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Sample records for electrochemical microscopy rc-secm

  1. Electrochemical force microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam F.; Rodriguez, Brian J.

    2017-01-10

    A system and method for electrochemical force microscopy are provided. The system and method are based on a multidimensional detection scheme that is sensitive to forces experienced by a biased electrode in a solution. The multidimensional approach allows separation of fast processes, such as double layer charging, and charge relaxation, and slow processes, such as diffusion and faradaic reactions, as well as capturing the bias dependence of the response. The time-resolved and bias measurements can also allow probing both linear (small bias range) and non-linear (large bias range) electrochemical regimes and potentially the de-convolution of charge dynamics and diffusion processes from steric effects and electrochemical reactivity.

  2. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy in Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Albert; Nebel, Michaela; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews recent work involving the application of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to the study of individual cultured living cells, with an emphasis on topographical and functional imaging of neuronal and secretory cells of the nervous and endocrine system. The basic principles of biological SECM and associated negative amperometric-feedback and generator/collector-mode SECM imaging are discussed, and successful use of the methodology for screening soft and fragile membranous objects is outlined. The drawbacks of the constant-height mode of probe movement and the benefits of the constant-distance mode of SECM operation are described. Finally, representative examples of constant-height and constant-distance mode SECM on a variety of live cells are highlighted to demonstrate the current status of single-cell SECM in general and of SECM in neuroscience in particular.

  3. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q watermore » and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.« less

  4. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  5. Electrochemical atomic force microscopy: In situ monitoring of electrochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco; Tamburri, Emanuela; Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2017-08-01

    The in-situ electrodeposition of polyaniline (PANI), one of the most attractive conducting polymers (CP), has been monitored performing electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) experiments. The electropolymerization of PANI on a Pt working electrode has been observed performing cyclic voltammetry experiments and controlling the evolution of current flowing through the electrode surface, together with a standard AFM image. The working principle and the potentialities of this emerging technique are briefly reviewed and factors limiting the studying of the in-situ electrosynthesis of organic compounds discussed.

  6. Screening of photocatalysts by scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joowook; Ye, Heechang; Pan, Shanlin; Bard, Allen J

    2008-10-01

    A method for rapid screening of photocatalysts employing a form of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is described. A piezoelectric dispenser was used to deposit arrays composed of approximately 300-microm-size photocatalyst spots with different compositions onto conducting glass, fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate. The scanning tip of the SECM was replaced by a fiber optic connected to a xenon lamp and was rapidly scanned over the array. In this arrangement, the photocatalytic performance of the spots was evaluated by measuring the photocurrent at the substrate of the array. A fiber optic with a ring electrode can also be used to electrochemically detect products of the photoreaction. Several iron oxide-based bimetallic oxide combinations were found to exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity, when compared to pure alpha-Fe2O3. These combinations included iron-palladium, iron-europium, and iron-rubidium in specific ratios. A trimetallic bismuth-vanadium-zinc oxide combination was also found to show a higher photocurrent, by approximately 40%, compared to BiVO3.

  7. Visualization of ion transport in Nafion using electrochemical strain microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suran; No, Kwangsoo; Hong, Seungbum

    2015-12-24

    The electromechanical response of a Nafion membrane immersed in water was probed using electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) to redistribute protons and measure the resulting local strain that is caused by the movement of protons. We also measured the relaxation of protons from the surface resulting from proton diffusion. Using this technique, we can visualize and analyze the local strain change resulting from the redistribution and relaxation of hydrated protons.

  8. Local deposition of anisotropic nanoparticles using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Roman G; Mandler, Daniel

    2013-02-28

    We demonstrate localized electrodeposition of anisotropic metal nanoobjects, namely Au nanorods (GNR), on indium tin oxide (ITO) using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). A gold microelectrode was the source of the gold ions whereby double pulse chronoamperometry was employed to generate initially Au seeds which were further grown under controlled conditions. The distance between the microelectrode and the ITO surface as well as the different experimental parameters (electrodeposition regime, solution composition and temperature) were optimized to produce faceted gold seeds with the required characteristics (size and distribution). Colloidal chemical synthesis was successfully exploited for better understanding the role of the surfactant and different additives in breaking the crystallographic symmetry and anisotropic growth of GNR. Experiments performed in a conventional three-electrode cell revealed the most appropriate electrochemical conditions allowing high yield synthesis of nanorods with well-defined shape as well as nanocubes and bipyramids.

  9. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Ventosa, E; Schuhmann, W

    2015-11-21

    Li-ion batteries (LIBs) are receiving increasing attention over the past decade due to their high energy density. This energy storage technology is expected to continue improving the performance, especially for its large-scale deployment in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and full electric vehicles (EVs). Such improvement requires having a large variety of analytical techniques at scientists' disposal in order to understand and address the multiple mechanisms and processes occurring simultaneously in this complex system. This perspective article aims to highlight the strength and potential of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in this field. After a brief description of a LIB system and the most commonly used techniques in this field, the unique information provided by SECM is illustrated by discussing several recent examples from the literature.

  10. Microfluidic push-pull probe for scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Momotenko, Dmitry; Cortes-Salazar, Fernando; Lesch, Andreas; Wittstock, Gunther; Girault, Hubert H

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic push-pull probe for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) consisting of a working microelectrode, an integrated counter/reference electrode and two microchannels for pushing and pulling an electrolyte solution to and away from a substrate. With such a configuration, a droplet of a permanently renewed redox mediator solution is maintained just at the probe tip to carry out SECM measurements on initially dry substrates or in microenvironments. For SECM imaging purposes, the probe fabricated in a soft polymer material is used in a contact regime. SECM images of various gold-on-glass samples demonstrate the proof-of-concept of a push-pull probe for local surface activity characterization with high spatial resolution even on vertically oriented substrates. Finite element computations were performed to guide the improvement of the probe sensitivity.

  11. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy of DNA Monolayers Modified with Nile Blue

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Hammond, William J.; Hill, Michael G.; Slowinski, Krzysztof; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2009-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is used to probe long-range charge transport (CT) through DNA monolayers containing the redox-active Nile Blue (NB) intercalator covalently affixed at a specific location in the DNA film. At substrate potentials negative of the formal potential of covalently attached NB, the electrocatalytic reduction of Fe(CN)63− generated at the SECM tip is observed only when NB is located at the DNA/solution interface; for DNA films containing NB in close proximity to the DNA/electrode interface, the electrocatalytic effect is absent. This behavior is consistent with both rapid DNA-mediated CT between the NB intercalator and the gold electrode as well as a rate-limiting electron transfer between NB and the solution phase Fe(CN)63−. The DNA-mediated nature of the catalytic cycle is confirmed through sequence-specific and localized detection of attomoles of TATA-binding protein, a transcription factor that severely distorts DNA upon binding. Importantly, the strategy outlined here is general and allows for the local investigation of the surface characteristics of DNA monolayers both in the absence and in the presence of DNA binding proteins. These experiments highlight the utility of DNA-modified electrodes as versatile platforms for SECM detection schemes that take advantage of CT mediated by the DNA base pair stack. PMID:19053641

  12. In-situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy for battery research.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, B Layla; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong-Min; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  13. In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdi, Beata L.; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R.; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R.; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A.; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  14. Electro-deposition of Cu studied with in situ electrochemical scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, A. P.; Qin, Z.; Rosendahl, S. M.; Lee, V.; Reynolds, M.; Hosseinkhannazer, H.

    2016-01-01

    Soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to investigate Cu deposition onto, and stripping from a Au surface. Cu 2p spectromicroscopy was used to analyze initial and final states (ex situ processing) and follow the processes in situ. The in situ experiments were carried out using a static electrochemical cell with an electrolyte layer thickness of ˜1 μm. A new apparatus for in situ electrochemical STXM is described.

  15. Pointed carbon fiber ultramicroelectrodes: a new probe option for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sripirom, Jiyapa; Kuhn, Sonja; Jung, Ulrich; Magnussen, Olaf; Schulte, Albert

    2013-01-15

    Carbon tips for in situ scanning tunneling microscopy studies in an electrochemical environment were prepared by electrochemical etching of carbon fibers and subsequent coating with electrodeposition paint and a silicone elastomer. The tips obtained were stable in acidic electrolyte and allowed high-resolution in situ imaging of the bare Au(111) electrode surface and of Au(111) covered by monolayers of the octyl-triazatriangulenium molecule.

  16. Fluorescence-enabled electrochemical microscopy with dihydroresorufin as a fluorogenic indicator.

    PubMed

    Oja, Stephen M; Guerrette, Joshua P; David, Michelle R; Zhang, Bo

    2014-06-17

    Recently, we introduced a new electrochemical imaging technique called fluorescence-enabled electrochemical microscopy (FFEM). The central idea of FEEM is that a closed bipolar electrode is utilized to electrically couple a redox reaction of interest to a complementary fluorogenic reaction converting an electrochemical signal into a fluorescent signal. This simple strategy enables one to use fluorescence microscopy to observe conventional electrochemical processes on very large electrochemical arrays. The initial demonstration of FEEM focused on the use of a specific fluorogenic indicator, resazurin, which is reduced to generate highly fluorescent resorufin. The use of resazurin has enabled the study of analyte oxidation reactions, such as the oxidation of dopamine and H2O2. In this report, we extend the capability of FEEM to the study of cathodic reactions using a new fluorogenic indicator, dihydroresorufin. Dihydroresorufin is a nonfluorescent molecule, which can be electrochemically oxidized to generate resorufin. The use of dihydroresorufin has enabled us to study a series of reducible analyte species including Fe(CN)6(3-) and Ru(NH3)6(3+). Here we demonstrate the correlation between the simultaneously recorded fluorescence intensity of resorufin and electrochemical oxidation current during potential sweep experiments. FEEM is used to quantitatively detect the reduction of ferricyanide down to a concentration of approximately 100 μM on a 25 μm ultramicroelectrode. We also demonstrate that dihydroresorufin, as a fluorogenic indicator, gives an improved temporal response and significantly decreases diffusional broadening of the signal in FEEM as compared to resazurin.

  17. Electrochemical reactions in subfemtoliter-droplets studied with plasmonics-based electrochemical current microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixian; Shan, Xiaonan; Cui, Fengjuan; Li, Jinghong; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-06

    We report on a plasmonics-based electrochemical current imaging of redox reactions in aqueous droplets with diameters varying from a few hundred nanometers (tens of attoliter in volume) to a few micrometers. The imaging technique allows us to obtain cyclic voltammograms of multiple droplets on a gold electrode simultaneously and to examine the local redox reactions within a droplet. The results are supported by numerical simulations. The work demonstrates a new capability of studying electrochemistry in microdroplets, which offers an opportunity to understand electrochemical reactions within a small confined volume.

  18. Application of scanning electrochemical microscopy to biological samples.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C; Kwak, J; Bard, A J

    1990-01-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope can be used in the feedback mode in two-dimensional scans over biological substrates to obtain topographic information at the micrometer level. In this mode, the effect of distance between a substrate (either conductive or insulating) and a scanning ultramicroelectrode tip on the electrolytic current flowing at the tip is recorded as a function of the tip x-y position. Scans of the upper surface of a grass leaf and the lower surface of a Ligustrum sinensis leaf (which show open stomata structures) immersed in aqueous solution are shown. Scans of the upper surface of an elodea leaf in the dark and under irradiation, where the tip reaction is the reduction of oxygen produced by photosynthesis, demonstrate the possibility of obtaining information about the distribution of reaction sites on the substrate surface. Images PMID:2308933

  19. High-resolution friction force microscopy under electrochemical control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Paul, William; Pietrobon, Brendan; Lennox, R. Bruce; Grütter, Peter H.; Bennewitz, Roland

    2010-08-01

    We report the design and development of a friction force microscope for high-resolution studies in electrochemical environments. The design choices are motivated by the experimental requirements of atomic-scale friction measurements in liquids. The noise of the system is analyzed based on a methodology for the quantification of all the noise sources. The quantitative contribution of each noise source is analyzed in a series of lateral force measurements. Normal force detection is demonstrated in a study of the solvation potential in a confined liquid, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane. The limitations of the timing resolution of the instrument are discussed in the context of an atomic stick-slip measurement. The instrument is capable of studying the atomic friction contrast between a bare Au(111) surface and a copper monolayer deposited at underpotential conditions in perchloric acid.

  20. Application of Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy to Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chongmok; Kwak, Juhyoun; Bard, Allen J.

    1990-03-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope can be used in the feedback mode in two-dimensional scans over biological substrates to obtain topographic information at the micrometer level. In this mode, the effect of distance between a substrate (either conductive or insulating) and a scanning ultramicroelectrode tip on the electrolytic current flowing at the tip is recorded as a function of the tip x-y position. Scans of the upper surface of a grass leaf and the lower surface of a Ligustrum sinensis leaf (which show open stomata structures) immersed in aqueous solution are shown. Scans of the upper surface of an elodea leaf in the dark and under irradiation, where the tip reaction is the reduction of oxygen produced by photosynthesis, demonstrate the possibility of obtaining information about the distribution of reaction sites on the substrate surface.

  1. Reactivity of monolayer chemical vapor deposited graphene imperfections studied using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cen; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Parks, Joshua J; Ritzert, Nicole L; Ralph, Daniel C; Abruña, Héctor D

    2012-04-24

    Imperfections that disrupt the sp(2) conjugation of graphene can alter its electrical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Here we report on the examination of monolayer chemical vapor deposited graphene imperfections using scanning electrochemical microscopy in the feedback mode. It was found that the sites with a large concentration of defects are approximately 1 order of magnitude more reactive, compared to more pristine graphene surfaces, toward electrochemical reactions. Furthermore, we successfully passivated the activity of graphene defects by carefully controlling the electropolymerization conditions of o-phenylenediamine. With further electropolymerization, a thin film of the polymer was formed, and it was found to be insulating in nature toward heterogeneous electron transfer processes. The use of spatially resolved scanning electrochemical microscopy for detecting the presence and the "healing" of defects on graphene provides a strategy for in situ characterization and control of this attractive surface, enabling optimization of its properties for application in electronics, sensing, and electrocatalysis.

  2. Correlation between drive amplitude and resonance frequency in electrochemical strain microscopy: Influence of electrostatic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushta, Valon; Bradler, Stephan; Roling, Bernhard; Schirmeisen, André

    2017-06-01

    Electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) is based on the detection of the surface deformation of electrochemical materials induced by local electrical excitation via an AFM tip. Here, we compare the two common excitation methods, dual ac resonance tracking and band excitation, for resonance-amplified electrochemical strain microscopy. By means of these methods, we characterize two different materials, a mixed electronic-ionic conductor and a pure solid state ion conductor. We find a significant correlation between the resonance frequency and ESM drive amplitude. We performed numerical simulations taking into account the complex interplay of sample-tip interactions, contact mechanics, and cantilever dynamics. These simulations predict a positive amplitude-frequency correlation for pure Vegard strain and negative correlations for local tip/sample and non-local cantilever/sample electrostatic forces. These results are important for the quantitative interpretation of ESM-based images.

  3. Mapping Ionic Currents and Reactivity on the Nanoscale: Electrochemical Strain Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, S.V.

    2010-10-19

    Solid-state electrochemical processes in oxides underpin a broad spectrum of energy and information storage devices, ranging from Li-ion and Li-air batteries, to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to electroresistive and memristive systems. These functionalities are controlled by the bias-driven diffusive and electromigration transport of mobile ionic species, as well as intricate a set of electrochemical and defect-controlled reactions at interfaces and in bulk. Despite the wealth of device-level and atomistic studies, little is known on the mesoscopic mechanisms of ion diffusion and electronic transport on the level of grain clusters, individual grains, and extended defects. The development of the capability for probing ion transport on the nanometer scale is a key to deciphering complex interplay between structure, functionality, and performance in these systems. Here we introduce Electrochemical Strain Microscopy, a scanning probe microscopy technique based on strong strain-bias coupling in the systems in which local ion concentrations are changed by electrical fields. The imaging capability, as well as time- and voltage spectroscopies analogous to traditional current based electrochemical characterization methods are developed. The reversible intercalation of Li and mapping electrochemical activity in LiCoO2 is demonstrated, illustrating higher Li diffusivity at non-basal planes and grain boundaries. In Si-anode device structure, the direct mapping of Li diffusion at extended defects and evolution of Li-activity with charge state is explored. The electrical field-dependence of Li mobility is studied to determine the critical bias required for the onset of electrochemical transformation, allowing reaction and diffusion processes in the battery system to be separated at each location. Finally, the applicability of ESM for probing oxygen vacancy diffusion and oxygen reduction/evolution reactions is illustrated, and the high resolution ESM maps are correlated with

  4. Electrochemical strain microscopy probes morphology-induced variations in ion uptake and performance in organic electrochemical transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridharagopal, R.; Flagg, L. Q.; Harrison, J. S.; Ziffer, M. E.; Onorato, J.; Luscombe, C. K.; Ginger, D. S.

    2017-07-01

    Ionic transport phenomena in organic semiconductor materials underpin emerging technologies ranging from bioelectronics to energy storage. The performance of these systems is affected by an interplay of film morphology, ionic transport and electronic transport that is unique to organic semiconductors yet poorly understood. Using in situ electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), we demonstrate that we can directly probe local variations in ion transport in polymer devices by measuring subnanometre volumetric expansion due to ion uptake following electrochemical oxidation of the semiconductor. The ESM data show that poly(3-hexylthiophene) electrochemical devices exhibit voltage-dependent heterogeneous swelling consistent with device operation and electrochromism. Our data show that polymer semiconductors can simultaneously exhibit field-effect and electrochemical operation regimes, with the operation modality and its distribution varying locally as a function of nanoscale film morphology, ion concentration and potential. Importantly, we provide a direct test of structure-function relationships by correlating strain heterogeneity with local stiffness maps. These data indicate that nanoscale variations in ion uptake are associated with local changes in polymer packing that may impede ion transport to different extents within the same macroscopic film and can inform future materials optimization.

  5. Electrochemical push-pull probe: from scanning electrochemical microscopy to multimodal altering of cell microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Alexandra; Cortés-Salazar, Fernando; Gheorghiu, Mihaela; Gáspár, Szilveszter; Momotenko, Dmitry; Stanica, Luciana; Lesch, Andreas; Gheorghiu, Eugen; Girault, Hubert H

    2015-04-21

    To understand biological processes at the cellular level, a general approach is to alter the cells' environment and to study their chemical responses. Herein, we present the implementation of an electrochemical push-pull probe, which combines a microfluidic system with a microelectrode, as a tool for locally altering the microenvironment of few adherent living cells by working in two different perturbation modes, namely electrochemical (i.e., electrochemical generation of a chemical effector compound) and microfluidic (i.e., infusion of a chemical effector compound from the pushing microchannel, while simultaneously aspirating it through the pulling channel, thereby focusing the flow between the channels). The effect of several parameters such as flow rate, working distance, and probe inclination angle on the affected area of adherently growing cells was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. As a proof of concept, localized fluorescent labeling and pH changes were purposely introduced to validate the probe as a tool for studying adherent cancer cells through the control over the chemical composition of the extracellular space with high spatiotemporal resolution. A very good agreement between experimental and simulated results showed that the electrochemical perturbation mode enables to affect precisely only a few living cells localized in a high-density cell culture.

  6. Atomic force microscopy with nanoelectrode tips for high resolution electrochemical, nanoadhesion and nanoelectrical imaging.

    PubMed

    Nellist, Michael R; Chen, Yikai; Mark, Andreas; Gödrich, Sebastian; Stelling, Christian; Jiang, Jingjing; Poddar, Rakesh; Li, Chunzeng; Kumar, Ravi; Papastavrou, Georg; Retsch, Markus; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Huang, Zhuangqun; Xiang, Chengxiang; Boettcher, Shannon W

    2017-03-03

    Multimodal nano-imaging in electrochemical environments is important across many areas of science and technology. Here, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) using an atomic force microscope (AFM) platform with a nanoelectrode probe is reported. In combination with PeakForce tapping AFM mode, the simultaneous characterization of surface topography, quantitative nanomechanics, nanoelectronic properties, and electrochemical activity is demonstrated. The nanoelectrode probe is coated with dielectric materials and has an exposed conical Pt tip apex of ∼200 nm in height and of ∼25 nm in end-tip radius. These characteristic dimensions permit sub-100 nm spatial resolution for electrochemical imaging. With this nanoelectrode probe we have extended AFM-based nanoelectrical measurements to liquid environments. Experimental data and numerical simulations are used to understand the response of the nanoelectrode probe. With PeakForce SECM, we successfully characterized a surface defect on a highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode showing correlated topographical, electrochemical and nanomechanical information at the highest AFM-SECM resolution. The SECM nanoelectrode also enabled the measurement of heterogeneous electrical conductivity of electrode surfaces in liquid. These studies extend the basic understanding of heterogeneity on graphite/graphene surfaces for electrochemical applications.

  7. Atomic force microscopy with nanoelectrode tips for high resolution electrochemical, nanoadhesion and nanoelectrical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellist, Michael R.; Chen, Yikai; Mark, Andreas; Gödrich, Sebastian; Stelling, Christian; Jiang, Jingjing; Poddar, Rakesh; Li, Chunzeng; Kumar, Ravi; Papastavrou, Georg; Retsch, Markus; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Huang, Zhuangqun; Xiang, Chengxiang; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2017-03-01

    Multimodal nano-imaging in electrochemical environments is important across many areas of science and technology. Here, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) using an atomic force microscope (AFM) platform with a nanoelectrode probe is reported. In combination with PeakForce tapping AFM mode, the simultaneous characterization of surface topography, quantitative nanomechanics, nanoelectronic properties, and electrochemical activity is demonstrated. The nanoelectrode probe is coated with dielectric materials and has an exposed conical Pt tip apex of ∼200 nm in height and of ∼25 nm in end-tip radius. These characteristic dimensions permit sub-100 nm spatial resolution for electrochemical imaging. With this nanoelectrode probe we have extended AFM-based nanoelectrical measurements to liquid environments. Experimental data and numerical simulations are used to understand the response of the nanoelectrode probe. With PeakForce SECM, we successfully characterized a surface defect on a highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode showing correlated topographical, electrochemical and nanomechanical information at the highest AFM-SECM resolution. The SECM nanoelectrode also enabled the measurement of heterogeneous electrical conductivity of electrode surfaces in liquid. These studies extend the basic understanding of heterogeneity on graphite/graphene surfaces for electrochemical applications.

  8. Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy for single-molecule investigation.

    PubMed

    Alessandrini, Andrea; Facci, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The technique of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM) and spectroscopy (ECSTS) for studying electron transport through single redox molecules is here described. Redox molecules of both biological and organic nature have been studied by this technique with the aim of understanding the transport mechanisms ruling the flow of electrons via a single molecule placed in a nanometer-sized gap between two electrodes while elucidating the role of the redox density of states brought about by the molecule. The obtained results provide unique clues to single-molecule transport behavior and support the concept of single-molecule electrochemical gating.

  9. Characterization of LiMn2O4 cathodes by electrochemical strain microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Alikin, D. O.; Ievlev, A. V.; Luchkin, S. Yu.; ...

    2016-03-15

    Electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) is a scanning probe microscopy(SPM) method in which the local electrodiffusion is probed via application of AC voltage to the SPM tip and registration of resulting electrochemical strain. In this study, we implemented ESM to measure local strain in bulk LiMn2O4 cathodes of a commercial Li-battery in different states of charge to investigate distribution of Li-ion mobility and concentration. Ramped AC ESM imaging and voltage spectroscopy were used to find the most reliable regime of measurements allowing separating and diminishing different contributions to ESM. This is not a trivial task due to complex geometry of themore » sample and various obstacles resulting in less predictable contributions of different origins into ESM response: electrostatic tip–surface interactions, charge injection, electrostriction, and flexoelectricity. Finally, understanding and control of these contributions is an important step towards quantitative interpretation of ESM data.« less

  10. Local electrochemical functionality in energy storage materials and devices by scanning probe microscopies: status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina

    2010-09-15

    Energy storage and conversion systems are an integral component of emerging green technologies, including mobile electronic devices, automotive, and storage components of solar and wind energy economics. Despite the rapidly expanding manufacturing capabilities and wealth of phenomenological information on the macroscopic device behaviors, the microscopic mechanisms underpinning battery and fuel cell operations in the nanometer-micrometer range are virtually unknown. This lack of information is due to the dearth of experimental techniques capable of addressing elementary mechanisms involved in battery operation, including electronic and ion transport, vacancy injection, and interfacial reactions, on the nanometer scale. In this article, a brief overview of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) methods addressing nanoscale electrochemical functionalities is provided and compared with macroscopic electrochemical methods. Future applications of emergent SPM methods, including near field optical, electromechanical, microwave, and thermal probes and combined SPM-(S)TEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy) methods in energy storage and conversion materials are discussed.

  11. Characterization of LiMn2O4 cathodes by electrochemical strain microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikin, D. O.; Ievlev, A. V.; Luchkin, S. Yu.; Turygin, A. P.; Shur, V. Ya.; Kalinin, S. V.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2016-03-01

    Electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) is a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) method in which the local electrodiffusion is probed via application of AC voltage to the SPM tip and registration of resulting electrochemical strain. Here, we implemented ESM to measure local strain in bulk LiMn2O4 cathodes of a commercial Li-battery in different states of charge to investigate distribution of Li-ion mobility and concentration. Ramped AC ESM imaging and voltage spectroscopy were used to find the most reliable regime of measurements allowing separating and diminishing different contributions to ESM. This is not a trivial task due to complex geometry of the sample and various obstacles resulting in less predictable contributions of different origins into ESM response: electrostatic tip-surface interactions, charge injection, electrostriction, and flexoelectricity. Understanding and control of these contributions is an important step towards quantitative interpretation of ESM data.

  12. Local electrochemical functionality in energy storage materials and devices by scanning probe microscopies: Status and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, S. V.; Balke, N.

    2010-01-01

    Energy storage and conversion systems are an integral component of emerging green technologies, including mobile electronic devices, automotive, and storage components of solar and wind energy economics. Despite the rapidly expanding manufacturing capabilities and wealth of phenomenological information on the macroscopic device behaviors, the microscopic mechanisms underpinning battery and fuel cell operations in the nanometer–micrometer range are virtually unknown. This lack of information is due to the dearth of experimental techniques capable of addressing elementary mechanisms involved in battery operation, including electronic and ion transport, vacancy injection, and interfacial reactions, on the nanometer scale. In this article, a brief overview of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) methods addressing nanoscale electrochemical functionalities is provided and compared with macroscopic electrochemical methods. Future applications of emergent SPM methods, including near field optical, electromechanical, microwave, and thermal probes and combined SPM-(S)TEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy) methods in energy storage and conversion materials are discussed.

  13. Novel Automatic Electrochemical-mechanical Polishing (ECMP) of Metals for Scanning Electron Microscopy (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-23

    Micron 41 (2010) 615–621 619 Fig. 4 . XPS binding energy (eV) versus sputtering time (s) results for the Ti 2p peaks for the titanium samples: (a...improved the IQ values. 4 . Conclusions The electrochemical–mechanical polishing system (ECMP) removed material from titanium and nickel alloys at a...March 2014 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE NOVEL AUTOMATIC ELECTROCHEMICAL-MECHANICAL POLISHING (ECMP) OF METALS FOR SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

  14. Monitoring charge storage processes in nanoscale oxides using electrochemical scanning probe microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Lu, Ping; Huang, Jian Yu

    2010-11-01

    Advances in electrochemical energy storage science require the development of new or the refinement of existing in situ probes that can be used to establish structure - activity relationships for technologically relevant materials. The drive to develop reversible, high capacity electrodes from nanoscale building blocks creates an additional requirement for high spatial resolution probes to yield information of local structural, compositional, and electronic property changes as a function of the storage state of a material. In this paper, we describe a method for deconstructing a lithium ion battery positive electrode into its basic constituents of ion insertion host particles and a carbon current collector. This model system is then probed in an electrochemical environment using a combination of atomic force microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy to correlate local activity with morphological and electronic configurational changes. Cubic spinel Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are grown on graphite surfaces using vacuum deposition methods. The structure and composition of these particles are determined using transmission electron microscopy and Auger microprobe analysis. The response of these particles to initial de-lithiation, along with subsequent electrochemical cycling, is tracked using scanning probe microscopy techniques in polar aprotic electrolytes (lithium hexafluorophosphate in ethylene carbonate:diethylcarbonate). The relationship between nanoparticle size and reversible ion insertion activity will be a specific focus of this paper.

  15. Mapping fluxes of radicals from the combination of electrochemical activation and optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Sorin; Roger, Jean Paul; Fedala, Yasmina; Amiot, Fabien; Combellas, Catherine; Tessier, Gilles; Kanoufi, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The coating of gold (Au) electrode surfaces with nitrophenyl (NP) layers is studied by combination of electrochemical actuation and optical detection. The electrochemical actuation of the reduction of the nitrobenzenediazonium (NBD) precursor is used to generate NP radicals and therefore initiate the electrografting. The electrografting process is followed in situ and in real time by light reflectivity microscopy imaging, allowing for spatio-temporal imaging with sub-micrometer lateral resolution and sub-nanometer thickness sensitivity of the local growth of a transparent organic coating onto a reflecting Au electrode. The interest of the electrochemical actuation resides in its ability to finely control the grafting rate of the NP layer through the electrode potential. Coupling the electrochemical actuation with microscopic imaging of the electrode surface allows quantitative estimates of the local grafting rates and subsequently a real time and in situ mapping of the reacting fluxes of NP radicals on the surface. Over the 2 orders of magnitude range of grafting rates (from 0.04 to 4 nm s(-1)), it is demonstrated that the edge of Au electrodes are grafted -1.3 times more quickly than their centre, illustrating the manifestation of edge-effects on flux distribution at an electrode. A model is proposed to explain the observed edge-effect, it relies on the short lifetime of the intermediate NP radical species.

  16. Electrochemical characterization of sub-micro-gram amounts of organic semiconductors using scanning droplet cell microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gasiorowski, Jacek; Mardare, Andrei I; Sariciftci, Niyazi S; Hassel, Achim Walter

    2013-02-15

    Scanning droplet cell microscopy (SDCM) uses a very small electrolyte droplet at the tip of a capillary which comes in contact with the working electrode. This method is particularly interesting for studies on organic semiconductors since it provides localized electrochemical investigations with high reproducibility. One clear advantage of applying SDCM is represented by the very small amounts of material necessary (less than 1 mg). Organic materials can be investigated quickly and inexpensively in electrochemical studies with a high throughput. In the present study, thin layers of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), which is one of the most often used material for organic solar cells, were deposited on ITO/glass as working electrodes in SDCM studies. The redox reactions in 0.1 M tetra(n-butyl)ammonium hexafluorophosphate (TBAPF6) dissolved in propylene carbonate were studied by cyclic voltammetry and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Two reversible, distinct oxidation steps of the P3HT were detected and their kinetics were studied in detail. The doping of P3HT increased due to the electrochemical oxidation and had resulted in a decrease of the film resistance by a few orders of magnitude. Due to localization on the sample various parameter combinations can be studied quantitatively and reproducibly.

  17. Electrochemical characterization of sub-micro-gram amounts of organic semiconductors using scanning droplet cell microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gasiorowski, Jacek; Mardare, Andrei I.; Sariciftci, Niyazi S.; Hassel, Achim Walter

    2013-01-01

    Scanning droplet cell microscopy (SDCM) uses a very small electrolyte droplet at the tip of a capillary which comes in contact with the working electrode. This method is particularly interesting for studies on organic semiconductors since it provides localized electrochemical investigations with high reproducibility. One clear advantage of applying SDCM is represented by the very small amounts of material necessary (less than 1 mg). Organic materials can be investigated quickly and inexpensively in electrochemical studies with a high throughput. In the present study, thin layers of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), which is one of the most often used material for organic solar cells, were deposited on ITO/glass as working electrodes in SDCM studies. The redox reactions in 0.1 M tetra(n-butyl)ammonium hexafluorophosphate (TBAPF6) dissolved in propylene carbonate were studied by cyclic voltammetry and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Two reversible, distinct oxidation steps of the P3HT were detected and their kinetics were studied in detail. The doping of P3HT increased due to the electrochemical oxidation and had resulted in a decrease of the film resistance by a few orders of magnitude. Due to localization on the sample various parameter combinations can be studied quantitatively and reproducibly. PMID:24926226

  18. Imaging of Biological Macromolecules on Mica in Humid Air by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Fu-Ren F.; Bard, Allen J.

    1999-12-01

    Imaging of DNA, keyhole limpet hemocyanin, mouse monoclonal IgG, and glucose oxidase on a mica substrate has been accomplished by scanning electrochemical microscopy with a tungsten tip. The technique requires the use of a high relative humidity to form a thin film of water on the mica surface that allows electrochemical reactions to take place at the tip and produce a faradaic current (≈ 1\\ pA) that can be used to control tip position. The effect of relative humidity and surface pretreatment with buffer solutions on the ionic conductivity of a mica surface was investigated to find appropriate conditions for imaging. Resolution of the order of 1 nm was obtained.

  19. Importance and Challenges of Electrochemical in Situ Liquid Cell Electron Microscopy for Energy Conversion Research.

    PubMed

    Hodnik, Nejc; Dehm, Gerhard; Mayrhofer, Karl J J

    2016-09-20

    The foreseeable worldwide energy and environmental challenges demand renewable alternative sources, energy conversion, and storage technologies. Therefore, electrochemical energy conversion devices like fuel cells, electrolyzes, and supercapacitors along with photoelectrochemical devices and batteries have high potential to become increasingly important in the near future. Catalytic performance in electrochemical energy conversion results from the tailored properties of complex nanometer-sized metal and metal oxide particles, as well as support nanostructures. Exposed facets, surface defects, and other structural and compositional features of the catalyst nanoparticles affect the electrocatalytic performance to varying degrees. The characterization of the nanometer-size and atomic regime of electrocatalysts and its evolution over time are therefore paramount for an improved understanding and significant optimization of such important technologies like electrolyzers or fuel cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) are to a great extent nondestructive characterization tools that provide structural, morphological, and compositional information with nanoscale or even atomic resolution. Due to recent marked advancement in electron microscopy equipment such as aberration corrections and monochromators, such insightful information is now accessible in many institutions around the world and provides huge benefit to everyone using electron microscopy characterization in general. Classical ex situ TEM characterization of random catalyst locations however suffers from two limitations regarding catalysis. First, the necessary low operation pressures in the range of 10(-6) to 10(-9) mbar for TEM are not in line with typical reaction conditions, especially considering electrocatalytic solid-liquid interfaces, so that the active state cannot be assessed. Second, and somewhat related, is the lack of time resolution for the

  20. Plasma-deposited fluorocarbon films: insulation material for microelectrodes and combined atomic force microscopy-scanning electrochemical microscopy probes.

