ( C11000 ) copper , in which the effect is particularly stro n g and readily measurable because of the low penetration depth...electri- cal conductivity measurements were carried out on each fully relaxed shot peened copper specimen over a wide frequency range from 1 kHz to...residual stress is created over a shallow surface layer. Shot peening is performed on a wide range of materials, including gas turbine engine components

  8. What we can learn from measurements of air electric conductivity in 222Rn-rich atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seran, E.; Godefroy, M.; Pili, E.; Michielsen, N.; Bondiguel, S.

    2017-02-01

    Electric conductivity of air is an important characteristic of the electric properties of an atmosphere. Testing instruments to measure electric conductivity ranging from 10-13 to 10-9 S m-1 in natural conditions found in the Earth atmosphere is not an easy task. One possibility is to use stratospheric balloon flights; another (and a simpler one) is to look for terrestrial environments with significant radioactive decay. In this paper we present measurements carried out with different types of conductivity sensors in two 222Rn-rich environments, i.e., in the Roselend underground tunnel (French Alps) and in the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety BACCARA (BAnC de CAllibrage du RAdon) chamber. The concept of the conductivity sensor is based on the classical time relaxation method. New elements in our design include isolation of the sensor sensitive part (electrode) from the external electric field and sensor miniaturization. This greatly extends the application domain of the sensor and permits to measure air electric conductivity when the external electric field is high and varies from few tens of V m-1 to up to few tens of kV m-1. This is suitable to propose the instrument for a planetary mission. Two-fold objectives were attained as the outcome of these tests and their analysis. First was directly related to the performances of the conductivity sensors and the efficiency of the conductivity sensor design to shield the external electric field. Second objective aimed at understanding the decay mechanisms of 222Rn and its progeny in atmosphere and the impact of the enclosed space on the efficiency of gas ionization.

  9. Effect of Crystallinity on Electrical Conduction in Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikezaki, Kazuo; Kaneko, Takanobu; Sakakibara, Toshio

    1981-03-01

    The electrical conduction of 20 μm thick polypropylene films with different crystallinities has been studied at 72°C below 400 kV/cm. The field dependence of the current shows that the conduction mechanism in this polymer is ion hopping. The estimated ionic jump distance strongly depends on the polymer crystallinity, and it decreases from 100 Å to 45 Å as the crystallinity increases from 50.5% to 78%. Preheating of samples seriously affects the electrical conduction in polypropylene, so differences in conductivity, activation energy and jump distance obtained by different authors can be explained partly by differences in the thermal history of the samples used.

  10. Software optimization for electrical conductivity imaging in polycrystalline diamond cutters

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, G.; Ludwig, R.; Wiggins, J.; Bertagnolli, K.

    2014-02-18

    We previously reported on an electrical conductivity imaging instrument developed for measurements on polycrystalline diamond cutters. These cylindrical cutters for oil and gas drilling feature a thick polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide substrate. The instrument uses electrical impedance tomography to profile the conductivity in the diamond table. Conductivity images must be acquired quickly, on the order of 5 sec per cutter, to be useful in the manufacturing process. This paper reports on successful efforts to optimize the conductivity reconstruction routine, porting major portions of it to NVIDIA GPUs, including a custom CUDA kernel for Jacobian computation.

  11. Muon spin relaxation as a probe of electron motion in conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, F. L.

    2004-10-01

    The use of implanted muons to probe the dynamics of electronic excitations in conducting polymers is reviewed. Early work on polyacetylene showed evidence for mobile solitons performing one-dimensional diffusion in the trans isomer and localized spins in the cis isomer. Subsequent muon studies on a range of conducting polymers have shown evidence for mobile polaronic excitations and microscopic transport properties for these polarons have been derived from the measurements. A theoretical framework was developed by Risch and Kehr to describe the intermittent hyperfine coupling between a static muon and an electron diffusing randomly through a chain of sites. This theory predicts a specific form for both the muon spin relaxation function and the field dependence of the relaxation rate. The experimental data are found to be described well by this model. Intrachain diffusion rates can be extracted from the data; in several cases an interchain diffusion rate can also be measured. The anisotropy of diffusion rates can be as high as 104 at low temperatures, reducing typically to 102 or less at room temperature. The importance of molecular vibrational modes in controlling the electronic motion in the polymer has been shown.

  12. Dielectric relaxation and polaronic conduction in epitaxial BaFe12O19 hexaferrite thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rujun; Zhou, Hao; Zhao, Run; Jian, Jie; Wang, Han; Huang, Jijie; Fan, Meng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Haiyan; Yang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    The dielectric properties of epitaxial BaFe12O19 hexaferrite thin film have been investigated as a function of frequency (50 Hz  -  2 MHz) and temperature (100-375 K). The frequency dependent permittivity, impedance ({{Z}\\prime \\prime} ) and modulus ({{M}\\prime \\prime} ) spectra show that the dielectric responses of BaFe12O19 thin film are thermally activated. The activation energy of BaFe12O19 film (E a) is much smaller than that of the polycrystalline bulk BaFe12O19. In addition, E a increases with increasing temperature and there is a distribution of relaxation time in the sample. The scaling behavior of {{Z}\\prime \\prime} and {{M}\\prime \\prime} spectra of the sample further suggest that the distribution of relaxation time is temperature independent at low temperatures (<250 K) and temperature dependent at high temperatures. The temperature dependent dc conductivity shows that small polaron hopping is the most probable conduction mechanism for BaFe12O19 film.

  13. Electrical Conductivity of the Lower-Mantle Ferropericlase

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J F; Weir, S T; Jackson, D D; Evans, W J; Vohra, Y K; Qiu, W; Yoo, C S

    2007-04-19

    Electrical conductivity of the lower-mantle ferropericlase-(Mg{sub 0.75},Fe{sub 0.25})O has been studied using designer diamond anvils to pressures over one megabar and temperatures up to 500 K. The electrical conductivity of (Mg{sub 0.75},Fe{sub 0.25})O gradually rises by an order of magnitude up to 50 GPa but decreases by a factor of approximately three between 50 to 70 GPa. This decrease in the electrical conductivity is attributed to the electronic high-spin to low-spin transition of iron in ferropericlase. That is, the electronic spin transition of iron results in a decrease in the mobility and/or density of the charge transfer carriers in the low-spin ferropericlase. The activation energy of the low-spin ferropericlase is 0.27 eV at 101 GPa, similar to that of the high-spin ferropericlase at relatively low temperatures. Our results indicate that low-spin ferropericlase exhibits lower electrical conductivity than high-spin ferropericlase, which needs to be considered in future geomagnetic models for the lower mantle. The extrapolated electrical conductivity of the low-spin ferropericlase, together with that of silicate perovskite, at the lower mantle pressure-temperature conditions is consistent with the model electrical conductivity profile of the lower mantle.

  14. The thermal conductivity of electrically-conducting liquids at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeham, W. A.; Zalaf, M.

    1986-05-01

    The paper describes a new instrument for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of electrically-conducting liquids at pressures up to 700 MPa with an accuracy of ±0.3%. The instrument is based upon the transient hot-wire principle and the novel features that make it applicable to electrically-conducting fluids are described. In particular a new automatic bridge for the direct measurement of the temperature rise of the hot-wires is discussed.

  15. Electrical Switchability and Dry-Wash Durability of Conductive Textiles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bangting; Zhang, Bowu; Wu, Jingxia; Wang, Ziqiang; Ma, Hongjuan; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the area of conductive textiles in the scientific and industrial community. Herein, we successfully prepared a conductive textile via covalently grafting polyaniline (PANI) onto cotton by a multi-step treatment process. The conductivity of the resultant fabric could be tuned by immersing in water having different pH values. The conductive and insulating properties of the textile could be conveniently switched by alternately immersing in acidic and alkaline bath solutions. Most importantly, the resultant conductive fabrics were able to withstand 40 simulated dry-wash cycles, with almost no decay in the electrical conductivity, indicating their excellent dry-wash durability. The present strategy for fabricating conductive fabrics with excellent switchability of electrical properties and dry-wash durability is expected to provide inspiration for the production of multifunctional conductive textiles for use in hash or sensitive conditions. PMID:26066704

  16. Electrical Switchability and Dry-Wash Durability of Conductive Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bangting; Zhang, Bowu; Wu, Jingxia; Wang, Ziqiang; Ma, Hongjuan; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2015-06-01

    There is growing interest in the area of conductive textiles in the scientific and industrial community. Herein, we successfully prepared a conductive textile via covalently grafting polyaniline (PANI) onto cotton by a multi-step treatment process. The conductivity of the resultant fabric could be tuned by immersing in water having different pH values. The conductive and insulating properties of the textile could be conveniently switched by alternately immersing in acidic and alkaline bath solutions. Most importantly, the resultant conductive fabrics were able to withstand 40 simulated dry-wash cycles, with almost no decay in the electrical conductivity, indicating their excellent dry-wash durability. The present strategy for fabricating conductive fabrics with excellent switchability of electrical properties and dry-wash durability is expected to provide inspiration for the production of multifunctional conductive textiles for use in hash or sensitive conditions.

  17. Measurements of electrical conductivities of carbonates in the subducted slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.

    2012-12-01

    The behavior of carbonate minerals in the deep mantle is important in our understanding of the geochemical cycle of carbon. Magnesium and calcium carbonate minerals dominate the Earth's interior. Magnesite (MgCO3) is a naturally occurring carbonate mineral and is stable over a wide range of pressure and temperature. In contrast, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) occurs in three structural forms: calcite, aragonite, and vaterite. Calcite is stable under ambient conditions, and adopts several different modifications (calcite I-V), whereas aragonite is thermodynamically stable at high pressures and high temperature. Dolomite (MgCaC2O6) is stable up to the mantle pressures. Therefore, the behavior of magnesite, aragonite, and dolomite are important for an understanding of the circulation of carbon from the crust to the upper mantle. Recent advances in geophysical observations have allowed to map the electrical conductivity of the Earth's mantle. Electrical conductivity measurements on carbonates at high pressures and high temperatures can contribute towards an estimation of the distribution of carbonate rocks in the deep mantle. In this study, we have determined the electrical conductivities of three carbonates up to 6 GPa and 1000 K using in situ complex impedance spectroscopy in a multi-anvil high-pressure apparatus. These measurements allowed us to quantify the effects of pressure and temperature. The electrical conductivity of magnesite increased with increasing pressure. The activation enthalpy also increased with increasing pressure. The effect of pressure was interpreted as being the activation volume in the Arrhenius equation. The negative activation volume and relatively large activation energy observed in this study suggests that the hopping of large polarons is the dominant mechanism for the electrical conductivity over the pressure and temperature range investigated [1]. In the case of aragonite, a decrease in the electrical conductivity with increasing pressure

  18. Electrostatic Discharge Sensitivity and Electrical Conductivity of Composite Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Daniels; Daniel J. Prentice; Chelsea Weir; Michelle L. Pantoya; Gautham Ramachandran; Tim Dallas

    2013-02-01

    Composite energetic material response to electrical stimuli was investigated and a correlation between electrical conductivity and ignition sensitivity was examined. The composites consisted of micrometer particle aluminum combined with another metal, metal oxide, or fluoropolymer. Of the nine tested mixtures, aluminum with copper oxide was the only mixture to ignite by electrostatic discharge with minimum ignition energy (MIE) of 25 mJ and an electrical conductivity of 1246.25 nS; two orders of magnitude higher than the next composite. This study showed a similar trend in MIE for ignition triggered by a discharged spark compared with a thermal hot wire source.

  19. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Measurements of Cda 510 Phosphor Bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, J.; Canavan, E.; DiPirro, M.

    2010-04-01

    Many cryogenic systems use electrical cables containing phosphor bronze wire. While phosphor bronze's electrical and thermal conductivity values have been published, results vary among different phosphor bronze formulations. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will use several phosphor bronze wire harnesses containing a specific formulation (CDA 510, annealed temper). These harnesses dominate the heat conducted into the JWST instrument stage, and approximately half of the harness conductance is due to the phosphor bronze wires. Since the JWST radiators are expected to keep the instruments at their operating temperature with limited cooling margin, it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the actual alloy being used. We describe an experiment that measured its electrical and thermal conductivity between 4 and 295 Kelvin.

  20. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Measurements of CDA 510 Phosphor Bronze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, James E.; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many cryogenic systems use electrical cables containing phosphor bronze wire. While phosphor bronze's electrical and thermal conductivity values have been published, there is significant variation among different phosphor bronze formulations. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will use several phosphor bronze wire harnesses containing a specific formulation (CDA 510, annealed temper). The heat conducted into the JWST instrument stage is dominated by these harnesses, and approximately half of the harness conductance is due to the phosphor bronze wires. Since the JWST radiators are expected to just keep the instruments at their operating temperature with limited cooling margin, it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the actual alloy being used. We describe an experiment which measured the electrical and thermal conductivity of this material between 4 and 295 Kelvin.

  1. Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Snowden, Jr., Thomas M.; Wells, Barbara J.

    1987-01-01

    A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40.degree. to 365.degree. C. to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

  2. Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Snowden, T.M. Jr.; Wells, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40 to 365/sup 0/C to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

  3. Electric field enhanced conductivity in strongly coupled dense metal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2012-06-15

    Experimentation with dense metal plasma has shown that non-negligible increases in plasma conductivity are induced when a relatively low electric field ({approx}6 kV/cm) is applied. Existing conductivity models assume that atoms, electrons, and ions all exist in thermal equilibrium. This assumption is invalidated by the application of an appreciable electric field, where electrons are accelerated to energies comparable to the ionization potential of the surrounding atoms. Experimental data obtained from electrically exploded silver wire is compared with a finite difference hydrodynamic model that makes use of the SESAME equation-of-state database. Free electron generation through both thermal and electric field excitations, and their effect on plasma conductivity are applied and discussed.

  4. Electric field enhanced conductivity in strongly coupled dense metal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2012-06-01

    Experimentation with dense metal plasma has shown that non-negligible increases in plasma conductivity are induced when a relatively low electric field (˜6 kV/cm) is applied. Existing conductivity models assume that atoms, electrons, and ions all exist in thermal equilibrium. This assumption is invalidated by the application of an appreciable electric field, where electrons are accelerated to energies comparable to the ionization potential of the surrounding atoms. Experimental data obtained from electrically exploded silver wire is compared with a finite difference hydrodynamic model that makes use of the SESAME equation-of-state database. Free electron generation through both thermal and electric field excitations, and their effect on plasma conductivity are applied and discussed.

  5. A Method for Measuring the Specific Electrical Conductivity of an Anisotropically Conductive Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ašmontas, S.; Kleiza, V.; Kleiza, J.

    2008-06-01

    The paper deals with the ways of finding an electrical conductivity tensor of a plane and anisotropically conductive sample. Application of the Van der Pauw method to investigate the conductivity of anisotropically conductive media makes the basis of research. Several models of distribution of the electric field potential are presented, their merits and demerits are discussed, and the necessary physical measurements are indicated. On the basis of these models, the respective calculation expressions of the specific conductivity tensor are derived and algorithms for their realization and error calculation are developed.

  6. Measurements of the vertical atmospheric electric field and of the electrical conductivity with stratospheric balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iversen, I. B.; Madsen, M. M.; Dangelo, N.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric (vertical) electric field with balloons in the stratosphere are reported. The atmospheric electrical conductivity is also measured and the current density inferred. The average vertical current shows the expected variation with universal time and is also seen to be influenced by external (magnetospheric) electric fields.

  7. Effects of Silver Microparticles and Nanoparticles on Thermal and Electrical Characteristics of Electrically Conductive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkarnain, M.; Fadzil, M. A.; Mariatti, M.; Azid, I. A.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of different volume fractions of silver (Ag) particles of different size (microsize, 2 μm to 3.5 μm diameter; nanosize, 80 nm diameter) on the thermal and electrical characteristics of epoxy-Ag electrically conductive adhesive (ECA) have been evaluated, as well as hybrid ECAs with both particle sizes at different ratios. Improved thermal and electrical conductivity resulted from the interaction between the particles, as evaluated by analysis of sample morphology. The interaction was altered to improve the conductivity. For both particle sizes, the electrical resistivity showed a transition from insulation to conduction at 6 vol.% Ag. In the hybrid system, the thermal conductivity decreased with increasing microparticle filler ratio. The electrical conductivity of the hybrid composite increased at 50:50 weight ratio.

  8. Cole-cole analysis and electrical conduction mechanism of N{sup +} implanted polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, Mahak; Shekhawat, Nidhi; Aggarwal, Sanjeev Sharma, Annu; Nair, K. G. M.

    2014-05-14

    In this paper, we present the analysis of the dielectric (dielectric constant, dielectric loss, a.c. conductivity) and electrical properties (I–V characteristics) of pristine and nitrogen ion implanted polycarbonate. The samples of polycarbonate were implanted with 100 keV N{sup +} ions with fluence ranging from 1 × 10{sup 15} to 1 × 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup −2}. The dielectric measurements of these samples were performed in the frequency range of 100 kHz to 100 MHz. It has been observed that dielectric constant decreases whereas dielectric loss and a.c. conductivity increases with increasing ion fluence. An analysis of real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity has been elucidated using Cole-Cole plot of the complex permittivity. With the help of Cole-Cole plot, we determined the values of static dielectric constant (ε{sub s}), optical dielectric constant (ε{sub ∞}), spreading factor (α), average relaxation time (τ{sub 0}), and molecular relaxation time (τ). The I–V characteristics were studied using Keithley (6517) electrometer. The electrical conduction behaviour of pristine and implanted polycarbonate specimens has been explained using various models of conduction.

  9. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2015-07-21

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  10. Electrical conductivity in the precambrian lithosphere of western canada

    PubMed

    Boerner; Kurtz; Craven; Ross; Jones; Davis

    1999-01-29

    The subcrustal lithosphere underlying the southern Archean Churchill Province (ACP) in western Canada is at least one order of magnitude more electrically conductive than the lithosphere beneath adjacent Paleoproterozoic crust. The measured electrical properties of the lithosphere underlying most of the Paleoproterozoic crust can be explained by the conductivity of olivine. Mantle xenolith and geological mapping evidence indicate that the lithosphere beneath the southern ACP was substantially modified as a result of being trapped between two nearly synchronous Paleoproterozoic subduction zones. Tectonically induced metasomatism thus may have enhanced the subcrustal lithosphere conductivity of the southern ACP.

  11. Measuring the local electrical conductivity of human brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtari, M.; Emin, D.; Ellingson, B. M.; Woodworth, D.; Frew, A.; Mathern, G. W.

    2016-02-01

    The electrical conductivities of freshly excised brain tissues from 24 patients were measured. The diffusion-MRI of the hydrogen nuclei of water molecules from regions that were subsequently excised was also measured. Analysis of these measurements indicates that differences between samples' conductivities are primarily due to differences of their densities of solvated sodium cations. Concomitantly, the sample-to-sample variations of their diffusion constants are relatively small. This finding suggests that non-invasive in-vivo measurements of brain tissues' local sodium-cation density can be utilized to estimate its local electrical conductivity.

  12. Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation and Conductivity Studies of the Non-Arrhenius Conductivity Behavior in Lithium Fast Ion Conducting Sulfide Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Benjamin Michael

    2003-01-01

    As time progresses, the world is using up more of the planet's natural resources. Without technological advances, the day will eventually arrive when these natural resources will no longer be sufficient to supply all of the energy needs. As a result, society is seeing a push for the development of alternative fuel sources such as wind power, solar power, fuel cells, and etc. These pursuits are even occurring in the state of Iowa with increasing social pressure to incorporate larger percentages of ethanol in gasoline. Consumers are increasingly demanding that energy sources be more powerful, more durable, and, ultimately, more cost efficient. Fast Ionic Conducting (FIC) glasses are a material that offers great potential for the development of new batteries and/or fuel cells to help inspire the energy density of battery power supplies. This dissertation probes the mechanisms by which ions conduct in these glasses. A variety of different experimental techniques give a better understanding of the interesting materials science taking place within these systems. This dissertation discusses Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques performed on FIC glasses over the past few years. These NMR results have been complimented with other measurement techniques, primarily impedance spectroscopy, to develop models that describe the mechanisms by which ionic conduction takes place and the dependence of the ion dynamics on the local structure of the glass. The aim of these measurements was to probe the cause of a non-Arrhenius behavior of the conductivity which has been seen at high temperatures in the silver thio-borosilicate glasses. One aspect that will be addressed is if this behavior is unique to silver containing fast ion conducting glasses. more specifically, this study will determine if a non-Arrhenius correlation time, τ, can be observed in the Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation (NSLR) measurements. If so, then can this behavior be modeled with a new single distribution of

  13. On the nonlinear variation of dc conductivity with dielectric relaxation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.; Andersson, Ove

    2006-09-01

    The long-known observations that dc conductivity σdc of an ultraviscous liquid varies nonlinearly with the dielectric relaxation time τ, and the slope of the logσdc against logτ plot deviates from -1 are currently seen as two of the violations of the Debye-Stokes-Einstein equation. Here we provide a formalism using a zeroth order Bjerrum description for ion association to show that in addition to its variation with temperature T and pressure P, impurity ion population varies with a liquid's equilibrium dielectric permittivity. Inclusion of this electrostatic effect modifies the Debye-Stokes-Einstein equation to log(σdcτ )=constant+logα, where α is the T and P-dependent degree of ionic dissociation of an electrolytic impurity. Variation of a liquid's shear modulus with T and P would add to the nonlinearity of σdc-τ relation, as would a nonequivalence of the shear and dielectric relaxation times, proton transfer along the hydrogen bonds, or occurrence of another chemical process. This is illustrated by using the data for ultraviscous acetaminophen-aspirin liquid.

  14. Electrical conduction in macroscopically oriented deoxyribonucleic and hyaluronic acid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutnjak, Zdravko; Lahajnar, Gojmir; Filipič, Cene; Podgornik, Rudolf; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Korolev, Nikolay; Rupprecht, Allan

    2005-04-01

    Measurements of the quasistatic and frequency dependent electrical conductivity below 1 MHz were carried out on wet-spun, macroscopically oriented, calf thymus deoxyribonucleic (DNA) and umbilical cord hyaluronic acid (HA) bulk samples. The frequency dependence of the electrical conductivity in the frequency range of approximately 10-3-106Hz of both materials is surprisingly rather similar. Temperature dependence of the quasistatic electrical conductivity above the low temperature saturation plateau can be well described by the activated Arrhenius law with the activation energy of ≈0.8eV for both DNA and HA. We discuss the meaning of these findings for the possible conduction mechanism in these particular charged polyelectrolytes.

  15. Electrical/dielectric properties and conductivity mechanism of epoxy/expanded graphite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanapitsas, Athanasios; Logakis, Emmanuel; Pandis, Christos; Pissis, Polycarpos; Jovic, Natasa; Djokovic, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    In this work the electrical and dielectric properties, as well as the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of epoxy/expanded graphite (EG) composites, are studied by employing dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS). For the preparation of the composites EG was sonicated in acetone for 10h and then the appropriate amount of epoxy resin added to the mixture. The sonication was prolonged for another 3 h. The mixture was dried at 60^oC for a few hours and then the appropriate amount of hardener (triethylenetetramine) was added followed by mechanical stirring for 15 min. Finally, the mixture was cast in a glass mould and outgassed overnight at room temperature. Before they were removed from the mould, all samples were post-cured at 127^oC for 10 min in air. Samples with EG weight fractions ranging from 0 to 8 wt.% were produced. Preliminary DRS results at room temperature indicate that electrical percolation threshold (pc) lies between 3-5 wt.% EG. The influence of the EG fillers (for concentrations below pc) on the dielectric relaxation mechanisms of the epoxy matrix, as well as the conductivity mechanism (for concentrations above pc) are investigated.

  16. A Random Network Model of Electrical Conduction in Hydrous Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Seki, M.; Katsura, T.; Ichiki, M.

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the variation in conductivity of hydrous rock during the dehydration, it is essential to comprehend the mechanism of electrical conduction network in rock. In the recent past, several attempts have been made to demonstrate the mechanism of electrical conduction network in hydrous rock. However, realistic conduction mechanism within the crustal rock and mineral is unknown and relevant theories have not been successful. The aim of our study is to quantify the electrical conduction network in the rock and/or mineral. We developed a cell-type lattice network model to evaluate the electrical conduction mechanism of fluid-mineral interaction. Using cell-type lattice model, we simulated the various electrical paths and connectivity in the rock and/or mineral sample. First, we assumed a network model consists of 100 by 100 elementary cells as matrix configuration. We also settled the current input and output layers at the edge of the lattice model. Second, we randomly generated and put the conductive and resistive cells using the scheme of Mersenne Twister. Third, we applied the current for this model and performed a great number of realization on each mineral distribution patterns explaining realistic conduction network model. Considering fractal dimensions, our model has been compared with images from Electron Probe Micro Analysis. To evaluate the distribution pattern of conductive and resistive cells quantitatively, we have determined fractal dimensions by box-counting method. Assessing the bulk conductivity change as a function of conductor ratio in the hydrous rock, the model has been examined successfully both against simulated data and experimental data.

  17. Detection of temperature distribution via recovering electrical conductivity in MREIT.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Jeong, Woo Chul; Chauhan, Munish; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2013-04-21

    In radiofrequency (RF) ablation or hyperthermia, internal temperature measurements and tissue property imaging are important to control their outputs and assess the treatment effect. Recently, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), as a non-invasive imaging method of internal conductivity distribution using an MR scanner, has been developed. Its reconstruction algorithm uses measured magnetic flux density induced by injected currents. The MREIT technique has the potential to visualize electrical conductivity of tissue with high spatial resolution and measure relative conductivity variation according to the internal temperature change based on the fact that the electrical conductivity of biological tissues is sensitive to the internal temperature distribution. In this paper, we propose a method to provide a non-invasive alternative to monitor the internal temperature distribution by recovering the electrical conductivity distribution using the MREIT technique. To validate the proposed method, we design a phantom with saline solution and a thin transparency film in a form of a hollow cylinder with holes to create anomalies with different electrical and thermal conductivities controlled by morphological structure. We first prove the temperature maps with respect to spatial and time resolution by solving the thermal conductivity partial differential equation with the real phantom experimental environment. The measured magnetic flux density and the reconstructed conductivity distributions using the phantom experiments were compared to the simulated temperature distribution. The relative temperature variation of two testing objects with respect to the background saline was determined by the relative conductivity contrast ratio (rCCR,%). The relation between the temperature and conductivity measurements using MREIT was approximately linear with better accuracy than 0.22 °C.

  18. Variety of alternative stable phase-locking in networks of electrically coupled relaxation oscillators.

    PubMed

    Meyrand, Pierre; Bem, Tiaza

    2014-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of a large-scale model network comprised of oscillating electrically coupled neurons. Cells are modeled as relaxation oscillators with short duty cycle, so they can be considered either as models of pacemaker cells, spiking cells with fast regenerative and slow recovery variables or firing rate models of excitatory cells with synaptic depression or cellular adaptation. It was already shown that electrically coupled relaxation oscillators exhibit not only synchrony but also anti-phase behavior if electrical coupling is weak. We show that a much wider spectrum of spatiotemporal patterns of activity can emerge in a network of electrically coupled cells as a result of switching from synchrony, produced by short external signals of different spatial profiles. The variety of patterns increases with decreasing rate of neuronal firing (or duty cycle) and with decreasing strength of electrical coupling. We study also the effect of network topology--from all-to-all--to pure ring connectivity, where only the closest neighbors are coupled. We show that the ring topology promotes anti-phase behavior as compared to all-to-all coupling. It also gives rise to a hierarchical organization of activity: during each of the main phases of a given pattern cells fire in a particular sequence determined by the local connectivity. We have analyzed the behavior of the network using geometric phase plane methods and we give heuristic explanations of our findings. Our results show that complex spatiotemporal activity patterns can emerge due to the action of stochastic or sensory stimuli in neural networks without chemical synapses, where each cell is equally coupled to others via gap junctions. This suggests that in developing nervous systems where only electrical coupling is present such a mechanism can lead to the establishment of proto-networks generating premature multiphase oscillations whereas the subsequent emergence of chemical synapses would later stabilize

  19. A Simulation Study of Electrical Fiber Composite Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezdour, D.; Sahli, S.

    2008-11-01

    Percolation concept has been used in this study to estimate the amount of conductive fibers embedded in polymeric matrix, necessary to establish conduction in this kind of composites. The resistance of composite materials is calculated by simulating composite samples with different size, containing conductive fibers with various lengths Calculation is based on detecting conductive pathways through the insulating matrix, these pathways are assumed to be resistances in parallel. Electrical resistance curves showed a percolative behavior of the samples versus volume fraction of filler. Lower conduction thresholds are obtained for fiber aspect ratio of 20 and sample size of 100. The electrical resistivity and the conduction thresholds of the carbon fiber reinforced polycarbonate composites have been characterized. Simulation results are in good agreement with an experimental result found in the literature.

  20. A Structural Electrical Conductivity Model for Oxide Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-02-01

    A structural electrical conductivity model for oxide melts was developed based on the Nernst-Einstein relationship of ionic conductivity. In the description of ionic conductivity, the effective diffusivities of cations in oxide slags were described as a function of the polymerization of the melt. The polymerization of oxide melts was calculated from the Modified Quasichemical Model, taking into account the short-range ordering in slags. The parameters of this conductivity model were fixed to reproduce the electrical conductivity data in unary and binary melts, and the model can well predict the conductivity data in ternary and higher order system without any additional model parameters. The model is successfully applied to the CaO-MgO-MnO-PbO-Al2O3-SiO2 system.

  1. Thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and specific heat of copper-carbon fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Kanai, Tsuneyuki; Chiba, Akio

    1988-01-01

    A new material of copper/carbon fiber composite is developed which retains the properties of copper, i.e., its excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, and the property of carbon, i.e., a small thermal expansion coefficient. These properties of the composite are adjustable within a certain range by changing the volume and/or the orientation of the carbon fibers. The effects of carbon fiber volume and arrangement changes on the thermal and electrical conductivity, and specific heat of the composite are studied. Results obtained are as follows: the thermal and electrical conductivity of the composite decrease as the volume of the carbon fiber increases, and were influenced by the fiber orientation. The results are predictable from a careful application of the rule of mixtures for composites. The specific heat of the composite was dependent, not on fiber orientation, but on fiber volume. In the thermal fatigue tests, no degradation in the electrical conductivity of this composite was observed.

  2. Low Dimensional String-like Relaxation Underpins Superionic Conduction in Fluorites and Related Structures

    PubMed Central

    Annamareddy, Ajay; Eapen, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Among the superionic conductors that show a Faraday transition – the continuous increase in the ionic conductivity over a range of temperatures – the fluorite structures have enjoyed incisive examinations over the past four decades; yet the fundamental nature of superionicity has remained largely inconclusive. Departing from the traditional quasi-static defect framework, we provide weighty evidence for string-like dynamical structures that govern the fast ion conduction process in fluorites. We show that lower temperatures encourage the growth of longer but slowly relaxing strings and vice-versa – a direct manifestation of heterogeneous dynamics. Remarkably, the ionic conductivity is inversely correlated to the lifetime of the ions that participate in the strings and not explicitly to the ion population. Our analysis methodology, which resolves a long-standing disagreement on defect structures and the mechanism of ionic transport in fcc fluorite structures, is well-positioned to describe the dynamics of low dimensional conduction in a larger class of superionic conductors. PMID:28344314

  3. Investigations of the conduction mechanism and relaxation properties of semiconductor Sm doped a-Se films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotkata, M. F.; Abdel-Wahab, F. A.; Maksoud, H. M.

    2006-05-01

    The ac and dc conductivities (σac and σdc) of amorphous semiconductor Sm doped Se (namely, SeSm0.005) films, prepared by thermal evaporation, were measured under vacuum in a wide range of frequency and temperature. The ac conductivity versus frequency plots were analysed by considering a power law: σac ~ ωs (s <= 1). A comparison between values of the index s with those numerically calculated from different conduction models reveals that correlated barrier hopping (CBH) is a fairly good model to describe the dominant ac conduction mechanism. The concept of the Meyer-Neldel (MN) rule in the expression of the relaxation time is considered for both ac and dc experimental data. The validity of the CBH model based on the MN (normal and inverted) rule is studied and discussed. Besides, results of the real dielectric constant (ɛ'), loss factor (ɛ') and loss tangent (tan δ) together with the Cole-Cole diagrams and the optical (ɛ∞) and static (ɛs) dielectric constants for a-SeSm0.005 films are given and discussed.

  4. Temperature dependent electric field control of the electron spin relaxation in (111)A GaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Balocchi, A.; Lagarde, D.; Zhu, C. R.; Amand, T.; Renucci, P.; Shi, Z. W.; Wang, W. X.; Liu, B. L.; Marie, X.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate the electrical control of the electron spin relaxation in GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells grown on (111)A substrate. By embedding the wells in a NIP structure, the application of an external bias yields a large increase of the electron spin relaxation time due to the compensation of the Dresselhaus spin-splitting by the Rashba one. Depending on the direction of the applied electric field, the electron spin relaxation can be slowed-down or sped-up. It can be tuned by a factor 50 at 75 K and still by a factor 2 at 250 K.

  5. Electric and thermal conductivities of quenched neutron star crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogata, Shuji; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1990-01-01

    The electric and thermal conductivities in the outer crustal matter of a neutron star quenched into a solid state by cooling are estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of freezing transition for dense plasmas. The conductivities are calculated by the precise evaluation of the scattering integrals, using the procedure of Ichimaru et al. (1983) and Iyetomi and Ichimaru (1983). The results predict the conductivities lower, by a factor of about 3, than those with the single-phonon approximation.

