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Sample records for electrical resistance method

  1. Electrical Methods: Resistivity Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Surface electrical resistivity surveying is based on the principle that the distribution of electrical potential in the ground around a current-carrying electrode depends on the electrical resistivities and distribution of the surrounding soils and rocks.

  2. A GIS Method for Analyzing Electrical Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazzard, S. C.; Mutiti, S.; Berry, L. E.; GCSU Hydrogeologists

    2011-12-01

    Shallow electrical resistivity methods provide a relatively easy and cost-effective way of mapping the subsurface in wetland environments. Traditional ways of analyzing these data include curve matching, analytical methods, and pseudosections, which resemble geologic cross sections. Psuedosections and Three Dimensional (3D) results can be obtained from specialized software, such as RES3DINV or EarthImager. In recent years, ArcGIS has become very popular in environmental studies, but not as popular in electrical resistivity data analysis. In a previous study, we demonstrated that ArcGIS can be used in electrical resistivity analysis. The objective of this project was to assess the performance and accuracy of ArcGIS in analyzing 3D-wetland resistivity data. The study area used for this analysis was located at the Oconee River Greenway, in Milledgeville, Georgia. The area of focus was Alice Basin, which is one of the small basins in the Greenway wetland area. Within the wetland, we observed significant subsurface flow that transported water between basins and from the wetland into nearby Fishing Creek. This subsurface flow is typically restricted to a high permeability layer, and is responsible for most of the water loss within the wetland. To better understand how this wetland functions, electrical resistivity profiling was used to map the subsurface and the extent of the high permeability layer. The data were collected with an ULTRA MiniRes resistivity meter, using the dipole-dipole electrode configuration. We then developed an easy GIS-method for analyzing these data in 3D, and compared the results with those from the specialized resistivity software, RES3DINV. The top layer outputs for both programs were compared to visual observations and soils in the field. The spline interpolation technique in ArcGIS produced a superior match to the observed data, than results from RES3DINV. However, results for the lower layers were similar between the two programs. An

  3. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 Ωm & 285 Ωm) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 Ωm & 199 Ωm) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  4. The electrical resistivity method in cased boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The use of downhole current sources in resistivity mapping can greatly enhance the detection and delineation of subsurface features. The purpose of this work is to examine the resistivity method for current sources in wells cased with steel. The resistivity method in cased boreholes with downhole current sources is investigated using the integral equation (IE) technique. The casing and other bodies are characterized as conductivity inhomogeneities in a half-space. For sources located along the casing axis, an axially symmetric Green's function is used to formulate the surface potential and electric field (E-field) volume integral equations. The situations involving off-axis current sources and three-dimensional (3-D) bodies is formulated using the surface potential IE method. The solution of the 3-D Green's function is presented in cylindrical and Cartesian coordinate systems. The methods of moments is used to solve the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the response due to the casing and other bodies. The numerical analysis revealed that the current in the casing can be approximated by its vertical component except near the source and the axial symmetric approximation of the casing is valid even for the 3-D problem. The E-field volume IE method is an effective and efficient technique to simulate the response of the casing in a half-space, whereas the surface potential approach is computationally better when multiple bodies are involved. Analyzing several configurations of the current source indicated that the casing response is influenced by four characteristic factors: conduction length, current source depth,casing depth, and casing length. 85 refs., 133 figs., 11 tabs.

  5. Evaluation of pozzolanic activity by the electric resistance measurement method

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Chuichi; Ikeda, Ko . Dept. of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering); Inoue, Yoshihiro )

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of electric resistance and amount of consumption of portlandite were carried out in accelerated curing conditions by preparing pastes of Fine Ceraments, fly ash, silica fume, kaolin, acid clay, zeolite and quartz activated with portlandite. Electric resistances of reactive pozzolans showed sharp rises except that of kaolin, whereas that of inactive material, quartz, showed no sharp rise. Electric resistances are proportional to the consumptions of portlandite except for fly ashes. The electric resistance measurement method combined with portlandite consumption measurement is useful to the rapid evaluation of pozzolanic activity.

  6. Less Invasive Corneal Transepithelial Electrical Resistance Measurement Method.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Masafumi; Mohamed, Yasser Helmy; Onizuka, Naoko; Ueki, Ryotaro; Inoue, Daisuke; Fujikawa, Azusa; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Kitaoka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate acute corneal permeability changes after instillation of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) using a newly developed in vivo less invasive corneal transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) measurement method in animals and humans. We previously developed an in vivo method for measuring corneal TER using intraocular electrodes in animals. This method can be used to precisely measure the decline of the corneal barrier function after instillation of BAC. To lessen the invasiveness of that procedure, we further refined the method for measuring the corneal TER by developing electrodes that could be placed on the surface of the cornea and in the conjunctival sac instead of inserting them into the anterior chamber. Corneal TER changes before and after exposure to 0.02% BAC were determined in this study using the new device in both rabbits and humans. There was a significant decrease in the corneal TER after exposure of the cornea to 0.02% BAC solution in both rabbits and humans (P<.01). The results of this new less invasive method agreed with those of formerly established anterior chamber methods in rabbit experiments. This new less invasive corneal TER measurement method enables us for the first time to measure TER of the human cornea, allowing safe and reliable investigation of the direct effect of different eye drop treatments on the corneal epithelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Method for the formation of cylindrical current and its application to evaluate electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T.-C.; Chang, C.-S.; Liang, W.-L.; Tsai, W.-F.; Ai, C.-F.; Lin, J.-F.

    2012-07-01

    A cylindrical current method is developed to obtain a stable and precise electrical resistivity of a specimen with or without a coating film. The electrical resistivity of a standard silicon wafer doped with boron at a concentration can be measured using the proposed method if the experimental results of electrical voltage varying with the distance from the center line of the cylindrical current are available. A comparison of the electrical resistivity obtained using the present method and the theoretical reference value indicates that the proposed method produces reliable and precise measurements. Using four test samples, the experimental results of electrical resistivity measured by the present method are shown to be reproducible and more precise than those measured by the four-terminal sensing method and the van der Pauw method. The electrical voltage and current obtained at various distances from the center line of the cylindrical current are almost independent of the distance and the direction of measurements. The effect of specimen's crystallinity appears to be the governing factor of electrical resistivity. Electrical resistivity decreases with increasing crystallinity generally.

  8. Procedure for measuring electrical resistivity of anisotropic materials: A revision of the Montgomery method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, C. A. M.; de Campos, A.; da Luz, M. S.; White, B. D.; Neumeier, J. J.; de Lima, B. S.; Shigue, C. Y.

    2011-10-01

    A procedure for determining the electrical resistivity of anisotropic materials is presented. It offers several improvements to the well-known Montgomery method. One improvement, in particular, is the ability to obtain the electrical resistivity for all three axes of an orthorhombic crystal analytically, rather than using the iterative approach suggested by Montgomery for the third axis. All necessary equations are derived and their application in determining the tensor components of the electrical resistivity is explained in detail. Measurements on isotropic specimens were executed in order to test the foundations of the method. Measurements on anisotropic samples are compared with measurements obtained by using the standard four-probe method, revealing good agreement.

  9. Electrical Resistivity Measurement of Petroleum Coke Powder by Means of Four-Probe Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouget, G.; Majidi, B.; Picard, D.; Gauvin, G.; Ziegler, D.; Mashreghi, J.; Alamdari, H.

    2017-10-01

    Carbon anodes used in Hall-Héroult electrolysis cells are involved in both electrical and chemical processes of the cell. Electrical resistivity of anodes depends on electrical properties of its constituents, of which carbon coke aggregates are the most prevalent. Electrical resistivity of coke aggregates is usually characterized according to the ISO 10143 standardized test method, which consists of measuring the voltage drop in the bed of particles between two electrically conducing plungers through which the current is also applied. Estimation of the electrical resistivity of coke particles from the resistivity of particle bed is a challenging task and needs consideration of the contribution of the interparticle void fraction and the particle/particle contact resistances. In this work, the bed resistivity was normalized by subtracting the interparticle void fraction. Then, the contact size was obtained from discrete element method simulation and the contact resistance was calculated using Holm's theory. Finally, the resistivity of the coke particles was obtained from the bed resistivity.

  10. Electrical Resistivity Measurement of Petroleum Coke Powder by Means of Four-Probe Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouget, G.; Majidi, B.; Picard, D.; Gauvin, G.; Ziegler, D.; Mashreghi, J.; Alamdari, H.

    2017-07-01

    Carbon anodes used in Hall-Héroult electrolysis cells are involved in both electrical and chemical processes of the cell. Electrical resistivity of anodes depends on electrical properties of its constituents, of which carbon coke aggregates are the most prevalent. Electrical resistivity of coke aggregates is usually characterized according to the ISO 10143 standardized test method, which consists of measuring the voltage drop in the bed of particles between two electrically conducing plungers through which the current is also applied. Estimation of the electrical resistivity of coke particles from the resistivity of particle bed is a challenging task and needs consideration of the contribution of the interparticle void fraction and the particle/particle contact resistances. In this work, the bed resistivity was normalized by subtracting the interparticle void fraction. Then, the contact size was obtained from discrete element method simulation and the contact resistance was calculated using Holm's theory. Finally, the resistivity of the coke particles was obtained from the bed resistivity.

  11. Electrical resistivity characteristics of diesel oil-contaminated kaolin clay and a resistivity-based detection method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibin; Liu, Songyu; Cai, Yi; Fang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    As the dielectric constant and conductivity of petroleum products are different from those of the pore water in soil, the electrical resistivity characteristics of oil-contaminated soil will be changed by the corresponding oil type and content. The contaminated soil specimens were manually prepared by static compaction method in the laboratory with commercial kaolin clay and diesel oil. The water content and dry density of the first group of soil specimens were controlled at 10 % and 1.58 g/cm(3). Corresponding electrical resistivities of the contaminated specimens were measured at the curing periods of 7, 14, and 28 and 90, 120, and 210 days on a modified oedometer cell with an LCR meter. Then, the electrical resistivity characteristics of diesel oil-contaminated kaolin clay were discussed. In order to realize a resistivity-based oil detection method, the other group of oil-contaminated kaolin clay specimens was also made and tested, but the initial water content, oil content, and dry density were controlled at 0~18 %, 0~18 %, 1.30~1.95 g/cm(3), respectively. Based on the test data, a resistivity-based artificial neural network (ANN) was developed. It was found that the electrical resistivity of kaolin clay decreased with the increase of oil content. Moreover, there was a good nonlinear relationship between electrical resistivity and corresponding oil content when the water content and dry density were kept constant. The decreasing velocity of the electrical resistivity of oil-contaminated kaolin clay was higher before the oil content of 12 % than after 12 %, which indicated a transition of the soil from pore water-controlled into oil-controlled electrical resistivity characteristics. Through microstructural analysis, the decrease of electrical resistivity could be explained by the increase of saturation degree together with the collapse of the electrical double layer. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) photos indicated that the diesel oil

  12. Joint-interpretation of 2-D electrical resistivity method and borehole data for subsurface lithology identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bery, Andy Anderson; Nordiana, M. M.; Kiu, Y. C.; Amalina, M. K. A. Nur; Saidin, M.; Mohamamad-Afiq, A.; Nur-Amalina, A. M.

    2017-07-01

    There have been improvement in the subsurface investigation using non-destructive geophysical method. These were supported by improvement in data inversion method for 2-D resistivity imaging method. This geophysical method have been used for many environmental and engineering studies, such as slope monitoring, cavities detection, buried man-made structures and so on. This paper present the 2-D data inversion in electrical resistivity method which was carried out in Penang, Malaysia. This non-destructive method is used to image the subsurface for soil's lithology purpose. In addition, two inline boreholes were used to validate and verify the obtained results of electrical resistivity imaging. Based on the electrical resistivity imaging, the subsurface is made up of four type of materials. They are sandy silt, silty sand, sand and lastly weathered granite. Sandy silt and silty sand soils give resistivity values of 65-220 Ωm and 120-770 Ωm. Meanwhile for sand and weathered granite materials, their resistivity values are 220-1400 Ωm and 410-2600 Ω.m respectively. Beside than electrical resistivity imaging, this work also present the distribution of conductivity for the investigated subsurface via the 2-D conductivity model. In conclusion, the used of the non-destructive geophysical method in this study is successful in image the investigated subsurface lithology and the investigation coverage area is enhanced instead of information from two discrete points of the geotechnical boreh oles. Therefore, the joint-interpretation of these two technical methods is capable and reliable to give information about the Earth's subsurface lithology.

  13. Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) is a geophysical method originally developed within the mining industry where it has been used for decades to explore for and characterize subsurface mineral deposits. It is one of the oldest geophysical methods with the first documented usag...

  14. Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) is a geophysical method originally developed within the mining industry where it has been used for decades to explore for and characterize subsurface mineral deposits. It is one of the oldest geophysical methods with the first documented usag...

  15. Estimating the hydration status in nephrotic patients by leg electrical resistivity measuring method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Bo, Yuhong; Cui, Taigen; Zhou, Yilun; Li, Zhongxin; Ma, Lijie; Bi, Zengqi

    2010-06-01

    For years, bioelectrical impedance analysis has been widely used to evaluate the hydration status in dialysis patients. However, its value in assessment and controlling the hydration status in non-dialysis patients with kidney disease, such as nephrotic syndrome, is little mentioned. Because a simple and accurate method to evaluate the hydration status of nephrotic patients is not available, the aim of the present study was to assess the value of leg electrical resistivity measurement in controlling the hydration status of nephrotic patients. The study investigated 46 nephrotic patients with a mean age of 41.65 +/- 17.15 years, 47.8% of whom were female. The patients were divided into remission and relapse groups according to their serum albumin concentration and oedema. Four hundred and twenty-seven healthy persons were studied as normal control. Their hydration status estimated by leg electrical resistivity was studied. There was significant negative correlation between leg electrical resistivity and percentage of extracellular fluid (ECF) measured by the bromide dilution method. The percentage of ECF estimated by the leg electrical resistivity in the relapse group was significantly larger than that of the remission group, but it was approximately the same in the remission group as in the normal control. For nephrotic patients in the relapse group, after they ahcieved remission, their percentage of ECF estimated by the leg electrical resistivity was significantly less than that before treatment, and was close to that of the normal control. Leg electrical resistivity measurement is a simple, non-invasive and valuable method for controlling the hydration status in patients with nephrotic syndrome.

  16. Electrical test methods for on-line fuel cell ohmic resistance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, K. R.; Smith, M.

    The principles and trade-offs of four electrical test methods suitable for on-line measurement of the ohmic resistance (R Ω) of fuel cells is presented: current interrupt, AC resistance, high frequency resistance (HFR), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The internal resistance of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell determined with the current interrupt, HFR and EIS techniques is compared. The influence of the AC amplitude and frequency of the HFR measurement on the observed ohmic resistance is examined, as is the ohmic resistance extracted from the EIS data by modeling the spectra with a transmission line model for porous electrodes. The ohmic resistance of a H 2/O 2 PEM fuel cell determined via the three methods was within 10-30% of each other. The current interrupt technique consistently produced measured cell resistances that exceeded those of the other two techniques. For the HFR technique, the frequency at which the measurement was conducted influenced the measured resistance (i.e., higher frequency providing smaller R Ω), whereas the AC amplitude did not effect the observed value. The difference in measured ohmic resistance between these techniques exceeds that reasonably accounted for by measurement error. The source of the discrepancy between current interrupt and impedance-based methods is attributed to the difference in the response of a non-uniformly polarized electrode, such as a porous electrode with non-negligible ohmic resistance, to a large perturbation (current interrupt event) as compared to a small perturbation (impedance measurement).

  17. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, William D.; Laine, Daren L.; Laine, Edwin F.

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner or between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid through the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  18. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Laine, D.L.; Laine, E.F.

    1997-08-26

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution. 6 figs.

  19. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Laine, Daren L.; Laine, Edwin F.

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  20. Detecting Defects Within Soil-Bentonite Slurry Cutoff Walls Using Electrical Resistivity Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aborn, L.; Jacob, R. W.; Mucelli, A.

    2016-12-01

    Installed in the subsurface, vertical cutoff walls may limit groundwater movement. The effectiveness of these walls can be undermined by defects, for example high permeability material, within the wall. An efficient way of detecting these defects in a soil-bentonite slurry cutoff wall has yet to be established. We installed an approximately 200-meter long and 7-meter deep soil-bentonite slurry cutoff wall for the purposes of research. The wall was constructed adjacent to a natural wetland, the Montandon Marsh near Lewisburg, PA. The wall is composed of soil-bentonite backfill and was designed to be a typical low permeability material. We evaluate the capability of non-invasive geophysical techniques, specifically electrical resistivity, to detect high permeability defects that are expected to have higher electrical resistivity values than the backfill material. The laboratory measured electrical resistivity of the backfill used for construction was 12.27-ohm meters. During construction, designed defects of saturated fine-grained sand bags were deployed at different positions and depths within the wall. To create larger defects multiple bags were tied together. Laboratory resistivity testing of the sand and the filled sand bags indicates values between 125-ohm meters at full saturation and 285-ohm meters at partial saturation. Post construction, we collected electrical resistivity data using a 28-channel system along the centerline of the cutoff wall, which indicated the backfill material to have a resistivity value of 15-ohm meters. The electrical resistivity profile was affected by the sidewalls of the trench, as expected, which may explain the difference between laboratory results and field measurements. To minimize the sidewalls obscuring the defects, we developed electrodes that are pushed into the backfill at different depths to collect subsurface resistivity. Different arrays and electrode spacings are being tested. Our presentation will report the most

  1. Lembang fault plane identification using electrical resistivity method for disaster mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulinadya, S.; Ramadhan, M. Lutfi; N. Wening, F.; Pinehas, D.; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    Lembang Fault is an active fault lies from West to East located 10 kilometers in north of Bandung. It is a normal fault that its foot wall raises 40-450 meters above the ground. Its location that is not so far from Bandung, which is densely populated and frequently visited by tourists, makes Lembang Fault a threat if it becomes suddenly active. Its movement can cause earthquakes that can result in fatalities. Therefore, act of mitigation is necessary, such as educating people about Lembang Fault and its potential to cause disaster. The objective of this study is to find Lembang Fault plane below the surface with geo electrical mapping method and vertical elect rical sounding method around Ciwarega and The Peak, Lembang (west side of Lembang Fault). Both of these methods are using electricity current to measure rock resistivity. Currents are injected to the ground and potential differences are measured. According to Ohm's Law, resistivity can be calculated so that resistivity distribution can be obtained. In this study, high resistivity contrast is obtained; it is about 1400-5000 Ohm.m. This resistivity contrast can be caused by lateral lithology difference resulted by fault existence. This proves that there is actually a fault in Lembang that potentially cause disasters like earthquakes.

  2. Electrically resistive coating for remediation (regeneration) of a diesel particulate filter and method

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, Amanda C [Malibu, CA; Kirby, Kevin K [Calabasas Hills, CA; Gregoire, Daniel J [Thousand Oaks, CA

    2012-02-14

    A resistively heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The resistively heated DPF includes a DPF having an inlet surface and at least one resistive coating on the inlet surface. The at least one resistive coating is configured to substantially maintain its resistance in an operating range of the DPF. The at least one resistive coating has a first terminal and a second terminal for applying electrical power to resistively heat up the at least one resistive coating in order to increase the temperature of the DPF to a regeneration temperature. The at least one resistive coating includes metal and semiconductor constituents.

  3. Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Using Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT): A Minimally Invasive Method

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R L; Ramirez, A L; Daily, W D

    2002-08-05

    Successful geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), will require monitoring the CO{sub 2} injection to confirm the performance of the caprock/reservoir system, assess leaks and flow paths, and understand the geophysical and geochemical interactions between the CO{sub 2} and the geologic minerals and fluids. Electrical methods are especially well suited for monitoring processes involving fluids, as electrical properties are sensitive to the presence and nature of the formation fluids. High resolution tomographs of electrical properties are now used for site characterization and to monitor subsurface migration of fluids (i.e., leaking underground tanks, infiltration events, steam floods, contaminant movement, and to assess the integrity of engineered barriers). When electrical resistance tomography (ERT) imaging can be performed using existing well casings as long electrodes, the method is nearly transparent to reservoir operators, and reduces the need for additional drilling. Using numerical simulations and laboratory experiments, we have conducted sensitivity studies to determine the potential of ERT methods to detect and monitor the migration of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface. These studies have in turn been applied to the design and implementation of the first field casing surveys conducted in an oil field undergoing a CO{sub 2} flood.

  4. A method to investigate the electron scattering characteristics of ultrathin metallic films by in situ electrical resistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trindade, I. G.; Sousa, J. B.; Fermento, R.; Leitao, D.

    2009-07-15

    In this article, a method to measure the electrical resistivity/conductivity of metallic thin films during layer growth on specific underlayers is described. The in situ monitoring of an underlayer electrical resistance, its change upon the incoming of new material atoms/molecules, and the growth of a new layer are presented. The method is easy to implement and allows obtaining in situ experimental curves of electrical resistivity dependence upon film thickness with a subatomic resolution, providing insight in film growth microstructure characteristics, specular/diffuse electron scattering surfaces, and optimum film thicknesses.

  5. The `L' Array, a method to model 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Segura, R. E.; Chavez-Hernandez, G.; Delgado, C.; Tejero-Andrade, A.

    2010-12-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method designed to calculate the distribution of apparent electrical resistivities in the subsoil by means of a great number of observations with the aim of determining an electrical image displaying the distribution of true resistivities in the subsoil. Such process can be carried out to define 2D or 3D models of the subsurface. For a 3D ERT, usually, the electrodes are placed in a squared grid keeping the distance between adjacent electrodes constant in the x and y directions. Another design employed, consists of a series of parallel lines whose space inter-lines must be smaller or equal to four times the electrode separation. The most common electrode arrays frequently employed for this type of studies are the pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole. Unfortunately, ERT surface sampling schemes are limited by physical conditions or obstacles, like buildings, highly populated urban zones, and geologic/topographic features, where the lines of electrodes cannot be set. However, it is always necessary to characterize the subsoil beneath such anthropogenic or natural features. The ‘L’ shaped array has the main purpose to overcome such difficulties by surrounding the study area with a square of electrode lines. The measurements are obtained by switching automatically current and potential electrodes from one line to the other. Each observation adds a level of information, from one profile to the other. Once the total levels of data are completed, the opposite ‘L’ array can be measured following the same process. The complete square is computed after the parallel profiles are observed as well. At the end, the computed resistivities are combined to form a 3D matrix of observations. Such set of data can be inverted to obtain the true resistivity distribution at depth in the form of a working cube, which can be interpreted. The method was tested with theoretical models, which included a set of two resistive cubes

  6. Novel laboratory methods for determining the fine scale electrical resistivity structure of core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslam, E. P.; Gunn, D. A.; Jackson, P. D.; Lovell, M. A.; Aydin, A.; Prance, R. J.; Watson, P.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution electrical resistivity measurements are made on saturated rocks using novel laboratory instrumentation and multiple electrical voltage measurements involving in principle a four-point electrode measurement but with a single, moving electrode. Flat, rectangular core samples are scanned by varying the electrode position over a range of hundreds of millimetres with an accuracy of a tenth of a millimetre. Two approaches are tested involving a contact electrode and a non-contact electrode arrangement. The first galvanic method uses balanced cycle switching of a floating direct current (DC) source to minimise charge polarisation effects masking the resistivity distribution related to fine scale structure. These contacting electrode measurements are made with high common mode noise rejection via differential amplification with respect to a reference point within the current flow path. A computer based multifunction data acquisition system logs the current through the sample and voltages along equipotentials from which the resistivity measurements are derived. Multiple measurements are combined to create images of the surface resistivity structure, with variable spatial resolution controlled by the electrode spacing. Fine scale sedimentary features and open fractures in saturated rocks are interpreted from the measurements with reference to established relationships between electrical resistivity and porosity. Our results successfully characterise grainfall lamination and sandflow cross-stratification in a brine saturated, dune bedded core sample representative of a southern North Sea reservoir sandstone, studied using the system in constant current, variable voltage mode. In contrast, in a low porosity marble, identification of open fracture porosity against a background very low matrix porosity is achieved using the constant voltage, variable current mode. This new system is limited by the diameter of the electrode that for practical reasons can only be

  7. Investigating Algal Reefs in Xinwu, Taiwan, by using Electrical Resistivity Tomography Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping-Yun; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2017-04-01

    The Guanxin algal reef, which is locating along the coastal line of Guanyin and Xinwu districts in the Taoyuan city, is the biggest and most complete algal reef in Taiwan. It is consisted of the calcified crustose coralline algae and is one of the most important ecosystems on the northwestern coast. Algal reefs grow extremely slow and expand only 0.1 to 80 mm annually; as a result, any investigation in the algal reef area must be implemented very carefully to reduce potential influence on the environment. Reefs have special electrical property; therefore, it is suitable for applications of electrical exploration methods. The Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a fast, non-destructive, and inexpensive surficial geophysical survey method, and therefore it is widely used to investigate reefs. In this study, we used ERT method to investigate the location, distribution area and depth of algal reefs in order to provide a reliable reference of coastal engineering and the establishment of ecosystem refuge. The study area is from the south coast of Fulin river to the south coast of Guanyin river. There are four ERT survey lines, three of them are 960m long and parallel to the shoreline, and the other one is 240m long and perpendicular to others. According to the Archie's Law, we calculated the porosity from the resistivity profile to estimate the depth of reefs beneath each survey line and verified the estimates with the data obtained from drilling well. The results show that the upper boundary of the algal reefs is 0-1.5m deep (there are sands above), and the lower boundary is 4-6m deep (there are gravels below) in the study area. In addition, all profiles obtained from the north-south survey lines show that the depth of the algal reef becomes shallower in the range of 100m in the southernmost end, which indicate the southern boundary of the reef distribution.

  8. Characterization of a dismissed landfill via electrical resistivity tomography and mise-à-la-masse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carlo, Lorenzo; Perri, Maria Teresa; Caputo, Maria Clementina; Deiana, Rita; Vurro, Michele; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2013-11-01

    Electrical resistivity methods are widely used for environmental applications, and they are particularly useful for the characterization and monitoring of sites where the presence of contamination requires a thorough understanding of the location and movement of water, that can act as a carrier of solutes. One such application is landfill studies, where the strong electrical contrasts between waste, leachate and surrounding formations make electrical methods a nearly ideal tool for investigation. In spite of the advantages, however, electrical investigation of landfills poses also challenges, both logistical and interpretational. This paper presents the results of a study conducted on a dismissed landfill, close to the city of Corigliano d'Otranto, in the Apulia region (Southern Italy). The landfill is located in an abandoned quarry, that was subsequently re-utilized about thirty years ago as a site for urban waste disposal. The waste was thought to be more than 20 m thick, and the landfill bottom was expected to be confined with an HDPE (high-density poli-ethylene) liner. During the digging operations performed to build a nearby new landfill, leachate was found, triggering an in-depth investigation including also non-invasive methods. The principal goal was to verify whether the leachate is indeed confined, and to what extent, by the HDPE liner. We performed both surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and mise-à-la-masse (MALM) surveys, facing the severe challenges posed by the rugged terrain of the abandoned quarry complex. A conductive body, probably associated with leachate, was found as deep as 40 m below the current landfill surface i.e. at a depth much larger than the expected 20 m thickness of waste. Given the logistical difficulties that limit the geometry of acquisition, we utilized synthetic forward modeling in order to confirm/dismiss interpretational hypotheses emerging from the ERT and MALM results. This integration between measurements and

  9. Monitoring strain and damage in multi-phase composite materials using electrical resistance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammatikos, S. A.; Gkikas, G.; Paipetis, A.

    2011-04-01

    The variation of the electrical properties of fiber reinforced polymers when subjected to load offer the ability of strain and damage monitoring. This is performed via electrical resistance and electrical potential measurements. On the other hand Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) have proved to be an efficient additive to polymers and matrices of composites with respect to structural enhancement and improvement of the electrical properties. The induction of CNTs increases the conductivity of the matrix, transforming it to an antistatic or a conducting phase. The key issue of the structural and electrical properties optimization is the dispersion quality of the nano-scale in the polymer phase. Well dispersed CNTs provide an electrical network within the insulating matrix. If the fibers are conductive, the CNT network mediates the electrical anisotropy and reduces the critical flaw size that is detectable by the change in conductivity. Thus, the network performs as an inherent sensor in the composite structure, since every invisible crack or delamination is manifested as an increase in the electrical resistance. The scope of this work is to further exploit the information provided by the electrical properties with a view to identify strain variation and global damage via bulk resistance measurements. The aforementioned techniques were employed to monitor, strain and damage in fiber reinforced composite laminates both with and without conductive nanofillers.

  10. Identification of Karstic Caves by Utilizing Two-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uçar, Fatih; Aktürk, Özgür

    2015-04-01

    The region consisting of easily soluble rocks is generally defined as karstic terrain and it is characterized by surface collapse and small or large scale dissolution voids on rock surface. Formation and expansion of these voids may cause dangerous situation during surface/subsurface construction works. Therefore, it is important to determine the location, size and dimension of karstic caves. Geophysical investigations are very helpful in determining the boundaries of geological subsurface structures. In order to determine subsurface profile and characteristic of soil, surface geophysical methods can be successfully applied. Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) is the most important methods among the convenient and commonly used methods to determine subsurface profile. By using this method, cavernous and weathered zones can be determined easily. Within the scope of this study, near surface profiles were determined by utilizing ERI at Akdeniz University Campus and Masa Dağı region located in the city of Antalya, Turkey. The results obtained from four different locations in the Akdeniz University campus compared only with Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) analyses. Since topographic cross-section is clearly seen in two different locations around Masa Dağı location, ERI results were superimposed with topography and also compared with VES. As a result, presences of subsurface cavities were determined and illustrated using 2D colorful images. Keywords: ERI, VES, Karstic terrain, Cave, Antalya

  11. Electrical Resistivity Methods to Characterize Sediment Deformation; Examples from Large-scale Glaciotectonic Structures in Michigan, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    An outcrop at the western edge of a large NW-SE trending ridge along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan south of Ludington contains Late Wisconsin deformation structures. Differential loading associated with a glacial re-advance caused glaciolacustrine loamy material to deform into several narrow anticlinal structures that rise from below beach level to near the top of the ~50 m high cliff. The anticlines separate ~100 m broad synclines that control local ground water flow and impact cliff stability. The objective of this study was to characterize the orientation and lateral extent of the structures below the ridge using different galvanic electrical resistivity methods. These methods exploit the large electrical contrast between the glaciolacustrine loams and overlying sandy outwash material. Electrical resistivity methods have long been part of the geophysical tool set. Recent advances, including the availability of multi-electrode systems and advanced data processing software, have made electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) a popular tool to obtain 2D models of subsurface resistivity. In this study, vertical electrical soundings (VES) were combined with borehole logs and lab-derived petrophysical relationships to characterize the site stratigraphy. Constant-spread traverses (CST) and ERT data were used to map the spatial extent of deformation structures. Field, lab, and modeling results presented in this work identify various strengths and limitations of electrical resistivity methods for the characterization of deformation structures in general and glaciotectonic structures in particular.

  12. The Use of Electrical Resistivity Method to Mapping The Migration of Heavy Metals by Electrokinetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, A. T. S.; Ayuni, S. A.; Ezree, A. M.; Nizam, Z. M.; Aziman, M.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Norshuhaila, M. S.; Zaidi, E.

    2017-08-01

    The presence of heavy metals contamination in soil environment highly needs innovative remediation. Basically, this contamination was resulted from ex-mining sites, motor workshop, petrol station, landfill and industrial sites. Therefore, soil treatment is very important due to metal ions are characterized as non-biodegradable material that may be harmful to ecological system, food chain, human health and groundwater sources. There are various techniques that have been proposed to eliminate the heavy metal contamination from the soil such as bioremediation, phytoremediation, electrokinetic remediation, solidification and stabilization. The selection of treatment needs to fulfill some criteria such as cost-effective, easy to apply, green approach and high remediation efficiency. Electrokinetic remediation technique (EKR) offers those solutions in certain area where other methods are impractical. While, electrical resistivity method offers an alternative geophysical technique for soil subsurface profiling to mapping the heavy metals migration by the influece of electrical gradient. Consequently, this paper presents an overview of the use of EKR to treat contaminated soil by using ERM method to verify their effectiveness to remove heavy metals.

  13. Assessment of groundwater vulnerability to leachate infiltration using electrical resistivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosuro, G. O.; Omosanya, K. O.; Bayewu, O. O.; Oloruntola, M. O.; Laniyan, T. A.; Atobi, O.; Okubena, M.; Popoola, E.; Adekoya, F.

    2016-02-01

    This aim of this work is to assess the degree of leachate infiltration at a dumpsite in Agbara industrial estate, Southwestern Nigeria using electrical resistivity techniques. Around the dumpsite were 45 vertical electrical sounding (VES) stations and 3 electrical resistivity tomography profiles. Current electrode spread varied from 300 to 600 m for the electrical sounding. Electrode configuration includes Schlumberger and Wenner array for sounding and profiling. The state of leachate contamination was tested using parameters such as aquifer vulnerability index, overburden protective capacity and longitudinal unit conductance (Si) derived from the apparent resistivity values. Four principal geoelectric layers inferred from the VES data include the topsoil, sand, clayey sand, and clay/shale. Resistivity values for these layers vary from 3 to 1688, 203 to 3642 123 to 388, and 67 to 2201 Ω m with corresponding thickness of 0.8-2.4, 2.5-140, 3-26 m and infinity, respectively. The leachate plume occurs at a maximum depth of 10 m on the 2-D inverse models of real electrical resistivity with an average depth of infiltration being 6 m in the study area. The correlation between longitudinal conductance and overburden protective capacity show that aquifers around the dumpsite have poor protective capacity and are vulnerable to leachate contamination. Leachate infiltration is favored by the absence of lithological barriers such as clay which in the study area are either mixed with sand or positioned away from the aquifer.

  14. Assessment of groundwater vulnerability to leachate infiltration using electrical resistivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosuro, G. O.; Omosanya, K. O.; Bayewu, O. O.; Oloruntola, M. O.; Laniyan, T. A.; Atobi, O.; Okubena, M.; Popoola, E.; Adekoya, F.

    2017-09-01

    This aim of this work is to assess the degree of leachate infiltration at a dumpsite in Agbara industrial estate, Southwestern Nigeria using electrical resistivity techniques. Around the dumpsite were 45 vertical electrical sounding (VES) stations and 3 electrical resistivity tomography profiles. Current electrode spread varied from 300 to 600 m for the electrical sounding. Electrode configuration includes Schlumberger and Wenner array for sounding and profiling. The state of leachate contamination was tested using parameters such as aquifer vulnerability index, overburden protective capacity and longitudinal unit conductance (S i) derived from the apparent resistivity values. Four principal geoelectric layers inferred from the VES data include the topsoil, sand, clayey sand, and clay/shale. Resistivity values for these layers vary from 3 to 1688, 203 to 3642 123 to 388, and 67 to 2201 Ω m with corresponding thickness of 0.8-2.4, 2.5-140, 3-26 m and infinity, respectively. The leachate plume occurs at a maximum depth of 10 m on the 2-D inverse models of real electrical resistivity with an average depth of infiltration being 6 m in the study area. The correlation between longitudinal conductance and overburden protective capacity show that aquifers around the dumpsite have poor protective capacity and are vulnerable to leachate contamination. Leachate infiltration is favored by the absence of lithological barriers such as clay which in the study area are either mixed with sand or positioned away from the aquifer.

  15. Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, James M.

    2013-09-10

    A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

  16. Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2017-02-28

    A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

  17. Focusing Sources on Induced Polarization and Electrical Resistivity Method Applied to Soil Pollution Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero, A.; Lopez, A.; Induced Polarization Team

    2013-05-01

    In recent years the problems of soil contamination have been increasing and geophysical methods, particularly electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) have struggled to find and monitor cases of contamination. Moreover, Induced Polarization (IP) has shown promise in mapping contaminant plumes, although both techniques (ERT and IP) have problems like noise, inductive coupling, effects of electrodes, etc. limiting the precision and accuracy of the data. To overcome these problems, this paper introduces a novel technique of focusing sources. This technique reduces the effects of adjacent vertical formations and contacts due to the flowing of current in a vertical way at the zone where the electrode potentials have been deployed. This fact allows obtaining cleaner data of ERT and IP. In order to introduce the proposed technique a vertical contact synthetic model is studied and after to a cultivar area in Hidalgo State, México which presents different types of

  18. A method to improve tree water use estimates by distinguishing sapwood from heartwood using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, A.; Ostergaard, K.; Lenkopane, M.; Fan, J.; Lockington, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Estimating whole-plant water use in trees requires reliable and accurate methods. Measuring sap velocity and extrapolating to tree water use is seen as the most commonly used. However, deducing the tree water use from sap velocity requires an estimate of the sapwood area. This estimate is the highest cause of uncertainty, and can reach more than 50 % of the uncertainty in the estimate of water use per day. Here, we investigate the possibility of using Electrical Resistivity Tomography to evaluate the sapwood area distribution in a plantation of Pinus elliottii. Electric resistivity tomographs of Pinus elliottii show a very typical pattern of electrical resistivity, which is highly correlated to sapwood and heartwood distribution. To identify the key factors controlling the variation of electrical resistivity, cross sections at breast height for ten trees have been monitored with electrical resistivity tomography. Trees have been cut down after the experiment to identify the heartwood/sapwood boundaries and to extract wood and sap samples. pH, electrolyte concentration and wood moisture content have then been analysed for these samples. Results show that the heartwood/sapwood patterns are highly correlated with electrical resistivity, and that the wood moisture content is the most influencing factor controlling the variability of the patterns. These results show that electric resistivity tomography could be used as a powerful tool to identify the sapwood area, and thus be used in combination with sapflow sensors to map tree water use at stand scale. However, if Pinus elliottii shows typical patterns, further work is needed to identify to see if there are species - specific characterictics as shown in previous works (, electrolyte gradients from the bark to the heartwood). Also, patterns of high resistivity in between needles positions, which are not correlated with either wood moisture content or sapwood, appear to be artifacts. Thus, inversion methods have

  19. RESISTIVITY METHODS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Resistivity methods were among the first geophysical techniques developed. The basic concept originated with Conrad Schlumberger, who conducted the initial resistivity field tests in Normandy, France during 1912. The resistivity method, employed in its earliest and most conventional form, uses an ex...

  20. Compressibility determination by electrical resistance measurement: a universal method for both crystalline and amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaozhi; He, Duanwei; Xu, Chao; Ren, Xiangting; Zhou, Xiaoling; Liu, Shenzuo

    2012-12-01

    A new method is introduced for investigating the compressibility of solids under high pressure by in situ electrical resistance measurement of a manganin wire, which is wrapped around the sample. This method does not rely on the lattice parameters measurement, and the continuous volume change of the sample versus pressure can be obtained. Therefore, it is convenient to look at the compressibility of solids, especially for the X-ray diffraction amorphous materials. The I-II and II-III phase transition of Bi accompanying with volume change of 4.5% and 3.5% has been detected using the method, respectively, while the volume change for the phase transition of Tl occurring at 3.67 GPa is determined as 0.5%. The fit of the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state to our data yields a zero-pressure bulk modulus K 0=28.98±0.03 GPa for NaCl and 6.97±0.02 GPa for amorphous red phosphorus.

  1. Detection of Old Mine Tunnels in Mexico City Highlands by Electric Resistivity Image Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, R. E.; Tejero, A.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) methods have been applied to study cavities or subsurface subsidence threatening urbanized areas. Unfortunately, ERT-3D techniques carried out on heavily urbanized areas become a difficult task, since parallel ERT arrays cannot be deployed. Then, a conventional regular grid cannot be carried out. We present a subsidence problem located in a densely populated portion of Mexico City highlands. Since the damaged houses are in the middle of a highly populated low-class neighborhood, an unconventional ERT array had to be applied. At first, a ';T'-array formed by two perpendicular transects was applied, deployed within a small alley, that stretched from the house entrance. This study determined a tubular structure beneath the houses following an irregular path at depth. Finally, houses were demolished due to the extensive damaged in their foundations. This made possible to carry out a second ERT-3D study, which included a dipolar array called ';L' and ';Corner' arrays. Such a new work defined a similar tubular structure. The cavity entrance was discovered, when excavations were made, although its precise shape could not be defined. The ERT-3D interpretation contributed to locate and accurately determine the geometrical characteristics of the geological feature that caused the collapse of dwellings.

  2. Imaging Rainfall Infiltration Processes with the Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Imaging Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Gui-Bin; Chen, Chien-chih; Chang, Ping-Yu; Wang, Tzu-Pin; Yen, Horng-Yuan; Dong, Jia-Jyun; Ni, Chuen-Fa; Chen, Su-Chin; Chen, Chao-Wei; Jia, Zheng-yuan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) was carried out continuously for 10 days to map the subsurface resistivity distribution along a potentially hazardous hillslope at the Jieshou Junior High School in Taoyuan, Taiwan. The reliability of the inverted resistivity structures down to about 25 m depth was examined with synthetic modeling using the same electrode arrangements installed on land surface as in field surveys, together with a DOI (depth-of-investigation) index calculated from the ERI data. The subsurface resistivity distribution is consistent with results from well logging. These ERI recordings were taken daily and provided highly resolved imagery of the resistivity distribution underground and illustrated the dynamical fluid-flow behavior due to heavy rainfall infiltration. Using Archie's law, the resistivity distribution was transformed into a map of relative water saturation (RWS), which is strongly correlated with the rainfall infiltration process. We then found that the averaged RWS is significantly correlated with daily precipitation. Our observations indicate that time-lapse ERI is effective in monitoring subterraneous rainfall infiltration; moreover, the preferential flow paths can be delineated according to the changes in averaged RWS derived from the ERI data.

  3. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  4. PILOT-SCALE FIELD VALIDATION OF THE LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TOMOGRAPHY METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    GLASER DR; RUCKER DF; CROOK N; LOKE MH

    2011-07-14

    Field validation for the long electrode electrical resistivity tomography (LE-ERT) method was attempted in order to demonstrate the performance of the technique in imaging a simple buried target. The experiment was an approximately 1/17 scale mock-up of a region encompassing a buried nuclear waste tank on the Hanford site. The target of focus was constructed by manually forming a simulated plume within the vadose zone using a tank waste simulant. The LE-ERT results were compared to ERT using conventional point electrodes on the surface and buried within the survey domain. Using a pole-pole array, both point and long electrode imaging techniques identified the lateral extents of the pre-formed plume with reasonable fidelity, but the LE-ERT was handicapped in reconstructing the vertical boundaries. The pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays were also tested with the LE-ERT method and were shown to have the least favorable target properties, including the position of the reconstructed plume relative to the known plume and the intensity of false positive targets. The poor performance of the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays was attributed to an inexhaustive and non-optimal coverage of data at key electrodes, as well as an increased noise for electrode combinations with high geometric factors. However, when comparing the model resolution matrix among the different acquisition strategies, the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays using long electrodes were shown to have significantly higher average and maximum values than any pole-pole array. The model resolution describes how well the inversion model resolves the subsurface. Given the model resolution performance of the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays, it may be worth investing in tools to understand the optimum subset of randomly distributed electrode pairs to produce maximum performance from the inversion model.

  5. Designing Predictive Diagnose Method for Insulation Resistance Degradation of the Electrical Power Cables from Neutral Insulated Power Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobra, R.; Pasculescu, D.; Risteiu, M.; Buica, G.; Jevremović, V.

    2017-06-01

    This paper describe some possibilities to minimize voltages switching-off risks from the mining power networks, in case of insulated resistance faults by using a predictive diagnose method. The cables from the neutral insulated power networks (underground mining) are designed to provide a flexible electrical connection between portable or mobile equipment and a point of supply, including main feeder cable for continuous miners, pump cable, and power supply cable. An electronic protection for insulated resistance of mining power cables can be made using this predictive strategy. The main role of electronic relays for insulation resistance degradation of the electrical power cables, from neutral insulated power networks, is to provide a permanent measurement of the insulated resistance between phases and ground, in order to switch-off voltage when the resistance value is below a standard value. The automat system of protection is able to signalize the failure and the human operator will be early informed about the switch-off power and will have time to take proper measures to fix the failure. This logic for fast and automat switch-off voltage without aprioristic announcement is suitable for the electrical installations, realizing so a protection against fires and explosion. It is presented an algorithm and an anticipative relay for insulated resistance control from three-phase low voltage installations with insulated neutral connection.

  6. A Nondestructive Evaluation Method: Measuring the Fixed Strength of Spot-Welded Joint Points by Surface Electrical Resistivity.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Akira; Yamashita, Keitaro; Inoue, Hirofumi; Yang, Sung-Mo; Iwata, Masahiro; Ike, Natsuko

    2013-04-01

    Destructive tests are generally applied to evaluate the fixed strength of spot-welding nuggets of zinc-plated steel (which is a widely used primary structural material for automobiles). These destructive tests, however, are expensive and time-consuming. This paper proposes a nondestructive method for evaluating the fixed strength of the welded joints using surface electrical resistance. A direct current nugget-tester and probes have been developed by the authors for this purpose. The proposed nondestructive method uses the relative decrease in surface electrical resistance, α. The proposed method also considers the effect of the corona bond. The nugget diameter is estimated by two factors: RQuota, which is calculated from variation of resistance, and a constant that represents the area of the corona bond. Since the maximum tensile strength is correlated with the nugget diameter, it can be inferred from the estimated nugget diameter. When appropriate measuring conditions for the surface electrical resistance are chosen, the proposed method can effectively evaluate the fixed strength of the spot-welded joints even if the steel sheet is zinc-plated.

  7. Assessment of leachate infiltration from Piyungan landfill using electrical resistivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parhusip, Jaingot Anggiat; Harijoko, Agung; Putra, Doni Prakasa Eka; Suryanto, Wiwit

    2017-07-01

    Piyungan Landfill (TPA) is the largest landfill located in Bantul Regency of Yogyakarta. Leachate samples collected around the landfill area indicate that there is a contamination of groundwater around the landfill. This study has been successfully found a leachate infiltration to the soil layer at the north area of the landfill, which is the flow direct ion of the groundwater flow from the landfill. Electrical resistivity (ER) measurement towards fluid-saturated soil was carried out in the laboratory. Soil samples were saturated with fluid aquades-leachate and ER values were measured. ER value gained for saturated sandy clay with total dissolve solid TDS 10 mg/l to 350 mg/l is between 6.8 Ωm - 9.7 Ωm. Measurement of geo-electric resistivity 2-D of multi electrode Wener Schlumberger configuration has a minimum distance of 5m with an expanse length of 190 m. It is geo-electric line is 300°NW at the point X = 437.172m; Y = 9130495m; Z = 73.5m. This line perpendicularly cut the fault line at point 110m, and cross the Banyak River flow at point 135m. ER values of soil layer obtained from the results of geo-electric interpretation RES2DINV were ranged from 2 Ωm - 120 Ωm. At point 135m of the eastern part, ER value is between 2 Ωm to 10 Ωm with a depth of 10-12 m. This layer is estimated as a layer of Sandy Clayey saturated with contaminated water by leachate from Piyungan Landfill. ER value under point 40m to 130m is between 2 Ωm -12 Ωm with a depth of 15m, which is estimated as a layer of Tuffaceous Clay Sand Stone.

  8. Challenges of using electrical resistivity method to locate karst conduits-A field case in the Inner Bluegrass Region, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, J.; Currens, J.C.; Dinger, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Conduits serve as major pathways for groundwater flow in karst aquifers. Locating them from the surface, however, is one of the most challenging tasks in karst research. Geophysical methods are often deployed to help locate voids by mapping variations of physical properties of the subsurface. Conduits can cause significant contrasts of some physical properties that can be detected; other subsurface features such as water-bearing fractures often yield similar contrasts, which are difficult to distinguish from the effects of the conduits. This study used electrical resistivity method to search for an unmapped karst conduit that recharges Royal Spring in the Inner Bluegrass karst region, Kentucky, USA. Three types of resistivity techniques (surface 2D survey, quasi-3D survey, and time-lapse survey) were used to map and characterize resistivity anomalies. Some of the major anomalies were selected as drilling targets to verify the existence of the conduits. Drilling near an anomaly identified by an electrical resistivity profile resulted in successful penetration of a major water-filled conduit. The drilling results also suggest that, in this study area, low resistivity anomalies in general are associated with water-bearing features. However, differences in the anomaly signals between the water-filled conduit and other water-bearing features such as water-filled fracture zones were undistinguishable. The electrical resistivity method is useful in conduit detection by providing potential drilling targets. Knowledge of geology and hydrogeology about the site and professional judgment also played important roles in locating the major conduit. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Application of the contact electric resistance method for in situ investigation of semiconductor surface properties in electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charny, L.; Saario, T.; Marichev, V. A.

    1994-06-01

    The contact electric resistance method (CER) has been applied for in situ investigation of the charge transfer through the semiconductor surface under potentiostatic control in electrolytes. Single crystals of n- and p-GaAs were investigated. As a result of changing the electrochemical potential, two simultaneous tendencies of surface resistance changes were observed. The first type of resistance change, which occurs immediately after application of the potential, is caused by band bending at the surface charge region. The second type of resistance change, characterized by a power law dependence on time, is caused by adsorption and / or oxidation processes at the surface. The surface resistance sharply increases close to the As/As 2O 3 (As/HAsO 2) equilibrium potential, but does not change at potentials close to the Ga/Ga(OH) 3 equilibrium potential. In addition, the influence of the sulphur content of the electrolyte on the surface resistance was investigated in 0.01M, 0.1M and 1M Na 2S borate buffer solutions. At potentials lower than -0.8 V SCE sulphur was found to adsorb competitively on GaAs and to prevent adsorption of borate and hydroxyl anions, resulting in reduction of the surface resistance.

  10. An integration of aeromagnetic and electrical resistivity methods in dam site investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Aina, A.; Olorunfemi, M.O.; Ojo, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    Aeromagnetic map and electrical resistivity sounding data obtained along eight traverses were examined at two sites across the Katsina-Ala River. The principal goals of this exercise were to define depths to the bedrock, bedrock relief, geologic structures, define the nature of the superficial deposit, and select probable minor and major axes for hydroelectric power dams. The aeromagnetic map shows that the basement rocks trend roughly northeast-southwest, which correlates with the strike of foliation measurements made on rock outcrops along the river channel. A network of cross cutting lineaments, suspected to be faults/fractures that trend approximately northeast/southwest and northwest/southeast, was also delineated from the magnetic map. The depths to the bedrock estimated from resistivity depth sounding data at site 1 generally vary from 1--53.1 m. Depths to the bedrock estimated at site 2 range from 1.9--19.5 m. The superficial deposit varies from clay to sandy clay, to clayey sand (with boulders in places), and to sand and laterite. The bedrock relief is relatively flat and gently undulates along most of the traverses, with an overall dip towards the river channel. Traverses E-F or I-J at site 1 and K-L at site 2 are probable dame axes. These traverses are characterized by relatively thin overburden thicknesses and rock heads dipping toward the river channel, thereby reducing the likelihood of water seepages from the flanks of the proposed dam axes.

  11. An Electrical Resistance Change Method for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Todoroki, A.; Mei, G.; Ren, Z.; Kwan, C.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon fibers are intrinsically conductive. They form an equivalent impedance network inside a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite material. This paper presents a method of using the resistance value change to detect, localize and size the damage or defect initiated inside the CFRP. Impact delamination and fatigue cracks are successfully monitored with this approach. This low cost, easy-to-implement technology could benefit aerospace and automotive industries for in-situ structural health monitoring of graphite-epoxy based components and subsystems.

  12. Steel Casing Resistivity Technology (SCRT): Innovative Applications of Electrical Methods for Buried Tank Leak Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, J. B.; Levitt, M. T.; Gee, G. W.

    2002-12-01

    The need for non-invasive leak detection methods is extremely important for monitoring cleanup efforts of nuclear waste contained in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Facility in Washington. Drilling is both very expensive and undesirable in the tank farms. Various geophysical imaging methods were evaluated over the past two years at two "cold" sites but within geologic conditions similar to the tank farms. The "cold" sites consisted of 1. a dense array of 32 steel casings, and 2. a "mock tank" in which various controlled leaks (injections) of a saturated aqueous solution of Na2S2O35H20 were metered. Nearly all methods required invasive drilling for subsurface placement of sensors. An innovative direct-current electrical method using existing infrastructure as grounding electrodes, such as steel casings and steel tanks, has shown very promising results and is undergoing further testing. The most useful results have been obtained by using multiple grounding points for spatial determinations and continuous time-series monitoring for temporal variations. Although the large size of tanks and lengths of casings make discrete volume estimations difficult, data acquired for test leaks to date have shown a surprising correlation between leak rates and the rate-of-change of specific electrical measurements. First order volume approximations can be made based on existing knowledge of the geologic environment and hydraulic parameters. Spatial data provide general leak location and gross flow characteristics, whereas temporal data indicate test leak commencement, cessation, and approximate leak rates. On-going testing is providing quantitative calibration information that is expected to transfer to the tank farm environments. Procedures are being developed that will simplify the installation and operation of the system in the tank-farm environments. Implementation of the technology necessitated remote operation and monitoring of the electrical system

  13. A method of Shaly sand correction for estimating gas hydrate saturations using downhole electrical resistivity log data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.

    2006-01-01

    Estimation of the amount of nonconductive and conductive constituents in the pore space of sediments, using electrical resistivity logs, generally loses accuracy when clays are present in the reservoir. Many different methods and clay models have been proposed to account for the conductivity of clay (for example, the shaly sand correction). In this study, the Simandoux model is employed to correct for the clay effect in order to more accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations. This study utilizes the fact that the effect of clay on the resistivity of a sediment is manifested in the Archie constants a and m, values of which are generally a = 1 and m = 2 for clean-sand reservoirs. Results of the study indicate that as the clay content increases, a also increases whereas m decreases. On the basis of the relationship between the Archie constants a and m with respect to the clay amount, a method of correcting for the clay effect on the estimation of water saturation is proposed. This method works well if the relationship between porosity and resistivity on a log-log plot is approximately linear and if accurate Archie constants a and m for clean sand are known. However, because of the linearity condition, it is difficult to apply the method to low-porosity reservoirs. Gas-hydrate-bearing sediments generally have high porosities because of their shallow depth of occurrence, so the method can be effectively applied in estimating gas hydrate saturations.

  14. Application of the surface azimuthal electrical resistivity survey method to determine patterns of regional joint orientation in glacial tills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, D.

    2010-01-01

    Joints within unconsolidated material such as glacial till can be primary avenues for the flow of electrical charge, water, and contaminants. To facilitate the siting and design of remediation programs, a need exists to map anisotropic distribution of such pathways within glacial tills by determining the azimuth of the dominant joint set. The azimuthal survey method uses standard resistivity equipment with a Wenner array rotated about a fixed center point at selected degree intervals that yields an apparent resistivity ellipse. From this ellipse, joint set orientation can be determined. Azimuthal surveys were conducted at 21 sites in a 500-km2 (193 mi2) area around Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and more specifically, at sites having more than 30 m (98 ft) of glacial till (to minimize the influence of underlying bedrock joints). The 26 azimuthal surveys revealed a systematic pattern to the trend of the dominant joint set within the tills, which is approximately parallel to ice flow direction during till deposition. The average orientation of the joint set parallel with the ice flow direction is N77??E and N37??E for the Oak Creek and Ozaukee tills, respectively. The mean difference between average direct observation of joint set orientations and average azimuthal resistivity results is 8??, which is one fifth of the difference of ice flow direction between the Ozaukee and Oak Creek tills. The results of this study suggest that the surface azimuthal electrical resistivity survey method used for local in situ studies can be a useful noninvasive method for delineating joint sets within shallow geologic material for regional studies. Copyright ?? 2010 The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrical Resistivity Measurements: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yadunath

    World-wide interest on the use of ceramic materials for aerospace and other advanced engineering applications, has led to the need for inspection techniques capable of detecting unusually electrical and thermal anomalies in these compounds. Modern ceramic materials offer many attractive physical, electrical and mechanical properties for a wide and rapidly growing range of industrial applications; moreover specific use may be made of their electrical resistance, chemical resistance, and thermal barrier properties. In this review, we report the development and various techniques for the resistivity measurement of solid kind of samples.

  16. Electrical condition monitoring method for polymers

    DOEpatents

    Watkins, Jr., Kenneth S.; Morris, Shelby J [Hampton, VA; Masakowski, Daniel D [Worcester, MA; Wong, Ching Ping [Duluth, GA; Luo, Shijian [Boise, ID

    2008-08-19

    An electrical condition monitoring method utilizes measurement of electrical resistivity of an age sensor made of a conductive matrix or composite disposed in a polymeric structure such as an electrical cable. The conductive matrix comprises a base polymer and conductive filler. The method includes communicating the resistivity to a measuring instrument and correlating resistivity of the conductive matrix of the polymeric structure with resistivity of an accelerated-aged conductive composite.