    PubMed

    Wiedemair, Justyna; Balu, Balamurali; Moon, Jong-Seok; Hess, Dennis W; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine

    2008-07-01

    Pinhole-free insulation of micro- and nanoelectrodes is the key to successful microelectrochemical experiments performed in vivo or in combination with scanning probe experiments. A novel insulation technique based on fluorocarbon insulation layers deposited from pentafluoroethane (PFE, CF3CHF2) plasmas is presented as a promising electrical insulation approach for microelectrodes and combined atomic force microscopy-scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) probes. The deposition allows reproducible and uniform coating, which is essential for many analytical applications of micro- and nanoelectrodes such as, e.g., in vivo experiments and SECM experiments. Disk-shaped microelectrodes and frame-shaped AFM tip-integrated electrodes have been fabricated by postinsulation focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The thin insulation layer for combined AFM-SECM probes renders this fabrication technique particularly useful for submicro insulation providing radius ratios of the outer insulation versus the disk electrode (RG values) suitable for SECM experiments. Characterization of PFE-insulated AFM-SECM probes will be presented along with combined AFM-SECM approach curves and imaging.

  1. Second harmonic detection in the electrochemical strain microscopy of Ag-ion conducting glass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Sangmo; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Jesse, Stephen; Noh, Tae Won; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-11-14

    The first and second harmonic electromechanical responses and their cross-correlation in Ag-ion conducting glass were investigated using band-excitation electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). Consecutive ESM images with increasing magnitudes of the applied AC voltage allowed observation of not only reversible surface displacement but also irreversible silver nanoparticle formation above a certain threshold voltage. The second harmonic ESM response was anticorrelated with the first harmonic response in many local regions. Furthermore, the nucleation sites of silver nanoparticles were closely related to the anti-correlated regions, specifically, with low second harmonic and high first harmonic ESM responses. The possible origins of the second harmonic ESM response are discussed.

  2. Carbon nanofiber electrodes and controlled nanogaps for scanning electrochemical microscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Tel-Vered, Ran; Walsh, Darren A; Mehrgardi, Masoud A; Bard, Allen J

    2006-10-01

    The electrochemical behavior of electrodes made by sealing carbon nanofibers in glass or with electrophoretic paint has been studied by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Because of their small electroactive surface area, conical geometry with a low aspect ratio and high overpotential for proton and oxygen reduction, carbon nanofiber (CNF) electrodes are promising candidates for producing electrode nanogaps, imaging with high spatial resolution and for the electrodeposition of single metal nanoparticles (e.g., Pt, Pd) for studies as electrocatalysts. By using the feedback mode of the SECM, a CNF tip can produce a gap that is smaller than 20 nm from a platinum disk. Similarly, the SECM used in a tip-collection substrate-generation mode, which subsequently shows a feedback interaction at short distances, makes it possible to detect a single CNF by another CNF and then to form a nanometer gap between the two electrodes. This approach was used to image vertically aligned CNF arrays. This method is useful in the detection in a homogeneous solution of short-lifetime intermediates, which can be electrochemically generated at one electrode and collected at the second at distances that are equivalent to a nanosecond time scale.

  3. Convective heat transfer in a measurement cell for scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Novev, Javor K; Compton, Richard G

    2016-11-21

    Electrochemical experiments, especially those performed with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), are often carried out without taking special care to thermostat the solution; it is usually assumed that its temperature is homogeneous and equal to the ambient. The present study aims to test this assumption via numerical simulations of the heat transfer in a particular system - the typical measurement cell for SECM. It is assumed that the temperature of the solution is initially homogeneous but different from that of its surroundings; convective heat transfer in the solution and the surrounding air is taken into account within the framework of the Boussinesq approximation. The hereby presented theoretical treatment indicates that an initial temperature difference of the order of 1 K dissipates with a characteristic time scale of ∼1000 s; the thermal equilibration is accompanied by convective flows with a maximum velocity of ∼10(-4) m s(-1); furthermore, the temporal evolution of the temperature profile is influenced by the sign of the initial difference. These results suggest that, unless the temperature of the solution is rigorously controlled, convection may significantly compromise the interpretation of data from SECM and other electrochemical techniques, which is usually done on the basis of diffusion-only models.

  4. Toward quantitative electrochemical measurements on the nanoscale by scanning probe microscopy: environmental and current spreading effects.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Thomas M; Kumar, Amit; Jesse, Stephen; Veith, Gabriel M; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-09-24

    The application of electric bias across tip-surface junctions in scanning probe microscopy can readily induce surface and bulk electrochemical processes that can be further detected though changes in surface topography, Faradaic or conductive currents, or electromechanical strain responses. However, the basic factors controlling tip-induced electrochemical processes, including the relationship between applied tip bias and the thermodynamics of local processes, remains largely unexplored. Using the model Li-ion reduction reaction on the surface in Li-ion conducting glass ceramic, we explore the factors controlling Li-metal formation and find surprisingly strong effects of atmosphere and back electrode composition on the process. We find that reaction processes are highly dependent on the nature of the counter electrode and environmental conditions. Using a nondepleting Li counter electrode, Li particles could grow significantly larger and faster than a depleting counter electrode. Significant Li ion depletion leads to the inability for further Li reduction. Time studies suggest that Li diffusion replenishes the vacant sites after ∼12 h. These studies suggest the feasibility of SPM-based quantitative electrochemical studies under proper environmental controls, extending the concepts of ultramicroelectrodes to the single-digit nanometer scale.

  5. Electrochemical deposition of platinum hydrosol on graphite observed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikhutdinov, Sh.K.; Moeller, F.A.; Mestl, G.; Behm, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Ligand stabilized metal colloids are discussed as promising candidates for metal catalyst precursors or even supported catalysts. The protective shell around the metal particles prevents their agglomeration and leads to a highly dispersed metal phase. A narrow metal particle size distribution, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy, is achieved by specific reduction techniques. These catalysts are generally prepared by adsorption, i.e., by adding the support material to the colloidal solution, followed by a drying step. Another way to prepared supported catalysts is electrophoretic deposition, which was recently demonstrated for a gold colloid. For conductive supports, such as carbon, an electrochemical deposition of colloids can be envisioned also. To our knowledge this has not been investigated yet. In this note the authors present, first, the results of a combined scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study on the electrochemical deposition of platinum nanocolloids with an organic shell (hydrosol) onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). 7 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Coating of tips for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy by means of silicon, magnesium, and tungsten oxides.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Marco

    2010-09-01

    Different combinations of metal tips and oxide coatings have been tested for possible operation in electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy. Silicon and magnesium oxides have been thermally evaporated onto gold and platinum-iridium tips, respectively. Two different thickness values have been explored for both materials, namely, 40 and 120 nm for silicon oxide and 20 and 60 nm for magnesium oxide. Alternatively, tungsten oxide has been grown on tungsten tips via electrochemical anodization. In the latter case, to seek optimal results we have varied the pH of the anodizing electrolyte between one and four. The oxide coated tips have been first inspected by means of scanning electron microscopy equipped with microanalysis to determine the morphological results of the coating. Second, the coated tips have been electrically characterized ex situ for stability in time by means of cyclic voltammetry in 1 M aqueous KCl supporting electrolyte, both bare and supplemented with K(3)[Fe(CN)(6)] complex at 10 mM concentration in milliQ water as an analyte. Only the tungsten oxide coated tungsten tips have shown stable electrical behavior in the electrolyte. For these tips, the uncoated metal area has been estimated from the electrical current levels, and they have been successfully tested by imaging a gold grating in situ, which provided stable results for several hours. The successful tungsten oxide coating obtained at pH=4 has been assigned to the WO(3) form.

  7. Electrochemomechanics with flexoelectricity and modelling of electrochemical strain microscopy in mixed ionic-electronic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Hu, Shuling; Shen, Shengping

    2016-08-01

    Recently, a new scanning probe microscopy approach, referred to as electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), for probing local ionic flows and electrochemical reactions in solids based on the bias-strain coupling was proposed by Morozovska et al. Then, a series of theoretical papers for analyzing the image formation and spectroscopic mechanism of ESM were published within the framework of Fermi-Dirac statistics, the Vegard law, the direct flexoelectric coupling effect, the electrostriction effect, and so on. However, most of the models in these papers are limited to the partial coupling or particular process, and numerically solved by using decoupling approximation. In this paper, to model the ESM measurement with the coupling electrical-chemical-mechanical process, the chemical Gibbs function variational principle for the thermal electrical chemical mechanical fully coupling problem is proposed. The fully coupling governing equations are derived from the variational principle. When the tip concentrates the electric field within a small volume of the material, the inhomogeneous electric field is induced. So, both direct and inverse flexoelectric effects should be taken into account. Here, the bulk defect electrochemical reactions are also taken into account, which are usually omitted in the existing works. This theory can be used to deal with coupling problems in solids, including conductors, semiconductors, and piezoelectric and non-piezoelectric dielectrics. As an application of this work, a developed initial-boundary value problem is solved numerically in a mixed ion-electronic conductor. Numerical results show that it is meaningful and necessary to consider the bulk defect chemical reaction. Besides, the chemical reaction and the flexoelectric effect have an interactive influence on each other. This work can provide theoretical basis for the ESM as well as investigating the bulk chemical reaction process in solids.

  8. Electrochemomechanics with flexoelectricity and modelling of electrochemical strain microscopy in mixed ionic-electronic conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Pengfei; Hu, Shuling; Shen, Shengping

    2016-08-14

    Recently, a new scanning probe microscopy approach, referred to as electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), for probing local ionic flows and electrochemical reactions in solids based on the bias-strain coupling was proposed by Morozovska et al. Then, a series of theoretical papers for analyzing the image formation and spectroscopic mechanism of ESM were published within the framework of Fermi-Dirac statistics, the Vegard law, the direct flexoelectric coupling effect, the electrostriction effect, and so on. However, most of the models in these papers are limited to the partial coupling or particular process, and numerically solved by using decoupling approximation. In this paper, to model the ESM measurement with the coupling electrical-chemical-mechanical process, the chemical Gibbs function variational principle for the thermal electrical chemical mechanical fully coupling problem is proposed. The fully coupling governing equations are derived from the variational principle. When the tip concentrates the electric field within a small volume of the material, the inhomogeneous electric field is induced. So, both direct and inverse flexoelectric effects should be taken into account. Here, the bulk defect electrochemical reactions are also taken into account, which are usually omitted in the existing works. This theory can be used to deal with coupling problems in solids, including conductors, semiconductors, and piezoelectric and non-piezoelectric dielectrics. As an application of this work, a developed initial-boundary value problem is solved numerically in a mixed ion-electronic conductor. Numerical results show that it is meaningful and necessary to consider the bulk defect chemical reaction. Besides, the chemical reaction and the flexoelectric effect have an interactive influence on each other. This work can provide theoretical basis for the ESM as well as investigating the bulk chemical reaction process in solids.

  9. Electrochemical direct writing and erasing of silver nanostructures on phosphate glass using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Shama F.; Jacobs, Kyle E.; Mensing, Glennys A.; Ferreira, Placid M.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports a liquid-free, mask-less electrochemical direct-write lithographic technique using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe for writing silver nanostructures in minutes on an optically transparent substrate. Under ambient conditions, silver is locally and controllably extracted to the surface of superionic (AgI)0.25 (AgPO3)0.75 glass by bringing a conductive AFM probe tip in contact with it, biasing the probe with a negative voltage, and regulating the resulting current. The growth mechanism of the resulting nanostructure is explored by extracting silver with a stationary AFM tip on the surface of the silver. A moving tip was then used to produce continuous lines, solid films and discrete dots of silver by implementing continuous and pulsed current writing approaches. The line dimensions depend on writing speed and current flowing in the electrochemical circuit, while the size and spacing of the dots depend on the parameters (magnitude, duration and frequency) of the current pulses and the writing speed of the AFM tip. Line-widths in the ∼100 nm range are demonstrated. Our investigation also shows that a threshold potential must be overcome to be able to draw and reduce silver ions on the glass surface. When polarity between the electrodes is reversed, the patterned silver ionizes back into the glass, thus offering the capability to erase and rewrite Ag patterns on the glass surface.

  10. Soft Surfaces for Fast Characterization and Positioning of Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Nanoelectrode Tips.

    PubMed

    Gossage, Zachary T; Simpson, Burton H; Schorr, Noah B; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-10-18

    The testing of nanoelectrode tips for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is a slow and cumbersome task that often results in untimely electrode breakage due to crashing against a substrate. Here, we evaluated approach curves of nano- and microelectrodes to soft surfaces using SECM for a rapid and more convenient characterization and positioning protocol. Soft surfaces consisted of either a submerged argon bubble or a thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer. While approach curves to Ar bubbles in the presence of a surfactant were promising for the characterization of microelectrode tips, their performance with nanoelectrodes was deficient. In contrast, approach curves to PDMS films allowed the rapid positioning of nanoelectrodes as small as 30 nm radius at speeds up to 5 μm/s without the risk of breakage. The nanoelectrodes were able to approach the polymer films multiple times without affecting their electrochemical performance. Furthermore, using a half-coated substrate with PDMS, nanoelectrodes could be retracted and positioned very close to the bare, hard substrate for characterization with traditional approach curves. We estimate time savings on tip characterization/positioning on the order of 10- to 100-fold. This simple procedure is easily implemented without the requirement of additional devices supplementing existing commercial SECM instruments.

  11. Electrochemical direct writing and erasing of silver nanostructures on phosphate glass using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barna, Shama F; Jacobs, Kyle E; Mensing, Glennys A; Ferreira, Placid M

    2017-02-10

    This paper reports a liquid-free, mask-less electrochemical direct-write lithographic technique using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe for writing silver nanostructures in minutes on an optically transparent substrate. Under ambient conditions, silver is locally and controllably extracted to the surface of superionic (AgI)0.25 (AgPO3)0.75 glass by bringing a conductive AFM probe tip in contact with it, biasing the probe with a negative voltage, and regulating the resulting current. The growth mechanism of the resulting nanostructure is explored by extracting silver with a stationary AFM tip on the surface of the silver. A moving tip was then used to produce continuous lines, solid films and discrete dots of silver by implementing continuous and pulsed current writing approaches. The line dimensions depend on writing speed and current flowing in the electrochemical circuit, while the size and spacing of the dots depend on the parameters (magnitude, duration and frequency) of the current pulses and the writing speed of the AFM tip. Line-widths in the ∼100 nm range are demonstrated. Our investigation also shows that a threshold potential must be overcome to be able to draw and reduce silver ions on the glass surface. When polarity between the electrodes is reversed, the patterned silver ionizes back into the glass, thus offering the capability to erase and rewrite Ag patterns on the glass surface.

  12. High-speed scanning electrochemical microscopy method for substrate kinetic determination: method and theory.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Sabine; Trinh, Dao; Danis, Laurence; Mauzeroll, Janine

    2015-08-18

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) allows imaging and analysis of a variety of biological samples, such as living cells. Up to now, it still remains a challenge to successfully decouple signals related to topography and reactivity. Furthermore, such delicate samples require careful adjustment of experimental parameters, such as scan velocity. The present study proposes a method to extract a substrate's kinetic rate by numerical modeling and experimental high speed constant height SECM imaging. This is especially useful for the determination of substrates with unknown surface reaction kinetics and large topographical features. To make this approach applicable to soft cell samples, which cannot be imaged at high velocity, a nonlinear fit strategy is presented to obtain kinetic rate values also under slow scan velocity conditions.

  13. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy: A Comprehensive Review of Experimental Parameters from 1989 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Polcari, David; Dauphin-Ducharme, Philippe; Mauzeroll, Janine

    2016-11-23

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is an electroanalytical scanning probe technique capable of imaging substrate topography and local reactivity with high resolution. Since its inception in 1989, it has expanded into a wide variety of research areas including biology, corrosion, energy, kinetics, instrumental development, and surface modification. In the past 25 years, over 1800 peer-reviewed publications have focused on SECM, including several topical reviews. However, these reviews often omit key details, forcing readers to search the literature. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the experimental parameters (e.g., solvents, probes, and mediators) used in all SECM publications since 1989, irrespective of the application. It can be used to rapidly assess experimental possibilities and make an informed decision about experimental design. In other words, it is a practical guide to SECM.

  14. Second harmonic detection in the electrochemical strain microscopy of Ag-ion conducting glass

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Sangmo; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; ...

    2014-11-14

    The first and second harmonic electromechanical responses and their cross-correlation in Ag-ion conducting glass were investigated using band-excitation electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). Consecutive ESM images with increasing magnitudes of the applied AC voltage allowed observation of not only reversible surface displacement but also irreversible silver nanoparticle formation above a certain threshold voltage. The second harmonic ESM response was anticorrelated with the first harmonic response in many local regions. Furthermore, the nucleation sites of silver nanoparticles were closely related to the anti-correlated regions, specifically, with low second harmonic and high first harmonic ESM responses. The possible origins of the second harmonicmore » ESM response are discussed.« less

  15. Direct mapping of Li distribution in electrochemically lithiated graphite anodes using scanning Auger electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Nobuyuki; Fukumitsu, Hitoshi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-02-01

    The spatial distribution of Li ions in electrochemically lithiated graphite anodes for Li-ion battery is characterized by scanning Auger electron microscopy. We show that direct mapping of Li KVV peak intensity reveal the spatial distribution of intercalated Li and its chemical state in a quantitative manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mapping using a C KVV peak also reflects the spatial distribution of Li due to the change in the electronic properties of C atoms induced by the electrode reaction (Li intercalation). Mapping measurements on three samples with different charging states (20%, 50%, and 100%) show that at the early stage of charging Li ions do not intercalate homogenously into all the graphite particles but selectively into some specific ones with higher rates. Our method provides the criteria to evaluate structure-correlated Li intercalation from nanometer- to micrometer-scale, such as conductivity network in the electrodes due to a non-uniform morphology of binder and conductive additives.

  16. Imaging space charge regions in Sm-doped ceria using electrochemical strain microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Li, Jiangyu; Adler, Stuart B.

    2014-11-17

    Nanocrystalline ceria exhibits a total conductivity several orders of magnitude higher than microcrystalline ceria in air at high temperature. The most widely accepted theory for this enhancement (based on fitting of conductivity data to various transport and kinetic models) is that relatively immobile positively charged defects and/or impurities accumulate at the grain boundary core, leading to a counterbalancing increase in the number of mobile electrons (small polarons) within a diffuse space charge region adjacent to each grain boundary. In an effort to validate this model, we have applied electrochemical strain microscopy to image the location and relative population of mobile electrons near grain boundaries in polycrystalline Sm-doped ceria in air at 20–200 °C. Our results show the first direct (spatially resolved) evidence that such a diffuse space charge region does exist in ceria, and is localized to both grain boundaries and the gas-exposed surface.

  17. Alternating current impedance imaging of membrane pores using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Eric Nathan; White, Henry S; Baker, Lane A

    2005-09-01

    Alternating current impedance imaging of a 6-microm thick membrane containing conical-shaped pores (60-nm and 2.5-microm diameter openings) using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is described. Impedance images of the pore openings were obtained by rastering a glass-sealed conically shaped Pt tip (approximately 1-microm radius) above the membrane surface, while measuring the total impedance between the tip and a large area Pt electrode located on the opposite side of the membrane. Individual pore openings in the high pore density membrane (approximately 8 x 10(4) pores/cm2) are observed in the SECM impedance image. The image contrast is due to the decrease in tip and membrane resistance, in the vicinity of the pore opening. An equivalent circuit for the SECM cell and membrane is proposed and evaluated against the measured SECM imaging impedance. Criteria for employing SECM in impedance mode to image membranes are discussed.

  18. Direct Visualization of Solid Electrolyte Interphase Formation in Lithium-Ion Batteries with In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Sacci, Robert L.; Adamczyk, Leslie A.; Alsem, Daan Hein; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie

    2014-08-01

    Complex, electrochemically driven transport processes form the basis of electrochemical energy storage devices. The direct imaging of electrochemical processes at high spatial resolution and within their native liquid electrolyte would significantly enhance our understanding of device functionality, but has remained elusive. In this work we use a recently developed liquid cell for in situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy to obtain insight into the electrolyte decomposition mechanisms and kinetics in lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries by characterizing the dynamics of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation and evolution. Here we are able to visualize the detailed structure of the SEI that forms locally at the electrode/electrolyte interface during lithium intercalation into natural graphite from an organic Li-ion battery electrolyte. We quantify the SEI growth kinetics and observe the dynamic self-healing nature of the SEI with changes in cell potential.

  19. Direct visualization of solid electrolyte interphase formation in lithium-ion batteries with in situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Sacci, Robert L; Adamczyk, Leslie A; Alsem, Daan Hein; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L

    2014-08-01

    Complex, electrochemically driven transport processes form the basis of electrochemical energy storage devices. The direct imaging of electrochemical processes at high spatial resolution and within their native liquid electrolyte would significantly enhance our understanding of device functionality, but has remained elusive. In this work we use a recently developed liquid cell for in situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy to obtain insight into the electrolyte decomposition mechanisms and kinetics in lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries by characterizing the dynamics of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation and evolution. Here we are able to visualize the detailed structure of the SEI that forms locally at the electrode/electrolyte interface during lithium intercalation into natural graphite from an organic Li-ion battery electrolyte. We quantify the SEI growth kinetics and observe the dynamic self-healing nature of the SEI with changes in cell potential.

  20. Scanning electrochemical microscopy as a local probe of oxygen permeability in cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalves, M; Barker, A L; Macpherson, J V; Unwin, P R; O'Hare, D; Winlove, C P

    2000-01-01

    The use of scanning electrochemical microscopy, a high-resolution chemical imaging technique, to probe the distribution and mobility of solutes in articular cartilage is described. In this application, a mobile ultramicroelectrode is positioned close ( approximately 1 microm) to the cartilage sample surface, which has been equilibrated in a bathing solution containing the solute of interest. The solute is electrolyzed at a diffusion-limited rate, and the current response measured as the ultramicroelectrode is scanned across the sample surface. The topography of the samples was determined using Ru(CN)(6)(4-), a solute to which the cartilage matrix was impermeable. This revealed a number of pit-like depressions corresponding to the distribution of chondrocytes, which were also observed by atomic force and light microscopy. Subsequent imaging of the same area of the cartilage sample for the diffusion-limited reduction of oxygen indicated enhanced, but heterogeneous, permeability of oxygen across the cartilage surface. In particular, areas of high permeability were observed in the cellular and pericellular regions. This is the first time that inhomogeneities in the permeability of cartilage toward simple solutes, such as oxygen, have been observed on a micrometer scale. PMID:10692342

  1. Determination of diffusion coefficient in gel and in aqueous solutions using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Csóka, Balázs; Nagy, Géza

    2004-10-29

    Diffusion coefficient of different species in different media is an important property needed in scientific research and practice. A method taking advantage on the special capability of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is described for the easy and accurate measurement of diffusion coefficient. The method is based on detecting the concentration-time transients with appropriate electrochemical microsensor positioned at the close vicinity of a miniature dose-source device. At a given time (ti), a small dose of the investigated species is introduced. The Deltatmax=(tcmax-ti) value and the distance (d=x+Deltaxn) between the source and the detector microelectrode are used for the calculation of D. While the original set distance (x) cannot be accurately measured in the micrometer scale, the tip travel distance (Deltaxn) of the microscope is well defined. Collecting a few Deltatmax-(x+Deltaxn) data pairs, a reliable value of the diffusion coefficient can be obtained. The procedure is simple, and no exact knowledge of the introduced dose is needed. Two ways of sample dose delivery were used: on the one hand, coulometric generation with current-controlled electric pulse using micro-disc electrode, and on the other one, pressure ejection of a nano-droplet from a glass micropipette. Diffusion coefficient of I2, H2O2, [Ru(NH3)6]Cl3 and K3[Fe(CN)6] were measured in solution and in agarose gel phases of different composition. The effect of polyelectrolyte ion exchangers on the diffusion of the investigated species was checked.

  2. Self-consistent modeling of electrochemical strain microscopy of solid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tselev, Alexander; Morozovska, Anna N.; Udod, Alexei; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-10-10

    Electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) employs a strong electromechanical coupling in solid ionic conductors to map ionic transport and electrochemical processes with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. To elucidate the mechanisms of the ESM image formation, we performed self-consistent numerical modeling of the electromechanical response in solid electrolytes under the probe tip in a linear, small-signal regime using the Boltzmann–Planck–Nernst–Einstein theory and Vegard's law while taking account of the electromigration and diffusion. We identified the characteristic time scales involved in the formation of the ESM response and found that the dynamics of the charge carriers in the tip-electrolyte system with blocking interfaces can be described as charging of the diffuse layer at the tip-electrolyte interface through the tip contact spreading resistance. At the high frequencies used in the detection regime, the distribution of the charge carriers under the tip is governed by evanescent concentration waves generated at the tip-electrolyte interface. The ion drift length in the electric field produced by the tip determines the ESM response at high frequencies, which follows a 1/f asymptotic law. The electronic conductivity, as well as the electron transport through the electrode-electrolyte interface, do not have a significant effect on the ESM signal in the detection regime. The results indicate, however, that for typical solid electrolytes at room temperature, the ESM response originates at and contains information about the very surface layer of a sample, and the properties of the one-unit-cell-thick surface layer may significantly contribute to the ESM response, implying a high surface sensitivity and a high lateral resolution of the technique. On the other hand, it follows that a rigorous analysis of the ESM signals requires techniques that account for the discrete nature of a solid.

  3. Nanogap-enabled study of electrode reactions by scanning electrochemical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nioradze, Nikoloz

    The nanogap quasi-steady-state voltammetry, developed in my work, presents the way to monitor and study rapid electron transfer reactions on macroscopic substrates of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). It combines the cyclic voltammetry and SECM and monitors substrate reaction as a tip current. The resulting plot of iT versus ES features the retraceable sigmoidal shape of a quasi-steady state voltammogram although a transient peak-shape voltammogram is obtained simultaneously at the macroscopic substrate. This simplifies measurement and analysis of a quasi-steady-state voltammogram and gives information about thermodynamic as well as kinetic parameters of the reaction taking place at the interface. No charging current at the amperometric tip, high and adjustable mass transport under the tip and high spatial resolution are all advantages of quasi-steady-state voltammetry. I also introduced generalized theory for nanoscale iT-ES voltammetry of substrate reactions with arbitrary reversibility and mechanism under comprehensive experimental conditions including any substrate potential and both SECM modes (feedback and substrate generation tip collection, SG/TC). I nanofabricated submicrometer size highly reliable Pt SECM tips and found the way of protection of these tiny electrodes from the damage caused either by electrostatic discharge or electrochemical etching. Subsequent application of quasi-steady-state voltammetry and reliable nanofabricated SECM probes enabled sensitive detection of adsorption of organic impurities from air and ultrapure water to the HOPG surface as evidenced by redox reaction of ferrocenylmethyl)trimethyl ammonium (FcTMA +). Study revealed that hydrophobic contaminant layer slows down the access of hydrophilic aqueous redox species to the underlying HOPG surface, thereby yielding a lower standard rate constant, k 0. Moreover, this barrier effects stronger to a more charged form (FcTMA2+) of a redox couple so that the electron

  4. Self-consistent modeling of electrochemical strain microscopy of solid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Tselev, Alexander; Morozovska, Anna N; Udod, Alexei; Eliseev, Eugene A; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-11-07

    Electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) employs a strong electromechanical coupling in solid ionic conductors to map ionic transport and electrochemical processes with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. To elucidate the mechanisms of the ESM image formation, we performed self-consistent numerical modeling of the electromechanical response in solid electrolytes under the probe tip in a linear, small-signal regime using the Boltzmann-Planck-Nernst-Einstein theory and Vegard's law while taking account of the electromigration and diffusion. The characteristic time scales involved in the formation of the ESM response were identified. It was found that the dynamics of the charge carriers in the tip-electrolyte system with blocking interfaces can be described as charging of the diffuse layer at the tip-electrolyte interface through the tip contact spreading resistance. At the high frequencies used in the detection regime, the distribution of the charge carriers under the tip is governed by evanescent concentration waves generated at the tip-electrolyte interface. The ion drift length in the electric field produced by the tip determines the ESM response at high frequencies, which follows a 1/f asymptotic law. The electronic conductivity, as well as the electron transport through the electrode-electrolyte interface, do not have a significant effect on the ESM signal in the detection regime. The results indicate, however, that for typical solid electrolytes at room temperature, the ESM response originates at and contains information about the very surface layer of a sample, and the properties of the one-unit-cell-thick surface layer may significantly contribute to the ESM response, implying a high surface sensitivity and a high lateral resolution of the technique. On the other hand, it follows that a rigorous analysis of the ESM signals requires techniques that account for the discrete nature of a solid.

  5. Self-consistent modeling of electrochemical strain microscopy of solid electrolytes

    DOE PAGES

    Tselev, Alexander; Morozovska, Anna N.; Udod, Alexei; ...

    2014-10-10

    Electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) employs a strong electromechanical coupling in solid ionic conductors to map ionic transport and electrochemical processes with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. To elucidate the mechanisms of the ESM image formation, we performed self-consistent numerical modeling of the electromechanical response in solid electrolytes under the probe tip in a linear, small-signal regime using the Boltzmann–Planck–Nernst–Einstein theory and Vegard's law while taking account of the electromigration and diffusion. We identified the characteristic time scales involved in the formation of the ESM response and found that the dynamics of the charge carriers in the tip-electrolyte system with blocking interfaces canmore » be described as charging of the diffuse layer at the tip-electrolyte interface through the tip contact spreading resistance. At the high frequencies used in the detection regime, the distribution of the charge carriers under the tip is governed by evanescent concentration waves generated at the tip-electrolyte interface. The ion drift length in the electric field produced by the tip determines the ESM response at high frequencies, which follows a 1/f asymptotic law. The electronic conductivity, as well as the electron transport through the electrode-electrolyte interface, do not have a significant effect on the ESM signal in the detection regime. The results indicate, however, that for typical solid electrolytes at room temperature, the ESM response originates at and contains information about the very surface layer of a sample, and the properties of the one-unit-cell-thick surface layer may significantly contribute to the ESM response, implying a high surface sensitivity and a high lateral resolution of the technique. On the other hand, it follows that a rigorous analysis of the ESM signals requires techniques that account for the discrete nature of a solid.« less

  6. Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting System--A Study of Interfacial Charge Transfer with Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingyan; Zhang, Xiaofan; Xiao, Xin; Shen, Yan

    2016-01-27

    Fast charge transfer kinetics at the photoelectrode/electrolyte interface is critical for efficient photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting system. Thus, far, a measurement of kinetics constants for such processes is limited. In this study, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is employed to investigate the charge transfer kinetics at the photoelectrode/electrolyte interface in the feedback mode in order to simulate the oxygen evolution process in PEC system. The popular photocatalysts BiVO4 and Mo doped BiVO4 (labeled as Mo:BiVO4) are selected as photoanodes and the common redox couple [Fe(CN)6](3-)/[Fe(CN)6](4-) as molecular probe. SECM characterization can directly reveal the surface catalytic reaction kinetics constant of 9.30 × 10(7) mol(-1) cm(3) s(-1) for the BiVO4. Furthermore, we find that after excitation, the ratio of rate constant for photogenerated hole to electron via Mo:BiVO4 reacting with mediator at the electrode/electrolyte interface is about 30 times larger than that of BiVO4. This suggests that introduction of Mo(6+) ion into BiVO4 can possibly facilitate solar to oxygen evolution (hole involved process) and suppress the interfacial back reaction (electron involved process) at photoanode/electrolyte interface. Therefore, the SECM measurement allows us to make a comprehensive analysis of interfacial charge transfer kinetics in PEC system.

  7. Alternating current scanning electrochemical microscopy with simultaneous fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jason A; Baur, Melinda B; Woodall, Erica L; Baur, John E

    2012-11-06

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is combined with alternating current scanning electrochemical microscopy (AC-SECM) for simultaneous measurements of impedance and faradaic current. Scan rates of 10-1000 V s(-1) were used for voltammetry, while a high-frequency (100 kHz), low-amplitude (10 mV rms) sine wave was added to the voltammetric waveform for the ac measurement. Both a lock-in amplifier and an analog circuit were used to measure the amplitude of the resultant ac signal. The effect of the added sine wave on the voltammetry at a carbon fiber electrode was investigated and found to have negligible effect. The combined FSCV and ac measurements were used to provide simultaneous chemical and topographical information about a substrate using a single carbon fiber probe. The technique is demonstrated in living cell culture, where cellular respiration and topography were simultaneously imaged without the addition of a redox mediator. This approach promises to be useful for the topographical and multidimensional chemical imaging of substrates.

  8. Digital simulation of scanning electrochemical microscopy approach curves to enzyme films with Michaelis-Menten kinetics.