  6. Electric and thermal conductivities of quenched neutron star crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogata, Shuji; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1990-01-01

    The electric and thermal conductivities in the outer crustal matter of a neutron star quenched into a solid state by cooling are estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of freezing transition for dense plasmas. The conductivities are calculated by the precise evaluation of the scattering integrals, using the procedure of Ichimaru et al. (1983) and Iyetomi and Ichimaru (1983). The results predict the conductivities lower, by a factor of about 3, than those with the single-phonon approximation.

  7. Optical and Electrical Characteristics of Silver Ion Conducting Nanocomposite Solid Polymer Electrolytes Based on Chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Shujahadeen B.; Rasheed, Mariwan A.; Abidin, Zul H. Z.

    2017-10-01

    Optical and electrical properties of nanocomposite solid polymer electrolytes based on chitosan have been investigated. Incorporation of alumina nanoparticles into the chitosan:silver triflate (AgTf) system broadened the surface plasmon resonance peaks of the silver nanoparticles and shifted the absorption edge to lower photon energy. A clear decrease of the optical bandgap in nanocomposite samples containing alumina nanoparticles was observed. The variation of the direct-current (DC) conductivity and dielectric constant followed the same trend with alumina concentration. The DC conductivity increased by two orders of magnitude, which can be attributed to hindrance of silver ion reduction. Transmission electron microscopy was used to interpret the space-charge and blocking effects of alumina nanoparticles on the DC conductivity and dielectric constant. The ion conduction mechanism was interpreted based on the dependences of the electrical and dielectric parameters. The dependence of the DC conductivity on the dielectric constant is explained empirically. Relaxation processes associated with conductivity and viscoelasticity were distinguished based on the incomplete semicircular arcs in plots of the real and imaginary parts of the electric modulus.

  8. Optical and Electrical Characteristics of Silver Ion Conducting Nanocomposite Solid Polymer Electrolytes Based on Chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Shujahadeen B.; Rasheed, Mariwan A.; Abidin, Zul H. Z.

    2017-06-01

    Optical and electrical properties of nanocomposite solid polymer electrolytes based on chitosan have been investigated. Incorporation of alumina nanoparticles into the chitosan:silver triflate (AgTf) system broadened the surface plasmon resonance peaks of the silver nanoparticles and shifted the absorption edge to lower photon energy. A clear decrease of the optical bandgap in nanocomposite samples containing alumina nanoparticles was observed. The variation of the direct-current (DC) conductivity and dielectric constant followed the same trend with alumina concentration. The DC conductivity increased by two orders of magnitude, which can be attributed to hindrance of silver ion reduction. Transmission electron microscopy was used to interpret the space-charge and blocking effects of alumina nanoparticles on the DC conductivity and dielectric constant. The ion conduction mechanism was interpreted based on the dependences of the electrical and dielectric parameters. The dependence of the DC conductivity on the dielectric constant is explained empirically. Relaxation processes associated with conductivity and viscoelasticity were distinguished based on the incomplete semicircular arcs in plots of the real and imaginary parts of the electric modulus.

  9. Deducting the temperature dependence of the structural relaxation time in equilibrium far below the nominal Tg by aging the decoupled conductivity relaxation to equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Wojnarowska, Z; Ngai, K L; Paluch, M

    2014-05-07

    Using broadband dielectric spectroscopy we investigate the changes in the conductivity relaxation times τσ observed during the physical aging of the protic ionic conductor carvedilol dihydrogen phosphate (CP). Due to the large decoupling of ion diffusion from host molecule reorientation, the ion conductivity relaxation time τσ(Tage,tage) can be directly measured at temperatures Tage below Tg for exceedingly long aging times tage till τσ(Tage,tage) has reached the equilibrium value τσ(eq)(Tage). The dependence of τσ(Tage,tage) on tage is well described by the stretched exponential function, τσ(Tage, tage) = Aexp[-((tage)/(τage(Tage)))(β)] + τσ(eq)(Tage), where β is a constant and τage(Tage) can be taken as the structural α-relaxation time of the equilibrium liquid at T = Tage. The value of τσ(eq)(Tage) obtained after 63 days long annealing of CP, deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTHσ) dependence of τσ(T) determined from data taken above Tg and extrapolated down to Tage. Concurrently, τage(Tage) also deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTHα) dependence. The results help to answer the longstanding question of whether the VFTH dependence of τσ(T) as well as the structural α-relaxation time τα(T) holds or not in the equilibrium liquid state far below Tg.

  10. Deducting the temperature dependence of the structural relaxation time in equilibrium far below the nominal Tg by aging the decoupled conductivity relaxation to equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Ngai, K. L.; Paluch, M.

    2014-05-01

    Using broadband dielectric spectroscopy we investigate the changes in the conductivity relaxation times τσ observed during the physical aging of the protic ionic conductor carvedilol dihydrogen phosphate (CP). Due to the large decoupling of ion diffusion from host molecule reorientation, the ion conductivity relaxation time τσ(Tage,tage) can be directly measured at temperatures Tage below Tg for exceedingly long aging times tage till τσ(Tage,tage) has reached the equilibrium value τ _σ ^{eq} ( {T_{age} } ). The dependence of τσ(Tage,tage) on tage is well described by the stretched exponential function, τ _σ ( {T_{age},t_{age} } ) = Aexp[ { - ( {{t_{age} }/{τ _{age ( {T_{age} } )}}} )^β } ] + τ _σ ^{eq} ( {T_{age} } ), where β is a constant and τage(Tage) can be taken as the structural α-relaxation time of the equilibrium liquid at T = Tage. The value of τ _σ ^{eq} ( {T_{age} } ) obtained after 63 days long annealing of CP, deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTHσ) dependence of τσ(T) determined from data taken above Tg and extrapolated down to Tage. Concurrently, τage(Tage) also deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTHα) dependence. The results help to answer the longstanding question of whether the VFTH dependence of τσ(T) as well as the structural α-relaxation time τα(T) holds or not in the equilibrium liquid state far below Tg.

  11. Fabrication of highly conductive carbon nanotube fibers for electrical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fengmei; Li, Can; Wei, Jinquan; Xu, Ruiqiao; Zhang, Zelin; Cui, Xian; Wang, Kunlin; Wu, Dehai

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential for use as electrical wires because of their outstanding electrical and mechanical properties. Here, we fabricate lightweight CNT fibers with electrical conductivity as high as that of stainless steel from macroscopic CNT films by drawing them through diamond wire-drawing dies. The entangled CNT bundles are straightened by suffering tension, which improves the alignment of the fibers. The loose fibers are squeezed by the diamond wire-drawing dies, which reduces the intertube space and contact resistance. The CNT fibers prepared by drawing have an electrical conductivity as high as 1.6 × 106 s m-1. The fibers are very stable when kept in the air and under cyclic tensile test. A prototype of CNT motor is demonstrated by replacing the copper wires with the CNT fibers.

  12. Electrical conductivity of hydrated olivine and its polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karato, S. I.; SUN, P.; Karki, B. B.

    2016-12-01

    Although extensive studies have been performed on the electrical conductivity of olivine containing hydrogen, there remains some challenges on two major issues: (i) discrepancies among different experimental studies and (ii) major inconsistencies between hydrogen-assisted conductivity and hydrogen diffusion. To resolve these issues we have conducted both experimental and theoretical studies on hydrogen-assisted electrical conductivity in olivine. The experimental studies and the first-principle computational studies show that hydrogen in olivine and its high-pressure polymorphs is present as various species (interstitial proton, proton trapped at cation sites). The different hydrogen-bearing species have different concentrations and mobility. This leads to the presence of multiple conduction mechanisms with different activation energies and anisotropy, and also explains major differences between conductivity and diffusion. We review the laboratory data on electrical conductivity and H-D diffusion in olivine and its high-pressure polymorphs. A major discrepancy between conductivity and diffusion is seen in all of these minerals suggesting that a complex role of hydrogen-related species is common to these minerals. Consequently, the extrapolation of laboratory data on conductivity obtained at low temperatures to high-temperature conditions in the Earth's asthenosphere must be made with great care.

  13. Laboratory-based electrical conductivity at Martian mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeven, Olivier; Vacher, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Information on temperature and composition of planetary mantles can be obtained from electrical conductivity profiles derived from induced magnetic field analysis. This requires a modeling of the conductivity for each mineral phase at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Interpretation of iron-rich Martian mantle conductivity profile therefore requires a careful modeling of the conductivity of iron-bearing minerals. In this paper, we show that conduction mechanism called small polaron is the dominant conduction mechanism at temperature, water and iron content conditions relevant to Mars mantle. We then review the different measurements performed on mineral phases with various iron content. We show that, for all measurements of mineral conductivity reported so far, the effect of iron content on the activation energy governing the exponential decrease in the Arrhenius law can be modeled as the cubic square root of the iron content. We recast all laboratory results on a common generalized Arrhenius law for iron-bearing minerals, anchored on Earth's mantle values. We then use this modeling to compute a new synthetic profile of Martian mantle electrical conductivity. This new profile matches perfectly, in the depth range [100,1000] km, the electrical conductivity profile recently derived from the study of Mars Global Surveyor magnetic field measurements.

  14. Electrical conductance between multi-walled carbon nanotube and Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Qu, Jianmin; Yao, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    Vertical MWCNT interconnects have already been investigated for vias, or even for through-wafer 3D interconnects. Several studies have been done to understand the electrical conductance of MWCNT itself. The electrical conductance at a junction between MWCNT and metals has not been studied yet. Here we reported the intershell interaction effect on the electrical conductance at the Cu/MWCNT/Cu junctions by quantum mechanics calculations. Both end- and side-contacts between MWCNT and Cu electrodes were studied. In the end-contact junction, each individual CNT in the MWCNT acts as if it is a single wave CNT. The total conductance is almost the sum of the contributions from each individual nanotube. However, in the side-contact junction, the conductance between the outermost CNT and Cu electrode is dominant, whereas the intershell interaction leads to a reduction of the total electrical conductance. This is attributed to the enhanced localization of density of states in the vicinity of Fermi level by inner tube. The authors acknowledge the financial support from Rockwell Collins Inc.

  15. Shear induced electrical behaviour of conductive polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starý, Zdeněk; Krückel, Johannes; Schubert, Dirk W.

    2013-04-01

    The time-dependent electrical resistance of polymethylmethacrylate containing carbon black was measured under oscillatory shear in the molten state. The electrical signal was oscillating exactly at the doubled frequency of the oscillatory shear deformation. Moreover, the experimental results gave a hint to the development of conductive structures in polymer melts under shear deformation. It was shown that the flow induced destruction of conductive paths dominates over the flow induced build-up in the beginning of the shear deformations. However, for longer times both competitive effects reach a dynamic equilibrium and only the thermally induced build-up of pathways influences the changes in the composite resistance during the shear. Furthermore, the oscillating electrical response depends clearly on the deformation amplitude applied. A simple physical model describing the behaviour of conductive pathways under shear deformation was derived and utilized for the description of the experimental data.

  16. Electrical conductivity of rigid polyurethane foam at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. T., Jr.

    1982-08-01

    The electrical conductivity of rigid polyurethane foam, used for electronic encapsulation, was measured during thermal decomposition to 3400 C. At higher temperatures the conductance continues to increase. With pressure loaded electrical leads, sample softening results in eventual contact between electrodes which produces electrical shorting. Air and nitrogen environments show no significant dependence of the conductivity on the atmosphere over the temperature range. The insulating characteristics of polyurethane foam below approx. 2700 C are similar to those for silicone based materials used for electronic case housings and are better than those for phenolics. At higher temperatures (greater than or equal to 2700 C) the phenolics appear to be better insulators to approx. 5000 C and the silicones to approx. 6000 C. It is concluded that the Sylgard 184/GMB encapsulant is a significantly better insulator at high temperature than the rigid polyurethane foam.

  17. Electrical Conductivity of HgTe at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Su, C.-H.; Scripa, R. N.

    2004-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of HgTe was measured using a rotating magnetic field method from 300 K to the melting point (943 K). A microscopic theory for electrical conduction was used to calculate the expected temperature dependence of the HgTe conductivity. A comparison between the measured and calculated conductivities was used to obtain the estimates of the temperature dependence of Gamma(sub 6)-Gamma(sub 8) energy gap from 300 K to 943 K. The estimated temperature coefficient for the energy gap was comparable to the previous results at lower temperatures (less than or equal to 300 K). A rapid increase in the conductivity just above 300 K and a subsequent decrease at 500 K is attributed to band crossover effects. This paper describes the experimental approach and some of the theoretical calculation details.

  18. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1971-01-01

    Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials, including 304L stainless steel Rigimesh, 304L stainless steel sintered spherical powders, and OFHC sintered spherical powders at different porosities and temperatures are reported and correlated. It was found that the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity can be related to the solid material properties and the porosity of the porous matrix regardless of the matrix structure. It was also found that the Wiedermann-Franz-Lorenz relationship is valid for the porous materials under consideration. For high conductivity materials, the Lorenz constant and the lattice component of conductivity depend on the material and are independent of the porosity. For low conductivity, the lattice component depends on the porosity as well.

  19. Electrical Conductivity of HgTe at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Su, C.-H.; Scripa, R. N.

    2004-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of HgTe was measured using a rotating magnetic field method from 300 K to the melting point (943 K). A microscopic theory for electrical conduction was used to calculate the expected temperature dependence of the HgTe conductivity. A comparison between the measured and calculated conductivities was used to obtain the estimates of the temperature dependence of Gamma(sub 6)-Gamma(sub 8) energy gap from 300 K to 943 K. The estimated temperature coefficient for the energy gap was comparable to the previous results at lower temperatures (less than or equal to 300 K). A rapid increase in the conductivity just above 300 K and a subsequent decrease at 500 K is attributed to band crossover effects. This paper describes the experimental approach and some of the theoretical calculation details.

  20. Computational analysis of electrical conduction in hybrid nanomaterials with embedded non-penetrating conductive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jizhe; Naraghi, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a comprehensive multi-resolution two-dimensional (2D) resistor network model is proposed to analyze the electrical conductivity of hybrid nanomaterials made of insulating matrix with conductive particles such as CNT reinforced nanocomposites and thick film resistors. Unlike existing approaches, our model takes into account the impenetrability of the particles and their random placement within the matrix. Moreover, our model presents a detailed description of intra-particle conductivity via finite element analysis, which to the authors’ best knowledge has not been addressed before. The inter-particle conductivity is assumed to be primarily due to electron tunneling. The model is then used to predict the electrical conductivity of electrospun carbon nanofibers as a function of microstructural parameters such as turbostratic domain alignment and aspect ratio. To simulate the microstructure of single CNF, randomly positioned nucleation sites were seeded and grown as turbostratic particles with anisotropic growth rates. Particle growth was in steps and growth of each particle in each direction was stopped upon contact with other particles. The study points to the significant contribution of both intra-particle and inter-particle conductivity to the overall conductivity of hybrid composites. Influence of particle alignment and anisotropic growth rate ratio on electrical conductivity is also discussed. The results show that partial alignment in contrast to complete alignment can result in maximum electrical conductivity of whole CNF. High degrees of alignment can adversely affect conductivity by lowering the probability of the formation of a conductive path. The results demonstrate approaches to enhance electrical conductivity of hybrid materials through controlling their microstructure which is applicable not only to carbon nanofibers, but also many other types of hybrid composites such as thick film resistors.

  1. Electrically conducting porphyrin and porphyrin-fullerene electropolymers

    DOEpatents

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony; Gervaldo, Miguel Andres; Bridgewater, James Ward; Brennan, Bradley James; Moore, Thomas Andrew; Moore, Ana Lorenzelli

    2014-03-11

    Compounds with aryl ring(s) at porphyrin meso position(s) bearing an amino group in position 4 relative to the porphyrin macrocycle, and at least one unsubstituted 5 (hydrogen-bearing) meso position with the 10-, 15-, and/or 20-relationship to the aryl ring bearing the amino group, and metal complexes thereof, feature broad spectral absorption throughout the visible region. These compounds are electropolymerized to form electrically conducting porphyrin and porphyrin-fullerene polymers that are useful in photovoltaic applications. The structure of one such electrically conducting porphyrin polymer is shown below. ##STR00001##

  2. Contamination from electrically conductive silicone tubing during aerosol chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yong; Alexander, M. L.; Perraud, Veronique; Bruns, Emily; Johnson, Stan; Ezell, Michael J.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2009-06-01

    Electrically conductive silicone tubing is used to minimize losses in sampling lines during the analysis of airborne particle size distributions and number concentrations. We report contamination from this tubing using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of filter-collected samples as well as by particle mass spectrometry. Comparison of electrically conductive silicone and stainless steel tubing showed elevated siloxanes only for the silicone tubing. The extent of contamination increased with length of tubing to which the sample was exposed, and decreased with increasing relative humidity.

  3. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Karen Gebert; Bryan, Coleman J.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Wrobleski, Debra A.

    1991-01-01

    In a joint effort between NASA Kennedy and LANL, electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed as corrosion protective coatings for metal surfaces. At NASA Kennedy, the launch environment consist of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid and/or elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  4. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  5. Electrical conduction measurement of thiol modified DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. S.; Hwang, S. W.; Ahn, D.

    2003-09-01

    We present a novel transport measurement of 60 base pairs of poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA molecules. Thiol-terminated DNA molecules are chemically anchored at the surface of a Au nanoparticle and this DNA attached Au nanoparticle is self-trapped in between Au nanoelectrodes to make an electrical conduction channel. It provides an automatic electrical conduction channel consisting of electrode-DNA-nanoparticle-DNA-electrode. Due to robust bonding of thiol and Au, this transport channel is stable and reliable. The current-voltage characteristics measured from our device show a nonlinear behavior with voltage gaps comparable to previous experiment using the same molecules.

  6. Electrically conductive doped block copolymer of polyacetylene and polyisoprene

    DOEpatents

    Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1985-01-01

    An electrically conductive block copolymer of polyisoprene and polyacetyl and a method of making the same are disclosed. The polymer is prepared by first polymerizing isoprene with n-butyllithium in a toluene solution to form an active isoprenyllithium polymer. The active polymer is reacted with an equimolar amount of titanium butoxide and subsequently exposed to gaseous acetylene. A block copolymer of polyisoprene and polyacetylene is formed. The copolymer is soluble in common solvents and may be doped with I.sub.2 to give it an electrical conductivity in the metallic regime.

  7. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Wrobleski, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    In a joint research effort involving the Kennedy Space Center and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed as corrosion-protective coatings for metal surfaces. At the Kennedy Space Center, the launch environment consists of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid/elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  8. Gradient-based electrical conductivity imaging using MR phase.

    PubMed

    Gurler, Necip; Ider, Yusuf Ziya

    2017-01-01

    To develop a fast, practically applicable, and boundary artifact free electrical conductivity imaging method that does not use transceive phase assumption, and that is more robust against the noise. Starting from the Maxwell's equations, a new electrical conductivity imaging method that is based solely on the MR transceive phase has been proposed. Different from the previous phase based electrical properties tomography (EPT) method, a new formulation was derived by including the gradients of the conductivity into the equations. The governing partial differential equation, which is in the form of a convection-reaction-diffusion equation, was solved using a three-dimensional finite-difference scheme. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method numerical simulations, phantom and in vivo human experiments have been conducted at 3T. Simulation and experimental results of the proposed method and the conventional phase-based EPT method were illustrated to show the superiority of the proposed method over the conventional method, especially in the transition regions and under noisy data. With the contributions of the proposed method to the phase-based EPT approach, a fast and reliable electrical conductivity imaging appears to be feasible, which is promising for clinical diagnoses and local SAR estimation. Magn Reson Med 77:137-150, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Electrical conductivity of a bulk metallic glass composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Fujita, T.; Chen, M. W.; Nieh, T. G.; Okada, H.; Koyama, K.; Zhang, W.; Inoue, A.

    2007-10-01

    The authors report the electrical conductivity of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) based composite fabricated by warm extrusion of a mixture of gas-atomized glassy powders and ductile α-brass powders. The conductivity of the BMG composite can be well modeled by the percolation theory and the critical percolation threshold volume of the high-conductive brass phase was estimated to be about 10%. It was found that the short irregular brass fibers can dramatically reduce the resistivity of the BMG, leading to an improved material with both high strength and good conductivity for functional applications.

  10. Effects of Stress Relaxation Aging with Electrical Pulses on Microstructures and Properties of 2219 Aluminum Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jingsheng; Zhan, Lihua; Zhang, Jiao; Yang, Zhan; Ma, Ziyao

    2016-01-01

    To realize the high-efficiency and high-performance manufacture of complex high-web panels, this paper introduced electric pulse current (EPC) into the stress relaxation aging forming process of 2219 aluminum alloy and systematically studied the effects of EPC, stress, and aging time upon the microstructure and properties of 2219 aluminum alloy. It is discovered that: (a) EPC greatly enhanced the mechanical properties after stress relaxation aging and reduced the sensitivity of the yield strength for the initial stress under the aging system of 165 °C/11 h; (b) compared with general aging, stress relaxation aging instead delayed the aging process of 2219 aluminum alloy and greatly increased the peak strength value; (c) EPC accelerated the aging precipitation behavior of 2219 aluminum alloy and reduced transgranular and grain-boundary energy difference, thus leading to a more diffused distribution of the transgranular precipitated phase and the absence of a significant precipitation-free zone (PFZ) and grain-boundary stable phase in the grain boundary, further improving the mechanical properties of the alloy. PMID:28773660

  11. Effects of Stress Relaxation Aging with Electrical Pulses on Microstructures and Properties of 2219 Aluminum Alloy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jingsheng; Zhan, Lihua; Zhang, Jiao; Yang, Zhan; Ma, Ziyao

    2016-07-01

    To realize the high-efficiency and high-performance manufacture of complex high-web panels, this paper introduced electric pulse current (EPC) into the stress relaxation aging forming process of 2219 aluminum alloy and systematically studied the effects of EPC, stress, and aging time upon the microstructure and properties of 2219 aluminum alloy. It is discovered that: (a) EPC greatly enhanced the mechanical properties after stress relaxation aging and reduced the sensitivity of the yield strength for the initial stress under the aging system of 165 °C/11 h; (b) compared with general aging, stress relaxation aging instead delayed the aging process of 2219 aluminum alloy and greatly increased the peak strength value; (c) EPC accelerated the aging precipitation behavior of 2219 aluminum alloy and reduced transgranular and grain-boundary energy difference, thus leading to a more diffused distribution of the transgranular precipitated phase and the absence of a significant precipitation-free zone (PFZ) and grain-boundary stable phase in the grain boundary, further improving the mechanical properties of the alloy.

  12. Carbonatite melts and electrical conductivity in the asthenosphere.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Malki, Mohammed; Iacono-Marziano, Giada; Pichavant, Michel; Scaillet, Bruno

    2008-11-28

    Electrically conductive regions in Earth's mantle have been interpreted to reflect the presence of either silicate melt or water dissolved in olivine. On the basis of laboratory measurements, we show that molten carbonates have electrical conductivities that are three orders of magnitude higher than those of molten silicate and five orders of magnitude higher than those of hydrated olivine. High conductivities in the asthenosphere probably indicate the presence of small amounts of carbonate melt in peridotite and can therefore be interpreted in terms of carbon concentration in the upper mantle. We show that the conductivity of the oceanic asthenosphere can be explained by 0.1 volume percent of carbonatite melts on average, which agrees with the carbon dioxide content of mid-ocean ridge basalts.

  13. Estimating Upper Mantle Hydration from In Situ Electrical Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, J.; Constable, S.; Heinson, G.; Everett, M.; Weiss, C.; Key, K.

    2004-12-01

    The electrical conductivity of 35-40 Ma Pacific plate has been measured in situ; one robust result is the presence of bulk anisotropy in the lithospheric upper mantle. We interpret this anisotropy to be a result of hydrothermal circulation into the upper mantle along spreading-ridge-parallel normal faults: the associated zones of serpentinized peridotite provide the pathways of enhanced electrical conductivity required by the data. Our modeling bounds the range of possible anisotropic ratios, which are then used to estimate the amount of water required to serpentinize the requisite amounts of peridotite. These data sets, however, do not indicate anisotropy in the bulk conductivity of the crust, nor in the asthenospheric mantle. This second point is significant, as recent measurements of sub-continental asthenospheric conductivity have been interpreted to indicate anisotropy aligned with present plate motion, with the diffusion of hydrogen through olivine advanced as an explanation.

  14. Nonlinear conductivity of a holographic superconductor under constant electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hua Bi; Tian, Yu; Fan, Zheyong; Chen, Chiang-Mei

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of a two-dimensional superconductor under a constant electric field E is studied by using the gauge-gravity correspondence. The pair breaking current induced by E first increases to a peak value and then decreases to a constant value at late times, where the superconducting gap goes to zero, corresponding to a normal conducting phase. The peak value of the current is found to increase linearly with respect to the electric field. Moreover, the nonlinear conductivity, defined as an average of the conductivity in the superconducting phase, scales as ˜E-2 /3 when the system is close to the critical temperature Tc, which agrees with predictions from solving the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation. Away from Tc, the E-2 /3 scaling of the conductivity still holds when E is large.

  15. Self-healable electrically conducting wires for wearable microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; You, Xiao; Jiang, Yishu; Guan, Guozhen; Fang, Xin; Deng, Jue; Chen, Peining; Luo, Yongfeng; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-09-01

    Electrically conducting wires play a critical role in the advancement of modern electronics and in particular are an important key to the development of next-generation wearable microelectronics. However, the thin conducting wires can easily break during use, and the whole device fails to function as a result. Herein, a new family of high-performance conducting wires that can self-heal after breaking has been developed by wrapping sheets of aligned carbon nanotubes around polymer fibers. The aligned carbon nanotubes offer an effective strategy for the self-healing of the electric conductivity, whereas the polymer fiber recovers its mechanical strength. A self-healable wire-shaped supercapacitor fabricated from a wire electrode of this type maintained a high capacitance after breaking and self-healing.

  16. Electrical conductivity in shaly sands with geophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Cathles, L. M., III; Losh, S.; Nunn, J. A.

    1998-10-01

    We develop a new electrical conductivity equation based on Bussian's model and accounting for the different behavior of ions in the pore space. The tortuosity of the transport of anions is independent of the salinity and corresponds to the bulk tortuosity of the pore space which is given by the product of the electrical formation factor F and the porosity ϕ. For the cations, the situation is different. At high salinities, the dominant paths for the electromigration of the cations are located in the interconnected pore space, and the tortuosity for the transport of cations is therefore the bulk tortuosity. As the salinity decreases, the dominant paths for transport of the cations shift from the pore space to the mineral water interface and consequently are subject to different tortuosities. This shift occurs at salinities corresponding to ξ/t(+)f ˜ 1, where ξ is the ratio between the surface conductivity of the grains and the electrolyte conductivity, and t(+)f is the Hittorf transport number for cations in the electrolyte. The electrical conductivity of granular porous media is determined as a function of pore fluid salinity, temperature, water and gas saturations, shale content, and porosity. The model provides a very good explanation for the variation of electrical conductivity with these parameters. Surface conduction at the mineral water interface is described with the Stern theory of the electrical double layer and is shown to be independent of the salinity in shaly sands above 10-3 mol L-1. The model is applied to in situ salinity determination in the Gulf Coast, and it provides realistic salinity profiles in agreement with sampled pore water. The results clearly demonstrate the applicability of the equations to well log interpretation of shaly sands.

  17. Tuning Electrical Conductivity of Inorganic Minerals with Carbon Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Anton A; Tour, James M

    2015-12-02

    Conductive powders based on Barite or calcium carbonate with chemically converted graphene (CCG) were successfully synthesized by adsorption of graphene oxide (GO) or graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs) onto the mineral surfaces and subsequent chemical reduction with hydrazine. The efficient adsorption of GO or GONRs on the surface of Barite and calcium carbonate-based mineral particles results in graphene-wrapped hybrid materials that demonstrate a concentration dependent electrical conductivity that increases with the GO or GONR loading.

  18. A model of electrical conduction in cardiac tissue including fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, A P; Seemann, G; Abildskov, J A

    2009-05-01

    Fibroblasts are abundant in cardiac tissue. Experimental studies suggested that fibroblasts are electrically coupled to myocytes and this coupling can impact cardiac electrophysiology. In this work, we present a novel approach for mathematical modeling of electrical conduction in cardiac tissue composed of myocytes, fibroblasts, and the extracellular space. The model is an extension of established cardiac bidomain models, which include a description of intra-myocyte and extracellular conductivities, currents and potentials in addition to transmembrane voltages of myocytes. Our extension added a description of fibroblasts, which are electrically coupled with each other and with myocytes. We applied the extended model in exemplary computational simulations of plane waves and conduction in a thin tissue slice assuming an isotropic conductivity of the intra-fibroblast domain. In simulations of plane waves, increased myocyte-fibroblast coupling and fibroblast-myocyte ratio reduced peak voltage and maximal upstroke velocity of myocytes as well as amplitudes and maximal downstroke velocity of extracellular potentials. Simulations with the thin tissue slice showed that inter-fibroblast coupling affected rather transversal than longitudinal conduction velocity. Our results suggest that fibroblast coupling becomes relevant for small intra-myocyte and/or large intra-fibroblast conductivity. In summary, the study demonstrated the feasibility of the extended bidomain model and supports the hypothesis that fibroblasts contribute to cardiac electrophysiology in various manners.

  19. Dynamic response of a thin sessile drop of conductive liquid to an abruptly applied or removed electric field.

    PubMed

    Corson, L T; Mottram, N J; Duffy, B R; Wilson, S K; Tsakonas, C; Brown, C V

    2016-10-01

    We consider, both theoretically and experimentally, a thin sessile drop of conductive liquid that rests on the lower plate of a parallel-plate capacitor. We derive analytical expressions for both the initial deformation and the relaxation dynamics of the drop as the electric field is either abruptly applied or abruptly removed, as functions of the geometrical, electrical, and material parameters, and investigate the ranges of validity of these expressions by comparison with full numerical simulations. These expressions provide a reasonable description of the experimentally measured dynamic response of a drop of conductive ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate.

  20. Dynamic response of a thin sessile drop of conductive liquid to an abruptly applied or removed electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, L. T.; Mottram, N. J.; Duffy, B. R.; Wilson, S. K.; Tsakonas, C.; Brown, C. V.

    2016-10-01

    We consider, both theoretically and experimentally, a thin sessile drop of conductive liquid that rests on the lower plate of a parallel-plate capacitor. We derive analytical expressions for both the initial deformation and the relaxation dynamics of the drop as the electric field is either abruptly applied or abruptly removed, as functions of the geometrical, electrical, and material parameters, and investigate the ranges of validity of these expressions by comparison with full numerical simulations. These expressions provide a reasonable description of the experimentally measured dynamic response of a drop of conductive ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate.

  1. Detection of internally infested popcorn using electrically conductive roller mills

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To detect popcorn kernels infested by the internal feeding stored-product insect pest Sitophilus zeamais, maize weevil, a laboratory roller mill was modified so that the electrical conductivity of the grain is measured while the kernels are milled between the rolls. When a kernel with a S. zeamais l...

  2. Soil water sensor response to bulk electrical conductivity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil water monitoring using electromagnetic (EM) sensors can facilitate observations of water content at high temporal and spatial resolutions. These sensors measure soil dielectric permittivity (Ka) which is largely a function of volumetric water content. However, bulk electrical conductivity BEC c...

  3. Electrically conductive polycrystalline diamond and particulate metal based electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg M.; Wang, Jian

    2005-04-26

    An electrically conducting and dimensionally stable diamond (12, 14) and metal particle (13) electrode produced by electrodepositing the metal on the diamond is described. The electrode is particularly useful in harsh chemical environments and at high current densities and potentials. The electrode is particularly useful for generating hydrogen, and for reducing oxygen and oxidizing methanol in reactions which are of importance in fuel cells.

  4. Electrical Conductivity, Thermal Behavior, and Seebeck Coefficient of Conductive Films for Printed Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankireddy, Krishnamraju; Menon, Akanksha K.; Iezzi, Brian; Yee, Shannon K.; Losego, Mark D.; Jur, Jesse S.

    2016-11-01

    Printed electronics is being explored as a rapid, facile means for manufacturing thermoelectric generators (TEGs) that can recover useful electrical energy from waste heat. This work examines the relevant electrical conductivity, thermal resistance, thermovoltage, and Seebeck coefficient of printed films for use in such printed flexible TEGs. The thermoelectric performance of TEGs printed using commercially relevant nickel, silver, and carbon inks is evaluated. The microstructure of the printed films is investigated to better understand why the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient are degraded. Thermal conduction is shown to be relatively insensitive to the type of metalized coating and nearly equivalent to that of an uncoated polymer substrate. Of the commercially available conductive ink materials examined, carbon-nickel TEGs are shown to exhibit the highest thermovoltage, with a value of 10.3 μV/K. However, silver-nickel TEGs produced the highest power generation of 14.6 μW [from 31 junctions with temperature difference (Δ T) of 113°C] due to their low electrical resistance. The voltage generated from the silver-nickel TEG was stable under continuous operation at 275°C for 3 h. We have also demonstrated that, after a year of storage in ambient conditions, these devices retain their performance. Notably, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measured for individual materials were consistent with those measured from actual printed TEG device structures, validating the need for further fundamental materials characterization to accelerate flexible TEG device optimization.