  17. Spatial variability of soil water conductivities obtained with classical laboratory methods and their relation to electrical resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dathe, Annette; Nemes, Attila; Bloem, Esther; Patterson, Matthew; Giménez, Daniel; Szõcs, Júlia; Koestel, Johannes; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    Soil water conductivity plays a critical role when estimating water transport using the Richard's equation. Modelers often take one value of the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) per soil layer and that value is decreased for unsaturated conditions following the equations of Mualem and van Genuchten. This approach can lead to inconsistencies between model and natural soil, because in the field Ksat can vary by several orders of magnitude on short (centimeter) distances and Ksat often expresses water movement through macropores which cannot be downscaled without caution towards matrix flux. To improve existing knowledge we established a field experiment on an agriculturally used silty clay loam (Stagnosol) in SE Norway. More than 100 undisturbed soil samples were taken to determine soil water retention, saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities and bulk density in the laboratory. A subset of these samples was scanned at the computer tomography facility at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala with special emphasis on characterizing macroporosity. Centimeter to decimeter scale heterogeneities were investigated in the field by using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a quasi-3D and a real 3D approach. The latter covered the soil volume of 2x1x1 m where the soil samples were taken. We will present comparisons between hydraulic conductivities obtained in the laboratory using different methods, and between laboratory hydraulic conductivity results and electrical resistivities obtained in the field.

  18. Grounding electrode and method of reducing the electrical resistance of soils

    DOEpatents

    Koehmstedt, Paul L.

    1980-01-01

    A first solution of an electrolyte is injected underground into a volume of soil having negative surface charges on its particles. A cationic surfactant suspended in this solution neutralizes these surface charges of the soil particles within the volume. Following the first solution, a cationic asphalt emulsion suspended in a second solution is injected into the volume. The asphalt emulsion diffuses through the volume and electrostatically bonds with additional soil surrounding the volume such that an electrically conductive water repellant shell enclosing the volume is formed. This shell prevents the leaching of electrolyte from the volume into the additional soil. The second solution also contains a dissolved deliquescent salt which draws water into the volume prior to the formation of the shell. When electrically connected to an electrical installation such as a power line tower, the volume constitutes a grounding electrode for the tower.

  19. Electrically Variable Resistive Memory Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Shangqing; Wu, Nai-Juan; Ignatiev, Alex; Charlson, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    Nonvolatile electronic memory devices that store data in the form of electrical- resistance values, and memory circuits based on such devices, have been invented. These devices and circuits exploit an electrically-variable-resistance phenomenon that occurs in thin films of certain oxides that exhibit the colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) effect. It is worth emphasizing that, as stated in the immediately preceding article, these devices function at room temperature and do not depend on externally applied magnetic fields. A device of this type is basically a thin film resistor: it consists of a thin film of a CMR material located between, and in contact with, two electrical conductors. The application of a short-duration, low-voltage current pulse via the terminals changes the electrical resistance of the film. The amount of the change in resistance depends on the size of the pulse. The direction of change (increase or decrease of resistance) depends on the polarity of the pulse. Hence, a datum can be written (or a prior datum overwritten) in the memory device by applying a pulse of size and polarity tailored to set the resistance at a value that represents a specific numerical value. To read the datum, one applies a smaller pulse - one that is large enough to enable accurate measurement of resistance, but small enough so as not to change the resistance. In writing, the resistance can be set to any value within the dynamic range of the CMR film. Typically, the value would be one of several discrete resistance values that represent logic levels or digits. Because the number of levels can exceed 2, a memory device of this type is not limited to binary data. Like other memory devices, devices of this type can be incorporated into a memory integrated circuit by laying them out on a substrate in rows and columns, along with row and column conductors for electrically addressing them individually or collectively.

  20. Assessment of electrical resistivity method to map groundwater seepage zones in heterogeneous sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gagliano, Michael P.; Nyquist, Jonathan E.; Toran, Laura; Rosenberry, Donald O.

    2009-01-01

    Underwater electrical‐resistivity data were collected along the southwest shore of Mirror Lake, NH, as part of a multi‐year assessment of the utility of geophysics for mapping groundwater seepage beneath lakes. We found that resistivity could locate shoreline sections where water is seeping out of the lake. A resistivity line along the lake bottom starting 27‐m off shore and continuing 27‐m on shore (1‐m electrode spacing) showed the water table dipping away from the lake, the gradient indicative of lake discharge in this area. Resistivity could also broadly delineate high‐seepage zones. An 80‐m line run parallel to shore using a 0.5‐m electrode spacing was compared with measurements collected the previous year using 1‐m electrode spacing. Both data sets showed the transition from high‐seepage glacial outwash, to low‐seepage glacial till, demonstrating reproducibility. However, even the finer 0.5‐m electrode spacing was insufficient to resolve the heterogeneity well enough to predict seepage variability within each zone. For example, over a 12.5‐m stretch where seepage varied from 1–38 cm/day, resistivity varied horizontally from 700–3900 ohm‐m and vertically in the top 2‐m from 900–4000 ohm‐m without apparent correlation with seepage. In two sections along this 80‐m line, one over glacial outwash, the other over till, we collected 14 parallel lines of resistivity, 13.5 m long spaced 1 m apart to form a 13.5 × 13 m data grid. These lines were inverted individually using a 2‐D inversion program and then interpolated to create a 3‐D volume. Examination of resistivity slices through this volume highlights the heterogeneity of both these materials, suggesting groundwater flow takes sinuous flow paths. In such heterogeneous materials the goal of predicting the precise location of high‐seepage points remains elusive.

  1. Efficacy of electrical resistivity and induced polarization methods for revealing fluoride contaminated groundwater in granite terrain.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Nepal C; Rao, Ananda V; Singh, Vijay P

    2010-09-01

    The accumulation of fluoride (F) in groundwater is a common phenomenon in India and worldwide. Its location can be identified through a direct hydrochemical analysis, which was carried out in Kurmapalli watershed (located 60 km SE of Hyderabad city), Nalgonda district, Andhra Pradesh, India affected by F contamination. The results of the hydrochemical analysis showed that F varied from 0.71 to 19.01 mg/l and its concentration exceeded the permissible limit (i.e., 1.5 mg/l) in 78% of the total 32 samples analyzed. The highest F value (19.01 mg/l) was found near Madnapur village, which is located in the central part of the watershed. Resistivity and induced polarization (IP) surveys were also carried out to reveal the zones where elevated F-contaminated groundwater exists. The objective of this paper was to highlight the utility of resistivity and IP surveys, using hydrochemical constituents as constraint, for the successful delineation of such contaminated/polluted groundwater zones in the granite area.

  2. Electrical resistance tomography from measurements inside a steel cased borehole

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Schenkel, Clifford; Ramirez, Abelardo L.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produced from measurements taken inside a steel cased borehole. A tomographic inversion of electrical resistance measurements made within a steel casing was then made for the purpose of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution in the formation remotely from the borehole. The ERT method involves combining electrical resistance measurements made inside a steel casing of a borehole to determine the electrical resistivity in the formation adjacent to the borehole; and the inversion of electrical resistance measurements made from a borehole not cased with an electrically conducting casing to determine the electrical resistivity distribution remotely from a borehole. It has been demonstrated that by using these combined techniques, highly accurate current injection and voltage measurements, made at appropriate points within the casing, can be tomographically inverted to yield useful information outside the borehole casing.

  3. Application of Electrical Resistivity Method for Detecting Shallow Old Gold Mine Workings: An Example from Boksburg, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, S.; Chirenje, E.

    2011-12-01

    Subsidence has been observed at several locations along the northern perimeter of the Central Witwatersrand Mining Basin south of Johannesburg, South Africa. Previous studies have defined the extent and distribution of hundreds of open ventilation shafts and surface collapses linked to areas of known and suspected shallow undermining. Many collapses appear to be in a meta-stable state prone to further collapse, which could and have led to casualties. Identification of zones of incipient instability is therefore an urgent state responsibility to protect life and property, as much of these abandoned mine lands have been invaded by shack dwellers. This paper outlines the results of an investigation using 2D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in combination with a standard geotechnical engineering drilling exploration, with the aim of identifying areas of incipient instability and possible future collapse. The electrical resistivity data were acquired via a network of intersecting survey lines using a SYSCAL Pro multimode resistivity imaging system equipped with 72 electrodes. The dipole-dipole and the Schlumberger arrays with an electrode spacing of 5 and 10 m were used. Inversion of the data was carried out using the commercially available software package RES2DINV. Analysis of the electrical resistivity data and conventional site investigation data proved to be a highly effective means of characterizing dangerous, abandoned mine openings of various sizes, depths and origins. Survey results also successfully confirmed the position of known shafts and shallow underground workings. These appeared as electrically well-defined features corresponding extremely closely to both underground plans and invasive site investigation data. The findings obtained from this study offer practical considerations for modeling shallow subsurface conditions, along the Boksburg area; to enable the reliable identification of hazardous areas constituting a potential threat to human

  4. Electrical Resistivity of Alkali Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    rubidium, cesium, and francium ) and contains recommended reference values (or provisional or typical values). The compiled data include all the...and information on the electrical resistivity of alkali elements (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium ) and contains...107Ic. Magnetic Flux Density Dependence o.. .. ... .... 112 4.6. Francium ..........................115j a. Temperature Dependence

  5. Electrical resistivity of composite superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. H.; Lee, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    In addition to its superconducting properties, a superconductor is usually characterized by poor thermal conductivity and relatively high electrical resistivity in the normal state. To remedy this situation a study of superconducting properties of Cu-rich CU-Nb wires prepared by directionally solidified and cold-rolled technique was conducted. Some of the specimens were prepared by melting, directional solidification and diffusing in Tin. A total of 12 wire specimens was tested. Each specimen was analyzed by plotting experimental data into the following curves: the graph of the residual resistivity as a function of the specimen current at 4.3 K; and the graph of the electrical resistivity as a function of the temperature at a constant current.

  6. A Study of the Electrotransport in Thin Films: An Advanced Method for the Study of Electrotransport in Thin Films Using Electrical Resistance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, R. E.; Slippy, W. A., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    To date, very little is understood about electrotransport in thin films. One reason for this is the lack of methods in which electromigration can be adequately monitored dynamically. In this thesis, a new nondestructive method for the study of the electrotransport phenomenon in thin aluminum films is presented. This method makes use of electrical resistance measurements of various regions along the test sample to monitor changes in resistance resulting from electromigration. The advantage of this method is that resistance changes can be observed long before void formation can be seen using standard microscopy methods. In order to achieve the best efficiency using this method, special consideration must be given to the design of the sample. Design problems and their respective solutions are given. The results of the electrical resistance measurements are interpreted by means of photographs taken with an scanning electron microscope. The increase in resistance of the aluminum samples is interpreted to be due to void formation. The expected decrease in resistance near the anode was never observed. It is shown that mass accumulation takes on the form of hillocks and whiskers on the surface of the aluminum film, which does not contribute appreciably to conductivity.

  7. A Study of the Electrotransport in Thin Films: An Advanced Method for the Study of Electrotransport in Thin Films Using Electrical Resistance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, R. E.; Slippy, W. A., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    To date, very little is understood about electrotransport in thin films. One reason for this is the lack of methods in which electromigration can be adequately monitored dynamically. In this thesis, a new nondestructive method for the study of the electrotransport phenomenon in thin aluminum films is presented. This method makes use of electrical resistance measurements of various regions along the test sample to monitor changes in resistance resulting from electromigration. The advantage of this method is that resistance changes can be observed long before void formation can be seen using standard microscopy methods. In order to achieve the best efficiency using this method, special consideration must be given to the design of the sample. Design problems and their respective solutions are given. The results of the electrical resistance measurements are interpreted by means of photographs taken with an scanning electron microscope. The increase in resistance of the aluminum samples is interpreted to be due to void formation. The expected decrease in resistance near the anode was never observed. It is shown that mass accumulation takes on the form of hillocks and whiskers on the surface of the aluminum film, which does not contribute appreciably to conductivity.

  8. Assessing clogging development in infiltration-percolation systems for wastewater treatment by electrical resistivity and induced polarisation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapias, Josefina C.; Himi, Mahjoub; Lovera, Raúl; de la Rocha, Angelica; Foch, Montserrat; Salvadó, Humbert; Casas, Albert

    2013-04-01

    Infiltration-percolation is a low technology process used to treat primary and secondary effluents. It consists in the intermittent application of sewage on buried sand filters where the infiltrated water percolates through unsaturated porous medium. The advantages over conventional mechanical sanitation systems are: low energy requirements, operation and maintenance that may be conducted by unskilled staff, and low sludge production because their simplicity and low operation costs. Nevertheless, clogging is a major operational and maintenance issue associated with the use of infiltration-percolation systems for wastewater treatment, and can ultimately limit the lifetime of the system. The clogging development causes decrease of hydraulic conductivity, reduced oxygen supply and further leads to a rapid decrease of the treatment performance. For this reason it is essential to assess in advance the evolution of clogging process and detect potential failures in the system. The preliminary results of this research conducted at the Hostalets de Pierola wastewater treatment plant (near Barcelona, Spain) show that electrical resistivity and induced polarisation geophysical methods can be very useful for delineating the clogging expansion. Then, this non-destructive metodology can help take the preventive measures for enlarge the lifetime of the treatment system.

  9. Pedotransfer functions in soil electrical resistivity estimation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is recognized as a powerful non-invasive soil survey and monitoring method. Relationships between ER and soil water contents that are needed to infer the spatial distribution of soil moisture from the ERT results, are known to reflect soil properties. ...

  10. Electrical contact resistance in filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Fa; Zhou, Zhengping; Zhou, Wang-Min

    2012-05-01

    Electrical contact resistance (ECR) influences the electrochemical performance of porous electrodes made of stacked discrete materials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, nanofibers, etc.) for use in supercapacitors and rechargeable batteries. This study establishes a simple elasticity-conductivity model for the ECR of filaments in adhesive contact. The elastic deformation and size of electrical contact zone of the filaments are determined by using an adhesive contact model of filaments, and the ECR of adhesive filaments is obtained in explicit form. Dependencies of the ECR upon the filament geometries, surface energy, and elasticity are examined.

  11. A Method for Partitioning Surface and Subsurface Flow Using Rainfall Simulaton and Two-Dimensional Surface Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, A. M.; Paige, G. B.; Miller, S. N.; Carr, B. J.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    In semi-arid rangeland environments understanding how surface and subsurface flow processes and their interactions are influenced by watershed and rainfall characteristics is critical. However, it is difficult to resolve the temporal variations between mechanisms controlling these processes and challenging to obtain field measurements that document their interactions. Better insight into how these complex systems respond hydrologically is necessary in order to refine hydrologic models and decision support tools. We are conducting field studies integrating high resolution, two-dimensional surface electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) with variable intensity rainfall simulation, to quantify real-time partitioning of rainfall into surface and subsurface response. These studies are being conducted at the hillslope scale on long-term runoff plots on four different ecological sites in the Upper Crow Creek Watershed in southeastern Wyoming. Variable intensity rainfall rates were applied using the Walnut Gulch Rainfall Simulator in which intensities were increased incrementally from 49 to 180 mm hr-1 and steady-state runoff rates for each intensity were measured. Two 13.5 m electrode arrays at 0.5 m spacing were positioned on the surface perpendicular to each plot and potentials were measured at given time intervals prior to, during and following simulations using a dipole-dipole array configuration. The configuration allows for a 2.47 m depth of investigation in which magnitude and direction of subsurface flux can be determined. We used the calculated steady state infiltration rates to quantify the variability in the partial area runoff response on the ecological sites. Coupling this information with time-lapse difference inversions of ERI data, we are able to track areas of increasing and decreasing resistivity in the subsurface related to localized areas of infiltration during and following rainfall events. We anticipate implementing this method across a variety of

  12. Applying electrical resistivity tomography and biological methods to assess the surface-groundwater interaction in two Mediterranean rivers (central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iepure, Sanda; Gómez Ortiz, David; Lillo Ramos, Javier; Rasines Ladero, Ruben; Persoiu, Aurel

    2014-05-01

    Delineation of the extent of hyporheic zone (HZ) in river ecosystems is problematic due to the scarcity of spatial information about the structure of riverbed sediments and the magnitude and extent of stream interactions with the parafluvial and riparian zones. The several existing methods vary in both quality and quantity of information and imply the use of hydrogeological and biological methods. In the last decades, various non-invasive geophysical techniques were developed to characterise the streambed architecture and also to provide detailed spatial information on its vertical and horizontal continuity. All classes of techniques have their strengths and limitations; therefore, in order to assess their potential in delineating the lateral and vertical spatial extents of alluvial sediments, we have combined the near-surface images obtained by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) with biological assessment of invertebrates in two Mediterranean lowland rivers from central Spain. We performed in situ imaging of the thickness and continuity of alluvial sediments under the riverbed and parafluvial zone during base-flow conditions (summer 2013 and winter 2014) at two different sites with distinct lithology along the Tajuña and Henares Rivers. ERT was performed by installing the electrodes (1 m spacing) on a 47 m long transect normal to the river channel using a Wener-Schlumberger array, across both the riparian zones and the river bed. Invertebrates were collected in the streambed from a depth of 20-40 cm, using the Bou-Rouch method, and from boreholes drilled to a depth of 1.5 m in the riparian zone. The ERT images obtained at site 1 (medium and coarse sand dominated lithology) shows resistivity values ranging from ~20 to 80 ohm•m for the in-stream sediments, indicating a permeable zone up to ~ 0.5 m thick and extending laterally for ca. 5 m from the channel. These sediments contribute to active surface/hyporheic water exchanges and to low water retention in

  13. Measurement of electrical resistance after nerve injuries of the hand.

    PubMed

    Egyed, B; Eory, A; Veres, T; Manninger, J

    1980-10-01

    The authors measured electrical resistance of skin to define the sensory loss. A significant increase of the skin resistance was observed in the zone of sensory loss, as compared with the skin surfaces of normal innervation. The sensory map, sweating map (ninhydrine test) and the skin resistance map were also compared by the authors. The main advantages of the electrical skin resistance test are that it is a quantitative one, and takes less time than the other methods.

  14. Determination of electrical resistivity of dry coke beds

    SciTech Connect

    Eidem, P.A.; Tangstad, M.; Bakken, J.A.

    2008-02-15

    The electrical resistivity of the coke bed is of great importance when producing FeMn, SiMn, and FeCr in a submerged arc furnace. In these processes, a coke bed is situated below and around the electrode tip and consists of metallurgical coke, slag, gas, and metal droplets. Since the basic mechanisms determining the electrical resistivity of a coke bed is not yet fully understood, this investigation is focused on the resistivity of dry coke beds consisting of different carbonaceous materials, i.e., coke beds containing no slag or metal. A method that reliably compares the electrical bulk resistivity of different metallurgical cokes at 1500{sup o} C to 1600{sup o}C is developed. The apparatus is dimensioned for industrial sized materials, and the electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, petroleum coke, and metallurgical coke has been measured. The resistivity at high temperatures of the Magnitogorsk coke, which has the highest resistivity of the metallurgical cokes investigated, is twice the resistivity of the Corus coke, which has the lowest electrical resistivity. Zdzieszowice and SSAB coke sort in between with decreasing resistivities in the respective order. The electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, and petroleum coke is generally higher than the resistivity of the metallurgical cokes, ranging from about two to about eight times the resistivity of the Corus coke at 1450{sup o}C. The general trend is that the bulk resistivity of carbon materials decreases with increasing temperature and increasing particle size.

  15. Determination of Electrical Resistivity of Dry Coke Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidem, P. A.; Tangstad, M.; Bakken, J. A.

    2008-02-01

    The electrical resistivity of the coke bed is of great importance when producing FeMn, SiMn, and FeCr in a submerged arc furnace. In these processes, a coke bed is situated below and around the electrode tip and consists of metallurgical coke, slag, gas, and metal droplets. Since the basic mechanisms determining the electrical resistivity of a coke bed is not yet fully understood, this investigation is focused on the resistivity of dry coke beds consisting of different carbonaceous materials, i.e., coke beds containing no slag or metal. A method that reliably compares the electrical bulk resistivity of different metallurgical cokes at 1500 °C to 1600 °C is developed. The apparatus is dimensioned for industrial sized materials, and the electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, petroleum coke, and metallurgical coke has been measured. The resistivity at high temperatures of the Magnitogorsk coke, which has the highest resistivity of the metallurgical cokes investigated, is twice the resistivity of the Corus coke, which has the lowest electrical resistivity. Zdzieszowice and SSAB coke sort in between with decreasing resistivities in the respective order. The electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, and petroleum coke is generally higher than the resistivity of the metallurgical cokes, ranging from about two to about eight times the resistivity of the Corus coke at 1450 °C. The general trend is that the bulk resistivity of carbon materials decreases with increasing temperature and increasing particle size.

  16. Structure-phase states and wear resistance of deposition surface formed on steel by electric arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raikov, S. V.; Kapralov, E. V.; Vashchuk, E. S.; Budovskikh, E. A.; Gromov, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Sosnin, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    Investigations of elementary and phase structure, state of defect structure and tribological characteristics of deposition, formed on a low carbon low-alloy steel by a welding method were carried out. It was revealed that deposition, formed on a steel surface is accompanied by the multilayer formation, and increase of wear resistance of the layer deposition as determined.

  17. Electrical resistance tomography of concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Binley, A.; Henry-Poulter, S.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility of using Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to nondestructively examine the interior of concrete structures such as bridge pillars and roadways. We report the results of experiments wherein ERT is used to image the two concrete specimens in the laboratory. Each specimen is 5 inches square and 12 inches long and contained steel reinforcing rods along its length. Twenty electrodes were placed on each sample and an-image of electrical resistivity distribution was generated from current and voltage measurements. We found that the images show the general location of the reinforcing steel and, what`s more important, delineate the absence of the steel. The method may therefore be useful for determining if such steel has been destroyed by corrosion, however to make it useful, the technique must have better resolution so that individual reinforcing steel units are resolved.

  18. Electrical resistance of a capillary endothelium

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The electrical resistance of consecutive segments of capillaries has been determined by a method in which the microvessels were treated as a leaky, infinite cable. A two-dimensional analytical model to describe the potential field in response to intracapillary current injection was formulated. The model allowed determination of the electrical resistance from four sets of data: the capillary radius, the capillary length constant, the length constant in the mesentery perpendicular to the capillary, and the relative potential drop across the capillary wall. Of particular importance were the mesothelial membranes covering the mesenteric capillaries with resistances several times higher than that of the capillary endothelium. 27 frog mesenteric capillaries were characterized. The average resistance of the endothelium was 1.85 omega cm2, which compares well with earlier determinations of the ionic permeability of such capillaries. However, heterogeneity with respect to resistance was observed, that of 10 arterial capillaries being 3.0 omega cm2 as compared with 0.95 omega cm2 for 17 mid- and venous capillaries. The average in situ length constant was 99 micrometers for the arterial capillaries and 57 micrometers for the mid- and venous capillaries. It is likely that the ions that carry the current must move paracellularly, through junctions that are leaky to small solutes. PMID:7241087

  19. Estimating soil suction from electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegari, E.; Di Maio, R.

    2013-09-01

    Soil suction and resistivity strongly depend on the degree of soil saturation and, therefore, both are used for estimating water content variations. The main difference between them is that soil suction is measured using tensiometers, which give point information, while resistivity is obtained by tomography surveys, which provide distributions of resistivity values in large volumes, although with less accuracy. In this paper, we have related soil suction to electrical resistivity with the aim of obtaining information about soil suction changes in large volumes, and not only for small areas around soil suction probes. We derived analytical relationships between soil matric suction and electrical resistivity by combining the empirical laws of van Genuchten and Archie. The obtained relationships were used to evaluate maps of soil suction values in different ashy layers originating in the explosive activity of the Mt Somma-Vesuvius volcano (southern Italy). Our findings provided a further example of the high potential of geophysical methods in contributing to more effective monitoring of soil stress conditions; this is of primary importance in areas where rainfall-induced landslides occur periodically.

  20. An introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Rhett

    2001-09-01

    Physicists are finding that the skills they have learned in their training may be applied to areas beyond traditional physics topics. One such field is that of geophysics. This paper presents the electrical resistivity component of an undergraduate geophysics course at Radford University. It is taught from a physics perspective, yet the application of the theory to the real world is the overriding goal. The concepts involved in electrical resistivity studies are first discussed in a general sense, and then they are studied through the application of the relevant electromagnetic theory. Since geology majors comprise the bulk of the students in this class, the math used is only that which is typically required of geology majors. The final results are given in a form that practicing geophysicists may use in the field. A method is presented for constructing an inexpensive apparatus for measuring electrical resistivity in both a tabletop laboratory setting and in the field. This apparatus is truly "plug and play" since its assembly and use requires only the most basic knowledge of electronics. This apparatus is tested in a tabletop laboratory setting as well as in two field surveys.

  1. Electrical condition monitoring method for polymers

    DOEpatents

    Watkins, Jr. Kenneth S.; Morris, Shelby J.; Masakowski, Daniel D.; Wong, Ching Ping; Luo, Shijian

    2010-02-16

    An electrical condition monitoring method utilizes measurement of electrical resistivity of a conductive composite degradation sensor to monitor environmentally induced degradation of a polymeric product such as insulated wire and cable. The degradation sensor comprises a polymeric matrix and conductive filler. The polymeric matrix may be a polymer used in the product, or it may be a polymer with degradation properties similar to that of a polymer used in the product. The method comprises a means for communicating the resistivity to a measuring instrument and a means to correlate resistivity of the degradation sensor with environmentally induced degradation of the product.

  2. Complex Electrical Resistivity for Monitoring DNAPL Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Brown; David Lesmes; John Fourkas

    2003-09-12

    Nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities have landfills and buried waste areas. Of the various contaminants present at these sites, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) are particularly hard to locate and remove. There is an increasing need for external or non-invasive sensing techniques to locate DNAPLs in the subsurface and to track their spread and monitor their breakdown or removal by natural or engineered means. G. Olhoeft and colleagues have published several reports based on laboratory studies using the complex resistivity method which indicate that organic solvents, notably toluene, PCE, and TCE, residing in clay-bearing soils have distinctive electrical signatures. These results have suggested to many researchers the basis of an ideal new measurement technique for geophysical characterization of DNAPL pollution. Encouraged by these results we proposed to bring the field measurement of complex resistivity as a means of pollution characterization from the conceptual stage to practice. We planned to document the detectability of clay-organic solvent interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further understanding of the underlying physical and chemical mechanisms, and then apply these observations to develop field techniques. As with any new research endeavor we note the extreme importance of trying to reproduce the work of previous researchers to ensure that any effects observed are due to the physical phenomena occurring in the specimen and not due to the particular experimental apparatus or method used. To this end, we independently designed and built a laboratory system, including a sample holder, electrodes, electronics, and data analysis software, for the measurement of the complex electrical resistivity properties of soil contaminated with organic solvents. The capabilities and reliability of this technique were documented. Using various standards we performed measurement accuracy, repeatability, and noise immunity

  3. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1972-01-01

    Process for determining thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials is described. Characteristics of materials are identified and used in development of mathematical models. Limitations of method are examined.

  4. Cone-based electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidlisecky, Adam

    Determining the 3-D spatial distribution of subsurface properties is a critical part of managing the clean-up of contaminated sites. Most standard hydrologic methods sample small regions immediately adjacent to wells or testing devices. This provides data which are not representative of the entire region of interest. Furthermore, at many contaminated sites invasive methods are not acceptable, due to the risks associated with contacting and spreading the contaminants. To address these issues, I have developed a minimally invasive technology that provides information about the 3-D distribution of electrical conductivity. This new technique, cone-based electrical resistivity tomography (C-bert), integrates the existing technologies of resistivity cone penetration testing (RCPT) with electrical resistivity tomography. Development of this tool included the creation of new software and modeling algorithms, the design of field equipment, field testing, and processing and interpretation of the resulting data. I present a 2.5-D forward modeling algorithm that incorporates an effective correction for the errors caused by boundary effects and source singularities. The algorithm includes an optimization technique for acquiring the Fourier coefficients required for the solution. A 3-D inversion algorithm is presented that has two major improvements over existing algorithms. First, it includes a 3-D version of the boundary correction/source singularity correction developed for the 2.5-D problem. Second, the algorithm can handle any type of acquisition geometry; this was a requirement for the development of C-bert. C-bert involves placing several permanent current electrodes in the subsurface and using electrodes mounted on a cone penetrometer and at the surface to measure the resultant potential field. In addition to these measurements, we obtain the standard suite of RCPT data, including high resolution resistivity logs. The RCPT data can be used to generate a realistic

  5. Measuring Electrical Resistivity Of Compacted Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Slightly modified micrometer used in conjunction with special cup to measure electrical resistance of specimen of powder as function of packing fraction. Powder pressed between anvils of micrometer, which make electrical contact with specimen. Device used in manufacturing batteries to determine effective electrical conductivities of powders loaded into plastic sheets to make battery substrates. Coupled with good mathematical description of expected conductivity of particulate composite as function of packing density. Also serves as tool for evaluating conductivity of dispersed phase, as well as evaluating electrical resistances of interparticle contacts.

  6. Investigation of groundwater in parts of Ndokwa District in Nigeria using geophysical logging and electrical resistivity methods: Implications for groundwater exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anomohanran, Ochuko; Ofomola, Merrious Oviri; Okocha, Fredrick Ogochukwu

    2017-05-01

    Groundwater study involving the application of geophysical logging and vertical electrical sounding (VES) methods was carried out in parts of Ndokwa area of Delta State, Nigeria. The objective was to delineate the geological situation and the groundwater condition of the area. The geophysical logging of a drilled well and thirty VESs of the Schlumberger configuration were executed in this study using the Abem SAS 1000/4000 Terrameter. The result of the lithological study from the drilled well showed that the subsurface formation consist of lateritic topsoil, very fine sand, clayey fine sand, fine and medium grain sand, coarse sand, medium coarse sand and very coarse sand. The interpretation of the vertical electrical sounding data using a combination of curve matching and Win Resist computer iteration showed a close correlation with the well record. The result revealed the presence of four geoelectric layers with the aquifer identified to be in the fourth layer and having resistivity which ranged from 480 to 11,904 Ωm, while the depth ranged between 17.8 and 38.8 m. The analysis of the geophysical logging revealed that the average value of the electrical conductivity and the total dissolved solid of the groundwater in the aquifer were obtained as 229 μS/cm and 149 mg/cm3 respectively. These results indicate that the groundwater is within the permissible limit set by the Standard Organization of Nigeria for potable water which is 1000 μS/cm for electrical conductivity and 500 mg/cm3 for total dissolved solid. The fourth layer was therefore identified as the potential non conductive zone suitable for groundwater development in the study area.

  7. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1999-06-22

    An electrical resistance tomography method is described which uses steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constrain the models. 2 figs.

  8. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.

    1999-01-01

    An electrical resistance tomography method using steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constain the models.

  9. Using a 2.5D Electrical Resistivity Imaging Method for Locating the House Remnants and Possible Landslide Victims of Typhoon Morak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.; Chang, P.; Chen, H.; Jan, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Typhoon Morak hits Taiwan on August 8th, 2009, and pours huge amount of precipitation (over 2000 mm in just three days) into the southern part of the island. The heavy precipitation induces many landslides in the mountain area and costs over 500 deaths. To help searching the remnants of the buildings and possible victims that may be buried under the buildings, we utilized the 2.5D electrical resistivity tomography (2.5D) technique in one landslide location near the Baolai village area in the Kaohsiung County. A family of 5 was reported missing in the landslide and only parts of the bodies were recovered in the rescue mission. We conducted 2.5D electrical resistivity tomography in two possible areas marked by the rescue team along four 20-meter long parallel lines. The remnants of the house and bodies were believed to be buried under the thick colluvium sediments. To search for possible anomalies from these man-made objects, we chose dipole-dipole method and the 0.5-m electrode spacing for the survey.

  10. The extracellular electrical resistivity in cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gleixner, Raimund; Fromherz, Peter

    2006-04-01

    The interaction of cells in a tissue depends on the nature of the extracellular matrix. The electrical properties of the narrow extracellular space are unknown. Here we consider cell adhesion mediated by extracellular matrix protein on a solid substrate as a model system. We culture human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells on silica coated with fibronectin and determine the electrical resistivity in the cell-solid junction rhoJ=rJdJ by combining measurements of the sheet resistance rJ and of the distance dJ between membrane and substrate. The sheet resistance is obtained from phase fluorometry of the voltage-sensitive dye ANNINE-5 by alternating-current stimulation from the substrate. The distance is measured by fluorescence interference contrast microscopy. We change the resistivity of the bath in a range from 66 Omega cm to 750 Omega cm and find that the sheet resistance rJ is proportionally enhanced, but that the distance is invariant around dJ=75 nm. In all cases, the resulting resistivity rhoJ is indistinguishable from the resistivity of the bath. A similar result is obtained for rat neurons cultured on polylysine. On that basis, we propose a "bulk resistivity in cell adhesion" model for cell-solid junctions. The observations suggest that the electrical interaction between cells in a tissue is determined by an extracellular space with the electrical properties of bulk electrolyte.

  11. Comparative study of Wenner and Schlumberger electrical resistivity method for groundwater investigation: a case study from Dhule district (M.S.), India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasantrao, Baride Mukund; Bhaskarrao, Patil Jitendra; Mukund, Baride Aarti; Baburao, Golekar Rushikesh; Narayan, Patil Sanjaykumar

    2017-06-01

    The area chosen for the present study is Dhule district, which belongs to the drought prone area of Maharashtra State, India. Dhule district suffers from water problem, and therefore, there is no extra water available to supply for the agricultural and industrial growth. To understand the lithological characters in terms of its hydro-geological conditions, it is necessary to understand the geology of the area. It is now established fact that the geophysical method gives a better information of subsurface geology. Geophysical electrical surveys with four electrodes configuration, i.e., Wenner and Schlumberger method, were carried out at the same selected sites to observe the similarity and compared both the applications in terms of its use and handling in the field. A total 54 VES soundings were carried out spread over the Dhule district and representing different lithological units. The VES curves are drawn using inverse slope method for Wenner configuration, IPI2 win Software, and curve matching techniques were used for Schlumberger configuration. Regionwise lithologs are prepared based on the obtained resistivity and thickness for Wenner method. Regionwise curves were prepared based on resistivity layers for Schlumberger method. Comparing the two methods, it is observed that Wenner and Schlumberger methods have merits or demerits. Considering merits and demerits from the field point of view, it is suggested that Wenner inverse slope method is more handy for calculation and interpretation, but requires lateral length which is a constrain. Similarly, Schlumberger method is easy in application but unwieldy for their interpretation. The work amply proves the applicability of geophysical techniques in the water resource evaluation procedure. This technique is found to be suitable for the areas with similar geological setup elsewhere.

  12. State Waste Discharge Permit Application: Electric resistance tomography testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This permit application documentation is for a State Waste Discharge Permit issued in accordance with requirements of Washington Administrative Code 173-216. The activity being permitted is a technology test using electrical resistance tomography. The electrical resistance tomography technology was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has been used at other waste sites to track underground contamination plumes. The electrical resistance tomography technology measures soil electrical resistance between two electrodes. If a fluid contaminated with electrolytes is introduced into the soil, the soil resistance is expected to drop. By using an array of measurement electrodes in several boreholes, the areal extent of contamination can be estimated. At the Hanford Site, the purpose of the testing is to determine if the electrical resistance tomography technology can be used in the vicinity of large underground metal tanks without the metal tank interfering with the test. It is anticipated that the electrical resistance tomography technology will provide a method for accurately detecting leaks from the bottom of underground tanks, such as the Hanford Site single-shell tanks.

  13. Anisotropic electric surface resistance of Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, A.; Lilie, P.; Dumas, P.; Hirschmugl, C.; Pilling, M.; Williams, Gwyn P.

    2007-08-01

    The electric surface resistance is measured without contacts by grazing incidence of p-polarized infrared (IR) radiation for the adsorbates CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, which settle on top of the close packed atomic ridges of Cu(110) in the <1, -1, 0> direction. Surface resistance has only been observed for the IR electric currents in this direction. This can be explained by the assumption that IR induced currents in the <001> direction can only flow in the second and deeper layers of Cu(110). Therefore, in this direction, there is no friction with the adsorbates and hence no surface resistance.

  14. A method for recording resistance changes non-invasively during neuronal depolarization with a view to imaging brain activity with Electrical Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Ori; Ghosh, Anthony; Oh, Dongin; Holder, David S

    2009-01-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a recently developed medical imaging method which has the potential to produce images of fast neuronal depolarization in the brain. The principle is that current remains in the extracellular space at rest but passes into the intracellular space during depolarization through open ion channels. As current passes into the intracellular space across the capacitance of cell membranes at higher frequencies, applied current needs to be below 100 Hz. A method is presented for its measurement with subtraction of the contemporaneous evoked potentials which occur in the same frequency band. Neuronal activity is evoked by stimulation and resistance is recorded from the potentials resulting from injection of a constant current square wave at 1 Hz with amplitude less than 25% of the threshold for stimulating neuronal activity. Potentials due to the evoked activity and the injected square wave are removed by subtraction. The method was validated with compound action potentials in crab walking leg nerve. Resistance changes of −0.85 ± 0.4 % (mean±SD) occurred which decreased from −0.97±0.43 % to −0.46±0.16 % with spacing of impedance current application electrodes from 2 to 8mm but did not vary significantly with applied currents of 1–10μA. These tallied with biophysical modelling, and so were consistent with a genuine physiological origin. This method appears to provide a reproducible and artefact free means for recording resistance changes during neuronal activity which could lead to the long-term goal of imaging of fast neural activity in the brain. PMID:19427534

  15. Electrical resistance of carbon-nanofiber concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Di; Sturm, Mariel; Mo, Y. L.

    2009-09-01

    Concrete is the most widely used construction material, and carbon nanofibers have many advantages in both mechanical and electrical properties such as high strength, high Young's modulus and high conductivity. In this paper, the mechanical and electrical properties of concrete containing carbon nanofibers (CNF) are experimentally studied. The test results indicate that the compressive strength and per cent reduction in electrical resistance while loading concrete containing CNF are much greater than those of plain concrete. Finally, a reasonable concentration of CNF is obtained for use in concrete which not only enhances compressive strength, but also improves the electrical properties required for strain monitoring, damage evaluation and self-health monitoring of concrete.

  16. Slime thickness evaluation of bored piles by electrical resistivity probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Ok-Hyun; Yoon, Hyung-Koo; Park, Min-Chul; Lee, Jong-Sub

    2014-09-01

    The bottoms of bored piles are generally stacked with soil particles, both while boreholes are being drilled, and afterward. The stacked soils are called slime, and when loads are applied on the pile, increase the pile settlement. Thus to guarantee the end bearing capacity of bored piles, the slime thickness should be precisely detected. The objective of this study is to suggest a new method for evaluating the slime thickness, using temperature compensated electrical resistivity. Laboratory studies are performed in advance, to estimate and compare the resolution of the electrical resistivity probe (ERP) and time domain reflectometry (TDR). The electrical properties of the ERP and TDR are measured using coaxial type electrodes and parallel type two-wire electrodes, respectively. Penetration tests, conducted in the fully saturated sand-clay mixtures, demonstrate that the ERP produces a better resolution of layer detection than TDR. Thus, field application tests using the ERP with a diameter of 35.7 mm are conducted for the investigation of slime thickness in large diameter bored piles. Field tests show that the slime layers are clearly identified by the ERP: the electrical resistivity dramatically increases at the interface between the slurry and slime layer. The electrical resistivity in the slurry layer inversely correlates with the amount of circulated water. This study suggests that the new electrical resistivity method may be a useful method for the investigation of the slime thickness in bored piles.

  17. Contactless method of measuring resistivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J. D.; Rabson, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the conductivity of materials without having to make electrical contact with the material. Currents which are magnetically induced in the conducting sample are measured by means of the magnetic fields they produce. Although induction techniques have been used in the past for this type of measurement, the configuration presented here makes it possible to perform absolute measurements of resistivity over a wide range of values for relatively small samples. The theory of the technique, the results of measurements made with it, and a comparison of the technique with other methods are presented.

  18. Ground-truthing electrical resistivity methods in support of submarine groundwater discharge studies: Examples from Hawaii, Washington, and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Cordell; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Richardson, Christina M.; Smith, Christopher G.; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Ganguli, Priya M.

    2015-01-01

    Rigorous ground-truthing at each field site showed that multi-channel electrcial resistivity techniques can reproduce the scales and dynamics of a seepage field when such data are correctly collected, and when the model inversions are tuned to field site characteristics. Such information can provide a unique perspective on the scales and dynamics of exchange processes within a coastal aquifer—information essential to scientists and resource managers alike.

  19. Assessing clogging processes caused by biofilm growth and organic particle accumulation in constructed wetlands using time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoub, Himi; Tapias, Josefina C.; Lovera, Raúl; Rivero, Lluís; Font, Xavier; Casas, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Constructed wetlands for removing pollutants from wastewater in small communities are growing rapidly in many regions of the world. The advantages over conventional mechanical sanitation systems, where land availability is not a limiting factor, are low energy requirements, easy operation and maintenance, low sludge production and cost-effectivity. Nevertheless, with time the cleaning process can result in gradual clogging of the porous layer by suspended solids, bacterial film, chemical precipitates and compaction. The clogging development causes decrease of hydraulic conductivity, reduced oxygen supply and further leads to a rapid decrease of the treatment performance. As the investment involved in reversing clogging can represent a substantial fraction of the cost of a new system it is essential to assess in advance the evolution of clogging process and detect potential failures in the system. Since there is a lack of experiences for monitoring the functionality of constructed wetlands time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography studies have been conducted at horizontal sub-surface flow municipal wastewater treatment wetlands of Catalonia (Spain). The results of this research show that electrical resistivity tomography can be a very useful technique for assessing the extent of silting up processes that clog the subsurface flow constructed wetlands through the gravel layer. In the unsaturated zone, the electrical resistivity is greater at the end of the filter, since the pores contains air which is dielectric, while at the beginning of the filter the resistivity is lower because the electrical conduction of organic matter around the mineral grains. Conversely, in the saturated zone, the electrical resistivity is lower at the end of the filter, since pores contain a higher proportion of high ionic conductivity wastewater, while at the beginning of the filter the electrical resistivity is higher because of the lower porosity due to the clogging process.

  20. Method of assembling an electric power

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2007-05-03

    A method of assembling and providing an electric power apparatus. The method uses a heat resistant housing having a structure adapted to accommodate and retain a power circuit card and also including a bracket adapted to accommodate and constrain a rigid conductive member. A power circuit card having an electrical terminal is placed into the housing and a rigid conductive member into the bracket. The rigid conductive member is flow soldered to the electrical terminal, thereby exposing the heat resistant housing to heat and creating a solder bond. Finally, the rigid conductive member is affirmatively connected to the housing. The bracket constrains the rigid conductive member so that the act of affirmatively connecting does not weaken the solder bond.

  1. Resistance after firing protected electric match

    DOEpatents

    Montoya, Arsenio P.

    1981-11-10

    An electric match having electrical leads embedded in flame-producing compound is protected against an accidental resistance across the leads after firing by a length of heat-shrinkable tubing encircling the match body and having a skirt portion extending beyond the leads. The heat of the burning match and an adjacent thermal battery causes the tubing to fold over the end of the match body, covering the ends of the leads and protecting them from molten pieces of the battery.

  2. Electrical resistivity of thin bismuth films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Katyal, O. P.

    1990-05-01

    The effect of the film thickness of a bismuth film deposited on glass substrate on its electrical resistivity was investigated for films from 41 to 225 nm thickness, in the temperature range 77-350 K. Results show that the electrical resistivity decreases with increasing temperature and that, for films 98.3 and 225.9 nm thick there exists a minimum (between 260 and 350 K) in resistivity at some temperature, Tc. This minimum shifts toward higher temperature for thinner samples, and lies above 350 K. The thickness dependence of the bismuth film resistivity, obtained at 77, 150, and 300 K, can be explained by a modified Fuchs model, which takes into account the thickness dependence of carrier density.

  3. The electrical resistivities of nanostructured aluminium films at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lijun; Dai, Fei; Zhang, Jicheng; Luo, Jiangshan; Xie, Chunping; Li, Jun; Lei, Haile

    2017-10-01

    The electrical resistivities of nanostructured aluminum (nano-Al) films grown onto quartz substrates were measured from 8 K to 300 K by the four-point probe method. The nano-Al films show a temperature (T)-dependent electrical resistivity in the form of T 4 and T 3, different from that of the coarse-grained bulk Al. The T 4 item increases with increasing the film thickness while the T 3 item is just vice versa to indicate the effect of grain boundaries and surfaces on the intrinsic resistivity becomes weak with increasing the film thickness. The residual electrical resistivity in nano-Al films is further revealed to be the 2–3 orders magnitude larger than the one in the coarse-grained bulk Al and decays with increasing the film thickness. The background mechanism is deduced to result from the scattering of electrons by the grain boundaries and surfaces.

  4. Electrical resistivity of coal-bearing rocks under high temperature and the detection of coal fires using electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhenlu; Wang, Deming; Wang, Yanming; Zhong, Xiaoxing; Tang, Xiaofei; Xi, Dongdong

    2016-02-01

    Coal fires are severe hazards to environment, health and safety throughout the world. Efficient and economical extinguishing of these fires requires that the extent of the subsurface coal fires should be delineated. Electrical and electromagnetic methods have been used to detect coal fires in recent years. However, the resistivity change of coal-bearing rocks at high temperature is rarely investigated. The resistivity characteristics of coal fires at different temperatures and depths are seldomly researched as well. In this paper, we present the results of measurements of several coal-bearing rocks' resistivity and permeability under high temperature. Two major causes for the change in resistivity with increasing temperature are recognized, there are the increase of charge carriers and thermal fracturing, of which the first one is probably the dominant cause. A set of 2-D simulations is carried out to compare the relation of resolution and efficiency of coal fires detection to temperature and depth when adopting the electrical resistance tomography. The simulation results show that the resolution and efficiency decrease with the decrease of temperature and the increase of depth. Finally, the electrical resistance tomography is used to delineate coal fires in the Anjialing Open Pit Mine. Most low-resistivity regions are verified as coal-fire areas according to the long-term monitoring of borehole temperature. The results indicate that the electrical resistance tomography can be used as a tool for the detection of coal fires.

  5. Release Resistant Electrical Interconnections For Mems Devices

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Garrett, Stephen E.; Reber, Cathleen A.

    2005-02-22

    A release resistant electrical interconnection comprising a gold-based electrical conductor compression bonded directly to a highly-doped polysilicon bonding pad in a MEMS, IMEMS, or MOEMS device, without using any intermediate layers of aluminum, titanium, solder, or conductive adhesive disposed in-between the conductor and polysilicon pad. After the initial compression bond has been formed, subsequent heat treatment of the joint above 363 C creates a liquid eutectic phase at the bondline comprising gold plus approximately 3 wt % silicon, which, upon re-solidification, significantly improves the bond strength by reforming and enhancing the initial bond. This type of electrical interconnection is resistant to chemical attack from acids used for releasing MEMS elements (HF, HCL), thereby enabling the use of a "package-first, release-second" sequence for fabricating MEMS devices. Likewise, the bond strength of an Au--Ge compression bond may be increased by forming a transient liquid eutectic phase comprising Au-12 wt % Ge.

  6. Electrical resistivity measurements in the Neillsville area, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spicer, H. Cecil; Edwards, George J.

    1955-01-01

    Sixty-eight electrical depth profiles were completed in the vicinity of Neillsville, Wis. to obtain information on the water-bearing beds in the glacial moraine and consolidated sedimentary rocks in the area. No productive aquifers were found but the best areas for test drilling are described. The basic theory and interpretation procedures, together with a short description of field methods on electrical resistivity measurements are also presented.

  7. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, A.L.; Chesnut, D.A.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-13

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations. 1 fig.

  8. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Daily, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations.

  9. Method for protecting an electric generator

    DOEpatents

    Kuehnle, Barry W.; Roberts, Jeffrey B.; Folkers, Ralph W.

    2008-11-18

    A method for protecting an electrical generator which includes providing an electrical generator which is normally synchronously operated with an electrical power grid; providing a synchronizing signal from the electrical generator; establishing a reference signal; and electrically isolating the electrical generator from the electrical power grid if the synchronizing signal is not in phase with the reference signal.

  10. Electrical resistance tomography for imaging concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, M.; Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.

    1995-11-08

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) has been used to non-destructively examine the interior of reinforced concrete pillars in the laboratory during a water infiltration experiment. ERT is a technique for determining the electrical resistivity distribution within a volume from measurement of injected currents and the resulting electrical potential distribution on the surface. The transfer resistance (ratio of potential to injected current) data are inverted using an algorithm based on a finite element forward solution which is iteratively adjusted in a least squares sense until the measured and calculated transfer resistances agree to within some predetermined value. Laboratory specimens of concrete pillars, 61.0 cm (24 in) in length and 20.3 cm (8 in) on a side, were prepared with various combinations of steel reinforcing bars and voids (1.27 cm diameter) which ran along the length of the pillars. An array of electrodes was placed around the pillar to allow for injecting current and measuring the resulting potentials. After the baseline resistivity distribution was determined, water was added to a void near one comer of the pillar. ERT was used to determine the resistivity distribution of the pillar at regular time intervals as water was added. The ERT images show very clearly that the water was gradually imbibed into the concrete pillar during the course of the experiment. The resistivity decreased by nearly an order of magnitude near the point of water addition in the first hour, and by nearly two orders of magnitude by the end of the experiment. Other applications for this technology include monitoring of curing in concrete structures, detecting cracks in concrete structures, detecting rebar location and corrosion state, monitoring slope stability and the stability of footings, detecting and monitoring leaks from storage tanks, monitoring thermal processes during environmental remediation, and for detecting and monitoring contaminants in soil and groundwater.

  11. Coal investigation using geo-electrical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timur, Emre

    2015-04-01

    Coal has been a very important energy source and there is an increasing demand for it. Electrical resistivity is a successful tool for exploring coal formations. Soma region has a well known coal potential and it was aimed to investigate the possible existence in the Akhisar (Manisa/Turkey) region close to it. For this purpose, vertical electrical sounding method was carried out in 63 points on 3 profiles, each has a length of 20 km, in order to determine vertical resistivity cross-sections of the field. Besides 2-dimensional damped least squares inversion method was applied to data. Also two points were drilled and coal samples were obtained from the anomalous areas.

  12. Electrical resistivity of iron at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, L.; Seagle, C.; Fei, Y.; Shahar, A.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of thermal conductivity of iron under high-pressure and temperature conditions is crucial to understand the heat transport and the thermal evolution of planetary interior. However, measurements of thermal conductivity at high pressure and temperature are challenging and experimental data are limited. In this study, we report the measured electrical resistivity of iron at high pressure and temperature. The data are then translated to thermal conductivity through Wiedemann-Franz law. A four-probe method was employed to measure the resistances of a cylindrical wire during heating cycles at high pressure. Experiments at 5, 7 and 13 GPa were performed on an iron wire sample by using a multi-anvil apparatus at the Geophysical Laboratory. At 5, 7 and 13 GPa, the measured electrical resistivity of iron at room temperature are 9.06 mΩ-cm (bcc phase), 8.85 mΩ-cm (bcc phase) and 12.72 mΩ-cm (hcp phase), respectively. The results are in a good agreement with reported room-temperature data. The kinks in electrical resistivity associated with the phase transitions of iron were clearly observed in each run. At 5 and 7 GPa, kinks in the electrical resistivity can be noticed at 677 oC and 652 oC, respectively, due to the bcc to fcc phase transition. At 5 GPa and 1687 oC, melting led to a discontinuous change in electrical resistivity. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity for bcc, fcc, and hcp iron are well constrained from these measurements. The hcp iron displays the strongest temperature dependence compared with that of the bcc and fcc phases. Our results provide critical thermodynamic parameters to constrain heat transport in the planetary cores.

  13. Using electrical resistance probes for moisture determination in switchgrass windrows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Determining moisture levels in windrowed biomass is important for both forage producers and researchers. Energy crops such as switchgrass have been troublesome when using the standard methods set for electrical resistance meters. The objectives of this study were to i) develop the methodologies need...

  14. Mechanism for detecting NAPL using electrical resistivity imaging.

    PubMed

    Halihan, Todd; Sefa, Valina; Sale, Tom; Lyverse, Mark

    2017-08-19

    The detection of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) related impacts in freshwater environments by electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) has been clearly demonstrated in field conditions, but the mechanism generating the resistive signature is poorly understood. An electrical barrier mechanism which allows for detecting NAPLs with ERI is tested by developing a theoretical basis for the mechanism, testing the mechanism in a two-dimensional sand tank with ERI, and performing forward modeling of the laboratory experiment. The NAPL barrier theory assumes at low bulk soil NAPL concentrations, thin saturated NAPL barriers can block pore throats and generate a detectable electrically resistive signal. The sand tank experiment utilized a photographic technique to quantify petroleum saturation, and to help determine whether ERI can detect and quantify NAPL across the water table. This experiment demonstrates electrical imaging methods can detect small quantities of NAPL of sufficient thickness in formations. The bulk volume of NAPL is not the controlling variable for the amount of resistivity signal generated. The resistivity signal is primarily due to a zone of high resistivity separate phase liquid blocking current flow through the fully NAPL saturated pores spaces. For the conditions in this tank experiment, NAPL thicknesses of 3.3cm and higher in the formation was the threshold for detectable changes in resistivity of 3% and greater. The maximum change in resistivity due to the presence of NAPL was an increase of 37%. Forward resistivity models of the experiment confirm the barrier mechanism theory for the tank experiment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Health Monitoring of TPS Structures by Measuring Their Electrical Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preci, Arianit; Herdrich, Georg; Steinbeck, Andreas; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika

    Health Monitoring in aerospace applications becomes an emerging technology leading to the development of systems capable of continuously monitoring structures for damage with minimal human intervention. A promising sensing method to be applied on hot structures and thermal protection systems is the electrical resistance measurement technique, which is barely investigated up to now. This method benefits from the advantageous characteristics of self-monitoring materials, such as carbon fiber-reinforced materials. By measuring the variation of the electrical resistance of these materials information on possibly present mechanical damage can be derived. In order to set up a database on electric properties of relevant materials under relevant conditions and to perform a proof-of-concept for this health monitoring method a facility has been laid out, which allows for the measurement of the electrical resistance of thermal protection system relevant materials at temperatures up to 2000°C. First preliminary measurements of the surface resistance of a graphite sample have been performed and are presented. It has been proven necessary to make some modifications to the setup. Therefore, the remaining measurements with graphite and C/C-SiC samples are subject of further investigation which will be performed in the future.

  16. Electrical Resistivity of Alkaline Earth Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    CHI CINDAS REPORT 42 December 1976 DTIC Q Prepared for ELECTE 3 DEFENSE SUPPLY AGENCY JUN 0’’ 983 , U. S. Department of Defense 4 Alexandria...OF REPORT A PEOD COVERED Electrical Resistivity of Alkaline Earth Elements State-of-the-Art Report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER CINDAS Report 42 7...TASKAREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Thermophysical and Electronic Properties Information Analysis Center, CINDAS /Purdue Univ., 2595 Yeager Rd., W. Lafayette, IN

  17. Towards electrical resistivity soundings in eco-engineering: A non-invasive and fast method to model the near-subsurface characteristics on stabilized alpine slopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bast, Alexander; Meyer, Christine; Meier, Wolfgang; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Lüscher, Peter; Graf, Frank; Gärtner, Holger

    2014-05-01

    The observation and monitoring of the aboveground plant development is a common practice in eco-engineering to estimate the plant's influence on the stabilization process. In contrast to this aboveground "sphere", the near subsurface is invisible and therefore difficult to address. To get an impression of the near subsurface and to model slope stability, (soil)samples are taken or a soil profile is dug and root traits (e.g., tensile strength) are determined. Other parameters as rooting depth, root length density, root clustering or the type of root in general are also of interest. However, soil samples or soil profiles only provide limited point-by-point data, alter parts of the study site, and are often time-consuming and expensive. The development of plants results a complex spatial and temporal distribution of the root network along a slope. This network causes shear strength variations and hydrological heterogeneities in the near subsurface within short distances. In contrast to the common point data, geophysical methods provide minimally-invasive, spatial and, via a time-lapse approach (monitoring), also temporal information of the near subsurface conditions. Hence, by measuring physical properties of the near subsurface, the root system, i.e. root distribution and rooting depth can be modeled. Furthermore, if a correlation between root traits and the measured physical properties is determined, the corresponding root trait can be estimated. To test this approach we applied electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a subalpine catchment in the Prättigau valley/Eastern Swiss Alps. Different ERT-soundings were conducted using varying electrode spacings (5cm, 25cm, 50cm and 100cm), electrode arrays (Wenner and Wenner-Schlummberger) and locations (eco-engineered slopes, stabilized two, three and 17 years ago; two forest stands of different stand densities). Furthermore, we took soil samples along the electrical profiles, and dug out several soil profiles to

  18. Small scale characterization of vine plant root zone via 3D electrical resistivity tomography and Mise-à-la-Masse method: a case study in a Bordeaux Vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mary, Benjamin; Peruzzo, Luca; Boaga, Jacopo; Schmutz, Myriam; Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan S.; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, best viticulture practices require the joint interpretation of climate and soils data. However, information about the soil structure and subsoil processes is often lacking, as point measurements, albeit precise, cannot ensure sufficient spatial coverage and resolution. Non-invasive methods can provide spatially extensive, high resolution information that, supported by traditional point-like data, help complete the complex picture of subsoil static and dynamic reality. So far very little emphasis has been given to investigating the role of soil properties and even less of roots activity on winegrapes. Vine plant's root systems play an important role in providing the minerals to the plants, but also control the water uptake and thus the water state of the vines, which is a key factor determining the grape quality potential. In this contribution we report about the measurements conducted since June 2016 in a vineyard near Bordeaux (France, Pessac Leognan Chateau). Two neighbor plants of different sizes have been selected. In order to spot small scale soil variations and root zone physical structure at the vicinity of the vine plants, we applied a methodology using longitudinal 2D tomography, 3D borehole-based electrical resistivity tomography and a variation of the mise-à-la-masse method (MALM) to assess the effect of plant roots on the current injection in the ground. Time-lapse measurements are particularly informative about the plant dynamics, and the focus is particularly applied on this approach. The time-lapse 3D ERT and MALM results are presented, and the potential to assimilate these data into a hydrological model that can account for the root water uptake as a function of atmospheric conditions is discussed.