    PubMed

    Burchardt, Malte; Träuble, Markus; Wittstock, Gunther

    2009-06-15

    The formalism for simulating scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) experiments by boundary element methods in three space coordinates has been extended to allow consideration of nonlinear boundary conditions. This is achieved by iteratively refining the boundary conditions that are encoded in a boundary condition matrix. As an example, the simulations are compared to experimental approach curves in the SECM feedback mode toward samples modified with glucose oxidase (GOx). The GOx layer was prepared by the layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolytes using glucose oxidase as one of the polyelectrolytes. The comparison of the simulated and experimental curves showed that under a wide range of experimentally accessible conditions approximations of the kinetics at the sample by first order models yield misleading results. The approach curves differ also qualitatively from curves calculated with first order models. As a consequence, this may lead to severe deviations when such curves are fitted to first order kinetic models. The use of linear approximations to describe the enzymatic reaction in SECM feedback experiments is justified only if the ratio of the mediator and Michaelis-Menten constant is equal to or smaller than 0.1 (deviation less than 10%).

  9. Scanning electrochemical microscopy, 52. Bipolar conductance technique at ultramicroelectrodes for resistance measurements.

    PubMed

    LeSuer, Robert J; Fan, Fu-Ren F; Bard, Allen J

    2004-12-01

    The bipolar conductance, BICON, technique for the measurement of solution resistance, based on the application of microsecond current pulses, as originally described by Enke and co-workers for measurements with conventional electrodes, was extended for use with ultramicroelectrodes, with a focus on its application in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). When the plateau time used to make the measurement lies within the BICON conditions, the solution conductance can be obtained directly from the output without the need for calibration curves. However, decreasing the size of the ultramicroelectrode decreases the range of values that satisfy these conditions, and one must resort to calibration curves to obtain solution conductance from the measured current, which was nevertheless found to be proportional to electrolyte concentration with electrodes as small as 5 mum in diameter. BICON/SECM approach curves over insulating substrates followed SECM negative feedback theory and approach curves in the presence of low (micromolar) or no added electrolyte are possible once the background conductivity is taken into account. Approach curves to a conducting substrate at open circuit potential are influenced by the solution time constant (solution resistance at the electrode tip x electrode double layer capacitance), which is a function of the tip/substrate distance, as well as the substrate size.

  10. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy as a Novel Proximity Sensor for Atraumatic Cochlear Implant Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, J.; Mirkin, M. V.; Svirsky, M. A.; Lalwani, A. K.; Llinas, R. R.

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of minimally invasive surgical and diagnostic procedures require the insertion of an optical, mechanical, or electronic device in narrow spaces inside a human body. In such procedures, precise motion control is essential to avoid damage to the patient’s tissues and/or the device itself. A typical example is the insertion of a cochlear implant which should ideally be done with minimum physical contact between the moving device and the cochlear canal walls or the basilar membrane. Because optical monitoring is not possible, alternative techniques for sub millimeter-scale distance control can be very useful for such procedures. The first requirement for distance control is distance sensing. We developed a novel approach to distance sensing based on the principles of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The SECM signal, i.e., the diffusion current to a microelectrode, is very sensitive to the distance between the probe surface and any electrically insulating object present in its proximity. With several amperometric microprobes fabricated on the surface of an insertable device, one can monitor the distances between different parts of the moving implant and the surrounding tissues. Unlike typical SECM experiments, in which a disk-shaped tip approaches a relatively smooth sample, complex geometries of the mobile device and its surroundings make distance sensing challenging. Additional issues include the possibility of electrode surface contamination in biological fluids and the requirement for a biologically compatible redox mediator. PMID:24845292

  11. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of membrane transport in the reverse imaging mode.

    PubMed

    Uitto, O D; White, H S

    2001-02-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), operated in reverse imaging mode (RIM), has been used to visualize the steady-state transport of molecules entering into porous membranes. RIM imaging is advantageous for investigating transport across biological membranes in situations where the SECM tip can access only the exterior membrane surface. Examples of RIM images of a synthetic membrane (mica with pores filled with the ion-selective polymer Nafion) and a biological membrane (hairless mouse skin) recorded during diffusive and iontophoretic transport, are reported. RIM imaging during diffusive transport allows visualization of the depletion of solute molecules in the solution adjacent to the pore openings. However, an accumulation of solute molecules above the pore opening is observed during iontophoresis, which is a consequence of the separation of the solute from the solvent (i.e., ultrafiltration). The separation results from differences in the rates of molecule transfer across the pore/solution interface when electroosmotic flow is operative. The results suggest that RIM imaging may be useful for measuring the kinetics of interfacial molecule transfer at biological membranes.

  12. Scanning electrochemical microscopy #54. Application to the study of heterogeneous catalytic reactions-hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José L; Hurth, Cedric; Bard, Allen J

    2005-05-19

    A scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) approach for the analysis of heterogeneous catalytic reactions at solid-liquid interfaces is described and applied. In this scheme, reactant, generated at a tip, undergoes a reaction (e.g., disproportionation) at the substrate. The theoretical background for this study, performed by digital simulations using a finite difference method, considers a chemical reaction at the substrate with general stoichiometry. In this case, the fraction of regenerated mediator (nu(S)) may differ with respect to a substrate reaction that is the reverse of the tip reaction, resulting in an asymmetric mediator loop. Simulated tip current transients and approach curves at different values of the kinetic rate constant for reactions where nu(S) < 1 were used to analyze this new SECM situation. This approach was used to study the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (HO2- --> 1/2O2 + OH-), where nu(S) = 0.5, on supported catalysts. A gold-mercury amalgam tip was used to quantitatively reduce dissolved O2 (mediator) to HO2-, which was decomposed back to oxygen at the catalyst substrate. Rate constants for the decomposition reaction on immobilized catalase and Pt particles were measured at different pH values by the correlation of experimental approach curves with the theoretical dependencies.

  13. Visualization of Electrochemical Reactions in Battery Materials with X-ray Microscopy and Mapping

    DOE PAGES

    Wolf, Mark; May, Brian M.; Cabana, Jordi

    2017-03-21

    By unlocking the full performance capabilities of battery materials we require a thorough understanding of the underlying electrochemical mechanisms at a variety of length scales. A broad arsenal of X-ray microscopy and mapping techniques is now available to probe these processes down to the nanoscale. The tunable nature of X-ray sources allows for the extraction of chemical states through spectromicroscopy. The addition of phase contrast imaging can retrieve the complex-valued refraction of the material, giving an even more nuanced chemical picture. Tomography and coherent Bragg diffraction imaging provide a reconstructed three-dimensional volume of the specimen, as well as internal strainmore » information from the latter. There have been many insights into battery materials achieved through the creative use of these, and similar, methods. Experiments performed while the battery is being actively cycled reveal behavior that differs significantly from what is observed at equilibrium and metastable conditions. Furthermore, there are planned improvements to X-ray source brightness and coherence will extend these techniques by alleviating the current trade-off in time, chemical, and spatial resolution.« less

  14. Quantification of photoelectrogenerated hydroxyl radical on TiO2 by surface interrogation scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zigah, Dodzi; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Bard, Allen J

    2012-10-05

    The surface interrogation mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SI-SECM) was used for the detection and quantification of adsorbed hydroxyl radical ˙OH((ads)) generated photoelectrochemically at the surface of a nanostructured TiO(2) substrate electrode. In this transient technique, a SECM tip is used to generate in situ a titrant from a reversible redox pair that reacts with the adsorbed species at the substrate. This reaction produces an SECM feedback response from which the amount of adsorbate and its decay kinetics can be obtained. The redox pair IrCl(6)(2-/3-) offered a reactive, selective and stable surface interrogation agent under the strongly oxidizing conditions of the photoelectrochemical cell. A typical ˙OH((ads)) saturation coverage of 338 μC cm(-2) was found in our nanostructured samples by its reduction with the electrogenerated IrCl(6)(3-). The decay kinetics of ˙OH((ads)) by dimerization to produce H(2)O(2) were studied through the time dependence of the SI-SECM signal and the surface dimerization rate constant was found to be ~k(OH) = 2.2 × 10(3) mol(-1) m(2) s(-1). A radical scavenger, such as methanol, competitively consumes ˙OH((ads)) and yields a shorter SI-SECM transient, where a pseudo-first order rate analysis at 2 M methanol yields a decay constant of k'(MeOH) ~ 1 s(-1).

  15. Operando study of Fe3O4 anodes by electrochemical atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuwei; Zhang, Weicong; Chen, Yuanning; Dai, Zhengwu; Zhao, Chongchong; Wang, Deyu; Shen, Cai

    2017-12-01

    Present study provided visual evidence of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formation on Fe3O4 anode during charge and discharge using in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy. AFM images show that SEI layer formed on Fe3O4 electrode from fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC)-based electrolyte was more stable and compact than that formed from ethylene carbonate (EC)-based electrolyte. In addition, presence of surface cracks on the electrodes indicated poor formation of an intact SEI layer. This observation was more apparent in the EC-based electrolyte. Lack of an intact SEI layer resulted in decomposition of electrolytes which were reflected by presence of large air bubbles and dendrites on the electrode during CV. Although FEC-based electrolyte improved the performance of Fe3O4 anodes in lithium ion batteries, its protective effects were far from perfect. To accelerate the application of Fe3O4 or other metal oxide anodes in lithium ion batteries, better electrolytes and sophisticated carbon coating techniques are needed.

  16. Measurement of stress and strain applied to electrochemically aligned collagen fibres by second-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goami, Nobutaka; Yoshiki, Keisuke; Namazu, Takahiro; Inoue, Shozo

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we developed a novel strain measurement technique for electrochemically aligned collagen (ELAC) fibres using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. The ELAC fibres were prepared by a typical electrochemical method and were subjected to cross-linking. For comparison with natural collagen fibres, polarization dependency of the prepared ELAC fibres and that of a human Achilles' tendon were evaluated. The results showed that, because of crosslinking, the ELAC fibres exhibit polarization dependency similar to that of the tendon but only in a region close to the tendon. The relationship between SHG and the applied strain was determined by a combination of SHG microscopy and tensile tests. The SHG from the ELAC fibres changed in the high strain region because of the applied stress.

  17. Characterization of LiMn2O4 cathodes by electrochemical strain microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Alikin, D. O.; Ievlev, A. V.; Luchkin, S. Yu.; Turygin, A. P.; Shur, V. Ya.; Kalinin, S. V.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2016-03-15

    Electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) is a scanning probe microscopy(SPM) method in which the local electrodiffusion is probed via application of AC voltage to the SPM tip and registration of resulting electrochemical strain. In this study, we implemented ESM to measure local strain in bulk LiMn2O4 cathodes of a commercial Li-battery in different states of charge to investigate distribution of Li-ion mobility and concentration. Ramped AC ESM imaging and voltage spectroscopy were used to find the most reliable regime of measurements allowing separating and diminishing different contributions to ESM. This is not a trivial task due to complex geometry of the sample and various obstacles resulting in less predictable contributions of different origins into ESM response: electrostatic tip–surface interactions, charge injection, electrostriction, and flexoelectricity. Finally, understanding and control of these contributions is an important step towards quantitative interpretation of ESM data.

  18. Scanning tunneling microscopy of electrochemically activated platinum surfaces. A direct ex-situ determination of the electrode nanotopography

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, L.; Gomez, J.; Baro, A.M.; Garcia, N.; Marcos, M.L.; Velasco, J.G.; Vara, J.M.; Arvia, A.J.; Presa, J.; Garcia, A.; Aguilar, M.

    1987-03-18

    A direct scanning tunneling microscopy ex-situ determination on the nanometer scale of the topography of electrochemically highly activated platinum electrodes is presented. A correlation between catalytic activity and surface microtopography becomes evident. This result gives support to a structural model for the activated electrode surface. In the model, a volume with a pebble-like structure allows electrocatalytic processes to occur practically free of diffusion relaxation contributions under usual voltammetric conditions.

  19. Microstamped Petri Dishes for Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Analysis of Arrays of Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Adithya; de Boer, Hans L.; van den Berg, Albert; Le Gac, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    While scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is a powerful technique for non-invasive analysis of cells, SECM-based assays remain scarce and have been mainly limited so far to single cells, which is mostly due to the absence of suitable platform for experimentation on 3D cellular aggregates or microtissues. Here, we report stamping of a Petri dish with a microwell array for large-scale production of microtissues followed by their in situ analysis using SECM. The platform is realized by hot embossing arrays of microwells (200 μm depth; 400 μm diameter) in commercially available Petri dishes, using a PDMS stamp. Microtissues form spontaneously in the microwells, which is demonstrated here using various cell lines (e.g., HeLa, C2C12, HepG2 and MCF-7). Next, the respiratory activity of live HeLa microtissues is assessed by monitoring the oxygen reduction current in constant height mode and at various distances above the platform surface. Typically, at a 40 μm distance from the microtissue, a 30% decrease in the oxygen reduction current is measured, while above 250 μm, no influence of the presence of the microtissues is detected. After exposure to a model drug (50% ethanol), no such changes in oxygen concentration are found at any height in solution, which reflects that microtissues are not viable anymore. This is furthermore confirmed using conventional live/dead fluorescent stains. This live/dead assay demonstrates the capability of the proposed approach combining SECM and microtissue arrays formed in a stamped Petri dish for conducting cellular assays in a non-invasive way on 3D cellular models. PMID:24690887

  20. Two-step controllable electrochemical etching of tungsten scanning probe microscopy tips

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Yasser; Al-Falih, Hisham; Zhang Yaping; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2012-06-15

    Dynamic electrochemical etching technique is optimized to produce tungsten tips with controllable shape and radius of curvature of less than 10 nm. Nascent features such as 'dynamic electrochemical etching' and reverse biasing after 'drop-off' are utilized, and 'two-step dynamic electrochemical etching' is introduced to produce extremely sharp tips with controllable aspect ratio. Electronic current shut-off time for conventional dc 'drop-off' technique is reduced to {approx}36 ns using high speed analog electronics. Undesirable variability in tip shape, which is innate to static dc electrochemical etching, is mitigated with novel 'dynamic electrochemical etching.' Overall, we present a facile and robust approach, whereby using a novel etchant level adjustment mechanism, 30 Degree-Sign variability in cone angle and 1.5 mm controllability in cone length were achieved, while routinely producing ultra-sharp probes.

  1. Potential-dependent adsorption/desorption behavior of perfluorosulfonated ionomer on a gold electrode surface studied by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical quartz microbalance, and electrochemical atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takuya; Ikeda, Kota; Uosaki, Kohei

    2013-02-19

    Potential-dependent adsorption/desorption behavior of perfluorosulfonated ionomer (PFSI) on a gold electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), and electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) in a Nafion (i.e., PFSI) dispersed aqueous solution without any other electrolyte. It was found that PFSI serves as an electrolyte and that electrochemical measurements can be performed in this solution without any significant IR drop. PFSI molecules were adsorbed on the Au surface in the lying-down configuration in the potential range between 0 and 0.45 V, the amount of adsorbed PFSI increased when the potential was made more positive than 0.75 V, and the adsorbed PFSI fully desorbed from the surface at potentials more positive than 1.4 V where gold oxide was formed. Once the gold oxide had been reduced, PFSI readsorbed on the surface, albeit slowly. PFSI desorbed from the surface as the potential was made more negative than 0 V. These processes took place reversibly.

  2. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of graphene/polymer hybrid thin films as supercapacitors: Physical-chemical interfacial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanju; Price, Carson

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid electrode comprising an electric double-layer capacitor of graphene nanosheets and a pseudocapacitor of the electrically conducting polymers namely, polyaniline; PAni and polypyrrole; PPy are constructed that exhibited synergistic effect with excellent electrochemical performance as thin film supercapacitors for alternative energy. The hybrid supercapacitors were prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly based on controlled electrochemical polymerization followed by reduction of graphene oxide electrochemically producing ErGO, for establishing intimate electronic contact through nanoscale architecture and chemical stability, producing a single bilayer of (PAni/ErGO)1, (PPy/ErGO)1, (PAni/GO)1 and (PPy/GO)1. The rationale design is to create thin films that possess interconnected graphene nanosheets (GNS) with polymer nanostructures forming well-defined tailored interfaces allowing sufficient surface adsorption and faster ion transport due to short diffusion distances. We investigated their electrochemical properties and performance in terms of gravimetric specific capacitance, Cs, from cyclic voltammograms. The LbL-assembled bilayer films exhibited an excellent Cs of ≥350 F g-1 as compared with constituents (˜70 F g-1) at discharge current density of 0.3 A g-1 that outperformed many other hybrid supercapacitors. To gain deeper insights into the physical-chemical interfacial processes occurring at the electrode/electrolyte interface that govern their operation, we have used scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) technique in feedback and probe approach modes. We present our findings from viewpoint of reinforcing the role played by heterogeneous electrode surface composed of nanoscale graphene sheets (conducting) and conducting polymers (semiconducting) backbone with ordered polymer chains via higher/lower probe current distribution maps. Also targeted is SECM imaging that allowed to determine electrochemical (re)activity of surface ion adsorption sites

  3. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of graphene/polymer hybrid thin films as supercapacitors: Physical-chemical interfacial processes

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanju Price, Carson

    2015-10-15

    Hybrid electrode comprising an electric double-layer capacitor of graphene nanosheets and a pseudocapacitor of the electrically conducting polymers namely, polyaniline; PAni and polypyrrole; PPy are constructed that exhibited synergistic effect with excellent electrochemical performance as thin film supercapacitors for alternative energy. The hybrid supercapacitors were prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly based on controlled electrochemical polymerization followed by reduction of graphene oxide electrochemically producing ErGO, for establishing intimate electronic contact through nanoscale architecture and chemical stability, producing a single bilayer of (PAni/ErGO){sub 1}, (PPy/ErGO){sub 1}, (PAni/GO){sub 1} and (PPy/GO){sub 1}. The rationale design is to create thin films that possess interconnected graphene nanosheets (GNS) with polymer nanostructures forming well-defined tailored interfaces allowing sufficient surface adsorption and faster ion transport due to short diffusion distances. We investigated their electrochemical properties and performance in terms of gravimetric specific capacitance, C{sub s}, from cyclic voltammograms. The LbL-assembled bilayer films exhibited an excellent C{sub s} of ≥350 F g{sup −1} as compared with constituents (∼70 F g{sup −1}) at discharge current density of 0.3 A g{sup −1} that outperformed many other hybrid supercapacitors. To gain deeper insights into the physical-chemical interfacial processes occurring at the electrode/electrolyte interface that govern their operation, we have used scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) technique in feedback and probe approach modes. We present our findings from viewpoint of reinforcing the role played by heterogeneous electrode surface composed of nanoscale graphene sheets (conducting) and conducting polymers (semiconducting) backbone with ordered polymer chains via higher/lower probe current distribution maps. Also targeted is SECM imaging that allowed to determine

  4. Fabrication of submicrometer-sized gold electrodes of controlled geometry for scanning electrochemical-atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abbou, Jeremy; Demaille, Christophe; Druet, Michel; Moiroux, Jacques

    2002-12-15

    A method for fabricating submicrometer-sized gold electrodes of conical or spherical geometry is described. By generating an electric arc between an etched gold microwire and a tungsten counter electrode, the very end of the gold microwire can be melted and given an overall spherical or conical shape a few hundred nanometers in size. The whole wire is subsequently insulated via the cathodic deposition of electrophoretic paint. By applying a high-voltage pulse to the microwire, the film covering its very end can then be selectively removed, thus exposing a submicrometer-sized electrode surface of predefined geometry. The selective exposure of the preformed end of the microwire is demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, and metal electrodeposition experiments. The electrophoretic paint coating provides a low-capacitance, robust insulating film allowing exploration of a very wide potential window in aqueous solution. The submicrometer-sized electrodes can easily be turned into probes suitable for combined scanning electrochemical-atomic force microscopy by bending and flattening the gold microwire so that the tip is borne by a flexible enough arm. The good agreement between theoretical and experimental scanning electrochemical microscopy approach curves thus obtained confirms that only the very end of the tip, of predefined geometry, is exposed to the solution.

  5. Iontophoretic transport through porous membranes using scanning electrochemical microscopy: application to in vitro studies of ion fluxes through skin.

    PubMed

    Scott, E R; White, H S; Phipps, J B

    1993-06-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is used to map localized iontophoretic fluxes of electroactive species through porous membranes. A method is described that allows both the rate of transport of species from a microscopic pore and the pore's diameter to be measured. SECM images and analyses of synthetic porous membranes (track-etched polycarbonate and mica membranes) and hairless mouse skin are reported. Preliminary analysis of SECM images of the mouse skin indicates that a significant percentage of the iontophoretic flux occurs through pores associated with hair follicles.

  6. Potential dependent structure of electric double layer faced to solid electrode surfaces analyzed by electrochemical frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Ken-ichi; Utsunomiya, Toru; Yokota, Yasuyuki

    2017-08-01

    This progress review summarizes recent achievements on the analyses of electric double layer (EDL) formed at electrolyte/electrode interfaces by using electrochemical frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (EC-FM-AFM), which enables to obtain the liquid side information on the liquid molecules’ structuring as well as the atomic scale resolution of the solid side at low loading forces. Potential and electrolyte dependent EDL structures at aqueous solution/graphite interfaces and strong substrate dependency on the structuring of interfacial ionic liquid are mainly discussed.

  7. The study of multireactional electrochemical interfaces via a tip generation/substrate collection mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy: the hydrogen evolution reaction for Mn in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Kevin C; Bard, Allen J

    2013-10-23

    We report a new method of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) that can be used to separate multireactional electrochemical interfaces, i.e., electrodes at which two or more reactions occur (and hence two partial currents flow) at the same time. This was done with a modified tip generation/substrate collection mode where the two reactions occur on the tip electrode, and the substrate electrode is held at a potential to collect only one of the products, allowing the determination of the individual partial currents. Thus, by using the substrate electrode current and the difference between the tip and substrate electrode currents, the two reactions occurring on the tip electrode can be separated. As a test case for this new method, we investigated proton reduction on Mn, a reaction that, because of the highly corrosive nature of Mn, to our knowledge has never before been directly measured. This test was carried out using a Mn tip electrode and a Pt substrate electrode. Using a three-dimensional COMSOL Multiphysics simulation, we were able to accurately determine the tip/substrate distance with this electrode, and by fitting simulations to experimental data, we were able to determine an exchange current density, log(j(0)) = -4.7 ± 0.7 A cm(-2), for proton reduction on Mn in strong acid. This result corrects a literature value and was used in a pattern recognition algorithm reported in a companion manuscript.

  8. New approach to writing and simultaneous reading of micropatterns: combining surface plasmon resonance imaging with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

    PubMed

    Szunerits, Sabine; Knorr, Nikolaus; Calemczuk, Roberto; Livache, Thierry

    2004-10-12

    This work establishes the compatibility of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR-i) with the visualization of localized electropolymerization. The "writing" of polypyrrole and polypyrrole-oligonucleotide patterns onto thin gold films is demonstrated using scanning electrochemical microcopy (SECM), while an optical method, SPR-i, simultaneously detected the formed micropatterns. The combination of these two methods, SECM/SPR-i, has the advantage of not only controlling the patterning process but also providing unique information on the micropattern formation. The influence of the pulsing time and the monomer concentration on the spot size and its characteristics has been investigated in detail using SPR-i. Fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy have also been used to support the data obtained by SPR-i. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  9. Transport of redox probes through single pores measured by scanning electrochemical-scanning ion conductance microscopy (SECM-SICM).

    PubMed

    Morris, Celeste A; Chen, Chiao-Chen; Baker, Lane A

    2012-07-07

    We report scanning electrochemical microscopy-scanning ion conductance microscopy (SECM-SICM) experiments that describe transport of redox active molecules which emanate from single pores of a track-etch membrane. Experiments are performed with electrodes which consist of a thin gold layer deposited on one side of a nanopipet. Subsequent insulation of the electrode with parylene results in a hybrid electrode for SECM-SICM measurements. Electrode fabrication is straightforward and highly parallel. For image collection, ionic current measured at the nanopipet both controls the position of the electrode with respect to the membrane surface and reports the local conductance in the vicinity of the nanopipet, while faradaic current measured at the Au electrode reports the presence of redox-active molecules. Application of a transmembrane potential difference affords additional control over migration of charged species across the membrane.

  10. Visualizing and Calculating Tip-Substrate Distance in Nanoscale Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Using 3-Dimensional Super-Resolution Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Vignesh; Marchuk, Kyle; Yu, Yun; Titus, Eric J; Wilson, Andrew J; Armstrong, Chadd M; Zhang, Bo; Willets, Katherine A

    2017-01-03

    We report a strategy for the optical determination of tip-substrate distance in nanoscale scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) using three-dimensional super-resolution fluorescence imaging. A phase mask is placed in the emission path of our dual SECM/optical microscope, generating a double helix point spread function at the image plane, which allows us to measure the height of emitting objects relative to the focus of the microscope. By exciting both a fluorogenic reaction at the nanoscale electrode tip as well as fluorescent nanoparticles at the substrate, we are able to calculate the tip-substrate distance as the tip approaches the surface with precision better than 25 nm. Attachment of a fluorescent particle to the insulating sheath of the SECM tip extends this technique to nonfluorogenic electrochemical reactions. Correlated electrochemical and optical determination of tip-substrate distance yielded excellent agreement between the two techniques. Not only does super-resolution imaging offer a secondary feedback mechanism for measuring the tip-sample gap during SECM experiments, it also enables facile tip alignment and a strategy for accounting for electrode tilt relative to the substrate.

  11. High resolution imaging of the distribution and permeability of methyl viologen dication in bovine articular cartilage using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, M; Macpherson, J V; O'Hare, D; Winlove, C P; Unwin, P R

    2001-11-15

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) has been used in the induced transfer (SECMIT) mode to image the permeability of a probe cation, methyl viologen (MV(2+)), in samples of articular cartilage. An ultramicroelectrode (UME), scanned just above the surface of a sample, is used to amperometrically detect the probe solute. The resulting depletion of MV(2+) in solution induces the transfer of this cation from the sample into the solution for detection at the UME. The current provides quantitative information on local permeability, provided that the sample-UME distance is known. It is shown that the necessary topographical information can be obtained using the amperometric response for the oxidation of Ru(CN)(4-)(6), which does not permeate into the cartilage matrix. This procedure was validated by marking samples in situ, after electrochemical imaging, with subsequent examination by ex situ interferometry and optical microscopy. Wide variations in the permeability of MV(2+) have been detected by SECMIT. These observations represent the first demonstration of the inhomogeneous permeability of a cation in cartilage on a micrometre scale. The permeability maps show similar features to the proteoglycan distribution, identified by toluidine blue staining, and it is likely that proteoglycans are the main determinant of MV(2+) permeability in articular cartilage.

  12. In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of electrochemical sodiation of individual Co₉S₈-filled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Yijun; Xu, Bingshe; Yang, Yuehai; Neupane, Suman; Li, Wenzhi

    2014-04-22

    The comprehension of fundamental electrochemical behavior and sodiation mechanism is critical for the design of high-performance electrode materials for sodium-ion (Na-ion) batteries. In this paper, the electrochemical sodiation process and microstructure evolution of individual Co9S8-filled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been directly visualized and studied using in situ transmission electron microscopy. Upon the first sodiation, a reaction front propagates progressively along the filling nanowire, causing the filled CNT to inflate. The filled CNTs behave differently depending on their structures and the magnitude of the sodiation voltage. For a Co9S8-filled CNT with an open end, the sodiated Co9S8 filler shows a substantial axial elongation of 120.8% and a small radial swelling due to the extrusion of CNT walls. In contrast, the closed CNT shows a major radial expansion of 40.6% and a small axial elongation because of the mechanical confinement of the carbon shells. After sodiation, the spacing between the carbon shells increases from 3.4 to 3.8 Å due to the Na(+)-ion insertion and the single-crystalline Co9S8 filler converts to numerous Co nanograins dispersed in a Na2S matrix. Compared with the gentle microstructure evolution of the CNT under small charging voltage, a strong electrochemical reaction accompanying drastic swelling and fracturing of CNT shells is observed for the CNT electrode under large charging voltage. Our observations provide direct evidence and important insights for the electrochemical process of CNT-based composite materials in Na-ion batteries.

  13. Scanning electrochemical microscopy studies of micropatterned copper sulfide (Cu(x)S) thin films fabricated by a wet chemistry method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miao; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaocui

    2011-05-30

    Patterned copper sulfide (Cu(x)S) microstructures on Si (1 1 1) wafers were successfully fabricated by a relatively simple solution growth method using copper sulfate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate and sodium thiosulfate aqueous solutions as precursors. The Cu(x)S particles were selectively deposited on a patterned self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane regions created by photolithography. To obtain high quality Cu(x)S films, preparative conditions such as concentration, proportion, pH and temperature of the precursor solutions were optimized. Various techniques such as optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) were employed to examine the topography and properties of the micro-patterned Cu(x)S films. Optical microscopy and AFM results indicated that the Cu(x)S micro-pattern possessed high selectivity and clear edge resolution. From combined X-ray diffraction analysis and optical band gap calculations we conclude that Cu(9)S(5) (digenite) was the main phase within the resultant Cu(x)S film. Both SECM image and cyclic voltammograms confirmed that the Cu(x)S film had good electrical conductivity. Moreover, from SECM approach curve analysis, the apparent electron-transfer rate constant (k) in the micro-pattern of Cu(x)S dominated surface was estimated as 0.04 cm/s. The SECM current map showed high edge acuity of the micro-patterned Cu(x)S.

  14. Scanning electrochemical microscopy studies of micropatterned copper sulfide (CuxS) thin films fabricated by a wet chemistry method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Miao; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaocui

    2011-01-01

    Patterned copper sulfide (CuxS) microstructures on Si (1 1 1) wafers were successfully fabricated by a relatively simple solution growth method using copper sulfate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate and sodium thiosulfate aqueous solutions as precursors. The CuxS particles were selectively deposited on a patterned self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane regions created by photolithography. To obtain high quality CuxS films, preparative conditions such as concentration, proportion, pH and temperature of the precursor solutions were optimized. Various techniques such as optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) were employed to examine the topography and properties of the micro-patterned CuxS films. Optical microscopy and AFM results indicated that the CuxS micro-pattern possessed high selectivity and clear edge resolution. From combined X-ray diffraction analysis and optical band gap calculations we conclude that Cu9S5 (digenite) was the main phase within the resultant CuxS film. Both SECM image and cyclic voltammograms confirmed that the CuxS film had good electrical conductivity. Moreover, from SECM approach curve analysis, the apparent electron-transfer rate constant (k) in the micro-pattern of CuxS dominated surface was estimated as 0.04 cm/s. The SECM current map showed high edge acuity of the micro-patterned CuxS. PMID:21785491

  15. Practical Aspects of Electrochemical Corrosion Measurements During In Situ Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Sibylle; Janssen, Arne; Zaluzec, Nestor J; Burke, M Grace

    2017-08-01

    The capability to perform liquid in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine the real-time processes of physical and chemical/electrochemical reactions during the interaction between metal surfaces and liquid environments. This work describes the requisite steps to make the technique fully analytical, from sample preparation, through modifications of the electrodes, characterization of electrolytes, and finally to electrochemical corrosion experiments comparing in situ TEM to conventional bulk cell and microcell configurations.

  16. Quantitative Visualization of Molecular Delivery and Uptake at Living Cells with Self-Referencing Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Page, Ashley; Kang, Minkyung; Armitstead, Alexander; Perry, David; Unwin, Patrick R

    2017-03-07

    A multifunctional dual-channel scanning probe nanopipet that enables simultaneous scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurements is demonstrated to have powerful new capabilities for spatially mapping the uptake of molecules of interest at living cells. One barrel of the probe is filled with electrolyte and the molecules of interest and is open to the bulk solution for both topographical feedback and local delivery to a target interface, while a solid carbon electrode in the other barrel measures the local concentration and flux of the delivered molecules. This setup allows differentiation in molecular uptake rate across several regions of single cells with individual measurements at nanoscale resolution. Further, operating in a "hopping mode", where the probe is translated toward the interface (cell) at each point allows self-referencing to be employed, in which the carbon electrode response is calibrated at each and every pixel in bulk for comparison to the measurement near the surface. This is particularly important for measurements in living systems where an electrode response may change over time. Finite element method (FEM) modeling places the technique on a quantitative footing to allow the response of the carbon electrode and local delivery rates to be quantified. The technique is extremely versatile, with the local delivery of molecules highly tunable via control of the SICM bias to promote or restrict migration from the pipet orifice. It is expected to have a myriad of applications from drug delivery to screening catalysts.

  17. Fabrication and Demonstration of Mercury Disc-Well Probes for Stripping-Based Cyclic Voltammetry Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Zachary J; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2017-03-07

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is a rising technique for the study of energy storage materials. Hg-based probes allow the extension of SECM investigations to ionic processes, but the risk of irreversible Hg amalgam saturation limits their operation to rapid timescales and dilute analyte solutions. Here, we report a novel fabrication protocol for Hg disc-well ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs), which retain access to stripping information but are less susceptible to amalgam saturation than traditional Hg sphere-caps or thin-films. The amalgamation and stripping behaviors of Hg disc-well UMEs are compared to those of traditional Hg sphere-cap UMEs and corroborated with data from finite element simulations. The improved protection against amalgam saturation allows Hg disc-wells to operate safely in highly concentrated environments at long timescales. The utility of the probes for bulk measurements extends also to SECM studies, where the disc geometry facilitates small tip-substrate gaps and improves both spatial and temporal resolution. Because they can carry out slow, high-resolution anodic stripping voltammetry approaches and imaging in concentrated solutions, Hg disc-well electrodes fill a new analytical niche for studies of ionic reactivity and are a valuable addition to the electrochemical toolbox.