  5. Is iron unique in promoting electrical conductivity in MOFs?

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Hendon, Christopher H; Park, Sarah S; Tulchinsky, Yuri; Wan, Ruomeng; Wang, Fang; Walsh, Aron; Dincă, Mircea

    2017-06-01

    Identifying the metal ions that optimize charge transport and charge density in metal-organic frameworks is critical for systematic improvements in the electrical conductivity in these materials. In this work, we measure the electrical conductivity and activation energy for twenty different MOFs pertaining to four distinct structural families: M2(DOBDC)(DMF)2 (M = Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+)); H4DOBDC = 2,5-dihydroxybenzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid; DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), M2(DSBDC)(DMF)2 (M = Mn(2+), Fe(2+); H4DSBDC = 2,5-disulfhydrylbenzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid), M2Cl2(BTDD)(DMF)2 (M = Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+); H2BTDD = bis(1H-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-b],[4',5'-i]dibenzo[1,4]dioxin), and M(1,2,3-triazolate)2 (M = Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+)). This comprehensive study allows us to single-out iron as the metal ion that leads to the best electrical properties. The iron-based MOFs exhibit at least five orders of magnitude higher electrical conductivity and significantly smaller charge activation energies across all different MOF families studied here and stand out materials made from all other metal ions considered here. We attribute the unique electrical properties of iron-based MOFs to the high-energy valence electrons of Fe(2+) and the Fe(3+/2+) mixed valency. These results reveal that incorporating Fe(2+) in the charge transport pathways of MOFs and introducing mixed valency are valuable strategies for improving electrical conductivity in this important class of porous materials.

  6. Effect of pH on the electrical properties and conducting mechanism of SnO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periathai, R. Sudha; Abarna, S.; Hirankumar, G.; Jeyakumaran, N.; Prithivikumaran, N.

    2017-03-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles have attracted more interests because of their size-dependent optical and electrical properties.SnO2 is an oxygen-deficient n-type semiconductor with a wide band gap of 3.6 eV (300 K). It has many remarkable applications as sensors, catalysts, transparent conducting electrodes, anode material for rechargeable Li- ion batteries and optoelectronic devices. In the present work, the role of pH in determining the electrical and dielectric properties of SnO2 nanoparticles has been studied as a function of temperature ranging from Room temperature (RT) to 114 °C in the frequency range of 7 MHz to 50 mHz using impedance spectroscopic technique. The non linear behavior observed in the thermal dependence of the conductance of SnO2 nanoparticles is explained by means of the surface property of SnO2 nanoparticles where proton hopping mechanism is dealt with. Jonscher's power law has been fitted for the conductance spectra and the frequency exponent ("s" value) gives an insight about the ac conducting mechanism. The temperature dependence of electrical relaxation phenomenon in the material has been observed. The complex electric modulus analysis indicates the possibility of hopping conduction mechanism in the system with non-exponential type of conductivity relaxation.

  7. Electric field induced percolation in microemulsions: simulation of the electric conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgenfritz, G.; Runge, F.

    1992-02-01

    Structure changes can be induced by high electric fields in microemulsions which bring the system from a nonconducting state to a highly conducting state. We report conductivity and electric birefringence measurements in a microemulsion, stabilized by the nonionic surfactant Igepal CO-520 (10 wt% 0.01 M KCl/40% n-hexane, 40% c-hexane/ 10% Igepal). Based on the experimental findings we investigate two models which may be relevant for understanding the field induced percolation behavior. Computer simulations of the electric conductivity, using the random walk approach, are performed with the following heterogeneous systems: (a) statistically distributed conducting Ising chains in a nonconducting matrix, (b) nonconducting overlapping spheres in a conducting medium. Both systems are capable of modelling certain aspects of the observed percolation. The continuum percolation with overlapping spheres puts special emphasis on the Bruggeman equation of the conductivity in dispersed systems, which is found to be valid in a much wider range than might have been thought before.

  8. In Situ Generation of Photosensitive Silver Halide for Improving the Conductivity of Electrically Conductive Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaowei; Li, Qiulong; Long, Xiaoyang; Li, Taotao; Zhao, Jingxin; Zhang, Kai; E, Songfeng; Zhang, Jun; Li, Zhuo; Yao, Yagang

    2017-08-30

    Electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) can be regarded as one of the most promising materials to replace tin/lead solder. However, relatively low conductivity seriously restricts their applications. In the present study, we develop an effective method to decrease the bulk electrical resistivity of ECAs. KI or KBr is added to replace the lubricant and silver oxide layers on silver flakes and to form photosensitive silver halide. After exposure to sunlight, silver halide can photodecompose into silver nanoparticles that will sinter and form metallic bonding between/among flakes during the curing process of ECAs, which would remarkably reduce the resistivity. The modified micro silver flakes play a crucial role in decreasing the electrical resistivity of the corresponding ECAs, exhibiting the lowest resistivity of 7.6 × 10(-5) Ω·cm for 70 wt % loaded ECAs. The obtained ECAs can have wide applications in the electronics industry, where high conductance is required.

  9. Electrical Conductivity of Shock-Compressed PVDF Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, V. V.; Yakusheva, T. I.

    1997-07-01

    Time-dependent conductivity measurements on shocked PVDF films were made using flyer plate impact experiments in the range of 4.6 to 23 GPa. Two types of PVDF films were investigated. They were a 30-micron uni-axially-stretched modified PVDF film (4Plastpolymer Okhta Research and Production Association of Russia and a 25-micron bi-axially-stretched PVDF film from Solvay, Belgium. Gauge arrangements with 5-mm square active areas and patterns similar to those used by Bauer of ISL, France, were produced and mounted in Teflon for the tests. The conductivity experiments were performed using the PVDF gauges in the Lagrangian mode while subjecting their elements to an electrical field in the direction of shock propagatiuon. Observations were made for 1 to 2 microseconds after shock arrival. The onset of electrical conductivity was detected at 10 GPa for the uni-axially stretched film, whereas, this event was detected at approximately 13.5 GPa for the bi-axially-stretched film. At 23 GPa, the conductivity of the uni-axially stretched film was measured to be less than 1 ohm (-1) m(-1). It appears that chemical decomposition may well play a role in the observed electrical conductivity in PVDF films, an effect that should not be too surprising if one considers the very large temperatures induced by shock compression at such high pressures.

  10. Microbial interspecies electron transfer via electric currents through conductive minerals

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    In anaerobic biota, reducing equivalents (electrons) are transferred between different species of microbes [interspecies electron transfer (IET)], establishing the basis of cooperative behaviors and community functions. IET mechanisms described so far are based on diffusion of redox chemical species and/or direct contact in cell aggregates. Here, we show another possibility that IET also occurs via electric currents through natural conductive minerals. Our investigation revealed that electrically conductive magnetite nanoparticles facilitated IET from Geobacter sulfurreducens to Thiobacillus denitrificans, accomplishing acetate oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction. This two-species cooperative catabolism also occurred, albeit one order of magnitude slower, in the presence of Fe ions that worked as diffusive redox species. Semiconductive and insulating iron-oxide nanoparticles did not accelerate the cooperative catabolism. Our results suggest that microbes use conductive mineral particles as conduits of electrons, resulting in efficient IET and cooperative catabolism. Furthermore, such natural mineral conduits are considered to provide ecological advantages for users, because their investments in IET can be reduced. Given that conductive minerals are ubiquitously and abundantly present in nature, electric interactions between microbes and conductive minerals may contribute greatly to the coupling of biogeochemical reactions. PMID:22665802

  11. Composite yarns of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with metallic electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Randeniya, Lakshman K; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Philip J; Tran, Canh-Dung

    2010-08-16

    Unique macrostructures known as spun carbon-nanotube fibers (CNT yarns) can be manufactured from vertically aligned forests of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These yarns behave as semiconductors with room-temperature conductivities of about 5 x 10(2) S cm(-1). Their potential use as, for example, microelectrodes in medical implants, wires in microelectronics, or lightweight conductors in the aviation industry has hitherto been hampered by their insufficient electrical conductivity. In this Full Paper, the synthesis of metal-CNT composite yarns, which combine the unique properties of CNT yarns and nanocrystalline metals to obtain a new class of materials with enhanced electrical conductivity, is presented. The synthesis is achieved using a new technique, self-fuelled electrodeposition (SFED), which combines a metal reducing agent and an external circuit for transfer of electrons to the CNT surface, where the deposition of metal nanoparticles takes place. In particular, the Cu-CNT and Au-CNT composite yarns prepared by this method have metal-like electrical conductivities (2-3 x 10(5) S cm(-1)) and are mechanically robust against stringent tape tests. However, the tensile strengths of the composite yarns are 30-50% smaller than that of the unmodified CNT yarn. The SFED technique described here can also be used as a convenient means for the deposition of metal nanoparticles on solid electrode supports, such as conducting glass or carbon black, for catalytic applications.

  12. Electrical conductivity anomalies associated with circular lunar maria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Daily, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    A strong anisotropy is observed in magnetic field fluctuations measured by the Lunokhod 2 magnetometer located on the eastern edge of Mare Serenitatis. This anisotropy can be explained by a regional anomaly in the subsurface electrical conductivity distribution associated with the mare similar to the proposed conductivity anomaly associated with Mare Imbrium. The Serenitatis magnetic field anisotropy is compared to the field fluctuation measured by the Apollo 16 magnetometer 1100 km to the south, and this comparison indicates that the subsurface conductivity distribution can be modeled by a nonconducting layer in the lunar lithosphere which is 150 km thick beneath the highlands and 300 km thick beneath Serenitatis. The decrease in electrical conductivity of the upper mantle beneath the mare may result from lower temperatures due to transport of thermal energy and radioactive heat sources to the surface during mare flooding. This proposed anomaly, along with that proposed for Mare Imbrium, strengthens the possibility of regional anomalies in electrical conductivity associated with all circular lunar maria.

  13. Time resolved strain dependent morphological study of electrically conducting nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Imran; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Mateus, Artur; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.

    2015-10-01

    An efficient and reliable method is introduced to understand the network behaviour of nano-fillers in a polymeric matrix under uniaxial strain coupled with small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The nanoparticles (carbon nanotubes) are conductive and the particles form a percolating network that becomes apparent source of electrical conduction and consequently the samples behave as a bulk conductor. Polyurethane based nanocomposites containing 2% w/w multiwall carbon nanotubes are studied. The electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite was (3.28×10-5s/m).The sample was able to be extended to an extension ratio of 1.7 before fracture. A slight variation in the electrical conductivity is observed under uniaxial strain which we attribute to the disturbance of conductive pathways. Further, this work is coupled with in- situ time resolved small angle x-ray scattering measurements using a synchrotron beam line to enable its measurements to be made during the deformation cycle. We use a multiscale structure to model the small angle x-ray data. The results of the analysis are interpreted as the presence of aggregates which would also go some way towards understanding why there is no alignment of the carbon nanotubes.

  14. Observations and parameterization of the stratospheric electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hua; Holzworth, Robert H.

    1996-12-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of the stratospheric electrical conductivity, made from multiple balloon platforms during the 1992-1993 Extended Life Balloon-Borne Observatories (ELBBO) experiment, have yielded the most comprehensive data set on the stratospheric electrical conductivity. The ELBBO project involved launches of five superpressure balloons into the stratosphere from Dunedin, New Zealand, beginning November 10, 1992, and lasting through March 18, 1993. Most of the balloons floated at a constant altitude of 26 km for over 3 months, covered a wide range of latitudes from the South Pole to 28°S, and circled around the southern hemisphere several times. On average, the positive polar conductivity (conductivity of positive ions alone) was about 15% higher than that of the negative conductivity, suggesting that differences may exist between the mobilities of positive and negative ions. Data from each polarity of polar conductivity also indicate persistent, apparently organized, short-term and localized variations, with amplitude within 30% of the mean value. In corrected geomagnetic (CGM) coordinates the conductivity variations were found to be a function of latitude but not of longitude. The total conductivity can increase 150% from low latitude to high latitude, and does remain nearly constant at latitudes above 55° (namely, the cosmic ray knee latitude). Calculations based on ionization theory demonstrate that the latitudinal variations in the conductivity measurements were mainly due to the latitudinal variations in incident galactic cosmic ray intensity, with only little effect from the air temperature variations. The calculations shown here also suggest that small ions (as opposed to large ions) provide the main contribution to the stratospheric conductivity. The comparisons between conductivity measurements and models show that commonly used models can underestimate the latitudinal variation by a factor of 2. In this paper the stratospheric

  15. Consequences of electrical conductivity in an orb spider's capture web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Fritz; Edmonds, Donald

    2013-12-01

    The glue-coated and wet capture spiral of the orb web of the garden cross spider Araneus diadematus is suspended between the dry silk radial and web frame threads. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the capture spiral is electrically conductive because of necks of liquid connecting the droplets even if the thread is stretched. We examine how this conductivity of the capture spiral may lead to entrapment of charged airborne particles such as pollen, spray droplets and even insects. We further describe and model how the conducting spiral will also locally distort the Earth's ambient electric field. Finally, we examine the hypothesis that such distortion could be used by potential prey to detect the presence of a web but conclude that any effect would probably be too small to allow an insect to take evasive action.

  16. Contactless electrical conductivity measurement of electromagnetically levitated metallic melts

    SciTech Connect

    Richardsen, T.; Lohoefer, G.

    1999-07-01

    The electrical conductivity {sigma} of metallic liquids is of obvious importance to many liquid metal processing operations, because it controls the melt flow under the influence of electromagnetic fields, e.g. during casting processes, or in crystal growth furnaces. A facility for noninvasive measurements of the electrical conductivity of liquid metals above and below the melting temperature is presented. It combines the containerless positioning method of electromagnetic levitation with the contactless technique of inductive conductivity measurement. Contrary to the conventional measurement method, the sample is freely suspended within the measuring field and, thus, has no exactly predefined shape. This made a new theoretical basis necessary with implications on the measurement and levitation fields. Furthermore, the problem of the mutual inductive interactions between the levitation and the measuring coils had to be solved.

  17. Computer simulation of electrical conductivity of colloidal dispersions during aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lebovka, N I; Tarafdar, S; Vygornitskii, N V

    2006-03-01

    The computation approach to the simulation of electrical conductivity of colloidal dispersions during aggregation is considered. We use the two-dimensional diffusion-limited aggregation model with multiple-seed growth. The particles execute a random walk, but lose their mobility after contact with the growing clusters or seeds. The two parameters that control the aggregation are the initial concentration of free particles in the system p and the concentration of seeds psi. The case of psi=1, when all the particles are the immobile seeds, corresponds with the usual random percolation problem. The other limiting case of psi=0, when all the particles walk randomly, corresponds to the dynamical percolation problem. The calculation of electrical conductivity and cluster analysis were done with the help of the algorithms of Frank-Lobb and Hoshen-Kopelman. It is shown that the percolation concentration phi c decreases from 0.5927 at psi=1 to 0 at psi --> 0. Scaling analysis was applied to study exponents of correlation length v and of conductivity t. For all psi>0 this model shows universal behavior of classical 2d random percolation with v approximately t approximately 4/3. The electrical conductivity sigma of the system increases during aggregation reaching up to a maximum at the final stage. The concentration dependence of conductivity sigma(phi) obeys the general effective medium equation with apparent exponent ta(psi) that exceeds t. The kinetics of electrical conductivity changes during the aggregation is discussed. In the range of concentration Pc(phi)

  18. Optimization and Testing of Electrically Conductive Spacecraft Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report discussing work done for the Space Environmental Effects (SEE) program in the Materials and Processes Laboratory, on electrically conductive thermal control coatings. These thermal control coatings are being developed to have several orders of magnitude lower electrical resistivity than most available thermal control coatings. Extensive research has taken place over the last few years to develop a variety of spacecraft coatings with the unique property of being able to conduct surface charge to a substrate or grounding system. The ability to conduct surface charge to a safe point, while maintaining optical properties and performance, is highly advantageous in maintaining operational space based systems. Without this mechanism the surface of a spacecraft can accumulate charge to the point that a catastrophic electrical breakdown can occur, resulting in damage to or failure of the spacecraft. Ultimately, use of this type of coating will help mitigate many of the concerns that NASA and the space industry still have for their space based systems. The unique coatings studied here fall into two specific categories: 1) broadband absorber and 2) selective absorber. These coatings have controllable solar absorptance and electrical surface resistivity values over the designated ranges. These coatings were developed under an SBIR program which focused on the development of such constituents and coatings. This project focused on simulated space environmental effects testing with the intent of using this data to help optimize the stability and initial properties of these coatings.

  19. Leaching of Conductive Species: Implications to Measurements of Electrical Resistivity.

    PubMed

    Spragg, R; Jones, S; Bu, Y; Lu, Y; Bentz, D; Snyder, K; Weiss, J

    2017-05-01

    Electrical tests have been used to characterize the microstructure of porous materials, the measured electrical response being determined by the contribution of the microstructure (porosity and tortuosity) and the electrical properties of the solution (conductivity of the pore solution) inside the pores of the material. This study has shown how differences in concentration between the pore solution (i.e., the solution in the pores) and the storage solution surrounding the test specimen leads to significant transport (leaching) of the conductive ionic species between the pore solution and the storage solution. Leaching influences the resistivity of the pore solution, thereby influencing electrical measurements on the bulk material from either a surface or uniaxial bulk resistance test. This paper has three main conclusions: 1.) Leaching of conductive species does occur with concentration gradients and that a diffusion based approach can be used to estimate the time scale associated with this change. 2.) Leaching of ions in the pore solution can influence resistivity measurements, and the ratio of surface to uniaxial resistivity can be used as a method to assess the presence of leaching and 3.) An estimation of the magnitude of leaching for standardized tests of cementitious materials.

  20. Study of Electrical Conduction Mechanism of Organic Double-Layer Diode Using Electric Field Induced Optical Second Harmonic Generation Measurement.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Shohei; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-04-01

    By using electric field induced optical second harmonic generation (EFISHG) and current voltage (I-V) measurements, we studied the electrical transport mechanism of organic double-layer diodes with a structure of Au/N, N'-di-[(1-naphthyl)-N, N'-diphenyl]-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (a-NPD)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/indium zinc oxide (IZO). Here the α-NPD is a carrier transport layer and the PMMA is an electrical insulating layer. The current level was very low, but the I-V characteristics showed a rectifying behavior. The EFISHG measurement selectively and directly probed the electric field across the α-NPD layer, and showed that the electric field across the a-NPD layer is completely relaxed owing to the charge accumulation at the a-NPD/PMMA interface in the region V > 0, whereas the carrier accumulation was not significant in the region V < 0. On the basis of these experimental results, we proposed a model of the rectification. Further, by coupling the I-V characteristics with the EFISHG measurement, the I-V characteristics of the diodes were well converted into the current-electric field (I-E) characteristics of the α-NPD layer and the PMMA layer. The I-E characteristics suggested the Schottky-type conduction governs the carrier transport. We conclude that the I-V measurement coupled with the EFISHG measurement is very useful to study carrier transport mechanism of the organic double-layer diodes.

  1. Conductivity and Dielectric Relaxation Properties of Annealed Cr-Substituted Ni-Ferrite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghazzawy, E. H.

    2017-10-01

    Nanocrystalline NiCr x Fe2- x O4 spinel samples with x = 0.1 and 0.2 have been synthesized by coprecipitation method and annealed at 620°C and 1175°C for 4 h. Their electrical properties were investigated as functions of frequency in the range of 100 Hz to 100 kHz and temperature in the range of 308 K to 358 K. The dielectric constant ( ɛ^' } ) and dielectric loss factor ( {tan} δ ) appeared to decrease with increasing frequency, while the alternating-current (AC) conductivity ( σ^' } ) increased. These dielectric parameters increased with increasing temperature. On the other hand, impedance spectroscopy gave Cole-Cole plots with only one semicircular arc for all the samples, indicating that the grain-boundary contribution was dominant in the conduction mechanism.

  2. Durable Microstructured Surfaces: Combining Electrical Conductivity with Superoleophobicity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zihe; Wang, Tianchang; Sun, Shaofan; Zhao, Boxin

    2016-01-27

    In this study, electrically conductive and superoleophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has been fabricated through embedding Ag flakes (SFs) and Ag nanowires (SNWs) into microstructures of the trichloroperfluorooctylsilane (FDTS)-blended PDMS elastomer. Microstructured PDMS surfaces became conductive at the percolation surface coverage of 3.0 × 10(-2) mg/mm(2) for SFs; the highest conductivity was 1.12 × 10(5) S/m at the SFs surface coverage of 6.0 × 10(-2) mg/mm(2). A significant improvement of the conductivity (increased 3 times at the SNWs fraction of 11%) was achieved by using SNWs to replace some SFs because of the conductive pathways from the formed SNWs networks and its connections with SFs. These conductive fillers bonded strongly with microstructured FDTS-blended PDMS and retained surface properties under the sliding preload of 8.0 N. Stretching tests indicated that the resistance increased with the increasing strains and returned to its original state when the strain was released, showing highly stretchable and reversible electrical properties. Compared with SFs embedded surfaces, the resistances of SFs/SNWs embedded surfaces were less dependent on the strain because of bridging effect of SNWs. The superoleophobicity was achieved by the synergetic effect of surface modification through blending FDTS and the microstructures transferred from sand papers. The research findings demonstrate a simple approach to make the insulating elastomer to have the desired surface oleophobicity and electrical conductivity and help meet the needs for the development of conductive devices with microstructures and multifunctional properties.

  3. Method for electrically isolating an electrically conductive member from another such member

    DOEpatents

    Tsang, K.L.; Chen, Y.

    1984-02-09

    The invention relates to methods for electrically isolating a first electrically conductive member from another such member by means of an electrically insulating medium. In accordance with the invention, the insulating medium is provided in the form of MgO which contains a dopant selected from lithium, copper, cobalt, sodium, silver, gold and hydrogen. The dopant is present in the MgO in an amount effective to suppress dielectric breakdown of the MgO, even at elevated temperatures and in the presence of electrical fields.

  4. Noninvasive electrical conductivity measurement by MRI: a test of its validity and the electrical conductivity characteristics of glioma.

    PubMed

    Tha, Khin Khin; Katscher, Ulrich; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Stehning, Christian; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Fujima, Noriyuki; Kudo, Kohsuke; Kazumata, Ken; Yamamoto, Toru; Van Cauteren, Marc; Shirato, Hiroki

    2017-07-11

    This study noninvasively examined the electrical conductivity (σ) characteristics of diffuse gliomas using MRI and tested its validity. MRI including a 3D steady-state free precession (3D SSFP) sequence was performed on 30 glioma patients. The σ maps were reconstructed from the phase images of the 3D SSFP sequence. The σ histogram metrics were extracted and compared among the contrast-enhanced (CET) and noncontrast-enhanced tumour components (NCET) and normal brain parenchyma (NP). Difference in tumour σ histogram metrics among tumour grades and correlation of σ metrics with tumour grades were tested. Validity of σ measurement using this technique was tested by correlating the mean tumour σ values measured using MRI with those measured ex vivo using a dielectric probe. Several σ histogram metrics of CET and NCET of diffuse gliomas were significantly higher than NP (Bonferroni-corrected p ≤ .045). The maximum σ of NCET showed a moderate positive correlation with tumour grade (r = .571, Bonferroni-corrected p = .018). The mean tumour σ measured using MRI showed a moderate positive correlation with the σ measured ex vivo (r = .518, p = .040). Tissue σ can be evaluated using MRI, incorporation of which may better characterise diffuse gliomas. • This study tested the validity of noninvasive electrical conductivity measurements by MRI. • This study also evaluated the electrical conductivity characteristics of diffuse glioma. • Gliomas have higher electrical conductivity values than the normal brain parenchyma. • Noninvasive electrical conductivity measurement can be helpful for better characterisation of glioma.

  5. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe for Phoenix Mars Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander will assess how heat and electricity move through Martian soil from one spike or needle to another of a four-spike electronic fork that will be pushed into the soil at different stages of digging by the lander's Robotic Arm.

    The four-spike tool, called the thermal and electrical conductivity probe, is in the middle-right of this photo, mounted near the end of the arm near the lander's scoop (upper left).

    In one type of experiment with this tool, a pulse of heat will be put into one spike, and the rate at which the temperature rises on the nearby spike will be recorded, along with the rate at which the heated spike cools. A little bit of ice can make a big difference in how well soil conducts heat. Similarly, soil's electrical conductivity -- also tested with this tool -- is a sensitive

    indicator of moisture in the soil. This device adapts technology used in soil-moisture gauges for irrigation-control systems. The conductivity probe has an additional role besides soil analysis. It will serve as a hunidity sensor when held in the air.

  6. Magneto-acousto-electrical measurement based electrical conductivity reconstruction for tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Ma, Qingyu; Guo, Gepu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2017-08-17

    Based on the interaction of ultrasonic excitation and magneto-electrical induction, magneto-acousto-electrical (MAE) technology was demonstrated to have the capability of differentiating conductivity variations along the acoustic transmission. By applying the characteristics of the MAE voltage, a simplified algorithm of MAE measurement based conductivity reconstruction was developed. With the analyses of acoustic vibration, ultrasound propagation, Hall Effect and magneto-electrical induction, theoretical and experimental studies of MAE measurement and conductivity reconstruction were performed. The formula of MAE voltage was derived and simplified for the transducer with strong directivity. MAE voltage was simulated for a 3-layer gel phantom and the conductivity distribution was reconstructed using the modified Wiener inverse filter and Hilbert transform, which was also verified by experimental measurements. The experimental results are basically consistent with the simulations, and demonstrate that the wave packets of MAE voltage are generated at tissue interfaces with the amplitudes and vibration polarities representing the values and directions of conductivity variations. With the proposed algorithm, the amplitude and polarity of conductivity gradient can be restored and the conductivity distribution can also be reconstructed accurately. The favorable results demonstrate the feasibility of accurate conductivity reconstruction with improved spatial resolution using MAE measurement for tissues with conductivity variations, especially suitable for non-dispersive tissues with abrupt conductivity changes. This study demonstrates that the MAE measurement based conductivity reconstruction algorithm can be applied as a new strategy for non-destructive real-time monitoring of conductivity variations in biomedical engineering.

  7. Effect of lattice relaxation on thermal conductivity of fcc-based structures: an efficient procedure of molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Min Young; Choi, Garam; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Hyo Seok; Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Won Bo

    2017-07-01

    This work studied the computational details of the Green-Kubo method with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for thermal conductivity prediction. In MD thermal conductivity calculation, little consensus has been made about the inclusion of zero-pressure volume relaxation in the isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble, which determines the simulation lattice parameters. Simulations of fcc-based structures with different lattice parameters were performed to calculate lattice thermal conductivities and phonon density of states, and the results were compared to experimental reports and ab initio results to conclude that NpT volume relaxation is crucial for accurate prediction of thermal conductivity. In addition, the relation between thermal conductivity and interatomic potential cutoff distance was also analysed in the context of lattice relaxation. The results suggested that calculated thermal conductivity is strictly dependent on the lattice parameter and essentially independent of the cutoff distance. It was also shown that reducing the cutoff distance can greatly accelerate the thermal conductivity calculation, even without sacrificing the accuracy of thermal conductivity.

  8. Synthesis of Conductive Nanofillers/Nanofibers and Electrical Properties of their Conductive Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvi, Ali

    Thanks to their corrosion resistance, light weight, low cost, and ease of processing, electrically conducting polymer composites (CPCs) have received significant attention for the replacement of metals and inorganic materials for sensors, actuators, supercapacitors, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shields. In this PhD thesis, high aspect ratio conductive nanofillers namely copper nanowires (CuNWs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were coated with polyaniline (PANi) using solution mixing and in-situ polymerization method, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a smooth polyaniline nano-coating between 5--18 nm in thickness on the nanofillers' surface. The coating thickness and; consequently, electrical conductivity was controlled and tuned by polyaniline/aniline concentration in solution. Composites with tunable conductivity may be used as chemisensors, electronic pressure sensors and switches. Coated nanofillers demonstrated better dispersion in polystyrene (PS) and provided lower electrical percolation threshold. Dispersion of nanofillers in PS was investigated using rheological measurements and confirmed with electron micrographs and nano-scale images of CPCs. Polyaniline (PANi), when used as a coating layer, was able to attenuate electromagnetic (EM) waves via absorption and store electrical charges though pseudocapacitance mechanism. The dielectric measurements of MWCNT-PANi/PS composites showed one order of magnitude increase in real electrical permittivity compared to that of MWCNT/PS composites making them suitable for charge storage purposes. Incorporation of PANi also brought a new insight into conductive network formation mechanism in electrospun mats where the orientation of conductive high aspect ratio nanofillers is a major problem. Conductive nanofibers of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) filled with coated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were fabricated using electrospinning. These highly oriented PVDF

  9. Conductivity and electrical studies of plasticized carboxymethyl cellulose based proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, M. I. N.; Noor, N. A. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolytes (SBE) comprises of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as polymer host, ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) as doping salt and ethylene carbonate (EC) as plasticizer has been prepared via solution casting technique. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was carried out to study the conductivity and electrical properties of plasticized CMC-NH4SCN SBE system over a wide range of frequency between 50 Hz and 1 MHz at temperature range of 303 to 353 K. Upon addition of plasticizer into CMC-NH4SCN SBE system, the conductivity increased from 10-5 to 10-2 Scm-1. The highest conductivity was obtained by the electrolyte containing 10 wt.% of EC. The conductivity of plasticized CMC-NH4SCN SBE system by various temperatures obeyed Arrhenius law where the ionic conductivity increased as the temperature increased. The activation energy, Ea was found to decrease with enhancement of EC concentration. Dielectric studies for the highest conductivity electrolyte obeyed non-Debye behavior. The conduction mechanism for the highest conductivity electrolyte was determined by employing Jonsher's universal power law and thus, can be represented by the quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) model.

  10. Electrically conductive chitosan/carbon scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana M; Eng, George; Caridade, Sofia G; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-02-10

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells.

  11. Electrically Conductive Chitosan/Carbon Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  12. Electrically Conductive Thick Film Made from Silver Alkylcarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianguo; Li, Xiangyou; Wang, Xiaoye; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2010-10-01

    A homogeneous electrically conductive silver paste without solid or particle phase was developed using silver alkylcarbamates [(C n H2 n-1NHCOO)2Ag, n ≤ 4] as the precursor of the functional phase. The silver alkylcarbamates were light insensitive and had a low decomposition temperature (below 200°C). The paste was a non-Newtonian fluid with viscosity significantly depending on the content of the thickening agent ethyl cellulose. Array patterns with a resolution of 20 μm were obtained using this paste by a micropen direct-writing method. After the paste with about 48 wt.% silver methylcarbamate [(CH3NHCOO)2Ag] precursor was sintered at 180°C for 15 min, an electrically conductive network consisting of more than 95 wt.% silver was formed, and was found to have a volume electrical resistivity on the order of 10-5 Ω cm and a sheet electrical resistivity on the order of 10-2-10-3 Ω/□. The cohesion strength within the sintered paste and the adhesion strength between the sintered paste layer and the alumina ceramic substrate were tested according to test method B of the American Society for Testing and Materials standard D3359-08. None of the sintered paste layer was detached under the test conditions, and the cohesion and adhesion strengths met the highest grade according to the standard.

  13. The deep lunar electrical conductivity profile - Structural and thermal inferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Herbert, F.; Sonett, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    Simultaneous lunar surface and orbital magnetometer records are reexamined, to ascertain intervals which may be suitable for measuring lunar inductive response in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosheath. Power spectral estimates of the response tangent to the lunar surface, defined in terms of transfer and gain functions, are obtained for the 0.0001-0.01 Hz frequency range. The maximum consistency of estimates from different time intervals is found when the initial analysis is limited to the tangential direction of maximum incident power, or that direction in which the ratio of signal to background noise is greatest. Spherically symmetric plasma confinement theory is used in the interpretation of transfer function data, by way of forward model calculations, under the assumption of continuous electrical conductivity increase with depth. Results are presented for internal electrical conductivity profile, metallic core radius, and selenotherm limits.

  14. Graphene oxide with improved electrical conductivity for supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. J.; Yang, B. C.; Zhang, S. R.; Zhao, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    Predominant few-layer graphene (FLG) sheets of high electrical conductivity have been synthesized by a multi-step intercalation and reduction method. The electrical conductivity of the as-synthesized FLG is measured to be ∼3.2 × 104 S m-1, comparable to that of pristine graphite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman analysis reveal that the as-synthesized FLG sheets have large areas with single and double layers. The specific capacitance of 180 F g-1 is obtained for the FLG in a 1 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte by integrating the cyclic voltammogram. The good capacitive behavior of the FLG is very promising for the application for next-generation high-performance electrochemical supercapacitors.

  15. Thermal conductivity, viscosity, and electrical conductivity of iron oxide with a cloud fractal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilpanah, Pouya; Pahlavanzadeh, Hassan; Kheradmand, Amanj

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, nanoscale iron oxide was synthesized using a hydrothermal method; XRD analysis revealed that all the produced crystals are iron oxide. FESEM microscopic imaging showed that particles are on the scale of nano and their morphology is cloud fractal. To study the laboratory properties of thermal conductivity, viscosity, and electrical conductivity of the nanoparticles, they were dispersed in ethylene glycol-based fluid and the nanofluid was in a two-step synthesis during this process. The experiments were carried out with a weight fraction between 0 and 2 % at temperatures between 25 and 45 °C. According to the results of the experiments, increasing the density of nanoparticles in the fluid increases thermal conductivity, as it was predicted in all theoretical models. On the other hand, nano viscosity increases as the weight fraction increases while it decreases as temperature goes up. Electrical conductivity also increases with raising the temperature and weight fraction. Theoretical models were studied to predict Thermal conductivity, viscosity, and electrical conductivity of the nanofluid.

  16. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for measuring electrical conductivity during electroporation.