  19. Delineation of graves using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nero, Callistus; Aning, Akwasi Acheampong; Danuor, Sylvester K.; Noye, Reginald M.

    2016-03-01

    A suspected old royal cemetery has been surveyed at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) campus, Kumasi, Ghana using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) with the objective of detecting graves in order to make informed decisions with regard to the future use of the area. The survey was conducted on a 10,000 m2 area. Continuous Vertical Electrical Sounding (CVES) was combined with the roll along technique for 51 profiles with 1 m probe separation separated by 2 m. Inverted data results indicated wide resistivity variations ranging between 9.34 Ωm and 600 Ωm in the near surface. Such heterogeneity suggests a disturbance of the soil at this level. Both high (≥ 600 Ωm) and low resistivity (≤ 74.7 Ωm) anomalies, relative to background levels, were identified within the first 4 m of the subsurface. These were suspected to be burial tombs because of their rectangular geometries and resistivity contrasts. The results were validated with forward numerical modeling results. The study area is therefore an old cemetery and should be preserved as a cultural heritage site.

  20. Recent Advances in Electrical Resistance Preheating of Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed Mahmoud; Kvande, Halvor

    2017-02-01

    There are two mainpreheating methods that are used nowadays for aluminum reduction cells. One is based on electrical resistance preheating with a thin bed of small coke and/or graphite particles between the anodes and the cathode carbon blocks. The other is flame preheating, where two or more gas or oil burners are used. Electrical resistance preheating is the oldest method, but is still frequently used by different aluminum producers. Many improvements have been made to this method by different companies over the last decade. In this paper, important points pertaining to the preparation and preheating of these cells, as well as measurements made during the preheating process and evaluation of the performance of the preheating, are illustrated. The preheating times of these cells were found to be between 36 h and 96 h for cell currents between 176 kA and 406 kA, while the resistance bed thickness was between 13 mm and 60 mm. The average cathode surface temperature at the end of the preheating was usually between 800°C and 950°C. The effect of the preheating methods on cell life is unclear and no quantifiable conclusions can be drawn. Some works carried out in the mathematical modeling area are also discussed. It is concluded that there is a need for more studies with real situations for preheated cells on the basis of actual measurements. The expected development in electrical resistance preheating of aluminum reduction cells is also summarized.

  1. Recent Advances in Electrical Resistance Preheating of Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed Mahmoud; Kvande, Halvor

    2016-06-01

    ABSTRACT There are two mainpreheating methods that are used nowadays for aluminum reduction cells. One is based on electrical resistance preheating with a thin bed of small coke and/or graphite particles between the anodes and the cathode carbon blocks. The other is flame preheating, where two or more gas or oil burners are used. Electrical resistance preheating is the oldest method, but is still frequently used by different aluminum producers. Many improvements have been made to this method by different companies over the last decade. In this paper, important points pertaining to the preparation and preheating of these cells, as well as measurements made during the preheating process and evaluation of the performance of the preheating, are illustrated. The preheating times of these cells were found to be between 36 h and 96 h for cell currents between 176 kA and 406 kA, while the resistance bed thickness was between 13 mm and 60 mm. The average cathode surface temperature at the end of the preheating was usually between 800°C and 950°C. The effect of the preheating methods on cell life is unclear and no quantifiable conclusions can be drawn. Some works carried out in the mathematical modeling area are also discussed. It is concluded that there is a need for more studies with real situations for preheated cells on the basis of actual measurements. The expected development in electrical resistance preheating of aluminum reduction cells is also summarized.

  2. Method for hermetic electrical connections

    DOEpatents

    Monroe, Saundra L [Tijeras, NM; Glass, S Jill [Albuquerque, NM; Stone, Ronnie G [Albuquerque, NM; Bond, Jamey T [Albuquerque, NM; Susan, Donald F [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-12-27

    A method of providing a hermetic, electrical connection between two electrical components by mating at least one metal pin in a glass-ceramic to metal seal connector to two electrical components, wherein the glass-ceramic to metal seal connector incorporates at least one metal pin encased (sealed) in a glass-ceramic material inside of a metal housing, with the glass-ceramic material made from 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16% Li.sub.2O, 2-8% Al.sub.2O.sub.3, 1-5% P.sub.2O.sub.5, 1-8% K.sub.2O, 0.5-7% B.sub.2O.sub.3, and 0-5% ZnO. The connector retains hermeticity at temperatures as high as 700.degree. C. and pressures as high as 500 psi.

  3. Nondestructive evaluation of composite materials by electrical resistance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhen

    This dissertation investigates electrical resistance measurement for nondestructive evaluation of carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polymer matrix composites. The method involves measuring the DC electrical resistance in either the longitudinal or through thickness direction. The thermal history and thermal properties of thermoplastic/CF composites were studied by longitudinal and through-thickness resistance measurements. The resistance results were consistent with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermomechanical analysis (TMA) results. The resistance measurements gave more information on the melting of the polymer matrix than TMA. They were more sensitive to the glass transition of the polymer matrix than DSC. The through-thickness resistance decreased as autohesion progressed. The activation energy of autohesion was 21.2 kJ/mol for both nylon-6 and polyphenylene sulfide (PPS)/CF composites. Adhesive bonding and debonding were monitored in real-time by measurement of the through-thickness resistance between the adherends in an adhesive joint during heating and subsequent cooling. Debonding occurred during cooling when the pressure or temperature during prior bonding was not sufficiently high. A long heating time below the melting temperature (T m) was found to be detrimental to subsequent PPS adhesive joint development above Tm, due to curing reactions below Tm and consequent reduced mass flow response above Tm. A high heating rate (small heating time) enhanced the bonding more than a high pressure. The longitudinal resistance measurement was used to investigate the effects of temperature and stress on the interface between a concrete substrate and its epoxy/CF composite retrofit. The resistance of the retrofit was increased by bond degradation, whether the degradation was due to heat or stress. The degradation was reversible. Irreversible disturbance in the fiber arrangement occurred slightly as thermal or load cycling occurred, as indicated by the

  4. Measurement of the electrical resistivity of liquid 32G2 and 32G1 steels by the rotating magnetic field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovykh, M. A.; Chikova, O. A.; Tsepelev, V. S.; V'yukhin, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    The resistivity of liquid 32G2 and 32G1 steels are measured using the rotating magnetic field method to obtain information on their liquid structures. The technique of measurements is described and the influence of self-induction and viscosity on the resistivity is estimated. The results are discussed in the framework of a microheterogeneous structure of a metallic melt. A conclusion is made about the character of the influence of slag inclusions detected by magnetic powder and ultrasonic methods on the temperature dependences of the resistivities of liquid 32G2 and 32G1 steels. The change in the temperature coefficient of the resistivity of the melt on heating to 1700°C is interpreted using the Nagel-Tauc model.

  5. Groundwater contamination in the basement-complex area of Ile-Ife, southwestern Nigeria: A case study using the electrical-resistivity geophysical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adepelumi, A. A.; Ako, B. D.; Ajayi, T. R.

    2001-11-01

    Hydrogeoenvironmental studies were carried out at the sewage-disposal site of Obafemi Awolowo University campus, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The objective of the survey was to determine the reliability of the electrical-resistivity method in mapping pollution plumes in a bedrock environment. Fifty stations were occupied with the ABEM SAS 300C Terrameter using the Wenner array. The electrical-resistivity data were interpreted by a computer-iteration technique. Water samples were collected at a depth of 5.0 m in 20 test pits and analyzed for quality. The concentrations of Cr, Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu are moderately above the World Health Organization recommended guidelines. Plumes of contaminated water issuing from the sewage ponds were delineated. The geoelectric sections reveal four subsurface layers, with increasing depth, lateritic clay, clayey sand/sand, and weathered/fractured bedrock, and fresh bedrock. The deepest layers, 3 and 4, constitute the main aquifer, which has a thickness of 3.1-67.1 m. The distribution of the elements in the sewage effluent confirms a hydrological communication between the disposal ponds and groundwater. The groundwater is contaminated, as shown by sampling and the geophysical results. Thus, the results demonstrate the reliability of the direct-current electrical-resistivity geophysical method in sensing and mapping pollution plumes in a crystalline bedrock environment. Résumé. Des études géo-environnementales ont été réalisées sur le site d'épandages du campus universitaire d'Obafemi Awolowo, à Ile-Ife (Nigeria). L'objectif de ce travail était de déterminer la fiabilité de la méthode des résistivités électriques pour cartographier les panaches de pollution dans un environnement de socle. Cinquante stations ont été soumises à mesures au moyen d'un ABEM SAS 300C Terrameter en utilisant le dispositif de Wenner. Les données de résistivité électrique ont été interprétées au moyen d'une technique de calcul itérative. Des

  6. Leaching of Conductive Species: Implications to Measurements of Electrical Resistivity.

    PubMed

    Spragg, R; Jones, S; Bu, Y; Lu, Y; Bentz, D; Snyder, K; Weiss, J

    2017-05-01

    Electrical tests have been used to characterize the microstructure of porous materials, the measured electrical response being determined by the contribution of the microstructure (porosity and tortuosity) and the electrical properties of the solution (conductivity of the pore solution) inside the pores of the material. This study has shown how differences in concentration between the pore solution (i.e., the solution in the pores) and the storage solution surrounding the test specimen leads to significant transport (leaching) of the conductive ionic species between the pore solution and the storage solution. Leaching influences the resistivity of the pore solution, thereby influencing electrical measurements on the bulk material from either a surface or uniaxial bulk resistance test. This paper has three main conclusions: 1.) Leaching of conductive species does occur with concentration gradients and that a diffusion based approach can be used to estimate the time scale associated with this change. 2.) Leaching of ions in the pore solution can influence resistivity measurements, and the ratio of surface to uniaxial resistivity can be used as a method to assess the presence of leaching and 3.) An estimation of the magnitude of leaching for standardized tests of cementitious materials.

  7. Polycrystalline configurations that maximize electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesi, Vincenzo; Milton, Graeme W.

    A lower bound on the effective conductivity tensor of polycrystalline aggregates formed from a single basic crystal of conductivity σ was recently established by Avellaneda. Cherkaev, Lurie and Milton. The bound holds for any basic crystal, but for isotropic aggregates of a uniaxial crystal, the bound is achieved by a sphere assemblage model of Schulgasser. This left open the question of attainability of the bound when the crystal is not uniaxial. The present work establishes that the bound is always attained by a rather large class of polycrystalline materials. These polycrystalline materials, with maximal electrical resistivity, are constructed by sequential lamination of the basic crystal and rotations of itself on widely separated length scales. The analysis is facilitated by introducing a tensor S = 0( 0I + σ) -1 where 0 > 0 is chosen so that Tr S = 1. This tensor s is related to the electric field in the optimal polycrystalline configurations.

  8. Electrical Resistance Tomography imaging of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Karhunen, Kimmo; Seppaenen, Aku; Lehikoinen, Anssi; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Kaipio, Jari P.

    2010-01-15

    We apply Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) for three dimensional imaging of concrete. In ERT, alternating currents are injected into the target using an array of electrodes attached to the target surface, and the resulting voltages are measured using the same electrodes. These boundary measurements are used for reconstructing the internal (3D) conductivity distribution of the target. In reinforced concrete, the metallic phases (reinforcing bars and fibers), cracks and air voids, moisture gradients, and the chloride distribution in the matrix carry contrast with respect to conductivity. While electrical measurements have been widely used to characterize the properties of concrete, only preliminary results of applying ERT to concrete imaging have been published so far. The aim of this paper is to carry out a feasibility evaluation with specifically cast samples. The results indicate that ERT may be a feasible modality for non-destructive evaluation of concrete.

  9. The Extracellular Electrical Resistivity in Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Gleixner, Raimund; Fromherz, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of cells in a tissue depends on the nature of the extracellular matrix. The electrical properties of the narrow extracellular space are unknown. Here we consider cell adhesion mediated by extracellular matrix protein on a solid substrate as a model system. We culture human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells on silica coated with fibronectin and determine the electrical resistivity in the cell-solid junction \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\rho}_{{\\mathrm{J}}}=r_{{\\mathrm{J}}}d_{{\\mathrm{J}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} by combining measurements of the sheet resistance \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}r_{{\\mathrm{J}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and of the distance \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}d_{{\\mathrm{J}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} between membrane and substrate. The sheet resistance is obtained from phase fluorometry of the voltage-sensitive dye ANNINE-5 by alternating-current stimulation from the substrate. The distance is measured by fluorescence interference contrast microscopy. We change the resistivity of the bath in a range from \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}66\\hspace{.167em}{\\Omega}\\hspace{.167em

  10. Electrical Stimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, A; Bowen, JM

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults and children. Data Sources A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 2007 until December 2012. Review Methods Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and observational studies (in the absence of RCTs) of adults or children were included. DBS studies were included if they specified that the anterior nucleus of thalamus was the area of the brain stimulated. Outcomes of interest were seizure frequency, health resource utilization, and safety. A cost analysis was also performed. Results The search identified 6 studies that assessed changes in seizure frequency after electrical stimulation: 1 RCT on DBS in adults, 4 RCTs on VNS in adults, and 1 RCT on VNS in children. The studies of DBS and VNS in adults found significantly improved rates of seizure frequency, but the study of VNS in children did not find a significant difference in seizure frequency between the high and low stimulation groups. Significant reductions in hospitalizations and emergency department visits were found for adults and children who received VNS. No studies addressed the use of health resources for patients undergoing DBS. Five studies reported on adverse events, which ranged from serious to transient for both procedures in adults and were mostly transient in the 1 study of VNS in children. Limitations We found no evidence on DBS in children or on health care use related to DBS. The measurement of seizure frequency is self-reported and is therefore subject to bias and issues of compliance. Conclusions Based on evidence of low to moderate quality, both DBS and VNS seemed to reduce seizure frequency in adults. In children, VNS did not appear to be as

  11. Seasonal Variations in Subsurface Electrical Resistivity in a Floodplain Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esker, A.; Marshall, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt to create a three-dimensional model of a floodplain aquifer along the New River in western North Carolina, we have collected numerous DC electrical resistivity profiles over the course of six years. Unfortunately, the electrical resistivity of geologic materials can be partially controlled by temperature and water content which both vary temporally. To determine the extent to which resistivity data is affected by temporal variations at our site, we conducted multiple DC electrical resistivity surveys collected at the same location at various times of the year to quantify changes in the resistivity patterns. We use a Wenner array that offers a large signal to noise ratio, but relatively few data points, and a Dipole-Dipole array that produces more data, but is more sensitive to noise. For each data acquisition date, we measure the depth to water at seven boreholes parallel to the survey to determine if any of the collected resistivity surveys can be independently used to detect the water table and if any changes affect subsurface resistivities. We created a stacked model of all surveys of the same array type, and compare to each survey to qualitatively and quantitatively identify changes in the subsurface patterns. Results indicate there are few major changes in the qualitative subsurface patterns with time. RMS errors between the stacked model and different surveys range from 56 to 201 Ohm-m and percent differences range from 5.84% to 21.50%. The surveys with largest RMS errors correspond to days that had a significant change of water table level from the static level. Our preliminary results suggest that so long as surveys are collected during similar water table conditions, data from multiple years should yield similar results. Furthermore, the subsurface resistivity values and GPR surveys do not clearly delineate the water table levels, suggesting that near surface geophysical methods many not be able to detect the water table at our site.

  12. Soil characterization using electrical resistivity tomography and geotechnical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudha, Kumari; Israil, M.; Mittal, S.; Rai, J.

    2009-01-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) has been used in association with Standard Penetration Test (SPT) and Dynamic Cone Penetration Test (DCPT) for Geotechnical investigations at two sites, proposed for thermal power plants, in Uttar Pradesh (UP), India. SPT and DCPT tests were conducted at 28 points and two ERT profiles, each measuring 355 m long, were recorded using 72 electrodes deployed at 5 m spacing. Electrical characterization of subsurface soil was done using borehole data and grain size analysis of the soil samples collected from boreholes. The concept of electrical resistivity variation with soil strength related to the grain size distribution, cementation, porosity and saturation has been used to correlate the transverse resistance of soil with the number of blow counts ( N-values) obtained from SPT and DCPT data. It was thus observed that the transverse resistance of soil column is linearly related with the number of blow counts ( N-values) at these sites. The linear relationships are site-specific and the coefficients of linear relation are sensitive to the lithology of subsurface formation, which was verified by borehole data. The study demonstrates the usefulness of the ERT method in geotechnical investigations, which is economic, efficient and less time consuming in comparison to the other geotechnical methods, such as SPT and DCPT, used for the purpose.

  13. Small-scale electrical resistivity tomography of wet fractured rocks.

    PubMed

    LaBrecque, Douglas J; Sharpe, Roger; Wood, Thomas; Heath, Gail

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments that tested the ability of the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method to locate correctly wet and dry fractures in a meso-scale model. The goal was to develop a method of monitoring the flow of water through a fractured rock matrix. The model was a four by six array of limestone blocks equipped with 28 stainless steel electrodes. Dry fractures were created by placing pieces of vinyl between one or more blocks. Wet fractures were created by injecting tap water into a joint between blocks. In electrical terms, the dry fractures are resistive and the wet fractures are conductive. The quantities measured by the ERT system are current and voltage around the outside edge of the model. The raw ERT data were translated to resistivity values inside the model using a three-dimensional Occam's inversion routine. This routine was one of the key components of ERT being tested. The model presented several challenges. First, the resistivity of both the blocks and the joints was highly variable. Second, the resistive targets introduced extreme changes the software could not precisely quantify. Third, the abrupt changes inherent in a fracture system were contrary to the smoothly varying changes expected by the Occam's inversion routine. Fourth, the response of the conductive fractures was small compared to the background variability. In general, ERT was able to locate correctly resistive fractures. Problems occurred, however, when the resistive fracture was near the edges of the model or when multiple fractures were close together. In particular, ERT tended to position the fracture closer to the model center than its true location. Conductive fractures yielded much smaller responses than the resistive case. A difference-inversion method was able to correctly locate these targets.

  14. A search for aquifers of sand and gravel by electrical-resistivity methods in north-central New Castle County, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spicer, H. Cecil; McCullough, Richard A.; Mack, Frederick K.

    1955-01-01

    A search for aquifers in an area immediately north of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal in New Castle, Del., has been made by an electrical resistivity study.  The search located 32 sites that may be underlain by sand and gravel. The thicker deposits are significant with respect to the occurrence of ground water, and all of them are of interest as possible sources of sand and gravel for construction purposes, such as for highway construction.  The thickness of these deposits ranges from 4.4 feet to 77 feet, and the computed resistivity for these ranges from a low of 97,800 ohm-cms to a high of 423,800 ohm-cms.  The study located with certainty one buried channel filled with sand and gravel deposits and pointed out the possibility of others that may be aquifers.  The interpretations show that a large deposit of sand and gravel is present in the eastern part of the area investigated and it is tentatively assumed that this deposit is continuous and may yield large quantities of ground water.  Places where the deposit was found to be the thickest and of high resistivity are described.

  15. Electrical Resistance Technique to Monitor SiC Composite Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are suitable for high temperature structural applications such as turbine airfoils and hypersonic thermal protection systems. The employment of these materials in such applications is limited by the ability to process components reliable and to accurately monitor and predict damage evolution that leads to failure under stressed-oxidation conditions. Current nondestructive methods such as ultrasound, x-ray, and thermal imaging are limited in their ability to quantify small scale, transverse, in-plane, matrix cracks developed over long-time creep and fatigue conditions. Electrical resistance of SiC/SiC composites is one technique that shows special promise towards this end. Since both the matrix and the fibers are conductive, changes in matrix or fiber properties should relate to changes in electrical conductivity along the length of a specimen or part. The effect of matrix cracking on electrical resistivity for several composite systems will be presented and some initial measurements performed at elevated temperatures under stress-rupture conditions. The implications towards electrical resistance as a technique applied to composite processing, damage detection (health monitoring), and life-modeling will be discussed.

  16. Electrical resistivity imaging of the architecture of substream sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, N.; Binley, A.; Knight, R.; Robinson, D. A.; Zarnetske, J.; Haggerty, R.

    2008-04-01

    The modeling of fluvial systems is constrained by a lack of spatial information about the continuity and structure of streambed sediments. There are few methods for noninvasive characterization of streambeds. Invasive methods using wells and cores fail to provide detailed spatial information on the prevailing architecture and its continuity. Geophysical techniques play a pivotal role in providing spatial information on subsurface properties and processes across many other environments, and we have applied the use of one of those techniques to streambeds. We demonstrate, through two examples, how electrical resistivity imaging can be utilized for characterization of subchannel architecture. In the first example, electrodes installed in riparian boreholes and on the streambed are used for imaging, under the river bed, the thickness and continuity of a highly permeable alluvial gravel layer overlying chalk. In the second example, electrical resistivity images, determined from data collected using electrodes installed on the river bed, provide a constrained estimate of the sediment volume behind a log jam, vital to modeling biogeochemical exchange, which had eluded measurement using conventional drilling methods owing to the boulder content of the stream. The two examples show that noninvasive electrical resistivity imaging is possible in complex stream environments and provides valuable information about the subsurface architecture beneath the stream channels.

  17. Scenario Evaluator for Electrical Resistivity Survey Pre-modeling Tool.

    PubMed

    Terry, Neil; Day-Lewis, Frederick D; Robinson, Judith L; Slater, Lee D; Halford, Keith; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John W; Werkema, Dale

    2017-05-23

    Geophysical tools have much to offer users in environmental, water resource, and geotechnical fields; however, techniques such as electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) are often oversold and/or overinterpreted due to a lack of understanding of the limitations of the techniques, such as the appropriate depth intervals or resolution of the methods. The relationship between ERI data and resistivity is nonlinear; therefore, these limitations depend on site conditions and survey design and are best assessed through forward and inverse modeling exercises prior to field investigations. In this approach, proposed field surveys are first numerically simulated given the expected electrical properties of the site, and the resulting hypothetical data are then analyzed using inverse models. Performing ERI forward/inverse modeling, however, requires substantial expertise and can take many hours to implement. We present a new spreadsheet-based tool, the Scenario Evaluator for Electrical Resistivity (SEER), which features a graphical user interface that allows users to manipulate a resistivity model and instantly view how that model would likely be interpreted by an ERI survey. The SEER tool is intended for use by those who wish to determine the value of including ERI to achieve project goals, and is designed to have broad utility in industry, teaching, and research. © 2017, National Ground Water Association.

  18. Scenario Evaluator for Electrical Resistivity survey pre-modeling tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terry, Neil; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Robinson, Judith L.; Slater, Lee D; Halford, Keith J.; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John; Werkema, Dale

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical tools have much to offer users in environmental, water resource, and geotechnical fields; however, techniques such as electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) are often oversold and/or overinterpreted due to a lack of understanding of the limitations of the techniques, such as the appropriate depth intervals or resolution of the methods. The relationship between ERI data and resistivity is nonlinear; therefore, these limitations depend on site conditions and survey design and are best assessed through forward and inverse modeling exercises prior to field investigations. In this approach, proposed field surveys are first numerically simulated given the expected electrical properties of the site, and the resulting hypothetical data are then analyzed using inverse models. Performing ERI forward/inverse modeling, however, requires substantial expertise and can take many hours to implement. We present a new spreadsheet-based tool, the Scenario Evaluator for Electrical Resistivity (SEER), which features a graphical user interface that allows users to manipulate a resistivity model and instantly view how that model would likely be interpreted by an ERI survey. The SEER tool is intended for use by those who wish to determine the value of including ERI to achieve project goals, and is designed to have broad utility in industry, teaching, and research.

  19. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOEpatents

    Chassin, David P.; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2006-12-12

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  20. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOEpatents

    Chassin, David P [Pasco, WA; Donnelly, Matthew K [Kennewick, WA; Dagle, Jeffery E [Richland, WA

    2011-12-06

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  1. Electrical resistivity characterization of anisotropy in the Biscayne Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Yeboah-Forson, Albert; Whitman, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Electrical anisotropy occurs when electric current flow varies with azimuth. In porous media, this may correspond to anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivity resulting from sedimentary fabric, fractures, or dissolution. In this study, a 28-electrode resistivity imaging system was used to investigate electrical anisotropy at 13 sites in the Biscayne Aquifer of SE Florida using the rotated square array method. The measured coefficient of electrical anisotropy generally ranged from 1.01 to 1.12 with values as high as 1.36 found at one site. The observed electrical anisotropy was used to estimate hydraulic anisotropy (ratio of maximum to minimum hydraulic conductivity) which ranged from 1.18 to 2.83. The largest values generally were located on the Atlantic Coastal Ridge while the lowest values were in low elevation areas on the margin of the Everglades to the west. The higher values of anisotropy found on the ridge may be due to increased dissolution rates of the oolitic facies of the Miami formation limestone compared with the bryozoan facies to the west. The predominate trend of minimum resistivity and maximum hydraulic conductivity was E-W/SE-NW beneath the ridge and E-W/SW-NE farther west. The anisotropy directions are similar to the predevelopment groundwater flow direction as indicated in published studies. This suggests that the observed anisotropy is related to the paleo-groundwater flow in the Biscayne Aquifer.

  2. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency nonintrusively

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G.; Harley, Ronald G.

    2011-08-30

    A system and method for nonintrusively determining electric motor efficiency includes a processor programed to, while the motor is in operation, determine a plurality of stator input currents, electrical input data, a rotor speed, a value of stator resistance, and an efficiency of the motor based on the determined rotor speed, the value of stator resistance, the plurality of stator input currents, and the electrical input data. The determination of the rotor speed is based on one of the input power and the plurality of stator input currents. The determination of the value of the stator resistance is based on at least one of a horsepower rating and a combination of the plurality of stator input currents and the electrical input data. The electrical input data includes at least one of an input power and a plurality of stator input voltages.

  3. Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

    2013-08-06

    Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

  4. Repeatable change in electrical resistance of Si surface by mechanical and electrical nanoprocessing.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Shojiro; Suzuki, Shota

    2014-01-01

    The properties of mechanically and electrically processed silicon surfaces were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Silicon specimens were processed using an electrically conductive diamond tip with and without vibration. After the electrical processing, protuberances were generated and the electric current through the silicon surface decreased because of local anodic oxidation. Grooves were formed by mechanical processing without vibration, and the electric current increased. In contrast, mechanical processing with vibration caused the surface to protuberate and the electrical resistance increased similar to that observed for electrical processing. With sequential processing, the local oxide layer formed by electrical processing can be removed by mechanical processing using the same tip without vibration. Although the electrical resistance is decreased by the mechanical processing without vibration, additional electrical processing on the mechanically processed area further increases the electrical resistance of the surface.

  5. TUTORIAL: Electrical resistance: an atomistic view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Supriyo

    2004-07-01

    This tutorial article presents a 'bottom-up' view of electrical resistance starting from something really small, like a molecule, and then discussing the issues that arise as we move to bigger conductors. Remarkably, no serious quantum mechanics is needed to understand electrical conduction through something really small, except for unusual things like the Kondo effect that are seen only for a special range of parameters. This article starts with energy level diagrams (section 2), shows that the broadening that accompanies coupling limits the conductance to a maximum of q2/h per level (sections 3, 4), describes how a change in the shape of the self-consistent potential profile can turn a symmetric current-voltage characteristic into a rectifying one (sections 5, 6), shows that many interesting effects in molecular electronics can be understood in terms of a simple model (section 7), introduces the non-equilibrium Green function (NEGF) formalism as a sophisticated version of this simple model with ordinary numbers replaced by appropriate matrices (section 8) and ends with a personal view of unsolved problems in the field of nanoscale electron transport (section 9). Appendix A discusses the Coulomb blockade regime of transport, while appendix B presents a formal derivation of the NEGF equations. MATLAB codes for numerical examples are listed in appendix C. (The appendices are available in the online version only.)

  6. Connection equation and shaly-sand correction for electrical resistivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the amount of conductive and nonconductive constituents in the pore space of sediments by using electrical resistivity logs generally loses accuracy where clays are present in the reservoir. Many different methods and clay models have been proposed to account for the conductivity of clay (termed the shaly-sand correction). In this study, the connectivity equation (CE), which is a new approach to model non-Archie rocks, is used to correct for the clay effect and is compared with results using the Waxman and Smits method. The CE presented here requires no parameters other than an adjustable constant, which can be derived from the resistivity of water-saturated sediments. The new approach was applied to estimate water saturation of laboratory data and to estimate gas hydrate saturations at the Mount Elbert well on the Alaska North Slope. Although not as accurate as the Waxman and Smits method to estimate water saturations for the laboratory measurements, gas hydrate saturations estimated at the Mount Elbert well using the proposed CE are comparable to estimates from the Waxman and Smits method. Considering its simplicity, it has high potential to be used to account for the clay effect on electrical resistivity measurement in other systems.

  7. Geophysical Exploration of Castle Remains in Barwałd Górny (Near Kalwaria Zebrzydowska, Poland) Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) with Assistance of Depth of Investigation Index (DOI) Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, Michał; Kula, Damian; Saternus, Robert; Lewicki, Paweł

    2014-09-01

    In March of 2014 at ruins of the 14th century castle, situated at the top of Mount Żar in Małopolska region, Poland, geophysical surveys were performed. Surveys were planned to investigate remains of the castle that could remain in the ground. Electrical Resistivity Tomography method was used there. In the paper 4 sections have been presented. During interpretation, as the supporting method, maps of Depth-of-Investigation (DOI) index have been used. Results of the surveys can point out potential remains of the castle walls and ruins of buildings that were situated in the stronghold

  8. Electrical resistivity survey in eastern Jeju Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.

    2010-12-01

    Electrical resistivity survey was conducted to acquire basic geological layer information for regional hydrogeologic application by our own developed system in eastern Jeju island. The system mainly consists of a stand-alone TX(transmitter) module, of which the excitation current into the earth has been increased very much using a portable AC generator instead of batteries, a digital stacking RX(receiver), and a pair of programmable synchronization clock modules to achieve the initial synchronization between TX and RX. The waveform of the excitation current into the earth at transmitter side is double bipolar, and the power is 1000V-1A or 800V-5A with a portable AC generator. At the receiver part controlled through a notebook PC's serial port, the operator can observe the exact waveform and the averaged value with 24-bit A/D resolution and gain 1-10-100. The small portable synchronization clocks, operated by 12V/2A sealed battery, provides the precise basic measurement cycles and initial triggering. The control and measurement software which acquires the earth resistivity data was developed user-interactively. The system was field-tested in eastern part of Jeju Island with dipole spacing a=300m and 600m, to n=10, and stations=43, by the array of which the exploration depth has been increased to about 2,400 m. By the developed portable system we could conduct very easy and fast field work and acquire very satisfactory data. The inversion of measured data gave us the useful information about the sub-surface resistivity structure to about 2,400 m depth along a 13km survey profile. Further study will be focused on simultaneous multi receiver data acquisition system.

  9. New Methods for Modeling Laterolog Resistivity Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzyna, Jadwiga Anna; Cichy, Adam; Drahos, Dezső; Galsa, Attila; Bała, Maria Joanna; Ossowski, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents methods for laterolog response modeling. In Coulomb's charges method, Laplace's equation is solved for the electric field distribution in rock medium with internal boundaries between different resistivity layers. There, the boundary problem is reduced to Fred-holm integral equation of the second kind. The second method uses a finite element array to model apparent resistivity from laterolog. The task is treated as DC problem and the Laplace equation is solved numerically. The presented methods were applied to borehole data covering a typical stratigraphie section of the Fore-Sudetic Monocline in southwestern Poland. Apparent resistivity was calculated using the Coulomb's charges method and alternatively modeled using a finite element method which gave similar results. Then, a series of linear corrections for borehole, shoulder bed, and filtration effects for apparent resistivity obtained by the Coulomb's charges method demonstrated the feasibility of calculating true resistivity of virgin and invaded zones. The proposed methods provide a flexible solution in modeling which can be adapted to other logs.

  10. Uncertainty analysis for common Seebeck and electrical resistivity measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Jon; Dynys, Frederick; Sehirlioglu, Alp

    2014-08-01

    This work establishes the level of uncertainty for electrical measurements commonly made on thermoelectric samples. The analysis targets measurement systems based on the four probe method. Sources of uncertainty for both electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient were identified and evaluated. Included are reasonable estimates on the magnitude of each source, and cumulative propagation of error. Uncertainty for the Seebeck coefficient includes the cold-finger effect which has been quantified with thermal finite element analysis. The cold-finger effect, which is a result of parasitic heat transfer down the thermocouple probes, leads to an asymmetric over-estimation of the Seebeck coefficient. A silicon germanium thermoelectric sample has been characterized to provide an understanding of the total measurement uncertainty. The electrical resistivity was determined to contain uncertainty of ±7.0% across any measurement temperature. The Seebeck coefficient of the system is +1.0%/-13.1% at high temperature and ±1.0% near room temperature. The power factor has a combined uncertainty of +7.3%/-27.0% at high temperature and ±7.5% near room temperature. These ranges are calculated to be typical values for a general four probe Seebeck and resistivity measurement configuration.

  11. Development of a Landslide Monitoring System using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hen-Jones, R. M.; Hughes, P. N.; Glendinning, S.; Gunn, D.; Chambers, J.; Stirling, R.

    2015-12-01

    Current assessments of slope stability rely on the use of point sensors, the results of which are often difficult to interpret, have relatively high associated installation and maintenance costs, and do not provide large-area coverage. A new system is currently under development, based on the use of integrated geophysical - geotechnical sensors to monitor ground water conditions via electrical resistivity tomography. This study presents the results of an in-situ electrical resistivity tomography survey, gathered over a two year investigation period at a full-scale clay test embankment in Northumberland, UK. The 3D resistivity array comprised 288 electrodes, at 0.7m grid spacing, covering an area of approximately 90 m2. The first year of investigation involved baseline data collection, followed by a second year which saw a series of deliberate interventions targeted at weakening the slope, to determine whether corresponding geotechnical property changes would be reflected in resistivity images derived from ERT. These interventions included the manual extension of four tension cracks already present in the slope, and the installation of a sprinkler system, eight months later. Laboratory methods were employed to derive a system of equations for relating resistivity to geotechnical parameters more directly relevant to slope stability, including moisture content, suction and shear strength. These equations were then applied to resistivity data gathered over the baseline and intervention periods, yielding geotechnical images of the subsurface which compared well with in-situ geotechnical point sensors. During the intervention period, no slope movement was recorded, however, tensiometers at 0.5 m and 1.0 m depths showed elevated pore pressures, with positive pressures being recorded at depths less than 0.5 m. Resistivity images were successful in capturing the extension of the tension cracks, and in identifying the development of a potential shear failure plane as water

  12. Soil spatial heterogeneity effect on soil electrical resistivity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electrical resistivity (ER) is growing in popularity due to its ease of use and because of its non-invasive techniques, which are used to reveal and map soil heterogeneity. The objective of this work was to evaluate how differing soil properties affect the electric resistivity and to observe these e...

  13. Electrical Resistivity Imaging to Quantify Spatial Soil Heterogeneit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electrical resistivity (ER) sounding is increasingly being used as non-invasive technique to reveal and map soil heterogeneity. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of soil properties on the electric resistivity and to observe these effects in spatial context in coarse-textured soil. T...

  14. Utilizing multichannel electrical resistivity methods to examine the dynamics of the fresh water–seawater interface in two Hawaiian groundwater systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dimova, Natasha T.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Dulaiova, Henrieta; Glenn, Craig R.

    2012-01-01

    Multichannel electrical resistivity (ER) measurements were conducted at two contrasting coastal sites in Hawaii to obtain new information on the spatial scales and dynamics of the fresh water–seawater interface and rates of coastal groundwater exchange. At Kiholo Bay (located on the dry, Kona side of the Big Island) and at a site in Maunalua Bay (Oahu), there is an evidence for abundant submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). However, the hydrologic and geologic controls on coastal groundwater discharge are likely to be different at these two sites. While at Kiholo Bay SGD is predominantly through lava tubes, at the Maunalua Bay site exchange occurs mostly through nearshore submarine springs. In order to calculate SGD fluxes, it is important to understand the spatial and temporal scales of coastal groundwater exchange. From ER time series data, subsurface salinity distributions were calculated using site-specific formation factors. A salinity mass balance box model was then used to calculate rates of point source (i.e., spatially discreet) and total fresh water discharge. From these data, mean SGD rates were calculated for Kiholo Bay (∼9,200 m3/d) and for the Maunalua Bay site (∼5,900 m3/d). While such results are on the same order of magnitude to geochemical tracer-derived SGD rates, the ER SGD rates provide enhanced details of coastal groundwater exchange that can enable a more cohesive whole watershed perspective.

  15. Suitability of Archie's Law For Interpreting Electrical Resistivity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, K.; Gorelick, S. M.

    2003-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is examined as a method to provide spatially continuous images of saline tracer concentrations during transport through unconsolidated fluid-saturated media. It is frequently accepted that there exists a quantitative relationship between the electrical conductivity of dilute electrolytes in pore water and bulk electrical conductivity of the subsurface measured using resistivity methods. The assumed relationship is typically Archie's Law. We tested the applicability of Archie's Law to field-scale data collected over a 10 m by 14 m area. A 20-day weak-dipole tracer test was conducted, in which 2 g/L NaCl were introduced into the upper 30 m of the saturated zone in a coarse sand and gravel aquifer. Cross-well ERT data were collected at 4 geophysical monitoring wells and inverted in 3-D. Fluid electrical conductivity was measured directly from a multilevel sampler. The change in the direct measurements of fluid electrical conductivity exceeded the change in bulk conductivity values in the tomograms by an order of magnitude. The estimated Archie formation factor from the field data was not constant with time, due largely to smoothing during the image reconstruction process. We illustrate by modeling synthetic cases over the field site that the ERT response is difficult to match to measured fluid conductivities due to the variability in the effects of regularization, which change in both space and time. Analysis of both the field data and synthetic cases suggest that Archie's Law cannot be used to directly scale ERT conductivities to fluid conductivities.

  16. Differential device for the determination of magnetic permeability or electric resistivity inside massive cylindrical samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ursu, D.D.; Bursuc, I.D.

    1985-03-01

    A differential device for the determination of magnetic permeability or electric resistivity of the ferromagnetic cylindrical samples was realized. Our method, which takes into account a simple model of hysteresis, leads to encouraging results.

  17. Improvement of resistance to hydrogen induced cracking in electric resistance welded pipes fabricated with slit coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hyun Uk; Lee, Jong Bong; Choi, Ho Jin

    2009-02-01

    The optimization of electric resistance welding (ERW) conditions was studied to improve the resistance to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) at the bondline in small diameter API X60 ERW pipes fabricated with slit coils. The results show that HIC is initiated preferentially at the elongated Si, Mn and Al-rich oxide inclusions, normally known as a penetrator on the bondline. However, no evidence was found of any centerline segregation effect. The HIC ratio increases with the fraction of penetrators at the bondline, regardless of the degrees of center segregation. Furthermore, for a satisfactory level of HIC resistance, the fraction of penetrators must be less than 0.03 % and most of the penetrators should be circular-shaped. The design of experimental (DOE) method was used to determine the optimum ERW condition for minimization of the penetrator ratio. Finally, guideline is suggested for the optimum ERW condition for achieving excellent HIC resistance.

  18. High electrical resistivity carbon/graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, F. L.; Forsman, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon/graphite fibers were chemically oxidized in the liquid phase to fibers of graphite oxide. Resistivity increases as high as 10,000 times were obtained, the oxidized fiber decomposed on exposure to atmosphere. A factor of 1,000 remained as a stable increment. The largest change observed was 1,000,000 times. Best results were obtained on the most highly graphitized fibers. Electrochemical oxidation yielded a lower increase--about 10 times, but provided a controllable method of synthesis and insight to the mechanism of reaction. Tensile tests indicated that the strength of the fiber on oxidation was decreased by no more than 25 percent.

  19. Building Better Electrodes for Electrical Resistivity and Induced Polarization Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, P. L.; La Brecque, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    In the third year of a project to understand and mitigate the systematic noise in resistivity and induced polarization measurements, we put a significant effort into understanding and developing better electrodes. The simple metal electrodes commonly used for both transmitting and receiving of electrical geophysical data are likely the Achilles" heal of the resistivity method. Even stainless steel, a commonly used electrode material because of its durability, showed only average results in laboratory tests for electrode noise. Better results have been found with non-polarizing metal-metal salt electrodes, which are widely used as surface electrodes and in IP surveys. But although they produce small measurement errors, they are not durable enough for in-situ borehole resistivity surveys, and often contain compounds that are toxic to the environment. They are also very seldom used as transmitters. In laboratory studies, we are exploring other materials and configurations for low-noise compound electrodes that will be nontoxic, inexpensive, and durable and can be used as both transmitters and receivers. Testing of the electrical noise levels of electrodes is an arduous task involving repeated measurements under varying conditions at field scales. Thus it is important to find methods of sorting out likely candidates from the mass of possible electrode configurations and construction methods. Testing of electrode impedance versus current density appears to provide simple criteria for predicting the suitability of electrodes. The best electrodes show relatively low overall contact impedance, relatively small changes in impedance with increased current density, and relatively small changes in impedance with time. Furthermore it can be shown that resistivity and induced polarization performance of electrodes is strongly correlated, so that methods of finding electrodes with low impedance and good direct current performance usually provide better quality induced

  20. Electrical resistivity and piezoresistivity of Ni-CNT filled epoxy-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jinbao; Xiao, Huigang; Li, Hui

    2013-04-01

    This paper investigates properties about electrical resistivity and piezoresistivity of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-filled epoxy-based composite and its further use for strain sensing. The MWCNTs dispersed epoxy resin, using MWCNTs in the amount of 1.5~3.0 vol.%, was first prepared by combined high-speed stirring and sonication methods. Then, the MWCNTs dispersed epoxy resin was cast into an aluminum mold to form specimens measuring 10×10×36 mm. After curing, DC electrical resistance measurements were performed along the longitudinal axis using the four-probe method, in which copper nets served as electrical contacts. The percolation threshold zone of resistivity was got as MWCNTs in the amount of 2.00-2.50 vol.%. Further compressive testing of these specimens was conducted with four-probe method for resistance measurements at the same time. Testing results show that the electrical resistivity of the composites changes with the strain's development, namely piezoresistivity. While for practical strain sensing use, signals of electric resistance and current in the acquisition circuits were both studied. Results show that the signal of current, compared with that of resistance, had better linear relationship with the compressive strain, better stability and longer effective section to reflect the whole deformation process of the specimens under pressure. Further works about the effects of low magnetic field on the electrical resistivity and piezoresistivity of Ni-CNTs filled epoxy-based composites were presented briefly at the end of the paper.

  1. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  2. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  3. Theoretical relationship between elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Sub; Yoon, Hyung-Koo

    2015-05-01

    Elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity have been commonly applied to estimate stratum structures and obtain subsurface soil design parameters. Both elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are related to the void ratio; the objective of this study is therefore to suggest a theoretical relationship between the two physical parameters. Gassmann theory and Archie's equation are applied to propose a new theoretical equation, which relates the compressional wave velocity to shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity. The piezo disk element (PDE) and bender element (BE) are used to measure the compressional and shear wave velocities, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistivity is obtained by using the electrical resistivity probe (ERP). The elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are recorded in several types of soils including sand, silty sand, silty clay, silt, and clay-sand mixture. The appropriate input parameters are determined based on the error norm in order to increase the reliability of the proposed relationship. The predicted compressional wave velocities from the shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity are similar to the measured compressional velocities. This study demonstrates that the new theoretical relationship may be effectively used to predict the unknown geophysical property from the measured values.

  4. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  5. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  6. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1997-04-15

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {<=}1% Cr and either {>=}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {>=}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, {<=}3% Cu, balance Fe. 64 figs.

  7. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  8. Use of electrical resistivity to detect underground mine voids in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, Rodney A.

    2002-01-01

    Electrical resistivity surveys were completed at two sites along State Route 32 in Jackson and Vinton Counties, Ohio. The surveys were done to determine whether the electrical resistivity method could identify areas where coal was mined, leaving air- or water-filled voids. These voids can be local sources of potable water or acid mine drainage. They could also result in potentially dangerous collapse of roads or buildings that overlie the voids. The resistivity response of air- or water-filled voids compared to the surrounding bedrock may allow electrical resistivity surveys to delineate areas underlain by such voids. Surface deformation along State Route 32 in Jackson County led to a site investigation, which included electrical resistivity surveys. Several highly resistive areas were identified using axial dipole-dipole and Wenner resistivity surveys. Subsequent drilling and excavation led to the discovery of several air-filled abandoned underground mine tunnels. A site along State Route 32 in Vinton County, Ohio, was drilled as part of a mining permit application process. A mine void under the highway was instrumented with a pressure transducer to monitor water levels. During a period of high water level, electrical resistivity surveys were completed. The electrical response was dominated by a thin, low-resistivity layer of iron ore above where the coal was mined out. Nearby overhead powerlines also affected the results.

  9. Mapping Contaminant Remediation with Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, J.; Power, C.; Tsourlos, P.; Karaoulis, M.; Giannopoulos, A.; Soupios, P. M.; Simyrdanis, K.

    2014-12-01

    The remediation of sites contaminated with industrial chemicals - specifically dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) like coal tar and chlorinated solvents - represents a major geoenvironmental challenge. Remediation activities would benefit from a non-destructive technique to map the evolution of DNAPL mass in space and time. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has long-standing potential in this context but has not yet become a common tool at DNAPL sites. This work evaluated the potential of time-lapse ERT for mapping DNAPL mass reduction in real time during remediation. Initially, a coupled DNAPL-ERT numerical model was developed for exploring this potential at the field scale, generating realistic DNAPL scenarios and predicting the response of an ERT survey. Also, new four-dimensional (4D) inversion algorithms were integrated for tracking DNAPL removal over time. 4D ERT applied at the surface for mapping an evolving DNAPL distribution was first demonstrated in a laboratory experiment. Independent simulation of the experiment demonstrated the reliability of the DNAPL-ERT model for simulating real systems. The model was then used to explore the 4D ERT approach at the field scale for a range of realistic DNAPL remediation scenarios. The approach showed excellent potential for mapping shallow DNAPL changes. However, remediation at depth was not as well resolved. To overcome this limitation, a new surface-to-horizontal borehole (S2HB) ERT configuration is proposed. A second laboratory experiment was conducted that demonstrated that S2HB ERT does better resolve changes in DNAPL distribution relative to surface ERT, particularly at depth. The DNAPL-ERT model was also used to demonstrate the improved mapping of S2HB ERT for field scale DNAPL scenarios. Overall, this work demonstrates that, with these innovations, ERT exhibits significant potential as a real time, non-destructive geoenvironmental remediation site monitoring tool.

  10. Electrical Resistivity and Thermodynamic Properties of Iron Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu, Ho Khac; Hai, Tran Thi; Hong, Nguyen Thi; Sang, Ngo Dinh; Tuyen, Nguyen Viet

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the electrical resistivity and thermodynamic properties of iron under high pressure have been investigated by using the semi-empirical approach. The recently well-established Grüneisen parameter expressions have been applied to derive the Debye frequency and temperature under compression. Using these results combined with the Bloch-Grüneisen law, the resistivity of iron has also been determined up to Earth's core pressures. We show that the electrical resistivity diminished gradually with pressure and saturates at high pressure. Our model gives low electrical resistivity values which are in agreement with the recent experimental measurements. The low resistivity may be attributed to the well-known resistivity saturation effect at high temperature, which was not considered in earlier models of core conductivity.

  11. Electrical Resistivity and Thermodynamic Properties of Iron Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu, Ho Khac; Hai, Tran Thi; Hong, Nguyen Thi; Sang, Ngo Dinh; Tuyen, Nguyen Viet

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the electrical resistivity and thermodynamic properties of iron under high pressure have been investigated by using the semi-empirical approach. The recently well-established Grüneisen parameter expressions have been applied to derive the Debye frequency and temperature under compression. Using these results combined with the Bloch-Grüneisen law, the resistivity of iron has also been determined up to Earth's core pressures. We show that the electrical resistivity diminished gradually with pressure and saturates at high pressure. Our model gives low electrical resistivity values which are in agreement with the recent experimental measurements. The low resistivity may be attributed to the well-known resistivity saturation effect at high temperature, which was not considered in earlier models of core conductivity.

  12. Electro-dewatering of activated sludge: Electrical resistance analysis.

    PubMed

    Conrardy, Jean-Baptiste; Vaxelaire, Jean; Olivier, Jérémy

    2016-09-01

    The significant risk of ohmic heating and the high electric energy consumption at terminal stages of the dewatering are two problems that hamper the development of the electro-dewatering (EDW) technology. In the future prospect of studying these two issues, it is important to provide and analyse quantitative data relative to the behavior of the electric resistance in EDW. It was the main goal of this study. It showed that the electric resistance of the complete system (cake + filter cloth) depended on the cake dryness. It increased sharply when the solids content exceeded around 45%.The solids loading also influenced the apparent resistance at the beginning of the process. The electric resistance of the filter cloth represented about 20% of the total resistance. It remained relatively constant over the process except at the terminal stage where it generally increased sharply. The use of conductive filter, such as metallic cloth, enabled to decrease the electric resistance and reduce the energy consumption of the process. The electric resistance decreased across the cake from the anode to the cathode. This behavior may be explained by several phenomena such as the ions migration and their interaction with the solid, the decrease of dry solids content from the anode to the cathode and the gas presence at the anode (due to electrolysis reaction).

  13. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency using an equivalent circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G.

    2011-06-07

    A system and method for determining electric motor efficiency includes a monitoring system having a processor programmed to determine efficiency of an electric motor under load while the electric motor is online. The determination of motor efficiency is independent of a rotor speed measurement. Further, the efficiency is based on a determination of stator winding resistance, an input voltage, and an input current. The determination of the stator winding resistance occurs while the electric motor under load is online.

  14. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency using an equivalent circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G.

    2015-10-27

    A system and method for determining electric motor efficiency includes a monitoring system having a processor programmed to determine efficiency of an electric motor under load while the electric motor is online. The determination of motor efficiency is independent of a rotor speed measurement. Further, the efficiency is based on a determination of stator winding resistance, an input voltage, and an input current. The determination of the stator winding resistance occurs while the electric motor under load is online.

  15. Use of electrical geophysical methods for supporting agricultural practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditama, Iqbal F.; Widodo, Setiawan, Tedy; Bijaksana, Satria; Sanny, Teuku A.

    2017-07-01

    Geophysical methods have been increasingly popular for shallow and environmental studies worldwide. In particular an electrical geophysical method is helpful in soil investigation which focuses on an interval from the ground surface down to a depth of 2 meters. The instrument of electrical geophysics were developed and successfully applied to assist in precision agricultural practices worldwide, i.e. Europe, Russia, and US. Our group from Indonesia has modified a resistivity instrument that integrates with other components and could increase mobility in soil mapping. The instrument measures electrical resistivity, conductivity, and potential that can be used for agricultural applications. In addition, we created forward modelsto help us understand and detect limits of our target.

  16. Electric discharge method for ceramics reported

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Masanori

    1988-07-01

    Reports were made that electric discharge grinding composite processing is effective not only for metallic materials but also for ceramics, which are bad conductors, but they tend to lack persuasive power because the mechanism is not clear. In studying the mechanism of this processing method, it is necessary to consider everything from the fact that the method uses an electrolytic solution as a processing fluid to the effects of the electric discharge processing phenomenon on ceramics in the electrolytic solution. In order to explain the mechanism of electric discharge grinding composite processing of fine ceramics, the electric discharge processing phenomenon was studied on alumina, silicon nitride, and zirconia using an acrylic resin rotational tool containing no abrasive and one using a nonconducting vitrified diamond grinder equipped with a discharge electrode. Based on these studies involving the mechanism of ceramics removal with electric discharge, the electric discharge grinding composite processing of ceramics is discussed.

  17. Electrical resistivity imaging study of near-surface infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampousis, Angelos

    High resolution electrical resistivity images (ERI method) were obtained during vadose zone infiltration experiments on agricultural soils in cooperation with Cornell University's Agricultural Stewardship Program, Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, Extension Education Center, Riverhead, New York [ as well as Cornell University's Long Island Horticultural Research & Extension Center (LIHREC) in Riverhead, New York]. One natural soil was also studied. Infiltration was monitored by means of image analysis of two-dimensional array resistivity generated by a Syscal Kid Switch resistivity system (Griffiths et al., 1990). The data was inverted with the computer program RES2DINV (Loke, 2004). The agricultural soils considered were Riverhead sandy loam (RdA), Haven loam (HaA), and Bridgehampton silt loam (BgA). The natural site was located in the Catskill Mountains of New York State. The soils there are classified as Schoharie silty clay loam. The electrical images of the three sites were compared against established soil properties, including particle size distribution, available water capacity, and soluble salts (from the literature), as well as against site-specific soil samples and penetrometer data, which were collected along with the geophysical measurements. This research evaluates the potential of acquiring high resolution, non-destructive measurements of infiltration in the uppermost 1.5 meter of the vadose zone. The results demonstrate that resistivity differences can detect infiltration in soils typical of the north-eastern United States. Temporal and spatial variations of soil water content in the upper 1.5 meters (relevant to agriculture) of the subsurface can be monitored successfully and non-destructively with ERI. The sensitivity of the method is higher in subsurface environments that demonstrate high overall apparent resistivity values (e.g. high sand content). Under conditions of increased soil heterogeneity, instead of the formation of a continuous

  18. Four-terminal electrical testing device. [initiator bridgewire resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Robert L. (Inventor); Graves, Thomas J. (Inventor); Hoffman, William C., III (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The invention relates to a four-terminal electrical connector device for testing and measuring unknown resistances of initiators used for starting pyrotechnic events aboard the space shuttle. The testing device minimizes contact resistance degradation effects and so improves the reliability of resistance measurements taken with the device. Separate and independent voltage sensing and current supply circuits each include a pair of socket contacts for mating engagement with the pins of the initiator. The unknown resistance that is measured by the device is the resistance of the bridgewire of the initiator which is required to be between 0.95 and 1.15 ohms.

  19. Study of electrical resistivity of lithium-indium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Gyanesh; Katyal, O. P.

    1984-12-01

    Experimental results are presented on the electrical resistivity of lithium-indium films. The resistivity has been studied as a function of temperature (150-300 K), thickness of the films (570-3300 Å) and concentration of Li (11.0-58.7 at. %). The resistivity is observed to be minimum for samples having a Li concentration of 25 and 50 at. %. In general, resistivity varies linearly with temperature but resistivity versus temperature plot shows two distinct regions which have different slopes, i.e., dρ/dT. The role of lithium in indium-lithium films is discussed.

  20. Fabrication of an Electrically-Resistive, Varistor-Polymer Composite

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Fatehi, Asma; Zakaria, Azmi; Mahmud, Shahrom; Mohammadi, Sanaz A.

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the fabrication and electrical characterization of a polymer composite based on nano-sized varistor powder. The polymer composite was fabricated by the melt-blending method. The developed nano-composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FeSEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). The XRD pattern revealed the crystallinity of the composite. The XRD study also showed the presence of secondary phases due to the substitution of zinc by other cations, such as bismuth and manganese. The TEM picture of the sample revealed the distribution of the spherical, nano-sized, filler particles throughout the matrix, which were in the 10–50 nm range with an average of approximately 11 nm. The presence of a bismuth-rich phase and a ZnO matrix phase in the ZnO-based varistor powder was confirmed by FeSEM images and EDX spectra. From the current-voltage curves, the non-linear coefficient of the varistor polymer composite with 70 wt% of nano filler was 3.57, and its electrical resistivity after the onset point was 861 KΩ. The non-linear coefficient was 1.11 in the sample with 100 wt% polymer content. Thus, it was concluded that the composites established a better electrical non-linearity at higher filler amounts due to the nano-metric structure and closer particle linkages. PMID:23443085

  1. Fabrication of an electrically-resistive, varistor-polymer composite.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Fatehi, Asma; Zakaria, Azmi; Mahmud, Shahrom; Mohammadi, Sanaz A

    2012-11-23

    This study focuses on the fabrication and electrical characterization of a polymer composite based on nano-sized varistor powder. The polymer composite was fabricated by the melt-blending method. The developed nano-composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FeSEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). The XRD pattern revealed the crystallinity of the composite. The XRD study also showed the presence of secondary phases due to the substitution of zinc by other cations, such as bismuth and manganese. The TEM picture of the sample revealed the distribution of the spherical, nano-sized, filler particles throughout the matrix, which were in the 10-50 nm range with an average of approximately 11 nm. The presence of a bismuth-rich phase and a ZnO matrix phase in the ZnO-based varistor powder was confirmed by FeSEM images and EDX spectra. From the current-voltage curves, the non-linear coefficient of the varistor polymer composite with 70 wt% of nano filler was 3.57, and its electrical resistivity after the onset point was 861 KΩ. The non-linear coefficient was 1.11 in the sample with 100 wt% polymer content. Thus, it was concluded that the composites established a better electrical non-linearity at higher filler amounts due to the nano-metric structure and closer particle linkages.