  18. Electrocatalytic activity of Pd-Co bimetallic mixtures for formic acid oxidation studied by scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Changhoon; Sánchez-Sánchez, Carlos M; Lin, Cheng-Lan; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Bard, Allen J

    2009-08-15

    The electrochemical oxidation of formic acid was studied by the tip generation-substrate collection (TG-SC) mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), extending the number of applications of SECM in electrocatalysis. Formic acid was generated at a Hg on Au ultramicroelectrode (UME) tip by reduction of CO(2) in a 0.1 M KHCO(3) solution saturated with this gas. The electrocatalytic activity of different Pd-Co bimetallic compositions was evaluated using a Pd-Co electrocatalyst array formed by spots deposited onto glassy carbon (GC) as a SECM substrate. The SECM tip, which generated a constant formic acid flux, was scanned above the array and the oxidation current generated when formic acid was collected by active electrocatalytic spots was displayed as a function of tip position. This generated a SECM image that showed the electrocatalytic activity of each spot. SECM screening identified Pd(50)Co(50) (Pd/Co = 50:50, atomic ratio) as a better electrocatalyst toward the formic acid oxidation than pure Pd or Pt in 0.1 M KHCO(3) solution and this result was confirmed by cyclic voltammetry. Positive feedback was observed for the most active compositions of Pd-Co which suggests fast reaction kinetics and chemical reversibility during the oxidation of formic acid to CO(2). Moreover this feedback increases the contrast between active and non-active spots in this imaging mode.

  19. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy of One-Dimensional Nanostructure: Effects of Nanostructure Dimensions on the Tip Feedback Current under Unbiased Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hui; Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Eunkyoung; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is developed as a powerful approach to electrochemical characterization of individual one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures under unbiased conditions. 1D nanostructures comprise high-aspect-ratio materials with both nanoscale and macroscale dimensions such as nanowires, nanotubes, nanobelts, and nanobands. Finite element simulations demonstrate that the feedback current at a disk-shaped ultramicroelectrode tip positioned above an unbiased nanoband, as prepared on an insulating substrate, is sensitive to finite dimensions of the band, i.e., micrometer length, nanometer width, and nanometer height from the insulating surface. The electron-transfer rate of a redox mediator at the nanoband surface depends not only on the intrinsic rate but also on the open-circuit potential of the nanoband, which is determined by the dimensions of the nanoband as well as the tip inner and outer radii, and tip–substrate distance. The theoretical predictions are confirmed experimentally by employing Au nanobands as fabricated on a SiO2 surface by electron-beam lithography, thereby yielding well defined dimensions of 100 or 500 nm in width, 47 nm in height, and 50 μm in length. A 100 nm-wide nanoband can be detected by SECM imaging with ∼2 μm-diameter tips although the tip feedback current is compromised by finite electron-transfer kinetics for Ru(NH3)63+ at the nanoband surface. PMID:20160938

  20. Monitoring Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Approach Curves with Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy – Towards a Novel Current-Independent Positioning Mode

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Kranz, Christine; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Single-bounce attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy in the 3–20 µm range (MIR) has been combined with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) for in situ spectroscopic detection of electrochemically induced localized surface modifications using an ultramicroelectrode (UME). In this study, a novel current-independent approach for positioning the UME in aqueous electrolyte solution is presented using either changes of IR absorption intensity associated with borosilicate glass (BSG), which is used as shielding material of the UME wire, or by monitoring IR changes of the water spectrum within the penetration depth of the evanescent field due to displacement of water molecules in the volume between the sample surface and the UME within the evanescent field. The experimental results show that the UME penetrates into the exponentially decaying evanescent field in close vicinity (a few µm) to the ATR crystal surface. Hence, the resulting intensity changes of the IR absorption spectra for borosilicate glass (increase) and for water (decrease), can be used to determine the position of the UME relative to the ATR crystal surface independent of the current measured at the UME. PMID:20329757

  1. Study on the Electrochemical Reaction Mechanism of ZnFe2O4 by In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qingmei; Wang, Shixin; Yao, Libing; Li, Haojie; Du, Gaohui; Ye, Huiqun; Fang, Yunzhang

    2016-01-01

    A family of mixed transition–metal oxides (MTMOs) has great potential for applications as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, the reaction mechanism of MTMOs anodes during lithiation/delithiation is remain unclear. Here, the lithiation/delithiation processes of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles are observed dynamically using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results suggest that during the first lithiation process the ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles undergo a conversion process and generate a composite structure of 1–3 nm Fe and Zn nanograins within Li2O matrix. During the delithiation process, volume contraction and the conversion of Zn and Fe take place with the disappearance of Li2O, followed by the complete conversion to Fe2O3 and ZnO not the original phase ZnFe2O4. The following cycles are dominated by the full reversible phase conversion between Zn, Fe and ZnO, Fe2O3. The Fe valence evolution during cycles evidenced by electron energy–loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques also exhibit the reversible conversion between Fe and Fe2O3 after the first lithiation, agreeing well with the in situ TEM results. Such in situ TEM observations provide valuable phenomenological insights into electrochemical reaction of MTMOs, which may help to optimize the composition of anode materials for further improved electrochemical performance. PMID:27306189

  2. Qualitative and quantitative detection of DNA amplified with HRP-modified SiO2 nanoparticles using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huajun; Jiao, Fang; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Qingjiang; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2013-09-15

    Qualitative and quantitative detection of DNA was achieved by a "sandwich" DNA sensor through SG/TC (substrate generation and tip collection) mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The "sandwich" DNA structure was formed by the hybridization of thiol-tethered oligodeoxynucleotide probes (capture probe), assembled on the gold substrate surface, with target DNA and biotinylated indicator probe. HRP (horseradish peroxidase)-wrapped SiO2 nanoparticles were linked to the sandwich structure through biotin-streptavidin interaction. Hydroquinone (H2Q) was oxidized to benzoquinone (BQ) at the modified substrate surface where sequence-specific hybridization had occurred through the HRP-catalyzed reaction in the presence of H2O2. The detection was based on the reduction of BQ generated on the modified substrate by SECM tip. For SECM imaging experiment, we structured the microsensor platform through localized desorption of 1-dodecanethiol monolayer. Approach curves were employed for quantitative detection of DNA concentration. The detection limit of complementary DNA was as low as 0.8pM. This technique is promising for the application on electrochemical DNA chip.

  3. Study on the Electrochemical Reaction Mechanism of ZnFe2O4 by In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qingmei; Wang, Shixin; Yao, Libing; Li, Haojie; Du, Gaohui; Ye, Huiqun; Fang, Yunzhang

    2016-06-01

    A family of mixed transition-metal oxides (MTMOs) has great potential for applications as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, the reaction mechanism of MTMOs anodes during lithiation/delithiation is remain unclear. Here, the lithiation/delithiation processes of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles are observed dynamically using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results suggest that during the first lithiation process the ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles undergo a conversion process and generate a composite structure of 1-3 nm Fe and Zn nanograins within Li2O matrix. During the delithiation process, volume contraction and the conversion of Zn and Fe take place with the disappearance of Li2O, followed by the complete conversion to Fe2O3 and ZnO not the original phase ZnFe2O4. The following cycles are dominated by the full reversible phase conversion between Zn, Fe and ZnO, Fe2O3. The Fe valence evolution during cycles evidenced by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques also exhibit the reversible conversion between Fe and Fe2O3 after the first lithiation, agreeing well with the in situ TEM results. Such in situ TEM observations provide valuable phenomenological insights into electrochemical reaction of MTMOs, which may help to optimize the composition of anode materials for further improved electrochemical performance.

  4. Real-time mapping of a hydrogen peroxide concentration profile across a polymicrobial bacterial biofilm using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuhui; Ramsey, Matthew M; Chen, Xiaole; Koley, Dipankar; Whiteley, Marvin; Bard, Allen J

    2011-02-15

    Quantitative detection of hydrogen peroxide in solution above a Streptococcus gordonii (Sg) bacterial biofilm was studied in real time by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The concentration of hydrogen peroxide was determined to be 0.7 mM to 1.6 mM in the presence of 10 mM glucose over a period of 2 to 8 h. The hydrogen peroxide production measured was higher near the biofilm surface in comparison to Sg grown planktonically. Differential hydrogen peroxide production was observed both by fluorometric as well as by SECM measurements. The interaction between two different species in a bacterial biofilm of Sg and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in terms of hydrogen peroxide production was also studied by SECM. One-directional y-scan SECM measurements showed the unique spatial mapping of hydrogen peroxide concentration across a mixed species biofilm and revealed that hydrogen peroxide concentration varies greatly dependent upon local species composition.

  5. Deposition of copper multilayers on Au(111) in sulfuric acid solution: An electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madry, B.; Wandelt, K.; Nowicki, M.

    2015-07-01

    The co-adsorption of submono-, mono- and multi-layers of Cu with sulfate anions on a Au(111) electrode surface was investigated in electrochemical environment (0.1 mM CuSO4 + 0.1 M H2SO4) by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Correlated with the STM investigations the CV measurements indicate co-adsorption/-desorption processes of Cu of submono-, mono- and multi-layer coverages with sulfuric acid species on Au(111). The formation of a quasi-hexagonal Moiré superstructure on terraces of copper multilayers was observed in situ by STM. In detail the observed Moiré-structure is similar but not identical to the one observed on the (111) surface of bulk copper. High resolution STM images show the formation of a (√{ 3} ×√{ 7})-like sulfate structure on all multilayer copper terraces.

  6. Self-consistent modelling of electrochemical strain microscopy in mixed ionic-electronic conductors: Nonlinear and dynamic regimes

    DOE PAGES

    Varenyk, O. V.; Silibin, M. V.; Kiselev, Dmitri A.; ...

    2015-08-19

    The frequency dependent Electrochemical Strain Microscopy (ESM) response of mixed ionic-electronic conductors is analyzed within the framework of Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Vegard law, accounting for steric effects from mobile donors. The emergence of dynamic charge waves and nonlinear deformation of the surface in response to bias applied to the tip-surface junction is numerically explored. The 2D maps of the strain and concentration distributions across the mixed ionic-electronic conductor and bias-induced surface displacements are calculated. Furthermore, the obtained numerical results can be applied to quantify the ESM response of Li-based solid electrolytes, materials with resistive switching, and electroactive ferroelectric polymers,more » which are of potential interest for flexible and high-density non-volatile memory devices.« less

  7. Self-consistent modelling of electrochemical strain microscopy in mixed ionic-electronic conductors: Nonlinear and dynamic regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Varenyk, O. V.; Silibin, M. V.; Kiselev, Dmitri A.; Eliseev, E. A.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Morozovska, A. N.

    2015-08-19

    The frequency dependent Electrochemical Strain Microscopy (ESM) response of mixed ionic-electronic conductors is analyzed within the framework of Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Vegard law, accounting for steric effects from mobile donors. The emergence of dynamic charge waves and nonlinear deformation of the surface in response to bias applied to the tip-surface junction is numerically explored. The 2D maps of the strain and concentration distributions across the mixed ionic-electronic conductor and bias-induced surface displacements are calculated. Furthermore, the obtained numerical results can be applied to quantify the ESM response of Li-based solid electrolytes, materials with resistive switching, and electroactive ferroelectric polymers, which are of potential interest for flexible and high-density non-volatile memory devices.

  8. Identical Location Transmission Electron Microscopy Imaging of Site-Selective Pt Nanocatalysts: Electrochemical Activation and Surface Disordering.

    PubMed

    Arán-Ais, Rosa M; Yu, Yingchao; Hovden, Robert; Solla-Gullón, Jose; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M; Abruña, Héctor D

    2015-12-02

    We have employed identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM) to study changes in the shape and morphology of faceted Pt nanoparticles as a result of electrochemical cycling; a procedure typically employed for activating platinum surfaces. We find that the shape and morphology of the as-prepared hexagonal nanoparticles are rapidly degraded as a result of potential cycling up to +1.3 V. As few as 25 potential cycles are sufficient to cause significant degradation, and after about 500-1000 cycles the particles are dramatically degraded. We also see clear evidence of particle migration during potential cycling. These finding suggest that great care must be exercised in the use and study of shaped Pt nanoparticles (and related systems) as electrocatlysts, especially for the oxygen reduction reaction where high positive potentials are typically employed.

  9. Self-consistent modelling of electrochemical strain microscopy in mixed ionic-electronic conductors: Nonlinear and dynamic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varenyk, O. V.; Silibin, M. V.; Kiselev, D. A.; Eliseev, E. A.; Kalinin, S. V.; Morozovska, A. N.

    2015-08-01

    The frequency dependent Electrochemical Strain Microscopy (ESM) response of mixed ionic-electronic conductors is analyzed within the framework of Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Vegard law, accounting for steric effects from mobile donors. The emergence of dynamic charge waves and nonlinear deformation of the surface in response to bias applied to the tip-surface junction is numerically explored. The 2D maps of the strain and concentration distributions across the mixed ionic-electronic conductor and bias-induced surface displacements are calculated. The obtained numerical results can be applied to quantify the ESM response of Li-based solid electrolytes, materials with resistive switching, and electroactive ferroelectric polymers, which are of potential interest for flexible and high-density non-volatile memory devices.

  10. Adlayer structure of octa-alkoxy-substituted copper(II) phthalocyanine on Au(111) by electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Ou-Yang, Liangyue; Yau, Shueh-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM) has been used to examine the adlayer of octa-alkoxy-substituted copper(II) phthalocyanines (CuPc(OC(8)H(17))(8)) on Au(111) in 0.1 M HClO(4), where the molecular adlayer was prepared by spontaneous adsorption from a benzene solution containing this molecule. Topography STM scans revealed long-range ordered, interweaved arrays of CuPc(OC(8)H(17))(8) with coexistent rectangular and hexagonal symmetries. High-quality STM molecular resolution yielded the internal molecular structure and the orientation of CuPc(OC(8)H(17))(8) admolecules. These STM results could shed insight into the method of generating ordered molecular assemblies of phthalocyanine molecules with long-chained substitutes on metal surface.

  11. Novel Protein Crystal Growth Electrochemical Cell For Applications in X-ray Diffraction and Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    G Gil-Alvaradejo; R Ruiz-Arellano; C Owen; A Rodriguez-Romero; E Rudino-Pinera; M Antwi; V Stojanoff; A Moreno

    2011-12-31

    A new crystal growth cell based on transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) glass-electrodes for electrochemically assisted protein crystallization allows for reduced nucleation and crystal quality enhancement. The crystallization behavior of lysozyme and ferritin was monitored as a function of the electric current applied to the growth cell. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed that for specific currents, the crystal quality is substantially improved. No conformational changes were observed in the 3D crystallographic structures determined for crystals grown under different electric current regimes. Finally, the strong crystal adhesion on the surface of ITO electrode because of the electroadhesion allows a sufficiently strong fixing of the protein crystals, to undergo atomic force microscopy investigations in a fluid cell.

  12. Self-consistent modelling of electrochemical strain microscopy in mixed ionic-electronic conductors: Nonlinear and dynamic regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Varenyk, O. V.; Morozovska, A. N. E-mail: anna.n.morozovska@gmail.com; Silibin, M. V.; Kiselev, D. A.; Eliseev, E. A.; Kalinin, S. V. E-mail: anna.n.morozovska@gmail.com

    2015-08-21

    The frequency dependent Electrochemical Strain Microscopy (ESM) response of mixed ionic-electronic conductors is analyzed within the framework of Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Vegard law, accounting for steric effects from mobile donors. The emergence of dynamic charge waves and nonlinear deformation of the surface in response to bias applied to the tip-surface junction is numerically explored. The 2D maps of the strain and concentration distributions across the mixed ionic-electronic conductor and bias-induced surface displacements are calculated. The obtained numerical results can be applied to quantify the ESM response of Li-based solid electrolytes, materials with resistive switching, and electroactive ferroelectric polymers, which are of potential interest for flexible and high-density non-volatile memory devices.

  13. Filming a live cell by scanning electrochemical microscopy: label-free imaging of the dynamic morphology in real time.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Michelle Meng-Ni; Long, Yi-Tao; Ding, Zhifeng

    2012-03-21

    The morphology of a live cell reflects the organization of the cytoskeleton and the healthy status of the cell. We established a label-free platform for monitoring the changing morphology of live cells in real time based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The dynamic morphology of a live human bladder cancer cell (T24) was revealed by time-lapse SECM with dissolved oxygen in the medium solution as the redox mediator. Detailed local movements of cell membrane were presented by time-lapse cross section lines extracted from time-lapse SECM. Vivid dynamic morphology is presented by a movie made of time-lapse SECM images. The morphological change of the T24 cell by non-physiological temperature is in consistence with the morphological feature of early apoptosis. To obtain dynamic cellular morphology with other methods is difficult. The non-invasive nature of SECM combined with high resolution realized filming the movements of live cells.

  14. Localization of proteins in paint cross-sections by scanning electrochemical microscopy as an alternative immunochemical detection technique.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, Giorgia; Prati, Silvia; Mazzeo, Rocco; Zangheri, Martina; Roda, Aldo; Bardini, Luca; Valenti, Giovanni; Rapino, Stefania; Marcaccio, Massimo

    2014-06-11

    The qualitative identification of proteinaceous substances, as well as their location within a complex paint stratigraphy, is one of the most challenging issues in the characterization of painting materials. Nevertheless, information on paint components represent a crucial task for studies concerning both the ancient painting techniques adopted and the state of conservation, being fundamental investigations for the selection of appropriate conservation actions. The present research was aimed at developing a new detection approach for the immunochemical localization of ovalbumin in paint cross-sections based on the use of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The immunochemical analyses were performed using an anti-ovalbumin primary antibody and a secondary antibody labelled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). SECM measurements were performed in feedback mode using benzoquinone (BQ)/hydroquinone (H2Q) redox couple. In presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), HRP catalyzes the re-oxidation of H2Q to BQ and the increment of BQ concentration in correspondence of the target protein was detected by SECM through the electrochemical reduction of the regenerated BQ at the microelectrode. Indeed, the localization of ovalbumin was possible thanks to a clear discrimination of SECM currents, achieved by the comparison of the measurements recorded before and after H2O2 administration, based on the HRP on/off approach. The method was evaluated both on samples from standard mocks-up and on a historical sample, collected from a Renaissance wood painting. The obtained results were promising, foreseeing a wider application of SECM on cultural heritage researches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Microscopy

    Treesearch

    Patricia A. Moss; Les Groom

    2001-01-01

    Microscopy is the study and interpretation of images produced by a microscope. "Interpretation" is the keyword, because the microscope enables one to see structures that are too small or too close together to be resolved by the unaided eye. (The human eye cannot separate two points or lines that are closer together than 0.1 mm.) it is important to...

  16. Single Cell Oxygen Mapping (SCOM) by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Uncovers Heterogeneous Intracellular Oxygen Consumption.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla Santana; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Bertotti, Mauro

    2017-09-12

    We developed a highly sensitive oxygen consumption scanning microscopy system using platinized platinum disc microelectrodes. The system is capable of reliably detecting single-cell respiration, responding to classical regulators of mitochondrial oxygen consumption activity as expected. Comparisons with commercial multi-cell oxygen detection systems show that the system has comparable errors (if not smaller), with the advantage of being able to monitor inter and intra-cell heterogeneity in oxygen consumption characteristics. Our results uncover heterogeneous oxygen consumption characteristics between cells and within the same cell´s microenvironments. Single Cell Oxygen Mapping (SCOM) is thus capable of reliably studying mitochondrial oxygen consumption characteristics and heterogeneity at a single-cell level.

  17. Insulating method using cataphoretic paint for tungsten tips for electrochemical scanning tunnelling microscopy (ECSTM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Claude-Montigny, B.; Gattrell, M.

    2005-12-01

    A new tip insulating process for active metal tips allowing atomic resolution ECSTM imaging has been developed. This new method using cathodic cataphoretic paint deposition has been tested successfully. The insulating deposited film appears homogeneous under optical microscopy and it has been characterised by infra red and SEM analysis. The depositing layer of the paint is sufficiently dense to effectively resist electrolyte ion penetration and resists corrosion in various acidic, basic aqueous or non-aqueous media. The coating film does not reduce the imaging capability of the ECSTM even to atomic resolution. This new insulating method adds to the approaches available to those preparing tips for ECSTM. This approach would also be of great utility for the preparation of microelectrodes using active metals.

  18. I Situ Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study of Dealloying and Stress Corrosion Cracking of Copper - Alloys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Syung Fred

    The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Cu-30Au in 0.6 M NaCl was investigated by a series of experiments, in which samples were dealloyed (i.e., selective removal of copper atoms) by potentiostatic anodic polarization at zero applied stress (i) for varying lengths of time (10 seconds to 30 minutes) and then impact bent, and (ii) for 30 minutes followed by a period of time (5 seconds to 10 minutes) at the open circuit potential and then impact bent. The results indicate that dealloying at zero applied stress produces a surface porous layer that is capable, for a brief period of time (<= ~ 15 seconds), of inducing intergranular cleavage failure of the normally ductile FCC substrate. However, for time >15 seconds at open circuit potential, aging or coarsening reverses the ability of the surface layer to induce cleavage. In addition, samples were dealloyed and simultaneously stressed at various nominal values. At low values of applied stress, failure occurred by brittle intergranular cracking (IGSCC); and at high values of stress, failure occurred by brittle transgranular cracking (TGSCC). The results indicate that the mechanism of IGSCC is identical to that of TGSCC and can best be described by a modification of the "film-induced cleavage" model. The implication of the aging phenomenon to the film-induced cleavage model of stress corrosion cracking is also discussed. An electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) was built and used to study the in-situ dealloying process of thin-film Cu-Au alloys. Thin-films of Cu-75 at%Au alloy were prepared by thermal evaporation of the bulk alloy and deposition of the vapor onto heated mica. The surface structure of the thin film thus grown consists of terrace of well defined (111) planes separated by atomic height steps. The results from in-situ ESTM indicate that if applied potentials were lower than the critical potential (E_{rm c}), dissolution of Cu preferentially occurred at the low coordination sites

  19. Giant Electric-Field-Induced Strain in PVDF-Based Battery Separator Membranes Probed by Electrochemical Strain Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Romanyuk, Konstantin; Costa, Carlos M; Luchkin, Sergey Yu; Kholkin, Andrei L; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2016-05-31

    Efficiency of lithium-ion batteries largely relies on the performance of battery separator membrane as it controls the mobility and concentration of Li-ions between the anode and cathode electrodes. Recent advances in electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) prompted the study of Li diffusion and transport at the nanoscale via electromechanical strain developed under an application of inhomogeneous electric field applied via the sharp ESM tip. In this work, we observed unexpectedly high electromechanical strain developed in polymer membranes based on porous poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PVDF-CTFE) and, using it, could study a dynamics of electroosmotic flow of electrolyte inside the pores. We show that, independently of the separator membrane, electric field-induced deformation observed by ESM on wetted membrane surfaces can reach up to 10 nm under a moderate bias of 1 V (i.e., more than an order of magnitude higher than that in best piezoceramics). Such a high strain is explained by the electroosmotic flow in a porous media composed of PVDF. It is shown that the strain-based ESM method can be used to extract valuable information such as average pore size, porosity, elasticity of membrane in electrolyte solvent, and membrane-electrolyte affinity expressed in terms of zeta potential. Besides, such systems can, in principle, serve as actuators even in the absence of apparent piezoelectricity in amorphous PVDF.

  20. A new application of scanning electrochemical microscopy for the label-free interrogation of antibody-antigen interactions: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Joanne L; Davis, Frank; Collyer, Stuart D; Higson, Séamus P J

    2012-09-05

    Within this paper we describe the use of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to fabricate a dotted array of biotinylated polyethyleneimine which was then used to immobilise first neutravidin and then a biotinylated antibody towards a relevant antigen of interest (PSA, NTx, ciprofloxacin). These antigens were selected both for their clinical relevance but also since they display a broad range of molecular weights, to determine whether the size of the antigen used effects the sensitivity of this approach. The SECM was then used to image the binding of both complementary and non-complementary antigens in a label-free assay. Imaging of the arrays before and following exposure to various concentrations of antigen in buffer showed clear evidence for specific binding of the complementary antigens to the antibody functionalised dots. Non-specific binding was also quantified by control experiments with other antigens. This demonstrated non-specific binding across the whole of the substrate, thereby confirming that specific binding does occur between the antibody and antigen of interest at the surface of the dots. The binding of ciprofloxacin was investigated both in simple buffer solution and in a more complex media, bovine milk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Real-time mapping of a hydrogen peroxide concentration profile across a polymicrobial bacterial biofilm using scanning electrochemical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiuhui; Ramsey, Matthew M.; Chen, Xiaole; Koley, Dipankar; Whiteley, Marvin; Bard, Allen J.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative detection of hydrogen peroxide in solution above a Streptococcus gordonii (Sg) bacterial biofilm was studied in real time by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The concentration of hydrogen peroxide was determined to be 0.7 mM to 1.6 mM in the presence of 10 mM glucose over a period of 2 to 8 h. The hydrogen peroxide production measured was higher near the biofilm surface in comparison to Sg grown planktonically. Differential hydrogen peroxide production was observed both by fluorometric as well as by SECM measurements. The interaction between two different species in a bacterial biofilm of Sg and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in terms of hydrogen peroxide production was also studied by SECM. One-directional y-scan SECM measurements showed the unique spatial mapping of hydrogen peroxide concentration across a mixed species biofilm and revealed that hydrogen peroxide concentration varies greatly dependent upon local species composition. PMID:21282623

  2. Scanning electrochemical microscopy based evaluation of influence of pH on bioelectrochemical activity of yeast cells - Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ramanavicius, A; Morkvenaite-Vilkonciene, I; Kisieliute, A; Petroniene, J; Ramanaviciene, A

    2017-01-01

    In this research scanning electrochemical microscopy was applied for the investigation of immobilized yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Two redox mediators based system was applied in order to increase the efficiency of charge transfer from yeast cells. 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) was applied as a lipophilic redox mediator, which has the ability to cross the cell's membrane; another redox mediator was ferricyanide, which acted as a hydrophylic electron acceptor able to transfer electrons from the PQ to the working electrode of SECM. Hill's function was applied to determine the optimal pH for this described SECM-based system. The influence of pH on cell viability could be well described by Hill's function. It was determined that at pH 6.5 the PQ has a minimal toxic influence on yeast cells, and the kinetics of metabolic processes in cells as well as electron transfer rate achieved in consecutive action of both redox mediators were appropriate to achieve optimal current signals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Real-time monitoring of quorum sensing in 3D-printed bacterial aggregates using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Connell, Jodi L; Kim, Jiyeon; Shear, Jason B; Bard, Allen J; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-12-23

    Microbes frequently live in nature as small, densely packed aggregates containing ∼10(1)-10(5) cells. These aggregates not only display distinct phenotypes, including resistance to antibiotics, but also, serve as building blocks for larger biofilm communities. Aggregates within these larger communities display nonrandom spatial organization, and recent evidence indicates that this spatial organization is critical for fitness. Studying single aggregates as well as spatially organized aggregates remains challenging because of the technical difficulties associated with manipulating small populations. Micro-3D printing is a lithographic technique capable of creating aggregates in situ by printing protein-based walls around individual cells or small populations. This 3D-printing strategy can organize bacteria in complex arrangements to investigate how spatial and environmental parameters influence social behaviors. Here, we combined micro-3D printing and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to probe quorum sensing (QS)-mediated communication in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results reveal that QS-dependent behaviors are observed within aggregates as small as 500 cells; however, aggregates larger than 2,000 bacteria are required to stimulate QS in neighboring aggregates positioned 8 μm away. These studies provide a powerful system to analyze the impact of spatial organization and aggregate size on microbial behaviors.

  4. Electrochemical strain microscopy time spectroscopy: Model and experiment on LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Amanieu, Hugues-Yanis; Thai, Huy N. M. Schröder, Jörg; Luchkin, Sergey Yu.; Rosato, Daniele; Lupascu, Doru C.; Keip, Marc-André; Kholkin, Andrei L.

    2015-08-07

    Electrochemical Strain Microscopy (ESM) can provide useful information on ionic diffusion in solids at the local scale. In this work, a finite element model of ESM measurements was developed and applied to commercial lithium manganese (III,IV) oxide (LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}) particles. ESM time spectroscopy was used, where a direct current (DC) voltage pulse locally disturbs the spatial distribution of mobile ions. After the pulse is off, the ions return to equilibrium at a rate which depends on the Li diffusivity in the material. At each stage, Li diffusivity is monitored by measuring the ESM response to a small alternative current (AC) voltage simultaneously applied to the tip. The model separates two different mechanisms, one linked to the response to DC bias and another one related to the AC excitation. It is argued that the second one is not diffusion-driven but is rather a contribution of the sum of several mechanisms with at least one depending on the lithium ion concentration explaining the relaxation process. With proper fitting of this decay, diffusion coefficients of lithium hosts could be extracted. Additionally, the effect of phase transition in LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} is taken into account, explaining some experimental observations.

  5. Scanning electrochemical microscopy coupled with intracellular standard addition method for quantification of enzyme activity in single intact cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ning; Wang, Xiaolei; Li, Lu; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jin, Wenrui

    2007-11-01

    This paper uses scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) coupled with an intracellular standard addition method to quantify enzyme activity in single intact cells. In this work, peroxidase (PO) inside human neutrophils is chosen as the model system. Cells immobilized onto a silanized coverslip are perforated with digitonin to form micropores on the cell membrane. Hydroquinone (H(2)Q) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as the enzyme substrates diffuse through the micropores into the cell interior. There, H(2)Q is converted into benzoquinone (BQ) by intracellular PO. BQ diffuses with a steady flux through the micropores from the cell interior onto the cell surface. The BQ near the cell surface is detected by the Au tip of SECM held at -0.3 V. When the tip is scanned laterally along the central line over the cell, a 2-D scan curve is obtained. Then, the intracellular standard addition method using ultramicroinjection with a submicrometer-sized micropipette tip is performed. After ultramicroinjection of a standard solution, another 2-D scan curve is recorded. The intercellular enzyme activity can be calculated from both peak current on two scan curves. This method to quantify PO activity in the cell environment has several obvious advantages: high sensitivity due to signal amplification via intracellular enzyme-catalyzed reaction and no sample dilution, no electrode fouling from adsorption of intracellular biological molecules, and no interference from electro-active compounds that can be directly oxidized at the SECM tip or from oxygen in the detected solution.

  6. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction: how confined oscillations reveal short lived radicals and auto-catalytic species.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, T Jane; Noël, Jean-Marc; Ristori, Sandra; Combellas, Catherine; Abou-Hassan, Ali; Rossi, Federico; Kanoufi, Frédéric

    2015-10-06

    Oscillating chemical reactions, encapsulated within artificial vesicles have been demonstrated as a powerful analogy of living cells for the investigation of chemical communication and morphogenesis. However, little is understood with regards to the influence of confinement on the reactivity of such systems. Herein, the effect of confinement on the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) oscillating reaction in bulk solution, (employing ferroin as a catalyst and malonic acid as the organic substrate) is investigated using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) toward different insulating surfaces such as glass, silanized glass, or PTFE. An unexpected increase in the amplitude of the BZ reaction at a tip-substrate distance of ∼12-15 μm is observed. By simulating different reaction mechanisms, from simple EC' catalysis to more sophisticated Oregonator or even an 11-reaction scheme, it is shown that such behavior reveals the intervention of redox catalysis processes and particularly the short-lived highly reactive radical intermediate BrO2(•) indirectly detected at micromolar concentrations. The reinspection of the EC' mechanism shows that the homogeneous catalysis route is confirmed and kinetically characterized from SECM toward an insulating substrate, with promising potentiality in many systems. More specifically to the complex chemical case of BZ reactions, the mechanism is understood from the envelope curves of the oscillations, which are assessed in the absence of the oscillation (absence of organic substrate).

  7. Using scanning electrochemical microscopy to probe chemistry at the solid-liquid interface in chemically amplified immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeSuer, Robert J.; Fan, Fu-Ren F.; Bard, Allen J.; Taylor, J. Christopher; Tsiartas, Pavlos; Willson, Grant; Conley, Willard E.; Feit, Gene; Kunz, Roderick R.

    2004-05-01

    Three modes of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) - voltammetry, pH, and conductivity - have been used to better understand the chemistry at, and diffusion through, the solid/liquid interface formed between a resist film and water in 193 nm immersion lithography. Emphasis has been placed on investigating the photoacid generator (PAG), triphenylsulfonium perfluorobutanesulfonate, and the corresponding photoacid. The reduction of triphenylsulfonium at a hemispherical Hg microelectrode was monitored using square wave voltammetry to detect trace amounts of the PAG leaching from the surface. pH measurements at a 100 μm diameter Sb microelectrode show the formation of acid in the water layer above a resist upon exposure with UV irradiation. Bipolar conductance measurements at a 100 μm Pt tip positioned 100 μm from the surface indicate that the conductivity of the solution during illumination is dependent upon the percentage of PAG in the film. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometric analysis of water samples in contact with resist films has been used to quantify the amounts (< 10 ng/cm2) of PAG leaching from the film in the dark which occurs within the first 30 seconds of contact time. Washing the film removes approximately 80% of the total leachable PAG.

  8. Well-ordered structure of methylene blue monolayers on Au(111) surface: electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li

    2009-02-01

    Well-ordered structure of methylene blue (MB) monolayers on Au(111) surface has been successfully obtained by controlling the substrate potential. Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM) examined the monolayers of MB on Au(111) in 0.1 M HClO(4) and showed long-range ordered, interweaved arrays of MB with quadratic symmetry on the substrate in the potential range of double-layer charging. High-resolution ECSTM image further revealed the details of the MB monolayers structure of c(5 x 5 radical 3)rect and the flat-lying orientation of ad-molecules. The dependence of molecular organization on the substrate potential and the formation mechanism of well-ordered structure on Au(111) surface were investigated in detail. The obtained well-ordered structure at the interface between a metal and an aqueous electrolyte might possibly be used as high-density device for signal memory and templates for the advanced nanopatterning of surfaces. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Investigating catalase activity through hydrogen peroxide decomposition by bacteria biofilms in real time using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abucayon, Erwin; Ke, Neng; Cornut, Renaud; Patelunas, Anthony; Miller, Douglas; Nishiguchi, Michele K; Zoski, Cynthia G

    2014-01-07

    Catalase activity through hydrogen peroxide decomposition in a 1 mM bulk solution above Vibrio fischeri (γ-Protebacteria-Vibrionaceae) bacterial biofilms of either symbiotic or free-living strains was studied in real time by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The catalase activity, in units of micromoles hydrogen peroxide decomposed per minute over a period of 348 s, was found to vary with incubation time of each biofilm in correlation with the corresponding growth curve of bacteria in liquid culture. Average catalase activity for the same incubation times ranging from 1 to 12 h was found to be 0.28 ± 0.07 μmol H2O2/min for the symbiotic biofilms and 0.31 ± 0.07 μmol H2O2/min for the free-living biofilms, suggesting similar catalase activity. Calculations based on Comsol Multiphysics simulations in fitting experimental biofilm data indicated that approximately (3 ± 1) × 10(6) molecules of hydrogen peroxide were decomposed by a single bacterium per second, signifying the presence of a highly active catalase. A 2-fold enhancement in catalase activity was found for both free-living and symbiotic biofilms in response to external hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 1 nM in the growth media, implying a similar mechanism in responding to oxidative stress.