    PubMed

    Kranjc, M; Bajd, F; Serša, I; Miklavčič, D

    2014-06-01

    The electroporation effect on tissue can be assessed by measurement of electrical properties of the tissue undergoing electroporation. The most prominent techniques for measuring electrical properties of electroporated tissues have been voltage-current measurement of applied pulses and electrical impedance tomography (EIT). However, the electrical conductivity of tissue assessed by means of voltage-current measurement was lacking in information on tissue heterogeneity, while EIT requires numerous additional electrodes and produces results with low spatial resolution and high noise. Magnetic resonance EIT (MREIT) is similar to EIT, as it is also used for reconstruction of conductivity images, though voltage and current measurements are not limited to the boundaries in MREIT, hence it yields conductivity images with better spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to investigate and demonstrate the feasibility of the MREIT technique for assessment of conductivity images of tissues undergoing electroporation. Two objects were investigated: agar phantoms and ex vivo liver tissue. As expected, no significant change of electrical conductivity was detected in agar phantoms exposed to pulses of all used amplitudes, while a considerable increase of conductivity was measured in liver tissue exposed to pulses of different amplitudes.

  17. Low-density lipoprotein density determination by electric conductivity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Higuero, José A; Salvador, Ana M; Arrondo, José L R; Milicua, José Carlos G

    2011-10-15

    The predominance of small dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. A simple but precise method has been developed, based on electrical conductivity of an isopycnic gradient of KBr, to obtain density values of human LDL fraction. The results obtained can distinguish LDL density populations and their subfractions from different patients. These data were corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) (structure) and light-scattering analyses (size).

  18. Using scalp electrical biosignals to control an object by concentration and relaxation tasks: design and evaluation.

    PubMed

    George, Laurent; Lotte, Fabien; Abad, Raquel Viciana; Lécuyer, Anatole

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore the use of electrical biosignals measured on scalp and corresponding to mental relaxation and concentration tasks in order to control an object in a video game. To evaluate the requirements of such a system in terms of sensors and signal processing we compare two designs. The first one uses only one scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) electrode and the power in the alpha frequency band. The second one uses sixteen scalp EEG electrodes and machine-learning methods. The role of muscular activity is also evaluated using five electrodes positioned on the face and the neck. Results show that the first design enabled 70% of the participants to successfully control the game, whereas 100% of the participants managed to do it with the second design based on machine learning. Subjective questionnaires confirm these results: users globally felt to have control in both designs, with an increased feeling of control in the second one. Offline analysis of face and neck muscle activity shows that this activity could also be used to distinguish between relaxation and concentration tasks. Results suggest that the combination of muscular and brain activity could improve performance of this kind of system. They also suggest that muscular activity has probably been recorded by EEG electrodes.

  19. Alternative methods for determining the electrical conductivity of core samples.

    PubMed

    Lytle, R J; Duba, A G; Willows, J L

    1979-05-01

    Electrode configurations are described that can be used in measuring the electrical conductivity of a core sample and that do not require access to the core end faces. The use of these configurations eliminates the need for machining the core ends for placement of end electrodes. This is because the conductivity in the cases described is relatively insensitive to the length of the sample. We validated the measurement technique by comparing mathematical models with actual measurements that were made perpendicular and paralled to the core axis of granite samples.

  20. On the electrical conductivity of Ti-implanted alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Cattani, M.; Nikolaev, A.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Park, H.-K.; Phillips, L.; Yu, K. M.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-03-15

    Ion implantation of metal species into insulators provides a tool for the formation of thin, electrically conducting, surface layers with experimenter-controlled resistivity. High energy implantation of Pt and Ti into alumina accelerator components has been successfully employed to control high voltage surface breakdown in a number of cases. In the work described here we have carried out some basic investigations related to the origin of this phenomenon. By comparison of the results of alumina implanted with Ti at 75 keV with the results of prior investigations of polymers implanted with Pt at 49 eV and Au at 67 eV, we describe a physical model of the effect based on percolation theory and estimate the percolation parameters for the Ti-alumina composite. We estimate that the percolation dose threshold is about 4 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} and the maximum dose for which the system remains an insulator-conductor composite is about 10 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The saturation electrical conductivity is estimated to be about 50 S/m. We conclude that the observed electrical conductivity properties of Ti-implanted alumina can be satisfactorily described by percolation theory.

  1. The Thermal Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for Phoenix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Cobos, Doug R.; Campbell, Gaylon S.; Campbell, Colin S.; Cardell, Greg; Foote, Marc C.; Wood, Stephen E.; Mehta, Manish

    2009-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) is a component of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) payload on the Phoenix Lander. TECP will measure the temperature, thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of the regolith. It will also detect and quantify the population of mobile H2O molecules in the regolith, if any, throughout the polar summer, by measuring the electrical conductivity of the regolith, as well as the dielectric permittivity. In the vapor phase, TECP is capable of measuring the atmospheric H2O vapor abundance, as well as augment the wind velocity measurements from the meteorology instrumentation. TECP is mounted near the end of the 2.3 m Robotic Arm, and can be placed either in the regolith material or held aloft in the atmosphere. This paper describes the development and calibration of the TECP. In addition, substantial characterization of the instrument has been conducted to identify behavioral characteristics that might affect landed surface operations. The greatest potential issue identified in characterization tests is the extraordinary sensitivity of the TECP to placement. Small gaps alter the contact between the TECP and regolith, complicating data interpretation. Testing with the Phoenix Robotic Arm identified mitigation techniques that will be implemented during flight. A flight model of the instrument was also field tested in the Antarctic Dry Valleys during the 2007-2008 International Polar year. 2

  2. The electrical conductivity of silicate liquids at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipioni, R.; Stixrude, L. P.

    2015-12-01

    Could the Earth have had a silicate dynamo early in its history? One requirement is that the electrical conductivity of silicate liquids be sufficiently high. However, very little is known about this property at the extreme conditions of pressure and temperature that prevailed in the magma ocean. We have computed from first principles molecular dynamics simulations the dc conductivity of liquid Silica SiO2 at pressure and temperature conditions spanning those of the magma ocean and super-Earth interiors. We find semi-metallic values of the conductivity at conditions typical of the putative basal magma ocean in the Early Earth. The variation of the conductivity with pressure and temperature displays interesting behavior that we rationalize on the basis of the closing the pseudo-gap at the Fermi level. For temperatures lower than T < 20,000 K electrical conductivity exhibits a maximum at intermediate compressions. We further explain this behavior in terms of stuctural changes that occur in silica liquid at high pressure; we find that the structure approaches that of the iso-electronic rare earth element Ne. We compare with Hugoniot data, including the equation of state, heat capacity, and reflectivity. The behavior of the heat capacity is different to that inferred from multiple Hugoniot experiments. These differences and the effect of including exact exchange on the calculations are discussed. Our results have important consequences for magnetic field generation in the early Earth and super-Earths.

  3. Conductive network formation of carbon nanotubes in elastic polymer microfibers and its effect on the electrical conductance: Experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Jeongmin; Kim, Un Jeong; Im, Kyuhyun; Park, Jong-Jin; Sung, Bong June

    2016-05-21

    We investigate how the electrical conductance of microfibers (made of polymers and conductive nanofillers) decreases upon uniaxial deformation by performing both experiments and simulations. Even though various elastic conductors have been developed due to promising applications for deformable electronic devices, the mechanism at a molecular level for electrical conductance change has remained elusive. Previous studies proposed that the decrease in electrical conductance would result from changes in either distances or contact numbers between conductive fillers. In this work, we prepare microfibers of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)/polyvinyl alcohol composites and investigate the electrical conductance and the orientation of SWCNTs upon uniaxial deformation. We also perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations, which reproduce experimental results for the relative decrease in conductance and the SWCNTs orientation. We investigate the electrical networks of SWCNTs in microfibers and find that the decrease in the electrical conductance upon uniaxial deformation should be attributed to a subtle change in the topological structure of the electrical network.

  4. Rearrangement of 1D conducting nanomaterials towards highly electrically conducting nanocomposite fibres for electronic textiles.

    PubMed

    Han, Joong Tark; Choi, Sua; Jang, Jeong In; Seol, Seung Kwon; Woo, Jong Seok; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-03-20

    Nanocarbon-based conducting fibres have been produced using solution- or dry-spinning techniques. Highly conductive polymer-composite fibres containing large amounts of conducting nanomaterials have not been produced without dispersants, however, because of the severe aggregation of conducting materials in high-concentration colloidal solutions. Here we show that highly conductive (electrical conductivity ~1.5 × 10(5) S m(-1)) polymer-composite fibres containing carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires can be fabricated via a conventional solution-spinning process without any other treatment. Spinning dopes were fabricated by a simple mixing of a polyvinyl alcohol solution in dimethylsulfoxide with a paste of long multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in organic solvents, assisted by quadruple hydrogen-bonding networks and an aqueous silver nanowire dispersion. The high electrical conductivity of the fibre was achieved by rearrangement of silver nanowires towards the fibre skin during coagulation because of the selective favourable interaction between the silver nanowires and coagulation solvents. The prepared conducting fibres provide applications in electronic textiles such as a textile interconnector of light emitting diodes, flexible textile heaters, and touch gloves for capacitive touch sensors.

  5. Rearrangement of 1D Conducting Nanomaterials towards Highly Electrically Conducting Nanocomposite Fibres for Electronic Textiles

    PubMed Central

    Han, Joong Tark; Choi, Sua; Jang, Jeong In; Seol, Seung Kwon; Woo, Jong Seok; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Nanocarbon-based conducting fibres have been produced using solution- or dry-spinning techniques. Highly conductive polymer-composite fibres containing large amounts of conducting nanomaterials have not been produced without dispersants, however, because of the severe aggregation of conducting materials in high-concentration colloidal solutions. Here we show that highly conductive (electrical conductivity ~1.5 × 105 S m−1) polymer-composite fibres containing carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires can be fabricated via a conventional solution-spinning process without any other treatment. Spinning dopes were fabricated by a simple mixing of a polyvinyl alcohol solution in dimethylsulfoxide with a paste of long multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in organic solvents, assisted by quadruple hydrogen-bonding networks and an aqueous silver nanowire dispersion. The high electrical conductivity of the fibre was achieved by rearrangement of silver nanowires towards the fibre skin during coagulation because of the selective favourable interaction between the silver nanowires and coagulation solvents. The prepared conducting fibres provide applications in electronic textiles such as a textile interconnector of light emitting diodes, flexible textile heaters, and touch gloves for capacitive touch sensors. PMID:25792333

  6. Rearrangement of 1D Conducting Nanomaterials towards Highly Electrically Conducting Nanocomposite Fibres for Electronic Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Joong Tark; Choi, Sua; Jang, Jeong In; Seol, Seung Kwon; Woo, Jong Seok; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-03-01

    Nanocarbon-based conducting fibres have been produced using solution- or dry-spinning techniques. Highly conductive polymer-composite fibres containing large amounts of conducting nanomaterials have not been produced without dispersants, however, because of the severe aggregation of conducting materials in high-concentration colloidal solutions. Here we show that highly conductive (electrical conductivity ~1.5 × 105 S m-1) polymer-composite fibres containing carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires can be fabricated via a conventional solution-spinning process without any other treatment. Spinning dopes were fabricated by a simple mixing of a polyvinyl alcohol solution in dimethylsulfoxide with a paste of long multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in organic solvents, assisted by quadruple hydrogen-bonding networks and an aqueous silver nanowire dispersion. The high electrical conductivity of the fibre was achieved by rearrangement of silver nanowires towards the fibre skin during coagulation because of the selective favourable interaction between the silver nanowires and coagulation solvents. The prepared conducting fibres provide applications in electronic textiles such as a textile interconnector of light emitting diodes, flexible textile heaters, and touch gloves for capacitive touch sensors.

  7. Comparison of electrical conductivity calculation methods for natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2012-01-01

    The capability of eleven methods to calculate the electrical conductivity of a wide range of natural waters from their chemical composition was investigated. A brief summary of each method is presented including equations to calculate the conductivities of individual ions, the ions incorporated, and the method's limitations. The ability of each method to reliably predict the conductivity depends on the ions included, effective accounting of ion pairing, and the accuracy of the equation used to estimate the ionic conductivities. The performances of the methods were evaluated by calculating the conductivity of 33 environmentally important electrolyte solutions, 41 U.S. Geological Survey standard reference water samples, and 1593 natural water samples. The natural waters tested include acid mine waters, geothermal waters, seawater, dilute mountain waters, and river water impacted by municipal waste water. The three most recent conductivity methods predict the conductivity of natural waters better than other methods. Two of the recent methods can be used to reliably calculate the conductivity for samples with pH values greater than about 3 and temperatures between 0 and 40°C. One method is applicable to a variety of natural water types with a range of pH from 1 to 10, temperature from 0 to 95°C, and ionic strength up to 1 m.

  8. Analysis of electrical conduction mechanism in the high temperature range of the nanostructured photoabsorber Cu2SnS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahlali, S.; Essaleh, L.; Belaqziz, M.; Chehouani, H.; Djessas, K.; Viallet, B.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamic electrical conduction in the bulk ternary semiconductor compound Cu2SnS3 is studied for the first time in the high temperature range from 300 °C to 440 °C in the frequency range 1 kHz-1 MHz. New activation energy for conduction mechanism is obtained and its frequency dependence is analyzed. The Cole-Cole representation is almost half circular indicating a single contribution to total electrical conduction through the material. The activation energy for the mean relaxation process, obtained separately from the analysis of imaginary part Z″ of complex impedance Z* and from the equivalent electric circuit, is estimated to be (942 ± 74) meV . The correlated barrier hopping model is considered to analyze the experimental data. The results are compared with those obtained previously in low temperature range.

  9. Nuclear spin lattice relaxation and conductivity studies of the non-Arrhenius conductivity behavior in lithium fast ion conducting sulfide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Benjamin Michael

    Homogeneous xB2O3 + (1-x)B 2S3 glasses were prepared between 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.80. Raman, IR, and 11B NMR spectroscopies show that the boron oxide structures of B2O3, especially the six-membered rings, quickly diminish with increasing sulfide content, whereas the corresponding sulfide structures in B2S3 remain relatively intense as oxide content is increased. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and density measurements show that physical properties of these boron oxysulfide glasses heavily favor the B2S3 properties regardless of the amount of B2O3 added to the system. It is hypothesized that the stability of the thioboroxol ring group relative to that of the BS 3/2 trigonal group is a possible source of this behavior. The formation of mixed boron oxysulfide structures of composition BSzO3-z where 0 < z < 3 is proposed. Structural studies of the ternary xLi2S + (1-x)[0.5 B2S3 + 0.5 GeS2] glasses using IR, Raman, and 11B NMR show that these glasses do not have equal sharing of the lithium atoms between GeS2 and B2S3. The IR spectra indicates that the B2S3 glass network are under-doped in comparison to corresponding compositions in the xLi 2S + (1-x)B2S3 binary system. Additionally, the Raman spectra show that the GeS2 glass network is over-modified. 11Boron static NMR gives evidence that ˜80% of the boron atoms are in tetrahedral coordinated. A super macro tetrahedron is proposed as one of the structures in these glasses in which some of them may contain boron sites substituted by germanium atoms at lower Li2S content. Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation and ionic conductivity measurements of Li doped Li2S + GeS2 + B2S3 glasses were performed to investigate the ion hopping dynamics and the non-Arrhenius conductivity behavior that has been observed in some fast ion conducting glasses. A distribution of activation energies model was used to fit the NSLR results and conductivity results. Comparisons are made to previously studied binary lithium thio-germanate and binary

  10. Electrical Conductivity and Chemical Diffusion Coefficient of Strontium-Doped Lanthanum Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Isamu; Hishinuma, Masakazu

    1996-05-01

    Electrical conductivity and chemical diffusion coefficient of Sr-doped lanthanum manganites, La 1- xSr xMnO 3±δ( x= 0.05 - 0.20), were measured by the dc four-probe technique and relaxation type experiments where a sudden change of oxygen chemical potential was imposed on the pre-equilibrated sample and the change of electrical conductivity was followed as a function of elapsed time. A defect model is proposed to elucidate the oxygen partial pressure dependence of the measured conductivity and the reported oxygen nonstoichiometry. The transient conductivity behavior after an abrupt change of oxygen partial pressure was successfully described by a diffusion model with consideration of partial control by surface reaction. The determined chemical diffusion coefficients, of the order of 10 -5to 10 -4cm 2s -1at 1000°C, increased with decreased oxygen partial pressure due to the thermodynamic enhancement effect. Using the enhancement factor estimated by combination of the proposed defect model and the ambipolar diffusion theory, the oxygen vacancy diffusion coefficients were derived. High vacancy diffusivity comparable to that of Fe- or Co-based perovskites predicts fast oxide ion diffusion under conditions where the manganites show oxygen deficient type non-stoichiometry.

  11. Electrically conductive biodegradable polymer composite for nerve regeneration: electricity-stimulated neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ze; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Wang, Zhaoxu; Roberge, Christophe; Shi, Guixin; Roche, Phillippe; Li, Jiangming; Dao, Lê H

    2007-01-01

    Normal and electrically stimulated PC12 cell cultures and the implantation of nerve guidance channels were performed to evaluate newly developed electrically conductive biodegradable polymer composites. Polypyrrole (PPy) doped by butane sulfonic acid showed a significantly higher number of viable cells compared with PPy doped by polystyrenesulfonate after a 6-day culture. The PC12 cells were left to proliferate for 6 days, and the PPy-coated membranes, showing less initial cell adherence, recorded the same proliferation rate as did the noncoated membranes. Direct current electricity at various intensities was applied to the PC12 cell-cultured conductive membranes. After 7 days, the greatest number of neurites appeared on the membranes with a current intensity approximating 1.7-8.4 microA/cm. Nerve guidance channels made of conductive biodegradable composite were implanted into rats to replace 8 mm of sciatic nerve. The implants were harvested after 2 months and analyzed with immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. The regenerated nerve tissue displayed myelinated axons and Schwann cells that were similar to those in the native nerve. Electrical stimulation applied through the electrically conductive biodegradable polymers therefore enhanced neurite outgrowth in a current-dependent fashion. The conductive polymers also supported sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.

  12. Electrical conductivity and magnetic field dependent current-voltage characteristics of nanocrystalline nickel ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Bhowmik, R. N.; Das, M. R.; Mitra, P.

    2017-04-01

    We have studied the grain size dependent electrical conductivity, dielectric relaxation and magnetic field dependent current voltage (I - V) characteristics of nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) . The material has been synthesized by sol-gel self-combustion technique, followed by ball milling at room temperature in air environment to control the grain size. The material has been characterized using X-ray diffraction (refined with MAUD software analysis) and Transmission electron microscopy. Impedance spectroscopy and I - V characteristics in the presence of variable magnetic fields have confirmed the increase of resistivity for the fine powdered samples (grain size 5.17±0.6 nm), resulted from ball milling of the chemical routed sample. Activation energy of the material for electrical charge hopping process has increased with the decrease of grain size by mechanical milling of chemical routed sample. The I - V curves showed many highly non-linear and irreversible electrical features, e.g., I - V loop and bi-stable electronic states (low resistance state-LRS and high resistance state-HRS) on cycling the electrical bias voltage direction during I-V curve measurement. The electrical dc resistance for the chemically routed (without milled) sample in HRS (∼3.4876×104 Ω) at 20 V in presence of magnetic field 10 kOe has enhanced to ∼3.4152×105 Ω for the 10 h milled sample. The samples exhibited an unusual negative differential resistance (NDR) effect that gradually decreased on decreasing the grain size of the material. The magneto-resistance of the samples at room temperature has been found substantially large (∼25-65%). The control of electrical charge transport properties under magnetic field, as observed in the present ferrimagnetic material, indicate the magneto-electric coupling in the materials and the results could be useful in spintronics applications.

  13. Beyond KTB - electrical conductivity of the deep continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul W. J.; Vine, F. J.

    1995-01-01

    Great strides have been made in understanding the upper part of the crust by in-situ logging in, and laboratory experiments on core recovered from super-deep bore-holes such as the KTB. These boreholes do not extend into the lower crust, and can contribute little to the elucidation of mechanisms that produce the high electrical conductivities that are commonly observed therein by magneto-telluric (MT) methods. Laboratory studies at simulated lower crustal conditions of temperature, pressure and saturation, on electrolyte saturated rocks thought to have been derived from the lower crust, have not been possible up until now due to their experimental difficulty. It is necessary to subject electrolyte-saturated rock samples to independently controlled confining and pore-fluid pressure, which implies that the rock be sleeved in some impermeable but deformable material, that can withstand the very high temperatures required. Metals are the only materials capable of being used, but these cause great difficulties for cell sealing and conductivity measurement. In this paper we describe recent breakthroughs in experimental work, specifically the development of two new types of sophisticated metal/ceramic seal, and a conductivity measurement technique that enables the measurement of saturated rock conductivity in the presence of a highly conducting metallic sleeve. The advances in experimental technique have enabled us to obtain data on the electrical conductivity of brine saturated basic, acidic and graphite-bearing rocks at lower crustal temperatures and raised pressures. These data have facilitated the comparison of MT derived crustal electrical conductivity profiles with profiles obtained from laboratory experiments for the first time. Initial modelling shows a good agreement between laboratory derived and MT derived profiles only if the mid-crust is composed of amphibolite pervaded by aqueous fluids, and the lower crust is composed of granulite that is saturated with

  14. Electrical Characterisation of Oxide Ion Conducting Perovskites and Apatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Anthony R.; Abram, Edward J.; Sinclair, Derek C.

    2002-12-01

    There is continuing interest in the development of new solid electrolytes with high levels of oxide ion conductivity as possible electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells, as well as for a range of sensor applications. When a new material of potential interest has been identified, the next stage is to optimise its processing into a suitable, usable form and to evaluate its electrical properties. Two materials of current interest are discussed here. First, doped LaGaO3, which has very high levels of oxide ion conductivity at intermediate temperatures, but for which the fabrication of dense ceramic samples free from grain boundary impedances can be difficult. Results are presented on the impedance of ceramics taking account of electrode-electrolyte interactions as well as grain boundary constriction resistance effects. A strategy for the analysis of impedance data of such electrically inhomogeneous samples is presented. Second, there is much current interest in doped lanthanum silicate materials with the apatite structure. These are oxide ion conductors whose conductivity can be enhanced considerably by chemical doping. The mechanism(s) responsible for the high level of conductivity has been the subject of much speculation and recent results in this area are presented.

  15. Electrical studies on silver based fast ion conducting glassy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, B. Appa Kumar, E. Ramesh Kumari, K. Rajani Bhikshamaiah, G.

    2014-04-24

    Among all the available fast ion conductors, silver based glasses exhibit high conductivity. Further, glasses containing silver iodide enhances fast ion conducting behavior at room temperature. Glasses of various compositions of silver based fast ion conductors in the AgI−Ag{sub 2}O−[(1−x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}−xTeO{sub 2}] (x=0 to1 mol% in steps of 0.2) glassy system have been prepared by melt quenching method. The glassy nature of the compounds has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The electrical conductivity (AC) measurements have been carried out in the frequency range of 1 KHz–3MHz by Impedance Analyzer in the temperature range 303–423K. The DC conductivity measurements were also carried out in the temperature range 300–523K. From both AC and DC conductivity studies, it is found that the conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with increasing the concentration of TeO{sub 2} as well as with temperature. The conductivity of the present glass system is found to be of the order of 10{sup −2} S/cm at room temperature. The ionic transport number of these glasses is found to be 0.999 indicating that these glasses can be used as electrolyte in batteries.

  16. Testing and Optimization of Electrically Conductive Spacecraft Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, R. J.; Wertz, G. E.; Edwards, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report discussing the work done for the Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program. It discusses test chamber design, coating research, and test results on electrically thermal control coatings. These thermal control coatings are being developed to have several orders of magnitude higher electrical conductivity than most available thermal control coatings. Most current coatings tend to have a range in surface resistivity from 1,011 to 1,013 ohms/sq. Historically, spacecraft have had thermal control surfaces composed of dielectric materials of either polymers (paints and metalized films) or glasses (ceramic paints and optical solar reflectors). Very seldom has the thermal control surface of a spacecraft been a metal where the surface would be intrinsically electrically conductive. The poor thermal optical properties of most metals have, in most cases, stopped them from being used as a thermal control surface. Metals low infrared emittance (generally considered poor for thermal control surfaces) and/or solar absorptance, have resulted in the use of various dielectric coatings or films being applied over the substrate materials in order to obtain the required optical properties.

  17. Electrically conductive gold- and copper-metallized DNA origami nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanli; Pearson, Anthony C; Gates, Elisabeth P; Uprety, Bibek; Davis, Robert C; Harb, John N; Woolley, Adam T

    2013-03-12

    This work demonstrates the use of a circuit-like DNA origami structure as a template to fabricate conductive gold and copper nanostructures on Si surfaces. We improved over previous results by using multiple Pd seeding steps to increase seed uniformity and density. Our process has also been characterized through atomic force microscopy, particle size distribution analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. We found that four successive Pd seeding steps yielded the best results for electroless metal plating on DNA origami. Electrical resistance measurements were done on both Au- and Cu-metallized nanostructures, with each showing ohmic behavior. Gold-plated DNA origami structures made under optimal conditions had an average resistivity of 7.0 × 10(-5) Ω·m, whereas copper-metallized structures had a resistivity as low as 3.6 × 10(-4) Ω·m. Importantly, this is the first demonstration of electrically conductive Cu nanostructures fabricated on either DNA or DNA origami templates. Although resistivities for both gold and copper samples were larger than those of the bulk metal, these metal nanostructures have the potential for use in electrically connecting small structures. In addition, these metallized objects might find use in surface-enhanced Raman scattering experiments.

  18. Realistic Electric Field Mapping of Anisotropic Muscle During Electrical Stimulation Using a Combination of Water Diffusion Tensor and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bup Kyung; Oh, Tong In; Sajib, Saurav Zk; Kim, Jin Woong; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2017-04-01

    To realistically map the electric fields of biological tissues using a diffusion tensor magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (DT-MREIT) method to estimate tissue response during electrical stimulation. Imaging experiments were performed using chunks of bovine muscle. Two silver wire electrodes were positioned inside the muscle tissue for electrical stimulation. Electric pulses were applied with a 100-V amplitude and 100-μs width using a voltage stimulator. During electrical stimulation, we collected DT-MREIT data from a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We adopted the projected current density method to calculate the electric field. Based on the relation between the water diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor, we computed the position-dependent scale factor using the measured magnetic flux density data. Then, a final conductivity tensor map was reconstructed using the multiplication of the water diffusion tensor and the scale factor. The current density images from DT-MREIT data represent the internal current flows that exist not only in the electrodes but also in surrounding regions. The reconstructed electric filed map from our anisotropic conductivity tensor with the projected current density shows coverage that is more than 2 times as wide, and higher signals in both the electrodes and surrounding tissues, than the previous isotropic method owing to the consideration of tissue anisotropy. An electric field map obtained by an anisotropic reconstruction method showed different patterns from the results of the previous isotropic reconstruction method. Since accurate electric field mapping is important to correctly estimate the coverage of the electrical treatment, future studies should include more rigorous validations of the new method through in vivo and in situ experiments.

  19. Realistic Electric Field Mapping of Anisotropic Muscle During Electrical Stimulation Using a Combination of Water Diffusion Tensor and Electrical Conductivity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To realistically map the electric fields of biological tissues using a diffusion tensor magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (DT-MREIT) method to estimate tissue response during electrical stimulation. Methods Imaging experiments were performed using chunks of bovine muscle. Two silver wire electrodes were positioned inside the muscle tissue for electrical stimulation. Electric pulses were applied with a 100-V amplitude and 100-μs width using a voltage stimulator. During electrical stimulation, we collected DT-MREIT data from a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We adopted the projected current density method to calculate the electric field. Based on the relation between the water diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor, we computed the position-dependent scale factor using the measured magnetic flux density data. Then, a final conductivity tensor map was reconstructed using the multiplication of the water diffusion tensor and the scale factor. Results The current density images from DT-MREIT data represent the internal current flows that exist not only in the electrodes but also in surrounding regions. The reconstructed electric filed map from our anisotropic conductivity tensor with the projected current density shows coverage that is more than 2 times as wide, and higher signals in both the electrodes and surrounding tissues, than the previous isotropic method owing to the consideration of tissue anisotropy. Conclusions An electric field map obtained by an anisotropic reconstruction method showed different patterns from the results of the previous isotropic reconstruction method. Since accurate electric field mapping is important to correctly estimate the coverage of the electrical treatment, future studies should include more rigorous validations of the new method through in vivo and in situ experiments. PMID:28446015

  20. High temperature electrically conducting ceramic heating element and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbach, C. R.; Page, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Improvements were made in both electrode technology and ceramic conductor quality to increase significantly the lifetime and thermal cycling capability of electrically conducting ceramic heater elements. These elements were operated in vacuum, inert and reducing environments as well as oxidizing atmospheres adding to the versatility of the conducting ceramic as an ohmic heater. Using stabilized zirconia conducting ceramic heater elements, a furnace was fabricated and demonstrated to have excellent thermal response and cycling capability. The furnace was used to melt platinum-20% rhodium alloy (melting point 1904 C) with an isothermal ceramic heating element having a nominal working cavity size of 2.5 cm diameter by 10.0 cm long. The furnace was operated to 1940 C with the isothermal ceramic heating element. The same furnace structure was fitted with a pair of main heater elements to provide axial gradient temperature control over a working cavity length of 17.8 cm.

  1. Measurements of middle-atmosphere electric fields and associated electrical conductivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, L. C.; Croskey, C. L.; Mitchell, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    A simple antenna for measuring the vertical electric field in the 'middle atmosphere' has been flown on a number of rocket-launched parachute-borne payloads. The data from the first nine such flights, launched under a variety of geophysical conditions, are presented, along with electrical conductivities measured simultaneously. The data include indications of layered peaks of several volts per meter in the mesospheric field at high and low latitudes in situations of relatively low conductivity. During an auroral 'REP' event the electric field reversed direction in the lower stratosphere, accompanied by a substantial enhancement in conductivity. The data generally do not confirm speculations based only on the extension of the thunderstorm circuit from below or the mapping of ionospheric and magnetospheric fields from above, but seem to require, in addition, internal generation processes in the middle atmosphere.

  2. Joining Mixed Conducting Oxides Using an Air-Fired Electrically Conductive Braze

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Weil, K. Scott

    2004-10-01

    Due to their mixed oxygen ion and electron conducting properties, ceramics such as lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrites (LSCF) are attractive materials for use in active electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and oxygen separation membranes. However, to take full advantage of the unique properties of these materials, reliable joining techniques need to be developed. If such a joining technique yields a ceramic-to-metal junction that is also electrically conductive, the hermetic seals in the device could provide the added function of either drawing current from the mixed conducting oxide, in the case of SOFC applications, or carrying it to the oxide to initate ionic conduction, in the case of oxygen separation and electrocatalysis applications. This would greatly reduce the need for complex interconnect design, thereby simplifying one of the major challenges faced in SOFC development. A process referred to as reactive air brazing (RAB) has been developed in which firing a Ag-CuO filler material in air creates a functional ceramic-to-metal junction, in which the silver-based matrix of the braze affords both metallic ductility and conductivity in the joint. Investigating a range of Ag-CuO alloy combinations determined that compositions containing between 1.4 and 16 mol% CuO appear to offer the best combination of wettability, joint strength, and electrical conductivity.

  3. Transparent electrical conducting films by activated reactive evaporation

    DOEpatents

    Bunshah, Rointan; Nath, Prem

    1982-01-01

    Process and apparatus for producing transparent electrical conducting thin films by activated reactive evaporation. Thin films of low melting point metals and alloys, such as indium oxide and indium oxide doped with tin, are produced by physical vapor deposition. The metal or alloy is vaporized by electrical resistance heating in a vacuum chamber, oxygen and an inert gas such as argon are introduced into the chamber, and vapor and gas are ionized by a beam of low energy electrons in a reaction zone between the resistance heater and the substrate. There is a reaction between the ionized oxygen and the metal vapor resulting in the metal oxide which deposits on the substrate as a thin film which is ready for use without requiring post deposition heat treatment.

  4. Development of Tailorable Electrically Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. S.; Harada, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The optical characteristics of surfaces on spacecraft are fundamental parameters in controlling its temperature. Passive thermal control coatings with designed solar absorptance and infrared emittance properties have been developed and been in use for some time. In this total space environment, the coating must be stable and maintain its desired optical properties for the course of the mission lifetime. The mission lifetimes are increasing and in our quest to save weight, newer substrates are being integrated which limit electrical grounding schemes. All of this has already added to the existing concerns about spacecraft charging and related spacecraft failures or operational failures. The concern is even greater for thermal control surfaces that are very large. One way of alleviating such concerns is to design new thermal control material systems (TCMS) that can help to mitigate charging via providing charge leakage paths. The object of this program was to develop two types of passive electrically conductive TCMS.

  5. Transparent electrical conducting films by activated reactive evaporation

    DOEpatents

    Bunshah, R.; Nath, P.

    1982-06-22

    Process and apparatus for producing transparent electrical conducting thin films by activated reactive evaporation is disclosed. Thin films of low melting point metals and alloys, such as indium oxide and indium oxide doped with tin, are produced by physical vapor deposition. The metal or alloy is vaporized by electrical resistance heating in a vacuum chamber, oxygen and an inert gas such as argon are introduced into the chamber, and vapor and gas are ionized by a beam of low energy electrons in a reaction zone between the resistance heater and the substrate. There is a reaction between the ionized oxygen and the metal vapor resulting in the metal oxide which deposits on the substrate as a thin film which is ready for use without requiring post deposition heat treatment. 1 fig.