  2. Chronic lead exposure reduces junctional resistance at an electrical synapse.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T

    1984-01-01

    Both acute and chronic lead exposure have been found to inhibit transmission at chemical synapses, possibly by interfering with inward calcium current. We have found that chronic lead exposure slightly reduces input resistance and greatly reduces the junctional resistance between two strongly electrically coupled neurons in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. The net effect is to increase the strength of electrical coupling. A reduction in gap junctional resistance would also be expected to increase the flow of small molecules between cells. However, Lucifer Yellow injections did not reveal dye-coupling between the cells. Lead exposure also increases the capacitance of the neurons.

  3. Infiltration front monitoring using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxarango, Laurent; Audebert, Marine; Guyard, Helene; Clement, Remi

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) geophysical method is commonly used to identify the spatial distribution of electrical resisitivity in the soil at the field scale. Recent progress in commercial acquisition systems allows repeating fast acquisitions (10 min) in order to monitor a 3D dynamic phenomenon. Since the ERT method is sensitive to moisture content variations, it can thus be used to delineate the infiltration shape during water infiltration. In heterogeneous conditions, the 3D infiltration shape is a crucial information because it could differ significantly from the homogeneous behavior. In a first step, the ERT method is validated at small scale (<1m) studying a suction infiltrometer test. The experiment is carried out in a pit filled with a homogenous silty-sandy soil. It is instrumented by 17 resistivity probes and 3 commercial capacitive moisture content probes to provide local measurements of the moisture content variation. The Multiple Inversion and Clustering Strategy (MICS) (Audebert et al 2014) is used to delineate the infiltration patern. A satisfying agreement between infiltration delineation and sensor measurements is obtained with a few centimeter accuracy on the moisture front location. In a second step, the same methodology is applied at a larger scale (> 10m). Two examples of leachate injection monitoring in municipal solid waste landfills are used to put forward benefits and limitations of the ERT-MICS method. Effective infiltration porosities in a range between 3% and 8% support the assumption of a flow in heterogeneous media. Audebert, M., R. Clément, N. Touze-Foltz, T. Günther, S. Moreau, and C. Duquennoi (2014), Time-lapse ERT interpretation methodology for leachate injection monitoring based on multiple inversions and a clustering strategy (MICS), Journal of Applied Geophysics, 111, 320-333. Keywords: ERT, infiltration front, field survey

  4. Improvement of electrical resistivity tomography for leachate injection monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, R.; Descloitres, M.; Guenther, T.; Oxarango, L.; Morra, C.

    2010-03-15

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in the scope of operating municipal waste landfills as bioreactors, which aims to increase the moisture content to optimize the biodegradation in landfills. Given that liquid flows exhibit a complex behaviour in very heterogeneous porous media, in situ monitoring methods are required. Surface time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is usually proposed. Using numerical modelling with typical 2D and 3D injection plume patterns and 2D and 3D inversion codes, we show that wrong changes of resistivity can be calculated at depth if standard parameters are used for time-lapse ERT inversion. Major artefacts typically exhibit significant increases of resistivity (more than +30%) which can be misinterpreted as gas migration within the waste. In order to eliminate these artefacts, we tested an advanced time-lapse ERT procedure that includes (i) two advanced inversion tools and (ii) two alternative array geometries. The first advanced tool uses invariant regions in the model. The second advanced tool uses an inversion with a 'minimum length' constraint. The alternative arrays focus on (i) a pole-dipole array (2D case), and (ii) a star array (3D case). The results show that these two advanced inversion tools and the two alternative arrays remove almost completely the artefacts within +/-5% both for 2D and 3D situations. As a field application, time-lapse ERT is applied using the star array during a 3D leachate injection in a non-hazardous municipal waste landfill. To evaluate the robustness of the two advanced tools, a synthetic model including both true decrease and increase of resistivity is built. The advanced time-lapse ERT procedure eliminates unwanted artefacts, while keeping a satisfactory image of true resistivity variations. This study demonstrates that significant and robust improvements can be obtained for time-lapse ERT monitoring of leachate recirculation in waste landfills.

  5. Improvement of electrical resistivity tomography for leachate injection monitoring.

    PubMed

    Clément, R; Descloitres, M; Günther, T; Oxarango, L; Morra, C; Laurent, J-P; Gourc, J-P

    2010-03-01

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in the scope of operating municipal waste landfills as bioreactors, which aims to increase the moisture content to optimize the biodegradation in landfills. Given that liquid flows exhibit a complex behaviour in very heterogeneous porous media, in situ monitoring methods are required. Surface time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is usually proposed. Using numerical modelling with typical 2D and 3D injection plume patterns and 2D and 3D inversion codes, we show that wrong changes of resistivity can be calculated at depth if standard parameters are used for time-lapse ERT inversion. Major artefacts typically exhibit significant increases of resistivity (more than +30%) which can be misinterpreted as gas migration within the waste. In order to eliminate these artefacts, we tested an advanced time-lapse ERT procedure that includes (i) two advanced inversion tools and (ii) two alternative array geometries. The first advanced tool uses invariant regions in the model. The second advanced tool uses an inversion with a "minimum length" constraint. The alternative arrays focus on (i) a pole-dipole array (2D case), and (ii) a star array (3D case). The results show that these two advanced inversion tools and the two alternative arrays remove almost completely the artefacts within +/-5% both for 2D and 3D situations. As a field application, time-lapse ERT is applied using the star array during a 3D leachate injection in a non-hazardous municipal waste landfill. To evaluate the robustness of the two advanced tools, a synthetic model including both true decrease and increase of resistivity is built. The advanced time-lapse ERT procedure eliminates unwanted artefacts, while keeping a satisfactory image of true resistivity variations. This study demonstrates that significant and robust improvements can be obtained for time-lapse ERT monitoring of leachate recirculation in waste landfills. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  6. Change Of Electrical Resistivity Depending On Water Saturation Of The Concrete Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbaǧ, Nevbahar; Uyanık, Osman

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the changes of electrical apparent resistivity values depending on the water saturation of cubic concrete samples which designed according to different strength were investigated. For this purpose, 3 different concrete design as poor, middle and good strength 150x150x150mm dimensions 9 for each design cubic samples were prepared. After measuring the weight of the prepared samples, in oven were dried at 105 ° C for 24 hours and then the dry weights were measured. Then the samples were placed into the curing pool and saturated weight of the samples were measured in specific time periods during the 90 day take out from the curing pool and the water content were calculated at each stage of these processes. The water content of the samples were obtained during 90 days specific points in time and as well as electrical apparent resistivity method of the different surfaces of the samples the potential difference measurements made by electrical resistivity method and electrical apparent resistivity values of the samples were calculated. Depending on time obtained from this study with respect to time curves of the water content and the apparent resistivity values were constructed. Results showed that the electrical apparent resistivity values increased depends on the water content. This study was supported with OYP05277-DR-14 Project No. by SDU and State Hydraulic Works 13th Regional/2012-01 Project No. Keywords: Concrete, cubic sample, Resistivity, water content, time

  7. Electrically Conductive, Heat-Resistant Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hribar, V. F.; Mell, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Improved, sprayable, thermal- and electrostatic-discharge-control coating for titanium possesses excellent adhesion and high resistance to both vibration and thermal shock. Coating is improved formulation of one described in "High-Temperature Coatings for Titanium" (NPO-16222).

  8. Electrical Resistivity Tomography Using Wenner β - Schlumberger Configuration for Anomaly Detection in The Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pebriyanto, Y.; Dahlan, K.; Sari, Y. W.

    2017-03-01

    In the subsurface exploration investigations there are many methods used, one of them is Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). ERT method is able to measure the electrical properties of the material below the earth surface based on the value of the resistivity of the material by injecting electric current and measure the potential at the surface. Based on the data obtained then will be inputted into RES2DINV software for final processing of 2D image. This research has been created by testing 2 configurations Wenner-Schlumberger and Wenner β - Schlumberger for detecting anomalies in homogeneous soil. A wooden box containing homogeneous soil is used for the test. Three anomalies (wood, stone, and wet soil) were placed in different positions and the variation of resistivity was detected. We found that the Wenner β - Schlumberger configuration results in a smaller resistivity value error than the Wenner-Schlumberger configurations.

  9. Preliminary Groundwater Assessment using Electrical Method at Quaternary Deposits Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Raqib, A. G. A.; Aziman, M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Khaidir, A. T. M.; Fairus, Y. M.; Rosli, S.; Fakhrurrazi, I. M.; Izzaty, R. A.

    2017-08-01

    Alternative water sources using groundwater has increasingly demand in recent years. In the past, proper and systematic study of groundwater potential was varies due to several constraints. Conventionally, tube well point was drilled based on subjective judgment of several parties which may lead to the uncertainties of the project success. Hence, this study performed an electrical method to investigate the groundwater potential at quaternary deposits area particularly using resistivity and induced polarization technique. Electrical method was performed using ABEM SAS4000 equipment based on pole dipole array and 2.5 m electrode spacing. Resistivity raw data was analyzed using RES2DINV software. It was found that groundwater was able to be detected based on resistivity and chargeability values which varied at 10 - 100 Ωm and 0 - 1 ms respectively. Moreover, suitable location of tube well was able to be proposed which located at 80 m from the first survey electrode in west direction. Verification of both electrical results with established references has shown some good agreement thus able to convince the result reliability. Hence, the establishment of electrical method in preliminary groundwater assessment was able to assist several parties in term groundwater prospective at study area which efficient in term of cost, time, data coverage and sustainability.

  10. Influence of Electrical Resistivity and Machining Parameters on Electrical Discharge Machining Performance of Engineering Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Renjie; Liu, Yonghong; Diao, Ruiqiang; Xu, Chenchen; Li, Xiaopeng; Cai, Baoping; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Engineering ceramics have been widely used in modern industry for their excellent physical and mechanical properties, and they are difficult to machine owing to their high hardness and brittleness. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is the appropriate process for machining engineering ceramics provided they are electrically conducting. However, the electrical resistivity of the popular engineering ceramics is higher, and there has been no research on the relationship between the EDM parameters and the electrical resistivity of the engineering ceramics. This paper investigates the effects of the electrical resistivity and EDM parameters such as tool polarity, pulse interval, and electrode material, on the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic's EDM performance, in terms of the material removal rate (MRR), electrode wear ratio (EWR), and surface roughness (SR). The results show that the electrical resistivity and the EDM parameters have the great influence on the EDM performance. The ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity up to 3410 Ω·cm can be effectively machined by EDM with the copper electrode, the negative tool polarity, and the shorter pulse interval. Under most machining conditions, the MRR increases, and the SR decreases with the decrease of electrical resistivity. Moreover, the tool polarity, and pulse interval affect the EWR, respectively, and the electrical resistivity and electrode material have a combined effect on the EWR. Furthermore, the EDM performance of ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity higher than 687 Ω·cm is obviously different from that with the electrical resistivity lower than 687 Ω·cm, when the electrode material changes. The microstructure character analysis of the machined ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic surface shows that the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic is removed by melting, evaporation and thermal spalling, and the material from the working fluid and the graphite electrode can transfer to the workpiece surface during electrical discharge

  11. Influence of electrical resistivity and machining parameters on electrical discharge machining performance of engineering ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Renjie; Liu, Yonghong; Diao, Ruiqiang; Xu, Chenchen; Li, Xiaopeng; Cai, Baoping; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Engineering ceramics have been widely used in modern industry for their excellent physical and mechanical properties, and they are difficult to machine owing to their high hardness and brittleness. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is the appropriate process for machining engineering ceramics provided they are electrically conducting. However, the electrical resistivity of the popular engineering ceramics is higher, and there has been no research on the relationship between the EDM parameters and the electrical resistivity of the engineering ceramics. This paper investigates the effects of the electrical resistivity and EDM parameters such as tool polarity, pulse interval, and electrode material, on the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic's EDM performance, in terms of the material removal rate (MRR), electrode wear ratio (EWR), and surface roughness (SR). The results show that the electrical resistivity and the EDM parameters have the great influence on the EDM performance. The ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity up to 3410 Ω·cm can be effectively machined by EDM with the copper electrode, the negative tool polarity, and the shorter pulse interval. Under most machining conditions, the MRR increases, and the SR decreases with the decrease of electrical resistivity. Moreover, the tool polarity, and pulse interval affect the EWR, respectively, and the electrical resistivity and electrode material have a combined effect on the EWR. Furthermore, the EDM performance of ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity higher than 687 Ω·cm is obviously different from that with the electrical resistivity lower than 687 Ω·cm, when the electrode material changes. The microstructure character analysis of the machined ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic surface shows that the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic is removed by melting, evaporation and thermal spalling, and the material from the working fluid and the graphite electrode can transfer to the workpiece surface during electrical discharge

  12. Construction Of Electrical Resistivity Images For Medical Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D. C.; Brown, B. H.

    1987-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of various tissues is known to cover a wide range of values and images of resistivity distribution within a patient should show good contrast and may prove to have some diagnostic use. Data on the internal distribution of resistivity within a patient may be obtained by applying current between electrodes attached to the patient and measuring the voltage developed across the surface of the patient. After collection of a complete set of data a tomographic image of resistivity may be constructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. Some likely clinical uses are in the assessment of respiratory function and cardiopulmonary dynamics.

  13. Observation of infiltration experiments with time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Ursula; Ganz, Christina; Altfelder, Sven; Günther, Thomas; Duijnisveld, Wilhelmus; Grissemann, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    analysed quantitatively. For the first experiment this calculation shows one day after the infiltration about 40% of the infiltrated water being lost to the groundwater. For the second experiment the quantitative interpretation takes into account the increased conductivity of the infiltrating tracer solution compared to the pore water of the vadose zone before infiltration. Another infiltration experiment is done on Loess. Due to the low infiltration rate only about 9l of water could be infiltrated within about 3 h (38mm/h). The time lapse ERT clearly reveals the water remaining close to surface and no sign of resistivity change due to the infiltration is observed to penetrate deeper than 30cm. At this depth the plough pan seems to inhibit the infiltration. The analysis shows the high sensitivity of the ERT method. Although the original water content is quite high and therefore the resistivity changes due to water content changes are small (the flat part of the Archie function) the time lapse ERT inversion depicts the changes of resistivity quite clearly. The experiments show the advantages of ERT measurements to observe the infiltration process in real time. However, the interpretation of such measurements still poses difficulties mainly due to the limited resolution and the ill posedness of the inversion problem of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). These problems are investigated further in order to advance the applicability of the method to infiltration problems showing signs of preferential flow.

  14. Sheet resistance determination of electrically symmetric planar four-terminal devices with extended contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornils, Martin; Paul, Oliver

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports an analytic method to determine the sheet resistance Rsq of symmetric planar four-terminal devices based on resistance measurements. Using the technique of conformal mapping it is first shown that any such device is electrically equivalent to a corresponding symmetric unit disk with the same Rsq and invariant under rotations by 90°. Two independent resistances measurable on these devices are expressed analytically as a function of Rsq and of the contact opening angle α. These two resistances fully characterize the electrical properties of such planar conductive devices. A simple procedure to extract both α and Rsq from the resistance values is then presented. These findings are corroborated by the experimental characterization of four-contact devices of ten different geometries fabricated using a commercial complementary metal oxide semiconductor process. From these widely different devices, the sheet resistance of a n-well is extracted to be 1042Ω with a relative uncertainty of only 0.45%.

  15. Electrical resistivity borehole measurements: application to an urban tunnel site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, A.; Marache, A.; Obellianne, T.; Breysse, D.

    2002-06-01

    This paper shows how it is possible to use wells drilled during geotechnical pre-investigation of a tunneling site to obtain a 2-D image of the resistivity close to a tunnel boring machine. An experimental apparatus is presented which makes it possible to perform single and borehole-to-borehole electrical measurements independent of the geological and hydrogeological context, which can be activated at any moment during the building of the tunnel. This apparatus is first demonstrated through its use on a test site. Numerical simulations and data inversion are used to analyse the experimental results. Finally, electrical resistivity tomography and single-borehole measurements on a tunneling site are presented. Experimental results show the viability of the apparatus and the efficiency of the inverse algorithm, and also highlight the limitations of the electrical resistivity tomography as a tool for geotechnical investigation in urban areas.

  16. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites.

    PubMed

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.It is established that the changes of the relative intensities of the bands in FTIR spectra indicate the destruction of the carboxyl group -COOH and group -OH. Electrical conductivity of composites has percolation character and graphite nanoplatelets (ultraviolet ozone treatment for 20 min) addition which leads to a decrease of percolation threshold 0.005 volume fraction and increase values of electrical conductivity (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) above the percolation threshold in comparison with composite materials-graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin. The changes of the value and behavior of temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity of epoxy composites with ultraviolet/ozone-treated graphite nanoparticles have been analyzed within the model of effective electrical conductivity. The model takes into account the own electrical conductivity of the filler and the value of contact electric resistance between the filler particles of the formation of continuous conductive pathways.

  17. [Numerical simulation and application of electrical resistivity survey in heavy metal contaminated sites].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-ling; Nai, Chang-xin; Wang, Yan-wen; Dong, Lu

    2013-05-01

    In order to analyze the effects of electrical resistivity in heavy metal contaminated sites, we established the resistivity model of typical contaminated sites and simulate the DC resistivity method with Wenner arrays using the finite element method. The simulation results showed that the electrical method was influenced by the contamination concentration and the location of pollution. The more serious the degree of pollution was, the more obvious the low resistivity anomaly, thus the easier the identification of the contaminated area; otherwise, if there was light pollution, Wenner array could not get obvious low resistivity anomalies, so it would be hard to judge the contaminated area. Our simulation results also showed that the closer the contaminated areas were to the surface, the more easily the pollution was detected and the low resistivity anomalies shown in the apparent resistivity diagram were influenced by the Layered medium. The actual field survey results using resistivity method also show that the resistivity method can correctly detect the area with serious pollution.

  18. Design and performance of low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, R. C.; Gonczy, J. D.; Phelan, P. E.; Nicol, T. H.

    Electrical conductors often require the removal of heat produced by normal operation. The heat can be removed by mechanical connection of the conductor to a refrigeration source. Such connections require both effective heat removal (low thermal resistance) and effective electrical isolation (high electrical resistance and high dielectric strength). Fabrication of these connections should be straightforward, and performance must be reliable and independent of operating temperature. The connection method described here involves clamping (by thermal interference fit) an electrically insulating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disc. Material candidates for insulating cylinders include composites, e.g. epoxy/fibreglass, and ceramics, e.g. alumina. Design factors, including geometry, materials and thermal contact resistance are discussed. The design, construction experience and performance measurements of a heat intercept connection in a high-temperature superconducting lead assembly is presented.

  19. Resistance after firing protected electric match. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Montoya, A.P.

    1980-03-20

    An electric match having electrical leads embedded in flame-producing compound is protected against an accidental resistance across the leads after firing by a length of heat-shrinkable tubing encircling the match body and having a skirt portion extending beyond the leads. The heat of the burning match and an adjacent thermal battery causes the tubing to fold over the end of the match body, covering the ends of the leads and protecting them from molten pieces of the battery.

  20. Electrical resistivity investigations at the Olkaria geothermal field, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Bhogal, P.S.

    1980-09-01

    The bipole-dipole, Schlumberger and in line dipole-dipole electrical resistivity configurations were used to delineate the Olkaria geothermal reservoir with the view to site boreholes for the production of electric power using the geopressurized hot water. The dipole-dipole resistivity data provided the least ambiguous and most usable data for assessing the resource. Deep drilling into two of the anomalies outlined by this survey has proved the existence of high-temperature reservoirs and a 15MW power station is under construction.

  1. Direct correlation between ferrite microstructure and electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernik, R. J.; Freer, R.; Leach, C.; Mongkolkachit, C.; Barnes, P.; Jacques, S.; Pile, K.; Wander, A.

    2007-05-01

    Variations in the composition and microstructure of Mn-Zn soft ferrites have been directly correlated with spatial variations in electrical resistivity, which were both observed to occur on a length scale of approximately 500 μm. Tomographic energy dispersive diffraction imaging (TEDDI) was used to determine the nonsystematic change in the lattice parameter across the sample volume (8.48±0.05 Å) at a spatial resolution of 50 μm. We have used a microprobe contact technique to measure the local electrical resistivity (˜35 Ω cm) and density functional theory to model the band structure. The band structure calculations directly utilized the experimentally measured lattice parameters from the TEDDI measurements and were in good agreement with the measured resistivity. The mean band gap shrinkage was found to be 0.02 eV. This value for Eg was found to account well for the observed 10-20 Ω cm resistivity variations.

  2. Electrical resistivity of Au-ZnO nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    Argibay, N.; Goeke, R. S.; Dugger, M. T.; Rodriguez, M. A.; Michael, J. R.; Prasad, S. V.

    2013-04-14

    The electrical resistivity of electron beam codeposited gold and zinc oxide (Au-ZnO) films was investigated over the full composition range. The electrical resistivity was shown to increase monotonically with increasing ZnO content, with three characteristic regimes of behavior associated primarily with (1) grain boundary electron scattering due to grain refinement at ZnO volume fractions below 0.3, (2) percolation theory for ZnO volume fractions at and above the percolation threshold (f{sub c} = 0.85), and (3) a transition region between these where it was proposed that resistivity was influenced by the formation of Au-Zn complexes due to an oxygen deficiency in the deposited ZnO. The electrical resistivity of the composite films remained below 100 {mu}{Omega} cm for ZnO volume fractions below 0.5. A model combining the general effective media equation and Mayadas-Shatzkes grain boundary electron scattering model was shown to generally describe the composition dependence of electrical resistivity for the investigated oxide dispersion hardened metal-matrix composite thin films.

  3. Electrical resistivity of Au-ZnO nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argibay, N.; Goeke, R. S.; Dugger, M. T.; Rodriguez, M. A.; Michael, J. R.; Prasad, S. V.

    2013-04-01

    The electrical resistivity of electron beam codeposited gold and zinc oxide (Au-ZnO) films was investigated over the full composition range. The electrical resistivity was shown to increase monotonically with increasing ZnO content, with three characteristic regimes of behavior associated primarily with (1) grain boundary electron scattering due to grain refinement at ZnO volume fractions below 0.3, (2) percolation theory for ZnO volume fractions at and above the percolation threshold (fc = 0.85), and (3) a transition region between these where it was proposed that resistivity was influenced by the formation of Au-Zn complexes due to an oxygen deficiency in the deposited ZnO. The electrical resistivity of the composite films remained below 100 μΩ cm for ZnO volume fractions below 0.5. A model combining the general effective media equation and Mayadas-Shatzkes grain boundary electron scattering model was shown to generally describe the composition dependence of electrical resistivity for the investigated oxide dispersion hardened metal-matrix composite thin films.

  4. Modeling the Electrical Contact Resistance at Steel-Carbon Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimmo, Ayoola T.; Hassan, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    In the aluminum smelting industry, electrical contact resistance at the stub-carbon (steel-carbon) interface has been recurrently reported to be of magnitudes that legitimately necessitate concern. Mitigating this via finite element modeling has been the focus of a number of investigations, with the pressure- and temperature-dependent contact resistance relation frequently cited as a factor that limits the accuracy of such models. In this study, pressure- and temperature-dependent relations are derived from the most extensively cited works that have experimentally characterized the electrical contact resistance at these contacts. These relations are applied in a validated thermo-electro-mechanical finite element model used to estimate the voltage drop across a steel-carbon laboratory setup. By comparing the models' estimate of the contact electrical resistance with experimental measurements, we deduce the applicability of the different relations over a range of temperatures. The ultimate goal of this study is to apply mathematical modeling in providing pressure- and temperature-dependent relations that best describe the steel-carbon electrical contact resistance and identify the best fit relation at specific thermodynamic conditions.

  5. Methods for Anticipating Problems with Electrical Wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cramer, K. Elliott (Inventor); Perey, Daniel F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Passive and active methods for anticipating problems with electrical wiring are provided. An insulative material in contact with an electrical conductor has at least one impurity that is impregnated in the insulative material and/or disposed thereon. An environment around the electrical conductor is monitored for the presence or the level of the impurity(ies) emanating from the insulative material in the form of a gaseous effluent. An alarm signal is generated when a predetermined level of the gaseous effluent is detected.

  6. Electrical resistance tomography experiments at the Oregon Graduate Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; LaBrecque, D.; Barber, W.

    1995-04-01

    Three controlled experiments were conducted at the Oregon Graduate Institute (OGI) with the purpose of evaluating electrical resistance tomography for imaging underground processes associated with in-situ site assessment and remediation. The OGI facilities are unique: a double-wall tank 10 m square and 5 m deep, filled with river bottom sediments and instrumented for geophysical and hydrological studies. At this facility, liquid contaminants could be released into the confined soil at a scale sufficiently large to represent real-world physical phenomena. In the first test, images of electrical resistivity were made before and during a controlled spill of gasoline into a sandy soil. The primary purpose was to determine if electrical resistivity images could detect the hydrocarbon in either the vadose or saturated zone. Definite changes in electrical resistivity were observed in both the vadose and saturated soils. The effects were an increase in resistivity of as much as 10% above pre-release values. A single resistive anomaly was imaged, directly below the release point, principally within the vadose zone but extending below the phreatic surface. The anomaly remained identifiable in tomograms taken two days after the release ended with clear indications of lateral spreading along the water table. The second test involved electrical resistance measurements before, during, and after air sparging in a saturated soil. The primary purpose was to determine if the electrical images could be used to detect and delineate the extent of the zone influenced by sparging. The images showed an increase of about 20% in resistivity over background values within the sparged zone and the extent of the imaged zone agreed with that inferred from other information. Electrical resistivity tomography measurements were made under a simulated oil storage tank in the third test. Comparison of images taken before and during separate releases of brine and water showed effects of changes

  7. Physical Modelling on Detecting Buried Object Using Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Nizam, Z. M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Shaylinda, M. Z. N.

    2016-07-01

    This study focused on the evaluation of electrical resistivity method (ERM) for buried object detection and its relationship due to the different stiffness of material. In the past, the conventional method to detect the buried structure was face some limitation due to the time and cost. For example, previous approach related to the trial and error excavation has always expose to some risky outcome due to the uncertainties of the buried object location. Hence, this study introduced an alternative technique with particular reference to resistivity method to detect and evaluate the buried object with different strength of stiffness. The experiment was performed based on field miniature model (small scale study) using soil trial embankment made by lateritic soil and various concrete cube strengths (grade 20, 25 and 30) representing buried object with different conditions. 2D electrical resistivity test (electrical resistivity imaging) was perform using ABEM Terrameter SAS4000 during the data acquisition while the raw data was process using RES2DINV software. It was found that the electrical resistivity method was able to detect the buried concrete structures targeted based on the contrast of the electrical resistivity image produced. Moreover, three different strength of concrete cube were able to be differentiated based on the electrical resistivity values (ERV) obtained. This study found that the ERV of concrete cube for grade 20, 25 and 30 were 170 Ωm, 227 Ωm and 503 Ωm, respectively. Hence, this study shows that the ERV has a strong relationship with different stiffness of material thus applicable to be a useful alternative tool in underground structure detection.

  8. Method for forming electrically charged laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1979-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  9. Invariant electrical resistivity of Co along the melting boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezenwa, Innocent C.; Secco, Richard A.

    2017-09-01

    The Earth's core is comprised mainly of Fe and Ni with some light alloying element(s) and the electrical resistivity behavior of these elements is an important property for characterizing geodynamo action, determining energy sources, and for understanding core thermal evolution. Knowledge of the electrical resistivity of solid and liquid transition metals with electronic structures similar to Fe reinforces our understanding of core properties. The electrical resistivity of high purity Co has been measured at pressures up to 5 GPa in a large volume press and at temperatures up to 100 K above the melting temperature. The results demonstrate that resistivity of Co is invariant along the melting boundary. This is interpreted in terms of the antagonistic effects of P-induced reduction in the amplitude of lattice vibrations tending to decrease resistivity, and the P-induced shift of the Fermi level closer to the d-resonance which tends to increase resistivity. We calculated the electronic thermal conductivity of Co using the Wiedemann-Franz law and show that it increases with pressure both in the solid and liquid states and decreases with temperature in the solid and increases in the liquid state. The pressure dependences of electrical resistivity and electronic thermal conductivity calculated from equations involving bulk modulus and the Gruneisen parameter are in reasonable agreement with values measured in this study. The constant resistivity of Co along its melting boundary found in our study portends similar behavior for its electronic structural analog, Fe. This prediction suggests that the electronic thermal conductivity of Fe at Earth's inner core boundary could be similar to its 1 atm value at the melting point. Using this value of thermal conductivity for the inner core boundary would admit thermal convection as an energy source for the geodynamo prior to the birth of the inner core.

  10. Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds. Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Lutken, Carol; Macelloni, Leonardo; D'Emidio, Marco; Dunbar, John; Higley, Paul

    2015-01-31

    This study was designed to investigate temporal variations in hydrate system dynamics by measuring changes in volumes of hydrate beneath hydrate-bearing mounds on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, the landward extreme of hydrate occurrence in this region. Direct Current Resistivity (DCR) measurements were made contemporaneously with measurements of oceanographic parameters at Woolsey Mound, a carbonate-hydrate complex on the mid-continental slope, where formation and dissociation of hydrates are most vulnerable to variations in oceanographic parameters affected by climate change, and where changes in hydrate stability can readily translate to loss of seafloor stability, impacts to benthic ecosystems, and venting of greenhouse gases to the water-column, and eventually, the atmosphere. We focused our study on hydrate within seafloor mounds because the structurally-focused methane flux at these sites likely causes hydrate formation and dissociation processes to occur at higher rates than at sites where the methane flux is less concentrated and we wanted to maximize our chances of witnessing association/dissociation of hydrates. We selected a particularly well-studied hydrate-bearing seafloor mound near the landward extent of the hydrate stability zone, Woolsey Mound (MC118). This mid-slope site has been studied extensively and the project was able to leverage considerable resources from the team’s research experience at MC118. The site exhibits seafloor features associated with gas expulsion, hydrates have been documented at the seafloor, and changes in the outcropping hydrates have been documented, photographically, to have occurred over a period of months. We conducted observatory-based, in situ measurements to 1) characterize, geophysically, the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability, and 2) contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents) to

  11. Electrical Resistance Tomography Field Trials to Image CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newmark, R.

    2003-12-01

    If geologic formations are used to sequester or store carbon dioxide (CO2) for long periods of time, it will be necessary to verify the containment of injected CO2 by assessing leaks and flow paths, and by understanding the geophysical and geochemical interactions between the CO2 and the geologic minerals and fluids. Remote monitoring methods are preferred, to minimize cost and impact to the integrity of the disposal reservoir. Electrical methods are especially well suited for monitoring processes involving fluids, as electrical properties are most sensitive to the presence and nature of the fluids contained in the medium. High resolution tomographs of electrical properties have been used with success for site characterization, monitoring subsurface migration of fluids in instances of leaking underground tanks, water infiltration events, subsurface steam floods, contaminant movement, and assessing the integrity of subsurface barriers. These surveys are commonly conducted utilizing vertical arrays of point electrodes in a crosswell configuration. Alternative ways of monitoring the reservoir are desirable due to the high costs of drilling the required monitoring boreholes Recent field results obtained using steel well casings as long electrodes are also promising. We have conducted field trials to evaluate the effectiveness of long electrode ERT as a potential monitoring approach for CO2 sequestration. In these trials, CO2 is not being sequestered but rather is being used as a solvent for enhanced oil recovery. This setting offers the same conditions expected during sequestration so monitoring secondary oil recovery allows a test of the method under realistic physical conditions and operational constraints. Field experience has confirmed the challenges identified during model studies. The principal difficulty are the very small signals due to the fact that formation changes occur only over a small segment of the 5000 foot length of the electrodes. In addition

  12. Analyses of temperature-dependent interface states, series resistances, and AC electrical conductivities of Al/p—Si and Al/Bi4Ti3O12/p—Si structures by using the admittance spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Yıldırım; Perihan, Durmuş; Şemsettin, Altındal

    2013-10-01

    In this study, Al/p—Si and Al/Bi4Ti3O12/p—Si structures are fabricated and their interface states (Nss), the values of series resistance (Rs), and AC electrical conductivity (σac) are obtained each as a function of temperature using admittance spectroscopy method which includes capacitance—voltage (C—V) and conductance—voltage (G—V) measurements. In addition, the effect of interfacial Bi4Ti3O12 (BTO) layer on the performance of the structure is investigated. The voltage-dependent profiles of Nss and Rs are obtained from the high-low frequency capacitance method and the Nicollian method, respectively. Experimental results show that Nss and Rs, as strong functions of temperature and applied bias voltage, each exhibit a peak, whose position shifts towards the reverse bias region, in the depletion region. Such a peak behavior is attributed to the particular distribution of Nss and the reordering and restructuring of Nss under the effect of temperature. The values of activation energy (Ea), obtained from the slope of the Arrhenius plot, of both structures are obtained to be bias voltage-independent, and the Ea of the metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor (MFS) structure is found to be half that of the metal—semiconductor (MS) structure. Furthermore, other main electrical parameters, such as carrier concentration of acceptor atoms (NA), built-in potential (Vbi), Fermi energy (EF), image force barrier lowering (Δ Φb), and barrier height (Φb), are extracted using reverse bias C-2—V characteristics as a function of temperature.

  13. Indirect estimation of electrical resistivity by abrasion and physico-mechanical properties of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Okan; Momayez, Moe

    2017-08-01

    This paper attempts to estimate electrical resistivity from physico-mechanical and abrasion properties of rocks. For this purpose, the electrical properties of rock samples collected from igneous and metamorphic formations were initially measured in a laboratory by employing the two-electrode method. In addition, physical, mechanical, and abrasion properties of the rocks were determined. Then, an attempt was made to examine the possibility of estimation of electrical resistivity from other rock properties. In this sense, it was found that water content, porosity, and the ratio of Vp/Vs have significant effects on the electrical resistivity. Moreover, we report that indirect tensile strength and static elastic modulus indirectly control the electrical characteristics of rocks, since reasonable correlations exist between them. Nevertheless, the reliability of the effect of rock abrasion on the resistivity could not be confirmed with a high degree of certainty. More data are needed to check its validity. Thus, we conclude in light of statistical analyses that the results of the tests and the relationships are statistically significant. For this reason, the electrical resistivity of the intact rock can be indirectly estimated by accounting for the physico-mechanical properties for a given formation. However, rock abrasion cannot be considered for the same purpose.

  14. Advances in the application of in situ electrical resistance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Gregory J.; Beyke, Gregory

    2007-07-01

    Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) is an aggressive in situ thermal remediation technology that was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy from the original oil production technology to enhance vapor extraction remediation technologies in low permeability soils. Soil and groundwater are heated by the passage of electrical current through saturated and unsaturated soil between electrodes, not by the electrodes themselves. It is the resistance to the flow of electrical current that results in increased subsurface temperatures, and this is typically applied to the boiling point of water. It is estimated that more than 75 ERH applications have been performed. Capacity to perform these projects has increased over the years, and as many as 15 to 20 of these applications now being performed at any given time, mainly in North America, with some European applications. While the main focus has been to vaporize volatile organic compounds, as one would expect other semi-volatile and non-volatile organic compounds have also been encountered, resulting in observations of chemical and physical reactions that have not been normally incorporated into environmental restoration projects. One such reaction is hydrolysis, which is slow under normal groundwater temperatures, becomes very rapid under temperatures that can easily be achieved using ERH. As a result, these chemical and physical reactions are increasing the applicability of ERH in environmental restoration projects, treating a wider variety of compounds and utilizing biotic and abiotic mechanisms to reduce energy costs. For the treatment of oil and coal tar residues from manufactured gas plants, a process TRS has called steam bubble floatation is used to physically remove the coal and oil tar from the soils for collection using conventional multi-phase collection methods. Heat-enhanced hydrolysis has been used to remediate dichloromethane from soils and groundwater at a site in Illinois, while heat-enhanced biotic and

  15. Equivalent Electrical Circuit Representations of AC Quantized Hall Resistance Standards

    PubMed Central

    Cage, M. E.; Jeffery, A.; Matthews, J.

    1999-01-01

    We use equivalent electrical circuits to analyze the effects of large parasitic impedances existing in all sample probes on four-terminal-pair measurements of the ac quantized Hall resistance RH. The circuit components include the externally measurable parasitic capacitances, inductances, lead resistances, and leakage resistances of ac quantized Hall resistance standards, as well as components that represent the electrical characteristics of the quantum Hall effect device (QHE). Two kinds of electrical circuit connections to the QHE are described and considered: single-series “offset” and quadruple-series. (We eliminated other connections in earlier analyses because they did not provide the desired accuracy with all sample probe leads attached at the device.) Exact, but complicated, algebraic equations are derived for the currents and measured quantized Hall voltages for these two circuits. Only the quadruple-series connection circuit meets our desired goal of measuring RH for both ac and dc currents with a one-standard-deviation uncertainty of 10−8 RH or less during the same cool-down with all leads attached at the device. The single-series “offset” connection circuit meets our other desired goal of also measuring the longitudinal resistance Rx for both ac and dc currents during that same cool-down. We will use these predictions to apply small measurable corrections, and uncertainties of the corrections, to ac measurements of RH in order to realize an intrinsic ac quantized Hall resistance standard of 10−8 RH uncertainty or less.

  16. Electrical resistivity tomography at the search of groundwater near Anapa town in the south of Russia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvon, Dina; Vladimir, Shevnin; Boris, Nikulin; Albert, Ryjov; Alexey, Skobelev

    2013-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography at the search of groundwater near Anapa town in the south of Russia. Kvon D. A.(1)*, Shevnin V.A.(1), Nikulin B. A.(1), Ryjov A. A.(2), Skobelev A. O.(1) (1)Geophysical dept., Faculty of Geology, Moscow state university; (2)VSEGINGEO Due to acute shortage of fresh drinking water near Anapa town (not far from the Black Sea), geophysical investigations were performed for searching and mapping aquifers in the area, where, according to rare wells exist probability to find fresh underground water. Geophysical explorations were carried out by Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method and water resistivity measurements. The resistivity of fresh groundwater is 15 Ohm.m, its salinity is 0.4 g/l. The structure of the area has been obtained by previous geological and hydrogeological studies and boreholes drilling. Geological structure of the area consists of two parts: the upper part of cross-section presented by loose lacustrine-alluvial sediments of Upper Pleistocene - Holocene, the lower part presented by hard rocs of carbonate-flysch formation of Upper Cretaceous age consisted of marl and limestone. Prospective areas to find underground water are: water-bearing horizon of upper Pleistocene-Holocene sediments, which is presented by gravel layer (base layer of modern lacustrine-alluvial sediments), and fractured zones in hard rocks of the carbonate-flysch formation of Maastricht age (Supseh formation). Analysis of rocks' resistivity obtained from Electrical resistivity tomography followed by calculation of rock resistivity on known petrophysical parameters (in Petrowin program created by A. A. Ryjov) [Shevnin et al., 2007]. The calculation showed that there is low clay content in carbonate rocks of the studied area, and the rock is limestone, not marl. Measurement of rock samples with X-ray radiometric method showed high calcium content (30-35%) or 75-87.5% limestone. This fact shows that flysch formation of the area is mainly

  17. Contribution of 3-D electrical resistivity tomography for landmines detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metwaly, M.; El-Qady, G.; Matsushima, J.; Szalai, S.; Al-Arifi, N. S. N.; Taha, A.

    2008-12-01

    Landmines are a type of inexpensive weapons widely used in the pre-conflicted areas in many countries worldwide. The two main types are the metallic and non-metallic (mostly plastic) landmines. They are most commonly investigated by magnetic, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and metal detector (MD) techniques. These geophysical techniques however have significant limitations in resolving the non-metallic landmines and wherever the host materials are conductive. In this work, the 3-D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) technique is evaluated as an alternative and/or confirmation detection system for both landmine types, which are buried in different soil conditions and at different depths. This can be achieved using the capacitive resistivity imaging system, which does not need direct contact with the ground surface. Synthetic models for each case have been introduced using metallic and non-metallic bodies buried in wet and dry environments. The inversion results using the L1 norm least-squares optimization method tend to produce robust blocky models of the landmine body. The dipole axial and the dipole equatorial arrays tend to have the most favorable geometry by applying dynamic capacitive electrode and they show significant signal strength for data sets with up to 5% noise. Increasing the burial depth relative to the electrode spacing as well as the noise percentage in the resistivity data is crucial in resolving the landmines at different environments. The landmine with dimension and burial depth of one electrode separation unit is over estimated while the spatial resolutions decrease as the burial depth and noise percentage increase.

  18. Electrical Resistivity Changes in Saturated Rock under Stress.

    PubMed

    Brace, W F; Orange, A S

    1966-09-23

    Electrical resistivity of water-saturated crystalline rock such as granite, diabase, dunite, or quartzite changes by an order of magnitude prior to fracture of the rock in compression. The effect observed even under high confining pressure is due to formation of open cracks which first appear at one-third to two-thirds the fracture stress.

  19. Informative Parameters of Dynamic Geo-electricity Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tursunmetov, R.

    With growing complexity of geological tasks and revealing abnormality zones con- nected with ore, oil, gas and water availability, methods of dynamic geo-electricity started to be used. In these methods geological environment is considered as inter- phase irregular one. Main dynamic element of this environment is double electric layer, which develops on the boundary between solid and liquid phase. In ore or wa- ter saturated environment double electric layers become electrochemical or electro- kinetic active elements of geo-electric environment, which, in turn, form natural elec- tric field. Mentioned field influences artificially created field distribution and inter- action bear complicated super-position or non-linear character. Therefore, geological environment is considered as active one, which is able to accumulate and transform artificially superpositioned fields. Main dynamic property of this environment is non- liner behavior of specific electric resistance and soil polarization depending on current density and measurements frequency, which serve as informative parameters for dy- namic geo-electricity methods. Study of disperse soil electric properties in impulse- frequency regime with study of temporal and frequency characteristics of electric field is of main interest for definition of geo-electric abnormality. Volt-amperic characteris- tics of electromagnetic field study has big practical significance. These characteristics are determined by electric-chemically active ore and water saturated fields. Mentioned parameters depend on initiated field polarity, in particular on ore saturated zone's character, composition and mineralization and natural electric field availability un- der cathode and anode mineralization. Non-linear behavior of environment's dynamic properties impacts initiated field structure that allows to define abnormal zone loca- tion. And, finally, study of soil anisotropy dynamic properties in space will allow to identify filtration flows

  20. Electrical resistance of complex two-dimensional structures of loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, M. A. F.; Hora, R. R.; Brito, V. P.

    2011-06-01

    This work presents a study of the dc electrical resistance of a recently discovered hierarchical two-dimensional system which has a complex topology consisting of a distribution of disordered macroscopic loops with no characteristic size and a distribution of several types of contacts between loops. In addition to its intrinsic interest in the important context of low-dimensional systems and crumpled systems, the structures under study are of relevance in a number of areas including soft condensed matter and packing of DNA in viral capsids. In the particular case discussed here, the loops are made of layers of graphite with a height of tens of nanometers deposited on a substrate of cellulose. Experiments with these systems indicate an anomalous electrical resistance of sub-diffusive type. The results reported here are explained with scaling arguments and computer simulation. A comparison with the dc electrical properties of percolation clusters is made, and some other experimental issues as future prospects are commented.

  1. Electric Crosstalk Effect in Valence Change Resistive Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Wang, Hong; Wu, Shiwei; Song, Fang; Wang, Zhan; Gao, Haixia; Ma, Xiaohua

    2017-08-01

    Electric crosstalk phenomenon in valence change resistive switching memory (VCM) is systematically investigated. When a voltage is applied on the VCM device, an electric field is formed in the isolated region between the devices, which causes the oxygen vacancies in conductive filaments (CFs) to drift apart, leading to a consequent resistance degradation of the neighboring devices. The effects of distance between memory cells, electrodes widths and physical dimensions of CFs on the memory performance are investigated in this work. Furthermore, the strategies to mitigate electric crosstalk effects are developed. According to the simulation results, the crosstalk phenomenon can become more severe as the distance between memory cells or the electrode width decreases. In order to optimize the device performance, it is helpful to control the location of the break points of CFs in the device close to the top electrode. Alternatively, taking the integration density into account, switching materials with a small field accelerated parameter can also contribute to obtaining a stable performance.

  2. Financial methods in competitive electricity markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shijie

    pricing electricity financial instruments such as electricity forwards, options and cross-commodity derivatives. It is also essential for the analysis of financial risk management, asset valuation, and project financing. In the setting of diffusion processes with multiple types of jumps, I examine three mean-reversion models for modeling the electricity spot prices. I impose some structure on the coefficients of the diffusion processes, which allows me to easily compute the prices of contingent claims (or, financial instruments) on electricity by Fourier methods. I derive the pricing formulas for various electricity derivatives and examine how the prices vary with different modeling assumptions. I demonstrate a couple of risk management applications of the electricity financial instruments. I also construct a real options approach to value electric power generation and transmission assets both with and without accounting for the operating characteristics of the assets. The implications of the mean-reversion jump-diffusion models on financial risk management and real asset valuation in competitive electricity markets are illustrated. With a discrete trinomial lattice modeling the underlying commodity prices, I estimate the effects of operational characteristics on the asset valuation by means of numerical examples that incorporate these aspects using stochastic dynamic programming. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  3. Resistivity methods in exploration for hydrothermal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Jiracek, G.R.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D.

    1981-05-01

    The practical aspects of using dc resistivity in the exploration for hydrothermal resources are discussed. There are several reasons why low electrical resistivity is expected in hydrothermal aquifers but the association is not without pit falls. Besides outlining the reasons why resistivity has proven a successful geothermal exploration tool, a section on how resistivity is practiced is included. Here, the common electrode arrays are considered with their major advantages and disadvantages pointed out. The current status in resistivity interpretation schemes is touched upon with emphasis on computer modeling. Finally, a successful resistivity case history of a low-temperature resource at Las Alturas Estates, New Mexico is included to illustrate a specific resistivity exploration philosophy. The case history concludes with drilling results which are, of course, the ultimate test.

  4. Electrical network method for the thermal or structural characterization of a conducting material sample or structure

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.

    1993-06-08

    A method for modeling a conducting material sample or structure system, as an electrical network of resistances in which each resistance of the network is representative of a specific physical region of the system. The method encompasses measuring a resistance between two external leads and using this measurement in a series of equations describing the network to solve for the network resistances for a specified region and temperature. A calibration system is then developed using the calculated resistances at specified temperatures. This allows for the translation of the calculated resistances to a region temperature. The method can also be used to detect and quantify structural defects in the system.

  5. Electrical network method for the thermal or structural characterization of a conducting material sample or structure

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marco G.

    1993-01-01

    A method for modeling a conducting material sample or structure system, as an electrical network of resistances in which each resistance of the network is representative of a specific physical region of the system. The method encompasses measuring a resistance between two external leads and using this measurement in a series of equations describing the network to solve for the network resistances for a specified region and temperature. A calibration system is then developed using the calculated resistances at specified temperatures. This allows for the translation of the calculated resistances to a region temperature. The method can also be used to detect and quantify structural defects in the system.

  6. Method for starting operation of a resistance melter

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Christopher Charles

    1977-01-01

    A method for starting the operation of a resistance furnace, where heating occurs by passing a current through the charge between two furnace electrodes and the charge is a material which is essentially electrically nonconductive when in a solid physical state but which becomes more electrically conductive when in a molten physical state, by connecting electrical resistance heating wire between the furnace electrodes, placing the wire in contact with the charge material between the electrodes and passing a current through the wire to heat the wire to a temperature sufficient to melt the material between the furnace electrodes so that as the material melts, current begins to pass between the electrodes through the melted material, further heating and melting more material until all current between the electrodes passes through the charge material without the aid or presence of the resistance element.

  7. Low electrical resistivity carbon nanotube and polyethylene nanocomposites for aerospace and energy exploration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloney, Padraig G.

    An investigation was conducted towards the development and optimization of low electrical resistivity carbon nanotube (CNT) and thermoplastic composites as potential materials for future wire and cable applications in aerospace and energy exploration. Fundamental properties of the polymer, medium density polyethylene (MDPE), such as crystallinity were studied and improved for composite use. A parallel effort was undertaken on a broad selection of CNT, including single wall, double wall and multi wall carbon nanotubes, and included research of material aspects relevant to composite application and low resistivity such as purity, diameter and chirality. With an emphasis on scalability, manufacturing and purification methods were developed, and a solvent-based composite fabrication method was optimized. CNT MDPE composites were characterized via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Raman spectroscopy, and multiple routes of electron microscopy. Techniques including annealing and pressure treatments were used to further improve the composites' resulting electrical performance. Enhancement of conductivity was explored via exposure to a focused microwave beam. A novel doping method was developed using antimony pentafluoride (SbF5) to reduce the resistivity of the bulk CNT. Flexible composites, malleable under heat and pressure, were produced with exceptional electrical resistivities reaching as low as 2*10-6O·m (5*105S/m). A unique gas sensor application utilizing the unique electrical resistivities of the produced CNT-MDPE composites was developed. The materials proved suitable as a low weight and low energy sensing material for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a nerve gas simulant.

  8. Variations of electric field and electric resistivity of air caused by dust motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seran, E.; Godefroy, M.; Renno, N.; Elliott, H.

    2013-08-01

    report results of a field campaign conducted in the Nevada desert with a suite of electric field instruments consisting of a field mill (FM) and a short dipole antenna (SDA). Furthermore, we show that a combination of the measurements of these two instruments allows the estimation of the electric resistivity of air, an important quantity that is extremely difficult to measure near the Earth's surface. The electric resistivity of air is found to vary between 1.5 · 1013 and 6 · 1013 Ω m and to correlate with changes in electric field. Vertical DC electric fields with amplitudes up to 6 kV m-1 were observed to correspond to clouds of dust blowing through the measurement site. Enhanced DC and AC electric fields are measured during periods when horizontal wind speed exceeds 7 m s-1, or around twice the background value. We suggest that low-frequency emissions, below ~200 Hz, are generated by the motion of electrically charged particles in the vicinity of the SDA electrode and propose a simple model to reproduce the observed spectra. According to this model, the spectral response is controlled by three parameters, (i) the speed of the charged particles, (ii) the charge concentration, and (iii) the minimum distance between the particle and the electrode. In order to explain the electric fields measured with the FM sensors at different heights, we developed a multilayer model that relates the electric field to the charge distribution. For example, a nonlinear variation of the electric field observed by the FM sensors below 50 cm is simulated by a near-surface layer of tens of centimeters that is filled with electrically charged particles that carry a predominantly negative charge in the vicinity of the soil. The charge concentration inside this layer is estimated to vary between 1012 and 5 · 1013 electrons m-3.

  9. Electrical Resistivity Imaging Below Nuclear Waste Tank Farms at the Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, D. F.; Levitt, M. T.

    2006-12-01

    The Hanford Site, a Department of Energy nuclear processing facility in eastern Washington, contains a complex series of radiological liquid waste disposal and storage facilities. The primary method of interim storage is the use of large single-shelled steel tanks with capacities of up to 3790 m3 (1 million gallons). The tanks are organized below ground into tank farms, with about 12 tanks per farm. The liquid waste within the tanks is primarily comprised of inorganic salts with minor constituents of heavy metals and radiological metals. The electrical properties of the radiological waste are significantly different to that of the surrounding engineered fill and native geologic formations. Over the past 60 years since the earliest tanks have been in use, many have been known to leak. An electrical resistivity survey was conducted within a tank farm to map the extent of the plumes resulting from historic leaks. Traditional surface-based electrical resistivity surveys resulted in unusable data due to the significant subsurface infrastructure that included a network of delivery pipes, wells, fences, and electrical discharge sources . HGI adapted the resistivity technique to include the site infrastructure as transceivers to augment data density and geometry. The results show a distribution of low resistivity values within the farm in areas that match known historic leak sites. The addition of site infrastructure as sensors demonstrates that the electrical resistivity technique can be used in highly industrial sites.

  10. Results of Electrical Resistivity Data Collected near the Town of Guernsey, Platte County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougal, Robert R.; Abraham, Jared D.; Bisdorf, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a study to investigate subsurface geologic conditions as they relate to ground-water flow in an abandoned landfill near the town of Guernsey, Wyoming, geophysical direct current (DC) resistivity data were collected. Eight vertical resistivity soundings and eight horizontal resistivity profiles were made using single channel and multi-channel DC instruments. Data collected in the field were converted from apparent resistivity to inverted resistivity with depth using a numerical inversion of the data. Results of the inverted resistivity data are presented as horizontal profiles and as profiles derived from the combined horizontal profile and vertical sounding data. The data sets collected using the single-channel and multi-channel DC systems provided for the resistivity investigation to extend to greater depth. Similarity of the electrical properties of the bedrock formations made interpretation of the resistivity profiles more difficult. High resistivity anomalies seen in the profiles are interpreted as quartzite lenses and as limestone or metadolomite structures in the eastern part of the study area. Terrace gravels were mapped as resistive where dry and less resistive in the saturated zone. The DC resistivity methods used in this study illustrate that multi-electrode DC resistivity surveying and more traditional methodologies can be merged and used to efficiently map anomalies of hydrologic interest in geologically complex terrain.

  11. Non-invasive determination of absolute lung resistivity in adults using electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Patterson, Robert

    2010-08-01

    Lung resistivity is a physiological parameter that describes the electrical characteristics of the lungs. Lung composition changes due to changes in the lung tissues, fluid and air volume. Various diseases that can cause a change in lung composition may be monitored by measuring lung resistivity. Currently, there is no accepted non-invasive method to measure lung resistivity. In this study, we presented a method and framework to non-invasively determine lung resistivity using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). By comparing actual measurements from subjects with data from a 3D human thorax model, an EIT image can be reconstructed to show a resistivity difference between the model and the subject. By adjusting the lung resistivity in the model, the resistivity difference in the lung regions can be reduced to near zero. This resistivity value then is the estimation of the lung resistivity of the subject. Using the proposed method, the lung resistivities of four normal adult males (43 +/- 13 years, 78 +/- 10 kg) in the supine position at air volumes starting at functional residual capacity (FRC--end expiration) and increasing in 0.5 l steps to 1.5 l were studied. The averaged lung resistivity changes 12.59%, from 1406 Omega cm to 1583 Omega cm, following the inspiration of 1.5 l air from FRC. The coefficients of variation (CV) of precision for the four subjects are less than 10%. The experiment was repeated five times at each air volume on a subject to test the reproducibility. The CVs are less than 3%. The results show that it is feasible to determine absolute lung resistivity using an EIT-based method.

  12. A new apparatus for non-destructive evaluation of green-state powder metal compacts using the electrical-resistivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Gene; Ludwig, Reinhold; Michalson, William R.

    2000-02-01

    This paper presents a new apparatus developed for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of green-state powder metal compacts. A green-state compact is an intermediate step in the powder metallurgy (PM) manufacturing process, which is produced when a metal powder-lubricant mixture is compacted in a press. This compact is subsequently sintered in a furnace to produce the finished product. Non-destructive material testing is most cost effective in the green state because early flaw detection permits early intervention in the manufacturing cycle and thus avoids scrapping large numbers of parts. Unfortunately, traditional NDE methods have largely been unsuccessful when applied to green-state PM compacts. A new instrumentation approach has been developed, whereby direct currents are injected into the green-state compact and an array of spring-loaded needle contacts records the voltage distributions on the surface. The voltage distribution is processed to identify potentially dangerous surface and sub-surface flaws. This paper presents the custom-designed hardware and software developed for current injection, voltage acquisition, pre-amplification and flaw detection. In addition, the testing algorithm and measurement results are discussed. The success of flaw detection using the apparatus is established by using controlled samples, which are PM compacts with dielectric inclusions inserted.

  13. Electrical resistivity of nanoporous gold modified with thiol self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamada, Masataka; Kato, Naoki; Mabuchi, Mamoru

    2016-11-01

    The electrical resistivity of nanoporous gold (NPG) modified with thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been measured at 298 K using a four-probe method. We found that the adsorption of thiol SAMs increases the electrical resistivity of NPG by up to 22.2%. Dependence of the electrical resistivity on the atmosphere (air or water) was also observed in SAMs-modified NPG, suggesting that the electronic states of the tail groups affect the electrons of the binding sulfur and adjacent surface gold atoms. The present results suggest that adsorption of thiol molecules can influence the behavior of the conducting electrons in NPG and that modification of NPG with SAMs may be useful for environmental sensing.

  14. Electric Field Quantitative Measurement System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and system are provided for making a quantitative measurement of an electric field. A plurality of antennas separated from one another by known distances are arrayed in a region that extends in at least one dimension. A voltage difference between at least one selected pair of antennas is measured. Each voltage difference is divided by the known distance associated with the selected pair of antennas corresponding thereto to generate a resulting quantity. The plurality of resulting quantities defined over the region quantitatively describe an electric field therein.