  10. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of DNA hybridization on DNA microarrays enhanced by HRP-modified SiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huajun; Wang, Xiaolan; Jiao, Fang; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Qingjiang; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2013-07-02

    Imaging of localized hybridization of nucleic acids immobilized on a glass DNA microarray was performed by means of generation collection (GC) mode scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Amine-tethered oligodeoxynucleotide probes, spotted on the glass surface, were hybridized with an unmodified target sequence and a biotinylated indicator probe via sandwich hybridization. Spots where sequence-specific hybridization had occurred were modified by streptavidin-horseradish-peroxidase-(HRP)-wrapped SiO2 nanoparticles through the biotin-streptavidin interaction. In the presence of H2O2, hydroquinone (H2Q) was oxidized to benzoquinone (BQ) at the modified spot surface through the HRP catalytic reaction, and the generated BQ corresponding to the amount of target DNA was reduced in solution by an SECM tip. With this DNA microarray, a number of genes could be detected simultaneously and selectively enough to discriminate between complementary sequences and those containing base mismatches. The DNA targets at prepared spots could be imaged in SECM GC mode over a wide concentration range (10(-7)-10(-12) M). This technique may find applications in genomic sequencing.

  11. Mapping Cd²⁺-induced membrane permeability changes of single live cells by means of scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Filice, Fraser P; Li, Michelle S M; Henderson, Jeffrey D; Ding, Zhifeng

    2016-02-18

    Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) is a powerful, non-invasive, analytical methodology that can be used to investigate live cell membrane permeability. Depth scan SECM imaging allowed for the generation of 2D current maps of live cells relative to electrode position in the x-z or y-z plane. Depending on resolution, one depth scan image can contain hundreds of probe approach curves (PACs). Individual PACs were obtained by simply extracting vertical cross-sections from the 2D image. These experimental PACs were overlaid onto theoretically generated PACs simulated at specific geometry conditions. Simulations were carried out using 3D models in COMSOL Multiphysics to determine the cell membrane permeability coefficients at different locations on the surface of the cells. Common in literature, theoretical PACs are generated using a 2D axially symmetric geometry. This saves on both compute time and memory utilization. However, due to symmetry limitations of the model, only one experimental PAC right above the cell can be matched with simulated PAC data. Full 3D models in this article were developed for the SECM system of live cells, allowing all experimental PACs over the entire cell to become usable. Cd(2+)-induced membrane permeability changes of single human bladder (T24) cells were investigated at several positions above the cell, displaced from the central axis. The experimental T24 cells under study were incubated with Cd(2+) in varying concentrations. It is experimentally observed that 50 and 100 μM Cd(2+) caused a decrease in membrane permeability, which was uniform across all locations over the cell regardless of Cd(2+) concentration. The Cd(2+) was found to have detrimental effects on the cell, with cells shrinking in size and volume, and the membrane permeability decreasing. A mapping technique for the analysis of the cell membrane permeability under the Cd(2+) stress is realized by the methodology presented.

  12. Cyclic Voltammetry Probe Approach Curves with Alkali Amalgams at Mercury Sphere-Cap Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Probes.

    PubMed

    Barton, Zachary J; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2017-03-07

    We report a method of precisely positioning a Hg-based ultramicroelectrode (UME) for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) investigations of any substrate. Hg-based probes are capable of performing amalgamation reactions with metal cations, which avoid unwanted side reactions and positive feedback mechanisms that can prove problematic for traditional probe positioning methods. However, prolonged collection of ions eventually leads to saturation of the amalgam accompanied by irreversible loss of Hg. In order to obtain negative feedback positioning control without risking damage to the SECM probe, we implement cyclic voltammetry probe approach surfaces (CV-PASs), consisting of CVs performed between incremental motor movements. The amalgamation current, peak stripping current, and integrated stripping charge extracted from a shared CV-PAS give three distinct probe approach curves (CV-PACs), which can be used to determine the tip-substrate gap to within 1% of the probe radius. Using finite element simulations, we establish a new protocol for fitting any CV-PAC and demonstrate its validity with experimental results for sodium and potassium ions in propylene carbonate by obtaining over 3 orders of magnitude greater accuracy and more than 20-fold greater precision than existing methods. Considering the timescales of diffusion and amalgam saturation, we also present limiting conditions for obtaining and fitting CV-PAC data. The ion-specific signals isolated in CV-PACs allow precise and accurate positioning of Hg-based SECM probes over any sample and enable the deployment of CV-PAS SECM as an analytical tool for traditionally challenging conditions.

  13. Lipid Bilayer Membrane in a Silicon Based Micron Sized Cavity Accessed by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Patel, Darayas; Weimer, Jeffrey; Williams, John Dalton

    2017-07-05

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are widely used in biophysical research to probe the functionality of biological membranes and to provide diagnoses in high throughput drug screening. Formation of SLBs at below phase transition temperature (Tm) has applications in nano-medicine research where low temperature profiles are required. Herein, we report the successful production of SLBs at above-as well as below-the Tm of the lipids in an anisotropically etched, silicon-based micro-cavity. The Si-based cavity walls exhibit controlled temperature which assist in the quick and stable formation of lipid bilayer membranes. Fusion of large unilamellar vesicles was monitored in real time in an aqueous environment inside the Si cavity using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the lateral organization of the lipid molecules was characterized until the formation of the SLBs. The stability of SLBs produced was also characterized by recording the electrical resistance and the capacitance using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Analysis was done in the frequency regime of 10(-2)-10⁵ Hz at a signal voltage of 100 mV and giga-ohm sealed impedance was obtained continuously over four days. Finally, the cantilever tip in AFM was utilized to estimate the bilayer thickness and to calculate the rupture force at the interface of the tip and the SLB. We anticipate that a silicon-based, micron-sized cavity has the potential to produce highly-stable SLBs below their Tm. The membranes inside the Si cavity could last for several days and allow robust characterization using AFM or EIS. This could be an excellent platform for nanomedicine experiments that require low operating temperatures.

  14. Chemical and phase evolution of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production [Chemical and phase evolution of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production directly observed using environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Sang Chul; Benck, Jesse D.; Tsai, Charlie; ...

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous MoSx is a highly active, earth-abundant catalyst for the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction. Previous studies have revealed that this material initially has a composition of MoS3, but after electrochemical activation, the surface is reduced to form an active phase resembling MoS2 in composition and chemical state. However, structural changes in the MoSx catalyst and the mechanism of the activation process remain poorly understood. In this study, we employ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image amorphous MoSx catalysts activated under two hydrogen-rich conditions: ex situ in an electrochemical cell and in situ in an environmental TEM. For the first time,more » we directly observe the formation of crystalline domains in the MoSx catalyst after both activation procedures as well as spatially localized changes in the chemical state detected via electron energy loss spectroscopy. Using density functional theory calculations, we investigate the mechanisms for this phase transformation and find that the presence of hydrogen is critical for enabling the restructuring process. Our results suggest that the surface of the amorphous MoSx catalyst is dynamic: while the initial catalyst activation forms the primary active surface of amorphous MoS2, continued transformation to the crystalline phase during electrochemical operation could contribute to catalyst deactivation. Finally, these results have important implications for the application of this highly active electrocatalyst for sustainable H2 generation.« less

  15. Evolution of the Corrosion Morphology on AZ31B Tracked Electrochemically and by In Situ Microscopy in Chloride-Containing Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, M. A.; Cain, T. W.; Briglia, B. F.; Scully, J. R.; Fitz-Gerald, J. M.

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of open-circuit corrosion morphology as a function of immersion time for Mg alloy AZ31B in 0.6-M NaCl solution was investigated. Real-time optical microscopy accompanied by simultaneous electrochemical characterization was used to characterize the filiform corrosion (FFC) of AZ31B. Specifically, the behavior of propagating corrosion filaments on the metal surface was observed, and correlations among polarization resistance, filament propagation rates, open-circuit potential, and active coverage of local corrosion sites were revealed. Three distinct stages of corrosion were observed in 0.6-M NaCl. An initial passive region, during which a slow potential rise occurred (termed stage I), a second FFC region (termed stage II) with shallow penetrating, distinct filaments, and a final FFC region (termed stage III) with deeper penetrating filaments, aligned to form a linear front. The electrochemical properties of each stage are discussed, providing insights into the penetration rates and corrosion model.

  16. Photoelectrochemical and Electrochemical Characterization of Sub-Micro-Gram Amounts of Organic Semiconductors Using Scanning Droplet Cell Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A model organic semiconductor (MDMO-PPV) was used for testing a modified version of a photoelectrochemical scanning droplet cell microscope (PE-SDCM) adapted for use with nonaqueous electrolytes and containing an optical fiber for localized illumination. The most attractive features of the PE-SDCM are represented by the possibility of addressing small areas on the investigated substrate and the need of small amounts of electrolyte. A very small amount (ng) of the material under study is sufficient for a complete electrochemical and photoelectrochemical characterization due to the scanning capability of the cell. The electrochemical behavior of the polymer was studied in detail using potentiostatic and potentiodynamic investigations as well as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Additionally, the photoelectrochemical properties were investigated under illumination conditions, and the photocurrents found were at least 3 orders of magnitude higher than the dark (background) current, revealing the usefulness of this compact microcell for photovoltaic characterizations. PMID:25101149

  17. Relative Li-ion mobility mapping in Li0.33La0.56TiO3 polycrystalline by electron backscatter diffraction and electrochemical strain microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, Shun; Ishikawa, Ryo; Sugiyama, Issei; Higashi, Takuma; Kimura, Teiichi; Ikuhara, Yumi H.; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-06-01

    Li-ion conductivity in a solid-state electrolyte has so far been measured by impedance spectroscopy. In this method, however, it is difficult to obtain microstructural information because of the absence of spatial resolution. Here, we show the relationship between the Li-ion mobility and the crystal orientation in Li0.33La0.56TiO3 polycrystalline by electrochemical strain microscopy combined with electron backscatter diffraction. On the experimentally constructed multivariable regression model, we obtained a qualitative Li-ion mobility map of sub-millimeter width with a 100 nm spatial resolution, which is impossible to achieve by only atomic force microscopy. The proposed method must be useful for identifying the Li-ion diffusion pathway in three dimensions.

  18. Chemical and phase evolution of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production [Chemical and phase evolution of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production directly observed using environmental transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Chul; Benck, Jesse D.; Tsai, Charlie; Park, Joonsuk; Koh, Ai Leen; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous MoSx is a highly active, earth-abundant catalyst for the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction. Previous studies have revealed that this material initially has a composition of MoS3, but after electrochemical activation, the surface is reduced to form an active phase resembling MoS2 in composition and chemical state. However, structural changes in the MoSx catalyst and the mechanism of the activation process remain poorly understood. In this study, we employ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image amorphous MoSx catalysts activated under two hydrogen-rich conditions: ex situ in an electrochemical cell and in situ in an environmental TEM. For the first time, we directly observe the formation of crystalline domains in the MoSx catalyst after both activation procedures as well as spatially localized changes in the chemical state detected via electron energy loss spectroscopy. Using density functional theory calculations, we investigate the mechanisms for this phase transformation and find that the presence of hydrogen is critical for enabling the restructuring process. Our results suggest that the surface of the amorphous MoSx catalyst is dynamic: while the initial catalyst activation forms the primary active surface of amorphous MoS2, continued transformation to the crystalline phase during electrochemical operation could contribute to catalyst deactivation. Finally, these results have important implications for the application of this highly active electrocatalyst for sustainable H2 generation.

  19. Scanning electrochemical microscopy study of ion annihilation electrogenerated chemiluminescence of rubrene and [Ru(bpy)3]2+.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Shen, Mei; Nepomnyashchii, Alexander B; Bard, Allen J

    2012-06-06

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for the study of electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) in the radical annihilation mode. The concurrent steady-state generation of radical ions in the microgap formed between a SECM probe and a transparent microsubstrate provides a distance-dependent ECL signal that can provide information about the kinetics, stability, and mechanism of the light emission process. In the present study, the ECL emission from rubrene and [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) was used to model the system by carrying out experiments with the SECM and light-detecting apparatus inside an inert atmosphere box. We studied the influence of the distance between the two electrodes, d, and the annihilation kinetics on the ECL light emission profiles under steady-state conditions, as well as the ECL profiles when carrying out cyclic voltammetry (CV) at a fixed d. Experimental results are compared to simulated results obtained through commercial finite element method software. The light produced by annihilation of the ions was a function of d; stronger light was observed at smaller d. The distance dependence of the ECL emission allows the construction of light approach curves in a similar fashion as with the tip currents in the feedback mode of SECM. These ECL approach curves provide an additional channel to describe the reaction kinetics that lead to ECL; good agreement was found between the ECL approach curve emission profile and the simulated results for a fast, diffusion-limited second-order annihilation process (k(ann) > 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). In the CV mode at fixed distance, the ECL emission of rubrene showed two distinct signals at different potentials when fixing the substrate to generate the radical cation and scanning the tip to generate the radical anion. The first signal (pre-emission) corresponded to an emission well before reaching the generation of the radical anion and was more intense on Au than on Pt. The second ECL signal showed the expected

  20. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy for the Investigation of Galvanic Corrosion of Iron with Zinc in 0.1 M NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph Raj, X.; Nishimura, T.

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy was used to monitor microscopic aspects of the electrochemical processes at the iron-zinc couple immersed in 0.1 M NaCl aqueous solution. The SECM measured the concentration of chemical species relevant to the corrosion processes. The electrochemical behavior of galvanic Fe/Zn coupling was investigated as a function of time using SECM microelectrode both as Fe/Zn joined together as well as away from each other. SECM amperometric line scan curves were obtained over the Fe/Zn at a constant distance. In the first case, the chemical species participating in the corrosion reactions at the sample are detected at the SECM tip by applying appropriate potential values to the microelectrode. The release of Zn2+ ionic species into the solution phase from local anodic sites, as well as the consumption of dissolved oxygen at the corresponding cathodic locations, was successfully monitored. The results revealed that the galvanic couple where Fe/Zn is close to each other will show higher corrosion rate of zinc than that of galvanic couple away from each other. The Fe/Zn couple away from each other showed a decrease in current values with time. This is due to the formation of oxide layer of Zn over the Fe followed by the protection of the corrosion products with further exposure times.

  1. Characterization of local electrochemical doping of high performance conjugated polymer for photovoltaics using scanning droplet cell microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gasiorowski, Jacek; Mardare, Andrei Ionut; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Hassel, Achim Walter

    2013-12-15

    The electrochemical oxidation of a next generation low bandgap high performance photovoltaic material namely poly[4,8-bis-substituted-benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b0]dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-4-substituted-thieno[3,4-b] thiophene-2,6-diyl] (PBDTTT-c) thin film was investigated using a scanning droplet cell microscope. Cyclic voltammetry was used for the basic characterization of the oxidation/doping of PBDTTT-c. Application of the different final potentials during the electrochemical study provides a close look to the oxidation kinetics. The electrical properties of both doped and undoped PBDTTT-c were analyzed in situ by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy giving the possibility to correlate the changes in the doping level with the subsequent changes in the resistance and capacitance. As a result one oxidation peak was found during the cyclic voltammetry and in potentiostatic measurements. From Mott-Schottky analysis a donor concentration of 2.3 × 10(20) cm(-3) and a flat band potential of 1.00 V vs. SHE were found. The oxidation process resulted in an increase of the conductivity by two orders of magnitude reaching a maximum for the oxidized form of 1.4 S cm(-1).

  2. Shearforce-based constant-distance scanning electrochemical microscopy as fabrication tool for needle-type carbon-fiber nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Hussien, Emad Mohamed; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Schulte, Albert

    2010-07-01

    Carbon fiber nanoelectrodes with nanometer radii tip curvatures were fabricated using a shearforce-based constant-distance scanning electrochemical microscope and electrochemically induced polymer deposition. A simple DC etching procedure in alkaline solution provided conically sharpened single carbon fibers with well-formed nanocones at their bottom. Coating the stems but not the end of the tips of the tapered structures with anodic electrodeposition paint was the strategy for limiting the bare carbon to the foremost end and restricting a feasible voltammetry current response to exactly this section. The electrodeposition of the polymer was prevented at the foremost end of the tip using a shearforce-based tip-to-sample distance control that allowed approaching the etched tips carefully in just touching distance to a film of a silicone elastomer. Analysis of the steady-state cyclic voltammograms in presence of a reversible redox compound revealed effective radii for the obtained needle-type carbon-fiber nanoelectrodes down to as small as 46 nm. The method offers an alternative pathway toward the fabrication of highly miniaturized carbon electrodes.

  3. Potential-dependent structures investigated at the perchloric acid solution/iodine modified Au(111) interface by electrochemical frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Toru; Tatsumi, Shoko; Yokota, Yasuyuki; Fukui, Ken-ichi

    2015-05-21

    Electrochemical frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy (EC-FM-AFM) was adopted to analyze the electrified interface between an iodine modified Au(111) and a perchloric acid solution. Atomic resolution imaging of the electrode was strongly dependent on the electrode potential within the electrochemical window: each iodine atom was imaged in the cathodic range of the electrode potential, but not in the more anodic range where the tip is retracted by approximately 0.1 nm compared to the cathodic case for the same imaging parameters. The frequency shift versus tip-to-sample distance curves obtained in the electric double layer region on the iodine adlayer indicated that the water structuring became weaker at the anodic potential, where the atomic resolution images could not be obtained, and immediately recovered at the original cathodic potential. The reversible hydration structures were consistent with the reversible topographic images and the cyclic voltammetry results. These results indicate that perchlorate anions concentrated at the anodic potential affect the interface hydration without any irreversible changes to the interface under these conditions.

  4. Insights into electrode/electrolyte interfacial processes and the effect of nanostructured cobalt oxides loading on graphene-based hybrids by scanning electrochemical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanju; Carrizosa, Sara B.

    2016-12-01

    Nanostructured cobalt oxide polymorphs (CoO and Co3O4) deposited via electrodeposition allowed optimal loading on supercapacitive graphene nanosheets producing a set of graphene-based hybrids namely, CoO/GO, CoO/ErGO, Co3O4/GO, Co3O4/rGO, and Co3O4/ErGO, as pseudocapacitive electrochemical electrodes. We gained fundamental insights into the complex physicochemical interfacial processes at electrode surfaces and electrode/electrolyte (or solid/liquid) interfaces by scanning electrochemical microscopy operating in the feedback probe approach and imaging modes while monitoring and mapping the redox probe (re)activity behavior. We determined the various experimental descriptors including diffusion coefficient, electron transfer rate, and electroactive site distribution on electrodes. We emphasize the interplay of (1) heterogeneous basal and edge plane active sites, (2) graphene surface functional moieties (conducting/semiconducting), and (3) crystalline spinel cobalt oxides (semiconducting/insulating) coated graphene, reinforcing the available electron density of states in the vicinity of the Fermi level contributing to higher electroactivity, faster interfacial diffusion, and shorter distances for electron transfer, facilitated through molecular and chemical bridges obtained by electrodeposition as compared with the physical deposition.

  5. Comparative electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy study of nonionic fluorosurfactant zonyl FSN self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) and Au(100): a potential-induced structural transition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongan; Yan, Jiawei; Zhu, Feng; Sun, Chunfeng; Mao, Bingwei

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the structure of nonionic fluorosurfactant zonyl FSN self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) and Au(100) in 0.05 M H(2)SO(4) as a function of the electrode potential by electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM). On Au(111), a (3(1/2) × 3(1/2))R30° arrangement of the FSN SAMs is observed, which remains unchanged in the potential range where the redox reaction of FSN molecules does not occur. On Au(100), some parallel corrugations of the FSN SAMs are observed, which originate from the smaller distance and the repulsive interaction between FSN molecules to make the FSN molecules deviate from the bridging sites, and ECSTM reveals a potential-induced structural transition of the FSN SAMs. The experimental observations are rationalized by the effect of the intermolecular interaction. The smaller distance between molecules on Au(100) results in the repulsive force, which increases the probability of structural change induced by external factors (i.e., the electrode potential). The appropriate distance and interactions of FSN molecules account for the stable structure of FSN SAMs on Au(111). Surface crystallography may influence the intermolecular interaction through changing the molecular arrangements of the SAMs. The results benefit the molecular-scale understanding of the behavior of the FSN SAMs under electrochemical potential control.

  6. In situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy of lead electrodes in sulfuric acid solution with or without lignin during anodic oxidation and cathodic reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, N.; Tabayashi, D.; Shiota, M.; Tanaka, T.

    The surface morphologies of lead sheets in sulfuric acid solution, with or without lignin, under temperature control during anodic oxidation and cathodic reduction are investigated by using in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy combined with cyclic voltammetry. Whether lignosulfonate (lignin) is added or not, it is found at -20 °C that the precipitation of lead sulfate crystals occurs immediately after supersaturation of dissolved Pb 2+ ions at the anodic oxidation peak on the cyclic voltammogram. It is also observed that the density of lead sulfate crystals formed on the lead electrode after anodic oxidation decreases and the crystal size becomes larger when lignin is added. Furthermore, the addition of lignin delays dissolution of lead sulfate crystals during cathodic reduction at room temperature (RT).

  7. Electropolishing of stainless steels in a choline chloride based ionic liquid: an electrochemical study with surface characterisation using SEM and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; Capper, Glen; McKenzie, Katy J; Glidle, Andrew; Ryder, Karl S

    2006-09-28

    We have studied the anodic dissolution (electropolishing) of various stainless steel alloys in an ionic liquid comprising a 2 : 1 stoichiometric mix of ethylene glycol (EG) and choline chloride. We have used a combination of electrochemical and spectroscopic methods together with in situ liquid probe microscopy. We discuss the role and influence of the surface oxide passivation layer, characterized here by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and linear sweep voltammetry, on the polishing process. We address the question of dealloying during the polish in order to contribute to our understanding of the viability of the ionic liquid as a replacement industrial electropolishing medium; the current commercial process uses a corrosive mixture of phosphoric and sulfuric acids. Also, we present data from ex situ and in situ liquid AFM studies giving both a qualitative and quantitative insight into the nature and scale of morphological changes at the steel surface during the polishing process.

  8. Electrochemically assisted localized etching of ZnO single crystals in water using a catalytically active Pt-coated atomic force microscopy probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kota; Sasano, Junji; Nagai, Moeto

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a nanofabrication technique based on the electrochemically assisted chemical dissolution of zinc oxide (ZnO) single crystals in water at room temperature using a catalytically active Pt-coated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe. Fabricated grooves featured depths and widths of several tens and several hundreds of nanometers, respectively. The material removal rate of ZnO was dramatically improved by controlling the formation of hydrogen ions (H+) on the surface of the catalytic Pt-coated probe via oxidation of H2O molecules; this reaction can be enhanced by applying a cathodic potential to an additional Pt-wire working electrode in a three-electrode configuration. Consequently, ZnO can be dissolved chemically in water as a soluble Zn2+ species via a reaction with H+ species present in high concentrations in the immediate vicinity of the AFM tip apex.

  9. Scanning electrochemical cell microscopy: theory and experiment for quantitative high resolution spatially-resolved voltammetry and simultaneous ion-conductance measurements.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Michael E; Güell, Aleix G; Lai, Stanley C S; McKelvey, Kim; Ebejer, Neil; O'Connell, Michael A; Colburn, Alexander W; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-03-06

    Scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) is a high resolution electrochemical scanning probe technique that employs a dual-barrel theta pipet probe containing electrolyte solution and quasi-reference counter electrodes (QRCE) in each barrel. A thin layer of electrolyte protruding from the tip of the pipet ensures that a gentle meniscus contact is made with a substrate surface, which defines the active surface area of an electrochemical cell. The substrate can be an electrical conductor, semiconductor, or insulator. The main focus here is on the general case where the substrate is a working electrode, and both ion-conductance measurements between the QRCEs in the two barrels and voltammetric/amperometric measurements at the substrate can be made simultaneously. In usual practice, a small perpendicular oscillation of the probe with respect to the substrate is employed, so that an alternating conductance current (ac) develops, due to the change in the dimensions of the electrolyte contact (and hence resistance), as well as the direct conductance current (dc). It is shown that the dc current can be predicted for a fixed probe by solving the Nernst-Planck equation and that the ac response can also be derived from this response. Both responses are shown to agree well with experiment. It is found that the pipet geometry plays an important role in controlling the dc conductance current and that this is easily measured by microscopy. A key feature of SECCM is that mass transport to the substrate surface is by diffusion and, for charged analytes, ion migration which can be controlled and varied quantifiably via the bias between the two QRCEs. For a working electrode substrate this means that charged redox-active analytes can be transported to the electrode/solution interface in a well-defined and controllable manner and that relatively fast heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics can be studied. The factors controlling the voltammetric response are determined by

  10. Ion permeability of the nuclear pore complex and ion-induced macromolecular permeation as studied by scanning electrochemical and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeon; Izadyar, Anahita; Shen, Mei; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2014-02-18

    Efficient delivery of therapeutic macromolecules and nanomaterials into the nucleus is imperative for gene therapy and nanomedicine. Nucleocytoplasmic molecular transport, however, is tightly regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC) with the hydrophobic transport barriers based on phenylalanine and glycine repeats. Herein, we apply scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to quantitatively study the permeability of the NPCs to small probe ions with a wide range of hydrophobicity as a measure of their hydrophobic interactions with the transport barriers. Amperometric detection of the redox-inactive probe ions is enabled by using the ion-selective SECM tips based on the micropipet- or nanopipet-supported interfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions. The remarkably high ion permeability of the NPCs is successfully measured by SECM and theoretically analyzed. This analysis demonstrates that the ion permeability of the NPCs is determined by the dimensions and density of the nanopores without a significant effect of the transport barriers on the transported ions. Importantly, the weak ion-barrier interactions become significant at sufficiently high concentrations of extremely hydrophobic ions, i.e., tetraphenylarsonium and perfluorobutylsulfonate, to permeabilize the NPCs to naturally impermeable macromolecules. Dependence of ion-induced permeabilization of the NPC on the pathway and mode of macromolecular transport is studied by using fluorescence microscopy to obtain deeper insights into the gating mechanism of the NPC as the basis of a new transport model.

  11. Measurement of apparent diffusion coefficients within ultrathin nafion Langmuir-Schaefer films: comparison of a novel scanning electrochemical microscopy approach with cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Bertoncello, Paolo; Ciani, Ilenia; Li, Fei; Unwin, Patrick R

    2006-12-05

    The use of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient, Dapp, of redox-active species in ultrathin Nafion films is described. In this technique, an ultramicroelectrode (UME) tip, positioned close to a film on a macroscopic electrode, is used to oxidize (or reduce) a species in bulk solution, causing the tip-generated oxidant (reductant) to diffuse to the film/solution interface. The oxidation (reduction) of film-confined species regenerates the reductant (oxidant) in solution, leading to feedback to the UME. A numerical model is developed that allows Dapp to be determined. For these studies, ultrathin films of Nafion were prepared using the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) technique and loaded with an electroactive species, either the ferrocene derivative ferrocenyltrimethylammonium cation, FA+, or tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II), Ru(bpy)32+. The morphology and the thickness of the Nafion LS films (1.5 +/- 0.2 nm per layer deposited) were evaluated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). For comparison with the SECM measurements, cyclic voltammetry (CV) was employed to evaluate the concentration of electroactive species within the Nafion LS films and to determine Dapp. The latter was found to be essentially invariant with film thickness, but the value for Ru(bpy)32+ was 1 order of magnitude larger than for FA+. CV and SECM measurements yield different values of Dapp, and the underlying reasons are discussed. In general, the Dapp values for these films are considerably smaller than for recast Nafion films, which can be attributed to the compactness of Nafion LS films. Nonetheless, the ultrathin nature of the films leads to fast response times, and we thus expect that these modified electrodes could find applications in sensing, electroanalysis, and electrocatalysis.

  12. Demonstration of an electrochemical liquid cell for operando transmission electron microscopy observation of the lithiation/delithiation behavior of Si nanowire battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R; Mehdi, B Layla; Unocic, Raymond R; McDowell, Matthew T; Sacci, Robert L; Xu, Wu; Connell, Justin Grant; Xu, Pinghong; Abellan, Patricia; Chen, Xilin; Zhang, Yaohui; Perea, Daniel E; Evans, James E; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Browning, Nigel D; Cui, Yi; Arslan, Ilke; Wang, Chong-Min

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few years, in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of lithium ion batteries using an open-cell configuration have helped us to gain fundamental insights into the structural and chemical evolution of the electrode materials in real time. In the standard open-cell configuration, the electrolyte is either solid lithium oxide or an ionic liquid, which is point-contacted with the electrode. This cell design is inherently different from a real battery, where liquid electrolyte forms conformal contact with electrode materials. The knowledge learnt from open cells can deviate significantly from the real battery, calling for operando TEM technique with conformal liquid electrolyte contact. In this paper, we developed an operando TEM electrochemical liquid cell to meet this need, providing the configuration of a real battery and in a relevant liquid electrolyte. To demonstrate this novel technique, we studied the lithiation/delithiation behavior of single Si nanowires. Some of lithiation/delithation behaviors of Si obtained using the liquid cell are consistent with the results from the open-cell studies. However, we also discovered new insights different from the open cell configuration-the dynamics of the electrolyte and, potentially, a future quantitative characterization of the solid electrolyte interphase layer formation and structural and chemical evolution.

  13. Demonstration of an Electrochemical Liquid Cell for Operando Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of the Lithiation/Delithiation Behavior of Si Nanowire Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R.; Mehdi, Beata L.; Unocic, Raymond R.; McDowell, Matthew T.; Sacci, Robert L.; Xu, Wu; Connell, Justin G.; Xu, Pinghong; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Chen, Xilin; Zhang, Yaohui; Perea, Daniel E.; Evans, James E.; Lauhon, Lincoln; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Browning, Nigel D.; Cui, Yi; Arslan, Ilke; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-11-13

    Over the last few years, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of lithium ion batteries using an open-cell configuration have helped us to gain fundamental insights into the structural and chemical evolution of the electrode materials in real time. In the standard open-cell configuration, the electrolyte is either solid lithium oxide or an ionic liquid, which is point-contacted with the electrode. This cell design is inherently different from a real battery, where liquid electrolyte forms conformal contact with electrode materials. The knowledge learnt from open cells can deviate significantly from the real battery, calling for operando TEM technique with conformal liquid electrolyte contact. In this paper, we developed an operando TEM electrochemical liquid cell to meet this need, providing the configuration of a real battery and in a relevant liquid electrolyte. To demonstrate this novel technique, we studied the lithiation/delithiation behavior of single Si nanowires. Some of lithiation/delithation behaviors of Si obtained using the liquid-cell are consistent with the results from the open-cell studies. However, we also discovered new insights different from the open cell configuration - the dynamics of the electrolyte and, potentially, a future quantitative characterization of the SEI layer formation and structural and chemical evolution.

  14. Ordered molecular assemblies of substituted bis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth complexes on Au(111): in situ scanning tunneling microscopy and electrochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Houyi; Yang, Liang-Yueh Ou; Pan, Na; Yau, Shueh-Lin; Jiang, Jianzhuang; Itaya, Kingo

    2006-02-28

    Substituted bis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth complexes ML2 (M = Y and Ce; L = [Pc(OC8H17)8]2, where Pc = phthalocyaninato) were adsorbed onto single crystalline Au(111) electrodes from benzene saturated with either YL2 or CeL2 complex at room temperature. In situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to examine the structures and the redox reactions of these admolecules on Au(111) electrodes in 0.1 mol dm(-3) HClO4. The CVs obtained with YL2- and CeL2-coated Au(111) electrodes respectively contained two and three pairs of redox peaks between 0 and 1.0 V (versus reversible hydrogen electrode). STM molecular resolution revealed that YL2 and CeL2 admolecules were imaged as spherical protrusions separated by 2.3 nm, which suggests that they were oriented with their molecular planes parallel to the unreconstructed Au(111)-(1 x 1). Both molecules when adsorbing from approximately micromolar benzene dosing solutions produced mainly ordered arrays characterized as (8 x 5 radical3)rect (theta = 0.0125). The redox reactions occurring between 0.2 and 1.0 V caused no change in the adlayer, but they were desorbed or oxidized at the negative and positive potential limits. The processes of adsorption and desorption at the negative potentials were reversible to the modulation of potential. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and CV measurements showed that YL2 and CeL2 adlayers could block the adsorption of perchlorate anions and mediating electron transfer at the Au(111) electrode, leading to the enhancement of charge transfer for the ferro/ferricyanide redox couple.

  15. The geometry of nanometer-sized electrodes and its influence on electrolytic currents and metal deposition processes in scanning tunneling and scanning electrochemical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklyar, Oleg; Treutler, Thomas H.; Vlachopoulos, Nikolaos; Wittstock, Gunther

    2005-12-01

    Electrodes with an effective radius of about 10 nm have been produced by a combination of electrochemical etching, electrophoretic deposition of polymer, and heat curing. Their size and stability were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. They were then used in combined electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopic (ECSTM) and scanning electrochemical microscopic (SECM) experiments. In an extension of an earlier report, electrochemical surface modification approaches are reported here. They comprise the local electrochemical removal of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of dodecanethiol on flame-annealed gold by an electrochemical desorption procedure. The possibility of local electrochemical deposition is demonstrated by positioning a nanoelectrode 0.5 nm above a surface and switching off the distance regulation while performing an electrodeposition of Pt at the tip. The growing deposit bridges the tip-sample gap. If the distance regulation is switched on after 1 ms, the Pt junction is disrupted leaving a Pt nanodot at the sample surface. The dot was characterized by ECSTM experiments after solution exchange. Digital simulations by the boundary element method (BEM) provide a quantitative description of Faraday currents in nanoelectrochemical assemblies. A software tool was created that can accept arbitrary geometries as input data sets. The flexibility of the simulation strategy was demonstrated by the calculation of local current densities during electrochemical copper deposition on a smooth electrode in the presence of an ECSTM tip close to the surface. The current densities deviate less than 1% from those in the absence of tip if the average current density is kept below 1 μA cm -2. SECM approach curves for nanoelectrodes were also calculated.