  6. The effect of electrical conductivity on pore resistance and electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianbo; Lin, Hao

    2008-11-01

    Electroporation is an elegant means to gain access to the cytoplasm, and to deliver molecules into the cell while simultaneously maintaining viability and functionality. In this technique, an applied electric pulse transiently permeabilizes the cell membrane, through which biologically active agents such as DNA, RNA, and amino acids can enter the cell, and perform tasks such as gene and cancer therapy. Despite wide applications, current electroporation technologies fall short of desired efficiency and reliability, in part due to the lack of fundamental understanding and quantitative modeling tools. This work focuses on the modeling of cell membrane conductance due to the formation of aqueous conducting pores. An analytical expression is developed to determine effective pore resistance as a function of the membrane thickness, pore size, and intracellular and extracellular conductivities. The availability of this expression avoids empirical or ad hoc specification of the conductivity of the pore-filling solution which was adopted in previous works. Such pore resistance model is then incorporated into a whole-cell electroporation simulation to investigate the effect of conductivity ratio on membrane permeabilization. The results reveal that the degree of permeabilization strongly depends on the specific values of the extracellular and intracellular conductivities.

  7. Assessment of cytoplasm conductivity by nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Denzi, Agnese; Merla, Caterina; Palego, Cristiano; Paffi, Alessandra; Ning, Yaqing; Multari, Caroline R; Cheng, Xuanhong; Apollonio, Francesca; Hwang, James C M; Liberti, Micaela

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new method for the better assessment of cytoplasm conductivity, which is critical to the development of electroporation protocols as well as insight into fundamental mechanisms underlying electroporation. For this goal, we propose to use nanosecond electrical pulses to bypass the complication of membrane polarization and a single cell to avoid the complication of the application of the "mixing formulas." Further, by suspending the cell in a low-conductivity medium, it is possible to force most of the sensing current through the cytoplasm for a more direct assessment of its conductivity. For proof of principle, the proposed technique was successfully demonstrated on a Jurkat cell by comparing the measured and modeled currents. The cytoplasm conductivity was best assessed at 0.32 S/m and it is in line with the literature. The cytoplasm conductivity plays a key role in the understanding of the basis mechanism of the electroporation phenomenon, and in particular, a large error in the cytoplasm conductivity determination could result in a correspondingly large error in predicting electroporation. Methods for a good estimation of such parameter become fundamental.

  8. Electrical Conductivity in Polymer Blends/ Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Ajit R.; Bose, Suryasarathi; Bhattacharyya, Arup R.

    2008-10-23

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) based polymer composites have emerged as the future multifunctional materials in view of its exceptional mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. One of the major interests is to develop conductive polymer composites preferably at low concentration of CNT utilizing their high aspect ratio (L/D) for numerous applications, which include antistatic devices, capacitors and materials for EMI shielding. In this context, polymer blends have emerged as a potential candidate in lowering the percolation thresholds further by the utilization of 'double-percolation' which arises from the synergistic improvements in blend properties associated with the co-continuous morphology. Due to strong inter-tube van der Waals' forces, they often tend to aggregate and uniform dispersion remains a challenge. To overcome this challenge, we exploited sodium salt of 6-aminohexanoic acid (Na-AHA) which was able to assist in debundlling the multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) through 'cation-{pi}' interactions during melt-mixing leading to percolative 'network-like' structure of MWNT within polyamide6 (PA6) phase in co-continuous PA6/acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) blends. The composite exhibited low electrical percolation thresholds of 0.25 wt% of MWNT, the lowest reported value in this system so far. Retention of 'network-like structure' in the solid state with significant refinement was observed even at lower MWNT concentration in presence Na-AHA, which was assessed through AC electrical conductivity measurements. Reactive coupling was found to be a dominant factor besides 'cation-{pi}' interactions in achieving low electrical percolation in PA6/ABS+MWNT composites.

  9. Stimulation of Neurite Outgrowth Using an Electrically Conducting Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christine E.; Shastri, Venkatram R.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Langer, Robert

    1997-08-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves often cannot be repaired by the juxtaposition of the severed nerve ends. Surgeons have typically used autologous nerve grafts, which have several drawbacks including the need for multiple surgical procedures and loss of function at the donor site. As an alternative, the use of nerve guidance channels to bridge the gap between severed nerve ends is being explored. In this paper, the electrically conductive polymer--oxidized polypyrrole (PP)--has been evaluated for use as a substrate to enhance nerve cell interactions in culture as a first step toward potentially using such polymers to stimulate in vivo nerve regeneration. Image analysis demonstrates that PC-12 cells and primary chicken sciatic nerve explants attached and extended neurites equally well on both PP films and tissue culture polystyrene in the absence of electrical stimulation. In contrast, PC-12 cells interacted poorly with indium tin oxide (ITO), poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(lactic acid-coglycolic acid) surfaces. However, PC-12 cells cultured on PP films and subjected to an electrical stimulus through the film showed a significant increase in neurite lengths compared with ones that were not subjected to electrical stimulation through the film and tissue culture polystyrene controls. The median neurite length for PC-12 cells grown on PP and subjected to an electrical stimulus was 18.14 μ m (n = 5643) compared with 9.5 μ m (n = 4440) for controls. Furthermore, animal implantation studies reveal that PP invokes little adverse tissue response compared with poly(lactic acid-coglycolic acid).

  10. Application of the compensated Arrhenius formalism to self-diffusion: implications for ionic conductivity and dielectric relaxation.

    PubMed

    Petrowsky, Matt; Frech, Roger

    2010-07-08

    Self-diffusion coefficients are measured from -5 to 80 degrees C in a series of linear alcohols using pulsed field gradient NMR. The temperature dependence of these data is studied using a compensated Arrhenius formalism that assumes an Arrhenius-like expression for the diffusion coefficient; however, this expression includes a dielectric constant dependence in the exponential prefactor. Scaling temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients to isothermal diffusion coefficients so that the exponential prefactors cancel results in calculated energies of activation E(a). The exponential prefactor is determined by dividing the temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients by the Boltzmann term exp(-E(a)/RT). Plotting the prefactors versus the dielectric constant places the data on a single master curve. This procedure is identical to that previously used to study the temperature dependence of ionic conductivities and dielectric relaxation rate constants. The energies of activation determined from self-diffusion coefficients in the series of alcohols are strikingly similar to those calculated for the same series of alcohols from both dielectric relaxation rate constants and ionic conductivities of dilute electrolytes. The experimental results are described in terms of an activated transport mechanism that is mediated by relaxation of the solution molecules. This microscopic picture of transport is postulated to be common to diffusion, dielectric relaxation, and ionic transport.

  11. Electrical Conductivity and Dielectrical Properties of Bulk Methylene Green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Menyawy, E. M.; Zedan, I. T.; Mansour, A. M.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal stability, direct current electrical conductivity (σ DC), alternating current electrical conductivity (σ AC) and dielectric properties of bulk methylene green (MG) have been investigated. The thermal stability of MG was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry techniques. Temperature dependence of σ DC showed that the MG has semiconductor behavior with two activation energies determined as 0.12 eV and 0.31 eV in the temperature range 303-343 K and 363-463 K, respectively. The σ AC of bulk MG was performed in the frequency range 150 Hz-5 MHz and temperature range 303-463 K. The dependence of AC conductivity on frequency for MG is found to satisfy Jonscher's universal power law, especially at high frequencies. The correlated barrier hopping model is found to be applicable in which the density of localized states is determined. The σ AC is thermally activated and the activation energy decreases with the increases in frequency. The variation of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant with the frequency and temperature is explained.

  12. DNA sequencing using electrical conductance measurements of a DNA polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Lee, Chia-Hui; Hung, Meng-Yen; Pan, Hsu-An; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Huang, G. Steven

    2013-06-01

    The development of personalized medicine--in which medical treatment is customized to an individual on the basis of genetic information--requires techniques that can sequence DNA quickly and cheaply. Single-molecule sequencing technologies, such as nanopores, can potentially be used to sequence long strands of DNA without labels or amplification, but a viable technique has yet to be established. Here, we show that single DNA molecules can be sequenced by monitoring the electrical conductance of a phi29 DNA polymerase as it incorporates unlabelled nucleotides into a template strand of DNA. The conductance of the polymerase is measured by attaching it to a protein transistor that consists of an antibody molecule (immunoglobulin G) bound to two gold nanoparticles, which are in turn connected to source and drain electrodes. The electrical conductance of the DNA polymerase exhibits well-separated plateaux that are ~3 pA in height. Each plateau corresponds to an individual base and is formed at a rate of ~22 nucleotides per second. Additional spikes appear on top of the plateaux and can be used to discriminate between the four different nucleotides. We also show that the sequencing platform works with a variety of DNA polymerases and can sequence difficult templates such as homopolymers.

  13. Miniatuization of the flowing fluid electric conductivity loggingtec hnique

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace W.; Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Cook, Paul J.; Shipp, William

    2005-10-19

    An understanding of both the hydraulic properties of the aquifer and the depth distribution of salts is critical for evaluating the potential of groundwater for conjunctive water use and for maintaining suitable groundwater quality in agricultural regions where groundwater is used extensively for irrigation and drinking water. The electrical conductivity profiles recorded in a well using the flowing fluid electric conductivity logging (FEC logging) method can be analyzed to estimate interval specific hydraulic conductivity and estimates of the salinity concentration with depth. However, irrigation wells that are common in agricultural regions have limited access into them because these wells are still in operation, and the traditional equipment used for FEC logging cannot fit through the small access pipe intersecting the well. A modified, miniaturized FEC logging technique was developed such that this logging method could be used in wells with limited access. In addition, a new method for injecting water over the entire screened interval of the well was developed to reduce the time required to perform FEC logging. Results of FEC logging using the new methodology and miniaturized system in two irrigation wells are also summarized.

  14. Lunar electrical conductivity, permeability and temperature from Apollo magnetometer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetometers were deployed at four Apollo sites on the moon to measure remanent and induced lunar magnetic fields. Measurements from this network of instruments were used to calculate the electrical conductivity, temperature, magnetic permeability, and iron abundance of the lunar interior. The measured lunar remanent fields range from 3 gammas minimum at the Apollo 15 site to 327 gammas maximum at the Apollo 16 site. Simultaneous magnetic field and solar plasma pressure measurements show that the remanent fields at the Apollo 12 and 16 sites interact with, and are compressed by, the solar wind. Remanent fields at Apollo 12 and Apollo 16 are increased 16 gammas and 32 gammas, respectively, by a solar plasma bulk pressure increase of 1.5 X 10 to the -7th power dynes/sq cm. Global lunar fields due to eddy currents, induced in the lunar interior by magnetic transients, were analyzed to calculate an electrical conductivity profile for the moon. From nightside magnetometer data in the solar wind it was found that deeper than 170 km into the moon the conductivity rises from .0003 mhos/m to .10 mhos/m at 100 km depth. Recent analysis of data obtained in the geomagnetic tail, in regions free of complicating plasma effects, yields results consistent with nightside values.

  15. Electrical Conductivity and Dielectrical Properties of Bulk Methylene Green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Menyawy, E. M.; Zedan, I. T.; Mansour, A. M.

    2017-07-01

    Thermal stability, direct current electrical conductivity ( σ DC), alternating current electrical conductivity ( σ AC) and dielectric properties of bulk methylene green (MG) have been investigated. The thermal stability of MG was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry techniques. Temperature dependence of σ DC showed that the MG has semiconductor behavior with two activation energies determined as 0.12 eV and 0.31 eV in the temperature range 303-343 K and 363-463 K, respectively. The σ AC of bulk MG was performed in the frequency range 150 Hz-5 MHz and temperature range 303-463 K. The dependence of AC conductivity on frequency for MG is found to satisfy Jonscher's universal power law, especially at high frequencies. The correlated barrier hopping model is found to be applicable in which the density of localized states is determined. The σ AC is thermally activated and the activation energy decreases with the increases in frequency. The variation of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant with the frequency and temperature is explained.

  16. Multifunctional conducting fibres with electrically controlled release of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Esrafilzadeh, Dorna; Razal, Joselito M; Moulton, Simon E; Stewart, Elise M; Wallace, Gordon G

    2013-08-10

    We hereby present a new method of producing coaxial conducting polymer fibres loaded with an antibiotic drug that can then be subsequently released (or sustained) in response to electrical stimulation. The method involves wet-spinning of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) fibre, which served as the inner core to the electropolymerised outer shell layer of polypyrrole (Ppy). Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (Cipro) was selected as the model drug and as the dopant in the Ppy synthesis. The release of Cipro in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) from the fibres was controlled by switching the redox state of Ppy.Cipro layer. Released Cipro under passive and stimulated conditions were tested against Gram positive (Streptococcus pyogenes) and Gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Significant inhibition of bacterial growth was observed against both strains tested. These results confirm that Cipro retains antibacterial properties during fibre fabrication and electrochemically controlled release. In vitro cytotoxicity testing utilising the neural B35 cell line confirmed the cytocompatibility of the drug loaded conducting fibres. Electrical conductivity, cytocompatibility and tuning release profile from this flexible fibre can lead to promising bionic applications such as neuroprosthetics and localised drug delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrically conductive nano graphite-filled bacterial cellulose composites.

    PubMed

    Erbas Kiziltas, Esra; Kiziltas, Alper; Rhodes, Kevin; Emanetoglu, Nuri W; Blumentritt, Melanie; Gardner, Douglas J

    2016-01-20

    A unique three dimensional (3D) porous structured bacterial cellulose (BC) can act as a supporting material to deposit the nanofillers in order to create advanced BC-based functional nanomaterials for various technological applications. In this study, novel nanocomposites comprised of BC with exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) incorporated into the BC matrix were prepared using a simple particle impregnation strategy to enhance the thermal properties and electrical conductivity of the BC. The flake-shaped xGnP particles were well dispersed and formed a continuous network throughout the BC matrix. The temperature at 10% weight loss, thermal stability and residual ash content of the nanocomposites increased at higher xGnP loadings. The electrical conductivity of the composites increased with increasing xGnP loading (attaining values 0.75 S/cm with the addition of 2 wt.% of xGnP). The enhanced conductive and thermal properties of the BC-xGnP nanocomposites will broaden applications (biosensors, tissue engineering, etc.) of BC and xGnP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrical conductivity of a warm neutron star crust in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Arus; Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-08-01

    We study the electrical conductivity of finite-temperature crust of a warm compact star which may be formed in the aftermath of a supernova explosion or a binary neutron star merger as well as when a cold neutron star is heated by accretion of material from a companion. We focus on the temperature-density regime where plasma is in the liquid state and, therefore, the conductivity is dominated by the electron scattering off correlated nuclei. The dynamical screening of this interaction is implemented in terms of the polarization tensor computed in the hard-thermal-loop effective field theory of QED plasma. The correlations of the background ionic component are accounted for via a structure factor derived from Monte Carlo simulations of one-component plasma. With this input we solve the Boltzmann kinetic equation in relaxation time approximation taking into account the anisotropy of transport due to the magnetic field. The electrical conductivity tensor is studied numerically as a function of temperature and density for carbon and iron nuclei as well as density-dependent composition of zero-temperature dense matter in weak equilibrium with electrons. We also provide accurate fit formulas to our numerical results as well as supplemental tables which can be used in dissipative magneto-hydrodynamics simulations of warm compact stars.

  19. Analyzing bank filtration by deconvoluting time series of electric conductivity.

    PubMed

    Cirpka, Olaf A; Fienen, Michael N; Hofer, Markus; Hoehn, Eduard; Tessarini, Aronne; Kipfer, Rolf; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2007-01-01

    Knowing the travel-time distributions from infiltrating rivers to pumping wells is important in the management of alluvial aquifers. Commonly, travel-time distributions are determined by releasing a tracer pulse into the river and measuring the breakthrough curve in the wells. As an alternative, one may measure signals of a time-varying natural tracer in the river and in adjacent wells and infer the travel-time distributions by deconvolution. Traditionally this is done by fitting a parametric function such as the solution of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation to the data. By choosing a certain parameterization, it is impossible to determine features of the travel-time distribution that do not follow the general shape of the parameterization, i.e., multiple peaks. We present a method to determine travel-time distributions by nonparametric deconvolution of electric-conductivity time series. Smoothness of the inferred transfer function is achieved by a geostatistical approach, in which the transfer function is assumed as a second-order intrinsic random time variable. Nonnegativity is enforced by the method of Lagrange multipliers. We present an approach to directly compute the best nonnegative estimate and to generate sets of plausible solutions. We show how the smoothness of the transfer function can be estimated from the data. The approach is applied to electric-conductivity measurements taken at River Thur, Switzerland, and five wells in the adjacent aquifer, but the method can also be applied to other time-varying natural tracers such as temperature. At our field site, electric-conductivity fluctuations appear to be an excellent natural tracer.

  20. Pore connectivity, electrical conductivity, and partial water saturation: Network simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Tang, Y. B.; Bernabé, Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Li, X. F.; Bai, X. Y.; Zhang, L. H.

    2015-06-01

    The electrical conductivity of brine-saturated rock is predominantly dependent on the geometry and topology of the pore space. When a resistive second phase (e.g., air in the vadose zone and oil/gas in hydrocarbon reservoirs) displaces the brine, the geometry and topology of the pore space occupied by the electrically conductive phase are changed. We investigated the effect of these changes on the electrical conductivity of rock partially saturated with brine. We simulated drainage and imbibition as invasion and bond percolation processes, respectively, in pipe networks assumed to be perfectly water-wet. The simulations included the formation of a water film in the pipes invaded by the nonwetting fluid. During simulated drainage/imbibition, we measured the changes in resistivity index as well as a number of relevant microstructural parameters describing the portion of the pore space saturated with water. Except Euler topological number, all quantities considered here showed a significant level of "universality," i.e., insensitivity to the type of lattice used (simple cubic, body-centered cubic, or face-centered cubic). Hence, the coordination number of the pore network appears to be a more effective measure of connectivity than Euler number. In general, the simulated resistivity index did not obey Archie's simple power law. In log-log scale, the resistivity index curves displayed a substantial downward or upward curvature depending on the presence or absence of a water film. Our network simulations compared relatively well with experimental data sets, which were obtained using experimental conditions and procedures consistent with the simulations. Finally, we verified that the connectivity/heterogeneity model proposed by Bernabé et al. (2011) could be extended to the partial brine saturation case when water films were not present.

  1. Gas-Tolerant Device Senses Electrical Conductivity of Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Edward W.

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts a device for measuring the electrical conductivity of a flowing liquid. Unlike prior such devices, this one does not trap gas bubbles entrained in the liquid. Usually, the electrical conductivity of a liquid is measured by use of two electrodes immersed in the liquid. A typical prior device based on this concept contains large cavities that can trap gas. Any gas present between or near the electrodes causes a significant offset in the conductivity reading and, if the gas becomes trapped, then the offset persists. Extensive tests on two-phase (liquid/ gas) flow have shown that in the case of liquid flowing along a section of tubing, gas entrained in the liquid is not trapped in the section as long as the inner wall of the section is smooth and continuous, and the section is the narrowest tubing section along the flow path. The design of the device is based on the foregoing observation: The electrodes and the insulators separating the electrodes constitute adjacent parts of the walls of a tube. The bore of the tube is machined to make the wall smooth and to provide a straight flow path from the inlet to the outlet. The diameter of the electrode/insulator tube assembly is less than the diameter of the inlet or outlet tubing. An outer shell contains the electrodes and insulators and constitutes a leak and pressure barrier. Any gas bubble flowing through this device causes only a momentary conductivity offset that is filtered out by software used to process the conductivity readings.

  2. The bedrock electrical conductivity structure of Northern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamish, David

    2013-08-01

    An airborne geophysical survey of the whole of Northern Ireland has provided over 4.8 M estimates of the bedrock conductivity over the wide range of geological formations present. This study investigates how such data can be used to provide additional knowledge in relation to existing digital geological map information. A by-product of the analysis is a simplification of the spatially aggregated information obtained in such surveys. The methodology used is a GIS-based attribution of the conductivity estimates using a lithological classification of the bedrock formations. A 1:250k geological classification of the data is performed leading to a 56 unit lithological and geostatistical analysis of the conductivity information. The central moments (medians) of the classified data are used to provide a new digital bedrock conductivity map of Northern Ireland with values ranging from 0.32 to 41.36 mS m-1. This baseline map of conductivities displays a strong correspondence with an existing 4 quadrant, chrono-geological description of Northern Ireland. Once defined, the baseline conductivity map allows departures from the norm to be assessed across each specific lithological unit. Bulk electrical conductivity is controlled by a number of petrophysical parameters and it is their variation that is assessed by the procedures employed. The igneous rocks are found to display the largest variability in conductivity values and many of the statistical distributions are multi-modal. A sequence of low-value modes in these data are associated with intrusives within volcanic complexes. These and much older Neoproterzoic rocks appear to represent very low porosity formations that may be the product of rapid cooling during emplacement. By way of contrast, extensive flood basalts (the Antrim lavas) record a well-defined and much higher median value (12.24 mS m-1) although they display complex spatial behaviour in detail. Sedimentary rocks appear to follow the broad behaviours anticipated

  3. Increased electrical conductivity of peptides through annealing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgung, Seok Daniel; Lee, Jaehun; Choe, Ik Rang; Sung, Taehoon; Kim, Young-O.; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Nam, Ki Tae; Kwon, Jang-Yeon

    2017-08-01

    Biocompatible biologically occurring polymer is suggested as a component of human implantable devices since conventional inorganic materials are apt to trigger inflammation and toxicity problem within human body. Peptides consisting of aromatic amino acid, tyrosine, are chosen, and enhancement on electrical conductivity is studied. Annealing process gives rise to the decrease on resistivity of the peptide films and the growth of the carrier concentration is a plausible reason for such a decrease on resistivity. The annealed peptides are further applied to an active layer of field effect transistor, in which low on/off current ratio (˜10) is obtained.

  4. Electrical conductivity of carbonaceous chondrites and electric heating of meteorite parent bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duba, A.

    1986-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of samples of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous chondrites is 4 to 6 magnitudes greater than rock forming minerals such as Olivine up to 700 C. The remarkably high electrical conductivity of these meteorites is attributed to carbon at grain boundaries. The environment in the wake of the space station can be exploited to produce conditions which will allow pyrolysis of carbonaceous chondrites. An experimental package consisting of a one square meter shield attached to a 15 cm diameter by 40 cm long furnace and tied to a conductance bridge, furnace controller, and digital voltmeter inside the space station via umbilical cable could make the required measurements. Since heating rates as low as 0.1 C/hour are required to study kinetics of the pyrolysis reations which are the cause of the high conductivity of the carbonaceous chondrites, experimental times up to 3 months will be needed.

  5. Fluctuations electrical conductivity in a granular s-wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H.; Yousefvand, A.; Zargar Shoushtari, M.

    2017-01-01

    The present study tries to evaluate the fluctuation electrical conductivity in a granular s-wave superconductor at the temperature near to the critical temperature. The evaluation is conducted under the condition of limited tunneling conductance between the grains and small impurity concentration. All the first order fluctuation corrections, involving the nonlocal scattered electron in a granular s-wave superconductor, are calculated in three dimensions and in the limit of clean. Using Green's function theory initially, the Cooperon (impurity vertex), λ (q , ε1 , ε2) , and the fluctuation propagator, Lk (q , Ωk) , are calculated in the presence of impurities. Then, the three distinct contributions of Aslamazov-Larkin, Maki-Thompson, and Density of states are calculated by means of the Kubo formula. Analysis shows that the terms of Aslamazov-Larkin and anomalous Maki-Thompson have positive contributions to the conductivity in the clean limit, whereas the terms of Density of state and the regular Maki-Thompson have negative signs, leading to the reduction of total fluctuation conductivity.

  6. Electrical conductivity of condensed molecular hydrogen in the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical interpretation of several phenomena concerning Jupiter and Saturn depends upon the electrical conductivity of molecular hydrogen which, according to present models, forms the outermost layer of both planets. The layer starts at the transition pressure between the metallic and the molecular form of hydrogen, that is around 1 Mbar, and extends to the outside limits of the atmosphere. Whether at the highest pressures (and temperatures) this layer is a solid or a dense fluid is not certain. In any case, the fluid is in supercritical condition so that there is only a gradual transition from dense liquid to a gaseous form. The two theories which require specific values of the conductivity of the condensed molecular hydrogen are those pertaining to the generation of a magnetic field in the liquid hydrogen rather than in the deep metallic interior (HIDE, 1967), and those concerned with the electromagnetic coupling and exchange of angular momentum between the liquid core and the solid molecular hydrogen mantle.

  7. Ultrahigh electrical conductivity in solution-sheared polymeric transparent films

    PubMed Central

    Worfolk, Brian J.; Andrews, Sean C.; Park, Steve; Reinspach, Julia; Liu, Nan; Toney, Michael F.; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-01-01

    With consumer electronics transitioning toward flexible products, there is a growing need for high-performance, mechanically robust, and inexpensive transparent conductors (TCs) for optoelectronic device integration. Herein, we report the scalable fabrication of highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) thin films via solution shearing. Specific control over deposition conditions allows for tunable phase separation and preferential PEDOT backbone alignment, resulting in record-high electrical conductivities of 4,600 ± 100 S/cm while maintaining high optical transparency. High-performance solution-sheared TC PEDOT:PSS films were used as patterned electrodes in capacitive touch sensors and organic photovoltaics to demonstrate practical viability in optoelectronic applications. PMID:26515096

  8. Interplanetary double-shock ensembles with anomalous electrical conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M.

    1972-01-01

    Similarity theory is applied to the case of constant velocity, piston-driven, shock waves. This family of solutions, incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field for the case of infinite electric conductivity, represents one class of experimentally observed, flare-generated shock waves. This paper discusses the theoretical extension to flows with finite conductivity (presumably caused by unspecified modes of wave-particle interactions). Solutions, including reverse shocks, are found for a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers from one to infinity. Consideration of a zero and nonzero ambient flowing solar wind (together with removal of magnetic considerations) enables the recovery of earlier similarity solutions as well as numerical simulations. A limited comparison with observations suggests that flare energetics can be reasonably estimated once the shock velocity, ambient solar wind velocity and density, and ambient azimuthal Alfven Mach number are known.

  9. Electrical conductivity of noble gases at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Adams, J R; Reinholz, H; Redmer, R; Mintsev, V B; Shilkin, N S; Gryaznov, V K

    2007-09-01

    Theoretical results for the electrical conductivity of noble gas plasmas are presented in comparison with experiment. The composition is determined within a partially ionized plasma model. The conductivity is then calculated using linear response theory, in which the relevant scattering mechanisms of electrons from ions, electrons, and neutral species are taken into account. In particular, the Ramsauer-Townsend effect in electron-neutral scattering is discussed and the importance of a correct description of the Coulomb logarithm in electron scattering by charged particles is shown. A detailed comparison with recent experiments on argon and xenon plasmas is given and results for helium and neon are also revisited. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is observed, showing considerable improvement upon previous calculations.

  10. Electrical conduction in nanodomains in congruent lithium tantalate single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yasuo

    2014-01-27

    The electrical current flow behavior was investigated for nanodomains formed in a thin congruent lithium tantalate (LiTaO{sub 3}) single-crystal plate. When the nanodomains were relatively large, with diameters of about 100 nm, current flow was detected along the domain wall. However, when they were about 40 nm or smaller, the current flowed through the entire nanodomain. Schottky-like rectifying behavior was observed. Unlike the case of LiNbO{sub 3}, optical illumination was not required for current conduction in LiTaO{sub 3}. A clear temperature dependence of the current was found indicating that the conduction mechanism for nanodomains in LiTaO{sub 3} may involve thermally activated carrier hopping.

  11. Electrical conductivity of a methane–air burning plasma under the action of weak electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonna, G.; Pietanza, L. D.; D’Angola, A.; Laricchiuta, A.; Di Vita, A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper focuses on the calculation of the electrical conductivity of a methane–air flame in the presence of weak electric fields, solving the Boltzmann equation for free electrons self-consistently coupled with chemical kinetics. The chemical model GRI-Mech 3.0 has been completed with chemi-ionization reactions to model ionization in the absence of fields, and a database of cross sections for electron-impact-induced processes to account for reactions and transitions activated in the flame during discharge. The dependence of plasma properties on the frequency of an oscillating field has been studied under different pressure and gas temperature conditions. Fitting expressions of the electrical conductivity as a function of gas temperature and methane consumption are provided for different operational conditions in the Ansaldo Energia burner.

  12. Custom modular electromagnetic induction system for shallow electrical conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, Achim; Zimmermann, Egon; Tan, Xihe; von Hebel, Christian; van der Kruk, Jan; van Waasen, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) is a contactless measurement method that offers fast and easy investigations of the shallow electrical conductivity, e.g. on the field-scale. Available frequency domain EMI systems offer multiple fixed transmitter-receiver (Tx-Rx) pairs with Tx-Rx separations between 0.3 and 4.0 m and investigation depths of up to six meters. Here, we present our custom EMI system that consists of modular sensor units that can either be transmitters or receivers, and a backpack containing the data acquisition system. The prototype system is optimized for frequencies between 5 and 30 kHz and Tx-Rx separations between 0.4 and 2.0 m. Each Tx and Rx signal is digitized separately and stored on a notebook computer. The soil conductivity information is determined after the measurements with advanced digital processing of the data using optimized correction and calibration procedures. The system stores the raw data throughout the entire procedure, which offers many advantages: (1) comprehensive accuracy and error analysis as well as the reproducibility of corrections and calibration procedures; (2) easy customizability of the number of Tx-/Rx-units and their arrangement and frequencies; (3) signals from simultaneously working transmitters can be separated within the received data using orthogonal signals, resulting in additional Tx-Rx pairs and maximized soil information; and (4) later improvements in the post-processing algorithms can be applied to old data sets. Exemplary, here we present an innovative setup with two transmitters and five receivers using orthogonal signals yielding ten Tx-Rx pairs. Note that orthogonal signals enable for redundant Tx-Rx pairs that are useful for verification of the transmitter signals and for data stacking. In contrast to commercial systems, only adjustments in the post-processing were necessary to realize such measurement configurations with flexibly combined Tx and Rx modules. The presented system reaches an accuracy of

  13. Anomaly in the conductivity relaxation parameters at the phase transition of ferroelectric materials: A time domain study

    SciTech Connect

    Leyet, Y.; Guerrero, F.; Amorin, H.; Guerra, J. de Los S.; Eiras, J. A.

    2010-10-18

    The influence of the ferroelectric to paraelectric transition on the relaxation parameters of conductive processes in ferroelectric materials is studied in the time domain. Three well-known ferroelectric systems were chosen with transition temperatures in different regions, these are, high-temperature PbNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}-based ceramics; nanostructured Pb(Zr{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4})O{sub 3} ceramics; and submicron BaTiO{sub 3}. The thermal evolution of relaxation parameters shows clear anomalies in their typical behavior when conductivity processes arise in the temperature range where the ferroelectric transition takes place. The method here described allows obtaining information about the correlation between charge transport and the motion of the off-center ions at the phase transition.

  14. Electrical study and dielectric relaxation behavior in nanocrystalline Ce0.85Gd0.15O2- δ material at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Baral, Ashok; Sankaranarayanan, V.

    2010-02-01

    The nanocrystalline material of 15 mol% Gd-doped ceria (Ce0.85Gd0.15O2- δ ) was prepared by citrate auto ignition method. The electrical study and dielectric relaxation technique were applied to investigate the ionic transport process in this nanocrystalline material with an average grain size of 13 nm and the dynamic relaxation parameters are deduced in the temperature range of 300-600°C. The ionic transference number in the material is found to be 0.85 at 500°C at ambient conditions. The oxygen ionic conduction in the nanocrystalline Ce0.85Gd0.15O2- δ material follows the hopping mechanism. The grain boundary relaxation is found to be associated with migration of charge carriers. The frequency spectra of modulus M″ exhibited a dielectric relaxation peak corresponding to defect associates (Gd-Vo^{_{_{{blacksquare blacksquare}}}})^{_{_{{blacksquare}}}}. The material exhibits very low values of migration energy and association energy of the oxygen vacancies in the long-range motion, i.e., 0.84 and 0.07 eV, respectively.

  15. Electric conductivity of polymer films filled with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, B. M.; Bibikov, S. B.; Bychkova, A. V.; Leontiev, V. G.; Berendyaev, V. I.; Sorokina, O. N.; Kovarskii, A. L.

    2016-12-01

    The conductivity of polymer composites with magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) containing magnetite and other MNP (Ni, Cu-Ni) in the layers and planar cells with Al electrodes is studied. For soluble polymers (polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyvinyl alcohol) containing 1-10 wt % of magnetite MNP, a substantial effect of MNP on surface conductivity is detected over a wide range (from 10-10 to 10-3 Ω-1). It is shown that the addition of magnetite MNP not only results in a considerable change in cell conductivity, but also leads to its partially irreversible variation (by an order of magnitude or more) via minor modifications of the experimental conditions (temperature, electric field). For high-resistance samples with low probabilities of conducting chain formation, temperature current peaks are observed upon moderate heating (up to 350 K). These peaks are similar to the maxima observed upon polymer electret thermodischarges when the charges are captured by the deep centers associated with separate MNP or MNP aggregates. The type and position of the maxima are determined by the characteristics of the polymer matrix. For polyvinylpyrrolidone composites, the maxima are observed some time after heating (the echo effect). With composites based on solventborne polymers (polyalkanesterimides, soluble polyimide) and Ni, Cu-Ni MNP, no change in film conductivity measured electrophotographically is observed, due to the formation of a dielectric coating formed by polymer macromolecules adsorbed on the MNP surface. An explanation based on the possible formation of magnetic aggregates of magnetite MNP and conducting chains is proposed. Magnetic aggregation IPM is proposed as one way of controlling cell conductivity.

  16. Magnetoresistance, electrical conductivity, and Hall effect of glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.F.