  15. Forensic Assessment on Ground Instability Using Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Fauzan, S. M. S. A.; Ikhwan, J. M.; Aishah, M. A. N.

    2017-02-01

    Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) was used to evaluate the ground settlement in local scale at housing areas. ERI and Borehole results were used to interpret the condition of the problematic subsurface profile due to its differential stiffness. Electrical resistivity of the subsurface profile was measured using ABEM SAS4000 equipment set. ERI results using electrical resistivity anomaly on subsurface materials resistivity shows the subsurface profile exhibited low (1 - 100 Ωm) and medium (> 100 Ωm) value (ERV) representing weak to firm materials. The occurrences of soft to medium cohesive material (SPT N value = 2 - 7) and stiff cohesive material (SPT N ≥ 8) in local scale has created inconsistency of the ground stability condition. Moreover, it was found that a layer of organic decayed wood (ERV = 43 ˜ 29 Ωm & SPT N = 15 ˜ 9) has been buried within the subsurface profile thus weaken the ground structure and finally promoting to the ground settlement. The heterogeneous of the subsurface material presented using integrated analysis of ERI and borehole data enabled ground settlement in this area to be evaluated. This is the major factor evaluating ground instability in the local scale. The result was applicable to assist in planning a strategy for sustainable ground improvement of local scale in fast, low cost, and large data coverage.

  16. Methods for resistive switching of memristors

    DOEpatents

    Mickel, Patrick R.; James, Conrad D.; Lohn, Andrew; Marinella, Matthew; Hsia, Alexander H.

    2016-05-10

    The present invention is directed generally to resistive random-access memory (RRAM or ReRAM) devices and systems, as well as methods of employing a thermal resistive model to understand and determine switching of such devices. In particular example, the method includes generating a power-resistance measurement for the memristor device and applying an isothermal model to the power-resistance measurement in order to determine one or more parameters of the device (e.g., filament state).

  17. Electrical resistance determination of actual contact area of cold welded metal joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hordon, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Method measures the area of the bonded zone of a compression weld by observing the electrical resistance of the weld zone while the load changes from full compression until the joint ruptures under tension. The ratio of bonding force to maximum tensile load varies considerably.

  18. Permanent electrical resistivity measurements for monitoring water circulation in clayey landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gance, J.; Malet, J.-P.; Supper, R.; Sailhac, P.; Ottowitz, D.; Jochum, B.

    2016-03-01

    Landslides developed on clay-rich slopes are controlled by the soil water regime and the groundwater circulation. Spatially-distributed and high frequency observations of these hydrological processes are important for improving our understanding and prediction of landslide triggering. This work presents observed changes in electrical resistivity monitored at the Super-Sauze clayey landslide with the GEOMON 4D resistivity instrument installed permanently on-site for a period of one year. A methodological framework for processing the raw measurement is proposed. It includes the filtering of the resistivity dataset, the correction of the effects of non-hydrological factors (sensitivity of the device, sensitivity to soil temperature and fluid conductivity, presence of fissures in the topsoil) on the filtered resistivity values. The interpretation is based on a statistical analysis to define possible relationships between the rainfall characteristics, the soil hydrological observations and the soil electrical resistivity response. During the monitoring period, no significant relationships between the electrical response and the measured hydrological parameters are evidenced. We discuss the limitations of the method due to the effect of heat exchange between the groundwater, the vadose zone water and the rainwater that hides the variations of resistivity due to variations of the soil water content. We demonstrate that despite the absence of hydrogeophysical information for the vadose zone, the sensitivity of electrical resistivity monitoring to temperature variations allows imaging water fluxes in the saturated zone and highlighting the existence of matrix and preferential flows that does not occur at the same time and for the same duration. We conclude on the necessity to combine electrical resistivity measurements with distributed soil temperature measurements.

  19. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.

  20. Electrical methods of determining soil moisture content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, L. F.; Schultz, F. V.; Zalusky, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    The electrical permittivity of soils is a useful indicator of soil moisture content. Two methods of determining the permittivity profile in soils are examined. A method due to Becher is found to be inapplicable to this situation. A method of Slichter, however, appears to be feasible. The results of Slichter's method are extended to the proposal of an instrument design that could measure available soil moisture profile (percent available soil moisture as a function of depth) from a surface measurement to an expected resolution of 10 to 20 cm.

  1. Effect of the nanocrystalline state and electrical resistance of Fe and Fe75Si25 powders produced by the method of high-energy ball milling on the frequency dispersion of microwave material parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, K. N.; Petrov, D. A.; Yelsukov, E. P.; Protasov, A. V.; Yurovskikh, A. S.; Yazovskikh, K. A.; Lomayeva, S. F.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the nanocrystalline state of Fe and Fe75Si25 particles and their electrical resistance on the microwave properties of composite materials that contain these particles has been investigated experimentally. The main factors that determine changes in the frequency dispersion of the permeability are the skin effect and the decrease in the internal field of anisotropy of the particles. In the case of Fe particles, the role of skin effect of prevails.

  2. Acidic Barren Slope Profiling using Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) at Ayer Hitam area Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, A. T. S.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Aziman, M.; Haimi, D. S.; Hafiz, Z. M.

    2016-04-01

    Recently, non-destructive method such as the electrical resistivity technique has become increasingly popular in engineering, environmental, mining and archeological studies nowadays. This method was popular in subsurface profiling due to its ability to replicate the images of the subsurface indirectly. The soil slope found in Batu Pahat, specifically in Ayer Hitam, is known to be problematic due to its barren condition. This location is believed to contain futile soil due to its difficulty in supporting the growth of vegetations. In the past, acidic barren slope assessment using non-destructive method was rarely being used due to several reasons related to the equipment and knowledge constraints. Hence, this study performed an electrical resistivity imaging using ABEM Terrameter LS in order to investigate the acidic barren slope conditions. Field data acquisition was based on Schlumberger and Wenner arrays while RES2DINV software was used to analyze and generate a 2-D model of the problematic subsurface profile. Based on electrical resistivity results, it was found that the acidic barren slope studied consists of two main zones representing residual soil (electrical resistivity value = 10 - 600 Ωm) and shale (electrical resistivity value = 20 - 2000 Ωm). The results of resistivity value were correlated with the physical mapping and the in situ mackintosh probe test for verification purposes. It was found that the maximum depth of the mackintosh probe test was 1.8 m due to its ground penetration limitation. However, the results of the resistivity section managed to achieve greater depth up to 40 m. Hence, the correlation between electrical resistivity and mackintosh probe results can only be performed at certain depth of the acidic barren slope profile in contrast with the physical mapping which able to define the whole section of the barren soil slope structure. Finally, a good match of electrical resistivity results calibrated with mackintosh and physical

  3. Monitoring an underground steam injection process using electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.; Owen, E.; Chesnut, D. ); LaBrecque, D. )

    1993-01-01

    We used electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to map the subsurface distribution of a steam flood as a function of time as part of a prototype environmental restoration process performed by the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project. We evaluated the capability of ERT to monitor changes in the soil resistivity during the steam injection process using a dipole-dipole measurement technique to measure the bulk electrical resistivity distribution in the soil mass. The injected steam caused changes in the soil's resistivity because the steam displaced some of the native pore water, increased the pore water and soil temperatures and changed the ionic content of the pore water. We could detect the effects of steam invasion by mapping changes in the soil resistivity as a function of space and time. The ERT tomographs are compared with induction well logs, formation temperature logs and lithologic logs. These comparisons suggest that the ERT tomographs mapped the formation regions invaded by the steam flood. The data also suggest that steam invasion was limited in vertical extent to a gravel horizon at depth of approximately 43 m. The tomographs show that with time, the steam invasion zone extended laterally to all areas monitored by the ERT technique.

  4. Electrical resistance tomography used to monitor subsurface steam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.; Owen, E.; Chesnut, D.; LaBrecque, D.

    1992-04-01

    We used electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to map the subsurface distribution of a steam flood as function of time as part of a prototype environmental restoration process performed by the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project. We evaluated the capability of ERT to monitor changes in the soil resistivity during the steam injection process using a dipole-dipole measurement technique to measure the bulk electrical resistivity distribution in the soil mass. The injected steam caused changes in the soil`s resistivity because the steam displaced some of the native pore water, increased the pore water and soil temperatures and changed the ionic content of the pore water. We could detect the effects of steam invasion by mapping changes in the soil resistivity as a function of space and time. The ERT tomographs are compared with induction well logs, formation temperature logs and lithologic logs. These comparisons suggest that the ERT tomographs mapped the formation regions invaded by the steam flood. The data also suggest that steam invasion was limited in vertical extent to a gravel horizon at depth of approximately 43 m. The tomographs show that with time, the steam invasion zone extended laterally to all areas monitored by the ERT technique.

  5. Characterization of fracture aperture field heterogeneity by electrical resistance measurement.

    PubMed

    Boschan, A; Ippolito, I; Chertcoff, R; Hulin, J P; Auradou, H

    2011-04-01

    We use electrical resistance measurements to characterize the aperture field in a rough fracture. This is done by performing displacement experiments using two miscible fluids of different electrical resistivity and monitoring the time variation of the overall fracture resistance. Two fractures have been used: their complementary rough walls are identical but have different relative shear displacements which create "channel" or "barrier" structures in the aperture field, respectively parallel or perpendicular to the mean flow velocity U(→). In the "channel" geometry, the resistance displays an initial linear variation followed by a tail part which reflects the velocity contrast between slow and fast flow channels. In the "barrier" geometry, a change in the slope between two linear zones suggests the existence of domains of different characteristic aperture along the fracture. These variations are well reproduced analytically and numerically using simple flow models. For each geometry, we present then a data inversion procedure that allows one to extract the key features of the heterogeneity from the resistance measurement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

    2002-05-09

    Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

  7. A unique data acquisition system for electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Zonge, K.

    1996-01-04

    Unique capabilities are needed in instrumentation used for acquiring data to do electrical resistance tomography (ERT). A data acquisition system is described which has a good combination of the required capabilities and yet is field rugged and user friendly. The system is a multichannel detector for high data rates, can operate over a wide range of load conditions, will measure both in phase and quadrature resistance at frequencies between 0.0007 Hz and 8 kHz. The system has been used in both the field and laboratory to collect data with a typical accuracy between 1 and 10%.

  8. Calibration of EMI data based on different electrical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüsch, Anne-Kathrin; Werban, Ulrike; Dietrich, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The advantages of the electromagnetic induction (EMI)-method have been known to soil scientists for many years. Thus it is used for many soil investigations, ranging from salinity measurements over water content monitoring to classification of different soil types. There are several companies that provide instruments for each type of investigation. However, a major disadvantage of the method is that measurements obtained under different conditions (e.g. with different instruments, or at different times or field sites) are not easily comparable. Data values yielded when using the instruments are not absolute, which is an important prerequisite for the correct application of EMI, especially at the landscape scale. Furthermore drifts can occur, potentially caused by weather conditions or instrument errors and subsequently give results with variations in conductivities, which are not actually reflective of actual test results. With the help of reference lines and repeated measurements, drifts can be detected and eliminated. Different measurements (spatial and temporal) are more comparable, but the final corrected values are still not absolute. The best solution that allows for absolute values to be obtained is to calibrate the EMI-Data with the help of a known conductivity from other electrical methods. In a series of test measurements, we studied which electrical method is most feasible for a calibration of EMI-data. The chosen field site is situated at the floodplain of the river Mulde in Saxony (Germany). We chose a profile 100 meters in length which is very heterogeneous and crosses a buried back water channel. Results show a significant variance of conductivities. Several EMI-instruments were tested. Among these are EM38DD and EM31 devices from Geonics. These instruments are capable of investigating the subsurface to a depth of up to six meters. For the calibration process, we chose electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES), and

  9. Electrical Resistivity of an Elasmobranch's Ampullary Jelly in Varying Electric and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Brandon; Hughes, Mary E.

    2001-03-01

    The ampullae of Lorenzini are believed to function as the electroreceptive organs in elasmobranch fishes. Though the entire excised organs have been the subject of electrical transport measurements, the jelly that fills the ampullae -- composed primarily of glycoproteins with proteins and dissolved salts -- has received less scrutiny. The specific electromagnetic properties of the jelly contribute to electroreception, and we hope to supply useful parameters to modeling efforts via precise electrical characterization. We report preliminary resistivity measurements from ampullary jelly removed, post mortem, from an adult triaenodon obesus (white-tip reef shark). We present data over a broad range of applied electrical currents. We also present data of the resistivity as a function of applied magnetic field strength.

  10. Detecting leaks in hydrocarbon storage tanks using electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; LaBrecque, D.; Binley, A.

    1995-04-03

    Large volumes of hydrocarbons are stored worldwide in surface and underground tanks. It is well documented [1] that all too often these tanks are found to leak, resulting in not only a loss of stored inventory but, more importantly, contamination to soil and groundwater. Two field experiments are reported herein to evaluate the utility of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) for detecting and locating leaks as well as delineating any resulting plumes emanating from steel underground storage tanks (UST). Current leak detection methods for single shell tanks require careful inventory monitoring, usually from liquid level sensors within the tank, or placement of chemical sensors in the soil under and around the tank. Liquid level sensors can signal a leak but are limited in sensitivity and, of course, give no information about the location or the leak or the distribution of the resulting plume. External sensors are expensive to retrofit and must be very densely spaced to assure reliable detection, especially in heterogeneous soils. The rational for using subsurface tomography is that it may have none of these shortcomings.

  11. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R L; Daily, W; Ramirez, A

    1999-03-22

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) using multiple electrodes installed in boreholes has been shown to be useful for both site characterization and process monitoring. In some cases, however, installing multiple downhole electrodes is too costly (e.g., deep targets) or risky (e.g., contaminated sites). For these cases we have examined the possibility of using the steel casings of existing boreholes as electrodes. The first case we investigated used an array of steel casings as electrodes. This results in very few data and thus requires additional constraints to limit the domain of possible inverse solutions. Simulations indicate that the spatial resolution and sensitivity are understandably low but it is possible to coarsely map the lateral extent of subsurface processes such as steam floods. A hybrid case uses traditional point electrode arrays combined with long-conductor electrodes (steel casings). Although this arrangement provides more data, in many cases it results in poor reconstructions of test targets. Results indicate that this method may hold promise for low resolution imaging where steel casings can be used as electrodes.

  12. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as long electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W; Newmark, R L; Ramirez, A

    1999-07-20

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) using multiple electrodes installed in boreholes has been shown to be useful for both site characterization and process monitoring. In some cases, however, installing multiple downhole electrodes is too costly (e.g., deep targets) or risky (e.g., contaminated sites). For these cases we have examined the possibility of using the steel casings of existing boreholes as electrodes. Several possibilities can be considered. The first case we investigated uses an array of steel casings as electrodes. This results in very few data and thus requires additional constraints to limit the domain of possible inverse solutions. Simulations indicate that the spatial resolution and sensitivity are understandably low but it is possible to coarsely map the lateral extent of subsurface processes such as steam floods. The second case uses an array of traditional point borehole electrodes combined with long-conductor electrodes (steel casings). Although this arrangement provides more data, in many cases it results in poor reconstructions of test targets. Results indicate that this method may hold promise for low resolution imaging where steel casings can be used as electrodes but the merits depend strongly on details of each application. Field tests using these configurations are currently being conducted.

  13. Waste disposal mapping with electrical resistivity tomography case: Leuwigajah landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanti, Erisha; Ardi, Ahmad Puji; Almunziri, Muaz; Xanggam, Zael Yahd; Eleazar, Adino; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    Leuwigajah landfill as administrative is located between district of Bandung and Cimahi citythat has an environmental and social problem that caused aquifer contamination due to the big amount of waste from Bandung city, Cimahi and Bandung regency. It is occupied in abandoned andesite mine site with an area of about 25 hectare. The aim of this research is to map the geology structure and to study the leachate towards aquifer layer below Leuwigajah landfill. Here, we present the study of Leuwigajah landfill subsurface using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). ERT is one of the most promising prospecting techniques mainly concerning its effective contribution to resolve several environmental problems, was applied for the geophysical modeling. ERT is a robust imaging method the theory and implementation of which are well documented in geophysical research literature. The geological setting comprises clayed weathered layer, fractured andesitic dike. Due to the above-mentioned geological singularity and in the light of the requirement for an environmentally safe construction of the landfill, an ERT survey was carried out with dipole-dipole array, 78 m of acquisition line and 6 m of electrode spacing. The model consists of 4 layers below the Leuwigajah landfill and andesitic fracture until depth of 18.7 m below the surface.

  14. Students' understanding of direct current resistive electrical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Paula Vetter; Beichner, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Both high school and university students' reasoning regarding direct current resistive electric circuits often differ from the accepted explanations. At present, there are no standard diagnostic tests on electric circuits. Two versions of a diagnostic instrument were developed, each consisting of 29 questions. The information provided by this test can provide instructors with a way of evaluating the progress and conceptual difficulties of their students. The analysis indicates that students, especially females, tend to hold multiple misconceptions, even after instruction. During interviews, the idea that the battery is a constant source of current was used most often in answering the questions. Students tended to focus on the current in solving problems and to confuse terms, often assigning the properties of current to voltage and/or resistance.

  15. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1971-01-01

    Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials, including 304L stainless steel Rigimesh, 304L stainless steel sintered spherical powders, and OFHC sintered spherical powders at different porosities and temperatures are reported and correlated. It was found that the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity can be related to the solid material properties and the porosity of the porous matrix regardless of the matrix structure. It was also found that the Wiedermann-Franz-Lorenz relationship is valid for the porous materials under consideration. For high conductivity materials, the Lorenz constant and the lattice component of conductivity depend on the material and are independent of the porosity. For low conductivity, the lattice component depends on the porosity as well.

  16. Using electrical resistivity tomography to differentiate sapwood from heartwood: application to conifers.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Adrien; Ostergaard, Kasper T; Lenkopane, Mothei; Fan, Junliang; Lockington, David A

    2013-02-01

    Estimating sapwood area is one of the main sources of error when upscaling point scale sap flow measurements to whole-tree water use. In this study, the potential use of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to determine the sapwood-heartwood (SW-HW) boundary is investigated for Pinus elliottii Engelm var. elliottii × Pinus caribaea Morelet var. hondurensis growing in a subtropical climate. Specifically, this study investigates: (i) how electrical resistivity is correlated to either wood moisture content, or electrolyte concentration, or both, and (ii) how the SW-HW boundary is defined in terms of electrical resistivity. Tree cross-sections at breast height are analysed using ERT before being felled and the cross-section surface sampled for analysis of major electrolyte concentrations, wood moisture content and density. Electrical resistivity tomography results show patterns with high resistivities occurring in the inner part of the cross-section, with much lower values towards the outside. The high-resistivity areas were generally smaller than the low-resistivity areas. A comparison between ERT and actual SW area measured after felling shows a slope of the linear regression close to unity (=0.96) with a large spread of values (R(2) = 0.56) mostly due to uncertainties in ERT. Electrolyte concentrations along sampled radial transects (cardinal directions) generally showed no trend from the centre of the tree to the bark. Wood moisture content and density show comparable trends that could explain the resistivity patterns. While this study indicates the potential for application of ERT for estimating SW area, it shows that there remains a need for refinement in locating the SW-HW boundary (e.g., by improvement of the inversion method, or perhaps electrode density) in order to increase the robustness of the method.

  17. Electrical resistivity of V-Cr-Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Gubbi, A.N.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-04-01

    Room temperature electrical resistivity measurements have been performed on vanadium alloys containing 3-6%Cr and 3-6%Ti in order to evaluate the microstructural stability of these alloys. A nonlinear dependence on Cr and Ti concentration was observed, which suggests that either short range ordering or solute precipitation (perhaps in concert with interstitial solute clustering) has occurred in V-6Cr-6Ti.

  18. Negative differential electrical resistance of a rotational organic nanomotor

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Hatef; Sangtarash, Sara; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Sparks, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Summary A robust, nanoelectromechanical switch is proposed based upon an asymmetric pendant moiety anchored to an organic backbone between two C60 fullerenes, which in turn are connected to gold electrodes. Ab initio density functional calculations are used to demonstrate that an electric field induces rotation of the pendant group, leading to a nonlinear current–voltage relation. The nonlinearity is strong enough to lead to negative differential resistance at modest source–drain voltages. PMID:26734524

  19. Evaluation of physico-mechanical properties of clayey soils using electrical resistivity imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibria, Golam

    Resistivity imaging (RI) is a promising approach to obtaining continuous profile of soil subsurface. This method offers simple technique to identify moisture variation and heterogeneity of the investigated area. However, at present, only qualitative information of subsurface can be obtained using RI. A study on the quantification of geotechnical properties has become important for rigorous use of this method in the evaluation of geohazard potential and construction quality control of landfill liner system. Several studies have been performed to describe electrical resistivity of soil as a function of pore fluid conductivity and surface conductance. However, characterization tests on pore water and surface charge are not typically performed in a conventional geotechnical investigation. The overall objective of this study is to develop correlations between geotechnical parameters and electrical resistivity of soil, which would provide a mean to estimate geotechnical properties from RI. As a part of the study, multiple regression analyses were conducted to develop practically applicable models correlating resistivity with influential geotechnical parameters. The soil samples considered in this study were classified as highly plastic clay (CH) and low plasticity clay (CL) according to Unified Soil Classification System (USCS). Based on the physical tests, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, kaolinite was identified as the dominant mineral with some traces of magnesium, calcium, potassium, and iron. Electrical resistivity tests were conducted on compacted clays and undisturbed samples under varied geotechnical conditions. The experimental results indicated that the degree of saturation substantially influenced electrical resistivity. Electrical resistivity decreased as much as 11 times from initial value for the increase of degree of saturation from 23 to 100% in the laboratory tests on compacted clays. In case of

  20. Complex electrical resistance tomography of a subsurface PCE plume

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W,; LeBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    A controlled experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of complex electrical resistivity tomography (CERT) for detecting and delineating free product dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. One hundred ninety liters of PCE were released at a rate of 2 liters per hour from a point 0.5 m below ground surface. The spill was conducted within a double walled tank where saturated layers of sand, bentonite and a sand/bentonite mixture were installed. Complex electrical resistance measurements were performed. Data were taken before the release, several times during, and then after the PCE was released. Magnitude and phase were measured at 1 and 64 Hz. Data from before the release were compared with those during the release for the purpose of imaging the changes in conductivity resulting from the plume. Conductivity difference tomographs showed a decrease in electrical conductivity as the DNAPL penetrated the soil. A pancake-shaped anomaly developed on the top of a bentonite layer at 2 m depth. The anomaly grew in magnitude and extent during the release and borehole television surveys data confirmed the anomaly to be free-product PCE whose downward migration was stopped by the low permeability clay. The tomographs clearly delineated the plume as a resistive anomaly.

  1. High pressure and temperature electrical resistivity of iron and implications for planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Liwei; Seagle, Christopher; Fei, Yingwei; Shahar, Anat

    2013-01-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements of polycrystalline iron have been performed at 5, 7, and 15 GPa and in the temperature range 293-2200 K by employing a four-wired method. The kinks in electrical resistivity associated with solid iron phase transitions and the solid to liquid transition were clearly observed upon increasing temperature. Geometry corrections due to volume variations with pressure and temperature were applied to the entire data set. High pressure and temperature thermal conductivity were calculated by fitting resistivity data through the Wiedemann-Franz law. The temperature dependences of electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity for α, γ, and ɛ solid iron have been determined at high-pressure conditions. Our study provides the first experimental constraint on the heat flux conducted at Mercury's outmost core, estimated to be 0.29-0.36 TW, assuming an adiabatic core. Extrapolations of our data to Martian outer core conditions yield a series of heat transport parameters (e.g., electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and heat flux), which are in reasonable comparison with various geophysical estimates.

  2. High pressure and temperature electrical resistivity of iron and implications for planetary cores (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, L.; Seagle, C. T.; Fei, Y.; Shahar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements of polycrystalline iron have been performed at 5, 7 and 15 GPa and in the temperature range 293-2200 K by employing a four-wired method. The kinks in electrical resistivity associated with solid iron phase transitions and the solid to liquid transition were clearly observed upon increasing temperature. Geometry corrections due to volume variations with pressure and temperature were applied to the entire data set. High pressure and temperature thermal conductivity were calculated by fitting resistivity data through the Wiedemann-Franz law. The temperature dependences of electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity for α, γ and ɛ solid iron have been determined at high pressure conditions. Our study provides the first experimental constraint on the heat flux conducted at Mercury's outmost core, estimated to be 0.29-0.36 TW, assuming an adiabatic core. Extrapolations of our data to Martian outer core conditions yield a series of heat transport parameters (eg. electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and heat flux), which are in reasonable comparison with various geophysical estimates.

  3. Tuning electrical conduction along endothelial tubes of resistance arteries through Ca2+-activated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Behringer, Erik J.; Segal., Steven S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Electrical conduction through gap junction channels between endothelial cells of resistance vessels is integral to blood flow control. Small and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (SKCa/IKCa) initiate electrical signals in endothelial cells but it is unknown whether SKCa/IKCa activation alters signal transmission along the endothelium. Objective We tested the hypothesis that SKCa/IKCa activity regulates electrical conduction along the endothelium of resistance vessels. Methods and Results Freshly isolated endothelial cell tubes (60 μm wide; 1–3mm long; cell length, ~35 μm) from mouse skeletal muscle feed (superior epigastric) arteries were studied using dual intracellular microelectrodes. Current was injected (±0.1–3 nA) at Site 1 while recording membrane potential (Vm) at Site 2 (separation distance = 50–2000 μm). SKCa/IKCa activation (NS309, 1 μmol/L) reduced the change in Vm along endothelial cell tubes by ≥50% and shortened the electrical length constant (λ) from 1380 to 850 μm (P<0.05) while intercellular dye transfer (propidium iodide) was maintained. Activating SKCa/IKCa with acetylcholine or SKA-31 also reduced electrical conduction. These effects of SKCa/IKCa activation persisted when hyperpolarization (>30 mV) was prevented with 60 mM [K+]o. Conversely, blocking SKCa/IKCa (apamin + charybdotoxin) depolarized cells by ~10 mV and enhanced electrical conduction (i.e., changes in Vm) by ~30% (P<0.05). Conclusions These findings illustrate a novel role for SKCa/IKCa activity in tuning electrical conduction along the endothelium of resistance vessels by governing signal dissipation through changes in membrane resistance. Voltage-insensitive ion channels can thereby tune intercellular electrical signaling independent from gap junction channels. PMID:22492531

  4. Antimicrobial resistance in campylobacter: susceptibility testing methods and resistance trends.

    PubMed

    Ge, Beilei; Wang, Fei; Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; McDermott, Patrick F

    2013-10-01

    Most Campylobacter infections are self-limiting but antimicrobial treatment (e.g., macrolides, fluoroquinolones) is necessary in severe or prolonged cases. Susceptibility testing continues to play a critical role in guiding therapy and epidemiological monitoring of resistance. The methods of choice for Campylobacter recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) are agar dilution and broth microdilution, while a disk diffusion method was recently standardized by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Macrolides, quinolones, and tetracyclines are among the common antimicrobials recommended for testing. Molecular determination of Campylobacter resistance via DNA sequencing or PCR-based methods has been performed. High levels of resistance to tetracycline and ciprofloxacin are frequently reported by many national surveillance programs, but resistance to erythromycin and gentamicin in Campylobacter jejuni remains low. Nonetheless, variations in susceptibility observed over time underscore the need for continued public health monitoring of Campylobacter resistance from humans, animals, and food.

  5. Hydrogeophysical Characterization of shallow karst using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a limestone mining area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H.; Qi, Z.; Li, X., Sr.; Ma, X.; Xue, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.

    2016-12-01

    Karst is a kind of geological phenomenon under the chemical erosion process from water to soluble rock, such as limestone, gypsum, salt rock etc. Karst is widely distributed around the world and also in southwest of China. The Guangxi area is famous as the highly degree of karstification due to long time groundwater erosion and the development of fracture network. The hydrogeological units become complex involving subsurface karst pipes, caves, eroded groove, etc. Moreover, the complex system is hard to evaluate. The karst collapse may cause many kind of disaster which will influence the human activities. Classical hydrogeological methods, such as pumping tests and tracer tests, to estimate the hydraulic conductivity distribution in an aquifer are hard to finish in some condition with large area and high resolution required. Because a large number of wells are needed, which is uncommon because of the high drilling costs. However, geophysical method is cost-effective in mapping underground structures. And geophysical imaging is highly linked with the subsurface hydrological parameters. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a widely used geophysical method in environmental and engineering applications. It detect and identify targets with different resistivity to the background by measuring the potential difference between different electric nodes. When the target has lower resistivity than the background, such as water resource, karst, evaluation of marine transgression etc., the acquired data show higher voltage corresponding to low resistivity. While when the target has higher resistivity than the background, such as empty holes, sliding surface for dry landslide and archaeological geophysics etc., the acquired data show opposite phenomenon. One can obtain the real resistivity profile of the subsurface by inverting the acquired data. We study the characterization of shallow karst using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) which is the most cost effective

  6. Evaluation of metal-nanowire electrical contacts by measuring contact end resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hongsik; Beresford, Roderic; Ha, Ryong; Choi, Heon-Jin; Shin, Hyunjung; Xu, Jimmy

    2012-06-01

    It is known, but often unappreciated, that the performance of nanowire (NW)-based electrical devices can be significantly affected by electrical contacts between electrodes and NWs, sometimes to the extent that it is really the contacts that determine the performance. To correctly understand and design NW device operation, it is thus important to carefully measure the contact resistance and evaluate the contact parameters, specific contact resistance and transfer length. A four-terminal pattern or a transmission line model (TLM) pattern has been widely used to measure contact resistance of NW devices and the TLM has been typically used to extract contact parameters of NW devices. However, the conventional method assumes that the electrical properties of semiconducting NW regions covered by a metal are not changed after electrode formation. In this study, we report that the conventional methods for contact evaluation can give rise to considerable errors because of an altered property of the NW under the electrodes. We demonstrate that more correct contact resistance can be measured from the TLM pattern rather than the four-terminal pattern and correct contact parameters including the effects of changed NW properties under electrodes can be evaluated by using the contact end resistance measurement method.

  7. Electrical resistance and transport numbers of ion-exchange membranes used in electrodialytic soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, H.K.; Ottosen, L.M.; Villumsen, A.

    1999-08-01

    Electrodialytic soil remediation is a recently developed method to decontaminate heavy metal polluted soil using ion-exchange membranes. In this method one side of the ion-exchange membrane is in direct contact with the polluted soil. It is of great importance to known if this contact with the soil causes damage to the membrane. This work presents the result of transport number and electrical resistance measurements done on four sets of ion-exchange membranes (Ionics, Inc CR67 HMR412 cation-exchange membranes and Ionics, Inc AR204 SXZR anion-exchange membranes), which have been used in four different electrodialytic soil remediation experiments. The experiments showed that after the use in electrodialytic soil remediation, the ion-exchange membranes had transport numbers in the same magnitude as new membranes. The electrical resistance for six membranes did not differ from that of new membranes, whereas two membranes showed a slightly increased resistance.

  8. On the Modeling of Electrical Effects Experienced by Space Explorers During Extra Vehicular Activities: Intracorporal Currents, Resistances, and Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cela, Carlos J.; Loizos, Kyle; Lazzi, Gianluca; Hamilton, Douglas; Lee, Raphael C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has shown that space explorers engaged in Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs) may be exposed, under certain conditions, to undesired electrical currents. This work focuses on determining whether these undesired induced electrical currents could be responsible for involuntary neuromuscular activity in the subjects, possibly caused by either large diameter peripheral nerve activation or reflex activity from cutaneous afferent stimulation. An efficient multiresolution variant of the admittance method along with a millimeter-resolution model of a male human body were used to calculate induced electric fields, resistance between contact electrodes used to simulate the potential exposure condition, and currents induced in the human body model. Results show that, under realistic exposure conditions using a 15V source, current density magnitudes and total current injected are well above previously reported startle reaction thresholds. This indicates that, under the considered conditions, the subjects could experience involuntary motor response.

  9. Rolling resistance of electric vehicle tires from track tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.; Slavik, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Special low-rolling-resistance tires were made for DOE's ETV-1 electric vehicle. Tests were conducted on these tires and on a set of standard commercial automotive tires to determine the rolling resistance as a function of time during both constant-speed tires and SAE J227a driving cycle tests. The tests were conducted on a test track at ambient temperatures that ranged from 15 to 32 C (59 to 89 F) and with tire pressures of 207 to 276 kPa (30 to 40 psi). At a contained-air temperature of 38 C (100 F) and a pressure of 207 kPa (30 psi) the rolling resistances of the electric vehicle tires and the standard commercial tires, respectively, were 0.0102 and 0.0088 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight. At a contained-air temperature of 38 C (100 F) and a pressure of 276 kPa (40 psi) the rolling resistances were 0.009 and 0.0074 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight, respectively.

  10. Laboratory Electrical Resistivity Studies on Cement Stabilized Soil

    PubMed Central

    Lokesh, K. N.; Jacob, Jinu Mary

    2017-01-01

    Electrical resistivity measurement of freshly prepared uncured and cured soil-cement materials is done and the correlations between the factors controlling the performance of soil-cement and electrical resistivity are discussed in this paper. Conventional quality control of soil-cement quite often involves wastage of a lot of material, if it does not meet the strength criteria. In this study, it is observed that, in soil-cement, resistivity follows a similar trend as unconfined compressive strength, with increase in cement content and time of curing. Quantitative relations developed for predicting 7-day strength of soil-cement mix, using resistivity of the soil-cement samples at freshly prepared state, after 1-hour curing help to decide whether the soil-cement mix meets the desired strength and performance criteria. This offers the option of the soil-cement mix to be upgraded (possibly with additional cement) in its fresh state itself, if it does not fulfil the performance criteria, rather than wasting the material after hardening. PMID:28540364

  11. Detecting Cracks in Ceramic Matrix Composites by Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90o fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  12. Detecting Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90 deg fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  13. Laboratory and Field Measurements of Electrical Resistivity to Determine Saturation and Detect Fractures in a Heated Rock Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J J; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

    2001-04-03

    Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of intact and fractured representative geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to infer saturation and fracture location in a large-scale field test. Measurements were performed to simulate test conditions with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures to 145 C. Measurements presented are a first step toward making the search for fractures using electrical methods quantitatively. Intact samples showed a gradual resistivity increase when pore pressure was decreased below the phase-boundary pressure of free water, while fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling. The resistivity change is greatest for samples with the most exposed surface area. Analysis of a field test provided the opportunity to evaluate fracture detection using electrical methods at a large scale. Interpretation of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) images of resistivity contrasts, aided by laboratory derived resistivity-saturation-temperature relationships, indicates that dynamic saturation changes in a heated rock mass are observable and that fractures experiencing drying or resaturation can be identified. The same techniques can be used to locate fractures in geothermal reservoirs using electrical field methods.

  14. Hydrogeophysical estimation of groundwater tracer concentrations from field-scale electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Kamini

    This research has established a systematic procedure to accurately track the migration of a groundwater solute tracer using cross-well electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). There are three contributions in this dissertation. First, based on original experimental data collected for this project at the Massachusetts Military Reservation, it is shown that the migration of a saline tracer was readily detected in 3D using ERT, and that the mass, center of mass, and spatial variance of the imaged tracer plume were estimated from modified moment analysis of the electrical resistivity tomograms. Conversion of the inverted electrical resistivities to solute concentrations via Archie's law resulted in significant underestimation of tracer mass and greater apparent dispersion than that suggested by reasonable advection-dispersion simulations. However, the center of mass estimated from ERT inversions was accurately tracked when compared to 3D transport simulation. The second contribution presented in this dissertation is to reveal how the spatially variable resolution of ERT affects electrical resistivity estimates and local solute concentrations. Underestimated tracer mass from ERT and overestimated tracer plume dispersion is shown to be an effect of two properties of ERT surveys: (1) reduced measurement sensitivity to electrical resistivity values with distance from the electrodes and, (2) spatial smoothing (regularization) resulting from tomographic inversion. Analyses suggest that no single petrophysical relation, such as Archie's law, exists between concentration and electrical resistivity. The "correct" petrophysical model must vary both in space and time. Finding this non-stationary petrophysical model is the third contribution of this research. A method is demonstrated that employs numerical simulation of both solute transport and electrical flow to create local non-stationary linear relations between resistivities and tracer concentrations. These relations are used

  15. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2008-09-02

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  16. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2006-03-07

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  17. Measurement of the electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Borup, Kasper A; Toberer, Eric S; Zoltan, Leslie D; Nakatsukasa, George; Errico, Michael; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Iversen, Bo B; Snyder, G Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    The implementation of the van der Pauw (VDP) technique for combined high temperature measurement of the electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient is described. The VDP method is convenient for use since it accepts sample geometries compatible with other measurements. The technique is simple to use and can be used with samples showing a broad range of shapes and physical properties, from near insulators to metals. Three instruments utilizing the VDP method for measurement of heavily doped semiconductors, such as thermoelectrics, are discussed.

  18. Measurement of the electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borup, Kasper A.; Toberer, Eric S.; Zoltan, Leslie D.; Nakatsukasa, George; Errico, Michael; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Iversen, Bo B.; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    The implementation of the van der Pauw (VDP) technique for combined high temperature measurement of the electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient is described. The VDP method is convenient for use since it accepts sample geometries compatible with other measurements. The technique is simple to use and can be used with samples showing a broad range of shapes and physical properties, from near insulators to metals. Three instruments utilizing the VDP method for measurement of heavily doped semiconductors, such as thermoelectrics, are discussed.

  19. Post-remediation evaluation of a LNAPL site using electrical resistivity imaging.

    PubMed

    Halihan, Todd; Paxton, Stanley; Graham, Ivy; Fenstemaker, Thomas; Riley, Matt

    2005-04-01

    Present understanding of the earth's subsurface is most often derived from samples at discrete points (wells) and interpolations or models that interpret the space between these points. Electrical resistivity imaging techniques have produced an improved capability to map contaminants (especially NAPLs--NonAqueous Phase Liquids) away from traditional wells using actual field data. Electrical resistivity image data, confirmed by drilling, have demonstrated that LNAPL (Light NAPL--less dense than water, such as gasoline) contaminants exist outside of a delineated and remediated area in Golden, Oklahoma. The data also demonstrate that LNAPL exists between monitoring and remediation wells which indicate low contaminant levels when sampled. Additionally, the electrical images provided the drilling location with the highest concentration of hydrocarbon ever found on the site, even after two phases of remediation work had been performed, although the sampling protocols varied. The results indicate that current methods of post-remediation site characterization are inadequate for complete site characterization.

  20. Electrical resistivity structure of the upper mantle in the Southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, H.; Seama, N.; Matsuno, T.; Shibata, Y.; Kimura, M.; Nogi, Y.; Okino, K.

    2012-12-01

    We show a 2-D electrical resistivity structure of the upper mantle in the Southern Mariana Trough. The Mariana Trough is an active back-arc basin in which the seafloor spreading has occurred. In the southern region of the Mariana Trough, the seafloor spreading rate is 35-45 km/Myr at present (Kato et al., 2003) that is slow, but there are characteristics of the fast spreading ridge such as an axial topographic high (Martinez et al., 2000) and a nearly constant low mantle Bouguer anomaly along the spreading axis suggesting high magmatic activity with a sheet-like mantle upwelling under the spreading axis (Kitada et al., 2006). We carried out an electromagnetic experiment along a ~120 km length profile across the spreading axis to estimate an electrical resistivity structure, and hence the physical property like temperature, water and melt content in the upper mantle. The observation was made using ten Ocean Bottom Electro-Magnetometers (OBEMs) from August to November in 2010. The data was recorded for ~85 days in two OBEMs and for ~60 days in the rest of the OBEMs. Successfully, eight OBEMs recorded time-variations of the electric and magnetic fields and two OBEMs recorded only those of the magnetic field. The magnetotelluric (MT) method is a base for the data analysis. We carried out the time-series data analysis to estimate the MT responses and correct topographic distortions in the MT responses. We have basically performed a smooth model inversion analysis using the processed MT responses to estimate a minimum electrical resistivity structure, and also have considered a prior constraint in the inversion analysis for the subducted slab inferred from a seismic research (Gudmundsson and Sambridge, 1998). The obtained 2-D electrical resistivity structure shows an asymmetry about the spreading center. The trenchward side shows higher resistivity (~300 Ohm-m), while the opposite side (the west side) shows that intermediate resistivity (~100 Ohm-m) with ~40 km thickness

  1. Categorical modeling on electrical anomaly of room-and-pillar coal mine fires and application for field electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wujun; Wang, Yanming; Shao, Zhenlu

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of fire area delineation in coalfield with electrical prospecting, the categorical geoelectric models of coal fires are established according to geological and mining conditions. The room-and-pillar coal mine fires are divided into three types which are coal seam fire, goaf fire and subsidence area fire, respectively, and forward electrical simulations and inversion analysis of each type of coal fire are implemented. Simulation results show that the resistance anomalies of goaf fires exist around one and a half to two times higher than background field, in contrast, coal seam and subsidence area fires performance low resistivity response which are roughly half to two-third of background field resistivity, respectively. Identification of different fire types and delineation of coal fire areas are further presented. The inversion results which are validated by borehole survey prove that the presented method could eliminate the omission of coal fires with high resistance anomaly and provide a novel reference for fire extinguishing in the future.

  2. Electrical resistivity tomography to delineate greenhouse soil variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Amato, M.; Bitella, G.; Bochicchio, R.

    2013-03-01

    Appropriate management of soil spatial variability is an important tool for optimizing farming inputs, with the result of yield increase and reduction of the environmental impact in field crops. Under greenhouses, several factors such as non-uniform irrigation and localized soil compaction can severely affect yield and quality. Additionally, if soil spatial variability is not taken into account, yield deficiencies are often compensated by extra-volumes of crop inputs; as a result, over-irrigation and overfertilization in some parts of the field may occur. Technology for spatially sound management of greenhouse crops is therefore needed to increase yield and quality and to address sustainability. In this experiment, 2D-electrical resistivity tomography was used as an exploratory tool to characterize greenhouse soil variability and its relations to wild rocket yield. Soil resistivity well matched biomass variation (R2=0.70), and was linked to differences in soil bulk density (R2=0.90), and clay content (R2=0.77). Electrical resistivity tomography shows a great potential in horticulture where there is a growing demand of sustainability coupled with the necessity of stabilizing yield and product quality.

  3. Cyclic electric field stress on bipolar resistive switching devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, A.; Acha, C.

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the effects of accumulating cyclic electrical pulses of increasing amplitude on the non-volatile resistance state of interfaces made by sputtering a metal (Au, Pt) on top of the surface of a cuprate superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ. We have analyzed the influence of the number of applied pulses N on the relative amplitude of the remnant resistance change between the high (RH) and the low (RL) state [(α=(RH-RL)/RL] at different temperatures (T). We show that the critical voltage (Vc) needed to produce a resistive switching (RS, i.e., α >0) decreases with increasing N or T. We also find a power law relation between the voltage of the pulses and the number of pulses Nα0 required to produce a RS of α =α0. This relation remains very similar to the Basquin equation used to describe the stress-fatigue lifetime curves in mechanical tests. This points out to the similarity between the physics of the RS, associated with the diffusion of oxygen vacancies induced by electrical pulses, and the propagation of defects in materials subjected to repeated mechanical stress.

  4. A higher dimensional theory of electrical contact resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. Y.; Tang, Wilkin

    2009-06-01

    The electrical contact resistance is computed for a local constriction of finite length and finite transverse dimension in a conducting current channel. Conformal mapping is used for a rectangular current channel, and an electrostatic code is used for a cylindrical current channel. The connecting bridge, which models a local electrical contact, is assumed to be made of the same conducting material as the main current channel. Very simple analytic scaling laws for the contact resistance are constructed for a wide range of geometrical aspect ratios between the main current channel and its connecting bridge, which may assume a rectangular shape (for Cartesian channel), and a cylindrical or funnel shape (for cylindrical channel). These scaling laws have been confirmed by spot checks with numerical code results. They are generalizations of the classical theory of Holm and Timsit on the contact resistance of the "a-spot," defined as a small circular area of zero thickness through which current can flow. Potential applications and extensions of the theory are indicated.

  5. The study of mudrocks resistivity in Northwestern Peninsula Malaysia using electrical resistivity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisham, Hazrul; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; Jia, Teoh Ying

    2017-07-01

    Mudrock is a type of sedimentary rock whose original constituents are clays and muds. Mudrocks are fine grained siliciclastic which include mudstone and claystone depending on the grain size. The colour of mudstone is a function of its minerology content and geochemistry processes. One common sedimentary structure of mudrocks is lamination due to variations in grain size and composition changes. The importance of mudrocks is as a mixture for cement and to produce brick used for building structure. This research emphasizes on the resistivity value of mudrocks; claystone and mudstone which exist in northwestern of Peninsula Malaysia. Mudstone of Kubang Pasu Formation, red mudstone and grey mudstone of Chepor Member and claystone of Semanggol Formation were chose as the study area as each of the mudrock was formed in a different environmental condition. Electrical resistivity survey was conducted on top of the outcrops using Wenner - Schlumberger array with 1.5 m and 1 m electrode spacing with respect to localities. The data was processed using Res2Dinv software to get the inversion model resistivity and the results were imported to Surfer10 software for labelling purposes. The mudstone resistivity value of Kubang Pasu Formation formed by depositional of calm water gives resistivity value from 20 - 120 Ωm. The red mudstone of Chepor Member formed at high oxidation environment gives resistivity value of 15 - 100 Ωm contrast to grey mudstone which formed under low oxidizing condition gives 120 - 500 Ωm resistivity value. The claystone of Semanggol Formation formed from shallow depositional environment gives resistivity value from 400 - 1000 Ωm. As a conclusion, electrical resistivity survey was successfully applied in differentiating the type of mudrocks. Also, mudrocks formed from different depositional environment gives different values of resistivity.

  6. Electrical and capacitive methods for detecting degradation in wire insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Robert T.

    Motivated by a need within the aerospace industry to detect and characterize degradation in the insulation of onboard wires, this thesis reports testing of several extant methods and development of novel capacitive sensors. This work focuses on measuring the electrical parameters resistance and capacitance that are directly related to the material parameters conductivity and permittivity, respectively, of the insulation. It is shown that the measured electrical parameters successfully indicate degradation in the wire insulation. Insulation resistance tests were performed on 17 wire samples, removed from various locations on a retired aircraft, and compared with those conducted on pristine wire samples, in order to assess any change in conductivity exhibited by degraded insulation. Timed resistance tests were also performed to determine the dielectric absorption of the insulation. Curved patch-electrode sensors were applied in order to measure the capacitance and dissipation factor of the same wires. Results from the resistive and capacitive tests both identified wire samples that were apparently significantly degraded, as indicated qualitatively by visual inspection. Further, a novel cylindrical interdigital capacitive sensor was developed. The interdigital sensor is designed with the goal of achieving a good signal-to-noise ratio, the lowest instrument error possible at 1 MHz, full circumferential coverage of the wire, and the ability to adjust the penetration depth of the electric field into the insulation layer by adjusting the separation of the sensor digits. With the aim, ultimately, of quantitative measurement of insulation complex permittivity, a numerical model was developed using a cylindrical Green's function and the Method of Moments to calculate theoretically the capacitance of the interdigital sensor. Benchmark experiments were carried out on large-scale dielectric-coated conductive cylinders to test the validity of the model. Experimental results

  7. Electrical resistivity of some Zintl phase and the precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, L.

    1990-09-21

    Resistivity measurements have been performed for electric characterization of the compounds Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} and Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}Cl, both with the Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3} structure type, along with Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3} and Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}F, both with the {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} structure type. These measurements were taken as a function of temperature using the four probe method on pressed polycrystalline pellets of the compounds. A sealed apparatus was developed for containing these air-sensitive compounds throughout the experiments. By a simple electron count, one extra electron in both Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} and Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3} should occupy a conduction band, giving these compounds a metallic character. In the cases of Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}Cl and Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}F, the extra electron should bond to the halide, both filling the valence band and giving rise to semiconducting character. Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}, Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}F, and Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}Cl were found to comply with the electron count prediction. Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}, however, was found to be a semiconductor (E{sub g} = 0.30 eV) with a larger band gap than its corresponding chloride (E{sub g} = 0.09 eV).

  8. Application of electrical resistivity tomography technique for investigation of landslides: a case from Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drahor, Mahmut G.; Göktürkler, Gökhan; Berge, Meriç A.; Kurtulmuş, T. Özgür

    2006-05-01

    Electrical resistivity imaging is a widely used tool in near surface geophysical surveys for investigation of various geological, environmental and engineering problems including landslide. In this study, an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) survey was conducted in a landslide area, located in the Söke district of Aydın, Turkey. In 2003, the Neogene-aged units on the slope next to a newly built school building became unstable due to an excavation work and moved after a heavy rainfall. The resulting landslide partly covered the school. The authors carried out a 2-D resistivity survey along three profiles over the landslide mass using a Wenner configuration. It yielded useful information about the geometry and characteristics of the landslide. In addition, a 2-D synthetic resistivity modelling study was carried out to understand the response of the resistivity method to a landslide problem before the field surveys. Eight boreholes were also drilled in the landslide area. Both the drilling and resistivity results indicated the presence of a fault in the site. Also, the resistivity data from the line measured along the axis of the landslide revealed the surface of rupture.

  9. Electrical Resistivity Tomography in the characterisation of wetting patterns of historical masonry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-González, Laura; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Ortiz de Cosca, Raquel Otero; García-Morales, Soledad

    2016-04-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a geophysical technique widely used to identify subsurface structures based on electrical resistivity measurements made at the surface. In recent years this technique has been used for surveying historic buildings and characterise the subsurface of walls by using non-invasive EKG electrodes. This methods is used to locate wet areas based on the lower electrical resistivity wet materials have in relation to dry ones. A good knowledge of the wetting patterns of historic buildings during, for example, rainfalls is crucial to understand the decay processes that take place in the building and plan interventions. This paper presents results of transects of Electric Resistivity Tomography of walls of the Monastery of Santa Maria de Mave (Palencia, Spain), a 9th century Romanesque building, during rainfall. ERT transects were performed with a GeoTom device (Geolog2000) in areas with and without buttresses to understand how this architectural detail affected the wetting dynamics of the building. The ERT results were integrated with other resistivity-based techniques and Thermohygrometric survey in a GIS and showed how lower resistivity surface measurements ERT correspond with areas of higher humidity. Resistivity-based techniques measured and evaporation focal points take in the interior of the building mark the outer ground level. The highest moisture content measurements do not always correspond to the visibly most damaged areas of the wall. The consecutive ERT transects show the wall getting wetter as rainfall progresses. The comparison of the measurements obtained of a wall affected by water obtained with GIS mapping, allowed to quickly studying the development of moisture in the wall over time, which is essential for a correct diagnosis of the building. Research funded by Madrid's Regional Government project Geomateriales 2 S2013/MIT-2914

  10. Optimal Electrode Selection for Electrical Resistance Tomography in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    PubMed Central

    Escalona Galvis, Luis Waldo; Diaz-Montiel, Paulina; Venkataraman, Satchi

    2017-01-01

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) offers a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that takes advantage of the inherent electrical properties in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites for internal damage characterization. This paper investigates a method of optimum selection of sensing configurations for delamination detection in thick cross-ply laminates using ERT. Reduction in the number of sensing locations and measurements is necessary to minimize hardware and computational effort. The present work explores the use of an effective independence (EI) measure originally proposed for sensor location optimization in experimental vibration modal analysis. The EI measure is used for selecting the minimum set of resistance measurements among all possible combinations resulting from selecting sensing electrode pairs. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is applied to obtain a spectral representation of the resistance measurements in the laminate for subsequent EI based reduction to take place. The electrical potential field in a CFRP laminate is calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) applied on models for two different laminate layouts considering a set of specified delamination sizes and locations with two different sensing arrangements. The effectiveness of the EI measure in eliminating redundant electrode pairs is demonstrated by performing inverse identification of damage using the full set and the reduced set of resistance measurements. This investigation shows that the EI measure is effective for optimally selecting the electrode pairs needed for resistance measurements in ERT based damage detection. PMID:28772485

  11. Optimal Electrode Selection for Electrical Resistance Tomography in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Escalona Galvis, Luis Waldo; Diaz-Montiel, Paulina; Venkataraman, Satchi

    2017-02-04

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) offers a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that takes advantage of the inherent electrical properties in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites for internal damage characterization. This paper investigates a method of optimum selection of sensing configurations for delamination detection in thick cross-ply laminates using ERT. Reduction in the number of sensing locations and measurements is necessary to minimize hardware and computational effort. The present work explores the use of an effective independence (EI) measure originally proposed for sensor location optimization in experimental vibration modal analysis. The EI measure is used for selecting the minimum set of resistance measurements among all possible combinations resulting from selecting sensing electrode pairs. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is applied to obtain a spectral representation of the resistance measurements in the laminate for subsequent EI based reduction to take place. The electrical potential field in a CFRP laminate is calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) applied on models for two different laminate layouts considering a set of specified delamination sizes and locations with two different sensing arrangements. The effectiveness of the EI measure in eliminating redundant electrode pairs is demonstrated by performing inverse identification of damage using the full set and the reduced set of resistance measurements. This investigation shows that the EI measure is effective for optimally selecting the electrode pairs needed for resistance measurements in ERT based damage detection.

  12. Characterization and monitoring of subsurface processes using parallel computing and electrical resistivity imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Truex, Michael J.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Marble, Justin

    2011-12-01

    This newsletter discusses recent advancement in subsurface resistivity characterization and monitoring capabilities. The BC Cribs field desiccation treatability test resistivity monitoring data is use an example to demonstrate near-real time 3D subsurface imaging capabilities. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface. An ERT data collection system consists of an array of electrodes, deployed on the ground surface or within boreholes, that are connected to a control unit which can access each electrode independently (Figure 1). A single measurement is collected by injecting current across a pair of current injection electrodes (source and sink), and measuring the resulting potential generated across a pair of potential measurement electrodes (positive and negative). An ERT data set is generated by collecting many such measurements using strategically selected current and potential electrode pairs. This data set is then processed using an inversion algorithm, which reconstructs an estimate (or image) of the electrical conductivity (i.e. the inverse of resistivity) distribution that gave rise to the measured data.

  13. EMI- data calibration using different electrical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschornack, L.; Nüsch, A.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.

    2011-12-01

    EMI-measurements were used for a wide range of soil investigations and research including water content monitoring, the derivation and classification of different soil types or measurements of salinity. Thus, the EMI-method became a common and widely accepted tool for soil scientists for many years. In addition, several companies provide different devices for a wide range of field applications and all types of investigation. However, the method suffers from a major disadvantage regarding the comparability between measurements obtained under different conditions (e.g., different measurement devices or varying weather conditions). The measured data values cannot be stated as absolute values which is a critical prerequisite for an accurate and proper application of EMI especially at larger scales (e.g., landscape scale). In addition, measurement drifts either induced from changing weather conditions or device dependent errors can provide conductivity variations which do not reflect the natural and real distribution and variability of (soil) conductivity. The use of reference lines and repeated measurements holds the potential to detect and eliminate previously unrecognized drifts in the data. That implies that different measurements (spatial and temporal separated from each other) will be more comparable but still do not provide absolute values. In this regard the best solution that allows for the derivation of absolute conductivity values is to calibrate the EMI-data using known conductivities gathered with other electrical methods. For this purpose a series of test measurements was performed to investigate which electrical method is most feasible for a calibration of EMI-data. The measurements were conducted at the floodplain of the river Mulde in Saxony (Germany). The field site is characterized by a heterogeneous sequence of river deposits including buried back water channels which causes significant variations in conductivities. We choose a reference profile with

  14. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  15. Pulsed Electric Propulsion Thrust Stand Calibration Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of the performance of any propulsion device requires the accurate measurement of thrust. While chemical rocket thrust is typically measured using a load cell, the low thrust levels associated with electric propulsion (EP) systems necessitate the use of much more sensitive measurement techniques. The design and development of electric propulsion thrust stands that employ a conventional hanging pendulum arm connected to a balance mechanism consisting of a secondary arm and variable linkage have been reported in recent publications by Polzin et al. These works focused on performing steady-state thrust measurements and employed a static analysis of the thrust stand response. In the present work, we present a calibration method and data that will permit pulsed thrust measurements using the Variable Amplitude Hanging Pendulum with Extended Range (VAHPER) thrust stand. Pulsed thrust measurements are challenging in general because the pulsed thrust (impulse bit) occurs over a short timescale (typically 1 micros to 1 millisecond) and cannot be resolved directly. Consequently, the imparted impulse bit must be inferred through observation of the change in thrust stand motion effected by the pulse. Pulsed thrust measurements have typically only consisted of single-shot operation. In the present work, we discuss repetition-rate pulsed thruster operation and describe a method to perform these measurements. The thrust stand response can be modeled as a spring-mass-damper system with a repetitive delta forcing function to represent the impulsive action of the thruster.