  16. Analytical and mineralogical studies of ore and impurities from a chromite mineral using X-ray analysis, electrochemical and microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramos, S; Doménech-Carbó, A; Gimeno-Adelantado, J V; Peris-Vicente, J

    2008-02-15

    A wide analytical study of South African chromite ore, material with high interest in ceramic industry, has been carried out. With this purpose, an accurate chemical identification and mineralogical characterization of the mineral and the gangue have been performed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), voltammetry, X-ray diffraction (XRD), light microscopy (LM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX). The elemental composition of the sample (ore and gangue) has been obtained by XRF. The voltammetric analysis has allowed to demonstrate that iron in the sample was as Fe(II). The main compound of the chromite ore was a spinel (magnesiochromite ferroan), identified by XRD from the sample, which constitutes the chromite ore. This technique has also been useful to characterize some silicates as impurities in the chromite ore sample. Light microscopy has allowed the detection of the spinel and the identification of a silicate impurity (chrome chlorite), by means of their colouration. On the other hand, the other silicate impurity was identified as labradorite by means of X-ray microscopy by SEM/EDX. Finally, a strategy was developed to calculate the composition of each mineral in the unknown sample. The obtained results were: chromite spinel 82.89%, chlorite 12.79% and labradorite 4.32%.

  17. High-Speed Electrochemical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momotenko, Dmitry; Byers, Joshua C; McKelvey, Kim; Kang, Minkyung; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-09-22

    The design, development, and application of high-speed scanning electrochemical probe microscopy is reported. The approach allows the acquisition of a series of high-resolution images (typically 1000 pixels μm(-2)) at rates approaching 4 seconds per frame, while collecting up to 8000 image pixels per second, about 1000 times faster than typical imaging speeds used up to now. The focus is on scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM), but the principles and practicalities are applicable to many electrochemical imaging methods. The versatility of the high-speed scan concept is demonstrated at a variety of substrates, including imaging the electroactivity of a patterned self-assembled monolayer on gold, visualization of chemical reactions occurring at single wall carbon nanotubes, and probing nanoscale electrocatalysts for water splitting. These studies provide movies of spatial variations of electrochemical fluxes as a function of potential and a platform for the further development of high speed scanning with other electrochemical imaging techniques.

  18. Probing the conformation and 2D-distribution of pyrene-terminated redox-labeled poly(ethylene glycol) chains end-adsorbed on HOPG using cyclic voltammetry and atomic force electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Anne, Agnès; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Chovin, Arnaud; Demaille, Christophe; Taofifenua, Cécilia

    2014-03-14

    The present paper aims at illustrating how end-attachment of water-soluble flexible chains bearing a terminal functional group onto graphene-like surfaces has to be carefully tuned to ensure the proper positioning of the functional moiety with respect to the anchoring surface. The model experimental system considered here consists of a layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains, bearing an adsorbing pyrene foot and a ferrocene (Fc) redox functional head, self-assembled onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Cyclic voltammetry is used to accurately measure the chain coverage and gain insights into the microenvironment experienced by the Fc heads. Molecule-touching atomic force electrochemical microscopy (Mt/AFM-SECM) is used to simultaneously probe the chain conformation and the position of the Fc heads within the layer, and also to map the 2D-distribution of the chains over the surface. This multiscale electrochemical approach allows us to show that whereas Fc-PEG-pyrene readily self-assembles to form extremely homogeneous layers, the strongly hydrophobic nature of graphite planes results in a complex coverage-dependent structure of the PEG layer due to the interaction of the ferrocene label with the HOPG surface. It is shown that, even though pyrene is known to adsorb particularly strongly onto HOPG, the more weakly adsorbing terminal ferrocene can also act as the chain anchoring moiety especially at low coverage. However we show that beyond a critical coverage value the Fc-PEG-pyrene chains adopt an ideal "foot-on" end-attached conformation allowing the Fc head to explore a volume away from the surface solely limited by the PEG chain elasticity.

  19. Detection of the Sn(III) intermediate and the mechanism of the Sn(IV)/Sn(II) electroreduction reaction in bromide media by cyclic voltammetry and scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jinho; Bard, Allen J

    2014-01-08

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) were used to investigate the reduction of Sn(IV) as the hexabromo complex ion in a 2 M HBr-4 M NaBr medium. CV at scan rates to 100 V/s and SECM indicated the reaction pathway involves ligand-coupled electron transfer via an ECEC-DISP process: (1) one-electron reduction of Sn(IV)Br6(2-) to Sn(III)Br6(3-); (2) bromide dissociation of the reduced Sn(III)Br6(3-) to Sn(III)Br5(2-); (3) disproportionation of the reduced 2Sn(III)Br5(2-) to Sn(IV)Br5(-) and Sn(II)Br5(3-); (4) one-electron reduction of Sn(III)Br5(2-) to Sn(II)Br5(3-); (5) bromide dissociation from Sn(II)Br5 to Sn(II)Br4(2-). The intermediate Sn(III) species was confirmed by SECM(3-), where the Sn(III) generated at the Au tip was collected on a Au substrate in the tip generation/substrate collection mode when the distance between the tip and substrate was a few hundred nanometers.

  20. Electrochemical and in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy studies of bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide based ionic liquids on graphite and gold electrodes and lithium salt influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Chunlei; Yan, Jiawei; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-10-01

    We report electrochemical and in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies of surface processes on graphite and Au(111) electrodes in N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (Py13FSI) and N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Py13TFSI) ionic liquids in the absence and presence of LiTFSI salt. In both of neat ionic liquids, the intercalation of cations and exfoliation of HOPG layers occur during cathodic excursion. However, the surface decomposition of FSI anions can form an effective protection film on the surface, which suppresses the intercalation and exfoliation processes, while the surface decomposition of TFSI anions mainly causes etching of the surface, which makes the intercalation and exfoliation easier to proceed. The addition of Li salt can promote the formation of the protective film, especially in Py13FSI, and thus significantly suppress the intercalation and exfoliation processes. The discrepancies between these two ionic liquids are caused by the different anion interactions with graphite. Additionally, comparisons of the behaviors on HOPG and on Au(111) confirm that the surface processes are crucially dependent on the nature of the electrode. Trace amounts of oxygen and water can cause the formation of a film-like structure on Au(111), but show no apparent influence on HOPG.

  1. Temperature-Dependent Lithium-Ion Diffusion and Activation Energy of Li1.2Co0.13Ni0.13Mn0.54O2 Thin-Film Cathode at Nanoscale by Using Electrochemical Strain Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Yan, Binggong; Wu, Jiaxiong; Lu, Li; Zeng, Kaiyang

    2017-04-26

    This paper presents the in situ mapping of temperature-dependent lithium-ion diffusion at the nanometer level in thin film Li1.2Co0.13Ni0.13Mn0.54O2 cathode using electrochemical strain microscopy. The thin-film Li1.2Co0.13Ni0.13Mn0.54O2 cathode exhibits higher lithium-ion diffusivities with increasing temperature, which explains the higher capacity observed in the lithium-ion batteries with a Li-rich cathode at elevated temperature. In addition, the activation energy for lithium-ion diffusion can be extracted in an Arrhenius-type plot at the level of grain structure with the assumption that the ionic movement is diffusion controlled. Compared with the grain interiors, the grain boundaries show relatively lower activation energy; hence, it is the preferred diffusion path for lithium ions. This study has bridged the gap between atomistic calculations and traditional macroscopic experiments, showing direct evidence as well as mechanisms for ionic diffusion for Li-rich cathode material.

  2. Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) at TiO2 Electrodes in Li-Ion Batteries: Defining Apparent and Effective SEI Based on Evidence from X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy and Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ventosa, Edgar; Madej, Edyta; Zampardi, Giorgia; Mei, Bastian; Weide, Philipp; Antoni, Hendrik; La Mantia, Fabio; Muhler, Martin; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2017-01-25

    The high (de)lithiation potential of TiO2 (ca. 1.7 V vs Li/Li(+) in 1 M Li(+)) decreases the voltage and, thus, the energy density of a corresponding Li-ion battery. On the other hand, it offers several advantages such as the (de)lithiation potential far from lithium deposition or absence of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI). The latter is currently under controversial debate as several studies reported the presence of a SEI when operating TiO2 electrodes at potentials above 1.0 V vs Li/Li(+). We investigate the formation of a SEI at anatase TiO2 electrodes by means of X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The investigations were performed in different potential ranges, namely, during storage (without external polarization), between 3.0-2.0 V and 3.0-1.0 V vs Li/Li(+), respectively. No SEI is formed when a completely dried and residues-free TiO2 electrode is cycled between 3.0 and 2.0 V vs Li/Li(+). A SEI is detected by XPS in the case of samples stored for 6 weeks or cycled between 3.0 and 1.0 V vs Li/Li(+). With use of SECM, it is verified that this SEI does not possess the electrically insulating character as expected for a "classic" SEI. Therefore, we propose the term apparent SEI for TiO2 electrodes to differentiate it from the protecting and effective SEI formed at graphite electrodes.

  3. Size dependent behavior of Fe3O4 crystals during electrochemical (de)lithiation: an in situ X-ray diffraction, ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Bock, David C; Pelliccione, Christopher J; Zhang, Wei; Timoshenko, Janis; Knehr, K W; West, Alan C; Wang, Feng; Li, Yan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Takeuchi, Esther S; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Marschilok, Amy C

    2017-08-09

    The iron oxide magnetite, Fe3O4, is a promising conversion type lithium ion battery anode material due to its high natural abundance, low cost and high theoretical capacity. While the close packing of ions in the inverse spinel structure of Fe3O4 enables high energy density, it also limits the kinetics of lithium ion diffusion in the material. Nanosizing of Fe3O4 to reduce the diffusion path length is an effective strategy for overcoming this issue and results in improved rate capability. However, the impact of nanosizing on the multiple structural transformations that occur during the electrochemical (de)lithiation reaction in Fe3O4 is poorly understood. In this study, the influence of crystallite size on the lithiation-conversion mechanisms in Fe3O4 is investigated using complementary X-ray techniques along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and continuum level simulations on electrodes of two different Fe3O4 crystallite sizes. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were utilized to track the changes to the crystalline phases during (de)lithiation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements at multiple points during the (de)lithiation processes provided local electronic and atomic structural information. Tracking the crystalline and nanocrystalline phases during the first (de)lithiation provides experimental evidence that (1) the lithiation mechanism is non-uniform and dependent on crystallite size, where increased Li(+) diffusion length in larger crystals results in conversion to Fe(0) metal while insertion of Li(+) into spinel-Fe3O4 is still occurring, and (2) the disorder and size of the Fe metal domains formed when either material is fully lithiated impacts the homogeneity of the FeO phase formed during the subsequent delithiation.

  4. Electrochemical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkire, Richard

    1976-01-01

    Discusses an electrochemical engineering course that combines transport phenomena and basic physical chemistry. Lecture notes and homework problems are used instead of a textbook; an outline of lecture topics is presented. (MLH)

  5. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  6. Electrochemical Design of Optical Nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilchenko, V. E.; Kharintsev, S. S.; Salakhov, M. Kh.

    2015-09-01

    Electrochemical techniques for fabricating tapered gold nanoantennas (tips) are discussed. In the paper, the tunable design of nanoantennas is demonstrated. Tip parameters such as a tip apex curvature, mesoscopic morphology, aspect ratio and enhancement factor can be varied with etching electrolyte and applied voltage. The low-cost method makes tipehnahced optical spectroscopy and microscopy feasible for routine optical measurements beyond the diffraction limit.

  7. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1996-07-16

    An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm{sup 3}; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6{times}10{sup 4}cm{sup 2}/g of Ni. 6 figs.

  8. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1994-02-01

    An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm[sup 3]; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6[times]10[sup 4] cm[sup 2]/g of Ni. 8 figures.

  9. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  10. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1996-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  11. Note: Electrochemical etching of sharp iridium tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalanne, Jean-Benoît; Paul, William; Oliver, David; Grütter, Peter H.

    2011-11-01

    We describe an etching procedure for the production of sharp iridium tips with apex radii of 15-70 nm, as determined by scanning electron microscopy, field ion microscopy, and field emission measurements. A coarse electrochemical etch followed by zone electropolishing is performed in a relatively harmless calcium chloride solution with high success rate.

  12. Electron microscopy investigation and electrochemical performance of carbon-coated LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4 for lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohman, Fadli; Suwandi, Endang; Majid, Nurhalis; Subhan, Achmad

    2016-02-01

    The carbon-coated LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4 was synthesized using solid state reaction method and sintering process. The carbon was coated on the surface of the LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4 particle using citric acid as the carbon source. the crystal phase and diffraction peak of the particle was shown from X-Ray Diffraction characterization. The particle morphology and size distribution of this material was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The thickness of the carbon coating and the crystal lattice spacing was investigated using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The particle size, carbon coating thickness, and crystal lattice spacing were found to be 10 - 50 µm, 4 nm, and Å, respectively. The effect of the carbon layer on the surface of the LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4 particle as a cathode material in lithium-ion battery exhibited in the electrochemical performance test as shown in cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge measurement test. According to the cyclic voltammetry test, it was shown that the redox peaks of the carbon-coated LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4 from Fe2+ to Fe3+ were at 3.579 V and 2.96 V, but there was lower peak at 3.52 V. This phenomenon indicated the presence of doped Mn and Ni. The specific capacity of carbon coated LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4 was 49 mAh/g, which was higher than uncoated LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4, 30 mAh/g. On the other hand, after 40 cycles the specific capacity of carbon-coated LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4 was decreasing to 10%, while the specific capacity of uncoated LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4 remained almost similar before and after 40 cycles. In term of columbic efficiency, carbon-coated LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4 was more stable, better than uncoated LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4. Moreover, all samples were in close proximity to 100% efficiency. The C-rates test result showed that the discharge C-rates ability of the carbon coated LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4 had been better than uncoated LiFe0.7Mn0.2Ni0.1PO4. At 1.5 C rate, the capacity loss of carbon-coated LiFe0

  13. Electrochemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkire, Richard C.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses engineering ramifications of electrochemistry, focusing on current/potential distribution, evaluation of trade-offs between influences of different phenomena, use of dimensionless numbers to assist in scale-over to new operating conditions, and economics. Also provides examples of electrochemical engineering education content related to…

  14. Electrochemical construction

    DOEpatents

    Einstein, Harry; Grimes, Patrick G.

    1983-08-23

    An electrochemical cell construction features a novel co-extruded plastic electrode in an interleaved construction with a novel integral separator-spacer. Also featured is a leak and impact resistant construction for preventing the spill of corrosive materials in the event of rupture.

  15. Electrochemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkire, Richard C.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses engineering ramifications of electrochemistry, focusing on current/potential distribution, evaluation of trade-offs between influences of different phenomena, use of dimensionless numbers to assist in scale-over to new operating conditions, and economics. Also provides examples of electrochemical engineering education content related to…

  16. Electrochemical capacitor

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Liu, Kuo -Chuan; Mohr, Charles M.

    1999-10-05

    An inexpensive porous metal oxide material having high surface area, good conductivity and high specific capacitance is advantageously used in an electrochemical capacitor. The materials are formed in a sol-gel process which affords control over the properties of the resultant metal oxide materials.

  17. Electrochemical device

    DOEpatents

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Bellows, Richard J.

    1988-01-12

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  18. Electrochemical Deburring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, R. K.

    1983-01-01

    Electrochemical deburring removes burrs from assembled injector tubes. Since process uses liquid anodic dissolution in liquid electrolyte to proide deburring action, smoothes surfaces and edges in otherwise inaccessible areas. Tool consists of sleeve that contains metallic ring cathode. Sleeve is placed over tube, and electrolytic solution is forced to flow between tube and sleeve. The workpiece serves an anode.

  19. Electron Microscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  20. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a .beta." alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl.sub.4 or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose.

  1. Electrochemical Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-25

    formation. Frequently, the first atmic layer of the depositing element forms at a potential prior to, under, that needed to deposit the bulk element. Thiis...ps referred to as undepotential deposition (UPD). UPD is an importaM well studied and reviewed area of electrochemical surface science [4-6]. In...general, UPD results in deposits one atom thick (an atomic layer), although the absolute coveage is fequmty some function of the deposition potential. In

  2. Electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, F.M.

    1986-12-23

    This patent describes an electrochemical cell having a metal anode wherein the metal is selected from zinc and cadmium; a bromine cathode; and an aqueous electrolyte containing a metal bromide, the metal bromide having the same metal as the metal of the anode. The improvement described here comprises: a bromine complexing agent in the aqueous metal bromide electrolyte, the complexing agent consisting solely of a quaternary ammonium salt of an N-organo substituted alpha amino acid, ester, or betaine.

  3. Electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Heuts, J.J.F.; Frens, G.

    1987-10-27

    An electrochemical cell is described comprising a negative electrode. The electrochemically active material consists of an intermetallic compound forming a hydride with hydrogen, which compound has the CaCu/sub 5/-structure and the compositional formula AB/sub m/C/sub n/, where m+n is between 4.8 and 5.4, and where n is between 0.05 and 0.6. A consists of Mischmetall or of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, Ti, Hf, Zr, Ca, Th, La and the remaining rare earth metals, in which the total atomic quantities of the elements Y, Ti, Hf and Zr may not be more than 40% of A. B consists of two or more elements selected from the group consisting of Ni, Co, Cu, Fe and Mn, the maximum atomic quantity per gram atom of A is being for Ni:3.5, for Co:3.5, for Cu:3.5, for Fe:2.0 and for Mn:1.0. C consists of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Al, Cr and Si in the following atomic quantities: Al:0.05-0.6, Cr:0.05-0.5 and Si:0.05-0.5, characterized in that the electrochemically active material of the negative electrode also comprises an intermetallic compound forming a hydride with hydrogen, of the compositional formula DNihd pE/sub q/ in an amount from 5 to 45% by weight calculated on the total amount of electrochemically active material, where p+q is between 4.8 and 5.4, where p is between 3.5 and 5.4, where q has a value from 0 to 1.5. D is selected from the group formed by La and Mischmetall, and E consists of one or more elements selected from the group consisting of Co, Cr, Mn and Cu.

  4. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Myles, Kevin M.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1996-01-01

    An electrochemical cell with a positive electrode having an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride. A negative electrode of an alkali metal and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at cell operating temperature is included in the cell. The electrolyte is present at least partially as a corrugated .beta." alumina tube surrounding the negative electrode interior to the positive electrode. The ratio of the volume of liquid electrolyte to the volume of the positive electrode is in the range of from about 0.1 to about 3. A plurality of stacked electrochemical cells is disclosed each having a positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal molten at cell operating temperature, and a compatible electrolyte. The electrolyte is at least partially present as a corrugated .beta." alumina sheet separating the negative electrode and interior to the positive electrodes. The alkali metal is retained in a porous electrically conductive ceramic, and seals for sealing the junctures of the electrolyte and the adjacent electrodes at the peripheries thereof.

  5. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Zoltan; Yonco, Robert M.; You, Hoydoo; Melendres, Carlos A.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 90.degree. in either direction while maintaining the working and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte.

  6. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.; You, H.; Melendres, C.A.

    1992-08-25

    An electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 90[degree] in either direction while maintaining the working and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte. 5 figs.

  7. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.I.; Myles, K.M.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1996-07-02

    An electrochemical cell is described with a positive electrode having an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride. A negative electrode of an alkali metal and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at cell operating temperature is included in the cell. The electrolyte is present at least partially as a corrugated {beta}{double_prime} alumina tube surrounding the negative electrode interior to the positive electrode. The ratio of the volume of liquid electrolyte to the volume of the positive electrode is in the range of from about 0.1 to about 3. A plurality of stacked electrochemical cells is disclosed each having a positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal molten at cell operating temperature, and a compatible electrolyte. The electrolyte is at least partially present as a corrugated {beta}{double_prime} alumina sheet separating the negative electrode and interior to the positive electrodes. The alkali metal is retained in a porous electrically conductive ceramic, and seals for sealing the junctures of the electrolyte and the adjacent electrodes at the peripheries thereof. 8 figs.

  8. Electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Notten, P.H.L.

    1991-12-10

    This patent describes an electrochemical cell comprising a negative electrode. It comprises an electrochemical active material consisting of an intermetallic compound of the formula AB{sub m}C{sub n} wherein m plus n is between 4.8 and 5.4, n has a value of up to 0.6 and greater than 0, A is a Mischmetall or at least one element of the group consisting of Y, Ti, Hf, Zr, Ca, Th, La and the remaining rare earth metals, B is at least two elements selected from the group consisting of Ni, Co, Cu, Fe and Mn and C consists of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Al, Cr, and Si, and has a CaCu{sub 5} structure, and a catalytic material at the surface of which hydrogen exhibits a large electrochemical activity, the catalytic material having a composition of formula DE{sub 3} wherein D is at least one element selected from the group consisting of Cr, Mo and W and E is at least one element selected from the group consisting of Ni and Co.

  9. Carbon nanowalls as material for electrochemical transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Luais, E.; Boujtita, M.; Gohier, A.; Tailleur, A.; Casimirius, S.; Djouadi, M. A.; Granier, A.; Tessier, P. Y.

    2009-07-06

    The electrochemical reactivity of a carbon nanowalls electrode was highlighted. The carbon nanowalls were synthesized at 520 deg. C in an acetylene/ammonia electron cyclotronic resonance plasma without any metal catalyst. The electrode surface was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Its electrochemical reactivity was studied by both cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. After the carbon nanowalls deposition, the electronic transfer rate constant and the electroactive surface area were found to be increased by a factor of 7 and 3, respectively.

  10. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    An improved secondary electrochemical cell is disclosed having a negative electrode of lithium aluminum, a positive electrode of iron sulfide, a molten electrolyte of lithium chloride and potassium chloride, and the combination that the fully charged theoretical capacity of the negative electrode is in the range of 0.5-1.0 that of the positive electrode. The cell thus is negative electrode limiting during discharge cycling. Preferably, the negative electrode contains therein, in the approximate range of 1-10 volume % of the electrode, an additive from the materials of graphitized carbon, aluminum-iron alloy, and/or magnesium oxide.

  11. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1994-08-23

    An electrochemical cell is described having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a [beta] alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl[sub 4] or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose. 6 figs.

  12. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    An improved secondary electrochemical cell is disclosed having a negative electrode of lithium aluminum, a positive electrode of iron sulfide, a molten electrolyte of lithium chloride and potassium chloride, and the combination that the fully charged theoretical capacity of the negative electrode is in the range of 0.5 to 1.0 that of the positive electrode. The cell thus is negative electrode limiting during discharge cycling. Preferably, the negative electrode contains therein, in the approximate range of 1 to 10 volume % of the electrode, an additive from the materials of graphitized carbon, aluminum-iron alloy, and/or magnesium oxide.

  13. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  14. Preparation of reliable probes for electrochemical tunneling spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Güell, Aleix G; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Gorostiza, Pau; Sanz, Fausto

    2004-09-01

    We present a new procedure to prepare Pt/Ir probes for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy applications. We detail the experimental setup and the improvements over previous methods. The probes have been used successfully for measurements of tunneling spectroscopy under electrochemical control, which requires scanning the potential of the tip at high velocity. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  15. Electrochemical supercapacitors

    DOEpatents

    Rudge, Andrew J.; Ferraris, John P.; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    1996-01-01

    A new class of electrochemical capacitors provides in its charged state a positive electrode including an active material of a p-doped material and a negative electrode including an active material of an n-doped conducting polymer, where the p-doped and n-doped materials are separated by an electrolyte. In a preferred embodiment, the positive and negative electrode active materials are selected from conducting polymers consisting of polythiophene, polymers having an aryl group attached in the 3-position, polymers having aryl and alkyl groups independently attached in the 3- and 4-positions, and polymers synthesized from bridged dimers having polythiophene as the backbone. A preferred electrolyte is a tetraalykyl ammonium salt, such as tetramethylammonium trifluoromethane sulphonate (TMATFMS), that provides small ions that are mobile through the active material, is soluble in acetonitrile, and can be used in a variety of capacitor configurations.

  16. Correlative Microscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microscopy and Imaging offers many opportunities to collaborate and cooperate with scientists in many different fields nationally and internationally. Images have proven to be very important components in basic research, product development and understanding structure/function relationships in addit...

  17. Electrochemical synthesis of multisegmented nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, Kuan-Ying; Ng, Inn-Khuan; Saidin, Nur Ubaidah

    2012-11-27

    Electrochemical deposition has emerged as a promising route for nanostructure fabrication in recent years due to the many inherent advantages it possesses. This study focuses on the synthesis of high-aspect-ratio multisegmented Au/Ni nanowires using template-directed sequential electrochemical deposition techniques. By selectively removing the Ni segments in the nanowires, high-yield of pure gold nanorods of predetermined lengths was obtained. Alternatively, the sacrificial Ni segments in the nanowires can be galvanically displaced with Bi and Te to form barbells structures with Bi{sub x}Te{sub y} nanotubes attached to neighbouring gold segments. Detailed studies on the nanostructures obtained were carried out using various microscopy, diffraction and probebased techniques for structural, morphological and chemical characterizations.

  18. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  19. Electrochemical synthesis and surface characterization of (pyrrole+2-methylfuran) copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djaouane, Linda; Nessark, Belkacem; Sibous, Lakhdar

    2017-02-01

    Electrochemical copolymerization of pyrrole (Py) and 2-methylfuran (2 MF) was performed on platinum and ITO substrates in acetonitrile/lithium perchlorate solution, using cyclic voltammetry method. The electrochemical behavior of the modified electrode surface by polypyrrole, poly(2-methylfuran) homopolymers and (pyrrole+2-methylfuran) copolymer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cyclic voltammetry shows anodic and cathodic peaks which are characteristic of the oxidation and the reduction of the formed films. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the results obtained by cyclic voltammetry. AFM and SEM analyses proved as well that the morphology and the electrochemical properties of the polypyrrole film are modified in the presence of 2-methylfuran.

  20. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzzo, Ralph G; Mitrovski, Svetlana M

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  1. Expansion Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. Here we report the discovery that, by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable super-resolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with effective ~70 nm lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color super-resolution imaging of ~107 μm3 of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope. PMID:25592419

  2. High Power Electrochemical Capacitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-23

    electrochemical properties of vanadium oxide aerogels prepared by a freeze-drying process. Journal of the Electrochemical Society, 2004. 151(5): p...Electrochemical Society, 2002. 149(1): p. A26-A30. 12. Rolison, D.R. and B. Dunn, Electrically conductive oxide aerogels : new materials in...surface area vanadium oxide aerogels . Electrochemical and Solid-State Letters, 2000. 3(10): p. 457-459. 14. Shembel, E., et al., Synthesis, investigation

  3. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  4. Electrochemical methane sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, S.; Otagawa, T.; Stetter, J.R.

    1984-08-27

    A method and instrument including an electrochemical cell for the detection and measurement of methane in a gas by the oxidation of methane electrochemically at a working electrode in a nonaqueous electrolyte at a voltage about 1.4 volts vs R.H.E. (the reversible hydrogen electrode potential in the same electrolyte), and the measurement of the electrical signal resulting from the electrochemical oxidation.

  5. Plasmonic Imaging of Electrochemical Reactions of Single Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yimin; Wang, Hui; Yu, Hui; Liu, Xianwei; Wang, Wei; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Tao, N J

    2016-11-15

    systems and nanoscale materials with high throughput. The plasmonic approach has two imaging modes: electrochemical current imaging and interfacial impedance imaging. The former images local electrochemical current associated with electrochemical reactions (faradic current), and the latter maps local interfacial impedance, including nonfaradic contributions (e.g., double layer charging). The plasmonic imaging technique can perform voltammetry (cyclic or square wave) in an analogous manner to the traditional electrochemical methods. It can also be integrated with bright field, dark field, and fluorescence imaging capabilities in one optical setup to provide additional capabilities. To date the plasmonic imaging technique has found various applications, including mapping of heterogeneous surface reactions, analysis of trace substances, detection of catalytic reactions, and measurement of graphene quantum capacitance. The plasmonic and other emerging optical imaging techniques (e.g., dark field and fluorescence microscopy), together with the scanning probe-based electrochemical imaging and single nanoparticle analysis techniques, provide new capabilities for one to study single nanoparticle electrochemistry with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. In this Account, we focus on imaging of electrochemical reactions at single nanoparticles.

  6. Nanomaterials for Electrochemical Immunosensing

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mingfei; Gu, Ying; Yun, Yaguang; Li, Min; Jin, Xincui; Wang, Shuo

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical immunosensors resulting from a combination of the traditional immunoassay approach with modern biosensors and electrochemical analysis constitute a current research hotspot. They exhibit both the high selectivity characteristics of immunoassays and the high sensitivity of electrochemical analysis, along with other merits such as small volume, convenience, low cost, simple preparation, and real-time on-line detection, and have been widely used in the fields of environmental monitoring, medical clinical trials and food analysis. Notably, the rapid development of nanotechnology and the wide application of nanomaterials have provided new opportunities for the development of high-performance electrochemical immunosensors. Various nanomaterials with different properties can effectively solve issues such as the immobilization of biological recognition molecules, enrichment and concentration of trace analytes, and signal detection and amplification to further enhance the stability and sensitivity of the electrochemical immunoassay procedure. This review introduces the working principles and development of electrochemical immunosensors based on different signals, along with new achievements and progress related to electrochemical immunosensors in various fields. The importance of various types of nanomaterials for improving the performance of electrochemical immunosensor is also reviewed to provide a theoretical basis and guidance for the further development and application of nanomaterials in electrochemical immunosensors. PMID:28475158

  7. Electrochemical polypyrrole formation from pyrrole 'adlayer'.

    PubMed

    Plausinaitis, Deivis; Sinkevicius, Linas; Mikoliunaite, Lina; Plausinaitiene, Valentina; Ramanaviciene, Almira; Ramanavicius, Arunas

    2017-01-04

    In this research study, we investigated the morphology of polypyrrole nanostructures, which were formed during the electrochemical deposition of conducting polymer. An electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) cell equipped with a flow-through system was employed to exchange solutions of different compositions within the EQCM cell. When bare PBS buffer in the EQCM cell was exchanged with PBS buffer with pyrrole we observed a distinct increase in the resonance frequency Δf. This change in the resonance frequency and electrical capacitance, which was calculated from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data, illustrate that pyrrole on the surface of the gold electrode formed an adsorbed layer (adlayer). The formation of a pyrrole adlayer before the potential pulse that induced polymerization was investigated by QCM-based measurements. The electrochemical polymerization of this adlayer was induced by a single potential pulse and a nanostructured layer, which consisted of adsorbed polypyrrole (Ppy) nanoparticles with a diameter of 50 nm, was formed. QCM and EIS data revealed that by the next cycle of the electrochemical formation of Ppy, which was investigated after flow-through-based exchange of solutions, the initially formed Ppy surface was covered by the adlayer of pyrrole. This adlayer was desorbed when pyrrole was removed from the solution. When electrochemical polymerization was performed using 50 potential pulses, a Ppy layer, which had more complex morphology, was formed on the EQCM crystal. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the conductivity of this layer was unequally distributed. We observed that the polypyrrole layer formed by electrochemical deposition, which was performed using potential pulses, was formed out of aggregated spherical Ppy particles with a diameter of 50 nm.

  8. Electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Samuel; Fàbregas, Esteve; Pumera, Martin

    2009-01-07

    Electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polysulfone composite electrodes for enhanced heterogeneous electron transfer is studied. The physicochemical insight into the electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polymer composites was provided by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Dopamine, ascorbic acid, NADH, and ferricyanide are used as a model redox system for evaluating the performance of activated carbon nanotube/polymer composite electrodes. We demonstrate that polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes is subject to defects and to partial removal during activation. Such tunable activation of electrodes would enable on-demand activation of electrodes for satisfying the needs of sensing or energy storage devices.

  9. Electrochemical cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-06-22

    Multiple stacks of tubular electrochemical cells having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films arranged in parallel on stamped conductive interconnect sheets or ferrules. The stack allows one or more electrochemical cell to malfunction without disabling the entire stack. Stack efficiency is enhanced through simplified gas manifolding, gas recycling, reduced operating temperature and improved heat distribution.

  10. Electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Indirect cholesterol electrochemical oxidation in the presence of various mediators leads to electrophilic addition to the double bond, oxidation at the allylic position, oxidation of the hydroxy group, or functionalization of the side chain. Recent studies have proven that direct electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol is also possible and affords different products depending on the reaction conditions. PMID:25977713

  11. Electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Reynier, Yvan; Yazami, Rachid; Fultz, Brent T.

    2009-09-29

    The present invention provides systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems. Systems and methods of the present invention are configured for simultaneously collecting a suite of measurements characterizing a plurality of interconnected electrochemical and thermodynamic parameters relating to the electrode reaction state of advancement, voltage and temperature. Enhanced sensitivity provided by the present methods and systems combined with measurement conditions that reflect thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions allow very accurate measurement of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and electrochemical systems, such as the energy, power density, current rate and the cycle life of an electrochemical cell.

  12. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2007-06-19

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  13. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson; Craig P. , Visco; Steven J. , De Jonghe; Lutgard C.