    1983-02-01

    These properties of glassy carbon heat treated for three hours between 1200 and 2700/sup 0/C were measured from 3 to 300/sup 0/K in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The magnetoresistance was generally negative and saturated with reciprocal temperature, but still increased as a function of magnetic field. The maximum negative magnetoresistance measured was 2.2% for 2700/sup 0/C material. Several models based on the negative magnetoresistance being proportional to the square of the magnetic moment were attempted; the best fit was obtained for the simplest model combining Curie and Pauli paramagnetism for heat treatments above 1600/sup 0/C. Positive magnetoresistance was found only in less than 1600/sup 0/C treated glassy carbon. The electrical conductivity, of the order of 200 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at room temperature, can be empirically written as sigma = A + Bexp(-CT/sup -1/4) - DT/sup -1/2. The Hall coefficient was independent of magnetic field, insensitive to temperature, but was a strong function of heat treatment temperature, crossing over from negative to positive at about 1700/sup 0/C and ranging from -0.048 to 0.126 cm/sup 3//coul. The idea of one-dimensional filaments in glassy carbon suggested by the electrical conductivity is compatible with the present consensus view of the microstructure.

  17. KTB and the electrical conductivity of the crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haak, V.; Simpson, F.; Bahr, Karsten; Bigalke, J.; Eisel, M.; Harms, U.; Hirschmann, G.; Huenges, E.; Jödicke, H.; Kontny, A.; Kück, J.; Nover, G.; Rauen, A.; Stoll, J.; Walther, J.; Winter, H.; Zulauf, G.; Wolfgang, J.

    1997-08-01

    The German Continental Deep Drilling Program (KTB) drilled two holes through crystalline rocks which are rich in both high-salinity fluids and graphite accumulated along shear zones. Analyses of a large number of borehole measurements yield models for the electrical resistivity of the upper and middle crust in the vicinity of the KTB holes. High observed resistivity, of more than 105Ωm in the lowermost part of the 9000 m deep main hole, in a rather ``wet'' crust, indicates that effective mechanisms exist to cut down connections between fluid accumulations and therefore that fluids are not the likely cause of high-conductivity anomalies. On the other hand, graphite accumulations appear to be connected along shear lineaments over hundreds of meters or more. Structural, mineralogical, and geochemical studies suggest a tectonic model which explains the deposition of graphite as the relic and witness of a shearing process that occurred during the late Variscan (Upper Carboniferous) thrusting. This process took place while this part of the crust resided at temperatures between 240° and 380°C. Subsequent independent reverse faulting lifted this part to the Earth's surface. Our conclusion is that the KTB case indicates how high electrical conductivities in the upper crust, which originated from the middle to lower crust, are caused by graphite accumulations, rather than by fluids, and that these anomalies are related to shearing processes. Such graphite accumulations may exist elsewhere and may be of relevance in the context of present-day midcrustal conductors.

  18. Density, viscosity and electrical conductivity of protic alkanolammonium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Pinkert, André; Ang, Keng L; Marsh, Kenneth N; Pang, Shusheng

    2011-03-21

    Ionic liquids are molten salts with melting temperatures below the boiling point of water, and their qualification for applications in potential industrial processes does depend on their fundamental physical properties such as density, viscosity and electrical conductivity. This study aims to investigate the structure-property relationship of 15 ILs that are primarily composed of alkanolammonium cations and organic acid anions. The influence of both the nature and number of alkanol substituents on the cation and the nature of the anion on the densities, viscosities and electrical conductivities at ambient and elevated temperatures are discussed. Walden rule plots are used to estimate the ionic nature of these ionic liquids, and comparison with other studies reveals that most of the investigated ionic liquids show Walden rule values similar to many non-protic ionic liquids containing imidazolium, pyrrolidinium, tetraalkylammonium, or tetraalkylphosphonium cations. Comparison of literature data reveals major disagreements in the reported properties for the investigated ionic liquids. A detailed analysis of the reported experimental procedures suggests that inappropriate drying methods can account for some of the discrepancies. Furthermore, an example for the improved presentation of experimental data in scientific literature is presented.

  19. Printability and Electrical Conductivity of UV Curable MWCNT Ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ada; Park, Byungwoo; Kim, Nam Soo

    2015-03-01

    Composites reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in a photosensitive acrylic matrix were successfully synthesized and their printing, rheological, and electrical behavior was characterized. The shape of the reinforcement MWCNT particles was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The MWCNT were mixed in the acrylic polymer at increasing concentrations until the percolation threshold was determined at 2 wt.% with a conductivity of 4.26 × 10-4 S/cm. The large increase in viscosity with addition of MWCNT showed the need for a printing system capable of dispensing solutions of up to 613 × 103 cp. Lines were printed with a precision dispensing system mounted in computer controlled x-y-z stages, while an integrated ultraviolet light emission diode dot with a single wavelength of 385 nm cured seconds after the ink was dispensed. The wetting properties of the composite with respect to polyester, polyethylene terephthalate, polyimide, and paper films were analyzed with a goniometer. The relationship between the contact angle, pattern accuracy, and electrical conductivity was determined for each substrate.

  20. Synthesis and electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline tetragonal FeS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Shu-Lin; Wang, Hui-Xian; Dong, Cheng

    2014-08-01

    A convenient method for synthesis of tetragonal FeS using iron powder as iron source, is reported. Nanocrystalline tetragonal FeS samples were successfully synthesized by reacting metallic iron powder with sodium sulfide in acetate buffer solution. The obtained sample is single-phase tetragonal FeS with lattice parameters a = 0.3767 nm and c = 0.5037 nm, as revealed by X-ray diffraction. The sample consists of flat nanosheets with lateral dimensions from 20 nm up to 200 nm and average thickness of about 20 nm. We found that tetragonal FeS is a fairly good conductor from the electrical resistivity measurement on a pellet of the nanosheets. The temperature dependence of conductivity of the pellet was well fitted using an empirical equation wherein the effect of different grain boundaries was taken into consideration. This study provides a convenient, economic way to synthesize tetragonal FeS in a large scale and reports the first electrical conductivity data for tetragonal FeS down to liquid helium temperature.

  1. Ion conduction and relaxation in PEO-LiTFSI-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} polymer nanocomposite electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Ghosh, A.

    2015-05-07

    Ion conduction and relaxation in PEO-LiTFSI-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} polymer nanocomposite electrolytes have been studied for different concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetric studies show that the maximum amorphous phase of PEO is observed for PEO-LiTFSI embedded with 5 wt. % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The maximum ionic conductivity ∼3.3 × 10{sup −4} S cm{sup −1} has been obtained for this composition. The transmission electron microscopic image shows a distribution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles in all compositions with size of <50 nm. The temperature dependence of the ionic conductivity follows Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher nature, indicating a strong coupling between ionic and polymer chain segmental motions. The scaling of the ac conductivity implies that relaxation dynamics follows a common mechanism for different temperatures and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations. The imaginary modulus spectra are asymmetric and skewed toward the high frequency sides of the maxima and analyzed using Havriliak-Negami formalism. The temperature dependence of the relaxation time obtained from modulus spectra also exhibits Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher nature. The values of the stretched exponent obtained from Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts fit to the modulus data are fairly low, suggesting highly non-exponential relaxation for all concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in these electrolytes.

  2. Electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and rheological properties of graphene oxide-based nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadadian, Mahboobeh; Goharshadi, Elaheh K.; Youssefi, Abbas

    2014-12-01

    Highly stable graphene oxide (GO)-based nanofluids were simply prepared by dispersing graphite oxide with the average crystallite size of 20 nm, in polar base fluids without using any surfactant. Electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and rheological properties of the nanofluids were measured at different mass fractions and various temperatures. An enormous enhancement, 25,678 %, in electrical conductivity of distilled water was observed by loading 0.0006 mass fraction of GO at 25 °C. GO-ethylene glycol nanofluids exhibited a non-Newtonian shear-thinning behavior followed by a shear-independent region. This shear-thinning behavior became more pronounced at higher GO concentrations. The maximum ratio of the viscosity of nanofluid to that of the ethylene glycol as a base fluid was 3.4 for the mass fraction of 0.005 of GO at 20 °C under shear rate of 27.5 s-1. Thermal conductivity enhancement of 30 % was obtained for GO-ethylene glycol nanofluid for mass fraction of 0.07. The measurement of the transport properties of this new kind of nanofluid showed that it could provide an ideal fluid for heat transfer and electronic applications.

  3. Role of Relaxation on the Giant Permittivity and Electrical Properties of CaCu3Ti4O12 Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuetong; Ren, Lulu; Liao, Ruijin; Li, Jianying; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Feipeng

    2016-06-01

    CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) ceramics were synthesized under various sintering conditions to investigate the role of relaxation on permittivity and electrical properties. Two relaxation processes that respectively related to grain and to domain boundary at a temperature as low as 223 K were fitted according to the Cole-Cole theory. The results indicate that both relaxations largely account for the giant permittivity of CCTO ceramics. Moreover, the relaxation behaviors of grain and of the grain boundary can be processed via impedance plots that vary from 113 K to 473 K. It is shown that longer sintering duration leads to lower resistance of grain and of grain boundary: e.g., from 3200 Ω to 810 Ω and 1.76 MΩ to 0.48 MΩ, respectively. The activation energy related to grain-boundary relaxation drops from 1.14 eV to 0.80 eV, while the value of grain stays unchanged at about 0.11 eV. The Schottky barrier of the CCTO sample decreases from 0.65 eV to 0.57 eV. It is also proposed that the nonlinearity of current-voltage property for CCTO ceramics may be strongly related to the relaxation processes of grain boundaries.

  4. Tuning the electrical conductance of metalloporphyrin supramolecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori, Mohammed; Aragonès, Albert C.; di Palma, Giuseppe; Darwish, Nadim; Bailey, Steven W. D.; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Grace, Iain; Amabilino, David B.; González-Campo, Arántzazu; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Lambert, Colin J.

    2016-11-01

    In contrast with conventional single-molecule junctions, in which the current flows parallel to the long axis or plane of a molecule, we investigate the transport properties of M(II)-5,15-diphenylporphyrin (M-DPP) single-molecule junctions (M=Co, Ni, Cu, or Zn divalent metal ions), in which the current flows perpendicular to the plane of the porphyrin. Novel STM-based conductance measurements combined with quantum transport calculations demonstrate that current-perpendicular-to-the-plane (CPP) junctions have three-orders-of-magnitude higher electrical conductances than their current-in-plane (CIP) counterparts, ranging from 2.10‑2 G0 for Ni-DPP up to 8.10‑2 G0 for Zn-DPP. The metal ion in the center of the DPP skeletons is strongly coordinated with the nitrogens of the pyridyl coated electrodes, with a binding energy that is sensitive to the choice of metal ion. We find that the binding energies of Zn-DPP and Co-DPP are significantly higher than those of Ni-DPP and Cu-DPP. Therefore when combined with its higher conductance, we identify Zn-DPP as the favoured candidate for high-conductance CPP single-molecule devices.

  5. Investigation of Thermal and Electrical Properties for Conductive Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juwhari, Hassan K.; Abuobaid, Ahmad; Zihlif, Awwad M.; Elimat, Ziad M.

    2017-10-01

    This study addresses the effects of temperature ranging from 300 K to 400 K on thermal ( κ) and electrical ( σ) conductivities, and Lorenz number ( L) for different conductive polymeric composites (CPCs), as tailoring the ratios between both conductivities of the composites can be influential in the design optimization of certain thermo-electronic devices. Both κ and σ were found to have either a linear or a nonlinear (2nd and 3rd degree polynomial function) increasing behavior with increased temperatures, depending on the conduction mechanism occurring in the composite systems studied. Temperature-dependent behavior of L tends to show decreasing trends above 300 K, where at 300 K the highest and the lowest values were found to be 3 × 103 W Ω/K2 for CPCs containing iron particles and 3 × 10-2 W Ω/K2 for CPCs-containing carbon fibers respectively. Overall, temperature-dependent behavior of κ/ σ and L can be controlled by heterogeneous structures produced via mechanical-molding-compression. These structures are mainly responsible for energy-transfer processes or transport properties that take place by electrons and phonons in the CPCs' bulks. Hence, the outcome is considered significant in the development process of high performing materials for the thermo-electronic industry.

  6. Electric pulp tester conductance through various interface media.

    PubMed

    Mickel, André K; Lindquist, Kimberly A D; Chogle, Sami; Jones, Jefferson J; Curd, Francis

    2006-12-01

    A conducting media is necessary when using an electric pulp tester (EPT). The objective of this study was to observe differences in conductance through various media. We hypothesized that variations in current conductance through different media exist. The pulp chamber of a freshly extracted premolar was exposed, and the cathode of a voltmeter was inserted into the pulpal tissue. The anode was coupled to the EPT handpiece. The measurement taken during dry (no interface media) EPT tip-to-tooth contact was 0 V, which served as negative control. EPT tip directly touching the cathode measured 3.9V and served as positive control. A number of media readily available in the dental office were tested. Data was analyzed using single factor ANOVA. Listerine (3.3) conducted the most voltage (p<0.5). Of nonliquids, K-Y Brand UltraGel and Crest Baking Soda & Peroxide Whitening Tartar Control toothpaste recorded significantly (p<0.05) higher voltage readings (1.4 V).

  7. Tuning the electrical conductance of metalloporphyrin supramolecular wires

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Mohammed; Aragonès, Albert C.; Di Palma, Giuseppe; Darwish, Nadim; Bailey, Steven W. D.; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Grace, Iain; Amabilino, David B.; González-Campo, Arántzazu; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Lambert, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast with conventional single-molecule junctions, in which the current flows parallel to the long axis or plane of a molecule, we investigate the transport properties of M(II)-5,15-diphenylporphyrin (M-DPP) single-molecule junctions (M=Co, Ni, Cu, or Zn divalent metal ions), in which the current flows perpendicular to the plane of the porphyrin. Novel STM-based conductance measurements combined with quantum transport calculations demonstrate that current-perpendicular-to-the-plane (CPP) junctions have three-orders-of-magnitude higher electrical conductances than their current-in-plane (CIP) counterparts, ranging from 2.10−2 G0 for Ni-DPP up to 8.10−2 G0 for Zn-DPP. The metal ion in the center of the DPP skeletons is strongly coordinated with the nitrogens of the pyridyl coated electrodes, with a binding energy that is sensitive to the choice of metal ion. We find that the binding energies of Zn-DPP and Co-DPP are significantly higher than those of Ni-DPP and Cu-DPP. Therefore when combined with its higher conductance, we identify Zn-DPP as the favoured candidate for high-conductance CPP single-molecule devices. PMID:27869128

  8. Synthesis and applications of electrically conducting polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Bon-Cheol

    This research focuses on the synthesis and applications of electrically conducting polymer nanocomposites through molecular self-assembly. Two different classes of polymers, polyaniline (PANI) and polyacetylenes have been synthesized by biomimetic catalysis and spontaneous polymerization method. For gas barrier materials, commercially available polymers, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly (acrylic acid) (PAA), have also been used and thermally cross-linked. The morphological, optical and electrical properties of amphiphilic polyacetylenes have been studied. Furthermore, barrier properties, permselectivity, pervaporation properties of polyacetylenes/aluminosilicate nanocomposites have been investigated. For processability and electrical properties of carbon nanotube and conducting polymers, substituted ionic polyacetylenes (SIPA) have been covalently incorporated onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using the "grafting-from" technique. In the first study, a nanocomposite film catalyst has been prepared by electrostatic layer-by-layer (ELBL) self-assembly of a polyelectrolyte and a biomimetic catalyst for synthesis of polyaniline. Poly(dimethyl diallylammonium chloride) (PDAC) and hematin have been used as polycation and counter anions, respectively. The absorption spectra by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy showed that conductive form polyaniline was formed not only as a coating on the surface of the ELBL composites but was also formed in solution. Furthermore, it was found that the reaction rate was affected by pH and concentration of hematin in the multilayers. The feasibility of controlled desorption of hematin molecules from the LBL assembly was explored and demonstrated by changing the pH and hematin concentration. The polymerization rate of aniline in solution was enhanced with decreasing pH of the solutions due to increased desorption of hematin nanoparticles from the multilayers. These ELBL hematin assemblies demonstrated both a way to functionalize

  9. Acidosis slows electrical conduction through the atrio-ventricular node

    PubMed Central

    Nisbet, Ashley M.; Burton, Francis L.; Walker, Nicola L.; Craig, Margaret A.; Cheng, Hongwei; Hancox, Jules C.; Orchard, Clive H.; Smith, Godfrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Acidosis affects the mechanical and electrical activity of mammalian hearts but comparatively little is known about its effects on the function of the atrio-ventricular node (AVN). In this study, the electrical activity of the epicardial surface of the left ventricle of isolated Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts was examined using optical methods. Perfusion with hypercapnic Tyrode's solution (20% CO2, pH 6.7) increased the time of earliest activation (Tact) from 100.5 ± 7.9 to 166.1 ± 7.2 ms (n = 8) at a pacing cycle length (PCL) of 300 ms (37°C). Tact increased at shorter PCL, and the hypercapnic solution prolonged Tact further: at 150 ms PCL, Tact was prolonged from 131.0 ± 5.2 to 174.9 ± 16.3 ms. 2:1 AVN block was common at shorter cycle lengths. Atrial and ventricular conduction times were not significantly affected by the hypercapnic solution suggesting that the increased delay originated in the AVN. Isolated right atrial preparations were superfused with Tyrode's solutions at pH 7.4 (control), 6.8 and 6.3. Low pH prolonged the atrial-Hisian (AH) interval, the AVN effective and functional refractory periods and Wenckebach cycle length significantly. Complete AVN block occurred in 6 out of 9 preparations. Optical imaging of conduction at the AV junction revealed increased conduction delay in the region of the AVN, with less marked effects in atrial and ventricular tissue. Thus acidosis can dramatically prolong the AVN delay, and in combination with short cycle lengths, this can cause partial or complete AVN block and is therefore implicated in the development of brady-arrhythmias in conditions of local or systemic acidosis. PMID:25009505

  10. Acidosis slows electrical conduction through the atrio-ventricular node.

    PubMed

    Nisbet, Ashley M; Burton, Francis L; Walker, Nicola L; Craig, Margaret A; Cheng, Hongwei; Hancox, Jules C; Orchard, Clive H; Smith, Godfrey L

    2014-01-01

    Acidosis affects the mechanical and electrical activity of mammalian hearts but comparatively little is known about its effects on the function of the atrio-ventricular node (AVN). In this study, the electrical activity of the epicardial surface of the left ventricle of isolated Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts was examined using optical methods. Perfusion with hypercapnic Tyrode's solution (20% CO2, pH 6.7) increased the time of earliest activation (Tact) from 100.5 ± 7.9 to 166.1 ± 7.2 ms (n = 8) at a pacing cycle length (PCL) of 300 ms (37°C). Tact increased at shorter PCL, and the hypercapnic solution prolonged Tact further: at 150 ms PCL, Tact was prolonged from 131.0 ± 5.2 to 174.9 ± 16.3 ms. 2:1 AVN block was common at shorter cycle lengths. Atrial and ventricular conduction times were not significantly affected by the hypercapnic solution suggesting that the increased delay originated in the AVN. Isolated right atrial preparations were superfused with Tyrode's solutions at pH 7.4 (control), 6.8 and 6.3. Low pH prolonged the atrial-Hisian (AH) interval, the AVN effective and functional refractory periods and Wenckebach cycle length significantly. Complete AVN block occurred in 6 out of 9 preparations. Optical imaging of conduction at the AV junction revealed increased conduction delay in the region of the AVN, with less marked effects in atrial and ventricular tissue. Thus acidosis can dramatically prolong the AVN delay, and in combination with short cycle lengths, this can cause partial or complete AVN block and is therefore implicated in the development of brady-arrhythmias in conditions of local or systemic acidosis.

  11. Electrical conductivity of carbonaceous chondrites and electric heating of meteorite parent bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duba, AL

    1987-01-01

    Electromagnetic heating of rock-forming materials most probably was an important process in the early history of the solar system. Electrical conductivity experiments of representative materials such as carbonaceous chondrites are necessary to obtain data for use in electromagnetic heating models. With the assumption that carbon was present at grain boundaries in the material that comprised the meteorite parent bodies, the electrical heating of such bodies was calculated as a function of body size and solar distance using the T-Tauri model of Sonett and Herbert (1977). The results are discussed.

  12. Imaging in electrically conductive porous media without frequency encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann-Horn, J. A.; Walbrecker, J. O.

    2012-07-01

    Understanding multi-phase fluid flow and transport processes under various pressure, temperature, and salinity conditions is a key feature in many remote monitoring applications, such as long-term storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) or nuclear waste in geological formations. We propose a low-field NMR tomographic method to non-invasively image the water-content distribution in electrically conductive formations in relatively large-scale experiments (˜1 m3 sample volumes). Operating in the weak magnetic field of Earth entails low Larmor frequencies at which electromagnetic fields can penetrate electrically conductive material. The low signal strengths associated with NMR in Earth's field are enhanced by pre-polarization before signal recording. To localize the origin of the NMR signal in the sample region we do not employ magnetic field gradients, as is done in conventional NMR imaging, because they can be difficult to control in the large sample volumes that we are concerned with, and may be biased by magnetic materials in the sample. Instead, we utilize the spatially dependent inhomogeneity of fields generated by surface coils that are installed around the sample volume. This relatively simple setup makes the instrument inexpensive and mobile (it can be potentially installed in remote locations outside of a laboratory), while allowing spatial resolution of the order of 10 cm. We demonstrate the general feasibility of our approach in a simulated CO2 injection experiment, where we locate and quantify the drop in water content following gas injection into a water-saturated cylindrical sample of 0.45 m radius and 0.9 m height. Our setup comprises four surface coils and an array consisting of three volume coils surrounding the sample. The proposed tomographic NMR methodology provides a more direct estimate of fluid content and properties than can be achieved with acoustic or electromagnetic methods alone. Therefore, we expect that our proposed method is relevant for

  13. Imaging in electrically conductive porous media without frequency encoding.

    PubMed

    Lehmann-Horn, J A; Walbrecker, J O

    2012-07-01

    Understanding multi-phase fluid flow and transport processes under various pressure, temperature, and salinity conditions is a key feature in many remote monitoring applications, such as long-term storage of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) or nuclear waste in geological formations. We propose a low-field NMR tomographic method to non-invasively image the water-content distribution in electrically conductive formations in relatively large-scale experiments (∼1 m(3) sample volumes). Operating in the weak magnetic field of Earth entails low Larmor frequencies at which electromagnetic fields can penetrate electrically conductive material. The low signal strengths associated with NMR in Earth's field are enhanced by pre-polarization before signal recording. To localize the origin of the NMR signal in the sample region we do not employ magnetic field gradients, as is done in conventional NMR imaging, because they can be difficult to control in the large sample volumes that we are concerned with, and may be biased by magnetic materials in the sample. Instead, we utilize the spatially dependent inhomogeneity of fields generated by surface coils that are installed around the sample volume. This relatively simple setup makes the instrument inexpensive and mobile (it can be potentially installed in remote locations outside of a laboratory), while allowing spatial resolution of the order of 10 cm. We demonstrate the general feasibility of our approach in a simulated CO(2) injection experiment, where we locate and quantify the drop in water content following gas injection into a water-saturated cylindrical sample of 0.45 m radius and 0.9 m height. Our setup comprises four surface coils and an array consisting of three volume coils surrounding the sample. The proposed tomographic NMR methodology provides a more direct estimate of fluid content and properties than can be achieved with acoustic or electromagnetic methods alone. Therefore, we expect that our proposed method is relevant

  14. Electrical Conductivity Measurements in Strongly Coupled Metal Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desilva, Alan; Katsouros, Joseph

    1999-11-01

    We measure the electrical conductivity of strongly coupled plasmas of various metals, including aluminum, iron, copper, and tungsten, in the temperature range 6-30 kK, in a density range from about 1/2 solid density down to about 10-3 times solid density. These plasmas may have coupling parameters (ratio of mean interparticle Coulomb energy to mean kinetic energy) ranging from as high as 50 down to unity. Plasmas are created by rapid vaporization of metal wire in a water bath which act as a tamper. Streak photography serves to determine the growth of the plasma radius in time, allowing determination of mean density. Temperature is deduced from the measured energy input in conjunction with an equation of state from the LANL SESAME database [1], and a brightness temperature may be obtained from radiation measurements. The column resistance is determined from time-resolved voltage and current measurements. Results of conductivity measurements will be shown and compared with the predictions of conductivity theories. 1.SESAME: The Los Alamos National Laboratory Equation of State Database, Report LA-UR-92-3407, ed. S. P. Lyon and J. D. Johnson, Group T-1.

  15. Gellan gum-graft-polyaniline--An electrical conducting biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Karthika, J S; Vishalakshi, B; Naik, Jagadish

    2016-01-01

    Grafting of polyaniline (PANI) on to gellan gum (GG) was carried out in the presence of catalytic amount of ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS) as oxidant/initiator under mild acidic conditions by microwave irradiation technique. The grafting condition was optimized by varying the microwave power, exposure time and the composition of the reaction mixture. The graft copolymer GG-g-PANI was characterized by FTIR, TGA, UV/vis, (1)H NMR and SEM techniques. The characteristic peaks at 1506, 1462, 1070 and 830 cm(-1) in the IR spectrum and signals at 7.3, 7.2, 7.1 and 4.0 δ in the (1)H NMR spectrum confirms the grafting process. The TGA data reveals GG-g-PANI to be thermally less stable than GG. The optimum grafting was observed when the reaction mixture containing 0.066 mmol APS, 0.1M aniline, 1M hydrochloric acid and 0.1g/dL GG was exposed to 80 W microwave power for 40s. The DC and AC conductivity of the GG-g-PANI were measured using the 'Two-point probe' method based on which the dielectric properties were evaluated. GG-g-PANI exhibited appreciable electrical conductivity, which increased with the extent of grafting. The results indicate threefold increase in DC conductivity of graft copolymer as compared to GG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Water uptake by growing cells: an assessment of the controlling roles of wall relaxation, solute uptake, and hydraulic conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Growing plant cells increase in volume principally by water uptake into the vacuole. There are only three general mechanisms by which a cell can modulate the process of water uptake: (a) by relaxing wall stress to reduce cell turgor pressure (thereby reducing cell water potential), (b) by modifying the solute content of the cell or its surroundings (likewise affecting water potential), and (c) by changing the hydraulic conductance of the water uptake pathway (this works only for cells remote from water potential equilibrium). Recent studies supporting each of these potential mechanisms are reviewed and critically assessed. The importance of solute uptake and hydraulic conductance is advocated by some recent studies, but the evidence is indirect and conclusions remain controversial. For most growing plant cells with substantial turgor pressure, it appears that reduction in cell turgor pressure, as a consequence of wall relaxation, serves as the major initiator and control point for plant cell enlargement. Two views of wall relaxation as a viscoelastic or a chemorheological process are compared and distinguished.

  17. Conduction mechanism and dielectric relaxation in high dielectric KxTiyNi1-x-yO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Pradip Kumar; Sarkar, Sudipta; Karmakar, Shilpi; Chaudhuri, B. K.

    2007-10-01

    Complex impedance spectroscopic study has been made to elucidate the conductivity mechanism and dielectric relaxations in a low loss giant dielectric (ɛ'˜104) KxTiyNi1-x-yO (KTNO) system with x =0.05-0.30 and y =0.02 over a wide temperature range (200-400K). Below ambient temperature (300K), dc conductivity follows variable range hopping mechanism. The estimated activation energy for dielectric relaxation is found to be higher than the corresponding polaron hopping energy, which is attributed to the combined effect of K-doped grains and highly disordered grain boundary (GB) contributions in KTNO. Observed sharp fall of ɛ' below ˜270K is ascribed to the freezing of charge carriers. Comparatively lower value of relaxation time distribution parameter β of KTNO than that of the CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) system reveals more disorder in KTNO. It is also found that KTNO is structurally more stable compared to the CCTO system, both having giant ɛ' value.

  18. Water uptake by growing cells: an assessment of the controlling roles of wall relaxation, solute uptake, and hydraulic conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Growing plant cells increase in volume principally by water uptake into the vacuole. There are only three general mechanisms by which a cell can modulate the process of water uptake: (a) by relaxing wall stress to reduce cell turgor pressure (thereby reducing cell water potential), (b) by modifying the solute content of the cell or its surroundings (likewise affecting water potential), and (c) by changing the hydraulic conductance of the water uptake pathway (this works only for cells remote from water potential equilibrium). Recent studies supporting each of these potential mechanisms are reviewed and critically assessed. The importance of solute uptake and hydraulic conductance is advocated by some recent studies, but the evidence is indirect and conclusions remain controversial. For most growing plant cells with substantial turgor pressure, it appears that reduction in cell turgor pressure, as a consequence of wall relaxation, serves as the major initiator and control point for plant cell enlargement. Two views of wall relaxation as a viscoelastic or a chemorheological process are compared and distinguished.

  19. Ventricular fibrillation risk estimation for conducted electrical weapons: critical convolutions.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Mark W; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Rahko, Peter S; Panescu, Dorin

    2011-01-01

    The TASER® Conducted Electrical Weapon (CEW) is used by law enforcement agencies about 900 times per day worldwide and has been shown to reduce suspect and officer injuries by about 65%. However, since a CEW delivers rapid electrical pulses through injected probes, the risk of inducing ventricular fibrillation (VF) has been considered. Animal studies have shown that the tip of the probe must come within a few millimeters of the surface of the heart for the CEW to induce VF in a typical animal application. Early calculations of the CEW VF risk in humans used sophisticated 3-D chest models to determine the size of the probe landing areas that had cardiac tissue within a given distance of the inner surface of the ribs. This produced a distribution of area (cm(2)) vs. mm of depth. Echocardiography was then used to determine the shortest distance from the skin surface to the cardiac surface. This produced a population distribution of skin-to-heart (STH) distances. These 2 distributions were then convolved to arrive at a probability of inducing VF for a typical human CEW application. With 900, 000 probe-mode field uses to date, epidemiological results have shown that these initial VF risk estimates were significant overestimates. We present model refinements that take into account the gender and body-mass-index (BMI) of the target demographics and produce VF risk estimates concordant with the epidemiological results. The risk of VF is estimated at 0.4 per million uses with males.

  20. Facile synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and improved electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjun; Luo, Lijie; Zhou, Longchang; Mo, Libin; Tong, Zhangfa

    2010-02-01

    A layer of catalyst film on substrate is usually required during the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials. In this work, however, a novel approach for synthesizing high-purity bamboo-like boron nitride (BN) nanotubes directly on commercial stainless steel foils was demonstrated. Synthesis was realized by heating boron and zinc oxide (ZnO) powders at 1200 degrees C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. The stainless steel foils played an additional role of catalyst besides the substrate during the VLS growth of the nanotubes. In addition, the electrical conductivity of the BN nanotubes was efficiently improved in a simple way by coating with Au and Pd nanoparticles. The decorated BN nanotubes may find potential applications in catalysts, sensors and nanoelectronics.

  1. Polymeric salt bridges for conducting electric current in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J [Livermore, CA; Tichenor, Mark S [San Diego, CA; Artau, Alexander [Humacao, PR

    2009-11-17

    A "cast-in-place" monolithic microporous polymer salt bridge for conducting electrical current in microfluidic devices, and methods for manufacture thereof is disclosed. Polymeric salt bridges are formed in place in capillaries or microchannels. Formulations are prepared with monomer, suitable cross-linkers, solvent, and a thermal or radiation responsive initiator. The formulation is placed in a desired location and then suitable radiation such as UV light is used to polymerize the salt bridge within a desired structural location. Embodiments are provided wherein the polymeric salt bridges have sufficient porosity to allow ionic migration without bulk flow of solvents therethrough. The salt bridges form barriers that seal against fluid pressures in excess of 5000 pounds per square inch. The salt bridges can be formulated for carriage of suitable amperage at a desired voltage, and thus microfluidic devices using such salt bridges can be specifically constructed to meet selected analytical requirements.

  2. System and method for determining velocity of electrically conductive fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A. (Inventor); Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Markusic, Thomas E. (Inventor); Stanojev, Boris Johann (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A flowing electrically-conductive fluid is controlled between an upstream and downstream location thereof to insure that a convection timescale of the flowing fluid is less than a thermal diffusion timescale of the flowing fluid. First and second nodes of a current-carrying circuit are coupled to the fluid at the upstream location. A current pulse is applied to the current-carrying circuit so that the current pulse travels through the flowing fluid to thereby generate a thermal feature therein at the upstream location. The thermal feature is convected to the downstream location where it is monitored to detect a peak associated with the thermal feature so-convected. The velocity of the fluid flow is determined using a time-of-flight analysis.

  3. Electrically conductive and optically active porous silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yongquan; Liao, Lei; Li, Yujing; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2009-12-01

    We report the synthesis of vertical silicon nanowire array through a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching of highly doped n-type silicon (100) wafers in a solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The morphology of the as-grown silicon nanowires is tunable from solid nonporous nanowires, nonporous/nanoporous core/shell nanowires, to entirely nanoporous nanowires by controlling the hydrogen peroxide concentration in the etching solution. The porous silicon nanowires retain the single crystalline structure and crystallographic orientation of the starting silicon wafer and are electrically conductive and optically active with visible photoluminescence. The combination of electronic and optical properties in the porous silicon nanowires may provide a platform for novel optoelectronic devices for energy harvesting, conversion, and biosensing.