  16. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  17. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  18. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  19. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  20. The Use Of Infrared Thermography And Resistive Load Banks For Testing Electrical Bus Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffrin, R. James

    1988-01-01

    Electrical bus duct is a common feature in both manufacturing facilities and high rise buildings. In the past, bus duct testing involved labor-intensive manual inspection and maintenance and a significant power outage. Infrared thermography can be useful in situations where bus duct loads are balanced and uniform; however, these conditions are not usually found in the field. Resistive load banks combined with infrared thermography provide a controlled and accurate non-destructive test method for electrical bus ducts. Labor and downtime are both reduced and testing may be varied from light to full load.

  1. Electric field penetration depth of myocardial surface catheters and the measurement of myocardial resistivity.

    PubMed

    Kottam, Anil; Pearce, John A

    2004-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of cardiac conductance in mice offers a method to generate an instantaneous left ventricular volume signal. In order to translate the measured conductance to volume, it is necessary to determine the resistivity of the myocardial tissue. This is done using tetrapolar surface conductance catheters, placed on the surface of the left ventricle. It is important to determine the depth of penetration of the electric field of this surface catheter to ensure that the electric field is confined within the myocardium and does not extend into the left ventricle blood volume. The depth of penetration is experimentally determined by a technique described by Foster et al. [2].

  2. Method Analysis of Microbial Resistant Gypsum Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Several commercially available gypsum products are marketed as microbial-resistant. During previous test method research on a microbial resistant gypsum wallboard study, a common theme from both stakeholders and product vendors was the need for a unified and accepted m...

  3. Method Analysis of Microbial Resistant Gypsum Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Several commercially available gypsum products are marketed as microbial-resistant. During previous test method research on a microbial resistant gypsum wallboard study, a common theme from both stakeholders and product vendors was the need for a unified and accepted m...

  4. Adaptive Motor Resistance Video Game Exercise Apparatus and Method of Use Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, Alton (Inventor); Shaw, James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The invention comprises a method and/or an apparatus using computer configured exercise equipment and an electric motor provided physical resistance in conjunction with a game system, such as a video game system, where the exercise system provides real physical resistance to a user interface. Results of user interaction with the user interface are integrated into a video game, such as running on a game console. The resistance system comprises: a subject interface, software control, a controller, an electric servo assist/resist motor, an actuator, and/or a subject sensor. The system provides actual physical interaction with a resistance device as input to the game console and game run thereon.

  5. Using electrical resistivity imaging to understand surface coal mine hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, E. T.; Greer, B. M.; Burbey, T. J.; Zipper, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the hydrology of disturbed lands is important given the increasing human footprint on earth. Surface coal mining has caused significant land-use change in central Appalachia in the past few decades. The mining process breaks up overburden rock above coal seams, and then replaces that material at the mine location and in adjacent unmined valleys (valley fills). The freshly exposed rock surfaces undergo weathering which often alters water quality and ultimately aquatic communities in effluent streams. One of the most common water quality effects is increased total dissolved solids (TDS), which is usually measured via its surrogate, specific conductance (SC). The SC of valley fill effluent is a function of fill construction methods, materials, and age. Yet hydrologic studies that relate these variables to water quality are sparse due to the difficulty of implementing traditional hydrologic measurements in fill material. We tested the effectiveness of electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) to monitor subsurface geologic patterns and hydrologic flow paths in a test-case valley fill. We paired ERI with artificial rainfall experiments to track infiltrated water as it moved through the valley fill material. Results indicate that ERI can be used to identify the subsurface geologic structure and track advancing wetting fronts or preferential flow paths. We observed that the upper portion of the fill profile contains significant fines, while the deeper profile is primarily composed of large rocks and void spaces. The artificial rainfall experiments revealed that water ponded on the surface of compacted areas until it reached preferential flow paths, where it infiltrated quickly and deeply. We observed water moving from the surface down to >10 m depth within 75 minutes. In sum, vertical and lateral preferential flow paths were evident at both shallow (through compacted layers) and deep (among boulders) locations. Such extensive preferential flow suggests that a

  6. Electrical Resistivity of natural Marcasite at High-pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Gopalakrishnarao

    2013-06-01

    Marcasite is considered to be a common iron sulfide in reducing Martian sediments and may enclose microbial remains during growth and hence study of marcasite may have significance in the search for fossil life on Mars. The high-pressure phase stability investigations of marcasite are useful in understanding the sulfide mineralogy of Martian surface, affected by meteorite impacts. The sulfides were characterized by electron microprobe micro analyses (EPMA), powder X-ray diffraction, DTA, and FTIR spectroscopic measurements. The samples were powdered using a porcelain mortar and pestle. The chemical composition of the sample was determined by an electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). High-pressure electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on natural marcasite, and marcasite rich samples (Marcasite 95 mol % pyrite 5 mol %) up to 7 GPa. Marcasite sample shows a discontinuous decrease in the electrical resistivity at 5. 2 (+/- 0.5) GPa indicating a first order phase transition. The Differential thermal analyses and the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements on the pressure quenched sample shows the characteristics of pyrite, indicating the pressure induced marcasite-to -pyrite transition of the natural marcasite at 5. 2 (+/- 0.5) GPa. The observation of marcasite to pyrite phase transition may be useful in estimating the pressure experienced by shock events on the Martian surface as well as the meteorites where marcasite- pyrite phases coexist. Financial support from CSIR-SHORE-PSC0205.

  7. Electric-field-driven resistive switching in dissipative Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiajun; Aron, Camille; Kotliar, Gabriel; Han, Jong

    Understanding of solids driven out of equilibrium by external fields has been one of the central goals in condensed matter physics for the past century and is relevant to nanotechnology applications such as resistive transitions. We study how strongly correlated electrons on a dissipative lattice evolve from equilibrium when driven by a constant electric field, focusing on the extent of the linear regime and hysteretic non-linear effects at higher fields. We access the non-equilibrium steady states, non-perturbatively in both the field and the electronic interactions, by means of a non-equilibrium dynamical mean-field theory in the Coulomb gauge. The linear response regime is limited by Joule heating effects and breaks down at fields orders of magnitude smaller than the quasi-particle energy scale. For large electronic interactions, strong but experimentally accessible electric fields can induce a resistive switching by driving the strongly correlated metal into a Mott insulator. Hysteretic I- V curves suggest that the non-equilibrium current is carried through a spatially inhomogeneous metal-insulator mixed state.

  8. Electric-field-driven resistive switching in dissipative Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiajun; Aron, Camille; Kotliar, Gabriel; Han, Jong

    2015-03-01

    Understanding of solids driven out of equilibrium by external fields has been one of the central goals in condensed matter physics for the past century and is relevant to nanotechnology applications such as resistive transitions. We study how strongly correlated electrons on a dissipative lattice evolve from equilibrium when driven by a constant electric field, focusing on the extent of the linear regime and hysteretic non-linear effects at higher fields. We access the non-equilibrium steady states, non-perturbatively in both the field and the electronic interactions, by means of a non-equilibrium dynamical mean-field theory in the Coulomb gauge. The linear response regime is limited by Joule heating effects and breaks down at fields orders of magnitude smaller than the quasi-particle energy scale. For large electronic interactions, strong but experimentally accessible electric fields can induce a resistive switching by driving the strongly correlated metal into a Mott insulator. Hysteretic I- V curves suggest that the non-equilibrium current is carried through a spatially inhomogeneous metal-insulator mixed state. Supported by NSF DMR-0907150, NSF DMR-1308141.

  9. New method for electrical conductivity temperature compensation.

    PubMed

    McCleskey, R Blaine

    2013-09-03

    Electrical conductivity (κ) measurements of natural waters are typically referenced to 25 °C (κ25) using standard temperature compensation factors (α). For acidic waters (pH < 4), this can result in a large κ25 error (δκ25). The more the sample temperature departs from 25 °C, the larger the potential δκ25. For pH < 4, the hydrogen ion transport number becomes substantial and its mode of transport is different from most other ions resulting in a different α. A new method for determining α as a function of pH and temperature is presented. Samples with varying amounts of H2SO4 and NaCl were used to develop the new α, which was then applied to 65 natural water samples including acid mine waters, geothermal waters, seawater, and stream waters. For each sample, the κ and pH were measured at several temperatures from 5 to 90 °C and κ25 was calculated. The δκ25 ranged from -11 to 9% for the new method as compared to -42 to 25% and -53 to 27% for the constant α (0.019) and ISO-7888 methods, respectively. The new method for determining α is a substantial improvement for acidic waters and performs as well as or better than the standard methods for circumneutral waters.

  10. New Method for Electrical Conductivity Temperature Compensation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2013-01-01

    Electrical conductivity (κ) measurements of natural waters are typically referenced to 25 °C (κ25) using standard temperature compensation factors (α). For acidic waters (pH < 4), this can result in a large κ25 error (δκ25). The more the sample temperature departs from 25 °C, the larger the potential δκ25. For pH < 4, the hydrogen ion transport number becomes substantial and its mode of transport is different from most other ions resulting in a different α. A new method for determining α as a function of pH and temperature is presented. Samples with varying amounts of H2SO4 and NaCl were used to develop the new α, which was then applied to 65 natural water samples including acid mine waters, geothermal waters, seawater, and stream waters. For each sample, the κ and pH were measured at several temperatures from 5 to 90 °C and κ25 was calculated. The δκ25 ranged from −11 to 9% for the new method as compared to −42 to 25% and −53 to 27% for the constant α (0.019) and ISO-7888 methods, respectively. The new method for determining α is a substantial improvement for acidic waters and performs as well as or better than the standard methods for circumneutral waters.

  11. Troubled waters: Environmental applications of electrical and electromagnetic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobes, David C.

    1996-07-01

    existing technology has lead to the development of fresh instruments, such as electrode arrays towed across the ground, resistivity logging while drilling, fast-rise time TEM, NMR combined with TEM, electric quadripole, et cetera. The applications of E & EM methods cover a wide range of geographic areas and groundwater problems, but have had particularly wide use for groundwater exploration in arid and semi-arid regions, for mapping and monitoring salt-water incursion in susceptible aquifers, and for mapping and monitoring contaminants.

  12. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  13. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  14. Laboratory measurements of electrical resistivity versus water content on small soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robain, H.; Camerlynck, C.; Bellier, G.; Tabbagh, A.

    2003-04-01

    The assessment of soil water content variations more and more leans on geophysical methods that are non invasive and that allow a high spatial sampling. Among the different methods, DC electrical imaging is moving forward. DC Electrical resistivity shows indeed strong seasonal variations that principally depend on soil water content variations. Nevertheless, the widely used Archie's empirical law [1], that links resistivity with voids saturation and water conductivity is not well suited to soil materials with high clay content. Furthermore, the shrinking and swelling properties of soil materials have to be considered. Hence, it is relevant to develop new laboratory experiments in order to establish a relation between electrical resistivity and water content taking into account the rheological and granulometrical specificities of soil materials. The experimental device developed in IRD laboratory allows to monitor simultaneously (i) the water content, (ii) the electrical resistivity and (iii) the volume of a small cylindrical soil core (100cm3) put in a temperature controlled incubator (30°C). It provides both the shrinkage curve of the soil core (voids volume versus water content) and the electrical resistivity versus water content curve The modelisation of the shrinkage curve gives for each moisture state the water respectively contained in macro and micro voids [2], and then allows to propose a generalized Archie's like law as following : 1/Rs = 1/Fma.Rma + 1/Fmi.Rmi and Fi = Ai/(Vi^Mi.Si^Ni) with Rs : the soil resistivity. Fma and Fmi : the so called "formation factor" for macro and micro voids, respectively. Rma and Rmi : the resistivity of the water contained in macro and micro voids, respectively. Vi : the volume of macro and micro voids, respectively. Si : the saturation of macro and micro voids, respectively. Ai, Mi and Ni : adjustment coefficients. The variations of Rmi are calculated, assuming that Rma is a constant. Indeed, the rise of ionic

  15. Thermal treatment of low permeability soils using electrical resistance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Udell, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The acceleration of recovery rates of second phase liquid contaminants from the subsurface during gas or water pumping operations is realized by increasing the soil and ground water temperature. Electrical heating with AC current is one method of increasing the soil and groundwater temperature and has particular applicability to low permeability soils. Several mechanisms have been identified that account for the enhanced removal of the contaminants during electrical heating. These are vaporization of liquid contaminants with low boiling points, temperature-enhanced evaporation rates of semi-volatile components, and removal of residual contaminants by the boiling of residual water. Field scale studies of electrical heating and fluid extraction show the effectiveness of this technique and its applicability to contaminants found both above and below the water table and within low permeability soils. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Fault mechanism analysis and simulation for continuity resistance test of electrical components in aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xudong; Yin, Yaping; Wang, Jialin; Sun, Zhaorong

    2017-01-01

    A large number of electrical components are used in civil aircraft engines, whose electrical circuits are usually intricate and complicated. Continuity resistance is an important parameter for the operating state of electrical components. Electrical continuity fault has serious impact on the reliability of the aircraft engine. In this paper, mathematical models of electrical components are established, and simulation is made by Simulink to analyze the electrical continuity fault.

  17. Application of the Electrical Resistivity Tomography to the stone content estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Chanzy, André; Courdier, Florence; Mariotte, Nicolas; Rachedi, Sabrina

    2009-04-01

    Electrical Resistivity of the soil is regarded as a proxy for many soil properties as structure, moisture content or bedrock depth. The stone content is important for the trees as a large number of stones in the soil restrict the volume of soil that is available for roots to uptake water and nutrients. The potential of ERT for estimating the stone content is evaluated by regarding the stony soil as a two-exponent mixture with stones, which are less conductive, suspend in a conductive matrix. The resistivity of the two components was obtained separately by 2-electrode and 4-electrode methods. On the basis of the resistivity of the soils and the stones, the stone size effect on the effective resistivity was addressed using numerical modeling by Windows based resistivity modeling program RES2DINV and RES3DINV. The effective resistivity at different stone content was calculated by inverting the simulated potential which reproduces a linear panel experiment. The results demonstrate that stone size effect is not very significant. Field measurements were carried out at Mt-Ventoux and l'Issole, located in south of France in the Provence Region. The sites stand in Karstic terrain with soils having high and variable stone content and lying on a bed rock which can be found very close to the surface. Pits were dug and their stone content (volumetric fraction) was estimated. There is an apparent relation between the effective resistivity values extracted from the ERT inversion results and the stone content, the tendency are in good agreement with theoretical results. However, exceptions are found with relatively higher stone content and lower ER value, it can be explained by 3D effect from soil characteristics surrounding the pit. An error assessment in stone content is given according to the resistivity contrast between phases (stones and soil) and the variability in electric resistivity within each phase.

  18. Enhanced oil recovery using electrical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Muhammad Moshin

    Heavy Oil Recovery is gaining much popularity because of huge consumption of oil in the modern industry. Main concern in the extraction of heavy oil is its high viscosity. Heating heavy oil by different electrical means has come out to be a promising solution for viscosity reduction. This includes the low frequency resistive heating, induction heating and high frequency microwave heating or the dielectric heating. Application of low frequency resistive heating is limited by the requirement of brine (conducting fluid) inside the reservoir while Induction heating is only applicable in the presence of ferrous elements in the reservoir. High frequency microwave heating can be used effectively for enhancing the oil productivity. Ultrasonic stimulation is another technique capable of reducing the viscosity of heavy oil without employing the heating techniques. Although many models have been presented addressing microwave heating of heavy oil but, no model has been found in the literature addressing the design of microwave sources and the experimental verification of the results. Similarly some authors have also addressed the ultrasonic stimulation of heavy oil but no one has discussed the behavior of ultrasonic waves at different power level along with the experimental verification. This thesis presents complete mathematical modeling of microwave heating, with numerical solution by considering two-dimensional radial model. In addition, the design, positioning, and orientation of the array of microwave antennas have also been considered in numerical simulations while results of some of the cases are also verified experimentally. Similarly, the Thesis discusses the ultrasonic modeling with numerical solution and experimental verification at different power levels and positioning of the ultrasonic transducer. These models present the results in the form of temperature & pressure distribution and productivity enhancement. For numerical simulations, a Finite Element Analysis

  19. Monitoring Damage Accumulation in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai H.

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection and accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites. Woven silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) ceramic matrix composites (CMC) possess unique properties such as high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, improved toughness, and good environmental stability (oxidation resistance), making them particularly suitable for hot structure applications. In specific, CMCs could be applied to hot section components of gas turbines [1], aerojet engines [2], thermal protection systems [3], and hot control surfaces [4]. The benefits of implementing these materials include reduced cooling air requirements, lower weight, simpler component design, longer service life, and higher thrust [5]. It has been identified in NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program that the SiC/SiC CMC has the most promise for high temperature, high oxidation applications [6]. One of the critical issues in the successful application of CMCs is on-board or insitu assessment of the damage state and an accurate prediction of the remaining service life of a particular component. This is of great concern, since most CMC components envisioned for aerospace applications will be exposed to harsh environments and play a key role in the vehicle s safety. On-line health monitoring can enable prediction of remaining life; thus resulting in improved safety and reliability of structural components. Monitoring can also allow for appropriate corrections to be made in real time, therefore leading to the prevention of catastrophic failures. Most conventional nondestructive

  20. Electrical resistivity for detecting subsurface non-aqueous phase liquids: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Shan, C.; Javandel, I.

    1995-06-01

    Soils and groundwater have been contaminated by hazardous substances at many places in the United States and many other countries. The contaminants are commonly either petroleum products or industrial solvents with very low solubility in water. These contaminants are usually called non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The cost of cleaning up the affected sites in the United States is estimated to be of the order of 100 billion dollars. In spite of the expenditure of several billion dollars during the last 15 years, to date, very few, if any major contaminated site has been restored. The presence of NAPL pools in the subsurface is believed to be the main cause for the failure of previous cleanup activities. Due to their relatively low water solubility, and depending on their volume, it takes tens or even hundreds of years to deplete the NAPL sources if they are not removed from the subsurface. The intrinsic electrical resistivity of most NAPLs is typically in the range of 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 12}{Omega}-m, which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of groundwater containing dissolved solids (usually in the range of a few {Omega}-m to a few thousand {Omega}-m). Although a dry soil is very resistive, the electrical resistivity of a wet soil is on the order of 100 {Omega}-m and is dependent on the extent of water saturation. For a given soil, the electrical resistivity increases with decrease of water saturation. Therefore, if part of the pore water is replaced by a NAPL, the electrical resistivity will increase. At many NAPL sites, both the vadose and phreatic zones can be partially occupied by NAPL pools. It is the great contrast in electrical resistivity between the NAPLs and groundwater that may render the method to be effective in detecting subsurface NAPLs at contaminated sites. The following experiments were conducted to investigate the change of the electrical resistivity of porous media when diesel fuel (NAPL) replaces part of the water.

  1. Effects of contact resistance on electrical conductivity measurements of SiC-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G. E.; Thomsen, E. C.; Henager, C. H.

    2013-11-01

    A combination 2/4-probe method was used to measure electrical resistances across a pure, monolithic CVD-SiC disc sample with contact resistance at the SiC/metallic electrode interfaces. By comparison of the almost simultaneous 2/4-probe measurements, the specific contact resistance (Rc) and its temperature dependence were determined for two types (sputtered gold and porous nickel) electrodes from room temperature (RT) to ~973 K. The Rc-values behaved similarly for each type of metallic electrode: Rc > ~1000 Ω cm2 at RT, decreasing continuously to ~1–10 Ω cm2 at 973 K. The temperature dependence of the inverse Rc indicated thermally activated electrical conduction across the SiC/metallic interface with an apparent activation energy of ~0.3 eV. Finally, for the flow channel insert application in a fusion reactor blanket, contact resistance potentially could reduce the transverse electrical conductivity by about 50%.

  2. Laboratory measurements of basalts electrical resistivity under deep oceanic crustal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violay, M. E.; Gibert, B.; Azais, P.; Pezard, P. A.; Flovenz, O. G.; Asmundsson, R.

    2009-12-01

    For sixty years, electrical resistivity soundings have been used to explore geothermal resources in Iceland. They have generally revealed two zones of high electrical conductivity, one at shallow depths (Flovenz et al., 1985) and another at 10-30 km depth (Beblo and Björnsson, 1978). The interpretation of these conductive zones in terms of composition and in-situ physical conditions is often ambiguous, as various parameters can explain these observations like temperature, partial melting, change in minerals and type of pore fluid. Accurate interpretations of resistivity data needed for geothermal exploration require laboratory measurements of electrical conductivities performed on rock samples at different conditions. We present here a method to measure electrical conductivity of rocks under deep crustal conditions for oceanic crustal rock, i.e. at temperatures up to 600°C, confining pressures up to 200 MPa and pore fluid pressures up to 50 MPa. The method has been developed in a internally heated, gas pressure apparatus (Paterson press). Electrical conductivity is measured on large cylindrical samples (15 to 22 mm in diameter and 10 to 15 mm in length) in a two parallel electrodes geometry. Such experiments require that the fluid saturated sample is sleeved in an impermeable and deformable jacket serving to separate the confining pressure medium (high pressure argon) from the pore fluid saturated sample. At temperature above 200°C a metal sleeve must be used, although it induces high leakage currents that could affect electrical measurements. The leakage currents are reduced using addition of 2 guard-ring parallel electrodes (Glover, 1995). The electrical impedance of basalt has been measured over a frequency range from 10 -1 to 106 Hertz. Five different types of low porosity basalts were selected to cover a range in alteration grade, from albitic to granulite facies. Application of this method will provide data on electrical conductivity of fresh and altered

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH

    2009-12-16

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

  4. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) monitoring for groundwater contamination in an uncontrolled landfill, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Samgyu; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Kim, Jung-Ho; Shin, Seung Wook

    2016-12-01

    In the study area, uncontrolled landfill leachate is a serious cause of groundwater contamination that occurs extensively and rapidly following the rainy season. For this reason, the use of traditional hydrogeological monitoring methods using drilled wells is expensive and limited. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) is suitable for monitoring groundwater contamination because this method helps quickly investigate a large site without the need for well drilling. The resistivity of the landfill leachate is lower than that of clean groundwater; based on this fact, we evaluated the diffusion of landfill leachate before and after the rainy season using 3-D ERI characterization. In addition, ERI results were compared with piezometric and hydrochemical data obtained from observation wells for the purpose of cross-validation. The groundwater monitoring results agreed with the 2-D and 3-D interpretation of ERI results. The electrical resistivity values of contaminated zones were lower than those of clean zones due to an abundance of ions or molecules in the groundwater. The resistivity boundary between contaminated and clean zones observed in the inverted 2-D and 3-D ERI sections was considered to be approximately 100 Ω-m. The low-resistivity anomaly of the contamination zones increased in extent after rainfall. The expansion was likely accelerated by groundwater movement and diffusion of the landfill leachate. Images of the change in electrical resistivity were helpful for characterization of the behavior. The two-directional behaviors of NE-SW and N-S trends were confirmed by the 3-D ratio images. It is therefore, considered that the ERI technique is excellent for imaging contaminated zones as well as monitoring the behaviors of landfill leachate in uncontrolled landfills.

  5. Multiple pulse-heating experiments with different current to determine total emissivity, heat capacity, and electrical resistivity of electrically conductive materials at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Yamashita, Yuichiro

    2012-01-01

    A modified pulse-heating method is proposed to improve the accuracy of measurement of the hemispherical total emissivity, specific heat capacity, and electrical resistivity of electrically conductive materials at high temperatures. The proposed method is based on the analysis of a series of rapid resistive self-heating experiments on a sample heated at different temperature rates. The method is used to measure the three properties of the IG-110 grade of isotropic graphite at temperatures from 850 to 1800 K. The problem of the extrinsic heating-rate effect, which reduces the accuracy of the measurements, is successfully mitigated by compensating for the generally neglected experimental error associated with the electrical measurands (current and voltage). The results obtained by the proposed method can be validated by the linearity of measured quantities used in the property determinations. The results are in reasonably good agreement with previously published data, which demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method, in particular, to the resistivity and total emissivity measurements. An interesting result is the existence of a minimum in the emissivity of the isotropic graphite at around 1120 K, consistent with the electrical resistivity results.

  6. Inspection of earthen embankment dams using time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Jared S.

    According to the National Inventory of Dams (NID), the number of dams across the United States is approximately 85,000. Many of these dams are more than 50 years old and need vast attention to ensure their safety. It is difficult to obtain a full assessment of the dam just by visual inspections alone. This is because many problems associated with dam failure occur internally, which makes it difficult to be observed by the dam inspectors. Examples of these flaws are piping and seepage (flow of water through or around dam walls). It is in this area where geophysical methods can aid in obtaining a more confident evaluation of a dam's integrity. Electrical resistivity is one geophysical technique that would be useful in detecting internal flaws associated with seepage and piping because it is sensitive to moisture changes. A study is being conducted to examine the feasibility of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to map and monitor internal compromised zones within earthen embankment dams. Two quarter-scaled earthen embankment dams were built at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agriculture Research Service (ARS) Hydraulics and Engineering Research Unit (HERU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. These two dams were constructed with known internal compromised zones that are susceptible to seepage and piping. Electrical resistivity surveys were conducted on the completed dams using a 56 electrode dipole-dipole array. The collected data was then processed using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) imaging software and evidence of these two compromised zones was easily visible. Also, additional surveys were conducted in order to monitor the changes in electrical signatures associated with changes in these zones due to filling of the reservoir and environmental/climate changes.

  7. Resistance non-uniformity correction method using bias heating for resistive type uncooled microbolometer FPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepegoz, Murat; Akin, Tayfun

    2007-04-01

    This paper proposes a new resistance non-uniformity correction method for microbolometer-type uncooled thermal detector focal plane arrays (FPAs) that suffer from pixel-to-pixel resistance variation, which is conventionally corrected by applying a specific bias voltage to each detector by the use on-chip DACs. The proposed method uses the heating of the detector with electrical bias, where the detector is heated-up for a pre-determined period of time before the read-out phase. The proposed method uses only a heat-up signal source and simple digital blocks for each column, eliminating the need for DACs that occupy large area, contribute to the noise floor of the system, and dissipate extra power. The proposed method provides a detector current resolution of 14.5 nA with 9-bit digital data, which corresponds to the resolution of 12-bit DAC used in conventional methods.

  8. Electrically conductive proppant and methods for detecting, locating and characterizing the electrically conductive proppant

    DOEpatents

    Cannan, Chad; Bartel, Lewis; Palisch, Terrence; Aldridge, David

    2015-01-13

    Electrically conductive proppants and methods for detecting, locating, and characterizing same are provided. The electrically conductive proppant can include a substantially uniform coating of an electrically conductive material having a thickness of at least 500 nm. The method can include injecting a hydraulic fluid into a wellbore extending into a subterranean formation at a rate and pressure sufficient to open a fracture therein, injecting into the fracture a fluid containing the electrically conductive proppant, electrically energizing the earth at or near the fracture, and measuring three dimensional (x, y, and z) components of electric and magnetic field responses at a surface of the earth or in an adjacent wellbore.

  9. Resistive graphene humidity sensors with rapid and direct electrical readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anderson D.; Elgammal, Karim; Niklaus, Frank; Delin, Anna; Fischer, Andreas C.; Vaziri, Sam; Forsberg, Fredrik; Råsander, Mikael; Hugosson, Håkan; Bergqvist, Lars; Schröder, Stephan; Kataria, Satender; Östling, Mikael; Lemme, Max C.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate humidity sensing using a change of the electrical resistance of single-layer chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene that is placed on top of a SiO2 layer on a Si wafer. To investigate the selectivity of the sensor towards the most common constituents in air, its signal response was characterized individually for water vapor (H2O), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar). In order to assess the humidity sensing effect for a range from 1% relative humidity (RH) to 96% RH, the devices were characterized both in a vacuum chamber and in a humidity chamber at atmospheric pressure. The measured response and recovery times of the graphene humidity sensors are on the order of several hundred milliseconds. Density functional theory simulations are employed to further investigate the sensitivity of the graphene devices towards water vapor. The interaction between the electrostatic dipole moment of the water and the impurity bands in the SiO2 substrate leads to electrostatic doping of the graphene layer. The proposed graphene sensor provides rapid response direct electrical readout and is compatible with back end of the line (BEOL) integration on top of CMOS-based integrated circuits.We demonstrate humidity sensing using a change of the electrical resistance of single-layer chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene that is placed on top of a SiO2 layer on a Si wafer. To investigate the selectivity of the sensor towards the most common constituents in air, its signal response was characterized individually for water vapor (H2O), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar). In order to assess the humidity sensing effect for a range from 1% relative humidity (RH) to 96% RH, the devices were characterized both in a vacuum chamber and in a humidity chamber at atmospheric pressure. The measured response and recovery times of the graphene humidity sensors are on the order of several hundred milliseconds. Density functional theory simulations are employed to further

  10. Noncontact technique for measuring the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of electrostatically levitated melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustan, G. E.; Spyrison, N. S.; Kreyssig, A.; Prozorov, R.; Goldman, A. I.

    2012-02-01

    Over the last two decades the popularity of levitation methods for studying equilibrium and supercooled melts has increased steadily. Measurements of density, viscosity, surface tension, and atomic structure have become well established. In contrast, measurements of electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of levitated melts have been very limited. To fill this void, we have combined the tunnel diode oscillator (TDO) technique with electrostatic levitation (ESL) to perform inductively coupled measurements on levitated melts. A description of the basic operating principles of the TDO and ESL will be given, as well as a description of the implementation and performance characteristics of this technique. Preliminary measurements of electrical resistivity in the solid and liquid state will be presented for samples of Zr, Si, and Ge, as well as the measurements of ferromagnetic transitions in Fe and Co based alloys.

  11. Temperature and volumetric water content petrophysical relationships in municipal solid waste for the interpretation of bulk electrical resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilawski, Tamara; Dumont, Gaël; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Landfills pose major environmental issues including long-term methane emissions, and local pollution of soil and aquifers but can also be seen as potential energy resources and mining opportunities. Water content in landfills determine whether solid fractions can be separated and recycled, and controls the existence and efficiency of natural or enhanced biodegradation. Geophysical techniques, such as electrical and electromagnetic methods have proven successful in the detection and qualitative investigation of sanitary landfills. However, their interpretation in terms of quantitative water content estimates makes it more challenging due to the influence of parameters such as temperature, compaction, waste composition or pore fluid. To improve the confidence given to bulk electrical resistivity data and to their interpretation, we established temperature and volumetric water content petrophysical relationships that we tested on field and laboratory electrical resistivity measurements. We carried out two laboratory experiments on leachates and waste samples from a landfill located in Mont-Saint-Guibert, Belgium. We determined a first relationship between temperature and electrical resistivity with pure and diluted leachates by progressively increasing the temperature from 5°C to 65°C, and then cooling down to 5°C. The second relationship was obtained by measuring electrical resistivity on waste samples of different volumetric water contents. First, we used the correlations obtained from the experiments to compare electrical resistivity measurements performed in a landfill borehole and on reworked waste samples excavated at different depths. Electrical resistivities were measured every 20cm with an electromagnetic logging device (EM39) while a temperature profile was acquired with optic fibres. Waste samples were excavated every 2m in the same borehole. We filled experimental columns with these samples and measured electrical resistivities at laboratory temperature

  12. Modified Electrical Resistivity Survey for Leakage Assessment of a Waterside Concrete Barrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B.; Oh, S.; Hong, J.

    2015-12-01

    An modified electrical resistivity survey has been suggested and applied to a leakage detection problem of concrete barrage. We suggest the modified electrical resistivity methods using electrodes floating on the water and apply line current sources instead of conventional point current sources in order to facilitate simple analysis. Furthermore, the study applied the following three variations of modified electrode array: Direct potential array, Parallel potential array and Cross potential array. In this study, first, the characteristics of potential difference graph by array during water leakage were confirmed from the numerical analysis. Next, a experiments on the effect factor of the filed geophysical exploration were conducted by using a barrage model. And then, modified electrode arrays were applied to the concrete barrage in practice in Korea. Finally, all of the results have been compared and analyzed in order to determine the applicability of three modified electrode arrays to water leakage detection of a concrete barrage. As a result, when water leakage occurred, all kind of array operations demonstrated a distinct change of aspect of potential difference in the numerical analysis, model experiment and field geophysical exploration graphs. Therefore, this modified electrode array of electrical resistivity survey, which has been adapted to the concrete barrage, has been found to be a useful method to detect water leakage.

  13. Monitoring of olive oil mills' wastes using electrical resistivity tomography techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simyrdanis, Kleanthis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Kirkou, Stella; Sarris, Apostolos; Tsourlos, Panagiotis

    2014-08-01

    Olive oil mills' wastes (OOMW) are one of the byproducts of the oil production that can lead to serious environmental pollution when they are deposited in ponds dug on the ground surface. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) method can provide a valuable tool in order to monitor through time the physical flow of the wastes into the subsurface. ERT could potentially locate the electrical signature due to lower resistivity values resulting from the leakage of OOMW to the subsurface. For this purpose, two vertical boreholes were installed (12m depth, 9 m apart) in the vicinity of an existing pond which is filled with OOMW during the oil production period. The test site is situated in Saint Andreas village about 15km south of the city of Rethymno (Crete, Greece). Surface ERT measurements were collected along multiple lines in order to reconstruct the subsurface resistivity models. Data acquisition was performed with standard and optimized electrode configuration protocols. The monitoring survey includes the ERT data collection for a period of time. The study was initiated before the OOMW were deposited in the pond, so resistivity fluctuations are expected due to the flow of OOMW in the porous subsurface media through time. Preliminary results show the good correlation of the ERT images with the drilled geological formations and the identification of low resistivity subsurface zone that could be attributed to the flow of the wastes within the porous layers.

  14. CRSP, numerical results for an electrical resistivity array to detect underground cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Amin; Ramazi, Hamidreza

    2017-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the application of the Combined Resistivity Sounding and Profiling electrode configuration (CRSP) to detect underground cavities. Electrical resistivity surveying is among the most favorite geophysical methods due to its nondestructive and economical properties in a wide range of geosciences. Several types of the electrode arrays are applied to detect different certain objectives. In one hand, the electrode array plays an important role in determination of output resolution and depth of investigations in all resistivity surveys. On the other hand, they have their own merits and demerits in terms of depth of investigations, signal strength, and sensitivity to resistivity variations. In this article several synthetic models, simulating different conditions of cavity occurrence, were used to examine the responses of some conventional electrode arrays and also CRSP array. The results showed that CRSP electrode configuration can detect the desired objectives with a higher resolution rather than some other types of arrays. Also a field case study was discussed in which electrical resistivity approach was conducted in Abshenasan expressway (Tehran, Iran) U-turn bridge site for detecting potential cavities and/or filling loose materials. The results led to detect an aqueduct tunnel passing beneath the study area.

  15. Electrical resistance tests of glass mat type separators

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, A.L.

    1997-12-01

    Resistance measurement of glass mat separators for VRLA batteries is necessary for proper design selection. The equipment described makes sample comparison possible under compression in either flooded or starved condition. The Palico Instrument Labs method operates on the principle of measuring the change in resistance of test cell as electrolyte level is changed, first with and then without the separator sample. Since the separator can only be removed by removing the Model 903 Carrier and then reinserting after separator removal, stability to test readings and accurate measurement of electrolyte level are essential. Measurements are made with a reversing polarity DC current in all of the Palico resistance test equipment which closely match conditions found in the final battery.

  16. Material morphology and electrical resistivity differences in EPDM rubbers.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-03-01

    Electrical resistance anomalies noted in EPDM gaskets have been attributed to zinc-enriched surface sublayers, about 10-{micro}m thick, in the sulfur cured rubber material. Gasket over-compression provided the necessary connector pin contact and was also found to cause surprising morphological changes on the gasket surfaces. These included distributions of zinc oxide whiskers in high pressure gasket areas and cone-shaped features rich in zinc, oxygen, and sulfur primarily in low pressure protruding gasket areas. Such whiskers and cones were only found on the pin side of the gaskets in contact with a molded plastic surface and not on the back side in contact with an aluminum surface. The mechanisms by which such features are formed have not yet been defined.

  17. Probability methods applied to electric power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    The roots of understanding probabilistic phenomena go back to antiquity. We have been willing to bet our money on the roll of dice or similar events for centuries. Yet, when it comes to betting our lives or livelihood, we have been slow to adapt probabilistic methods to describe uncertainty. As a matter of fact, we are loath to admit a probability of failure when it comes to such structures as bridges, buildings or airplanes. Electric utility engineers the world over realize that reliability of structures and systems can be improved and money can be saved if we use a more enlightened approach to uncertainty. The technology and analytical power that is now being made available to the working engineer make that possible. It is for this reason, the International Council on Probability Methods Applied to Power Systems (PMAPS) was formed in 1985. It is important that engineers have a forum for exchange of knowledge and ideas on subjects related to describing and coping with uncertainty. As the world becomes more complex and demands increase, it is the engineers lot to make the most efficient use possible of scarce resources. The papers contained within this document cover the design and analysis of transmission components, systems analysis and reliability assessment, testing of power components, systems operations planning and probabilistic analysis, power distribution systems, cost, and mathematical modeling. The individual papers have been individually cataloged and indexed.

  18. Electrical Resistivity Investigations of the Kurşunlu (Manisa/Turkey) Geothermal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarı, Coşkun; Timur, Emre

    2016-04-01

    It is of considerable importance to explore the geological structure around active faults, especially near-surface unconsolidated layers, to estimate the faults' activity. There are numerous case studies to investigate geothermal reservoirs and surrounding active faults using geophysical exploration methods; however, only a few cases have been verified in detail by comparison with other geological information. Electrical resistivity data provide a substantial contribution to the geophysical mapping and monitoring of geothermal reservoirs. We applied electrical methods, which can be effective for exploring to several hundred meters depth, to reveal geological structures covered by thick Quaternary alluvium formations. Geothermal activity around city of Manisa in Gediz Graben (Western Turkey) has been investigated by many researchers and many geothermal boreholes were drilled in order to produce electricity and for heating purposes. The Kurşunlu geothermal area is with the southern side of the Gediz Graben in 2 km west of Salihli, Manisa, Turkey. According to rising demand on thermal water around Salihli, geophysical studies were performed using the Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) measurements at 16 stations around the area of Kurşunlu hot springs, and they were interpreted using both one and two-dimensional modelling. Vertical and horizontal resistivity sections were mapped, and it was determined that two low-resistivity layers exist both in the North (stations 1,2 and 4) and the South (stations 6 and 10) part of the survey area. As a result of the studies, the boundaries of the low-resistivity layer were mapped and test drilling locations were recommended.

  19. Shallow electrical resistivity imaging of the Limón fault, Chagres River Watershed, Panama Canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojica, Alexis; Pérez, Tatiana; Toral, Jaime; Miranda, Roberto; Franceschi, Pastora; Calderón, Carlos; Vergara, Fidedigna

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was the use of electrical resistivity imaging to investigate the geometry of the southwest portion of one of the most important geologic fault zones of the Panama Canal Watershed: the Limón fault. This fault is characterized by its juxtaposition of pre-Tertiary andesitic basalt (Playa Venado Formation) against late Oligocene Tertiary sediments (Caimito Formation). In this zone, four 2D electrical resistivity tomography profiles were conducted perpendicular to the fault trace: T-1, T-2, T-3 and T-4. The T-1, T-3, and T-4 profiles were long profiles (235 m for the first two and 215 m for the last one), with a goal of determining the depth of the geologic boundary between the sedimentary and andesitic deposits. The T-2 profile was a short profile (23.5 m), with the objective of calibrating the results with data provided by the paleoseismic trenching previously developed in the area of interest. For these tests, two electrode arrays of types Wenner-Schlumberger and Dipole-Dipole, were used. For the inversion routine, two regularized least-squares methods were used: the smoothness-constrained method and robust inversion. The long electrical resistivity tomography profiles were able to identify a set of electrical anomalies associated with the andesitic basalt and the Tertiary sediments and with that, the contact geometry between these formations. In these profiles, fault angle measurements ranged from 60° to 80° with respect to the ground surface. In the T-2 profile, the electrical anomalies showed a good association with the results of the paleoseismic study. This allowed identification of the colluvium and alluvium covering the gravel and sand debris that mark the gradual transition to the soils of the Caimito Formation. Finally, a set of 2D synthetic models was developed for each of the T-1, T-3, and T-4 profiles with the objective of optimizing interpretation of the field results.

  20. Influence of plant roots on electrical resistivity measurements of cultivated soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloteau, Sophie; Blanchy, Guillaume; Javaux, Mathieu; Garré, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Electrical resistivity methods have been widely used for the last 40 years in many fields: groundwater investigation, soil and water pollution, engineering application for subsurface surveys, etc. Many factors can influence the electrical resistivity of a media, and thus influence the ERT measurements. Among those factors, it is known that plant roots affect bulk electrical resistivity. However, this impact is not yet well understood. The goals of this experiment are to quantify the effect of plant roots on electrical resistivity of the soil subsurface and to map a plant roots system in space and time with ERT technique in a soil column. For this research, it is assumed that roots system affect the electrical properties of the rhizosphere. Indeed the root activity (by transporting ions, releasing exudates, changing the soil structure,…) will modify the rhizosphere electrical conductivity (Lobet G. et al, 2013). This experiment is included in a bigger research project about the influence of roots system on geophysics measurements. Measurements are made on cylinders of 45 cm high and a diameter of 20 cm, filled with saturated loam on which seeds of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. are sowed. Columns are equipped with electrodes, TDR probes and temperature sensors. Experiments are conducted at Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, in a growing chamber with controlled conditions: temperature of the air is fixed to 20° C, photoperiod is equal to 14 hours, photosynthetically active radiation is equal to 200 μmol m-2s-1, and air relative humidity is fixed to 80 %. Columns are fully saturated the first day of the measurements duration then no more irrigation is done till the end of the experiment. The poster will report the first results analysis of the electrical resistivity distribution in the soil columns through space and time. These results will be discussed according to the plant development and other controlled factors. Water content of the soil will also be detailed

  1. Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI

    SciTech Connect

    Wannamaker, Philip E.; Wright, Phillip M.

    1992-03-24

    The principal objective of electrical geophysical research at UURI has been to provide reliable exploration and reservoir assessment tools for the shallowest to the deepest levels of interest in geothermal fields. Three diverse methods are being considered currently: magnetotellurics (MT, and CSAMT), self-potential, and borehole resistivity. Primary shortcomings in the methods addressed have included a lack of proper interpretation tools to treat the effects of the inhomogeneous structures often encountered in geothermal systems, a lack of field data of sufficient accuracy and quantity to provide well-focused models of subsurface resistivity structure, and a poor understanding of the relation of resistivity to geothermal systems and physicochemical conditions in the earth generally. In MT, for example, interpretation research has focused successfully on the applicability of 2-D models in 3-D areas which show a preferred structural grain. Leading computer algorithms for 2-D and 3-D simulation have resulted and are combined with modern methods of regularized inversion. However, 3-D data coverage and interpretation is seen as a high priority. High data quality in our own research surveys has been assured by implementing a fully remote reference with digital FM telemetry and real-time processing with data coherence sorting. A detailed MT profile across Long Valley has mapped a caldera-wide altered tuff unit serving as the primary hydrothermal aquifer, and identified a low-resistivity body in the middle crust under the west moat which corresponds closely with teleseismic delay and low density models. In the CSAMT method, our extensive tensor survey over the Sulphur Springs geothermal system provides valuable structural information on this important thermal regime and allows a fundamental analysis of the CSAMT method in heterogeneous areas. The self-potential (SP) method is promoted as an early-stage, cost-effective, exploration technique for covered hydrothermal

  2. Sinop Province, Şahintepesi Region, Bayraktepe Tumulus' Display With Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, Şahin; Ahmet Yüksel, Fethi; Avcı, Kerim; Ziya Görücü, Mahmut

    2017-04-01

    Paphlagonia is located on the Boztepe Foreland (Sinop Foreland) and its peninsula, which extends northwards along the coastal lane of the Black Sea. Sinop is at the northernmost tip of Turkey, in the middle of the Black Sea region. Archaeological excavations of the entire Sinop province have uncovered artifacts from the Bronze Age dating back to 3000 BC. Most ancient sources indicate that Mithridates is buried in Sinop. It is alleged that the Tumuli on the crest of the historical peninsula, called Boztepe in Sinop, could be the resting spot of Mithridates. There are three tumuli in this area known as Şahin Tepesi Mevkii (Şahin Hill Site). In order to determine the location of the burial chamber of the tomb, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurement methods were used, which is a geophysical method capable of three dimensional (3D) measurement and evaluation. In the area of the tumulus, measurements were made in a 57 electrode array using a 42 x 36 m (total 1512 m2) spread electrode pattern with 6m spacing. In the study, an AGI brand SuperString R1 Resistivity device and equipment were used. Resistivity data were interpreted using AGI Earthimag 3D software. From the geoelectric resistivity data, 2D and 3D images were obtained as a result of data processing. In the tumulus area smooth geometrical forms and individual high-amplitude anomalies were visualized, that could be attributed to structural remains and the presence of archaeological materials. These anomalies were plotted on the gridded location plan of the excavation area. Within the artificial hill forming the tumulus, with regards to the natural geological units, anomalies such as very high resistivity, linear elongations, angular rotations, curves, etc. (stone wall, hollow room) that are caused by architectural elements were observed. These geometrically shaped, very highly resistive, anomalies should be checked. Keywords: Sinope, Tumulus, Electrical Resistivity Tomography, Archaeo-geophysics

  3. Soil Moisture Monitoring using Surface Electrical Resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamita, Giuseppe; Perrone, Angela; Brocca, Luca; Straface, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    The relevant role played by the soil moisture (SM) for global and local natural processes results in an explicit interest for its spatial and temporal estimation in the vadose zone coming from different scientific areas - i.e. eco-hydrology, hydrogeology, atmospheric research, soil and plant sciences, etc... A deeper understanding of natural processes requires the collection of data on a higher number of points at increasingly higher spatial scales in order to validate hydrological numerical simulations. In order to take the best advantage of the Electrical Resistivity (ER) data with their non-invasive and cost-effective properties, sequential Gaussian geostatistical simulations (sGs) can be applied to monitor the SM distribution into the soil by means of a few SM measurements and a densely regular ER grid of monitoring. With this aim, co-located SM measurements using mobile TDR probes (MiniTrase), and ER measurements, obtained by using a four-electrode device coupled with a geo-resistivimeter (Syscal Junior), were collected during two surveys carried out on a 200 × 60 m2 area. Two time surveys were carried out during which Data were collected at a depth of around 20 cm for more than 800 points adopting a regular grid sampling scheme with steps (5 m) varying according to logistic and soil compaction constrains. The results of this study are robust due to the high number of measurements available for either variables which strengthen the confidence in the covariance function estimated. Moreover, the findings obtained using sGs show that it is possible to estimate soil moisture variations in the pedological zone by means of time-lapse electrical resistivity and a few SM measurements.

  4. Electrical resistivity behaviors of liquid Pb-Sn binary alloy in the presence of ultrasonic field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Zhang, Jianfeng; Li, Haoyu; Le, Qichi; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Wenyi; Bao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Electrical resistivity behaviors of liquid Pb-Sn alloys have been investigated in the presence of ultrasonic field. The process demonstrated significantly that electrical resistivity could reveal the precise influence caused by ultrasound. Details revealed by applying the resistivity measuring approach to the liquid Pb-Sn alloy show that the short ordered structures in the liquid could be modified by ultrasonic irradiation, and the resistivity approach could have application value in the ultrasonic irradiation process on the specific liquid metals and alloys.

  5. High resistance to sulfur poisoning of Ni with copper skin under electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaopei; Zhang, Yanxing; Yang, Zongxian

    2017-02-01

    The effects of sulfur poisoning on the (1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) surfaces of pure Ni and Cu/Ni alloy are studied in consideration of the effect of electric field. The effects of Cu dopants on the S poisoning characteristics are analyzed by the means of the density functional theory results in combination with thermodynamics data using the ab initio atomistic thermodynamic method. When the Cu concentration increases to 50% on the surface layer of the Cu/Ni alloy, the (1 1 0) surface becomes the most vulnerable to the sulfur poisoning. Ni with a copper skin can mostly decrease the sulfur poisoning effect. Especially under the electric field of 1.0 V/Å, the sulfur adsorption and phase transition temperature can be further reduced. We therefore propose that Ni surfaces with copper skin can be very effective to improve the resistance to sulfur poisoning of the Ni anode under high electric field.

  6. Salt wedge determination using electrical sounding method in the region of Oued Nador (Tipaza, Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amine Bechkit, Mohamed; Benaïssa, Zahia; Ouadfeul, Sid Ali; Deghmoum, Feriel

    2017-04-01

    The marine intrusion of freshwater aquifers by salt water results in soil degradation due to their salinization. The present survey aims to study the position of the fresh water - salt water interface using electric sounding method in the region of Oued Nador (Tipaza, Algeria). It is important to know the position of this interface for the continuation of the aquifer exploitation. For this, we conducted, in this zone, seven electric soundings oriented north-west south-east, with Schlumberger electrodes configuration. The inversion of the apparent resistivity data via the IP2Win software allowed us to recover the true values of electrical resistivity. The exploitation of obtained data requires the implementation of a geo-electric section, and for the interpretation, the results of a standard electrical sounding, acquired near the study area, are used. The results of this geophysical study allowed us to locate the freshwater - salt water contact with resistivity values that can reach 50 ohm m for freshwater formation, and less than 10 ohm m for saturated saltwater formation. The depth of the contact between fresh water and salt water increases gradually from 38 m to 40 m near the coast, and this over a distance of 0 m to 500 m, and then rises abruptly beyond a distance of 500 m at the borehole N°3 where it reaches the maximum depth of 97 m. Key words: Electrical survey - Salt wedge - Electrical resistivity - Aquifer - Intrusion.

  7. Applications of electrical resistance tomography to subsurface environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-11-15

    We are developing a new imaging technique, Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT), to map subsurface liquids as flow occurs during natural or clean-up processes and to map geologic structure. Natural processes (such as surface water infiltrating the vadose zone) and man-induced processes (such as tank leaks and clean-up processes such as steam injection), can create changes in a soil`s electrical properties that are readily measured. We have conducted laboratory and a variety of field experiments to investigate the capabilities and limitations of ERT for imaging underground structures and processes. In the last four years we have used ERT to successfully monitor several field processes including: a subsurface steam injection process (for VOC removal), an air injection process (below the water table) for VOC removal, water infiltration through the vadose zone, radio-frequency heating, ohmic heating, and tank and pond leaks. The information derived from ERT can be used by remediation projects to: detect and locate leaks, determine the effectiveness of clean-up processes, select appropriate clean-up alternatives, and to verify the installation and performance of subsurface barriers.

  8. Research on temperature control with numerical regulators in electric resistance furnaces with indirect heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2016-02-01

    The paper is an analysis of two-positions (hysteresis) regulators, self-tuned PID controller and PID controller for temperature control used for indirect heat resistance furnaces. For PID controller was used three methods of tuning: Ziegler-Nichols step response model, Cohen-Coon tuning rules and Ziegler-Nichols tuning rules. In experiments it used an electric furnace with indirect heating with active power of resistance of 1 kW/230V AC and a numerical temperature regulator AT-503 type (ANLY). It got a much better temperature control when using the Cohen-Coon tuning rules method than those of Ziegler-Nichols step response method and Ziegler-Nichols tuning rules method.

  9. Mass spectrometry methods for predicting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Charretier, Yannick; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2016-10-01

    Developing elaborate techniques for clinical applications can be a complicated process. Whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS revolutionized reliable microorganism identification in clinical microbiology laboratories and is now replacing phenotypic microbial identification. This technique is a generic, accurate, rapid, and cost-effective growth-based method. Antibiotic resistance keeps emerging in environmental and clinical microorganisms, leading to clinical therapeutic challenges, especially for Gram-negative bacteria. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is used to reliably predict antimicrobial success in treating infection, but it is inherently limited by the need to isolate and grow cultures, delaying the application of appropriate therapies. Antibiotic resistance prediction by growth-independent methods is expected to reduce the turnaround time. Recently, the potential of next-generation sequencing and microarrays in predicting microbial resistance has been demonstrated, and this review evaluates the potential of MS in this field. First, technological advances are described, and the possibility of predicting antibiotic resistance by MS is then illustrated for three prototypical human pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Clearly, MS methods can identify antimicrobial resistance mediated by horizontal gene transfers or by mutations that affect the quantity of a gene product, whereas antimicrobial resistance mediated by target mutations remains difficult to detect.

  10. Rapid Underway Sediment Classification by Electrical Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    interface, funcion of signal frequency and water conductivity some of the EM signal does take an Ptmosphertc path, (conductivity is the eciprocal of...Handbook of Geophysical Exploration at Sea, electric dipole sources, i.e., additional electric and R. A. Geyer and J. R. Moore (eds.), CRC Press, Boca

  11. The effect of electrical conductivity on pore resistance and electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianbo; Lin, Hao

    2008-11-01

    Electroporation is an elegant means to gain access to the cytoplasm, and to deliver molecules into the cell while simultaneously maintaining viability and functionality. In this technique, an applied electric pulse transiently permeabilizes the cell membrane, through which biologically active agents such as DNA, RNA, and amino acids can enter the cell, and perform tasks such as gene and cancer therapy. Despite wide applications, current electroporation technologies fall short of desired efficiency and reliability, in part due to the lack of fundamental understanding and quantitative modeling tools. This work focuses on the modeling of cell membrane conductance due to the formation of aqueous conducting pores. An analytical expression is developed to determine effective pore resistance as a function of the membrane thickness, pore size, and intracellular and extracellular conductivities. The availability of this expression avoids empirical or ad hoc specification of the conductivity of the pore-filling solution which was adopted in previous works. Such pore resistance model is then incorporated into a whole-cell electroporation simulation to investigate the effect of conductivity ratio on membrane permeabilization. The results reveal that the degree of permeabilization strongly depends on the specific values of the extracellular and intracellular conductivities.

  12. Investigations of discontinuous permafrost using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewkowicz, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    We have used electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) extensively over the past five years to examine frozen ground characteristics at natural and disturbed sites within the discontinuous permafrost zones of northern Canada. Examples of pure research include investigations to delimit permafrost patch size, to examine changes in permafrost conditions at altitudinal treeline, and to assess permafrost thickness in palsa bogs. Applied research has included hazard mapping where ERT, in association with boreholes, has been used to characterize permafrost conditions in different terrain units at Yukon communities as part of planning for climate change adaptation. ERT has also been used to examine temporal change through repeated surveys at sites equipped with permanent arrays. Rapid change is occurring at sites which were subject to recent forest fire in the Northwest Territories. Gradual reductions in average resistivity at sites along the Alaska Highway in Yukon and northern British Columbia indicate progressive increases in unfrozen moisture while ground temperatures at the same sites have increased only very slightly. We conclude that ERT should become a standard technique for the investigation of discontinuous permafrost sites and should be incorporated as a monitoring technique within international programs such as the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost.

  13. Application of in-situ electrical resistance measurements to the study of phase transformations in ferrous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbiš, Peter; Anžel, Ivan; Brunčko, Mihael

    2016-11-01

    Phase transformations have been studied in a variety of different steels with the use of "in situ" electrical resistance measurements. The results were evaluated by metallography of the initial and final microstructures and with consideration of data from the published literature. On this basis a good correlation has been established and it was shown that this method is suitable for such investigations. It even presents certain advantages, thus providing a more complete understanding of the physical metallurgy of steels. We out-lined the field in which the measurement of electrical resistance is particularly suitable and an example of processes that are difficult to monitor using other commonly used methods.

  14. Investigating electrical contact resistance losses in lithium-ion battery assemblies for hybrid and electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Peyman; Hsieh, Scott; Bahrami, Majid

    2011-08-01

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are favored in hybrid-electric vehicles and electric vehicles for their outstanding power characteristics. In this paper the energy loss due to electrical contact resistance (ECR) at the interface of electrodes and current-collector bars in Li-ion battery assemblies is investigated for the first time. ECR is a direct result of contact surface imperfections, i.e., roughness and out-of-flatness, and acts as an ohmic resistance at the electrode-collector joints. A custom-designed testbed is developed to conduct a systematic experimental study. ECR is measured at separable bolted electrode connections of a sample Li-ion battery, and a straightforward analysis to evaluate the relevant energy loss is presented. Through the experiments, it is observed that ECR is an important issue in energy management of Li-ion batteries. Effects of surface imperfection, contact pressure, joint type, collector bar material, and interfacial materials on ECR are highlighted. The obtained data show that in the considered Li-ion battery, the energy loss due to ECR can be as high as 20% of the total energy flow in and out of the battery under normal operating conditions. However, ECR loss can be reduced to 6% when proper joint pressure and/or surface treatment are used. A poor connection at the electrode-collector interface can lead to a significant battery energy loss as heat generated at the interface. Consequently, a heat flow can be initiated from the electrodes towards the internal battery structure, which results in a considerable temperature increase and onset of thermal runaway. At sever conditions, heat generation due to ECR might cause serious safety issues, sparks, and even melting of the electrodes.