    2010-11-09

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  14. Surface phenomenon in Electrochemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Tanya

    Interfaces play a critical role in the performance of electrochemical systems. This thesis focusses on interfaces in batteries and covers aspects of interfacial morphologies of metal anodes, including Silicon, Lithium and Zinc. Growth and cycling of electrochemically grown Lithium and Zinc metal structures is investigated. A new morphology of Zinc, called Hyper Dendritic Zinc is introduced. It is cycled against Prussian Blue Analogues and is shown to improve the performance of this couple significantly. Characterization of materials is done using various electron microscopy techniques ranging from Low Energy Electron Microscope (LEEM), to high energy Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). LEEM is used for capturing subtle surface phenomenon occurring during epitaxial process of electrolyte on anode. The system studied is Silicon (100) during Chemical Vapor Deposition of Ethylene Carbonate. A strain driven relaxation theory is modeled to explain the unusual restructuring of Si substrate. The other extreme, TEM, is often used to study electrochemical processes, without clear understanding of how the high-energy electron beam can influence the sample under investigation. Here, we study the radiolysis in liquid cell TEM and emphasize on the enhancement of radiation dose at interfaces of the liquid due to generation of secondary and backscattered electrons from adjoining materials. It is shown that this effect is localized in a 10 nm region around the interface and can play a dominating role if there is an interface of liquid with heavy metals like Gold and Platinum which are frequently used as electrode materials. This analysis can be used to establish guidelines for experimentalists to follow, for accurate interpretation of their results.

  15. Electrode for electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.; Nelson, P.A.; Miller, W.E.

    1980-05-09

    An electrode structure for a secondary electrochemical cell includes an outer enclosure defining a compartment containing electrochemical active material. The enclosure includes a rigid electrically conductive metal sheet with perforated openings over major side surfaces. The enclosure can be assembled as first and second trays each with a rigid sheet of perforated electrically conductive metal at major side surfaces and normally extending flanges at parametric margins. The trays can be pressed together with moldable active material between the two to form an expandable electrode. A plurality of positive and negative electrodes thus formed are arranged in an alternating array with porous frangible interelectrode separators within the housing of the secondary electrochemical cell.

  16. Electrode for electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Nelson, Paul A.; Miller, William E.

    1981-01-01

    An electrode structure for a secondary electrochemical cell includes an outer enclosure defining a compartment containing electrochemical active material. The enclosure includes a rigid electrically conductive metal sheet with perforated openings over major side surfaces. The enclosure can be assembled as first and second trays each with a rigid sheet of perforated electrically conductive metal at major side surfaces and normally extending flanges at parametric margins. The trays can be pressed together with moldable active material between the two to form an expandable electrode. A plurality of positive and negative electrodes thus formed are arranged in an alternating array with porous frangible interelectrode separators within the housing of the secondary electrochemical cell.

  17. Synthesis and electrochemical performance of polyaniline @MnO2/graphene ternary composites for electrochemical supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chao; Gu, Haiteng; Dong, Li

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a facile method to construct new ternary hierarchical nanocomposites by combining MnO2 coated one dimensional (1D) conducting polyaniline (PANI) nanowires with 2D graphene sheets (GNs). The hierarchical nanocomposite structures of PANI@MnO2/GNs (PMGNs) are further proved by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical characteristics of the electrodes made of the hierarchical structured PMGNs materials are determined by the CV and galvanostatic measurements. These electrochemical tests indicate that electrodes made of the nanostructured PMGNs exhibit an improved reversible capacitance of 695 F g-1 after 1000 cycles at a high current density of 4 A g-1. The ternary composites possess higher electrochemical capacitance than each individual component as supercapacitor electrode materials. Such intriguing electrochemical performance is mainly attributed to the synergistic effects of MnO2, PANI and graphene. The hierarchical ternary nanocomposites show excellent electrochemical properties for energy storage applications, which evidence their potential application as supercapacitors.

  18. Electrochemical, morphological and microstructural characterization of carbon film resistor electrodes for application in electrochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia-Caridade, Carla; Soares, David M.; Liess, Hans-Dieter; Brett, Christopher M. A.

    2008-08-01

    The electrochemical and microstructural properties of carbon film electrodes made from carbon film electrical resistors of 1.5, 15, 140 Ω and 2.0 kΩ nominal resistance have been investigated before and after electrochemical pre-treatment at +0.9 V vs SCE, in order to assess the potential use of these carbon film electrodes as electrochemical sensors and as substrates for sensors and biosensors. The results obtained are compared with those at electrodes made from previously investigated 2 Ω carbon film resistors. Cyclic voltammetry was performed in acetate buffer and phosphate buffer saline electrolytes and the kinetic parameters of the model redox system Fe(CN) 63-/4- obtained. The 1.5 Ω resistor electrodes show the best properties for sensor development with wide potential windows, similar electrochemical behaviour to those of 2 Ω and close-to-reversible kinetic parameters after electrochemical pre-treatment. The 15 and 140 Ω resistor electrodes show wide potential windows although with slower kinetics, whereas the 2.0 kΩ resistor electrodes show poor cyclic voltammetric profiles even after pre-treatment. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy related these findings to the interfacial properties of the electrodes. Microstructural and morphological studies were carried out using contact mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Confocal Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. AFM showed more homogeneity of the films with lower nominal resistances, related to better electrochemical characteristics. X-ray diffraction and Confocal Raman spectroscopy indicate the existence of a graphitic structure in the carbon films.

  19. Preparation of Chemically Etched Tips for Ambient Instructional Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaccardi, Margot J.; Winkelmann, Kurt; Olson, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    A first-year laboratory experiment that utilizes concepts of electrochemical tip etching for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is described. This experiment can be used in conjunction with any STM experiment. Students electrochemically etch gold STM tips using a time-efficient method, which can then be used in an instructional grade STM that…

  20. Preparation of Chemically Etched Tips for Ambient Instructional Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaccardi, Margot J.; Winkelmann, Kurt; Olson, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    A first-year laboratory experiment that utilizes concepts of electrochemical tip etching for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is described. This experiment can be used in conjunction with any STM experiment. Students electrochemically etch gold STM tips using a time-efficient method, which can then be used in an instructional grade STM that…

  1. Electrochemical heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Guy R. B.; Holley, Charles E.; Houseman, Barton L.; Sibbitt, Jr., Wilmer L.

    1978-01-01

    Electrochemical heat engines produce electrochemical work, and mechanical motion is limited to valve and switching actions as the heat-to-work cycles are performed. The electrochemical cells of said heat engines use molten or solid electrolytes at high temperatures. One or more reactions in the cycle will generate a gas at high temperature which can be condensed at a lower temperature with later return of the condensate to electrochemical cells. Sodium, potassium, and cesium are used as the working gases for high temperature cells (above 600 K) with halogen gases or volatile halides being used at lower temperature. Carbonates and halides are used as molten electrolytes and the solid electrolyte in these melts can also be used as a cell separator.

  2. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Elizabeth S; Wightman, R Mark

    2015-01-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  3. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements. PMID:25939038

  4. ELECTROCHEMICAL DEGRADATION OF POLYCHLOROBIPHENYLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular graphite is an ideal conductive material for electrochemical reduction technology applications in the field. Granular graphite was used to enhance the transfer of chlorinated aliphatic compounds in saturated, low permeability soils by electroosmosis. It was also used to ...

  5. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2015-07-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  6. ELECTROCHEMICAL DEGRADATION OF POLYCHLOROBIPHENYLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular graphite is an ideal conductive material for electrochemical reduction technology applications in the field. Granular graphite was used to enhance the transfer of chlorinated aliphatic compounds in saturated, low permeability soils by electroosmosis. It was also used to ...

  7. Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; McCloy, John S.; Matyas, Josef

    2011-12-01

    This is a brief description of PNNL's efforts in FY2011 towards developing advanced electrochemical waste forms. This is a short section that will become part of a larger document being put together by INL.

  8. Composite Nanostructured Material Fabrication By Electrochemical Scanning Probe Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-31

    achieve selective electrodeposition onto a nanostructured surface and in techniques and procedures needed to create a nanoheterostructure , a class of... nanoheterostructures . As an example of such a structure we would start with a nanostructure consisting of a metal film of material A which has nanometer-scale...selective electrodeposition onto a nanostructured surface and in techniques and procedures needed to create a nanoheterostructure . The first attempts to

  9. Electrochemical Energy Storage Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    separated to allow the electrolyte diffusion in an electrochemical cell . Figure 9c shows a zoomed cross-sectional view of the TiO2 coated Ni...Electrochemical half- cells were assembled using the TiO2 coated Ni nanowire arrays (working electrode) and Li foil (counter electrode) separated by two layers... Solar Cells Using Coaxial Electrospinning.” James R. Deneault, Xiaoyin Xiao, Tae-Sik Kang, Joanna S. Wang, Chien M. Wai, Gail J. Brown, Michael F

  10. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-25

    where an atomic layer of an element is deposited , or removed, in a surface limited reaction. The potentials used are referred to as underpotentials in...the electrochemical literature. The atomic layer deposition process is referred to as underpotential deposition (UPD). 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15, NUMBER OF...reaction. The potentials used are referred to as underpotentials in the electrochemical literature. The atomic layer deposition process is referred to as

  11. Solid state electrochemical composite

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2009-06-30

    Provided is a composite electrochemical device fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems including oxygen generation system.

  12. Genomagnetic Electrochemical Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Joseph; Erdem, Arzum

    The use of nucleic acid technologies has significantly improved preparation and diagnostic procedures in life sciences. Nucleic acid layers combined with electrochemical or optical transducers produce a new kind of affinity biosensors as DNA Biosensor for small molecular weight molecules. Electrochemical DNA biosensors are attractive devices for converting the hybridization event into an analytical signal for obtaining sequence-specific information in connection with clinical, environmental or forensic investigations. DNA hybridization biosensors, based on electrochemical transduction of hybridization, couple the high specificity of hybridization reactions with the excellent sensitivity and portability of electrochemical transducers. The main goal in all researches is to design DNA biosensors for preparing a basis for the future DNA microarray system. DNA chip has now become a powerful tool in biological research, however the real clinic assay is still under development. Recently, there has been a great interest to the magnetic beads and/or nanoparticles labelled with metals such as gold, cadmium, silver, etc. for designing of novel electrochemical DNA biosensor approaches resulting in efficient separation. The attractive features of this technology include simple approach, rapid results, multi-analyte detection, low-cost per measurument, stable, and non-hazardous reagents, and reduced waste handling. Some of these new approaches and applications of the electrochemical DNA biosensors based on magnetic beads and its combining with nanoparticles labelled with metals are described and discussed.

  13. Preparation and characterization of STM tips for electrochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahara, L. A.; Thundat, T.; Lindsay, S. M.

    1989-10-01

    We report on a fabrication technique for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips for in situ electrochemical investigations. Unwanted Faradaic currents were minimized by insulating the STM tips with Apiezon wax. Cyclic voltammetry showed Apiezon wax to be inert in various electrolytes.

  14. Electrochemical Characterization of Ultrathin Cross-Linked Metal Nanoparticle Films.

    PubMed

    Han, Chu; Percival, Stephen J; Zhang, Bo

    2016-09-06

    Here we report the preparation, characterization, and electrochemical study of conductive, ultrathin films of cross-linked metal nanoparticles (NPs). Nanoporous films ranging from 40 to 200 nm in thickness composed of gold and platinum NPs of ∼5 nm were fabricated via a powerful layer-by-layer spin coating process. This process allows preparation of uniform NP films as large as 2 × 2 cm(2) with precise control over thickness, structure, and electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties. Gold, platinum, and bimetallic NP films were fabricated and characterized using cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, and conductance measurements. Their electrocatalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated. Our results show that the electrochemical activity of such NP films is initially hindered by the presence of dense thiolate cross-linking ligands. Both electrochemical cycling and oxygen plasma cleaning are effective means in restoring their electrochemical activity. Gold NP films have higher electric conductivity than platinum possibly due to more uniform film structure and closer particle-particle distance. The electrochemical and electrocatalytic performance of platinum NP films can be greatly enhanced by the incorporation of gold NPs. This work focuses on electrochemical characterization of cross-linked NP films and demonstrates several unique properties. These include quick and easy preparation, ultrathin and uniform film thickness, tunable structure and composition, and transferability to many other substrates.

  15. Reclamation of niobium compounds from ionic liquid electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wixtrom, Alex I.; Buhler, Jessica E.; Reece, Charles E.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride (vitamin B4)-based solutions can be used as a greener alternative to acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. This study demonstrated a successful method for electrochemical deposition of niobium compounds onto the surface of copper substrates using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. Niobium ions present in the ionic liquid solution were dissolved into the solution prior to deposition via electrochemical polishing of solid niobium. A black coating was clearly visible on the surface of the Cu following deposition. This coating was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). This ionic liquid-based electrochemical deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities.

  16. Facile and controllable electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Jun; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Chong M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-01-01

    Graphene oxide is electrochemically reduced which is called electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ER-G). ER-G is characterized with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The oxygen content is significantly decreased and the sp 2 carbon is restored after electrochemical reduction. ER-G exhibits much higher electrochemical capacitance and cycling durability than carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and chemically reduced graphene; the specific capacitance measured with cyclic voltammetry (20 mV/s) is ~165 F/g, ~86 F/g, and ~100 F/g for ER-G, CNTs, and chemically reduced graphene,1 respectively. The electrochemical reduction of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide was greatly enhanced on ER-G electrodes as compared with CNTs. ER-G has shown a good potential for applications in energy storage, biosensors, and electrocatalysis.

  17. Electrochemical Biosensors - Sensor Principles and Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Grieshaber, Dorothee; MacKenzie, Robert; Vörös, Janos; Reimhult, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Quantification of biological or biochemical processes are of utmost importance for medical, biological and biotechnological applications. However, converting the biological information to an easily processed electronic signal is challenging due to the complexity of connecting an electronic device directly to a biological environment. Electrochemical biosensors provide an attractive means to analyze the content of a biological sample due to the direct conversion of a biological event to an electronic signal. Over the past decades several sensing concepts and related devices have been developed. In this review, the most common traditional techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry, impedance spectroscopy, and various field-effect transistor based methods are presented along with selected promising novel approaches, such as nanowire or magnetic nanoparticle-based biosensing. Additional measurement techniques, which have been shown useful in combination with electrochemical detection, are also summarized, such as the electrochemical versions of surface plasmon resonance, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy, ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance, and scanning probe microscopy. The signal transduction and the general performance of electrochemical sensors are often determined by the surface architectures that connect the sensing element to the biological sample at the nanometer scale. The most common surface modification techniques, the various electrochemical transduction mechanisms, and the choice of the recognition receptor molecules all influence the ultimate sensitivity of the sensor. New nanotechnology-based approaches, such as the use of engineered ion-channels in lipid bilayers, the encapsulation of enzymes into vesicles, polymersomes, or polyelectrolyte capsules provide additional possibilities for signal amplification. In particular, this review highlights the importance of the precise control over the delicate

  18. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Brian Wayne

    1992-01-01

    Presented here are initial investigations into an electrochemical method whereby thin films of compound semiconductors are produced by epitaxial growth of the constituent elements. This method is the electrochemical analogue of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) (a vacuum-based technique which relies on sequential formation of atomic layers of the constituent elements) and has been termed "Electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy" (ECALE). These preliminary studies are centered on the formation of CdTe, though in principle they could be extended to a number of other compound semiconductors. A background introduction on topics relevant to epitaxial growth in electrochemical systems will be presented. Predictions of underpotential behavior in the CdTe system will be made using potential -pH (Pourbaix) diagrams. Development of the method will proceed from our initial studies of Cd and Te underpotential deposition (UPD) on a number of metallic substrates, followed by results demonstrating the ECALE formation of two monolayers of CdTe on polycrystalline and single crystal gold substrates. The final chapter will present current attempts to design and construct an automated, computer-controlled thin-layer electrochemical flow cell, which is to be used for the deposition of thicker layers (up to 1 mu m) of compound semiconductors.

  19. Materials for electrochemical capacitors.

    PubMed

    Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2008-11-01

    Electrochemical capacitors, also called supercapacitors, store energy using either ion adsorption (electrochemical double layer capacitors) or fast surface redox reactions (pseudo-capacitors). They can complement or replace batteries in electrical energy storage and harvesting applications, when high power delivery or uptake is needed. A notable improvement in performance has been achieved through recent advances in understanding charge storage mechanisms and the development of advanced nanostructured materials. The discovery that ion desolvation occurs in pores smaller than the solvated ions has led to higher capacitance for electrochemical double layer capacitors using carbon electrodes with subnanometre pores, and opened the door to designing high-energy density devices using a variety of electrolytes. Combination of pseudo-capacitive nanomaterials, including oxides, nitrides and polymers, with the latest generation of nanostructured lithium electrodes has brought the energy density of electrochemical capacitors closer to that of batteries. The use of carbon nanotubes has further advanced micro-electrochemical capacitors, enabling flexible and adaptable devices to be made. Mathematical modelling and simulation will be the key to success in designing tomorrow's high-energy and high-power devices.

  20. Perspectives on in situ electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei

    2017-03-29

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with the ability to reveal materials dynamic processes with high spatial and temporal resolution has attracted significant interest. The recent advances in in situ methods, including liquid and gas sample environment, pump-probe ultrafast microscopy, nanomechanics and ferroelectric domain switching the aberration corrected electron optics as well as fast electron detector has opened new opportunities to extend the impact of in situ TEM in broad areas of research ranging from materials science to chemistry, physics and biology. Here in this paper, we highlight the development of liquid environment electron microscopy and its applications in themore » study of colloidal nanoparticle growth, electrochemical processes and others; in situ study of topological vortices in ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials. At the end, perspectives of future in situ TEM are provided.« less

  1. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of corrosion degradation on tinplate substrates.

    PubMed

    Zumelzu, E; Cabezas, C; Vera, A

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of electrolytic tinplate used in food containers was analysed and evaluated, using scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements of microcorrosion and ion dissolution by atomic absorption to prevent food contamination caused by metal traces and to increase the durability of such tinplates.

  2. Pulse electrochemical meso/micro/nano ultraprecision machining technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Young Bin; Park, Jeong Woo

    2013-11-01

    This study demonstrated meso/micro/nano-ultraprecision machining through electrochemical reactions using intermittent DC pulses. The experiment focused on two machining methods: (1) pulse electrochemical polishing (PECP) of stainless steel, and (2) pulse electrochemical nano-patterning (PECNP) on a silicon (Si) surface, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) for fabrication. The dissolution reaction at the stainless steel surface following PECP produced a very clean, smooth workpiece. The advantages of the PECP process included improvements in corrosion resistance, deburring of the sample surface, and removal of hydrogen from the stainless steel surface as verified by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). In PECNP, the electrochemical reaction generated within water molecules produced nanoscale oxide textures on a Si surface. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) was used to evaluate nanoscale-pattern processing on a Si wafer surface produced by AFM-PECNP For both processes using pulse electrochemical reactions, three-dimensional (3-D) measurements and AFM were used to investigate the changes on the machined surfaces. Preliminary results indicated the potential for advancing surface polishing techniques and localized micro/nano-texturing technology using PECP and PECNP processes.

  3. Electrochemical membrane incinerator

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Dennis C.; Houk, Linda L.; Feng, Jianren

    2001-03-20

    Electrochemical incineration of p-benzoquinone was evaluated as a model for the mineralization of carbon in toxic aromatic compounds. A Ti or Pt anode was coated with a film of the oxides of Ti, Ru, Sn and Sb. This quaternary metal oxide film was stable; elemental analysis of the electrolyzed solution indicated the concentration of these metal ions to be 3 .mu.g/L or less. The anode showed good reactivity for the electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone. The use of a dissolved salt matrix as the so-called "supporting electrolyte" was eliminated in favor of a solid-state electrolyte sandwiched between the anode and cathode.

  4. Electrochemical Membrane Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Dennis C.; Houk, Linda L.; Feng, Jianren

    1998-12-08

    Electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone was evaluated as a model for the mineralization of carbon in toxic aromatic compounds. A Ti or Pt anode was coated with a film of the oxides of Ti, Ru, Sn and Sb. This quaternary metal oxide film was stable; elemental analysis of the electrolyzed solution indicated the concentration of these metal ions to be 3 {micro}g/L or less. The anode showed good reactivity for the electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone. The use of a dissolved salt matrix as the so-called ''supporting electrolyte'' was eliminated in favor of a solid-state electrolyte sandwiched between the anode and cathode.

  5. Engineering electrochemical capacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John R.

    2016-09-01

    Electrochemical capacitor (EC) applications have broadened tremendously since EC energy storage devices were introduced in 1978. Then typical applications operated below 10 V at power levels below 1 W. Today many EC applications operate at voltages approaching 1000 V at power levels above 100 kW. This paper briefly reviews EC energy storage technology, shows representative applications using EC storage, and describes engineering approaches to design EC storage systems. Comparisons are made among storage systems designed to meet the same application power requirement but using different commercial electrochemical capacitor products.

  6. Electrochemical fabrication of capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Mansour, Azzam N.; Melendres, Carlos A.

    1999-01-01

    A film of nickel oxide is anodically deposited on a graphite sheet held in osition on an electrochemical cell during application of a positive electrode voltage to the graphite sheet while exposed to an electrolytic nickel oxide solution within a volumetrically variable chamber of the cell. An angularly orientated x-ray beam is admitted into the cell for transmission through the deposited nickel oxide film in order to obtain structural information while the film is subject to electrochemical and in-situ x-ray spectroscopy from which optimum film thickness, may be determined by comparative analysis for capacitor fabrication purposes.

  7. Electrochemical micro sensor

    DOEpatents

    Setter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-09-12

    A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

  8. Separators for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Steven Allen; Anakor, Ifenna Kingsley

    2014-11-11

    Provided are separators for use in an electrochemical cell comprising (a) an inorganic oxide and (b) an organic polymer, wherein the inorganic oxide comprises organic substituents. Preferably, the inorganic oxide comprises an hydrated aluminum oxide of the formula Al.sub.2O.sub.3.xH.sub.2O, wherein x is less than 1.0, and wherein the hydrated aluminum oxide comprises organic substituents, preferably comprising a reaction product of a multifunctional monomer and/or organic carbonate with an aluminum oxide, such as pseudo-boehmite and an aluminum oxide. Also provided are electrochemical cells comprising such separators.

  9. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  10. Bridging fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Development of new fluorescent probes and fluorescence microscopes has led to new ways to study cell biology. With the emergence of specialized microscopy units at most universities and research centers, the use of these techniques is well within reach for a broad research community. A major breakthrough in fluorescence microscopy in biology is the ability to follow specific targets on or in living cells, revealing dynamic localization and/or function of target molecules. One of the inherent limitations of fluorescence microscopy is the resolution. Several efforts are undertaken to overcome this limit. The traditional and most well-known way to achieve higher resolution imaging is by electron microscopy. Moreover, electron microscopy reveals organelles, membranes, macromolecules, and thus aids in the understanding of cellular complexity and localization of molecules of interest in relation to other structures. With the new probe development, a solid bridge between fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy is being built, even leading to correlative imaging. This connection provides several benefits, both scientifically as well as practically. Here, I summarize recent developments in bridging microscopy. PMID:18575880

  11. Chemical imaging of surfaces with the scanning electrochemical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Allen J.; Fan, Fu-Ren F.; Pierce, David T.; Unwin, Patrick R.; Wipf, David O.; Zhou, Feimeng

    1991-10-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy is a scanning probe technique that is based on faradaic current changes as a small electrode is moved across the surface of a sample. The images obtained depend on the sample topography and surface reactivity. The response of the scanning electrochemical microscope is sensitive to the presence of conducting and electroactive species, which makes it useful for imaging hetrogeneous surfaces. The principles and instrumentation used to obtain images and surface reaction-kinetic information are discussed, and examples of applications to the study of electrodes, minerals, and biological samples are given.

  12. Electrochemical ostwald ripening of colloidal ag particles on conductive substrates.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Peter L; Hallock, A J; Brus, Louis E

    2005-01-01

    Thermally evaporated silver nanoparticles on conducting substrates spontaneously evolve in size when immersed in pure water. The process was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and optical absorption spectroscopy. The particles are proposed to reform through an electrochemical Ostwald ripening mechanism driven by the size dependence of the work function and standard electrode potential. We also discuss prior literature experiments where this process appears to occur. Our results show the sensitivity of the electrochemical properties of metallic nanoparticles at relatively large sizes (approximately 50 nm).

  13. Effect of Multipasses on Microstructure and Electrochemical Behavior of Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhdoom, Muhammad Atif; Kamran, Muhammad; Awan, Gul Hameed; Mukhtar, Sehrish

    2013-12-01

    Shielded metal arc welding was applied to AISI 1045 medium carbon steel. The microstructural changes and electrochemical corrosion behavior of the heat-affected zone (HAZ), base metal (BM), and weld zone (WZ) were investigated. The effect of welding passes on microstructural changes of BM, HAZ, and WZ were elucidated using optical microscopy, potentiodynamic Tafel scan, and linear polarization resistance (LPR) methods in plain water and 3.5 pct (w/v) NaCl solution under standard temperature and pressure using corrosion kinetic parameters. From microstructural observations, the variations in ferrite morphology in the BM and WZ showed dissimilar electrochemical corrosion behavior and a corrosion rate than that of HAZ.

  14. Modification of the surface morphology of the silicon substrate for boron-doped diamond electrodes in electrochemical wastewater treatment applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Ji-Yoon; Lee, Choong-Hyun; Kim, Jung-Do; Lim, Dae-Soon

    2016-01-01

    For electrochemical wastewater treatment applications, textured boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes were fabricated by using a simple and cost-effective etching process. On the basis of the surface area measurement, the etching time was optimized in order to achieve higher electrochemical wastewater treatment performance. The surface structure, electrochemical properties, and electrochemical oxidation performance of the electrodes were characterized by using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, in addition to electrochemical techniques. The textured BDD electrode demonstrated a dense and large surface area with no change in the film's properties. The effective surface area of the textured BDD electrode was approximately twice as large as that of the planar BDD electrode. The electrochemical results clearly demonstrate that the enhanced surface area of the BDD electrode achieves a higher current efficiency and much lower energy consumption in the electrochemical oxidation of methyl-orange.

  15. Electrochemical biosensors and nanobiosensors

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Jules L.; Formisano, Nello; Carrara, Sandro; Tkac, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical techniques have great promise for low-cost miniaturised easy-to-use portable devices for a wide range of applications–in particular, medical diagnosis and environmental monitoring. Different techniques can be used for biosensing, with amperometric devices taking the central role due to their widespread application in glucose monitoring. In fact, glucose biosensing takes an approximately 70% share of the biosensor market due to the need for diabetic patients to monitor their sugar levels several times a day, making it an appealing commercial market. In this review, we present the basic principles of electrochemical biosensor devices. A description of the different generations of glucose sensors is used to describe in some detail the operation of amperometric sensors and how the introduction of mediators can enhance the performance of the sensors. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is a technique being increasingly used in devices due to its ability to detect variations in resistance and capacitance upon binding events. Novel advances in electrochemical sensors, due to the use of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, are presented as well as future directions that the field is taking. PMID:27365037

  16. Electro-chemical grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feagans, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Electro-chemical grinding technique has rotation speed control, constant feed rates, and contour control. Hypersonic engine parts of nickel alloys can be almost 100% machined, keeping tool pressure at virtual zero. Technique eliminates galling and permits constant surface finish and burr-free interrupted cutting.

  17. Differential Electrochemical Conductance Imaging at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Montserrat; Artés, Juan Manuel; Sarasso, Veronica; Carminati, Marco; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Sanz, Fausto; Gorostiza, Pau

    2017-09-01

    Electron transfer in proteins is essential in crucial biological processes. Although the fundamental aspects of biological electron transfer are well characterized, currently there are no experimental tools to determine the atomic-scale electronic pathways in redox proteins, and thus to fully understand their outstanding efficiency and environmental adaptability. This knowledge is also required to design and optimize biomolecular electronic devices. In order to measure the local conductance of an electrode surface immersed in an electrolyte, this study builds upon the current-potential spectroscopic capacity of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy, by adding an alternating current modulation technique. With this setup, spatially resolved, differential electrochemical conductance images under bipotentiostatic control are recorded. Differential electrochemical conductance imaging allows visualizing the reversible oxidation of an iron electrode in borate buffer and individual azurin proteins immobilized on atomically flat gold surfaces. In particular, this method reveals submolecular regions with high conductance within the protein. The direct observation of nanoscale conduction pathways in redox proteins and complexes enables important advances in biochemistry and bionanotechnology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Electrochemically formed 3D hierarchical thin films of cobalt-manganese (Co-Mn) hexacyanoferrate hybrids for electrochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam Venugopal, Narendra Kumar; Joseph, James

    2016-02-01

    Here we report the feasibility of forming 3D nanostructured hexacyanoferates of Cobalt and Manganese (Co-MnHCF) on GC surface by a facile electrochemical method. This 3D architecture on glassy carbon electrode characterised systematically by voltammetry and other physical characterisation techniques like Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) etc,. Electrochemical Quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) studies helped out to calculate the total mass change during Co-MnHCF formation. Electrochemical studies reveal that the formal redox potentials of both Co and MnHCF films remained close to that of newly formed Co-MnHCF hybrid films. These 3D modified films were successfully applied for two different electrochemical applications i) For pseudocapacitor studies in KNO3 medium ii) Investigated the electrocatalytic behaviour of redox film towards water oxidation reaction in alkaline medium. Electrochemical performances of newly formed Co-MnHCF are compared with their individual transition metal (Co, Mn) hexacyanoferrates. The resulting material shows a specific capacitance of 350 F g-1 through its fast reversible redox reaction of electrochemically formed Co-MnHCF modified film. Interestingly we showed the overpotential of 450 mV (from its thermodynamic voltage 1.2 V) to attain its optimum current density of 10 mA cm-2 for O2 evolution in alkaline medium.

  19. Electrochemical systems configured to harvest heat energy

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Seok Woo; Yang, Yuan; Ghasemi, Hadi; Chen, Gang; Cui, Yi

    2017-01-31

    Electrochemical systems for harvesting heat energy, and associated electrochemical cells and methods, are generally described. The electrochemical cells can be configured, in certain cases, such that at least a portion of the regeneration of the first electrochemically active material is driven by a change in temperature of the electrochemical cell. The electrochemical cells can be configured to include a first electrochemically active material and a second electrochemically active material, and, in some cases, the absolute value of the difference between the first thermogalvanic coefficient of the first electrochemically active material and the second thermogalvanic coefficient of the second electrochemically active material is at least about 0.5 millivolts/Kelvin.

  20. Dictionary of Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Julian

    2005-10-01

    The past decade has seen huge advances in the application of microscopy in all areas of science. This welcome development in microscopy has been paralleled by an expansion of the vocabulary of technical terms used in microscopy: terms have been coined for new instruments and techniques and, as microscopes reach even higher resolution, the use of terms that relate to the optical and physical principles underpinning microscopy is now commonplace. The Dictionary of Microscopy was compiled to meet this challenge and provides concise definitions of over 2,500 terms used in the fields of light microscopy, electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, x-ray microscopy and related techniques. Written by Dr Julian P. Heath, Editor of Microscopy and Analysis, the dictionary is intended to provide easy navigation through the microscopy terminology and to be a first point of reference for definitions of new and established terms. The Dictionary of Microscopy is an essential, accessible resource for: students who are new to the field and are learning about microscopes equipment purchasers who want an explanation of the terms used in manufacturers' literature scientists who are considering using a new microscopical technique experienced microscopists as an aide mémoire or quick source of reference librarians, the press and marketing personnel who require definitions for technical reports.

  1. Basic confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carolyn L

    2011-07-01

    This unit introduces the reader to the basic principles of confocal microscopy and the design and capabilities of current confocal microscopes. The advantages and disadvantages of confocal microscopy compared to other techniques for fluorescence imaging are described. There are also practical guidelines for sample preparation and optimization of imaging parameters, as well as examples of some of the applications of confocal microscopy.

  2. Electrochemical behavior of chemically synthesized selenium thin film.

    PubMed

    Patil, A M; Kumbhar, V S; Chodankar, N R; Lokhande, A C; Lokhande, C D

    2016-05-01

    The facile and low cost simple chemical bath deposition (CBD) method is employed to synthesize red colored selenium thin films. These selenium films are characterized for structural, morphological, topographical and wettability studies. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed the crystalline nature of selenium thin film with hexagonal crystal structure. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study displays selenium nanoparticles ranging from 20 to 475 nm. A specific surface area of 30.5 m(2) g(-1) is observed for selenium nanoparticles. The selenium nanoparticles hold mesopores in the range of 1.39 nm, taking benefits of the good physicochemical stability and excellent porosity. Subsequently, the electrochemical properties of selenium thin films are deliberated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The selenium thin film shows specific capacitance (Cs) of 21.98 F g(-1) with 91% electrochemical stability.

  3. System level electrochemical principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The traditional electrochemical storage concepts are difficult to translate into high power, high voltage multikilowatt storage systems. The increased use of electronics, and the use of electrochemical couples that minimize the difficulties associated with the corrective measures to reduce the cell to cell capacity dispersion were adopted by battery technology. Actively cooled bipolar concepts are described which represent some attractive alternative system concepts. They are projected to have higher energy densities lower volumes than current concepts. They should be easier to scale from one capacity to another and have a closer cell to cell capacity balance. These newer storage system concepts are easier to manage since they are designed to be a fully integrated battery. These ideas are referred to as system level electrochemistry. The hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cells (RFC) is probably the best example of the integrated use of these principles.

  4. Nitrogen-doped pyrolytic carbon films as highly electrochemically active electrodes.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Hugo; McEvoy, Niall; Keeley, Gareth P; Callaghan, Stephen D; McGuinness, Cormac; Duesberg, Georg S

    2013-11-14

    Nitrogen-doped Pyrolytic Carbon (N-PyC) films were employed as an electrode material in electrochemical applications. PyC was grown by via non-catalysed chemical vapour deposition and subsequently functionalised via exposure to ammonia-hydrogen plasma. The electrochemical properties of the N-PyC films were investigated using the ferri/ferro-cyanide and hexaamine ruthenium(III) chloride redox probes. Exceptional electron transfer properties were observed and quantified for the N-PyC compared to the as-grown films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of nitrogen in edge plane graphitic configurations and the surface of the N-PyC was investigated using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The excellent electrochemical performance of the N-PyC, in addition to its ease of preparation, renders this material ideal for applications in electrochemical sensing.