  4. Electrically conductive, optically transparent polymer/carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effective dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into polymer matrices. The nanocomposites are prepared using polymer matrices and exhibit a unique combination of properties, most notably, high retention of optical transparency in the visible range (i.e., 400-800 nm), electrical conductivity, and high thermal stability. By appropriate selection of the matrix resin, additional properties such as vacuum ultraviolet radiation resistance, atomic oxygen resistance, high glass transition (T.sub.g) temperatures, and excellent toughness can be attained. The resulting nanocomposites can be used to fabricate or formulate a variety of articles such as coatings on a variety of substrates, films, foams, fibers, threads, adhesives and fiber coated prepreg. The properties of the nanocomposites can be adjusted by selection of the polymer matrix and CNT to fabricate articles that possess high optical transparency and antistatic behavior.

  5. Microwave synthesis of electrically conductive gold nanowires on DNA scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Subrata; Liang, Hong

    2008-09-02

    Biological molecules, in particular DNA, have shown great potential to be used as interconnects of nanodevices and computational elements. In this research, we synthesized electrically conductive gold nanowires for the first time exploiting an electroless and microwave heating method for 120-180 s. Our results indicate that DNA serves as a reducing and nonspecific capping agent for the growth of nanowires. The current voltage ( I- V) characteristics of the Au nanowires are continuous, exhibiting Ohmic behavior having low contact resistance with the gold electrodes. The nanowires have a diameter of 10-15 nm in solution and of 20-30 nm in immobilized DNA with resistivity comparable to pure metals. The method is highly selective with deposition confined to the DNA itself. The nanowires we fabricated can be used as building blocks for functional nanodevices, sensors, and optoelectronics.

  6. Theoretic analysis on electric conductance of nano-wire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, N.-C.; Chiang, Y.-R.; Hsu, S.-L.

    2010-01-01

    By employing the commercial software nanoMos and Vienna ab Initio Simulation Package ( VASP), the performance of nano-wire field-effect transistors is investigated. In this paper, the Density-Gradient Model (DG Model) is used to describe the carrier transport behavior of the nano-wire transistor under quantum effects. The analysis of the drain current with respect to channel length, body dielectric constant and gate contact work function is presented. In addition, Fermi energy and DOS (Density of State) are introduced to explore the relative stability of carrier transport and electrical conductance for the silicon crystal with dopants. Finally, how the roughness of the surface of the silicon-based crystal is affected by dopants and their allocation can be illuminated by a few broken bonds between atoms near the skin of the crystal.

  7. TASER conducted electrical weapons and implanted pacemakers and defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Vanga, Subba R; Bommana, Sudharani; Kroll, Mark W; Swerdlow, Charles; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2009-01-01

    Conducted electrical weapons (CEW) have generated controversy in recent years regarding their effect on heart rhythm and on their suspected interaction with implanted devices such as the pacemakers and ICDs (implantable cardioverter defibrillators). We review the current evidence available on device interactions and pre-sent a new case series of 6 patients. We used the available case reports and animal studies on TASER or CEW related publications in PubMed. Oversensing of TASER CEW discharges may cause noise reversion pacing in pacemakers and inappropriate detection of VF in ICDs. The nominal 5-second discharge is sufficiently short that neither clinically significant inhibition of bradycardia pacing nor inappropriate ICD shocks have been reported. Current evidence indicates that CEW discharges do not have adverse effects on pacemakers and ICDs.

  8. Chemical Events in Conducting and Synaptic Membrances during Electrical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nachmansohn, David

    1971-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated in recent years for the central role of proteins and enzymes in the function of cell membranes. In the chemical theory proposed for the generation of bioelectricity, i.e., for the control of the ion permeability changes of excitable membranes, the protein assembly associated with the action of acetylcholine plays an essential role. Support of the theory by recent protein studies in which the excitable membranes of the highly specialized electric tissue were used will be discussed. A scheme is presented indicating the possible sequence of chemical reactions that change ion permeability after excitation. A sequence of chemical events within the excitable membranes of the synaptic junctions, i.e., within the pre- and postsynaptic membranes, similar to that proposed for the conducting membranes, is presented in a second scheme as an alternative to the hypothesis of the role of acetylcholine as a transmitter between two cells. Images PMID:4332011

  9. Lunar magnetic permeability, magnetic fields, and electrical conductivity temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkin, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    In the time period 1969-1972 a total of five magnetometers were deployed on the lunar surface during four Apollo missions. Data from these instruments, along with simultaneous measurements from other experiments on the moon and in lunar orbit, were used to study properties of the lunar interior and the lunar environment. The principal scientific results from analyses of the magnetic field data are discussed. The results are presented in the following main categories: (1) lunar electrical conductivity, temperature, and structure; (2) lunar magnetic permeability, iron abundance, and core size limits; (3) the local remnant magnetic fields, their interaction with the solar wind, and a thermoelectric generator model for their origin. Relevant publications and presented papers are listed.

  10. Reduction Kinetics and Electrical Conductivity in Lead Disilicate Glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sajal

    Reduced lead silicate based glasses constitute the active element in night vision devices. The thermochemical reduction of these glasses is necessary to render them electronically conducting. In this thesis some of the more important reduction parameters and their influence on the post-reduction have been identified. The aim of this work was to establish the conduction mechanism(s) responsible in these glasses. The samples were reduced in hydrogen of varying moisture content, in the temperature range of 330-500 ^circC for various times. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric measurements clearly established that the reduction resulted in the formation of metallic lead islands with a diameter of ~4 nm, with an inter-island spacing of ~ 3.4 nm. In contrast to the electrical conductivity, the microstructure was found to be a weak function of reduction parameters. No coarsening of the microstructure was observed even after extended anneals at high temperatures, strongly suggesting that the final lead-island size was dictated by the size of the holes either present in the parent glass or formed as a result of reduction, in an otherwise rigid glass network. The electronic conductivity was found to go through a minimum with reduction temperature. Increasing the moisture content of the reducing gas resulted in an increase in the post-reduction resistance and in the sharpness of the minimum. The post-reduction activation energies were measured to be ~0.09 eV and found to be independent of all reduction variables, indicating that a single conduction mechanism was operative in all cases. The variation in conductivity was ascribed to variation in the number of mobile carriers. The mechanism of conduction was proposed to be that of a bipolaron hopping between Pb^{4+} and Pb ^{2+} ions, the former forming as a result of a disproportionation reaction that takes place during reduction and/or cooling of the samples from the reduction temperature. The electron transport is believed

  11. Identification of current density distribution in electrically conducting subject with anisotropic conductivity distribution.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Hyun Chan; Kwon, Ohin; Seo, Jin Keun; Woo, Eung Je

    2005-07-07

    Current density imaging (CDI) is able to visualize a three-dimensional current density distribution J inside an electrically conducting subject caused by an externally applied current. CDI may use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to measure the induced magnetic flux density B and compute J via the Ampere law [Formula: see text]. However, measuring all three components of B = (B(x), B(y), B(z)) has a technical difficulty due to the requirement of orthogonal rotations of the subject inside the MRI scanner. In this work, we propose a new method of reconstructing a current density image using only B(z) data so that we can avoid the subject rotation procedure. The method utilizes an auxiliary injection current to compensate the missing information of B(x) and B(y). The major advantage of the method is its applicability to a subject with an anisotropic conductivity distribution. Numerical experiments show the feasibility of the new technique.

  12. Development of Tailorable Electrically Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. S.; Harada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The optical characteristics of surfaces on spacecraft are fundamental parameters in controlling its temperature. Passive thermal control coatings with designed solar absorptance and infrared emittance properties have been developed and have been in use for some time. In this total space environment, the coating must be stable and maintain its desired optical properties as well as mechanical properties for the course of the mission lifetime. The mission lifetimes are increasing and in our quest to save weight, newer substrates are being integrated which limit electrical grounding schemes. All of this has added to already existing concerns about spacecraft charging and related spacecraft failures or operational failures. The concern is even greater for thermal control surfaces that are very large. One way of alleviating such concerns is to design new thermal control material systems (TCMS) that can help to mitigate charging via providing charge leakage paths. The objective of this program was to develop two types of passive electrically conductive TCMS. The first was a highly absorbing/emitting black surface and the second was a low (alpha(sub s)/epsilon(sub N)) type white surface. The surface resistance goals for the black absorber was 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) Omega/square, and for the white surfaces it was 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 10) Omega/square. Several material system concepts were suggested and evaluated for space environment stability and electrical performance characterization. Our efforts in designing and evaluating these material systems have resulted in several developments. New concepts, pigments and binders have been developed to provide new engineering quality TCMS. Some of these have already found application on space hardware, some are waiting to be recognized by thermal designers, and some require further detailed studies to become state-of-the-art for future space hardware and space structures. Our studies on baseline state-of-the-art materials and

  13. Relaxation in photo-induced conductivity of polycrystalline BiFeO3 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zengwei; Liu, Baoting

    2015-08-01

    Polycrystalline BiFeO3 (BFO) film is deposited on Pt(1 1 1)/Ti/SiO2/Si(0 0 1) substrate via magnetron sputtering. Integrated Pt/SrRuO3 (SRO) are used to be top electrode to produce the Pt/SRO/BFO/Pt thin film capacitor. The remanent polarization is 59.5, 69.3, 77 and 89.8 μC/cm2 measured at 22.5, 25, 27.5 and 30 V, respectively. The photoconductivity is reported in BFO film under the illumination by the 5 mW/cm2 purple light of 404 nm. It is found that the leakage current density in purple light displays the tendency of decline with the increased illumination times, which can be explained by the recombination and capture of the photo-induced charges by the ionized vacancies. The relaxation time for the illuminated leakage current density reaching the steady state is 210 and 570 s at positive and negative bias, respectively. The obtained large relaxation time at negative bias is considered to be that negative bias is in the same direction as the SRO/BFO interface field.

  14. DNA origami metallized site specifically to form electrically conductive nanowires.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Anthony C; Liu, Jianfei; Pound, Elisabeth; Uprety, Bibek; Woolley, Adam T; Davis, Robert C; Harb, John N

    2012-09-06

    DNA origami is a promising tool for use as a template in the design and fabrication of nanoscale structures. The ability to engineer selected staple strands on a DNA origami structure provides a high density of addressable locations across the structure. Here we report a method using site-specific attachment of gold nanoparticles to modified staple strands and subsequent metallization to fabricate conductive wires from DNA origami templates. We have modified DNA origami structures by lengthening each staple strand in select regions with a 10-base nucleotide sequence and have attached DNA-modified gold nanoparticles to the lengthened staple strands via complementary base-pairing. The high density of extended staple strands allowed the gold nanoparticles to pack tightly in the modified regions of the DNA origami, where the measured median gap size between neighboring particles was 4.1 nm. Gold metallization processes were optimized so that the attached gold nanoparticles grew until gaps between particles were filled and uniform continuous nanowires were formed. Finally, electron beam lithography was used to pattern electrodes in order to measure the electrical conductivity of metallized DNA origami, which showed an average resistance of 2.4 kΩ per metallized structure.

  15. Electrical conductivity of silicate liquids and a magma ocean dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stixrude, Lars; Scipioni, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    Are silicate dynamos possible? So far planetary dynamos seated in silicate material are unknown. Several lines of evidence motivate the consideration of a silicate dynamo in the early Earth: 1) Paleomagnetic evidence of a very early dynamo-generated field 2) models of the early thermal state of Earth in which the mantle may have been too hot to permit a core-generated magnetic field, and 3) the possibility of a deep and thick basal magma ocean. The key requirement is that the electrical conductivity σ of silicate liquids be sufficiently large at the relevant high pressure-temperature conditions (σ > 1000 S/m). Despite its importance, σ of silicate liquids is unknown above a few GPa in pressure, and measured values at low pressure are far too small to support a dynamo. However, observations of reflectivity from oxide liquids in shock wave experiments suggest a different mechanism of conductivity at high pressure (electrons, rather than ions). We have used ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to compute from first principles the value of σ at extreme conditions in systems with compositions that are simple (SiO2) and rich (MgO-FeO-CaO-Al2O3-Na2O-SiO2). We use DFT+U with and without spin polarization combined with the Kubo-Greenwood formula. We find that the value of σ exceeds the minimum requirements and that a silicate dynamo seated in a basal magma ocean is viable.

  16. Electrical conduction mechanisms of metal/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, F.-C.; Chou, H.-W.; Lee, Joseph Yamin

    2005-05-15

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors that incorporate La{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric films were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. In this work, the essential structures and electrical properties of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were investigated. Capacitance-voltage, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that an interfacial layer was formed, subsequently reducing the effective dielectric constant of the 700 deg. C annealed La{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films. The dominant conduction mechanism of the Al/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-Si metal-lanthanum oxide-semiconductor capacitor is space-charge-limited current from 300 to 465 K in the accumulation mode. Three different regions, Ohm's law region, trap-filled-limited region, and Child's law region, were observed in the current-density-voltage (J-V) characteristics at room temperature. The activation energy of traps calculated from the Arrhenius plots was about 0.21{+-}0.01 eV. The electronic mobility, trap density, dielectric relaxation time, and density of states in the conduction band were determined from the space-charge-limited conduction at room temperature.

  17. Nonlinear electrical conductivity in a 1D granular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcon, E.; Castaing, B.; Creyssels, M.

    2004-04-01

    We report on observations of the electrical transport within a chain of metallic beads (slightly oxidized) under an applied stress. A transition from an insulating to a conductive state is observed as the applied current is increased. The voltage-current ( U- I) characteristics are nonlinear and hysteretic, and saturate to a low voltage per contact (0.4 V). Our 1D experiment allows us to understand phenomena (such as the “Branly effect”) related to this conduction transition by focusing on the nature of the contacts instead of the structure of the granular network. We show that this transition comes from an electro-thermal coupling in the vicinity of the microcontacts between each bead - the current flowing through these contact points generates their local heating which leads to an increase of their contact areas, and thus enhances their conduction. This current-induced temperature rise (up to 1050 ^{circ}C) results in the microsoldering of the contact points (even for voltages as low as 0.4 V). Based on this self-regulated temperature mechanism, an analytical expression for the nonlinear U- I back trajectory is derived, and is found to be in very good agreement with the experiments. In addition, we can determine the microcontact temperature with no adjustable parameters. Finally, the stress dependence of the resistance is found to be strongly non-hertzian due to the presence of the surface films. This dependence cannot be usually distinguished from the one due to the disorder of the granular contact network in 2D or 3D experiments.

  18. Thermal and electrical conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Davies, Chris; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2012-04-11

    The Earth acts as a gigantic heat engine driven by the decay of radiogenic isotopes and slow cooling, which gives rise to plate tectonics, volcanoes and mountain building. Another key product is the geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid iron core by a dynamo running on heat released by cooling and freezing (as the solid inner core grows), and on chemical convection (due to light elements expelled from the liquid on freezing). The power supplied to the geodynamo, measured by the heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), places constraints on Earth's evolution. Estimates of CMB heat flux depend on properties of iron mixtures under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions in the core, most critically on the thermal and electrical conductivities. These quantities remain poorly known because of inherent experimental and theoretical difficulties. Here we use density functional theory to compute these conductivities in liquid iron mixtures at core conditions from first principles--unlike previous estimates, which relied on extrapolations. The mixtures of iron, oxygen, sulphur and silicon are taken from earlier work and fit the seismologically determined core density and inner-core boundary density jump. We find both conductivities to be two to three times higher than estimates in current use. The changes are so large that core thermal histories and power requirements need to be reassessed. New estimates indicate that the adiabatic heat flux is 15 to 16 terawatts at the CMB, higher than present estimates of CMB heat flux based on mantle convection; the top of the core must be thermally stratified and any convection in the upper core must be driven by chemical convection against the adverse thermal buoyancy or lateral variations in CMB heat flow. Power for the geodynamo is greatly restricted, and future models of mantle evolution will need to incorporate a high CMB heat flux and explain the recent formation of the inner core.

  19. Electrically-conductive proppant and methods for making and using same

    SciTech Connect

    Cannan, Chad; Roper, Todd; Savoy, Steve; Mitchell, Daniel R.

    2016-09-06

    Electrically-conductive sintered, substantially round and spherical particles and methods for producing such electrically-conductive sintered, substantially round and spherical particles from an alumina-containing raw material. Methods for using such electrically-conductive sintered, substantially round and spherical particles in hydraulic fracturing operations.

  20. Microemulsions with surfactant TX100, cyclohexane, and an ionic liquid investigated by conductance, DLS, FTIR measurements, and study of solvent and rotational relaxation within this microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Rajib; Sarkar, Souravi; Ghatak, Chiranjib; Rao, Vishal Govind; Setua, Palash; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2010-06-10

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propyl ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide ([N(3111)][Tf(2)N]), were substituted for polar water and formed nonaqueous microemulsions with cyclohexane by the aid of nonionic surfactant TX-100. The phase behavior of the ternary system was investigated, and microregions of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N]-in-cyclohexane (IL/O), bicontinuous, and cyclohexane-in-[N(3111)][Tf(2)N] (O/IL) were identified by traditional electrical conductivity measurements. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed the formation of the IL microemulsions. The FTIR study of O-H stretching band of TX100 also supports this finding. The dynamics of solvent and rotational relaxation have been investigated in [N(3111)][Tf(2)N]/TX100/cyclohexane microemulsions using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool and coumarin 480 (C-480) as a fluorescence probe. The size of the microemulsions increases with gradual addition of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N], which revealed from DLS measurement. This leads to the faster collective motions of cation and anions of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N], which contributes to faster solvent relaxation in microemulsions.

  1. Spin relaxation and linear-in-electric-field frequency shift in an arbitrary, time-independent magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Steven Michael

    2010-12-03

    A method is presented to calculate the spin relaxation times T{sub 1}, T{sub 2} due to a nonuniform magnetic field, and the linear-in-electric-field precession frequency shift {delta}{omega}{sub E} when an electric field is present, in the diffusion approximation for spins confined to a rectangular cell. It is found that the rectangular cell geometry admits of a general result for T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, and {delta}{omega}{sub E} in terms of the spatial cosine-transform components of the magnetic field.

  2. Introduction of the conducted electrical weapon into a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jeffrey D; Clinton, Joseph E; Lappe, Mark A; Heegaard, William G; Williams, Martin F; Miner, James R

    2011-09-01

    The TASER(®) X26 Conducted Electrical Weapon (CEW) provides painful stimuli and neuromuscular incapacitation to potentially violent persons. Use by law enforcement in society is common. Presenting a CEW is known to de-escalate some situations. Health care personnel sometimes encounter violent persons within the confines of the hospital. CEW use by health care security personnel has not been described. The objective is to describe results from the introduction of the CEW into a hospital environment. Upon introducing the CEW into an urban hospital campus, standardized reports were made describing all CEW use by hospital security. Reports were retrospectively reviewed for the first 12 months of CEW use. Collected data included force options used, potential injuries avoided, witness comments, outcomes, and whether the CEW required full activation or if inactive presentation was sufficient to control the situation. Rates of security personnel injuries were also gathered. Descriptive analysis was applied. Twenty-seven CEW deployments occurred: four were inactive presentation, 20 were presentation with LASER sight activation, and three were probe deployments with a 5-s delivery of electrical current. Two persons required evaluation for minor injuries not related to CEW use. Witnesses reported that in all incidents, injuries were likely avoided due to CEW presentation or use. CEW use aborted one suicide attempt. Personnel injury rates decreased during the study period. CEW introduction into a health care setting demonstrated the ability to avert and control situations that could result in further injury to subjects, patients, and personnel. This correlates with a decrease in injury for hospital personnel. Further study is recommended for validation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Laboratory derived constraints on electrical conductivity beneath Slave craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdassarov, Nikolai S.; Kopylova, Maya G.; Eichert, Sandrine

    2007-04-01

    The depth profile of the electrical conductivity, σ(d), beneath the Central Slave craton (Canada) has been reconstructed with the help of laboratory measurements carried out on peridotite xenoliths. σ(T) of xenoliths was determined in the piston-cylinder apparatus at 1 and 2 GPa and from 600 to 1150 °C. σ(T) of xenoliths follows the Arrhenius dependence with the activation energy, E, varying from 2.10 to 1.44 eV depending on temperature range and the Mg-number. The calculated xenolith geotherm and the suggested lithology beneath the Central Slave have been used to constrain σ(d) as follows: σ(d) in the crust varies between 0.5×10-5 and 10-3 S/m; the lithospheric σ(d) sharply decreases below the Moho at 39.4 km to 0.5×10-8 S/m, which corresponds to 460 °C, and then gradually increases with the depth d to 0.5×10-2 S/m. The modeled MT-response of the constrained σ(d) profile has been compared with MT-observations [Jones, A.G., Lezaeta, P., Ferguson, I.J., Chave, A.D., Evans, R.L., Garcia, X., Spratt J., 2003. The electrical structure of the Slave craton. Lithos, 71, 505-527]. The general trend of the calculated MT-response based on the σ(d) model mimics the MT-inversion of the field data from the Central Slave.

  4. Electrical transport in the normal state of K3C60 fullerides: polaron conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Dinesh; Kaurav, N.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2005-10-01

    We investigate the temperature-dependent normal state resistivity of single-crystal K3C60 within the framework of the polaronic conduction of charge carriers. The electrical resistivity below 100 K can be well fitted by ρe-ph = [Eωs/sinh2(ωs/kBT)] with ωs as 110 K the softest optical phonon mode and E being a constant. Resistivity behaviour is consistent with small-polaron coherent motion, which involves a relaxation due to a soft optical phonon mode that is strongly coupled to the electrons as carriers in doped fullerides. The estimated contribution to resistivity, when subtracted from single-crystal data, implies quadratic temperature dependence over most of the temperature range. The power temperature dependence of ρdiff. = [ρexp.-(ρ0+ρe-ph)] may be attributed to the contribution of the three-dimensional transport mechanism and has been related to electron-electron interaction. It therefore appears that both the electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions play an important role in retracing the electrical transport of alkali intercalated fullerides.

  5. Relationships between electrical conductivity - water content, water potential and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity for three soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussan, Cl.; Ruy, S.; Cousin, I.

    2003-04-01

    In soil physics, water retention and hydraulic conductivity are key parameters for predicting water fluxes in soils. Determination of these hydrodynamic characteristics in the lab, particularly unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, is most often complicated, time consuming and error-prone. These difficulties often prohibit the examination of numerous soil samples for determining these parameters as would be necessary to get a good estimation of the field variability. In this case, an indirect and easy to measure variable, closely linked to water retention or hydraulic conductivity, would be helpful in the assessment of these parameters. Electrical conductivity (EC) is a good candidate for such a variable because, in a porous medium, its magnitude is largely determined by the number of water filled pores and their connectivity. Relationships between water content (or saturation) and EC have been established both from empirical or theoretical point of view for some time. However, relationships between EC and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity are much more scarce, as are experimental data. We present relationships between EC and water content or water potential for three soil types: a clay loam, a sandy loam and a sand. We also present experimental relationship between EC and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity for the sandy loam. The soil were cored in the field with PVC tubes 9.5 cm inner diameter × 3 cm height. Water retention was measured using sand boxes and pressure plates apparatus. Hydraulic conductivity was calculated from the Wind evaporation method and from steady state measurements for low suctions. For each suction, the EC of the bulk was calculated from complex impedance measurements at various frequencies using two circular stainless steal electrodes located above and at the bottom of the soil core. Mercury porosimetry measurements were also performed after the experiments. Water saturation reasonably follows a power-law relationship with relative EC (EC

  6. Temperature Dependence of Density, Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity for Hg-Based II-VI Semiconductor Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Scripa, R. N.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2004-01-01

    The relaxation phenomenon of semiconductor melts, or the change of melt structure with time, impacts the crystal growth process and the eventual quality of the crystal. The thermophysical properties of the melt are good indicators of such changes in melt structure. Also, thermophysical properties are essential to the accurate predication of the crystal growth process by computational modeling. Currently, the temperature dependent thermophysical property data for the Hg-based II-VI semiconductor melts are scarce. This paper reports the results on the temperature dependence of melt density, viscosity and electrical conductivity of Hg-based II-VI compounds. The melt density was measured using a pycnometric method, and the viscosity and electrical conductivity were measured by a transient torque method. Results were compared with available published data and showed good agreement. The implication of the structural changes at different temperature ranges was also studied and discussed.

  7. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTING POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.; Clark, E.; Lascola, R.

    2009-12-16

    Effects of beta (tritium) and gamma irradiation on the surface electrical conductivity of two types of conducting polymer films are documented to determine their potential use as a sensing and surveillance device for the tritium facility. It was shown that surface conductivity was significantly reduced by irradiation with both gamma and tritium gas. In order to compare the results from the two radiation sources, an approximate dose equivalence was calculated. The materials were also sensitive to small radiation doses (<10{sup 5} rad), showing that there is a measurable response to relatively small total doses of tritium gas. Spectroscopy was also used to confirm the mechanism by which this sensing device would operate in order to calibrate this sensor for potential use. It was determined that one material (polyaniline) was very sensitive to oxidation while the other material (PEDOT-PSS) was not. However, polyaniline provided the best response as a sensing material, and it is suggested that an oxygen-impermeable, radiation-transparent coating be applied to this material for future device prototype fabrication. A great deal of interest has developed in recent years in the area of conducting polymers due to the high levels of conductivity that can be achieved, some comparable to that of metals [Gerard 2002]. Additionally, the desirable physical and chemical properties of a polymer are retained and can be exploited for various applications, including light emitting diodes (LED), anti-static packaging, electronic coatings, and sensors. The electron transfer mechanism is generally accepted as one of electron 'hopping' through delocalized electrons in the conjugated backbone, although other mechanisms have been proposed based on the type of polymer and dopant [Inzelt 2000, Gerard 2002]. The conducting polymer polyaniline (PANi) is of particular interest because there are extensive studies on the modulation of the conductivity by changing either the oxidation state of the

  8. Spin-dependent electrical conduction in a pentacene Schottky diode explored by electrically detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Kunito; Asakawa, Naoki

    2017-02-01

    Reported is the observation of dark spin-dependent electrical conduction in a Schottky barrier diode with pentacene (PSBD) using electrically detected magnetic resonance at room temperature. It is suggested that spin-dependent conduction exists in pentacene thin films, which is explored by examining the anisotropic linewidth of the EDMR signal and current density-voltage (J-V) measurements. The EDMR spectrum can be decomposed to Gaussian and Lorentzian components. The dependency of the two signals on the applied voltage was consistent with the current density-voltage (J-V) of the PSBD rather than that of the electron-only device of Al/pentacene/Al, indicating that the spin-dependent conduction is due to bipolaron formation associated with hole polaronic hopping processes. The applied-voltage dependence of the ratio of intensity of the Gaussian line to the Lorentzian may infer that increasing current density should make conducting paths more dispersive, thereby resulting in an increased fraction of the Gaussian line due to the higher dispersive g-factor.

  9. Hygrothermal Stability of Electrical Contacts Made from Silver and Graphite Electrically Conductive Pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shoukai; Pang, Dick S.; Chung, D. D. L.

    2007-01-01

    The hygrothermal stability of electrical contacts made from silver and graphite electrically conductive pastes is comparatively evaluated by measurement of the increase in contact electrical resistance during immersion in water at 15°C and 40°C. The pastes are silver paint, silver paint with a nonconductive epoxy overcoat, silver epoxy, and graphite colloid. Each electrical contact is made between a seven-strand tin-coated copper wire and the surface of a carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composite. Silver paint and graphite colloid penetrate the spaces among the 130-μm-diameter strands, but silver epoxy does not. Partly due to its low penetrability and the silver flake (15 μm) preferred orientation, silver epoxy gives contacts of significantly higher resistance than silver paint. Graphite colloid is comparable to silver epoxy in the resistance. Among the four pastes, silver paint with an epoxy overcoat is most durable, though it gives slightly higher resistance than silver paint without epoxy. Silver epoxy is less durable than silver paint without an epoxy overcoat, particularly at 40°C, due to the low hygrothermal stability of epoxy. Graphite colloid is even less durable than silver epoxy, due to its being water based.

  10. Observation of Oscillatory Radial Electric Field Relaxation in a Helical Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, J. A.; Sánchez, E.; Calvo, I.; Velasco, J. L.; McCarthy, K. J.; Chmyga, A.; Eliseev, L. G.; Estrada, T.; Kleiber, R.; Krupnik, L. I.; Melnikov, A. V.; Monreal, P.; Parra, F. I.; Perfilov, S.; Zhezhera, A. I.; TJ-II Team

    2017-05-01

    Measurements of the relaxation of a zonal electrostatic potential perturbation in a nonaxisymmetric magnetically confined plasma are presented. A sudden perturbation of the plasma equilibrium is induced by the injection of a cryogenic hydrogen pellet in the TJ-II stellarator, which is observed to be followed by a damped oscillation in the electrostatic potential. The waveform of the relaxation is consistent with theoretical calculations of zonal potential relaxation in a nonaxisymmetric magnetic geometry. The turbulent transport properties of a magnetic confinement configuration are expected to depend on the features of the collisionless damping of zonal flows, of which the present Letter is the first direct observation.

  11. Highly Electrically Conducting Glass-Graphene Nanoplatelets Hybrid Coatings.

    PubMed

    Garcia, E; Nistal, A; Khalifa, A; Essa, Y; Martín de la Escalera, F; Osendi, M I; Miranzo, P

    2015-08-19

    Hybrid coatings consisting of a heat resistant Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 (YAS) glass containing 2.3 wt % of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were developed by flame spraying homogeneous ceramic powders-GNP granules. Around 40% of the GNPs survived the high spraying temperatures and were distributed along the splat-interfaces, forming a percolated network. These YAS-GNP coatings are potentially interesting in thermal protection systems and electromagnetic interference shields for aerospace applications; therefore silicon carbide (SiC) materials at the forefront of those applications were employed as substrates. Whereas the YAS coatings are nonconductive, the YAS-GNP coatings showed in-plane electrical conductivity (∼10(2) S·m(-1)) for which a low percolation limit (below 3.6 vol %) is inferred. Indentation tests revealed the formation of a highly damaged indentation zone showing multiple shear displacements between adjacent splats probably favored by the graphene sheets location. The indentation radial cracks typically found in brittle glass coatings are not detected in the hybrid coatings that are also more compliant.

  12. Optically transparent and electrically conducting epitaxial Ta2O films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanarajan, S.; Lam, S. K. H.; Foley, C. P.

    2007-03-01

    An optically transparent and electrically conducting oxide Ta2O epitaxial thin film has been fabricated and characterized. In our experiments, we grew epitaxial Ta films on r-cut sapphire crystal substrates, which were subsequently oxidized into Ta2O films. The x-ray θ-2θ scan peaks match the American Society for Testing and Materials x-ray powder data card for Ta2O (18-1302) with a cubic structure. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements indicated Ta 4f peak energy values between those for Ta and TaO whereas the O /Ta atomic ratio is between 0.5 and 1. Resistivity-temperature measurements showed a metallic behavior with resistivity values in the range of (1.5-3.3)×10-4Ωcm at 293K. Optical measurements on 25-100nm thick films indicated that they are transparent in the range of 400-2000nm and have an energy band gap between 2.04 and 2.17eV. The Hall mobility and carrier density of the films were in the range of 62-110cm2V-1s-1 and (1.9-3.0)×1020cm-3, respectively.

  13. Investigation on Temperature-Dependent Electrical Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube/Epoxy Composites for Sustainable Energy Applications.

    PubMed

    Njuguna, Michael K; Galpaya, Dilini; Yan, Cheng; Colwell, John M; Will, Geoffrey; Hu, Ning; Yarlagadda, Prasad; Bell, John M

    2015-09-01

    Composites with carbon nanotubes are becoming increasingly used in energy storage and electronic devices, due to incorporated excellent properties from carbon nanotubes and polymers. Although their properties make them more attractive than conventional smart materials, their electrical properties have been found to be temperature-dependent which is important to consider for the design of devices. To study the effects of temperature in electrically conductive multi-wall carbon nanotube/epoxy composites, thin films were prepared and the effect of temperature on the resistivity, thermal properties and Raman spectral characteristics of the composite films was evaluated. Resistivity-temperature profiles showed three distinct regions in as-cured samples and only two regions in samples whose thermal histories had been erased. In the vicinity of the glass transition temperature, the as-cured composites exhibited pronounced resistivity and enthalpic relaxation peaks, which both disappeared after erasing the composites' thermal histories by temperature cycling. Combined DSC, Raman spectroscopy, and resistivity-temperature analyses indicated that this phenomenon can be attributed to the physical aging of the epoxy matrix and that, in the region of the observed thermal history-dependent resistivity peaks, structural rearrangement of the conductive carbon nanotube network occurs through a volume expansion/relaxation process. These results have led to an overall greater understanding of the temperature-dependent behaviour of conductive carbon nanotube/epoxy composites, including the positive temperature coefficient effect.

  14. Conductivity relaxation in strongly underdoped YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Kamchatnaya, S. N.; Pinto Simoes, V. M.

    2017-08-01

    Temperature dependences of the basal-plane electrical resistance of underdoped YBa2Cu3Ot-δ single crystals are investigated in a broad temperature range down to the superconducting transition, after a fast cooldown from 650 ° C as well as after a room-temperature annealing. A stepped behavior of the superconducting transition has been observed, pointing to an inhomogeneity of the samples. Annealing has been revealed to lead to a narrowing of the superconducting transition and a reduction of both, the residual resistivity and the phonon scattering coefficient. This is accompanied by a slight increase of the Debye temperature attributed to a decrease of the lattice parameter caused, in turn, by a redistribution of the labile oxygen. The revealed changes of the parameters of the temperature dependence of the electrical resistance point to an equalization of the concentration of the labile oxygen in the layers and its ordering.

  15. Investigation of thermal conductivity, viscosity, and electrical conductivity of graphene based nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kole, Madhusree; Dey, T. K.