  15. Estimation of tree root distribution using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaltz, Elmar; Uhlemann, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Trees influence soil-mantled slopes mechanically by anchoring in the soil with coarse roots. Forest-stands play an important role in mechanical reinforcement to reduce the susceptibility to slope failures. However, the effect of stabilisation of roots is connected with the distribution of roots in the ground. The architecture and distribution of tree roots is diverse and strongly dependent on species, plant age, stand density, relief, nutrient supply as well as climatic and pedologic conditions. Particularly trees growing on inclined slopes show shape-shifting root systems. Geophysical techniques are commonly used to non-invasively study hydrological and geomorphological subsurface properties, by imaging contrasting physical properties of the ground. This also poses the challenge for geophysical imaging of root systems, as properties, such as electrical resistivity, of dry and wet roots fall within the range of soils. The objective of this study is whether electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) allows a reliable reproduction of root systems of alone-standing trees on diverse inclined slopes. In this regard, we set the focus on the branching of secondary roots of two common walnut trees (Juglans regia L.) that were not disturbed in the adjacencies and thus expected to develop their root systems unhindered. Walnuts show a taproot-cordate root system with a strong tap-root in juvenile age and a rising cordate rooting with increasing age. Hence, mature walnuts can exhibit a root system that appears to be deformed or shifted respectively when growing at hillslope locations. We employed 3D ERT centred on the tree stem, comprising dipole-dipole measurements on a 12-by-41 electrode grid with 0.5 m and 1.0m electrode spacing in x- and y-direction respectively. Data were inverted using a 3D smoothness constrained non-linear least-squares algorithm. First results show that the general root distribution can be estimated from the resistivity models and that shape

  16. Detection and characterization of a perched aquifer with an electrical-resistivity survey

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J.J.

    1983-06-01

    Two different electrical methods were used and compared in the investigation of a solid-waste landfill site in the central Coast Ranges of California. The methods were used in support of an investigation of the hydrology and geochemistry of the site with main concerns being (1) establishment of baseline conditions, (2) determination of possible contamination, and (3) design of a sampling/monitoring system. Data were obtained prior to the start of the drilling program and later integrated with reconnaissance geologic data for the purpose of selecting sites for monitoring wells. Two electrical methods were used: (1) dipole-dipole resistivity; and (2) terrain conductivity. Interpretations of the surveys, discussed below, were used in characterizing the geometry of the saturated zone, estimating groundwater gradients, and estimating relative depths to the saturated zone.

  17. Spatial filtering of electrical resistivity and slope intensity: Enhancement of spatial estimates of a soil property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourennane, Hocine; Hinschberger, Florent; Chartin, Caroline; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    To best utilize the electrical resistivity data and slope intensity derived from a Digital Elevation Model, the kriging spatial components technique was applied to separate the nuggets and small- and large-scale structures for both resistivity and slope intensity data. The spatial structures in the resistivity and slope intensity data, which are poorly correlated with soil thickness (ST), are then filtered out prior to integrating the resistivity data and slope intensity into soil thickness estimation over a 12 ha area located in the south-western Parisian Basin (France). ST was measured at 650 locations over the study area by manual augering. Twenty percent of the observations (131 points) were randomly selected to constitute the validation dataset. The remaining 80% of the dataset (519 points) was used as the prediction dataset. The resistivity data represent a set of 7394 measurement points for each of the three investigated depths over the study area. The methodology involves successively (1) a principal component analysis (PCA) on the electrical measurements and (2) a geostatistical filtering of the small-scale component and noise in the first component (PC1) of the PCA. The results show that the correlation between ST and PC1 is greatly improved when the small-scale component and noise are filtered out, and similarly, the correlation between ST and slope intensity is greatly improved once the geostatistical filtering is carried out on the slope data. Thus, the large scales of both slope intensity and the electrical resistivity's PC1 were used as external drifts to predict ST over the entire study area. This prediction was compared with ordinary kriging and kriging either with a large scale of slope intensity or with a large scale of the electrical resistivity's PC1 taken as an external drift. The first prediction of ST by ordinary kriging, which was considered as our reference, was also compared to those achieved by kriging using the raw secondary variables

  18. Towards a Global Permafrost Electrical Resistivity Survey (GPERS) database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewkowicz, Antoni G.; Douglas, Thomas; Hauck, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Hundreds, and perhaps thousands, of Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) surveys have been undertaken over the past two decades in permafrost areas in North America, Europe, and Asia. Two main types of ERT configurations have been conducted: galvanic surveys using metallic rods as conductors and capacitive-coupled surveys using towed cable arrays. ERT surveys have been carried out in regions with mountain permafrost, lowland permafrost, and coastal saline permafrost, and in undisturbed, naturally-disturbed (e.g. fire-affected), and anthropogenically-affected sites (e.g. around buildings and infrastructure). Some surveys are associated with local validation of frozen ground conditions, through borehole temperatures, frost probing or creep phenomena. Others are in locations without boreholes or with clast-rich or bedrock active layers which preclude this direct confirmation. Most surveys have been carried out individually on particular dates but there are increasing numbers of repeated ERT measurements being made to detect change, either at intervals using a fixed array of electrodes, or at high frequency with a fixed and automated measurement apparatus. Taken as a group, ERT profiles represent an untapped knowledge base relating to permafrost presence, absence, or partial presence (i.e. discontinuous permafrost), and in some cases to the thickness of permafrost and ice content. When combined with borehole information, ERT measurements can identify massive ice features and provides information on soil stratigraphy. The Global Permafrost Electrical Resistivity Survey (GPERS) database is planned as a freely available on-line repository of data from two-dimensional electrical resistivity surveys undertaken in permafrost regions. Its development is supported by the Permafrost Carbon Network and an application for an International Permafrost Association (IPA) Action Group is also underway. When the future GPERS records are compared with the GTN-P database it will be

  19. A setup for measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Xiong, Yucheng; Zhang, Wenhua; Xu, Dongyan

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a setup for measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials. The sample holder was designed to have a compact structure and can be directly mounted in a standard cryostat system for temperature-dependent measurements. For the Seebeck coefficient measurement, a thin bar-shaped sample is mounted bridging two copper bases; and two ceramic heaters are used to generate a temperature gradient along the sample. Two type T thermocouples are used to determine both temperature and voltage differences between two widely separated points on the sample. The thermocouple junction is flattened into a disk and pressed onto the sample surface by using a spring load. The flexible fixation method we adopted not only simplifies the sample mounting process but also prevents thermal contact deterioration due to the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the sample and other parts. With certain modifications, the sample holder can also be used for four-probe electrical resistivity measurements. High temperature measurements are essential for thermoelectric power generation. The experimental system we developed is capable of measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials in a wide temperature range from 80 to 500 K, which can be further extended to even higher temperatures. Measurements on two standard materials, constantan and nickel, confirmed the accuracy and the reliability of the system.

  20. An electric model with time varying resistance for a pneumatic membrane blood pump.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Qin, J

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the effects of an artificial heart and cardiac assist device on the cardiovascular system and determine the proper control method, an electrical model is an effective tool. An electric model with time varying resistance is proposed to represent a pneumatic membrane blood pump, by which the resistance of the valves in the pump is a function of time. The model is consistent over the whole cardiac cycle, and the important transitional processes between systole and diastole are considered. The calculated results based on this model are compared with the experimentally measured waveforms of the corresponding state-variables of a loaded pump, and the model parameters estimated using the least-squares criterion are compared with the measured physical values of corresponding functional parts. Results showed that this electric model is capable of representing a pneumatic membrane pump with quite satisfactory accuracy. They also showed that the transitional property of the valve resistance has a significant influence on the output characteristics of the pump.

  1. Electrical resistivity measurements of brine saturated porous media near reservoir conditions: Awibengkok preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B; Duba, A; Roberts, J

    1999-06-28

    Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of rocks and synthetic rocks with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 211 C were performed to further investigate how the pore-size distribution and capillarity affects boiling in porous media. Similar to previous measurements on samples from The Geysers, CA, we observed a gradual increase in resistivity when pore pressure was decreased below the phase-boundary pressure of free water, an indication that boiling is controlled not only by temperature and pressure, but also by pore size distribution. Other important phenomena observed were strong resistance fluctuations during boiling that may be chaotic, and salt deposition that caused sample cracking. If confirmed in further experiments, these results may lead to a new geophysical diagnostic for locating boiling in high permeability areas of geothermal reservoirs and for methods of permeability alteration.

  2. Electrical resistivity survey to search for a recent clandestine burial of a homicide victim, UK.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Jamie K; Jervis, John R

    2010-10-10

    This case report details an electrical resistivity survey to assist the search for a suspected 1-year-old clandestine burial of a murder victim in North Wales in the UK. Conventional search techniques (victim recovery dogs and probing) proved unsuccessful, and with a significant survey area and a high clay content soil precluding GPR as a geophysical search method, a resistivity survey was instead trialled. Ten resistivity grids were collected and site detrended with user-specified, contoured anomalies being generated. The resulting anomalies were compared to anomalies derived from similar-aged, simulated clandestine burial surveys. Seven anomalies with comparative sizes and amplitudes (±3Ω) of the simulated burials were identified within the search area and prioritised for further investigation. The shallowly buried victim was subsequently recovered outside the survey area.

  3. Multidimensional electrical resistivity survey for bedrock detection at the Rieti Plain (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, Ettore; De Donno, Giorgio

    2017-06-01

    The combined use of 1D, 2D and 3D electrical resistivity methods for estimating bedrock depth is presented with an application to a case study located in Central Italy. The site is a narrow basin where two boreholes were drilled reaching the bedrock, which had the greatest depth in the center of the basin. Six vertical electrical soundings were executed along a basin cross-section in order to have a preliminary 1D reconstruction of the bedrock and the overlying alluvial deposits. Inverted resistivity models, show bedrock depths in accordance with the borehole data and a complex subsurface layering of the overburden deposits to be further investigated with 2D and 3D electrical resistivity tomography. Four additional electrical lines, acquired using a pole-dipole array and directed normally to the alignment of the vertical soundings, confirm the 1D results in regards to the bedrock depths, adding additional information about the continuity of the bedrock within the basin, and giving a high resolution image of the shallower sediments. Through the tomographic inversion of 3D data we were able to reconstruct a volumetric image of the carbonate formation at the study site. Finally, the tomographic models have been validated through the inversion of a synthetic dataset, with the aim to attain a final model, whose synthetic model is comparable with the field one. The final model, estimated using an iterative procedure that minimises the absolute difference between field and synthetic models, has retrieved a bedrock resistivity one order of magnitude higher than that obtained from field data inversion.

  4. Electrical Resistance of SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for Damage Detection and Life-Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory; Xia, Zhenhai

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are suitable for high temperature structural applications such as turbine airfoils and hypersonic thermal protection systems due to their low density high thermal conductivity. The employment of these materials in such applications is limited by the ability to accurately monitor and predict damage evolution. Current nondestructive methods such as ultrasound, x-ray, and thermal imaging are limited in their ability to quantify small scale, transverse, in-plane, matrix cracks developed over long-time creep and fatigue conditions. CMC is a multifunctional material in which the damage is coupled with the material s electrical resistance, providing the possibility of real-time information about the damage state through monitoring of resistance. Here, resistance measurement of SiC/SiC composites under mechanical load at both room temperature monotonic and high temperature creep conditions, coupled with a modal acoustic emission technique, can relate the effects of temperature, strain, matrix cracks, fiber breaks, and oxidation to the change in electrical resistance. A multiscale model can in turn be developed for life prediction of in-service composites, based on electrical resistance methods. Results of tensile mechanical testing of SiC/SiC composites at room and high temperatures will be discussed. Data relating electrical resistivity to composite constituent content, fiber architecture, temperature, matrix crack formation, and oxidation will be explained, along with progress in modeling such properties.

  5. Rainfall infiltration process in mountain headwater region using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Yamamiya, K.; Shimada, J.

    2008-12-01

    Many researchers have studied about the hydrological process, especially rainfall-runoff process, in the headwater region using multi hydrometric methods. Since the possibility has been recognized that bedrock groundwater has important role to play in the rainfall-runoff process, it is important to comprehend the rainfall infiltration process within fluctuations of bedrock groundwater. However, we would need many hydrological instruments to understand this process precisely. So we have applied electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method to understand rainfall infiltration process in the area that is estimated the contribution of bedrock groundwater for rainfall-runoff processes. Resistivity changes with the saturation rate of the pore fluid in the subsurface material. So it is possible to estimate spatial and temporal distribution of subsurface water by using ERT. In this study, we will estimate rainfall infiltration process in mountain headwater region using resistivity method. The study area is the Mamushi-dani watershed in Shiranui, Kumamoto, Japan. We described the bedrock groundwater storage systems using resistivity method in this watershed previously. Resistivity has been observed at 2 measurement lines in slope areas of this watershed. Both measurement lines have 47m in length, 1m electrode spacing and 48 electrodes. We used the multi-electrode system, NEXT-400(Kowa Co. Ltd., Japan) for measuring apparent resistivity and the application software, E-tomo (Diaconsultant Co. Ltd., Japan) for inversion of apparent resistivity data. The observed resistivity data were compared with water head observed at borehole and specific discharge observed at foot of the watershed. Inverted resistivity profiles and observed hydrological data showed the interface between saturated and unsaturated zone. During rainfall occurs, resistivity in surface area gets lower than that before the rainfall and resistivity in some part of unsaturated area shows increasing tendency. Both

  6. The use of electrical resistivity tomography and borehole to characterize leachate distribution in Laogang landfill, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shi-Jin; Bai, Zhen-Bai; Cao, Ben-Yi; Lu, Shi-Feng; Ai, Shu-Gang

    2017-08-09

    Leachate is a polluting liquid which may cause harmful effects on human health or the environment without a tightly control manner. The leachate management is an important part of the design and operation of bioreactor landfills. To detect the leachate distribution in Laogang Landfill, China, the measurement of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was carried out in three areas with different ages. ERT method proved to be an effective non-invasive geophysical method in bioreactor landfills, and the physical properties of waste samples obtained by boreholes were tested in a laboratory. The correlation between the resistivity and the moisture content was described by Archie's law. The result shows that the moisture content of fresh waste is inhomogeneous, while that of aged waste increases with depth. A pseudo 3D model of the moisture content was proposed to improve the understanding of leachate distribution and exhibit the accuracy of the ERT method.

  7. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of electric... MSHA-approved flame-resistant cable. The cable shall be of the type that the splice kit is designed to... the cable shall be compatible with the splice kit design. Each splice shall be made in accordance...

  8. Indications of vigor loss after fire in Caribbean pine (Pinus caribaea) from electrical resistance measurements

    Treesearch

    T.E. Paysen; A.L. Koonce; E. Taylor; M.O. Rodriquez

    2006-01-01

    In May 1993, electrical resistance measurements were performed on trees in burned and unburned stands of Caribbean pine (Pinus caribaea Mor.) in north-eastern Nicaragua to determine whether tree vigor was affected by fire. An Osmose model OZ-67 Shigometer with digital readout was used to collect the sample electrical resistance data. Computer-...

  9. Three dimensional modeling and inversion of Borehole-surface Electrical Resistivity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Liu, D.; Liu, Y.; Qin, M.

    2013-12-01

    After a long time of exploration, many oil fields have stepped into the high water-cut period. It is sorely needed to determining the oil-water distribution and water flooding front. Borehole-surface electrical resistivity tomography (BSERT) system is a low-cost measurement with wide measuring scope and small influence on the reservoir. So it is gaining more and more application in detecting water flooding areas and evaluating residual oil distribution in oil fields. In BSERT system, current is connected with the steel casing of the observation well. The current flows along the long casing and transmits to the surface through inhomogeneous layers. Then received electric potential difference data on the surface can be used to inverse the deep subsurface resistivity distribution. This study presents the 3D modeling and inversion method of electrical resistivity data. In an extensive literature, the steel casing is treated as a transmission line current source with infinite small radius and constant current density. However, in practical multi-layered formations with different resistivity, the current density along the casing is not constant. In this study, the steel casing is modeled by a 2.5e-7 ohm-m physical volume that the casing occupies in the finite element mesh. Radius of the casing can be set to a little bigger than the true radius, and this helps reduce the element number and computation time. The current supply point is set on the center of the top surface of the physical volume. The homogeneous formation modeling result shows the same precision as the transmission line current source model. The multi-layered formation modeling result shows that the current density along the casing is high in the low-resistivity layer, and low in the high-resistivity layer. These results are more reasonable. Moreover, the deviated and horizontal well can be simulated as simple as the vertical well using this modeling method. Based on this forward modeling method, the

  10. Effects of microcrack evolution on the electrical resistance of Cu thin films on flexible PI substrates during cyclic-bend testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Atanu; Park, Ki-Seong; Choi, Shi-Hoon

    2017-07-01

    Cyclic-bend testing was conducted on flexible Cu-clad laminate (FCCL) to investigate the correlation between electrical resistance and the evolution of microcracks. During the test, the change in the electrical resistance of the FCCL was monitored using two-point probe method. The variation in the electrical resistance of the FCCL with respect to the bending cycle can be divided into three stages according to the slope. In order to reveal the microcracks in Cu thin film and how they contribute to the variation in electrical resistance, quantitative analysis of the microcracks was conducted on the surface and cross-section of the deformed Cu thin films using field emission scanning electron microscopy. Analysis showed that the simultaneous extensive evolution of microcracks in the tension and compression zones were main contributors to increase the electrical resistance following specific critical bending cycles.

  11. Monitoring crack development in fiber concrete beam by using electrical resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiwattanachang, N.; Giao, P. H.

    2011-10-01

    Accurate detection of damaged concrete zones plays an important role in selecting the proper remedial technique. This study presents results from an application of the electrical imaging method to monitor the development of cracks in fiber concrete beams. The study showed that resistivity measurements on the concrete specimens were able to detect the increase of concrete resistivity with the curing time that reached about 65 Ωm after 28 days of curing. A similar development trend of concrete compressive strength was also found. Two types of cracks were investigated, i.e., artificial cracks made of plastic sheets inserted in concrete and cracks developed during a four-step loading test. A mini-electric imaging survey with Wenner array was conducted on the tension face of the beams. To deal with the effect of the beam size new procedures to correct resistivity measurements before inversion were proposed and successfully applied in this study. The results indicated that both crack direction and depth could be accurately determined in the inverted resistivity sections.

  12. Noncontact technique for measuring the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of electrostatically levitated materials.

    PubMed

    Rustan, G E; Spyrison, N S; Kreyssig, A; Prozorov, R; Goldman, A I

    2012-10-01

    We describe the development of a new method for measuring the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of high temperature liquids and solids. The technique combines a tunnel diode oscillator with an electrostatic levitation furnace to perform noncontact measurements on spherical samples 2-3 mm in diameter. The tank circuit of the oscillator is inductively coupled to the sample, and measurements of the oscillator frequency as a function of sample temperature can be translated into changes in the sample's electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility. Particular emphasis is given on the need to improve the positional stability of the levitated samples, as well as the need to stabilize the temperature of the measurement coil. To demonstrate the validity of the technique, measurements have been performed on solid spheres of pure zirconium and low-carbon steel. In the case of zirconium, while absolute values of the resistivity were not determined, the temperature dependence of the resistivity was measured over the range of 640-1770 K and found to be in good agreement with literature data. In the case of low-carbon steel, the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition was clearly observable and, when combined with thermal data, appears to occur simultaneously with the solid-solid structural transition.

  13. Electrical resistivity tomography to quantify in situ liquid content in a full-scale dry anaerobic digestion reactor.

    PubMed

    André, L; Lamy, E; Lutz, P; Pernier, M; Lespinard, O; Pauss, A; Ribeiro, T

    2016-02-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method is a non-intrusive method widely used in landfills to detect and locate liquid content. An experimental set-up was performed on a dry batch anaerobic digestion reactor to investigate liquid repartition in process and to map spatial distribution of inoculum. Two array electrodes were used: pole-dipole and gradient arrays. A technical adaptation of ERT method was necessary. Measured resistivity data were inverted and modeled by RES2DINV software to get resistivity sections. Continuous calibration along resistivity section was necessary to understand data involving sampling and physicochemical analysis. Samples were analyzed performing both biochemical methane potential and fiber quantification. Correlations were established between the protocol of reactor preparation, resistivity values, liquid content, methane potential and fiber content representing liquid repartition, high methane potential zones and degradations zones. ERT method showed a strong relevance to monitor and to optimize the dry batch anaerobic digestion process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of subsurface stratigraphy along the lower American River floodplain using electrical resistivity, Sacramento, California, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Bethany L.; Powers, Michael H.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2014-01-01

    In July 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, completed a geophysical survey using electrical resistivity along an approximately 6-mile reach of the lower American River in Sacramento, California, to map near-surface lithological variations. This survey is a part of a manifold and comprehensive study of river-flow dynamics and geologic boundary-property knowledge necessary to estimate scour potential and levee erosion risk. Data were acquired on the left (south or west) bank between river mile 5 and 10.7 as well as a short section on the right bank from river mile 5.4 to 6. Thirteen direct-current resistivity profiles and approximately 8.3 miles of capacitively coupled resisistivity data were acquired along accessible areas of the floodplain between the levee and river bank. Capacitively coupled resistivity was used as a reconnaissance tool, because it allowed for greater spatial coverage of data but with lower resolution and depth of investigation than the DC resistivity method. The study area contains Pleistocene-age alluvial deposits, dominated by gravels, sands, silts, and clays, that vary in both lateral extent and depth. Several generations of lithologic logs were used to help interpret resistivity variations observed in the resistivity models.

  15. Electrical Bonding: A Survey of Requirement, Methods, and Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. W.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides information helpful to engineers imposing electrical bonding requirements, reviewing waiver requests, or modifying specifications on various space programs. Electrical bonding specifications and some of the processes used in the United States have been reviewed. This document discusses the specifications, the types of bonds, the intent of each, and the basic requirements where possible. Additional topics discussed are resistance versus impedance, bond straps, corrosion, finishes, and special applications.

  16. Ultrahigh Oxidation Resistance and High Electrical Conductivity in Copper-Silver Powder.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaxiang; Li, Yunping; Wang, Zhongchang; Bian, Huakang; Hou, Yuhang; Wang, Fenglin; Xu, Guofu; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yong

    2016-12-22

    The electrical conductivity of pure Cu powder is typically deteriorated at elevated temperatures due to the oxidation by forming non-conducting oxides on surface, while enhancing oxidation resistance via alloying is often accompanied by a drastic decline of electrical conductivity. Obtaining Cu powder with both a high electrical conductivity and a high oxidation resistance represents one of the key challenges in developing next-generation electrical transferring powder. Here, we fabricate a Cu-Ag powder with a continuous Ag network along grain boundaries of Cu particles and demonstrate that this new structure can inhibit the preferential oxidation in grain boundaries at elevated temperatures. As a result, the Cu-Ag powder displays considerably high electrical conductivity and high oxidation resistance up to approximately 300 °C, which are markedly higher than that of pure Cu powder. This study paves a new pathway for developing novel Cu powders with much enhanced electrical conductivity and oxidation resistance in service.

  17. Ultrahigh Oxidation Resistance and High Electrical Conductivity in Copper-Silver Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiaxiang; Li, Yunping; Wang, Zhongchang; Bian, Huakang; Hou, Yuhang; Wang, Fenglin; Xu, Guofu; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yong

    2016-12-01

    The electrical conductivity of pure Cu powder is typically deteriorated at elevated temperatures due to the oxidation by forming non-conducting oxides on surface, while enhancing oxidation resistance via alloying is often accompanied by a drastic decline of electrical conductivity. Obtaining Cu powder with both a high electrical conductivity and a high oxidation resistance represents one of the key challenges in developing next-generation electrical transferring powder. Here, we fabricate a Cu-Ag powder with a continuous Ag network along grain boundaries of Cu particles and demonstrate that this new structure can inhibit the preferential oxidation in grain boundaries at elevated temperatures. As a result, the Cu-Ag powder displays considerably high electrical conductivity and high oxidation resistance up to approximately 300 °C, which are markedly higher than that of pure Cu powder. This study paves a new pathway for developing novel Cu powders with much enhanced electrical conductivity and oxidation resistance in service.

  18. Ultrahigh Oxidation Resistance and High Electrical Conductivity in Copper-Silver Powder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiaxiang; Li, Yunping; Wang, Zhongchang; Bian, Huakang; Hou, Yuhang; Wang, Fenglin; Xu, Guofu; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of pure Cu powder is typically deteriorated at elevated temperatures due to the oxidation by forming non-conducting oxides on surface, while enhancing oxidation resistance via alloying is often accompanied by a drastic decline of electrical conductivity. Obtaining Cu powder with both a high electrical conductivity and a high oxidation resistance represents one of the key challenges in developing next-generation electrical transferring powder. Here, we fabricate a Cu-Ag powder with a continuous Ag network along grain boundaries of Cu particles and demonstrate that this new structure can inhibit the preferential oxidation in grain boundaries at elevated temperatures. As a result, the Cu-Ag powder displays considerably high electrical conductivity and high oxidation resistance up to approximately 300 °C, which are markedly higher than that of pure Cu powder. This study paves a new pathway for developing novel Cu powders with much enhanced electrical conductivity and oxidation resistance in service. PMID:28004839

  19. Investigation of degree of saturation in landfill liners using electrical resistivity imaging.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Golam; Hossain, Md Sahadat

    2015-05-01

    During construction of compacted clay liners and evapotranspiration (ET) covers, quality control involves laboratory and field tests in individual lifts. However, the available methods may be inadequate to determine non-uniform compaction conditions, poor bonding of lifts, and/or variable soil composition. Moreover, the applicability of the available methods is restricted, in many instances, when spatial variability of the subsurface is expected. Resistivity Imaging (RI) is a geophysical method employed to investigate a large area in a rapid and non-destructive way. High resistivity of clay liner soil is an indication of a low degree of saturation, high air-filled voids, and poor lift bonding. To utilize RI as a quality control tool in a landfill liner, it is important to determine the saturation condition of the compacted soils because compaction and permeability of liner soil are functions of degrees of saturation. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the degree of saturation of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill liner, using RI. Electrical resistivity tests were performed in the laboratory, at varied moisture contents and dry unit weights, on four types of soil samples, i.e., highly plastic clay (CH), low plastic clay (CL), Ca-bentonite, and kaolinite. According to the experimental results, electrical resistivity of the specimens decreased as much as 15.3 times of initial value with increase in the degrees of saturation from 23% to 100%. In addition, cation exchange capacity (CEC) substantially affected resistivity. A multiple linear regression (MLR) model was developed to correlate electrical resistivity with degree of saturation and CEC using experimental results. Additionally, RI tests were conducted on compacted clay liners to determine the degrees of saturation, and predicted degrees of saturation were compared with the in-situ density tests. The study results indicated that the developed model can be utilized for liner soils having CEC

  20. A laboratory study of the correlation between the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Xiaopei; Du, Lizhi

    2017-10-01

    Thermal conductivity k (Wm- 1 K- 1) and electrical resistivity ρ (Ω·m) depend on common parameters such as grain size, dry density and saturation, allowing the finding of a relationship between both parameters. In this paper, we found a linear quantitative formula between thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of soil. To accomplish this, we measured the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of 57 soil samples in the laboratory; samples included 8 reconstructed soils from the Changchun area (clay, silt, and sand) with approximately 7 different saturation levels. A linear relationship between thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity was found excluding the parameter of soil saturation, and the linear model was validated with undisturbed soils in Changchun area. To fully use this relationship (e.g., by imaging the thermal conductivity of soils with electrical resistivity tomography), further measurements with different soils are needed.

  1. Detection of questionable occlusal carious lesions using an electrical bioimpedance method with fractional electrical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, A. P.; Pino, A. V.; Souza, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the diagnostic performance of an alternative electric bioimpedance spectroscopy technique (BIS-STEP) detect questionable occlusal carious lesions. Six specialists carried out the visual (V), radiography (R), and combined (VR) exams of 57 sound or non-cavitated occlusal carious lesion teeth classifying the occlusal surfaces in sound surface (H), enamel caries (EC), and dentinal caries (DC). Measurements were based on the current response to a step voltage excitation (BIS-STEP). A fractional electrical model was used to predict the current response in the time domain and to estimate the model parameters: Rs and Rp (resistive parameters), and C and α (fractional parameters). Histological analysis showed caries prevalence of 33.3% being 15.8% hidden caries. Combined examination obtained the best traditional diagnostic results with specificity = 59.0%, sensitivity = 70.9%, and accuracy = 60.8%. There were statistically significant differences in bioimpedance parameters between the H and EC groups (p = 0.016) and between the H and DC groups (Rs, p = 0.006; Rp, p = 0.022, and α, p = 0.041). Using a suitable threshold for the Rs, we obtained specificity = 60.7%, sensitivity = 77.9%, accuracy = 73.2%, and 100% of detection for deep lesions. It can be concluded that BIS-STEP method could be an important tool to improve the detection and management of occlusal non-cavitated primary caries and pigmented sites.

  2. Detection of questionable occlusal carious lesions using an electrical bioimpedance method with fractional electrical model

    SciTech Connect

    Morais, A. P.; Pino, A. V.; Souza, M. N.

    2016-08-15

    This in vitro study evaluated the diagnostic performance of an alternative electric bioimpedance spectroscopy technique (BIS-STEP) detect questionable occlusal carious lesions. Six specialists carried out the visual (V), radiography (R), and combined (VR) exams of 57 sound or non-cavitated occlusal carious lesion teeth classifying the occlusal surfaces in sound surface (H), enamel caries (EC), and dentinal caries (DC). Measurements were based on the current response to a step voltage excitation (BIS-STEP). A fractional electrical model was used to predict the current response in the time domain and to estimate the model parameters: Rs and Rp (resistive parameters), and C and α (fractional parameters). Histological analysis showed caries prevalence of 33.3% being 15.8% hidden caries. Combined examination obtained the best traditional diagnostic results with specificity = 59.0%, sensitivity = 70.9%, and accuracy = 60.8%. There were statistically significant differences in bioimpedance parameters between the H and EC groups (p = 0.016) and between the H and DC groups (Rs, p = 0.006; Rp, p = 0.022, and α, p = 0.041). Using a suitable threshold for the Rs, we obtained specificity = 60.7%, sensitivity = 77.9%, accuracy = 73.2%, and 100% of detection for deep lesions. It can be concluded that BIS-STEP method could be an important tool to improve the detection and management of occlusal non-cavitated primary caries and pigmented sites.

  3. Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods

    DOEpatents

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2012-09-04

    Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods are described. According to one aspect, an electrical energy consumption control apparatus includes processing circuitry configured to receive a signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by a plurality of loads at a site, to compare the signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by the plurality of loads at the site with a desired substantially sinusoidal waveform of current of electrical energy which is received at the site from an electrical power system, and to use the comparison to control an amount of the electrical energy which is consumed by at least one of the loads of the site.

  4. Electrical resistivity measurement of Fe-0.6%Cu alloy irradiated by neutrons at 14-19 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Q.; Yokotani, T.; Sato, K.; Hori, F.

    2016-12-01

    Electrical resistivity measurement is a useful experimental method for investigating the recovery of defects that are induced by irradiation in metals and alloys. In this study, an Fe-0.6%Cu alloy, used to model steel from old commercial reactor pressure vessels, was irradiated by neutrons at a low temperature range of 14-19 K with a dose of about 1.3 × 1020 neutrons/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) in the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR); electrical resistivity measurement was performed during irradiation and after annealing of the irradiated sample from 20 K to 300 K to investigate the migration of point defects in the Fe-0.6%Cu alloy. The electrical resistivity was measured at 14-19 K. With the increase in the irradiation dose, the electrical resistivity increased linearly. Four peaks appeared at 70 K, 100 K, 150 K, and 260 K, in the change of electrical resistivity during annealing of the irradiated sample up to 300 K. The former two peaks were caused by the recombination of interstitials and vacancies, and the latter two peaks were caused by the formation of interstitial clusters and the migration of vacancies. Compared with previous electron irradiation results, the former two peaks represent new data, as does the ratio of recombination caused by close-pair and correlation to that caused by migrations of mixed-interstitials Fe-Cu and vacancies decreased in neutron irradiation.

  5. Joint 3D seismic travel time and full channel electrical resistivity inversion with cross gradient structure constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Near surface geophysical exploration for the purpose of engineering design or construction For this reason, geophysical imaging demands a higher resolution and a better quantitative interpretation. Seismic travel time tomography and direct current resistivity tomography are two main methods for the near surface survey. Because of the limited coverage of observation system and the complex physical relationship between physical parameters and observations, individual geophysical method suffers issues of non-uniqueness and resolution limitation to some degree. We have developed a joint inversion method to combine seismic travel time tomography and full channel resistivity tomography. For the full channel resistivity survey, it uses two electrodes for power supply and all the other electrodes for recording. Compared with the traditional resistivity method, it collects more data and has a better model converge. Our joint inversion strategy relies on the structure constraint enforced through minimizing cross gradients between seismic velocity and resistivity models (Gallardo, 2003). For resistivity tomography, sensitivity kernels are obtained through the adjoint method by solving the electrostatic field equation with the finite-difference method. For seismic travel time tomography, ray paths and travel times are calculated using the fast marching method. We have tested our joint inversion method for a 2D cross-hole problem where two small zones with high and low velocity/resistivity anomalies. Seismic/electrical sources/receivers are installed in two boreholes. For separate seismic inversion, the smearing effect is evident and two anomaly zones are distorted and misplaced. For separate electric resistivity inversion, although two anomaly zones are positioned correctly their values are not accurate. By joint inversion, two velocity anomaly zones are clearly imaged and the smearing effect is greatly reduced. In comparison, for the resistivity model, the two anomaly zones

  6. Electric-field-modulated nonvolatile resistance switching in VO₂/PMN-PT(111) heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Bowen; Gao, Guanyin; Xu, Haoran; Chen, Feng; Tan, Xuelian; Chen, Pingfan; Wang, Lingfei; Wu, Wenbin

    2014-04-09

    The electric-field-modulated resistance switching in VO2 thin films grown on piezoelectric (111)-0.68Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.32PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates has been investigated. Large relative change in resistance (10.7%) was observed in VO2/PMN-PT(111) hererostructures at room temperature. For a substrate with a given polarization direction, stable resistive states of VO2 films can be realized even when the applied electric fields are removed from the heterostructures. By sweeping electric fields across the heterostructure appropriately, multiple resistive states can be achieved. These stable resistive states result from the different stable remnant strain states of substrate, which is related to the rearrangements of ferroelectric domain structures in PMN-PT(111) substrate. The resistance switching tuned by electric field in our work may have potential applications for novel electronic devices.

  7. A novel in vivo corneal trans-epithelial electrical resistance measurement device.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Masafumi; Mohamed, Yasser Helmy; Onizuka, Naoko; Ueki, Ryotaro; Inoue, Daisuke; Fujikawa, Azusa; Kitaoka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    To develop a device that is capable of easily measuring corneal transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and changes in the corneal barrier function. We had previously developed an in vivo method for measuring corneal TER using intraocular electrode. This method can be used to precisely measure the decline of the corneal barrier function after instillation of benzalkonium chloride (BAC). In order to lessen the invasiveness of that procedure, we further refined the method for measuring the corneal TER by developing electrodes that could be placed on the cornea and in the conjunctival sac instead of inserting them into the anterior chamber. TER was then calculated by subtracting the electrical resistance, which lacked the corneal epithelial input, from the whole electrical resistance that was measured between the electrodes. Slit lamp examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to determine safety of the new device. Corneal TER changes after exposure to 0.02% BAC were determined using the new device as well as SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Slit lamp examination before and after exposure of rabbits' corneas to the sensor confirmed safety of the device. SEM examination revealed no difference of the corneal epithelium which exposed to the new device with normal corneas. SEM and TEM pictures revealed damaged microvilli and tight junctions after instillation of 0.02% BAC. TER change after treatment with 0.02%BAC was similar to those determined by the established anterior chamber method. We succeeded to develop a less invasive device for corneal TER measurement in vivo in animals. This new device may be applicable in the future for clinical use in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrical voltages and resistances measured to inspect metallic cased wells and pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Vail, III, William Banning; Momii, Steven Thomas

    2001-01-01

    A cased well in the earth is electrically energized with A.C. current. Voltages are measured from three voltage measurement electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing while the casing is electrically energized. In a measurement mode, A.C. current is conducted from a first current carrying electrode within the cased well to a remote second current carrying electrode located on the surface of the earth. In a calibration mode, current is passed from the first current carrying electrode to a third current carrying electrode located vertically at a different position within the cased well, where the three voltage measurement electrodes are located vertically in between the first and third current carrying electrodes. Voltages along the casing and resistances along the casing are measured to determine wall thickness and the location of any casing collars present so as to electrically inspect the casing. Similar methods are employed to energize a pipeline to measure the wall thickness of the pipeline and the location of pipe joints to electrically inspect the pipeline.

  9. Electrical voltages and resistances measured to inspect metallic cased wells and pipelines

    DOEpatents

    Vail III, William Banning; Momii, Steven Thomas

    2003-06-10

    A cased well in the earth is electrically energized with A.C. current. Voltages are measured from three voltage measurement electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing while the casing is electrically energized. In a measurement mode, A.C. current is conducted from a first current carrying electrode within the cased well to a remote second current carrying electrode located on the surface of the earth. In a calibration mode, current is passed from the first current carrying electrode to a third current carrying electrode located vertically at a different position within the cased well, where the three voltage measurement electrodes are located vertically in between the first and third current carrying electrodes. Voltages along the casing and resistances along the casing are measured to determine wall thickness and the location of any casing collars present so as to electrically inspect the casing. Similar methods are employed to energize a pipeline to measure the wall thickness of the pipeline and the location of pipe joints to electrically inspect the pipeline.

  10. Electrical voltages and resistances measured to inspect metallic cased wells and pipelines

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William Banning; Momii, Steven Thomas

    2000-01-01

    A cased well in the earth is electrically energized with A.C. current. Voltages are measured from three voltage measurement electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing while the casing is electrically energized. In a measurement mode, A.C. current is conducted from a first current carrying electrode within the cased well to a remote second current carrying electrode located on the surface of the earth. In a calibration mode, current is passed from the first current carrying electrode to a third current carrying electrode located vertically at a different position within the cased well, where the three voltage measurement electrodes are located vertically in between the first and third current carrying electrodes. Voltages along the casing and resistances along the casing are measured to determine wall thickness and the location of any casing collars present so as to electrically inspect the casing. Similar methods are employed to energize a pipeline to measure the wall thickness of the pipeline and the location of pipe joints to electrically inspect the pipeline.

  11. New Electrical Resistivity Tomography approach for karst cave characterization: Castello di Lepre karst cave (Marsico Nuovo, Southern Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerriero, Merilisa; Capozzoli, Luigi; De Martino, Gregory; Perciante, Felice; Gueguen, Erwan; Rizzo, Enzo

    2017-04-01

    Geophysical methods are commonly applied to characterize karst cave. Several geophysical method are used such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), gravimetric prospecting (G), ground penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic methods (S), in order to provide information on cave geometry and subsurface geological structure. In detail, in some complex karst systems, each geophysical method can only give partial information if used in normal way due to a low resolution for deep target. In order to reduce uncertainty and avoid misinterpretations based on a normal use of the electrical resistivity tomography method, a new ERT approach has been applied in karst cave Castello di Lepre (Marsico Nuovo, Basilicata region, Italy) located in the Mezo-Cenozoic carbonate substratum of the Monti della Maddalena ridge (Southern Appenines). In detail, a cross-ERT acquisition system was applied in order to improve the resolution on the electrical resistivity distribution on the surrounding geological structure of a karst cave. The cross-ERT system provides a more uniform model resolution vertically, increasing the resolution of the surface resistivity imaging. The usual cross-ERT is made by electrode setting in two or more borehole in order to acquire the resistivity data distribution. In this work the cross-ERT was made between the electrodes located on surface and along a karst cave, in order to obtain an high resolution of the electrical resistivity distributed between the cave and the surface topography. Finally, the acquired cross-ERT is potentially well-suited for imaging fracture zones since electrical current flow in fractured rock is primarily electrolytic via the secondary porosity associated with the fractures.

  12. Time-lapse electrical resistivity investigations for imaging the grouting injection in shallow subsurface cavities.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad; Park, Samgyu; Kim, Jung Ho; Song, Young Soo; Amjad Sabir, Mohammad; Umar, Muhammad; Tariq, Mohammad; Muhammad, Said

    2014-01-01

    The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway.

  13. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad; Kim, Jung Ho; Song, Young Soo; Amjad Sabir, Mohammad; Umar, Muhammad; Tariq, Mohammad; Muhammad, Said

    2014-01-01

    The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway. PMID:24578621

  14. Magnetic crossover realized by electrical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Hua; Zheng, XiaoHong; Jia, Ting; Zeng, Zhi

    2017-05-01

    Electrical control of molecular-scale magnetisms is a greatly important topic in molecular spintronics. This enables the ultimate-limit manipulation of magnetisms, and has the potential to revolutionize computer technologies. Two mechanisms related to electrical control of molecular-scale magnetisms are concerned in this review. One is the magnetic crossover realized by the electrostatic Stark effect. The other is the magnetic crossover induced by the electron tunneling through the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital under bias voltages or one added electron under gate voltages.

  15. Study on the Reliability Data Analysis Method for Electric Fuze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianjun; Wang, Zhijun

    Some key points of reliable data collection and analytic technology of the electric fuze are discussed in this paper. The produce, collection methods, note proceedings of the reliable data of the electric fuze are also discussed, so reliable database of every component in the electric fuzes should be established, the primary and secondary method - - an analytical method which uses the reliable data of the electric fuze with the application of the fuze products, then the key components which have influences on the reliability can be found.

  16. Electrical resistivity of radiation disordered oxide BaNb sub 4 O sub 6

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, S.A.; Goshchitskii, B.N.; Karkin, A.E.; Mirmelstein, A.V.; Voronin, V.I.; Parkhomenko, V.D. ); Zubkov, V.G.; Perelyaev, V.N.; Berger, I.F.; Kontzevaya, I.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The effect of radiation disorder on the electrical resistivity of the metallic non-superconducting BaNb{sub 4}O{sub 6} oxide has been investigated. It is shown that variation of electrical resistivity {rho} of this compound under disorder is typical of metallic systems, i.e. residual resistivity increases linearly with defect concentration while the temperature dependence of {rho} changes slightly. Such a behavior qualitatively differs from the previously observed unusual behavior of HTSC with similar crystal structure.

  17. Predicting and tracking spatiotemporal moments in electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. O. C.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J.; Bai, L.

    2015-12-01

    Visualisation is an invaluable tool in the study of near sub-surface processes, whether by mathematical modelling or by geophysical imaging. Quantitative analysis can further assist interpretation of the ongoing physical processes, and it is clear that any reliable model should take direct observations into account. Using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), localised areas can be surveyed to produce 2-D and 3-D time-lapse images. This study investigates combining quantitative results obtained via ERT with spatio-temporal motion models in tracer experiments to interpret and predict fluid flow. As with any indirect imaging technique, ERT suffers specific issues with resolution and smoothness as a result of its inversion process. In addition, artefacts are typical in the resulting volumes. Mathematical models are also a source of uncertainty - and in combining these with ERT images, a trade-off must be made between the theoretical and the observed. Using computational imaging, distinct regions of stable resistivity can be directly extracted from a time-slice of an ERT volume. The automated nature, as well the potential for more than one region-of-interest, means that multiple regions can be detected. Using Kalman filters, it is possible to convert the detections into a process state, taking into account pre-defined models and predicting progression. In consecutive time-steps, newly detected features are assigned, where possible, to existing predictions to create tracks that match the tracer model. Preliminary studies looked at a simple motion model, tracking the centre of mass of a tracer plume with assumed constant velocity and mean resistivity. Extending the model to factor in spatial distribution of the plume, an oriented semi-axis is used to represent the centralised second-order moment, with an increasing factor of magnitude to represent the plume dispersion. Initial results demonstrate the efficacy of the approach, significantly improving reliability as the

  18. Research on nonlinear feature of electrical resistance of acupuncture points.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianzi; Mao, Huijuan; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Lina; Liu, Sheng; Shen, Xueyong

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive volt-ampere characteristics detecting system was applied to measure the volt-ampere curves of nine acupuncture points, LU9, HT7, LI4, PC6, ST36, SP6, KI3, LR3, and SP3, and corresponding nonacupuncture points bilaterally from 42 healthy volunteers. Electric currents intensity was increased from 0 μA to 20 μA and then returned to 0 μA again. The results showed that the volt-ampere curves of acupuncture points had nonlinear property and magnetic hysteresis-like feature. On all acupuncture point spots, the volt-ampere areas of the increasing phase were significantly larger than that of the decreasing phase (P < 0.01). The volt-ampere areas of ten acupuncture point spots were significantly smaller than those of the corresponding nonacupuncture point spots when intensity was increase (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.001). And when intensity was decrease, eleven acupuncture point spots showed the same property as above (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.001), while two acupuncture point spots showed opposite phenomenon in which the areas of two acupuncture point spots were larger than those of the corresponding nonacupuncture point spots (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.01). These results show that the phenomenon of low skin resistance does not exist to all acupuncture points.

  19. Electrical resistance sensors record spring flow timing, Grand Canyon, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Adams, Eric A; Monroe, Stephen A; Springer, Abraham E; Blasch, Kyle W; Bills, Donald J

    2006-01-01

    Springs along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, are important ecological and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and are discharge points for regional and local aquifers of the Coconino Plateau. This study evaluated the applicability of electrical resistance (ER) sensors for measuring diffuse, low-stage (<1.0 cm) intermittent and ephemeral flow in the steep, rocky spring-fed tributaries of the south rim. ER sensors were used to conduct a baseline survey of spring flow timing at eight sites in three spring-fed tributaries in Grand Canyon. Sensors were attached to a nearly vertical rock wall at a spring outlet and were installed in alluvial and bedrock channels. Spring flow timing data inferred by the ER sensors were consistent with observations during site visits, with flow events recorded with collocated streamflow gauging stations and with local precipitation gauges. ER sensors were able to distinguish the presence of flow along nearly vertical rock surfaces with flow depths between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Laboratory experiments confirmed the ability of the sensors to monitor the timing of diffuse flow on impervious surfaces. A comparison of flow patterns along the stream reaches and at springs identified the timing and location of perennial and intermittent flow, and periods of increased evapotranspiration.

  20. Research on Nonlinear Feature of Electrical Resistance of Acupuncture Points

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jianzi; Mao, Huijuan; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Lina; Liu, Sheng; Shen, Xueyong

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive volt-ampere characteristics detecting system was applied to measure the volt-ampere curves of nine acupuncture points, LU9, HT7, LI4, PC6, ST36, SP6, KI3, LR3, and SP3, and corresponding nonacupuncture points bilaterally from 42 healthy volunteers. Electric currents intensity was increased from 0 μA to 20 μA and then returned to 0 μA again. The results showed that the volt-ampere curves of acupuncture points had nonlinear property and magnetic hysteresis-like feature. On all acupuncture point spots, the volt-ampere areas of the increasing phase were significantly larger than that of the decreasing phase (P < 0.01). The volt-ampere areas of ten acupuncture point spots were significantly smaller than those of the corresponding nonacupuncture point spots when intensity was increase (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.001). And when intensity was decrease, eleven acupuncture point spots showed the same property as above (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.001), while two acupuncture point spots showed opposite phenomenon in which the areas of two acupuncture point spots were larger than those of the corresponding nonacupuncture point spots (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.01). These results show that the phenomenon of low skin resistance does not exist to all acupuncture points. PMID:23346191

  1. Electrical resistance sensors record spring flow timing, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, E.A.; Monroe, S.A.; Springer, A.E.; Blasch, K.W.; Bills, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Springs along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, are important ecological and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and are discharge points for regional and local aquifers of the Coconino Plateau. This study evaluated the applicability of electrical resistance (ER) sensors for measuring diffuse, low-stage (<1.0 cm) intermittent and ephemeral flow in the steep, rocky spring-fed tributaries of the south rim. ER sensors were used to conduct a baseline survey of spring flow timing at eight sites in three spring-fed tributaries in Grand Canyon. Sensors were attached to a nearly vertical rock wall at a spring outlet and were installed in alluvial and bedrock channels. Spring flow timing data inferred by the ER sensors were consistent with observations during site visits, with flow events recorded with collocated streamflow gauging stations and with local precipitation gauges. ER sensors were able to distinguish the presence of flow along nearly vertical rock surfaces with flow depths between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Laboratory experiments confirmed the ability of the sensors to monitor the timing of diffuse flow on impervious surfaces. A comparison of flow patterns along the stream reaches and at springs identified the timing and location of perennial and intermittent flow, and periods of increased evapotranspiration.

  2. Visualizing Moisture Storage in Basin Lysimeters Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, W.; Munk, J.; Lee, W.

    2010-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was utilized to evaluate soil moisture in two large (10m x 20m x 2m) basin lysimeters over a four-year period in Anchorage, Alaska. The lysimeters were intended to test the efficacy of two competing landfill cover designs, thus water balance information was collected over the entire experimental period. The first lysimeter contained a thin (0.5m) layer of compacted soil within its 2m depth and was planted with local grasses. The second lysimeter contained no compacted soil layer and was planted with deep-rooting woody vegetation to maximize moisture removal via evapotranspiration. After four years of observation, 291mm of moisture percolated through the compacted soil lysimeter compared to 201mm in the evapotranspiration lysimeter. This presentation describes the observed water balance results, discusses efficacy of utilizing compacted soils versus evapotranspiration as the primary means of minimizing infiltration into engineered soil systems, and demonstrates the use of ERT as a technique for visualizing soil moisture storage.

  3. High electric resistant zirconia and/or hafnia ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Mase, S.; Soejima, S.

    1985-03-26

    Disclosed are Zirconia and/or hafnia-containing ceramics having high electric resistivity and mechanical strength which consists essentially of 5-30 mol % of at least one component of Group A consisting of YO, ScO, SmO, EuO, GdO, TbO, DyO, HoO, ErO, TmO, YbO, LuO, CaO and MgO, 5-40 mol % of at least one component of Group B consisting of NbO and TaO and 30-90 mol % of at least one component of Group C consisting of ZrO/sub 2/ and HfO/sub 2/, said ceramics preferably satisfying the following equation ..sigma..((4-(ion valence number of each component of Group A))X(number of mole of each component of Group A))less than or equal to(total number of mole of components of Group B). and crystal phase of said ceramics being preferred to be composed mainly of tetragonal phase.

  4. Detection of Matrix Crack Density of CFRP using an Electrical Potential Change Method with Multiple Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoroki, Akira; Omagari, Kazuomi

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminates are adopted for fuel tank structures of next generation space rockets or automobiles. Matrix cracks may cause fuel leak or trigger fatigue damage. A monitoring system of the matrix crack density is required. The authors have developed an electrical resistance change method for the monitoring of delamination cracks in CFRP laminates. Reinforcement fibers are used as a self-sensing system. In the present study, the electric potential method is adopted for matrix crack density monitoring. Finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to investigate the possibility of monitoring matrix crack density using multiple electrodes mounted on a single surface of a specimen. The FEA reveals the matrix crack density increases electrical resistance for a target segment between electrodes. Experimental confirmation was also performed using cross-ply laminates. Eight electrodes were mounted on a single surface of a specimen using silver paste after polishing of the specimen surface with sandpaper. The two outermost electrodes applied electrical current, and the inner electrodes measured electric voltage changes. The slope of electrical resistance during reloading is revealed to be an appropriate index for the detection of matrix crack density.

  5. Use of a thermal analogy to find electrical resistances of the electrical breaks in the TPX passive stabilization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Redler, K.M.; Baxi, C.B.; Hoffmann, E.H.; Schaubel, K.M.

    1995-12-31

    The inner and outer passive stabilization systems for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) are similar in design in that they both utilize copper passive plates that form large toroidal rings. The rings are electrically continuous except at one toroidal location where a high resistance break must exist. Vertical conductors connect the rings together on either side of the electrical break forming a saddle coil. In order to prevent all the current during initial plasma start-up from flowing through the rings instead of the plasma, the resistances of the breaks for the inner and outer stabilizers must be greater than 70 and 300 {mu}{Omega} respectively. A thermal-electrical analogy has been developed so that 2-D heat transfer finite element codes can be used to find the electrical resistances in the proposed designs of the high resistance breaks. This analogy is based on classical heat transfer theory using an electrical analogy for finding the equivalent conductances of materials that are in series or parallel. In these cases the conductivities of the materials are converted into conduction resistances.

  6. Environmental monitoring of leaks using time-lapsed long electrode electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, Dale F.; Fink, James B.; Loke, Meng H.

    2011-08-01

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. The risk of this occurring may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. Although the method of using long electrodes has been proposed by others, no time-lapse resistivity data have been collected, modeled, and analyzed within a nuclear waste tank farm environment. Therefore, the main objective of this work was to test whether the long electrode method using steel-cased wells can be employed to spatially and temporally track simulated leaks in a highly industrialized setting. A secondary objective was to apply a time-lapse regularization procedure in the inverse modeling code, similar to the 4D tomography approach by Kim et al. (2009), and to test the procedure's effect on the quality of the outcome regarding plume intensity and position. For the synthetic examples, a simple target of varying electrical properties was placed beneath different types of layers of low resistivity to simulate the effects of the infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes were tested on the synthetic domain, and the test cases covered a variety of survey parameters including low and high electrode density, noise, array type, and the explicit location of the wells relative to the target. All data were processed in four dimensions, where the regularization procedure was applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case showed that the long electrode resistivity method could detect relative changes in resistivity that was commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes

  7. Analysis of the Peak Resistance Frequency Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Boshuo; Weiland, James D

    2016-10-01

    This study analyzes the peak resistance frequency (PRF) method described by Mercanzini et al., a method that can easily extract the tissue resistance from impedance spectroscopy for many neural engineering applications but has no analytical description thus far. Mathematical analyses and computer simulations were used to explore underlying principles, accuracy, and limitations of the PRF method. The mathematical analyses demonstrated that the PRF method has an inherent but correctable deviation dependent on the idealness of the electrode-tissue interface, which is validated by simulations. Further simulations show that both frequency sampling and noise affect the accuracy of the PRF method, and in general, it performs less accurately than least squares methods. However, the PRF method achieves simplicity and reduced measurement and computation time at the expense of accuracy. From the qualitative results, the PRF method can work with reasonable precision and simplicity, although its limitation and the idealness of the electrode-tissue interface involved should be taken into consideration. This paper provides a mathematical foundation for the PRF method and its practical implementation.

  8. Electrical resistivity of substitutionally disordered hcp Fe-Si and Fe-Ni alloys: Chemically-induced resistivity saturation in the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomi, Hitoshi; Hirose, Kei; Akai, Hisazumi; Fei, Yingwei

    2016-10-01

    The thermal conductivity of the Earth's core can be estimated from its electrical resistivity via the Wiedemann-Franz law. However, previously reported resistivity values are rather scattered, mainly due to the lack of knowledge with regard to resistivity saturation (violations of the Bloch-Grüneisen law and the Matthiessen's rule). Here we conducted high-pressure experiments and first-principles calculations in order to clarify the relationship between the resistivity saturation and the impurity resistivity of substitutional silicon in hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) iron. We measured the electrical resistivity of Fe-Si alloys (iron with 1, 2, 4, 6.5, and 9 wt.% silicon) using four-terminal method in a diamond-anvil cell up to 90 GPa at 300 K. We also computed the electronic band structure of substitutionally disordered hcp Fe-Si and Fe-Ni alloy systems by means of Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method with coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA). The electrical resistivity was then calculated from the Kubo-Greenwood formula. These experimental and theoretical results show excellent agreement with each other, and the first principles results show the saturation behavior at high silicon concentration. We further calculated the resistivity of Fe-Ni-Si ternary alloys and found the violation of the Matthiessen's rule as a consequence of the resistivity saturation. Such resistivity saturation has important implications for core dynamics. The saturation effect places the upper limit of the resistivity, resulting in that the total resistivity value has almost no temperature dependence. As a consequence, the core thermal conductivity has a lower bound and exhibits a linear temperature dependence. We predict the electrical resistivity at the top of the Earth's core to be 1.12 ×10-6 Ωm, which corresponds to the thermal conductivity of 87.1 W/m/K. Such high thermal conductivity suggests high isentropic heat flow, leading to young inner core age (<0.85 Gyr old) and high initial

  9. Application of electric and electromagnetic prospection methods for the investigation of geological fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaumann, G.; Günther, T.; Musmann, P.; Grinat, M.

    2012-04-01

    Electric and electromagnetic prospection methods are applied in combination and investigated concerning their ability to image geological fault zones with depths up to a few km. Faults are prominent targets to explore because they bear possible flow paths for hydrothermal fluids. Therefore resistivity can become a valuable key parameter. Within the German Research Association gebo (Geothermal Energy and High Performance Drilling, www.gebo-nds.de) the electric/electromagnetic methods are operated alongside with the seismic exploration method. While seismic investigations yield information about the subsurface structure, electric and electromagnetic methods supplement these results with their ability to provide information about the resistivity distribution. Commonly used survey setups are analysed with respect to their investigation depth. Non-standard large-scale DC resistivity measurements in a dipole-dipole configuration energized by a high current source were applied in the field. Furthermore, Transient electromagnetic (TEM) soundings with a high transmitter moment were carried out. The setup in the field was modified in order to reach greater investigation depths. The course of seismic reflectors was incorporated into the inversion of the DC resistivity data by structural constraints. Especially thin low-resistive layers, detected by a 1D interpretation of the TEM data show a correlation to the seismic reflectors. While the 2D DC results give information about the resistivity structure of the fault zone, layers of low resistivity that are poorly determined with the DC measurements can be observed with an adapted TEM survey setup. After an initial investigation of known shallow fault zones more emphasis will be attached to the exploration of deeper structures in the subsurface, significant for geothermal tasks. A concept for a suitable field survey design is under development, especially adapted to the specific geological features in the sedimentary basin of

  10. Methods for rotational speed reduction for alternating current electric motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, A. V.; Glukhanich, D. Y.