    2013-02-01

    Stable and well dispersed functionalized graphene-ethylene glycol (EG) + distilled water nanofluids having graphene nano-sheets (GnS) volume concentration between 0.041 and 0.395 vol. % are prepared without any surfactant. Graphene nano-sheets are prepared from high purity graphite powder by Hummers method followed by exfoliation and reduction by hydrogen gas. Thus, obtained hydrogen exfoliated graphene (HEG) is then functionalized using acid. The graphene nano-sheets are characterized using XRD, TEM, Raman spectroscopy, and FTIR spectroscopy. Thermal conductivity and viscosity measurements are performed both as a function of graphene loading and temperature between 10 and 70 °C. Thermal conductivity enhancement of ˜15% for a loading of 0.395 vol. % f-HEG is observed at room temperature. The measured nanofluid's thermal conductivity is explained well in terms of the expression derived by Nan et al. (J. Appl. Phys. 81, 6692 (1997)), which considers matrix-additive interface contact resistance of mis-oriented ellipsoidal particles. The viscosity of the prepared f-HEG nanofluids and the base fluid (EG + distilled water) displays non-Newtonian behaviour with the appearance of shear thinning and nearly 100% enhancement compared to the base fluid (EG + DI water) with f-HEG loading of 0.395 vol. %. Known theoretical models for nanofluid's viscosity fail to explain the observed f-HEG volume concentration dependence of the nanofluid's viscosity. Temperature dependence of the studied nanofluid between 10 and 70 °C is explained well by the correlations proposed earlier for nanofluids with spherical nanoparticles. Electrical conductivity of the f-HEG nanofluids shows significant enhancement of ˜8620% for 0.395 vol. % loading of f-HEG in a base fluid of 70:30 mixture of EG and distilled water.

  16. Analytic electrical-conductivity tensor of a nondegenerate Lorentz plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Gerdin, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.

    2002-10-01

    We have developed explicit quantum-mechanical expressions for the conductivity and resistivity tensors of a Lorentz plasma in a magnetic field. The expressions are based on a solution to the Boltzmann equation that is exact when the electric field is weak, the electron-Fermi-degeneracy parameter Θ>>1, and the electron-ion Coulomb-coupling parameter Γ/Z<<1. (Γ is the ion-ion coupling parameter and Z is the ion charge state.) Assuming a screened 1/r electron-ion scattering potential, we calculate the Coulomb logarithm in the second Born approximation. The ratio of the term obtained in the second approximation to that obtained in the first is used to define the parameter regime over which the calculation is valid. We find that the accuracy of the approximation is determined by Γ/Z and not simply the temperature, and that a quantum-mechanical description can be required at temperatures orders of magnitude less than assumed by Spitzer [Physics of Fully Ionized Gases (Wiley, New York, 1962)]. When the magnetic field B=0, the conductivity is identical to the Spitzer result except the Coulomb logarithm ln Λ1=(ln χ1- 1/2)+[(2Ze2/λmev2e1)(ln χ1-ln 24/3)], where χ1≡2meve1λ/ħ, me is the electron mass, ve1≡(7kBT/me)1/2, kB is the Boltzmann constant, T is the temperature, λ is the screening length, ħ is Planck's constant divided by 2π, and e is the absolute value of the electron charge. When the plasma Debye length λD is greater than the ion-sphere radius a, we assume λ=λD otherwise we set λ=a. The B=0 conductivity is consistent with measurements when Z>~1, Θ>~2, and Γ/Z<~1, and in this parameter regime appears to be more accurate than previous analytic models. The minimum value of ln Λ1 when Z>=1, Θ>=2, and Γ/Z<=1 is 1.9. The expression obtained for the resistivity tensor (B≠0) predicts that η⊥/η∥ (where η⊥ and η∥ are the resistivities perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field) can be as much as 40% less than previous analytic

  17. Illuminating the electrical conductivity of the lowermost mantle from below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jault, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic field that originates in the earth's core is transformed across the electrically conducting mantle before being observed, at the earth's surface or above. Assuming that the conductivity depends only on radius, it has been customary to treat the mantle as a linear time-invariant filter for the core magnetic field, with properties (as a function of the frequency ω) specified by the transfer function Γ(ω). An high-frequency approximation to Γ(ω), which is derived from a three terms WKBJ expansion with ω-1/2 as small parameter, is found here to reproduce adequately, for low harmonic degrees and/or thin conducting layers, the exact solution, which is evaluated numerically. It is contrasted with the low-frequency estimation of Γ, which consists in a perturbation procedure and in writing Γ(ω) as a series in powers of ω (ω → 0). The low-frequency theory is applied to the magnetic variations produced by the geostrophic core flows with about 6 yr period as the phase of these flows is independently determined from their effect on the length of the day. Apart from that, the low-frequency approximation overestimates the screening by the mantle of high-frequency signals, especially the low harmonic degree ones. In practice, the attenuating factor defined from the O(ω2) term in the expansion of Γ as ω → 0 cannot be retrieved from analyses of geomagnetic time-series. Application of the mantle filter theory hinges on our knowledge about the time spectrum of the magnetic field at the core surface. The low-frequency theory had been previously applied to observatory series on the assumption that geomagnetic jerks occurring in the core are rare and isolated events. Rather than following up these earlier studies, I note that the spectral density function for the second time derivative of the main magnetic field coefficients is approximately independent of ω in a frequency range for which the mantle has undoubtedly negligible influence. In the absence of

  18. Electrical Conductivity Measurements in Strongly Coupled Metal Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desilva, Alan

    1998-11-01

    The coupling parameter Γ=e^2/akT, where a is the mean ion-ion separation, expresses the ratio of the mean potential energy of ions in a plasma to their mean kinetic energy. Plasma is said to be strongly coupled when Γ is greater than unity. Transport properties of strongly coupled plasmas are of interest in the study of the structure of dense astrophysical objects and gaseous planetary interiors, as well as in arcs and laser-produced plasmas. We are attempting to measure the electrical conductivity of strongly coupled metal plasmas (copper, tungsten and aluminum) in the temperature range 8-30 kK, in a density range from about 1/2 solid density down to about 10-3 times solid density. They may have coupling parameters Γ ranging from as high as 100 down to unity Plasmas are created by rapid vaporization of metal wire in a glass capillary or in a water bath which act as a tamper, slowing the expansion rate. The effect of the tamper is to force the interior pressure of the plasma to be fairly uniform. Streak photography serves to determine the growth of the plasma radius in time, allowing determination of mean density. Temperature is deduced from the measured energy input in conjunction with an equation of state from the LANL sesame database(SESAME: The Los Alamos National Laboratory Equation of State Database, Report No. LA-UR-92-3407, Ed. S. P. Lyon and J. D. Johnson, Group T-1 (unpublished)), and a brightness temperature may be obtained from radiation measurements. The column resistance is simply determined from time-resolved voltage and current measurements. For temperatures less than about 14,000K, as density decreases from the highest values measured, the conductivity falls roughly as the cube of density, reaches a minimum, and subsequently rises to approach the Spitzer prediction at low density. The rate of change of conductivity with density becomes less rapid as temperature increases, and the minimum becomes less pronounced, disappearing altogether above

  19. Energy Market Transparency: Analyzing the Impacts of Constraint Relaxation and Out-of-Market Correction Practices in Electric Energy Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Abdullah, Yousef Mohammad

    This work presents research on practices in the day-ahead electric energy market, including replication practices and reliability coordinators used by some market operators to demonstrate the impact these practices have on market outcomes. The practice of constraint relaxations similar to those an Independent System Operator (ISO) might perform in day-ahead market models is implemented. The benefits of these practices are well understood by the industry; however, the implications these practices have on market outcomes and system security have not been thoroughly investigated. By solving a day-ahead market model with and without select constraint relaxations and comparing the resulting market outcomes and possible effects on system security, the effect of these constraint relaxation practices is demonstrated. Proposed market solutions are often infeasible because constraint relaxation practices and approximations that are incorporated into market models. Therefore, the dispatch solution must be corrected to ensure its feasibility. The practice of correcting the proposed dispatch solution after the market is solved is known as out-of-market corrections (OMCs), defined as any action an operator takes that modifies a proposed day-ahead dispatch solution to ensure operating and reliability requirements. The way in which OMCs affect market outcomes is illustrated through the use of different corrective procedures. The objective of the work presented is to demonstrate the implications of these industry practices and assess the impact these practices have on market outcomes.

  20. Determination of the electric-field gradient and relaxation time measurements in scandium metal at very low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L.; Smith, E.N.; Parpia, J.M.; Richardson, R.C. )

    1992-06-01

    Results are presented of measurements on a single crystal sample of scandium metal at temperatures down to 100 {mu}K using nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Two regimes are found in the relaxation curves; an initial fast relaxation, followed by a slower relaxation consistent with the three exponential recovery expected for an I = 7/2 system in zero external magnetic field. The Korringa constant for this longer time relaxation in the sample is 90 {plus minus} 9 msec K{sup {minus}1}. By observing deviations in the ratio of the intensities of adjacent nuclear spin transitions at the lowest attainable temperatures, the authors were able to make a determination of the sign of the total electric field gradient present in the crystal. Results show that the lowest energy state of the nuclear spin system corresponds to m{sub I} = {plus minus} 7/2. A combination of these deviations and pulse NQR allows this system to be used as an absolute thermometer in the {mu}Kelvin regime.

  1. A percolation model for electrical conduction in wood with implications for wood-water relations

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Samuel V. Glass; Donald S. Stone

    2008-01-01

    The first models used to describe electrical conduction in cellulosic materials involved conduction pathways through free water. These models were abandoned in the middle of the 20th century. This article re-evaluates the theory of conduction in wood by using a percolation model that describes electrical conduction in terms of overlapping paths of loosely bound or...

  2. Engineered electrical conduction tract restores conduction in complete heart block: from in vitro to in vivo proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Eugenio; Ionta, Vittoria; Cheng, Ke; Giacomello, Alessandro; Cho, Hee Cheol; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-12-23

    Cardiac electrical conduction delays and blocks cause rhythm disturbances such as complete heart block, which can be fatal. Standard of care relies on electronic devices to artificially restore synchrony. We sought to create a new modality for treating these disorders by engineering electrical conduction tracts designed to propagate electrical impulses. This study sought to create a new approach for treating cardiac conduction disorders by using engineered electrical conduction tracts (EECTs). Paramagnetic beads were conjugated with an antibody to gamma-sarcoglycan, a cardiomyocyte cell surface antigen, and mixed with freshly isolated neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. A magnetic field was used to pattern a linear EECT. In an in vitro model of conduction block, the EECT was patterned so that it connected 2 independently beating neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocyte monolayers; it achieved coordinated electrical activity, with action potentials propagating from 1 region to the other via EECT. Spiking the EECT with heart-derived stromal cells yielded stable structures with highly reproducible conduction velocities. Transplantation of EECTs in vivo restored atrioventricular conduction in a rat model of complete heart block. An EECT can re-establish electrical conduction in the heart. This novel approach could, in principle, be used not only to treat cardiac arrhythmias but also to repair other organs. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurement of Electrical Conductivity into Tomato Cultivation Beds using Small Insertion Type Electrical Conductivity Sensor Designed for Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Kazuko; Futagawa, Masato; Ban, Yoshihiro; Asano, Yoshiyuki; Sawada, Kazuaki

    Our group has studied on-site monitoring sensor for agricultural field. An electrical conductivity (EC) sensor had been fabricated using Si integrated circuit technology. EC information of solutions shows ion concentrations dissolving in water, and can be used as the index of nutrient concentration for plants. So, it is important to measure EC in real time and on site. Because our EC sensor (5mm×5mm in size) is smaller than other commercial ones (several centimeters), it is easy to insert and achieve measurement in rock wool. In this study, our sensor measured long term EC values in tomato cultivation soil and rock wool medium. At first, we calibrated a relationship between output voltages and EC values on the sensor. The sensor was confirmed about enough EC measurement range from 8 to 969mS/m. In long period measurement, the sensor was confirmed about continuous operation for over five months, and intermittent measurement for over a year. In measurement in the cultivation soil, the sensor indicated that water was kept and diffused in the soil. In contrast, it was found that water diffused without keeping in it in rock wool medium. We confirmed our small EC sensor is useful for on-site monitoring and analysis of solution concentration distribution in several kinds of cultivation bed in real time.

  4. The electrically detected magnetic resonance microscope: Combining conductive atomic force microscopy with electrically detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Konrad; Hauer, Benedikt; Stoib, Benedikt; Trautwein, Markus; Matich, Sonja; Huebl, Hans; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Finger, Friedhelm; Bittl, Robert; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2013-10-01

    We present the design and implementation of a scanning probe microscope, which combines electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and (photo-)conductive atomic force microscopy ((p)cAFM). The integration of a 3-loop 2-gap X-band microwave resonator into an AFM allows the use of conductive AFM tips as a movable contact for EDMR experiments. The optical readout of the AFM cantilever is based on an infrared laser to avoid disturbances of current measurements by absorption of straylight of the detection laser. Using amorphous silicon thin film samples with varying defect densities, the capability to detect a spatial EDMR contrast is demonstrated. Resonant current changes as low as 20 fA can be detected, allowing the method to realize a spin sensitivity of 8 × 10^6spins/sqrtHz at room temperature.

  5. The electrically detected magnetic resonance microscope: combining conductive atomic force microscopy with electrically detected magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Klein, Konrad; Hauer, Benedikt; Stoib, Benedikt; Trautwein, Markus; Matich, Sonja; Huebl, Hans; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Finger, Friedhelm; Bittl, Robert; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S

    2013-10-01

    We present the design and implementation of a scanning probe microscope, which combines electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and (photo-)conductive atomic force microscopy ((p)cAFM). The integration of a 3-loop 2-gap X-band microwave resonator into an AFM allows the use of conductive AFM tips as a movable contact for EDMR experiments. The optical readout of the AFM cantilever is based on an infrared laser to avoid disturbances of current measurements by absorption of straylight of the detection laser. Using amorphous silicon thin film samples with varying defect densities, the capability to detect a spatial EDMR contrast is demonstrated. Resonant current changes as low as 20 fA can be detected, allowing the method to realize a spin sensitivity of 8×10(6)spins/√Hz at room temperature.

  6. Predicting saturated hydraulic conductivity in a sandy grassland using proximally sensed apparent electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Meisam; Saey, Timothy; Seuntjens, Piet; Joris, Ingeborg; Boënne, Wesley; Van Meirvenne, Marc; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Finding a correspondence between soil hydraulic properties, such as saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) as an easily measurable parameter, may be a way forward to estimate the spatial distribution of hydraulic properties at the field scale. In this study, the spatial distributions of Ks, of soil ECa measured by a DUALEM-21S sensor and of soil physical properties were investigated in a sandy grassland. To predict field scale Ks, the statistical relationship between co-located soil Ks, and EMI-ECa was evaluated. Results demonstrated the large spatial variability of all studied properties with Ks being the most variable one (CV = 86.21%) followed by ECa (CV ≥ 53.77%). A significant negative correlation was found between ln-transformed Ks and ECa (r = 0.83; P ≤ 0.01) at two depths of exploration (0-50 and 0-100 cm). This site-specific relation between ln Ks and ECa was used to predict saturated hydraulic conductivity over 0-50 cm depth for the whole field. The empirical relation was validated using an independent dataset of measured Ks. The statistical results demonstrate the robustness of this empirical relation with mean estimation error MEE = 0.46 (cm h- 1), root-mean-square estimation errors RMSEE = 0.74 (cm h- 1), coefficient of determination r2 = 0.67 and coefficient of model efficiency Ce = 0.64. The relationship was then used to produce a detailed map of Ks for the whole field. The result will allow model predictions of spatially distributed water content in view of irrigation management.

  7. Microstructural inhomogeneity of electrical conductivity in subcutaneous fat tissue.

    PubMed

    Kruglikov, Ilja L

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic peculiarities stemming from a temperature increase in subcutaneous adipose tissue (sWAT) after applying a radio-frequency (RF) current, must be strongly dependent on the type of sWAT. This effect is connected with different electrical conductivities of pathways inside (triglycerides in adipocytes) and outside (extra-cellular matrix) the cells and to the different weighting of these pathways in hypertrophic and hyperplastic types of sWAT. The application of the RF current to hypertrophic sWAT, which normally has a strongly developed extracellular matrix with high concentrations of hyaluronan and collagen in a peri-cellular space of adipocytes, can produce, micro-structurally, a highly inhomogeneous temperature distribution, characterized by strong temperature gradients between the peri-cellular sheath of the extra-cellular matrix around the hypertrophic adipocytes and their volumes. In addition to normal temperature effects, which are generally considered in body contouring, these temperature gradients can produce thermo-mechanical stresses on the cells' surfaces. Whereas these stresses are relatively small under normal conditions and cannot cause any direct fracturing or damage of the cell structure, these stresses can, under some supportive conditions, be theoretically increased by several orders of magnitude, causing the thermo-mechanical cell damage. This effect cannot be realized in sWAT of normal or hyperplastic types where the peri-cellular structures are under-developed. It is concluded that the results of RF application in body contouring procedures must be strongly dependent on the morphological structure of sWAT.

  8. Incapacitation recovery times from a conductive electrical weapon exposure.

    PubMed

    Criscione, John C; Kroll, Mark W

    2014-06-01

    Law enforcement officers expect that a TASER(®) CEW (Conducted Electrical Weapon) broad-spread probe exposure will temporarily incapacitate a subject who will then be able to immediately (~1 s delay) recover motor control in order to comply with commands. However, this recovery time has not been previously reported. A total of 32 police academy students were exposed to a very broad-spread 5 s CEW stimulus as part of their training and told to depress a push-button as soon as they sensed the stimulus. A subgroup also depressed the push-button after being alerted by an audio stimulus. The response time after the audio trigger was 1.05 ± 0.25 s; the median was 1.04 s (range 0.69-1.34 s). For the paired CEW triggered group the mean response time was 1.41 ± 0.61 s with a median of 1.06 s (range 0.92-2.18 s), which was not statistically different. Only 2/32 subjects were able to depress the button during the CEW exposure and with delays of 3.09 and 4.70 s from the start. Of the remaining 30 subjects the mean response time to execute the task (once the CEW exposure ended) was 1.27 ± 0.58 s with a median of 1.19 s (range 0.31-2.99 s) (NS vs. the audio trigger). With a very-broad electrode spread, a CEW exposure could prevent or delay some purposeful movements. Normal reaction times appear to return immediately (~1 s) after the CEW exposure ceases.

  9. Transcardiac conducted electrical weapon (TASER) probe deployments: incidence and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, William P; Teacher, Eric; Winslow, James E

    2012-12-01

    TASER (TASER International, Scottsdale, AZ) conducted electrical weapons (CEWs) are commonly used by law enforcement officers. Although animal studies have suggested that transcardiac CEW discharges may produce direct cardiac effects, this has not been demonstrated in human studies. This study sought to determine the incidence and outcomes of transcardiac CEW probe impact locations in a large series of actual CEW deployments. A multi-center database of consecutive CEW uses by law enforcement officers was retrospectively reviewed. Case report forms were independently reviewed by three investigators to identify cases with paired probe configurations potentially producing a transcardiac discharge vector. Descriptive analysis was performed and inter-rater reliability was assessed. Among 1201 total CEW uses, 813 included probe deployments and 178 cases had paired anterior probe impacts potentially capable of producing a transcardiac discharge vector. This represents 14.8% of all CEW uses (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.9-16.9%) and 21.9% of CEW uses in probe mode (95% CI 19.1-24.9%). Inter-rater agreement was very good, with kappa = 0.82. There were no immediate deaths in any cases (97.5% CI 0.0-0.3%) to suggest a cardiac dysrhythmia, including those with transcardiac discharge vector. CEW deployments with probe impact configurations capable of producing a transcardiac discharge occur in a minority of cases in field use conditions. None of these cases, transcardiac or otherwise, produced immediately fatal dysrhythmias. These data support the overall safety of CEWs and provide a benchmark estimate of the likelihood of transcardiac discharge vectors occurring in field use of CEWs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human cardiovascular effects of a new generation conducted electrical weapon.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jeffrey D; Dawes, Donald M; Reardon, Robert F; Strote, Seth R; Kunz, Sebastian N; Nelson, Rebecca S; Lundin, Erik J; Orozco, Benjamin S; Miner, James R

    2011-01-30

    The conducted electrical weapon (CEW) is used by law enforcement to control potentially violent people. Much of the research in CEW safety has focused on the TASER X26, which uses a single deployment cartridge. New Generation CEW (NGCEW) technology has been developed that uses a different circuit and multiple cartridges that can be simultaneously deployed. The objective of this study is to examine the cardiovascular effects of the NGCEW in different deployment possibilities. This was a prospective study of human subjects during NGCEW training courses. Subjects received a NGCEW probe deployment to the frontal torso in 1 of 3 configurations: 2, 3,or 4 embedded probes and then underwent a 10-s exposure. Before and after vital signs, electrocardiograms (ECGs), and serum troponin I values were obtained. Real-time echocardiography was utilized before, during and after the exposure to evaluate heart rate and rhythm. Initially, a 1st version NGCEW (NGCEWv1) that was in the final stages of manufacturer verification was used at the training courses. It had not been publicly released. During a NGCEWv1 exposure with 2 probes, there was an apparent brief episode of cardiac capture. Testing was halted and the manufacturer was notified. The device was redesigned and the study continued when a redesigned, 2nd version (NGCEWv2) was used. The NGCEW1 was studied in 8 subjects. The NGCEWv2 was studied in 45 subjects with no evidence of cardiac capture. There were no important post-exposure vital sign, troponin I or ECG changes found in any volunteers. An apparent brief myocardial capture event occurred with the NGCEWv1. This device was not released and was redesigned. The NGCEWv2 appears to exhibit a reasonable degree of cardiac safety with frontal torso exposures and multiple probe combination configurations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Conducted electrical weapon (TASER) use against minors: a shocking analysis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Alison R; Hauda, William E; Bozeman, William P

    2012-09-01

    Conducted electrical weapons (CEWs) such as the TASER are often used by law enforcement (LE) personnel during suspect apprehension. Previous studies have reported an excellent safety profile and few adverse outcomes with CEW use in adults. We analyzed the safety and injury profile of CEWs when used during LE apprehension of children and adolescents, a potentially vulnerable population. Consecutive CEW uses by LE officers against criminal suspects were tracked at 10 LE agencies and entered into a database as part of an ongoing multicenter injury surveillance program. All CEW uses against minors younger than 18 years were retrieved for analysis. Primary outcomes included the incidence and type of mild, moderate, and severe CEW-related injury, as assessed by physician reviewers in each case. Ultimate outcomes, suspect demographics, and circumstances surrounding LE involvement are reported secondarily. Of 2026 consecutive CEW uses, 100 (4.9%) were uses against minor suspects. Suspects ranged from 13 to 17 years, with a mean age of 16.1 (SD, 0.99) years (median, 16 years). There were no significant (moderate or severe) injuries reported (0%; 97.5% confidence interval, 0.0%-3.6%). Twenty suspects (20%; 95% confidence interval, 12.7%-29.1%) were noted to sustain 34 mild injuries. The majority of these injuries (67.6%) were expected superficial punctures from CEW probes. Other mild injuries included superficial abrasions and contusions in 7 cases (7%). None of the minor suspects studied sustained significant injury, and only 20% reported minor injuries, mostly from the expected probe puncture sites. These data suggest that adolescents are not at a substantially higher risk than adults for serious injuries after CEW use.

  12. Microstructural Inhomogeneity of Electrical Conductivity in Subcutaneous Fat Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kruglikov, Ilja L.

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic peculiarities stemming from a temperature increase in subcutaneous adipose tissue (sWAT) after applying a radio-frequency (RF) current, must be strongly dependent on the type of sWAT. This effect is connected with different electrical conductivities of pathways inside (triglycerides in adipocytes) and outside (extra-cellular matrix) the cells and to the different weighting of these pathways in hypertrophic and hyperplastic types of sWAT. The application of the RF current to hypertrophic sWAT, which normally has a strongly developed extracellular matrix with high concentrations of hyaluronan and collagen in a peri-cellular space of adipocytes, can produce, micro-structurally, a highly inhomogeneous temperature distribution, characterized by strong temperature gradients between the peri-cellular sheath of the extra-cellular matrix around the hypertrophic adipocytes and their volumes. In addition to normal temperature effects, which are generally considered in body contouring, these temperature gradients can produce thermo-mechanical stresses on the cells’ surfaces. Whereas these stresses are relatively small under normal conditions and cannot cause any direct fracturing or damage of the cell structure, these stresses can, under some supportive conditions, be theoretically increased by several orders of magnitude, causing the thermo-mechanical cell damage. This effect cannot be realized in sWAT of normal or hyperplastic types where the peri-cellular structures are under-developed. It is concluded that the results of RF application in body contouring procedures must be strongly dependent on the morphological structure of sWAT. PMID:25734656

  13. The Wilkes subglacial basin eastern margin electrical conductivity anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzello, Daniele; Armadillo, Egidio; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Caneva, Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    allowed for a new processing of a wide dataset acquired during three different international Antarctic campaigns supported by the Italian Antarctic Project: the BACKTAM, WIBEM and WISE expeditions. The qualitative analysis of the induction arrows, in the period range 20-170 s, reveals an approximately 2D regional electrical conductivity pattern with a clear differentiation between the three Terrains crossed by the GDS transect we have re-analized: the Robertson Bay, the Bowers and the Wilson Terrain. Bi-dimensional conductivity models, jointly with magnetic and gravimetric profiles, suggest a differentiation of the investigated area in three crustal sectors separated by the Daniels Range and the Bowers Mts., in close relation with main known structural lineaments; to the West, a deep conductivity anomaly is associated with the transition to the Wilkes Subglagial Basin. We deem that such anomaly, together with the magnetic and gravimetric signatures, is compatible with an extensional regime in the eastern margin of the WSB. References Rizzello, D., Armadillo, E., Manzella, A."Statistical analysis of the polar electrojet influence on geomagnetic transfer functions estimates, over wide time and space scales". EGU 2013 General Assembly, Wien - poster presentation.

  14. Maximum on the Electrical Conductivity Polytherm of Molten TeCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyulev, Alexander B.; Potapov, Alexei M.

    2017-05-01

    The electrical conductivity of molten TeCl4 was measured up to 761K, i.e. 106 degrees above the normal boiling point of the salt. For the first time it was found that TeCl4 electrical conductivity polytherm has a maximum. It was recorded at 705K (κmax=0.245 Sm/cm), whereupon the conductivity decreases as the temperature rises. The activation energy of electrical conductivity was calculated.

  15. Low temperature dielectric and conductivity relaxation studies on magnetoelectric Pb(Fe2/3W1/3)O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteppanavar, Shidaling; Shivaraja, I.; Rayaprol, Sudhindra; Angadi, Basavaraj

    2016-05-01

    The single phase perovskite Pb(Fe2/3W1/3)O3 [PFW] was synthesized by modified low - temperature (sintering at 850°C) solid-state reaction. Rietveld refinement ofroom temperature (RT) X-ray diffraction (XRD) and neutron diffraction (ND) patterns of the samples confirm the single phase formation with cubic structure (Pm-3m). Surface morphology of the compounds was studied by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and average grain size was estimated to be ˜2 µm. The RT dielectric properties of PFW ceramic are studied as a function of frequency from 100 - 1MHz. The temperature dependent (120 - 293K) dielectric properties were studied at few selected frequencies. We found the frequency dependent dielectric constant shows increasing trend with increase in temperature from 120 - 293K, with minimum dielectric loss. The frequency dependence of dielectric loss shows a maximum in between 10 Hz and 1 kHz, confirms the extrinsic phenomena like interfacial polarization due to space charge accumulation at grain boundaries. Impedance spectroscopy is used to study the electrical behaviour of PFW in the frequency range from 100 to 1MHz and in the temperature range from 120 - 293 K. The frequency-dependent electrical data are analysed by impedance formalisms and shows the relaxation (conduction) mechanism in the sample. We suggest this low temperature sintered PFW is a suitable candidate for the multilayer ceramic capacitorsandrelated negative temperature coefficient of resistance type (NTCR) behavior like that of semiconductors.

  16. Modeling geomagnetic induction hazards using a 3-D electrical conductivity model of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liejun; Lewis, Andrew M.; Ogawa, Yasuo; Jones, William V.; Costelloe, Marina T.

    2016-12-01

    The surface electric field induced by external geomagnetic source fields is modeled for a continental-scale 3-D electrical conductivity model of Australia at periods of a few minutes to a few hours. The amplitude and orientation of the induced electric field at periods of 360 s and 1800 s are presented and compared to those derived from a simplified ocean-continent (OC) electrical conductivity model. It is found that the induced electric field in the Australian region is distorted by the heterogeneous continental electrical conductivity structures and surrounding oceans. On the northern coastlines, the induced electric field is decreased relative to the simple OC model due to a reduced conductivity contrast between the seas and the enhanced conductivity structures inland. In central Australia, the induced electric field is less distorted with respect to the OC model as the location is remote from the oceans, but inland crustal high-conductivity anomalies are the major source of distortion of the induced electric field. In the west of the continent, the lower conductivity of the Western Australia Craton increases the conductivity contrast between the deeper oceans and land and significantly enhances the induced electric field. Generally, the induced electric field in southern Australia, south of latitude -20°, is higher compared to northern Australia. This paper provides a regional indicator of geomagnetic induction hazards across Australia.

  17. Electrical properties, equivalent circuit and dielectric relaxation studies of [(C3H7)4N]3Bi3Cl12 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigui, W.; Oueslati, A.; Chaabane, I.; Corbel, G.; Hlel, F.

    2015-05-01

    The tri-tetrapropylammonium dodeca chlorobismuthate(III) has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder and impedance spectroscopy. DSC analysis and X-ray diffraction as function of temperature have revealed one irreversible solid-solid phase transition at 414 ± 5 K of order-disorder types. The electrical properties were studied using impedance spectroscopy at different temperatures in the frequency range of 209 Hz-5 MHz. The obtained results were analyzed by fitting the experimental data with the equivalent electrical circuit. We observed that the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of materials exhibits a crossover from T -1/4 to T -1 dependence in the temperature range between 414 and 453 K. Furthermore, the modulus plots can be characterized by the non-experiential decay function . The analysis of the experimental data based on the jump relaxation model has shown that the translation motion of the charge carrier and reorientation hopping between the equivalent sites of the metal chloride [Bi3Cl12]3- anions and the [(C3H7)4N]+ cations are responsible for the observed ac conductivity.

  18. Dielectric α-relaxation and ionic conductivity in propylene glycol and its oligomers measured at elevated pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalini, Riccardo; Roland, C. Michael

    2003-12-01

    Structural dynamics and volume were measured as a function of both temperature and pressure for a propylene glycol and its oligomers (PPG), and the results compared with previous data on higher molecular weight polypropylene glycols. PPG is of special interest because the terminal groups form hydrogen bonds; thus, by studying different molecular weights, the manner in which hydrogen bonding influences the dynamics in the supercooled regime can be systematically investigated. The fragility (Tg-normalized temperature dependence) of the dimer and trimer of PPG increases with pressure, similar to results for other H-bonded liquids, but different from van der Waals glass formers. This behavior is believed to be due to the effect of pressure in decreasing the extent of hydrogen bonding. From the combined temperature and volume dependences of the relaxation times, the relative degree to which thermal energy and volume govern the dynamics was quantified. With decreasing molecular weight, the relative contribution of thermal energy to the dynamics was found to strongly increase, reflecting the role of hydrogen bonding. By comparing the ionic conductivity and the dielectric relaxation times, a decoupling between rotational and translational motions was observed. Interestingly, this decoupling was independent of both pressure and molecular weight, indicating that hydrogen bonds have a negligible effect on the phenomenon.

  19. Patterns of gas and liquid reflux during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation: a study using intraluminal electrical impedance

    PubMed Central

    Sifrim, D; Silny, J; Holloway, R; Janssens, J

    1999-01-01

    Background—Belching has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying acid gastro-oesophageal reflux in normal subjects. However, the presence of oesophageal gas has not been measured directly but only inferred from manometry. 
Aims—To investigate, using intraluminal electrical impedance, the patterns of gas and liquid reflux during transient lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) relaxations, the main mechanism of acid reflux in normal subjects. 
Methods—Impedance changes associated with the passage of gas were studied in vitro, and in vivo in cats. Oesophageal manometry, pH, and intraluminal electrical impedance measurements were performed in 11 normal subjects after a meal. 
Results—Gas reflux caused a sudden increase in impedance that propagated rapidly to the proximal oesophagus whereas liquid reflux induced a retrogressively propagated fall in impedance. Impedance showed gas or liquid reflux during most (102/141) transient LOS relaxations. When acid reflux occurred, impedance showed evidence of intraoesophageal retrograde flow of liquid in the majority (78%) of events. Evidence of gas retroflow was found in almost half (47%) of acid reflux episodes. When present together, however, liquid preceded gas on 44% of occasions. Overall, gas reflux occurred as the initial event in only 25% of acid reflux episodes. 
Conclusions—These findings suggest that in upright normal subjects, although belching can precipitate acid reflux, most acid reflux occurs as a primary event. 

 Keywords: belching; gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; oesophageal manometry; intraluminal electrical impedance; lower oesophageal sphincter PMID:9862825

  20. Intercomponent momentum transport and electrical conductivity of collisionless plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Based on the Lenard-Balescu equation, the interaction integral for the intercomponent momentum transfer in a two-component, collisionless plasma is evaluated in closed form. The distribution functions of the electrons and ions are represented in the form of nonisothermal, displaced Maxwellians corresponding to the 5-moment approximation. As an application, the transport of electrical current in an electric field is discussed for infrasonic up to sonic electron-ion drift velocities.