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of rotational speed reduction methods for alternating current electric motors are given, assigned to low-speed electric drives of various power levels. The integrated classification of electric machines of well-known types is given, the rotational speed reduction method being used as the basis. The main advantages and disadvantages, defining perspectives for the application in various low-speed electric drives, are explained. The approximate bounds of engineering expediency of the applications of the motors are given for obtaining certain assessments in selection of a type of the drive motor.

  11. Method of fabricating high-density hermetic electrical feedthroughs

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Kedar G.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.; Delima, Terri L.

    2015-06-02

    A method of fabricating electrical feedthroughs selectively removes substrate material from a first side of an electrically conductive substrate (e.g. a bio-compatible metal) to form an array of electrically conductive posts in a substrate cavity. An electrically insulating material (e.g. a bio-compatible sealing glass) is then flowed to fill the substrate cavity and surround each post, and solidified. The solidified insulating material is then exposed from an opposite second side of the substrate so that each post is electrically isolated from each other as well as the bulk substrate. In this manner a hermetic electrically conductive feedthrough construction is formed having an array of electrical feedthroughs extending between the first and second sides of the substrate from which it was formed.

  12. Vertical electrical resistivity sounding (VERS) of tundra and forest tundra soils of Yamal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Ivan; Kostecki, Jakub; Abakumov, Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine electrical resistivity peculiarities of tundra and forest tundra soils and soil-permafrost layers of the Yamal region. Measurements of electrical resistivity of soil and permafrost strata were performed with a portable device LandMapper (to a depth of 300-500 cm). These measurements allow determination of the values of apparent electrical resistivity of soils and permafrost at different depths and determination of the depths of the permafrost table on each key plot. It was found that there are several trends in vertical distribution of apparent electrical resistivity values. The first trend is a monotonous increase in electrical resistivity values to the depth. It may be explained by the increasing electrical resistivity within the soil depth in relation to the increase in permafrost density. The second trend is a sharp decrease replaced by a gradual increase in electrical resistivity values caused by changing of non-frozen friable debris to frozen massive crystalline rock. These differences were related to the type of landscape: flat lowlands composed of friable grounds underlain by permafrost or friable grounds with permafrost underlain by a rock crystalline layer.

  13. A one-dimensional model of solid-earth electrical resistivity beneath Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, Cletus; Love, Jeffrey J.; Pedrie, Kolby; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Rigler, E. Joshua

    2015-11-19

    An estimated one-dimensional layered model of electrical resistivity beneath Florida was developed from published geological and geophysical information. The resistivity of each layer is represented by plausible upper and lower bounds as well as a geometric mean resistivity. Corresponding impedance transfer functions, Schmucker-Weidelt transfer functions, apparent resistivity, and phase responses are calculated for inducing geomagnetic frequencies ranging from 10−5 to 100 hertz. The resulting one-dimensional model and response functions can be used to make general estimates of time-varying electric fields associated with geomagnetic storms such as might represent induction hazards for electric-power grid operation. The plausible upper- and lower-bound resistivity structures show the uncertainty, giving a wide range of plausible time-varying electric fields.

  14. Identification of leachate from livestock mortality burial using electrical resistivity and small-loop EM survey: case history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Ho; Cho, In-Ky; Choi, Kwang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Leachate from livestock mortality burial is harmful to the soil and groundwater environment and adequate assessment approaches are necessary to manage burial sites. Among the methods used to detect leachate, geophysical surveys, including electrical resistivity and electromagnetic (EM) techniques, are used in many engineering approaches to environmental problems, such as identifying contaminant plumes and evaluating hydrogeological conditions. Electrical resistivity, with a small-loop EM survey, was used in this study as a reconnaissance technique to identify the burial shape and distribution of leachate from livestock mortality burial in five small separate zones. We conducted a multi-frequency small-loop EM survey using lattice nets and acquired apparent conductivity values along several parallel and perpendicular lines over a burial site. We also compared geophysical results to the geochemical analysis of samples from both a leachate collection well and a downstream observation well within the study area. Depth slices of apparent conductivities at each frequency (obtained from the small-loop EM survey data) clearly identified the subsurface structure of the burial shape and the extent of leachate transport. Low-resistivity zones, identified from two-dimensional (2D) electrical resistivity imaging results, were matched to the five burial zones (within a depth of 5 m), as well as high electrical conductivity of the leachate obtained from leachate collection wells, and depth slices of the apparent conductivity distribution obtained from the small-loop EM survey. A three-dimensional (3D) inversion of resistivity data provided a detailed 3D structure of the overall burial site and leachate pathways. Moreover, these zones were widely spread over the burial site, indicating that leachate potentially extended through damaged regions of the composite liner to a depth of 10 m along the downstream groundwater flow. Both the small-loop EM method and the electrical

  15. Imaging Pathways in Fractured Rock Using Three-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Judith; Slater, Lee; Johnson, Timothy; Shapiro, Allen; Tiedeman, Claire; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Johnson, Carole; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lacombe, Pierre; Imbrigiotta, Thomas; Lane, John

    2016-03-01

    Major challenges exist in delineating bedrock fracture zones because these cause abrupt changes in geological and hydrogeological properties over small distances. Borehole observations cannot sufficiently capture heterogeneity in these systems. Geophysical techniques offer the potential to image properties and processes in between boreholes. We used three-dimensional cross borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a 9 m (diameter) × 15 m well field to capture high-resolution flow and transport processes in a fractured mudstone contaminated by chlorinated solvents, primarily trichloroethylene. Conductive (sodium bromide) and resistive (deionized water) injections were monitored in seven boreholes. Electrode arrays with isolation packers and fluid sampling ports were designed to enable acquisition of ERT measurements during pulsed tracer injections. Fracture zone locations and hydraulic pathways inferred from hydraulic head drawdown data were compared with electrical conductivity distributions from ERT measurements. Static ERT imaging has limited resolution to decipher individual fractures; however, these images showed alternating conductive and resistive zones, consistent with alternating laminated and massive mudstone units at the site. Tracer evolution and migration was clearly revealed in time-lapse ERT images and supported by in situ borehole vertical apparent conductivity profiles collected during the pulsed tracer test. While water samples provided important local information at the extraction borehole, ERT delineated tracer migration over spatial scales capturing the primary hydrogeological heterogeneity controlling flow and transport. The fate of these tracer injections at this scale could not have been quantified using borehole logging and/or borehole sampling methods alone.

  16. Imaging pathways in fractured rock using three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Judith; Slater, Lee; Johnson, Timothy B.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Tiedeman, Claire R.; Ntlargiannis, Dimitrios; Johnson, Carole D.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Lacombe, Pierre; Imbrigiotta, Thomas; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2016-01-01

    Major challenges exist in delineating bedrock fracture zones because these cause abrupt changes in geological and hydrogeological properties over small distances. Borehole observations cannot sufficiently capture heterogeneity in these systems. Geophysical techniques offer the potential to image properties and processes in between boreholes. We used three-dimensional cross borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a 9 m (diameter) × 15 m well field to capture high-resolution flow and transport processes in a fractured mudstone contaminated by chlorinated solvents, primarily trichloroethylene. Conductive (sodium bromide) and resistive (deionized water) injections were monitored in seven boreholes. Electrode arrays with isolation packers and fluid sampling ports were designed to enable acquisition of ERT measurements during pulsed tracer injections. Fracture zone locations and hydraulic pathways inferred from hydraulic head drawdown data were compared with electrical conductivity distributions from ERT measurements. Static ERT imaging has limited resolution to decipher individual fractures; however, these images showed alternating conductive and resistive zones, consistent with alternating laminated and massive mudstone units at the site. Tracer evolution and migration was clearly revealed in time-lapse ERT images and supported by in situ borehole vertical apparent conductivity profiles collected during the pulsed tracer test. While water samples provided important local information at the extraction borehole, ERT delineated tracer migration over spatial scales capturing the primary hydrogeological heterogeneity controlling flow and transport. The fate of these tracer injections at this scale could not have been quantified using borehole logging and/or borehole sampling methods alone.

  17. Epikarstic storage and doline structural characterization with time-lapse geophysics (seismic refraction & electrical resistivity)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valois, R.; Galibert, P.; Guérin, R.; Mendes, M.; Plagnes, V.

    2011-12-01

    Karst formations are one of the most challenging environments in terms of groundwater, engineering and environmental issues. Geophysical methods can provide useful subsurface information in karst regions concerning groundwater vulnerability assessment, exploitation or hazard estimation. First, dolines are studied as preferential pathways for the protection of karstic aquifer in south France. Geophysics helps to characterize lateral and underground morphologies of such objects and is able to detect doline hidden by the soil cover too. Electrical resistivity and seismic refraction tomographies provide information about dolines filling and could help to propose a genesis scenario. Time-lapse resistivity measurements show that the studied doline is more vulnerable to infiltration on its sides than at its centre. The epikarst could be defined as a perched aquifer above the massive carbonate rocks; it constitutes a highly fractured zone, which water stock capacities. So, the epikarst was investigated with 3D seismic refraction and results show an important velocity anisotropy linked to the fracturing and weathering of the dolostone. The 3D model presents also some large heterogeneities: a corridor with highly weathered dolostone and an unweathered pinnacle. The corridor is probably situated on vertical joints, which have conducted aggressive water. The associated weathering with residual weathered-rock keeping its initial volume could create a "ghost-rock" corridor. So, the epikarst in the dolostones of the Causse du Larzac (France) seems to be composed by "ghost-rock" developed around a specific direction of fractures. Time-lapse electrical resistivity and seismic refraction velocity were carried out on this epikarst to observe the influence of water saturation on the measurements. The results show important variations for both seismic and electrical methods and are localized in the first 6 m: in the weathered zone. So, time-lapse measurements could more easily identify

  18. Electrical Resistance as a NDE Technique to Monitor Processing and Damage Accumulation in SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are suitable for high temperature structural applications such as turbine airfoils and hypersonic thermal protection systems. The employment of these materials in such applications is limited by the ability to process components reliable and to accurately monitor and predict damage evolution that leads to failure under stressed-oxidation conditions. Current nondestructive methods such as ultrasound, x-ray, and thermal imaging are limited in their ability to quantify small scale, transverse, in-plane, matrix cracks developed over long-time creep and fatigue conditions. Electrical resistance of SiC/SiC composites is one technique that shows special promise towards this end. Since both the matrix and the fibers are conductive, changes in matrix or fiber properties should relate to changes in electrical conductivity along the length of a specimen or part. Initial efforts to quantify the electrical resistance of different fiber and different matrix SiC/SiC composites will be presented. Also, the effect of matrix cracking on electrical resistivity for several composite systems will be presented. The implications towards electrical resistance as a technique applied to composite processing, damage detection, and life-modeling will be discussed.

  19. Trilogy possible meteorite impact crater at Bukit Bunuh, Malaysia using 2-D electrical resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinmin, M.; Rosli, S.; Nordiana, M. M.; Mokhtar, S.

    2017-07-01

    Bukit Bunuh situated in Lenggong (Perak) is one of Malaysia's most important areas for archeology that revealed many traces of Malaysia's prehistory. Geophysical method especially 2-D electrical resistivity imaging method is non-destructive which is applied in geo-subsurface study for meteorite impact. The study consists of two stages which are regional and detail study with a total of fourteen survey lines. The survey lines were conducted using Pole-dipole array with 5 m minimum electrode spacing. The results of each stage are correlated and combined to produce detail subsurface resistivity distribution of the study area. It shows that the area consists of two main layers which are overburden and granitic bedrock. The first layer is overburden mix with boulders with resistivity value of 10-800 Ωm while the second layer is granitic bedrock with resistivity value of >1500 Ωm. This study also shows few spotted possibility of uplift (rebound) due to the high impact which suspected from meteorite. A lot of fracture were found within the survey area which could be one of the effect of meteorite impact. The result suggest that Bukit Bunuh is under layer by a complex crater with diameter of crater rim is approximately 5-6 km.

  20. Thermal-electrical properties and resistance stability of silver coated yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yafang; Liu, Hao; Li, Xiaojiu

    2017-03-01

    Thermal-electrical properties and resistance stability of silver yarns was researched to evaluate the performance be a heating element. Three samples of silver coated yarns with different linear density and electrical resistivity, which obtained by market. Silver coated yarns were placed at the high temperature condition for ageing. The electrical resistances of yarns were increased with the ageing process. The infrared photography instrument was used to measurement the temperature variation of silver coated yarns by applied different current on. The result shows that the temperature rise with the power increases.

  1. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical insulation and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Cho, W.D.

    1996-11-01

    Several intermetallic films were applied to high-temperature alloys (V alloys and 304, 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain growth at 1000 C for the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy was investigated to determine stability of the alloy substrate during coating formation by CVD or metallic vapor processes at 800-850 C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and XRD analysis; they were also tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. Results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  2. Direct-current vertical electrical-resistivity soundings in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westjohn, D.B.; Carter, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Ninety-three direct-current vertical electrical-resistivity soundings were conducted in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan from June through October 1987. These soundings were made to assist in mapping the depth to brine in areas where borehole resistivity logs and water-quality data are sparse or lacking. The Schlumberger array for placement of current and potential electrodes was used for each sounding. Vertical electrical-resistivity sounding field data, shifted and smoothed sounding data, and electric layers calculated using inverse modeling techniques are presented. Also included is a summary of the near-surface conditions and depths to conductors and resistors for each sounding location.

  3. Field trials for corrosion inhibitor selection and optimization, using a new generation of electrical resistance probes

    SciTech Connect

    Ridd, B.; Blakset, T.J.; Queen, D.

    1998-12-31

    Even with today`s availability of corrosion resistant alloys, carbon steels protected by corrosion inhibitors still dominate the material selection for pipework in the oil and gas production. Even though laboratory screening tests of corrosion inhibitor performance provides valuable data, the real performance of the chemical can only be studied through field trials which provide the ultimate test to evaluate the effectiveness of an inhibitor under actual operating conditions. A new generation of electrical resistance probe has been developed, allowing highly sensitive and immediate response to changes in corrosion rates on the internal environment of production pipework. Because of the high sensitivity, the probe responds to small changes in the corrosion rate, and it provides the corrosion engineer with a highly effective method of optimizing the use of inhibitor chemicals resulting in confidence in corrosion control and minimizing detrimental environmental effects.

  4. Eradication of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii in burn wounds by antiseptic pulsed electric field.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G Felix; Vecchio, Daniela; Khan, Saiqa; Hamblin, Michael R; Austen, William G; Sheridan, Robert L; Yarmush, Martin L

    2014-06-01

    Emerging bacterial resistance to multiple drugs is an increasing problem in burn wound management. New non-pharmacologic interventions are needed for burn wound disinfection. Here we report on a novel physical method for disinfection: antiseptic pulsed electric field (PEF) applied externally to the infected burns. In a mice model, we show that PEF can reduce the load of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii present in a full thickness burn wound by more than four orders of magnitude, as detected by bioluminescence imaging. Furthermore, using a finite element numerical model, we demonstrate that PEF provides non-thermal, homogeneous, full thickness treatment for the burn wound, thus, overcoming the limitation of treatment depth for many topical antimicrobials. These modeling tools and our in vivo results will be extremely useful for further translation of the PEF technology to the clinical setting, as they provide the essential elements for planning of electrode design and treatment protocol.

  5. Eradication of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii in burn wounds by antiseptic pulsed electric field

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Vecchio, Daniela; Khan, Saiqa; Hamblin, Michael R.; Austen, William G.; Sheridan, Robert L.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging bacterial resistance to multiple drugs is an increasing problem in burn wound management. New non-pharmacologic interventions are needed for burn wound disinfection. Here we report on a novel physical method for disinfection: antiseptic pulsed electric field (PEF) applied externally to the infected burns. In a mice model, we show that PEF can reduce the load of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii present in a full thickness burn wound by more than four orders of magnitude, as detected by bioluminescence imaging. Furthermore, using a finite element numerical model, we demonstrate that PEF provides non-thermal, homogeneous, full thickness treatment for the burn wound, thus, overcoming the limitation of treatment depth for many topical antimicrobials. These modeling tools and our in vivo results will be extremely useful for further translation of the PEF technology to the clinical setting, as they provide the essential elements for planning of electrode design and treatment protocol. PMID:25089285

  6. Improved measurements of the apparent resistivity for small depths in Vertical Electrical Soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faleiro, E.; Asensio, G.; Moreno, J.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a full simulation of a Vertical Electrical Sounding of a multilayer soil using a Wenner array is performed when both the active and the measurement electrodes consist of bare rod length L buried vertically at ground level. The apparent resistivity is calculated for a wide range of values of the separation between the electrodes using the values of the potential between the measuring electrode and a proposed function that characterizes the behavior of the electrodes used which substantially improves the measurements for small depths. The results allow comparing the values of apparent resistivity obtained by known calculation expressions with the results found by using a characteristic function of the electrodes, which is proposed in this paper. In order to obtain a complete vertical sounding of the soil, the convenience of using adapted methods to the type of electrode used in the sounding is discussed.

  7. Estimation of unsaturated hydraulic parameters in sandstone using electrical resistivity tomography under a water injection test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzamian, Mohammad; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Khalil, Mohamed A.

    2015-10-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is an important soil property when determining the potential for water movement in topsoil and in spite of its importance; soil hydraulic conductivity remains one of the most difficult of soil properties to assess. Laboratory methods have limitations due to the size of the samples and taking undisturbed soil samples is usually difficult in sandy soil and in-situ methods are required to estimate hydraulic conductivity. This study was conducted to estimate saturated hydraulic conductivity in unsaturated sandstone using the ground surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). The site is characterized by a deep Arenosol soil with high permeability and a low water retention capacity located at the Semora-Correia, the east of Lisbon. Eight ERT snapshots were collected during a water injection test to produce a sequence of 2D resistivity images. Time-lapse ERT data were inverted using independent data inversion, the difference inversion and simultaneous space-time inversion methods. Afterward, using an in-situ approach resistivity variation models were converted to water content images. By comparing first and second spatial moments of water movement images inferred from the ERT method with unsaturated flow simulation predicted from a numerical solution of Richards' equation, the range of saturated hydraulic conductivity is estimated to be in 0.5-0.7 (cm/min). The evaluation of ERT approach was made using a synthetic test. The results of synthetic test showed that the estimated parameters were significantly influenced by the ERT inversion method and an overprediction of spatial moments and consequently saturated hydraulic conductivity was observed in all inversion methods; however the resistivity models obtained by simultaneous space-time inversion method was more successful in water movement monitoring.

  8. Method of electric powertrain matching for battery-powered electric cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guobao; Xiong, Lu; Zhang, Lijun; Yu, Zhuoping

    2013-05-01

    The current match method of electric powertrain still makes use of longitudinal dynamics, which can't realize maximum capacity for on-board energy storage unit and can't reach lowest equivalent fuel consumption as well. Another match method focuses on improving available space considering reasonable layout of vehicle to enlarge rated energy capacity for on-board energy storage unit, which can keep the longitudinal dynamics performance almost unchanged but can't reach lowest fuel consumption. Considering the characteristics of driving motor, method of electric powertrain matching utilizing conventional longitudinal dynamics for driving system and cut-and-try method for energy storage system is proposed for passenger cars converted from traditional ones. Through combining the utilization of vehicle space which contributes to the on-board energy amount, vehicle longitudinal performance requirements, vehicle equivalent fuel consumption level, passive safety requirements and maximum driving range requirement together, a comprehensive optimal match method of electric powertrain for battery-powered electric vehicle is raised. In simulation, the vehicle model and match method is built in Matlab/simulink, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) is chosen as a test condition. The simulation results show that 2.62% of regenerative energy and 2% of energy storage efficiency are increased relative to the traditional method. The research conclusions provide theoretical and practical solutions for electric powertrain matching for modern battery-powered electric vehicles especially for those converted from traditional ones, and further enhance dynamics of electric vehicles.

  9. Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry

    1988-01-01

    A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself.

  10. Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.

    1988-03-15

    A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself. 4 figs.

  11. Corrosion-resistant, electrically-conductive plate for use in a fuel cell stack

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J David; Mawdsley, Jennifer R; Niyogi, Suhas; Wang, Xiaoping; Cruse, Terry; Santos, Lilia

    2010-04-20

    A corrosion resistant, electrically-conductive, durable plate at least partially coated with an anchor coating and a corrosion resistant coating. The corrosion resistant coating made of at least a polymer and a plurality of corrosion resistant particles each having a surface area between about 1-20 m.sup.2/g and a diameter less than about 10 microns. Preferably, the plate is used as a bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cell stack.

  12. Electrical Properties of Materials for Elevated Temperature Resistance Strain Gage Application. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to study the electrical resistances of materials that are potentially useful as resistance strain gages at 1000 C. Transition metal carbides and nitrides, boron carbide and silicon carbide were selected for the experimental phase of this research. Due to their low temperature coefficient of resistance and good stability, TiC, ZrC, B sub 4 C and beta-SiC are suggested as good candidates for high temperature resistance strain gage applications.

  13. Contact resistance extraction methods for short- and long-channel carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Sanchez, Anibal; Claus, Martin; Mothes, Sven; Schröter, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Three different methods for the extraction of the contact resistance based on both the well-known transfer length method (TLM) and two variants of the Y-function method have been applied to simulation and experimental data of short- and long-channel CNTFETs. While for TLM special CNT test structures are mandatory, standard electrical device characteristics are sufficient for the Y-function methods. The methods have been applied to CNTFETs with low and high channel resistance. It turned out that the standard Y-function method fails to deliver the correct contact resistance in case of a relatively high channel resistance compared to the contact resistances. A physics-based validation is also given for the application of these methods based on applying traditional Si MOSFET theory to quasi-ballistic CNTFETs.

  14. Method for electrically isolating an electrically conductive member from another such member

    DOEpatents

    Tsang, K.L.; Chen, Y.

    1984-02-09

    The invention relates to methods for electrically isolating a first electrically conductive member from another such member by means of an electrically insulating medium. In accordance with the invention, the insulating medium is provided in the form of MgO which contains a dopant selected from lithium, copper, cobalt, sodium, silver, gold and hydrogen. The dopant is present in the MgO in an amount effective to suppress dielectric breakdown of the MgO, even at elevated temperatures and in the presence of electrical fields.

  15. Determination of the electrical resistivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, O. A.; Il'in, O. I.; Rubashkina, M. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Fedotov, A. A.; Tsukanova, O. G.

    2015-07-01

    Techniques are developed to determine the resistance per unit length and the electrical resistivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA CNTs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These techniques are used to study the resistance of VA CNTs. The resistance of an individual VA CNT calculated with the AFM-based technique is shown to be higher than the resistance of VA CNTs determined by the STM-based technique by a factor of 200, which is related to the influence of the resistance of the contact of an AFM probe to VA CNTs. The resistance per unit length and the electrical resistivity of an individual VA CNT 118 ± 39 nm in diameter and 2.23 ± 0.37 μm in height that are determined by the STM-based technique are 19.28 ± 3.08 kΩ/μm and 8.32 ± 3.18 × 10-4 Ω m, respectively. The STM-based technique developed to determine the resistance per unit length and the electrical resistivity of VA CNTs can be used to diagnose the electrical parameters of VA CNTs and to create VA CNT-based nanoelectronic elements.

  16. Combined DC Resistivity Survey and Electric Conductivity- Dielectric Permittivity Measurement at Sag Pond near Lembang Fault, West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iryanti, Mimin; Srigutomo, Wahyu; Bijaksana, Satria; Setiawan, Tedy

    2016-08-01

    Lembang Fault is a normal fault situated at the southern flank of Tangkuban Parahu Volcano in West Java Indonesia. The fault's movement may have caused the formation of sag pond in the vicinity of its which is characterized by the soil layers of the sag pond. The characteristics of the soil can be examined based on its electrical properties such as conductivity (the inverse of resistivity) and dielectric permittivity. Direct field measurement was conducted using DC-resistivity Wenner-Schlumberger method on the sag pond as well as laboratory resistivity measurement of cores taken from the sag pond. Two resistivity crosssections were obtained after performing 2D inversion of the data which reveal that the resistivity distribution consist of a resistive layer (40-60 ohm.m) overlying a medium resistive layer (30-35 ohm.m). The third layer has relatively low resistivity of 16-25 ohm.m. At the intersection of these two lines we took coring samples down to depth of 5 m below surface and measured the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity for each 1 cm of sample using EM-50 data logger. Results from both field and laboratory measurement were analysed to get a better understanding of the sag pond.

  17. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) Applied to Karst Carbonate Aquifers: Case Study from Amdoun, Northwestern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhaounia, Belgacem; Ilondo, Batobo Ountsche; Gabtni, Hakim; Sami, Khomsi; Bédir, Mourad

    2016-04-01

    The Amdoun region is characterized by a high degree of karstification due to the climate impact (±1500 mm year-1) and the development of fracture network. Survey using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is deployed to provide a cost-effective characterization of the subsurface karst environments. A total of seven ERT profiles with lengths of 315 m were evaluated at the Béja governorate (NW Tunisia). The area represents a small syncline of Boudabbous limestone rocks (Lower Eocene), which is covered by a thin layer of clay. In this study, an ERT survey was conducted to examine the spatial distribution and shape of underground cavities in the karst area in Jebel Sabah anticline and Aïn Sallem-Zahret Medien syncline. In this study, geological, hydro-geological and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) methods were applied to determine the geometry of the perched aquifer in the Amdoun region (NW Tunisia). The area is characterized by fractured and karstic limestone aquifer of Late Cretaceous (Abiod Fm.) and Lower Eocene (Boudabbous Fm.). The aquifers have a karstic functioning and drain aquifers of economical interest, despite some wells exploiting them. Seven resistivity profiles were conducted along the survey area at three sites. The orientation, extension and the degree of inclination of those profiles are shown in the location map. The correct resistivity data were interpreted using Earth Imager 2D software. The results of the interpreted geo-electrical sections showed that the resistivity of the carbonate aquifer varied between 2.5 to over 5794 Ωm. The thickness of the perched aquifer ranged from 15 to 50 m, while its depth from the surface lies between 10 and 60 m. The ERT not only provided precise near surface information, but was also very useful for establishing the 3D geometry and the position of several potential cavities and karts. The results show the presence of small to large isolated cavities at various depths. The low resistivity of cavities

  18. Method and apparatus for remote tube crevice detection by current and voltage probe resistance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Kikta, T.J.; Mitchell, R.D.

    1992-11-24

    A method and apparatus for determining the extent of contact between an electrically conducting tube and an electrically conductive tubesheet surrounding the tube, based upon the electrical resistance of the tube and tubesheet. A constant current source is applied to the interior of the electrically conducting tube by probes and a voltmeter is connected between other probes to measure the voltage at the point of current injection, which is inversely proportional to the amount of contact between the tube and tubesheet. Namely, the higher the voltage measured by the voltmeter, the less contact between the tube and tubesheet. 4 figs.

  19. Method and apparatus for remote tube crevice detection by current and voltage probe resistance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Kikta, Thomas J.; Mitchell, Ronald D.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the extent of contact between an electrically conducting tube and an electrically conductive tubesheet surrounding the tube, based upon the electrical resistance of the tube and tubesheet. A constant current source is applied to the interior of the electrically conducting tube by probes and a voltmeter is connected between other probes to measure the voltage at the point of current injection, which is inversely proportional to the amount of contact between the tube and tubesheet. Namely, the higher the voltage measured by the voltmeter, the less contact between the tube and tubesheet.

  20. Review: Some Low-Frequency Electrical Methods for Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring in Hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect

    Revil, Andre; Karaoulis, M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Low-frequency geoelectrical methods include mainly self-potential, resistivity, and induced polarization. These methods are commonly used to solve hydrogeological problems in the shallow subsurface and provide complementary information to each other and to in-situ measurements. The self-potential method is a passive measurement of the electrical response associated with the in-situ generation of current mainly due to the flow of pore water in porous media, a salinity gradient, and/or the concentration of redox-active species. It can be used to visualize groundwater flow patterns, to determine permeability, and to detect preferential flow paths. Electrical resistivity is dependent on the water content, the temperature, the salinity of the pore water, and the clay content and mineralogy. Induced polarization characterizes the ability of rocks to store electrical energy in terms of ion accumulations in the pore water. Electrical resistivity, time-domain and frequency-domain induced polarization methods can be used to image the permeability and the distribution of contaminants in the ground.

  1. Review: Some low-frequency electrical methods for subsurface characterization and monitoring in hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect

    Revil, Andre; Karaoulis, M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Kemna, Andreas

    2012-02-10

    Low-frequency geoelectrical methods include mainly self-potential, resistivity, and induced polarization techniques, which have potential inmany environmental and hydrogeological applications. They provide complementary information to each other and to in-situ measurements. The self-potential method is a passive measurement of the electrical response associated with the in-situ generation of electrical current due to the flow of pore water in porous media, a salinity gradient, and/or the concentration of redoxactive species. Under some conditions, this method can be used to visualize groundwater flow, to determine permeability, and to detect preferential flow paths. Electrical resistivity is dependent on the water content, the temperature, the salinity of the pore water, and the clay content and mineralogy. Time-lapse resistivity can be used to assess the permeability and dispersivity distributions and to monitor contaminant plumes. Induced polarization characterizes the ability of rocks to reversibly store electrical energy. It can be used to image permeability and to monitor chemistry of the pore water-minerals interface. These geophysical methods, reviewed in this paper, should always be used in concert with additional in-situ measurements (e.g. in-situ pumping tests, chemical measurements of the pore water), for instance through joint inversion schemes, which is an area of fertile on-going research.

  2. Double-sensor method for detection of oscillating electric field.

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, Yasunori; Ikeyama, Taeko; Nogi, Yasuyuki

    2011-04-01

    An electric-field sensor consisting of thin copper plates is designed to measure an oscillating electric field produced by charge separations on a plasma column. The sensor installed in a vacuum region around plasma detects charges induced by the electric field on the copper plates. The value of the induced charges depends not only on the strength of the electric field, but also on the design of the sensor. To obtain the correct strength of the electric field, a correction factor arising from the design of the sensor must be known. The factor is calculated numerically using Laplace's equation and compared with a value measured using a uniform electric field in the frequency range of 10-500 kHz. When an external circuit is connected to the sensor to measure the induced charges, the electric field around the sensor is disturbed. Therefore, a double-sensor method for excluding a disturbed component in the measured electric field is proposed. The reliability of the double-sensor method is confirmed by measuring dipole-like and quadrupole-like electric fields. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  3. An Ultra-Precise System for Electrical Resistivity Tomography Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrecque, Douglas J; Adkins, Paula L

    2008-12-09

    The objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of building and operating an ERT system that will allow measurement precision that is an order of magnitude better than existing systems on the market today and in particular if this can be done without significantly greater manufacturing or operating costs than existing commercial systems. Under this proposal, we performed an estimation of measurement errors in galvanic resistivity data that arise as a consequence of the type of electrode material used to make the measurements. In our laboratory, measurement errors for both magnitude and induced polarization (IP) were estimated using the reciprocity of data from an array of electrodes as might be used for electrical resistance tomography using 14 different metals as well as one non-metal - carbon. In a second phase of this study, using archival data from two long-term ERT surveys, we examined long-term survivability of electrodes over periods of several years. The survey sites were: the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (which was sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy as part of the civilian radioactive waste management program), and a water infiltration test at a site adjacent to the New Mexico Institute of Mines and Technology in Socorro, New Mexico (sponsored by the Sandia/Tech vadose program). This enabled us to compare recent values with historical values and determine electrode performance over the long-term as well as the percentage of electrodes that have failed entirely. We have constructed a prototype receiver system, made modifications and revised the receiver design. The revised prototype uses a new 24 bit analog to digital converter from Linear Technologies with amplifier chips from Texas Instruments. The input impedance of the system will be increased from 107 Ohms to approximately 1010 Ohms. The input noise level of the system has been decreased to approximately 10 Nanovolts and system resolution to about 1 Nanovolt at

  4. An Elementary Treatise on Electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerk Maxwell, James; Garnett, William

    2011-06-01

    Editor's preface; Fragment of author's preface; 1. Experiment 1; 2. On the charges of electrified bodies; 3. On electrical work and energy; 4. The electric field; 5. Faraday's law of lines of induction; 6. Particular cases of electrification; 7. Electrical images; 8. Capacity; 9. Electric current; 10. Phenomena of an electric current which flows through heterogeneous media; 11. Methods of maintaining an electric current; 12. On the measurement of electric resistance; 13. On the electric resistance of substances.

  5. Adjoint-state inversion of electric resistivity tomography data of seawater intrusion at the Argentona coastal aquifer (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-López, Sheila; Carrera, Jesús; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Luquot, Linda; Martínez, Laura; Bellmunt, Fabián

    2016-04-01

    Seawater intrusion in aquifers is a complex phenomenon that can be characterized with the help of electric resistivity tomography (ERT) because of the low resistivity of seawater, which underlies the freshwater floating on top. The problem is complex because of the need for joint inversion of electrical and hydraulic (density dependent flow) data. Here we present an adjoint-state algorithm to treat electrical data. This method is a common technique to obtain derivatives of an objective function, depending on potentials with respect to model parameters. The main advantages of it are its simplicity in stationary problems and the reduction of computational cost respect others methodologies. The relationship between the concentration of chlorides and the resistivity values of the field is well known. Also, these resistivities are related to the values of potentials measured using ERT. Taking this into account, it will be possible to define the different resistivities zones from the field data of potential distribution using the basis of inverse problem. In this case, the studied zone is situated in Argentona (Baix Maresme, Catalonia), where the values of chlorides obtained in some wells of the zone are too high. The adjoint-state method will be used to invert the measured data using a new finite element code in C ++ language developed in an open-source framework called Kratos. Finally, the information obtained numerically with our code will be checked with the information obtained with other codes.

  6. Evaluation of the capacitively coupled resistivity (line antenna) method for the characterization of vadose zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Qifei; Wang, Yu-Hsing; Zhao, Kairan

    2014-07-01

    The electrical resistivity survey, traditionally realized by the direct current (DC) resistivity method, has shown great value for characterizing vadose zone dynamics. Compared with the DC resistivity method, the capacitively coupled (CC) resistivity method has a higher ratio of measurement speed to data density, and thus is economically preferred for resistivity surveys that require high data density, e.g., hydrological characterizations. To test the applicability of the CC resistivity method to the study of vadose zone dynamics, we conducted time-lapse resistivity surveys using a commercial CC resistivity (line antenna) system, the OhmMapper, to monitor the water content change in an unsaturated zone due to artificial rainfall infiltration. Special considerations were paid to the inversion of CC resistivity (line antenna) measurements in order to increase the accuracy of inversion results. The derived resistivity of the subsurface clearly captures the water movement in the vadose zone and shows the applicability of the CC resistivity method. The experiment also showed a limitation of the equipment: when the ground surface became extremely conductive, the OhmMapper falsely interpreted the current level. If the wrong current level is identified in the measurement, the measured resistance should be corrected accordingly. The overestimation of the ground resistivity of the CC resistivity method, arising from the decrease in the ground resistivity, was also examined and discussed. Although the measurement bias was found to be negligible in our study, one should still be cautious about it when using the CC resistivity method for similar applications, especially when the measurement is made with a short dipole cable.

  7. Influence of Resistance Method on Motor Winding Temperature Rise Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beges, G.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this article is presentation of influences when measuring the motor winding temperature rise in the scope of safety testing of electrical appliances, with respect to conformity assessment. The temperature measurement in testing is one of the most defined fields of measurement, but it is very important how the measurement is performed. Standards only describe that the resistance method shall be used for determination of the temperature rise (heating) of the winding. The temperature rise is defined as the average temperature rise of the windings above the ambient (surrounding) temperature, at the specified load of the unit under test. It is not explicitly defined how to approach this measurement when using cooling characteristics of the winding for determination of the temperature rise. Since the extrapolation curve is used, the procedure is also very important to obtain a result as accurate as possible. It is important that measurement results and their associated uncertainties are correctly evaluated, and on that basis, appropriate conclusions of conformity of the product with specifications are made. The resistance method influence on the motor winding temperature rise measurement is a case study in this article. The article focuses on the measurement of the temperature rise of electrical motors used in electrical appliances according to the standard EN 60335-1, clause 11 (2002) (identical as standard IEC 60335-1, 2001). In this article, the influencing parameters are analyzed when measuring the temperature rise of electromotor winding. As a case study, concrete measurements are presented. The optimal time after which the performer has to start measurement of the cooling characteristics is analyzed, since the motors are typically mounted deep into appliances. Especially for a collector motor winding, it takes some time for a performer to be able to connect the measuring instrument to collector's lamellas because this contact has an important

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH; MYERS DA

    2009-11-05

    Highly industrialized areas pose significant challenges for surface based electrical resistivity characterization and monitoring due to the high degree of metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically several orders of magnitude more conductive than the desired targets, preventing the geophysicist from obtaining a clear picture of the subsurface. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes in a complex nuclear waste facility to monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank. The leak was simulated by injecting high conductivity fluid in a perforated well and the resistivity measurements were made before and after the leak test. The data were processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure was applied in both the time and space domains. The results showed a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site. The time lapsed regularization parameter had a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post datasets, potentially making calibration of the results to specific hydrogeologic parameters difficult.

  9. Imaging Saltwater Intrusion Along the Coast of Monterey Bay Using Long-Offset Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, M.; Knight, R. J.; Pidlisecky, A.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal regions represent a complex dynamic interface where saltwater intrusion moves seawater landward and groundwater discharge moves freshwater seaward. These processes can have a dramatic impact on water quality, affecting both humans and coastal ecosystems. The ability to map the subsurface distribution of fresh and salt water is a critical step in predicting and managing water quality in coastal regions. This is commonly accomplished using wells, which are expensive and provide point information, which may fail to capture the spatial complexity in subsurface conditions. We present an alternate method for acquiring data, long-offset Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), which is non-invasive, cost effective, and can address the problem of poor spatial sampling. This geophysical method can produce continuous profiles of subsurface electrical resistivity to a depth of 300 m, with spatial resolution on the order of tens of meters. Our research focuses on the Monterey Bay region, where sustained groundwater extraction over the past century has led to significant saltwater intrusion. ERT was acquired along 40 kilometers of the coast using the roll along method, allowing for continuous overlap in data acquisition. Electrodes were spaced every 22.2 m, with a total of 81 electrodes along the 1.8 km active cable length. The data show a complex distribution of fresh and salt water, influenced by geology, groundwater pumping, recharge, and land-use. While the inverted ERT resistivity profiles correspond well with existing data sets and geologic interpretations in the region, the spatial complexity revealed through the ERT data goes beyond what is known from traditional data sources alone. This leads us to conclude that this form of data can be extremely useful in informing and calibrating groundwater flow models, making targeted management decisions, and monitoring changes in subsurface salinities over time.

  10. Electrical resistivity and geotechnical assessment of subgrade soils in southwestern part of Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebisi, N. O.; Ariyo, S. O.; Sotikare, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    The subgrade soils in areas underlain by the slightly Migmatized to Non-migmatized Metasedimentary and Metaigneous rocks of Southwestern Nigeria have been considerably investigated. However, a serious research which employs electrical resistivity method for insight into the profile development, as well as estimation of resistance to deformation for predicting the stability of flexible highway pavements is yet to be carried out. In this study, Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) were carried out after a reconnaissance survey based on stable and unstable locations on the road. Index and strength tests related to road construction were also carried out on bulk samples obtained from stable and failed (unstable) locations of the Ago-Iwoye/Ishara highway. Results show mostly three (3) layers in the profiles with H, HK, and HKH curve types. The subgrade soils below the stable locations have better vertical and interval variations in the resistivities (89-1095 Ωm) to a depth of 3.4 m as against those from the failed portions. Those from the stable locations also have higher specific gravity (2.72), low-medium plasticity and A-2-6 kaolinitic clayey soils with higher compacted density (2090 kg/m3) compared to subgrade soils from the failed locations. On the basis of Califonia Bearing Ratio (CBR), subgrade soils at stable locations have greater strength than those obtained from failed locations. Estimated resistance to deformation (R-value) and resilient modulus (MR) proved to be the overriding parameters for predicting the stability of the flexible highway pavements.

  11. The application of surface electrical and shallow geothermic methods in monitoring network design.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilkeson, R.H.; Cartwright, K.

    1983-01-01

    There are a variety of surface geophysical methods that are routinely used in geologic investigations. The three broad applications of these methods to evaluate the impact of waste disposal on shallow groundwater flow systems are: 1) evaluation of proposed waste disposal sites; 2) monitoring of site performance; and 3) investigation of contaminant migration at existing sites. Electrical and shallow geothermic are two surface geophysical methods that have application to waste disposal investigations. Of the electrical methods, electrical resistivity has the greatest application with a variety of techniques available. The distribution of temperature in shallow geologic materials (shallow geothermics) may define characteristics of shallow groundwater flow systems including zones of recharge and discharge and lithologic variation in the shallow geologic materials.-from Authors

  12. In situ TEM studies of oxygen vacancy migration for electrically induced resistance change effect in cerium oxides.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Zhenzhong; Fu, Wangyang; Liao, Zhaoliang; Liu, Kaihui; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Wang, Enge

    2010-06-01

    Oxide materials with resistance hysteresis are very promising for next generation memory devices. However, the microscopic dynamic process of the resistance change is still elusive. Here, we use in situ transmission electron microscopy method to study the role of oxygen vacancies for the resistance switching effect in cerium oxides. The structure change during oxygen vacancy migration in CeO(2) induced by electric field was in situ imaged inside high-resolution transmission electron microscope, which gives a direct evidence for oxygen migration mechanism for the microscopic origin of resistance change effect in CeO(2). Our results have implications for understanding the nature of resistance change in metal oxides with mixed valence cations, such as fluorite, rutile and perovskite oxides. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

  14. Electrical Resistivity Imaging and Quantification of Water Content Distribution during Infiltration and Redistribution in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, K.; Mirus, B. B.; Nimmo, J. R.; Perkins, K.

    2006-12-01

    Controlled by precipitation, evapotranspiration, recharge, and soil-hydraulic properties, water content is difficult to measure extensively in heterogeneous, natural environments without disturbing the subsurface. Time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) is a cost-effective, minimally invasive method for imaging changes in water content in the vadose zone. Quantifying the relation between resistivity and water content, however, is challenging due to 1) spatially variable resolution, 2) spatial variability in the properties that relate resistivity to water content, 3) possible variability of soil-water salinity, and 4) the need for introduction of auxiliary information to achieve a unique solution of the inverse problem. Although quantitative integration of ERI data into hydrogeologic studies is complicated by these problems, the ERI technique provides copious and spatially exhaustive soft data that would otherwise be unavailable in this heterogeneous environment, especially over the multi-meter scale. We developed a methodology for analyzing ERI measurements in terms of water content, and applied it to ERI data collected during infiltration/redistribution experiments conducted in two soil types in the Mojave National Preserve. One experiment was conducted in an active wash, the other in a highly developed Pleistocene soil. In both, changes in water content through time were estimated from ERI to a depth of approximately 1.5 m during and after ponded infiltration in a 1-m diameter ring. Approximately 40 snapshots over approximately one week along intersecting two-dimensional lines were collected through time for both experiments. To reduce ambiguities in our interpretation, we use numerical simulations of water and electrical flow to convert estimated resistivity to water content, calibrating for variations in resolution, spatially variable petrophysical properties, and fluid salinity on the relation between water content and estimated resistivity

  15. Wireless Damage Monitoring of Laminated CFRP Composites using Electrical Resistance Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-25

    Final report Project Title: Wireless Damage Monitoring of Laminated CFRP composites using Electrical Resistance Change Project number...07 NOV 2007 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Wireless Damage Monitoring of Laminated CFRP composites using Electrical...strain measuring sensors into laminated composite structures [12, 13]. This approach, however, may cause reductions in static and fatigue strengths

  16. Silicone oil contamination and electrical contact resistance degradation of low-force gold contacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Dickrell, Daniel John, III

    2006-02-01

    Hot-switched low-force gold electrical contact testing was performed using a nanomechanical test apparatus to ascertain the sensitivity of simulated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) contact to silicone oil contamination. The observed cyclic contact resistance degradation was dependent on both closure rate and noncontact applied voltage. The decomposition of silicone oil from electrical arcing was hypothesized as the degradation mechanism.

  17. Methods for Estimation of Market Power in Electric Power Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcik, M.; Oleinikova, I.; Junghans, G.; Kolcun, M.

    2012-01-01

    The article is related to a topical issue of the newly-arisen market power phenomenon in the electric power industry. The authors point out to the importance of effective instruments and methods for credible estimation of the market power on liberalized electricity market as well as the forms and consequences of market power abuse. The fundamental principles and methods of the market power estimation are given along with the most common relevant indicators. Furthermore, in the work a proposal for determination of the relevant market place taking into account the specific features of power system and a theoretical example of estimating the residual supply index (RSI) in the electricity market are given.

  18. Integration of electrical resistivity imaging and ground penetrating radar to investigate solution features in the Biscayne Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeboah-Forson, Albert; Comas, Xavier; Whitman, Dean

    2014-07-01

    The limestone composing the Biscayne Aquifer in southeast Florida is characterized by cavities and solution features that are difficult to detect and quantify accurately because of their heterogeneous spatial distribution. Such heterogeneities have been shown by previous studies to exert a strong influence in the direction of groundwater flow. In this study we use an integrated array of geophysical methods to detect the lateral extent and distribution of solution features as indicative of anisotropy in the Biscayne Aquifer. Geophysical methods included azimuthal resistivity measurements, electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) and were constrained with direct borehole information from nearby wells. The geophysical measurements suggest the presence of a zone of low electrical resistivity (from ERI) and low electromagnetic wave velocity (from GPR) below the water table at depths of 4-9 m that corresponds to the depth of solution conduits seen in digital borehole images. Azimuthal electrical measurements at the site reported coefficients of electrical anisotropy as high as 1.36 suggesting the presence of an area of high porosity (most likely comprising different types of porosity) oriented in the E-W direction. This study shows how integrated geophysical methods can help detect the presence of areas of enhanced porosity which may influence the direction of groundwater flow in a complex anisotropic and heterogeneous karst system like the Biscayne Aquifer.

  19. Wet method for measuring starch gelatinization temperature using electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Morales-Sanchez, E; Figueroa, J D C; Gaytan-Martínez, M

    2009-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a method for obtaining the gelatinization temperature of starches by using electrical conductivity. Native starches from corn, rice, potato, and wheat were prepared with different proportions of water and heated from room temperature to 90 degrees C, in a device especially designed for monitoring the electrical conductivity as a function of temperature. The results showed a linear trend of the electrical conductivity with the temperature until it reaches the onset gelatinization temperature. After that point, the electrical conductivity presented an increment or decrement depending on the water content in the sample and it was related to starch swelling and gelatinization phenomena. At the end gelatinization temperature, the conductivity becomes stable and linear, indicating that there are no more changes of phase. The starch gelatinization parameter, which was evaluated in the 4 types of starches using the electrical conductivity, was compared with those obtained by using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The onset temperature at which the electrical conductivity increased or decreased was found to be similar to that obtained by DSC. Also, the final temperature at which the electrical conductivity returned to linearity matched the end gelatinization temperature of the DSC. Further, a wet method for measuring the onset, peak, and end gelatinization temperatures as a function of temperature using the electrical conductivity curves is presented for a starch-water suspension.

  20. Internal Structure of Periglacial Landforms: Assessment using 3D Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, Adrian; Kneisel, Christof

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of internal heterogeneities within periglacial landforms (e.g. frost table topography or varying ice content) is in most cases not inferable from the surface. Hence, to develop an enhanced understanding of the interaction between surface and subsurface processes, it is necessary to analyse the internal structure of different periglacial landforms and landform elements. The assessment of the internal structure is provided by the application of three-dimensional Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI). ERI is the technique of merging datum points from several parallel and perpendicular performed two-dimensional ERT (Electrical Resistivity Tomography) measurements and inverting the data set with a 3D inversion algorithm (sometimes also referred to as quasi-3D ERT). The application of this method has proven to be a valuable tool for mapping the spatial extent of isolated permafrost bodies and associated subsurface conditions. In this contribution, we present results from four ERI measurements, carried out in summer 2014 at different investigation sites in the Swiss Alps: Three measurements were performed on pebbly rockglaciers of different size and topographical position and one measurement was performed on a solifluction slope. Each of the 3D survey grids consists of 17 to 32 single 2D ERT surveys (Dipol-Dipol or Wenner-Schlumberger array) and covers an area of between 6000 m² and 7000 m², depending on the specific survey grid set-up. The inversions of the data sets were performed using the two different inversion algorithms of the software products "RES3DINV" and "BERT" (Boundless Electrical Resistivity Tomography) for a comparative analysis and to further support the geomorphological interpretation of the geophysical models. Each of the resulting resistivity models shows strong small-scale spatial heterogeneities between the investigated landforms but also within landform elements. For the investigated rockglacier sites, these structures include

  1. Characterization of the Highway 95 Fault in lower Fortymile Wash using electrical and electromagnetic methods, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macy, Jamie P.; Kryder, Levi; Walker, Jamieson

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated application of electrical and electromagnetic geophysical methods provided better characterization of the Highway 95 Fault. The comparison of dipole-dipole resistivity, TEM, and CSAMT data confirm faulting of an uplifted block of resistive Paleozoic Carbonate that lies beneath a more conductive sandstone unit. A more resistive alluvial basin-fill unit is found above the sandstone unit, and it constitutes only about 150 m of the uppermost subsurface.

  2. Apparatus for measuring Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of small dimension samples using infrared microscope as temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaafar, W. M. N. Wan; Snyder, J. E.; Min, Gao

    2013-05-01

    An apparatus for measuring the Seebeck coefficient (α) and electrical resistivity (ρ) was designed to operate under an infrared microscope. A unique feature of this apparatus is its capability of measuring α and ρ of small-dimension (sub-millimeter) samples without the need for microfabrication. An essential part of this apparatus is a four-probe assembly that has one heated probe, which combines the hot probe technique with the Van der Pauw method for "simultaneous" measurements of the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity. The repeatability of the apparatus was investigated over a temperature range of 40 °C-100 °C using a nickel plate as a standard reference. The results show that the apparatus has an uncertainty of ±4.9% for Seebeck coefficient and ±5.0% for electrical resistivity. The standard deviation of the apparatus against a nickel reference sample is -2.43 μVK-1 (-12.5%) for the Seebeck coefficient and -0.4 μΩ cm (-4.6%) for the electrical resistivity, respectively.

  3. Apparatus for measuring Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of small dimension samples using infrared microscope as temperature sensor.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, W M N Wan; Snyder, J E; Min, Gao

    2013-05-01

    An apparatus for measuring the Seebeck coefficient (α) and electrical resistivity (ρ) was designed to operate under an infrared microscope. A unique feature of this apparatus is its capability of measuring α and ρ of small-dimension (sub-millimeter) samples without the need for microfabrication. An essential part of this apparatus is a four-probe assembly that has one heated probe, which combines the hot probe technique with the Van der Pauw method for "simultaneous" measurements of the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity. The repeatability of the apparatus was investigated over a temperature range of 40 °C-100 °C using a nickel plate as a standard reference. The results show that the apparatus has an uncertainty of ±4.9% for Seebeck coefficient and ±5.0% for electrical resistivity. The standard deviation of the apparatus against a nickel reference sample is -2.43 μVK(-1) (-12.5%) for the Seebeck coefficient and -0.4 μΩ cm (-4.6%) for the electrical resistivity, respectively.

  4. Eradication of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas Biofilm with Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saiqa I.; Golberg, Alexander; McCormack, Michael C.; Yarmush, Martin L.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Austen, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a significant problem, accounting for over eighty percent of microbial infections in the body. Biofilm eradication is problematic due to increased resistance to antibiotics and antimicrobials as compared to planktonic cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on biofilm-infected mesh. Prolene mesh was infected with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa and treated with PEF using a concentric electrode system to derive, in a single experiment, the critical electric field strength needed to kill bacteria. The effect of the electric field strength and the number of pulses (with a fixed pulse length duration and frequency) on bacterial eradication was investigated. For all experiments, biofilm formation and disruption were confirmed with bioluminescent imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Computation and statistical methods were used to analyze treatment efficiency and to compare it to existing theoretical models. In all experiments 1500 V are applied through a central electrode, with pulse duration of 50 μs, and pulse delivery frequency of 2 Hz. We found that the critical electric field strength (Ecr) needed to eradicate 100–80% of bacteria in the treated area was 121 ± 14 V/mm when 300 pulses were applied, and 235 ± 6.1 V/mm when 150 pulses were applied. The area at which 100–80% of bacteria were eradicated was 50.5 ± 9.9 mm2 for 300 pulses, and 13.4 ± 0.65 mm2 for 150 pulses. 80% threshold eradication was not achieved with 100 pulses. The results indicate that increased efficacy of treatment is due to increased number of pulses delivered. In addition, we that showed the bacterial death rate as a function of the electrical field follows the statistical Weibull model for 150 and 300 pulses. We hypothesize that in the clinical setting, combining systemic antibacterial therapy with PEF will yield a synergistic effect leading to improved eradication of mesh infections. PMID

  5. Combined analysis of electrical resistivity and geotechnical SPT blow counts for the safety assessment of fill dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seokhoon; Sun, Chang-Guk

    2008-03-01

    Electrical resistivity survey and the geotechnical SPT blow counts ( N value) method were simultaneously analyzed to investigate the stability of a center-core type earth-fill dam against the seepage phenomenon. The coupling of these heterogeneous field methods provided a chance to understand the status of underground material by comparing the geophysical and geotechnical view. The analysis shows that the zones with low resistivity value generally have low N value, which means low stiffness. However, some zones with a high resistivity pattern are not accompanied by an increase of its N value, and are even showing a lower N value. These results imply that one should be careful to directly correlate resistivity value with the real status of the core material of a fill dam. And a highly resistive zone may be in poor status due to the effect of increase of resistivity value as a result of the piping condition. Additional laboratory tests show that there is a deficiency of fine soil particles believed as the clay at the troubled region, which means an increase in resistivity value. Therefore, multiple explorations should be planned to reduce the uncertainty in application of geophysical methods to dam safety evaluation in order to compensate the resistivity information of core material.

  6. Case histories of electrical resistivity and controlled-source magnetotelluric surveys for the site investigation of tunnel construction

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, H.S.; Song, Y.; Yi, M.J.; Chung, H.J.; Kim, K.S.

    2006-12-15

    In tunnel construction, the information regarding rock mass quality and the distribution of weak zones is crucial for economical tunnel design and to ensure safety. Usually, the rock mass grade is estimated by observing recovered cores obtained by drilling or by physical parameters calculated in a laboratory using core samples. However, the high drilling cost limits the number of boreholes; furthermore, rough terrains can reduce the access of drilling machines to the survey sites. In such situations, surface geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity or controlled-source magnetotelluric (CSMT) can provide a rough estimate of the rock mass condition over the planned tunnel route. These methods can also map weak zones (faults, fractures, coal bearing zones, and cavities), which are characterized by a lower resistivity than the surrounding fresh rock mass. We present two successful applications of the electrical resistivity and CSMT methods to the site investigation of tunnel construction over a rough terrain. The first example demonstrates that the boundary of the bedrock and weak zones related to the distribution of coaly shale and coal seams were estimated to extend beyond a few hundred meters below the rough surface. The second example shows that the developing direction and depth of cavities, which are mainly related to the weak zones in limestone, were successfully interpreted by a three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity survey with the aid of borehole test results.

  7. Encapsulation methods for organic electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Blum, Yigal D.; Chu, William Siu-Keung; MacQueen, David Brent; Shi, Yijian

    2013-06-18

    The disclosure provides methods and materials suitable for use as encapsulation barriers in electronic devices. In one embodiment, for example, there is provided an electroluminescent device or other electronic device encapsulated by alternating layers of a silicon-containing bonding material and a ceramic material. The encapsulation methods provide, for example, electronic devices with increased stability and shelf-life. The invention is useful, for example, in the field of microelectronic devices.

  8. The (RH+t) aging correlation. Electrical resistivity of PVB at various temperatures and relative humidities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    Electrical products having organic materials functioning as pottants, encapsulants, and insulation coatings are commonly exposed to elevated conditions of temperature and humidity. In order to assess service life potential from this method of accelerated aging, it was empirically observed that service life seems proportional to an aging correlation which is the sum of temperature in degrees Celsius (t), and the relative humidity (RH) expressed in percent. Specifically, the correlation involves a plot of time-to-failure on a log scale versus the variable RH + T plotted on a linear scale. A theoretical foundation is provided for this empirically observed correlation by pointing out that the correlation actually involves a relationship between the electrical resistivity (or conductivity) of the organic material, and the variable RH + t. If time-to-failure is a result of total number of coulombs conducted through the organic material, then the correlation of resistivity versus RH + t is synonymous with the empirical correlation of time-to-failure versus RH + t.

  9. Direct prediction of spatially and temporally varying physical properties from time-lapse electrical resistance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Thomas; Oware, Erasmus; Caers, Jef

    2016-09-01

    Time-lapse applications of