  5. Electrochemical corrosion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knockemus, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objective was to gain familiarity with the Model 350 Corrosion Measurement Console, to determine if metal protection by grease coatings can be measured by the polarization-resistance method, and to compare corrosion rates of 4130 steel coated with various greases. Results show that grease protection of steel may be determined electrochemically. Studies were also conducted to determine the effectiveness of certain corrosion inhibitors on aluminum and steel.

  6. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris; Larson, David

    1997-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  7. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Haberfellner, F.; Prappacher, G.

    1985-01-08

    Electrochemical storage cell of the sodium and sulfur type with at least one anode space for receiving the anolyte and a cathode space for receiving the catholyte, which are separated from each other by an alkali ion-conducting solid electrolyte and are bounded at least in some areas by a metallic housing. The cathode space is in communication via at least one connecting element with at least one supply container for the sodium polysulfide being formed in the chemical reaction.

  8. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Steinleitner, G.

    1984-05-01

    Electrochemical storage cell or battery with at least one anode space for receiving the anolyte and one cathode space for receiving the catholyte which spaces are separated from each other by an alkali ion-conducting solid electrolyte and are bounded at least in some places by a metallic housing. A safety space which is subdivided into at least two safety zones, adjoins at least in some places, the solid electrolyte.

  9. Molten Salt Electrochemical Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-31

    metal tetrafluoroborates were examined for similar behavior. Commercial samples of the lithium, sodium and potassium salts were used, while the...REPORT a PERID C £0 inal, 1 June 1980-31 March Molten Salt Electrochemical Systems 1983 6 PERFORMING OŘG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(a) I CONTRACT OR...dilfferent from Reporl) IS. KEY WORDS (Continue ora ow... side 55 n~cssay and Identify by block number ) Molten Salt , Phase Diagram, Electrolyte 30

  10. Electrochemical flow capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Gogotsi, Yury; Presser, Volker; Kumbur, Emin Caglan

    2015-10-27

    The present invention generally relates to devices for energy storage technologies, and more particularly to electrochemical flow capacitor systems and applications. In some aspects, these flow capacitors have at least one electrode comprising a non-stationary solid or semi-solid composition comprising supercapacitive particles and an electrolytic solvent in electrical communication with at least one current collector, and energy is stored and/or released by charging and/or discharging the electrode(s).

  11. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, Elton J.; Hietbrink, Earl H.

    1981-01-01

    This section includes some historical background of the rise and fall and subsequent rebirth of the electric vehicle; and a brief discussion of current transportation needs, and environmental and energy utilization issues that resulted in the renewed interest in applying electrochemical energy conversion technology to electric vehicle applications. Although energy utilization has evolved to be the most significant and important issue, the environmental issue will be discussed first in this section only because of its chronological occurrence. The next part of the chapter is a review of passenger and commercial electric vehicle technology with emphasis on vehicle design and demonstrated performance of vehicles with candidate power sources being developed. This is followed by a discussion of electrochemical power source requirements associated with future electric vehicles that can play a role in meeting modern transportation needs. The last part of the chapter includes first a discussion of how to identify candidate electrochemical systems that might be of interest in meeting electric vehicle power source requirements. This is then followed by a review of the current technological status of these systems and a discussion of the most significant problems that must be resolved before each candidate system can be a viable power source.

  12. Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Nanobalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inzelt, György

    The method of piezoelectric microgravimetry (nanogravimetry) using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) or nanobalance (EQCN) can be considered as a novel and much more sensitive version of electrogravimetry. The EQCN technique has become a widely used technique in several areas of electrochemistry, electroanalytical chemistry, bioelectrochemistry, etc. [1-10]. Obviously, mass changes occurring during adsorption, sorption, electrosorption, electrodeposition, or spontaneous deposition can be followed, which is very helpful for the elucidation of reaction mechanism via identification of the species accumulated on the surface. These investigations include metal and alloy deposition, underpotential deposition, electroplating, synthesis of conducting polymers by electropolymerization, adsorption of biologically active materials, and analytical determination of small ions and biomolecules. Of course, the opposite processes, i.e., spontaneous dissolution, electrodissolution, corrosion, can also be studied. Electrochemical oscillations, in which the formation and oxidation of chemisorbed molecular fragments play a determining role, have been studied, too. The majority of the investigations have been devoted to ion and solvent transport associated with the redox transformations of electrochemically active polymers. Similar studies have been carried out regarding polynuclear surface layers such as metal hexacyanometalates as well as inorganic and organic microcrystals of different compositions.

  13. Tissue Specific Electrochemical Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Sobrova, Pavlina; Vyslouzilova, Lenka; Stepankova, Olga; Ryvolova, Marketa; Anyz, Jiri; Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Hubalek, Jaromir; Kizek, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Background Proteomics and metalloproteomics are rapidly developing interdisciplinary fields providing enormous amounts of data to be classified, evaluated and interpreted. Approaches offered by bioinformatics and also by biostatistical data analysis and treatment are therefore of extreme interest. Numerous methods are now available as commercial or open source tools for data processing and modelling ready to support the analysis of various datasets. The analysis of scientific data remains a big challenge, because each new task sets its specific requirements and constraints that call for the design of a targeted data pre-processing approach. Methodology/Principal Findings This study proposes a mathematical approach for evaluating and classifying datasets obtained by electrochemical analysis of metallothionein in rat 9 tissues (brain, heart, kidney, eye, spleen, gonad, blood, liver and femoral muscle). Tissue extracts were heated and then analysed using the differential pulse voltammetry Brdicka reaction. The voltammograms were subsequently processed. Classification models were designed making separate use of two groups of attributes, namely attributes describing local extremes, and derived attributes resulting from the level = 5 wavelet transform. Conclusions/Significance On the basis of our results, we were able to construct a decision tree that makes it possible to distinguish among electrochemical analysis data resulting from measurements of all the considered tissues. In other words, we found a way to classify an unknown rat tissue based on electrochemical analysis of the metallothionein in this tissue. PMID:23185396

  14. Simultaneous impedance spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy for the real-time monitoring of the response of cells to drugs† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional details on the simultaneous setup and mathematical modelling, control experiments on potential dye cytotoxicity, selecting the most sensitive frequency, XPS and electrochemical characterization of the modified surfaces. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc05159f Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Parviz, M.; Gaus, K.

    2017-01-01

    A dual fluorescence microscopy and electrochemical strategy to investigate how cell–surface interactions influence the cellular responses to cues for the cell-based biosensing of drug efficacy is reported herein. The combined method can be used to not only monitor the importance of controlling the cellular adhesive environment on the cell response to drugs but it also provides biological information on the timescales of downstream outside-in signaling from soluble cues. As an example of the use of the combined method, we show how adhesive cues influence the signalling responses of cells to soluble cues. G-protein-coupled receptors were used as the target for the soluble cues. The changes in cell adhesion, cell morphology and Ca2+ flux induced by soluble histamine were simultaneously monitored as a function of the spacing of the adhesive ligand RGD on the interdigitated indium tin oxide electrodes. The simultaneous measurements revealed that the timescales of histamine-induced Ca2+ mobilization and the decrease in cell–cell adhesions are correlated. Furthermore, cells on the surfaces with an RGD spacing of 31 nm were shown to display a faster release of Ca2+ and change in cell adhesion upon histamine stimulation compared to cells on other surfaces. PMID:28451304

  15. Electrochemical Deposition of Niobium onto the Surface of Copper Using a Novel Choline Chloride-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wixtroma, Alex I.; Buhlera, Jessica E.; Reece, Charles E.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride-based solutions can be used to replace acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. In this study niobium metal was successfully deposited on the surface of copper substrate via electrochemical deposition using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. The niobium metal used for deposition on the Cu had been dissolved in the solution from electrochemical polishing of a solid niobium piece prior to the deposition. The visible coating on the surface of the Cu was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). This deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing.

  16. A compact analytical formalism for current transients in electrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pradeep R; Alam, Muhammad A

    2013-01-21

    Micro- and nanostructured electrodes form an integral part of a wide variety of electrochemical systems for biomolecular detection, batteries, solar cells, scanning electrochemical microscopy, etc. Given the complexity of the electrode structures, the Butler-Volmer formalism of redox reactions, and the diffusion transport of redox species, it is hardly surprising that only a few problems are amenable to closed-form, compact analytical solutions. While numerical solutions are widely used, it is often difficult to integrate the insights gained into the design and optimization of electrochemical systems. In this article, we develop a comprehensive analytical formalism for current transients that not only anticipate the responses of complex electrode structures to complicated voltammetry measurements, but also intuitively interpret diverse experiments such as redox detection of molecules at nanogap electrodes, scanning electrochemical microscopy, etc. The results from the analytical model, well supported through detailed numerical simulations and experimental data from the literature, have broad implications in the design and optimization of nanostructured electrodes for healthcare and energy storage applications.

  17. Corrosion protection of ENIG surface finishing using electrochemical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, Q.V.; Nam, N.D.; Choi, D.H.; Lee, J.B.; Lee, C.Y.; Kar, A.; Kim, J.G.; Jung, S.B.

    2010-03-15

    Four types of thin film coating were carried out on copper for electronic materials by the electroless plating method at a pH range from 3 to 9. The coating performance was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization testing in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. In addition, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction were also used to analyze the coating surfaces. The electrochemical behavior of the coatings was improved using the electroless nickel plating solution of pH 5. The electroless nickel/immersion gold on the copper substrate exhibited high protective efficiency, charge transfer resistance and very low porosity, indicating an increase in corrosion resistance. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed the surface uniformity and the formation of the crystalline-refined NiP {l_brace}1 2 2{r_brace} phase at pH 5.

  18. The possibility of multi-layer nanofabrication via atomic force microscope-based pulse electrochemical nanopatterning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Uksu; Morita, Noboru; Lee, Deug; Jun, Martin; Park, Jeong Woo

    2017-03-27

    Pulse electrochemical nanopatterning (PECN), a non-contact scanning probe lithography (NC-SPL) process using ultrashort voltage pulses, is based primarily on an electrochemical machining (ECM) process using localized electrochemical oxidation between a sharp tool tip and the sample surface. In this study, nanoscale oxide patterns were formed on silicon Si (100) wafer surfaces via electrochemical surface nanopatterning, by supplying external pulsed currents through non-contact atomic force microscopy. Nanoscale oxide width and height were controlled by modulating the applied pulse duration. Additionally, protruding nanoscale oxides were removed completely by simple chemical etching, showing a depressed pattern on the sample substrate surface. Nanoscale two-dimensional oxides, prepared by a localized electrochemical reaction, can be defined easily by controlling physical and electrical variables, before proceeding further to a layer-by-layer nanofabrication process.

  19. Electrochemical Sensing and Imaging Based on Ion Transfer at Liquid/Liquid Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Shigeru; Kim, Jiyeon; Izadyar, Anahita; Kabagambe, Benjamin; Shen, Mei; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi

    2013-01-01

    Here we review the recent applications of ion transfer (IT) at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES) for electrochemical sensing and imaging. In particular, we focus on the development and recent applications of the nanopipet-supported ITIES and double-polymer-modified electrode, which enable the dynamic electrochemical measurements of IT at nanoscopic and macroscopic ITIES, respectively. High-quality IT voltammograms are obtainable using either technique to quantitatively assess the kinetics and dynamic mechanism of IT at the ITIES. Nanopipet-supported ITIES serves as an amperometric tip for scanning electrochemical microscopy to allow for unprecedentedly high-resolution electrochemical imaging. Voltammetric ion sensing at double-polymer-modified electrodes offers high sensitivity and unique multiple-ion selectivity. The promising future applications of these dynamic approaches for bioanalysis and electrochemical imaging are also discussed. PMID:24363454

  20. The possibility of multi-layer nanofabrication via atomic force microscope-based pulse electrochemical nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Uk Su; Morita, Noboru; Lee, Deug Woo; Jun, Martin; Park, Jeong Woo

    2017-05-01

    Pulse electrochemical nanopatterning, a non-contact scanning probe lithography process using ultrashort voltage pulses, is based primarily on an electrochemical machining process using localized electrochemical oxidation between a sharp tool tip and the sample surface. In this study, nanoscale oxide patterns were formed on silicon Si (100) wafer surfaces via electrochemical surface nanopatterning, by supplying external pulsed currents through non-contact atomic force microscopy. Nanoscale oxide width and height were controlled by modulating the applied pulse duration. Additionally, protruding nanoscale oxides were removed completely by simple chemical etching, showing a depressed pattern on the sample substrate surface. Nanoscale two-dimensional oxides, prepared by a localized electrochemical reaction, can be defined easily by controlling physical and electrical variables, before proceeding further to a layer-by-layer nanofabrication process.

  1. Space Electrochemical Research and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of NASA's third Space Electrochemical Research and Technology (SERT) conference are presented. The objective of the conference was to assess the present status and general thrust of research and development in those areas of electrochemical technology required to enable NASA missions in the next century. The conference provided a forum for the exchange of ideas and opinions of those actively involved in the field, in order to define new opportunities for the application of electrochemical processes in future NASA missions. Papers were presented in three technical areas: the electrochemical interface, the next generation in aerospace batteries and fuel cells, and electrochemistry for nonenergy storage applications.

  2. Electrochemical Sensors for Clinic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, You; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Jianming; Li, Guang

    2008-01-01

    Demanded by modern medical diagnosis, advances in microfabrication technology have led to the development of fast, sensitive and selective electrochemical sensors for clinic analysis. This review addresses the principles behind electrochemical sensor design and fabrication, and introduces recent progress in the application of electrochemical sensors to analysis of clinical chemicals such as blood gases, electrolytes, metabolites, DNA and antibodies, including basic and applied research. Miniaturized commercial electrochemical biosensors will form the basis of inexpensive and easy to use devices for acquiring chemical information to bring sophisticated analytical capabilities to the non-specialist and general public alike in the future. PMID:27879810

  3. Electrochemical Corrosion of Stainless Steel in Thiosulfate Solutions Relevant to Gold Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Lokesh; Wang, Wei; Alfantazi, Akram

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to characterize the electrochemical corrosion behavior of stainless steel in the ammoniacal thiosulfate gold leaching solutions. Electrochemical corrosion response was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, while the semi-conductive properties and the chemical composition of the surface film were characterized using Mott-Schottky analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The morphology of the corroded specimens was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The stainless steel 316L showed no signs of pitting in the ammoniacal thiosulfate solutions.

  4. Coimmobilization of urease and glutamate dehydrogenase in electrochemically prepared polypyrrole-polyvinyl sulfonate films.

    PubMed

    Gambhir, A; Gerard, M; Mulchandani, A K; Malhotra, B D

    2001-01-01

    Immobilization of urease and glutamate dehydrogenase enzymes in electrochemically prepared polypyrrole-polyvinyl sulfonate films (PPY-PVS) was carried out using physical adsorption and electrochemical entrapment techniques. Detailed studies on optimum pH, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and scanning electron microscopy of the enzymes in the immobilized state were conducted. The value of the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant was experimentally determined to be 2.5 and 2.7 for physically adsorbed and electrochemically entrapped urease in PPY-PVS films, respectively.

  5. Adsorption and Assembly of Ions and Organic Molecules at Electrochemical Interfaces: Nanoscale Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Soichiro; Itaya, Kingo

    2013-06-01

    We describe the history of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and advances made in this field during the past 20 years. In situ STM allows one to monitor various electrode processes, such as the underpotential deposition of copper and silver ions; the specific adsorption of iodine and sulfate/bisulfate ions; electrochemical dissolution processes of silicon and gold single-crystal surfaces in electrolyte solutions; and the molecular assembly of metalloporphyrins, metallophthalocyanines, and fullerenes, at atomic and/or molecular resolution. Furthermore, a laser confocal microscope, combined with a differential interference contrast microscope, enables investigation of the dynamics of electrochemical processes at atomic resolution.

  6. Adsorption and assembly of ions and organic molecules at electrochemical interfaces: nanoscale aspects.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Soichiro; Itaya, Kingo

    2013-01-01

    We describe the history of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and advances made in this field during the past 20 years. In situ STM allows one to monitor various electrode processes, such as the underpotential deposition of copper and silver ions; the specific adsorption of iodine and sulfate/bisulfate ions; electrochemical dissolution processes of silicon and gold single-crystal surfaces in electrolyte solutions; and the molecular assembly of metalloporphyrins, metallophthalocyanines, and fullerenes, at atomic and/or molecular resolution. Furthermore, a laser confocal microscope, combined with a differential interference contrast microscope, enables investigation of the dynamics of electrochemical processes at atomic resolution.

  7. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-27

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  8. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  9. Basic confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carolyn L

    2008-01-01

    This unit introduces the reader to the basic principles of confocal microscopy and the design and capabilities of current confocal microscopes. The advantages and disadvantages of confocal microscopy compared to other techniques for fluorescence imaging are described. There are also practical guidelines for sample preparation and optimization of imaging parameters, as well as examples of some of the applications of confocal microscopy. (c) 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlation mapping microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, James; Alexandrov, Sergey; Owens, Peter; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the microcirculation are associated with conditions such as Raynauds disease. Current modalities used to assess the microcirculation such as nailfold capillaroscopy are limited due to their depth ambiguity. A correlation mapping technique was recently developed to extend the capabilities of Optical Coherence Tomography to generate depth resolved images of the microcirculation. Here we present the extension of this technique to microscopy modalities, including confocal microscopy. It is shown that this correlation mapping microscopy technique can extend the capabilities of conventional microscopy to enable mapping of vascular networks in vivo with high spatial resolution.

  12. Light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Mickoleit, Michaela; Huisken, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces the concept of light sheet microscopy along with practical advice on how to design and build such an instrument. Selective plane illumination microscopy is presented as an alternative to confocal microscopy due to several superior features such as high-speed full-frame acquisition, minimal phototoxicity, and multiview sample rotation. Based on our experience over the last 10 years, we summarize the key concepts in light sheet microscopy, typical implementations, and successful applications. In particular, sample mounting for long time-lapse imaging and the resulting challenges in data processing are discussed in detail.

  13. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  14. Electrochemical nucleation and growth of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radisic, Aleksandar

    2005-12-01

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to provide more insight into nucleation and growth processes during electrochemical deposition of copper on various metallic and semiconductor substrates. Electrodeposition is the current method used in forming copper interconnects in integrated circuits, primarily due to the ability of this technique to fill high aspect ratio features with complex geometries at high deposition rates, leading to high throughput and lower manufacturing costs. Important processing steps prior to electroplating involve the deposition of a thin diffusion barrier layer, to prevent copper diffusion into silicon, and deposition of a copper seed layer by means of physical vapor deposition (PVD). The copper seed layer provides good electrical contact and improved adhesion to the diffusion barrier layer. As the feature sizes in integrated circuits continue to decrease, industry is forced to explore the possibility of electrochemical deposition of high quality copper films without the use of a copper seed layer. It is not a priori clear that copper films deposited on diffusion barriers will follow the same growth mode as copper films deposited on copper seed layers, and whether it will be possible to achieve the "superfilling" effects without the copper seed layer. The growth of copper films on diffusion barrier materials occurs through Volmer-Weber (3D island) mode of growth. As a result, high nucleus densities are essential in depositing continuous thin films. For complex structures with small length scales, such as trenches and vias in integrated circuits, a detailed understanding of nucleation and growth, and the influence of parameters such as potential and solution chemistry on the deposition mechanism is critical in designing processes for obtaining the void-free features. The goal of our research is to improve the understanding of the electrochemical nucleation and growth processes necessary for successful electrodeposition of copper onto

  15. Continuous organic electrochemical synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nobe, K.; Baizer, M.; Pintauro, P.; Park, K.; Gilbert, S.

    1984-07-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid and reduction of glucose to sorbitol has been successfully paired in an undivided packed bed electrode flow cell. The use of a Raney nickel powder catalytic cathode significantly improved the current efficiency for sorbitol production, as compared to a high hydrogen overpotential Zn(Hg) cathode. The optimum operating conditions for the paired synthesis are: activity W-2 Raney nickel powder cathode, graphite chip anode, a 1.6 M glucose and 0.4 M CaBr/sub 2/ initial solution composition, pH 6-7, 60/sup 0/C solution temperature, a current density of 250 to 500 mA and a solution volumetric flow rate of 100 ml min/sup -1/. Under these conditions the sorbitol current efficiencies are at least 80%, the glucose acid current efficiencies are 100% and the product yields are quantitative. A separation scheme for the paired synthesis has also been devised. It consists of the precipitation of the oxidation product (calcium gluconate) and the ethanol extraction of glucose and CaBr/sub 2/ from sorbitol. Based on a preliminary economic analysis of the cost of raw materials, energy and the electrochemical cell and separation equipment the cost of producing 1 lb calcium gluconate and 0.68 lb sorbitol in a paired synthesis was estimated to be $0.896. The cost of producing the same amount of sorbitol and calcium gluconate in separate electrochemical cells was calculated to be $1.20. Thus, the paired synthesis appears to be an economically viable process.

  16. Electrochemical incineration of wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockris, J. O. M.; Bhardwaj, R. C.; Tennakoon, C. L. K.

    1993-01-01

    There is an increasing concern regarding the disposal of human wastes in space vehicles. It is of utmost importance to convert such wastes into harmless products which can be recycled into an Environmental Life Support System (CELSS), which incorporates the growth of plants (e.g. wheat) and algae to supplement the diet of the astronauts. Chemical treatments have proven relatively unsatisfactory and tend to be increasingly so with increase of the mission duration. Similarly, the use of heat to destroy wastes and convert them to CO2 by the use of air or oxygen has the disadvantage and difficulty of dissipating heat in a space environment and to the inevitable presence of oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide in the effluent gases. In particular, electrochemical techniques offer several advantages including low temperatures which may be used and the absence of any NO and CO in the evolved gases. Successful research has been carried out in the electrochemical oxidation of wastes over the last several years. The major task for 1992 was to conduct parametric studies in preparation for the building of a breadboard system, i.e., an actual practical device to consume the daily waste output of one astronaut in 24 hours, electrochemical incineration of human wastes in space vehicles. One of the main objectives was to decide on the type of three dimensional or other electrode system that would suit this purpose. The various types of electrode systems which were considered for this purpose included: rotating disc electrode, micro-electrode (an array), vibrating electrode, jet electrode, and packed bed electrode.

  17. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Allison, David P; Mortensen, Ninell P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH). © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH).

  19. Amplifying Electrochemical Indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong; Li, Jun; Han, Jie

    2004-01-01

    Dendrimeric reporter compounds have been invented for use in sensing and amplifying electrochemical signals from molecular recognition events that involve many chemical and biological entities. These reporter compounds can be formulated to target specific molecules or molecular recognition events. They can also be formulated to be, variously, hydrophilic or amphiphilic so that they are suitable for use at interfaces between (1) aqueous solutions and (2) electrodes connected to external signal-processing electronic circuits. The invention of these reporter compounds is expected to enable the development of highly miniaturized, low-power-consumption, relatively inexpensive, mass-producible sensor units for diverse applications.

  20. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR).

  1. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, J.W.

    1994-01-11

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

  2. Electrochemical incineration of wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaba, L.; Hitchens, G. D.; Bockris, J. O'M.

    1989-01-01

    A low temperature electrolysis process has been developed for the treatment of solid waste material and urine. Experiments are described in which organic materials are oxidized directly at the surface of an electrode. Also, hypochlorite is generated electrochemically from chloride component of urine. Hypochlorite can act as a strong oxidizing agent in solution. The oxidation takes place at 30-60 C and the gaseous products from the anodic reaction are carbon dioxide, nitrogen, oxygen. Hydrogen is formed at the cathode. Carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides and methane were not detected in the off gases. Chlorine was evolved at the anode in relatively low amounts.

  3. Divided electrochemical cell assembly

    SciTech Connect

    King, Ch. J. H.

    1985-02-19

    A divided electrochemical cell assembly comprises stacked bipolar substantially square parallel planar electrodes and membranes. The corners and edges of the electrodes with bordering insulative spacers in juxtaposition with the chamber walls define four electrolyte circulation manifolds. Anolyte and catholyte channeling means permit the separate introduction of anolyte and catholyte into two of the manifolds and the withdrawal of anolyte and catholyte separately from at least two other manifolds. The electrodes and membranes are separated from one another by the insulative spacers which are also channeling means disposed to provide electrolyte channels across the interfaces of adjacent electrodes and membranes.

  4. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hasenauer, D.

    1983-09-20

    An electrochemical storage cell is disclosed based on alkali metal and chalcogen comprising at least one anode space for the alkali metal anolyte and a cathode space for the chalcogen catholyte, with the anode space and the cathode space separated from each other by an alkali ion-conducting solid electrolyte wall and a metallic housing bounding the cell. The solid electrolyte wall has a plurality of spaced, outwardly extending hollow recesses, and at least one current collector disposed between each pair of adjacent recesses.

  5. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Steinleitner, G.

    1985-05-07

    Electrochemical storage cell of the alkali metal and chalcogen type with at least one anode space for the alkali metal anolyte, and a cathode space for the chalcogen catholyte, with the anode space and the cathode space separated from each other by an alkali ion-conducting solid electrolyte wall, the improvement comprising the addition in the anode space of sodium and of a capturing material with O/sub 2/-getter properties in an amount sufficient to absorb detrimental bound or free oxygen.

  6. Electrochemical incineration of wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaba, L.; Hitchens, G. D.; Bockris, J. O'M.

    1989-01-01

    A low temperature electrolysis process has been developed for the treatment of solid waste material and urine. Experiments are described in which organic materials are oxidized directly at the surface of an electrode. Also, hypochlorite is generated electrochemically from chloride component of urine. Hypochlorite can act as a strong oxidizing agent in solution. The oxidation takes place at 30-60 C and the gaseous products from the anodic reaction are carbon dioxide, nitrogen, oxygen. Hydrogen is formed at the cathode. Carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides and methane were not detected in the off gases. Chlorine was evolved at the anode in relatively low amounts.

  7. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  8. In situ fabrication and electrochemical behavior of amino acid polyoxometalate nanoparticles-embedded microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dawei; Deng, Yongming; Hao, Jingcheng

    2010-11-01

    Amino acid polyoxometalate nanoparticles-embedded microcapsules were in situ fabricated by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method [polyoxometalate, H3PMo12O40·nH2O (PMo12); amino acid, glycine (Gly)]. The morphology of the obtained microcapsules was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behavior of the amino acid polyoxometalate nanoparticles-embedded microcapsules was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The microcapsules show the pH-dependent properties, indicating that the pH of solution plays an important role in the electrochemical behavior of heteropolyanions.

  9. Electrochemical photovoltaic cells and electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A.

    1984-01-01

    Improved electrochemical photovoltaic cells and electrodes for use therein, particularly electrodes employing amorphous silicon or polyacetylene coating are produced by a process which includes filling pinholes or porous openings in the coatings by electrochemical oxidation of selected monomers to deposit insulating polymer in the openings.

  10. Electrochemical planarization for multilevel metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Contolini, R.J.; Bernhardt, A.F.; Mayer, S.T. )

    1994-09-01

    The authors describe an electrochemical planarization technology involving electroplating followed by electropolishing, resulting in a very flat surface containing embedded conductors. Electrochemical planarization technology has been used to produce silicon substrate multichip modules. Both the electroplating and electropolishing processes have a thickness uniformity of better than [+-] 2% ([+-]3[sigma]) across a 100 mm wafer.

  11. Electrochemical Ag+ for preservative use.

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, N; Simonetti, G; Bougnol, F; Scalzo, M

    1992-01-01

    In contact experiments with different experimental conditions, electrochemical Ag+ solutions exhibited better antimicrobial effectiveness against bacteria, a yeast species, and a mold than did analogous silver solutions from inorganic salts. The particular characteristics of electrochemical Ag+, such as the mode of action, effectiveness at low concentrations, and stability, indicate that Ag+ could be used effectively in preservatives. PMID:1476427

  12. Electrochemical performance and interfacial investigation on Si composite anode for lithium ion batteries in full cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobukawa, Hitoshi; Alvarado, Judith; Yang, Yangyuchen; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2017-08-01

    Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) containing silicon (Si) as a negative electrode have gained much attention recently because they deliver high energy density. However, the commercialization of LIBs with Si anode is limited due to the unstable electrochemical performance associated with expansion and contraction during electrochemical cycling. This study investigates the electrochemical performance and degradation mechanism of a full cell containing Si composite anode and LiFePO4 (lithium iron phosphate (LFP)) cathode. Enhanced electrochemical cycling performance is observed when the full cell is cycled with fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) additive compared to the standard electrolyte. To understand the improvement in the electrochemical performance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used. Based on the electrochemical behavior, FEC improves the reversibility of lithium ion diffusion into the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the Si composite anode. Moreover, XPS analysis demonstrates that the SEI composition generated from the addition of FEC consists of a large amount of LiF and less carbonate species, which leads to better capacity retention over 40 cycles. The effective SEI successively yields more stable capacity retention and enhances the reversibility of lithium ion diffusion through the interphase of the Si anode, even at higher discharge rate. This study contributes to a basic comprehension of electrochemical performance and SEI formation of LIB full cells with a high loading Si composite anode.

  13. Coupling EELS/EFTEM Imaging with Environmental Fluid Cell Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Insight into dynamically evolving electrochemical reactions and mechanisms encountered in electrical energy storage (EES) and conversion technologies (batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors), materials science (corrosion and oxidation), and materials synthesis (electrodeposition) remains limited due to the present lack of in situ high-resolution characterization methodologies. Electrochemical fluid cell microscopy is an emerging in-situ method that allows for the direct, real-time imaging of electrochemical processes within a fluid environment. This technique is facilitated by the use of MEMS-based biasing microchip platforms that serve the purpose of sealing the highly volatile electrolyte between two electron transparent SiNx membranes and interfacing electrodes to an external potentiostat for controlled nanoscale electrochemislly experiments [!]. In order to elucidate both stmctural and chemical changes during such in situ electrochemical experiments, it is impmtant to first improve upon the spatial resolution by utilizing energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) (to minimize chromatic aben ation), then to detennine the chemical changes via electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). This presents a formidable challenge since the overall thickness through which electrons are scattered through the multiple layers of the cell can be on the order of hundreds of nanometers to microns, scattering through which has the deleterious effect of degrading image resolution and decreasing signal-to noise for spectroscopy [2].

  14. Electrochemically Formed Porous Silica

    PubMed Central

    Chazalviel, Jean-Noël; Ozanam, François

    2011-01-01

    Controlled electrochemical formation of porous silica can be realized in dilute aqueous, neutral-pH, fluoride medium. Formation of a porous film is initiated by sweeping the potential applied to silicon to values higher than 20 V. Film formation, reaching a steady state, may be pursued in a wide range of potentials, including lower potentials. The origin of a threshold potential for porous film initiation has been explained quantitatively. All of the films appear mesoporous. Films grown at high potentials exhibit a variety of macrostructures superimposed on the mesoporosity. These macrostructures result from selective dissolution of silica induced by local pH lowering due to oxygen evolution. Films grown at potentials lower than 15 V appear uniform on the micrometer scale. However, all of the films also exhibit a stratified structure on the scale of a few tens of nanometres. This periodic structure can be traced back to the oscillatory behavior observed during the electrochemical dissolution of silicon in fluoride medium. It suggests that periodic breaking of the growing film may be responsible for this morphology. PMID:28879953

  15. Electrochemically Programmable Plasmonic Antennas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Zhiping; Fan, Jonathan A

    2016-07-26

    Plasmonic antennas are building blocks in advanced nano-optical systems due to their ability to tailor optical response based on their geometry. We propose an electrochemical approach to program the optical properties of dipole antennas in a scalable, fast, and energy-efficient manner. These antennas comprise two arms, one serving as an anode and the other a cathode, separated by a solid electrolyte. As a voltage is applied between the antenna arms, a conductive filament either grows or dissolves within the electrolyte, modifying the antenna load. We probe the dynamics of stochastic filament formation and their effects on plasmonic mode programming using a combination of three-dimensional optical and electronic simulations. In particular, we identify device operation regimes in which the charge-transfer plasmon mode can be programmed to be "on" or "off." We also identify, unexpectedly, a strong correlation between DC filament resistance and charge-transfer plasmon mode frequency that is insensitive to the detailed filament morphology. We envision that the scalability of our electrochemical platform can generalize to large-area reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces for on-chip and free-space applications.

  16. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retter, Utz; Lohse, Heinz

    Non-steady-state measuring techniques are known to be extremely suitable for the investigation of the electrode kinetics of more complex electrochemical systems. Perturbation of the electrochemical system leads to a shift of the steady state. The rate at which it proceeds to a new steady state depends on characteristic parameters (reaction rate constants, diffusion coefficients, charge transfer resistance, double-layer capacity). Due to non-linearities caused by the electron transfer, low-amplitude perturbation signals are necessary. The small perturbation of the electrode state has the advantage that the solutions of relevant mathematical equations used are transformed in limiting forms that are normally linear. Impedance spectroscopy represents a powerful method for investigation of electrical properties of materials and interfaces of conducting electrodes. Relevant fields of application are the kinetics of charges in bulk or interfacial regions, the charge transfer of ionic or mixed ionic-ionic conductors, semiconducting electrodes, the corrosion inhibition of electrode processes, investigation of coatings on metals, characterisation of materials and solid electrolyte as well as solid-state devices.

  17. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  18. Electrochemical biosensors for hormone analyses.

    PubMed

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-06-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have a unique place in determination of hormones due to simplicity, sensitivity, portability and ease of operation. Unlike chromatographic techniques, electrochemical techniques used do not require pre-treatment. Electrochemical biosensors are based on amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric, and conductometric principle. Amperometric technique is a commonly used one. Although electrochemical biosensors offer a great selectivity and sensitivity for early clinical analysis, the poor reproducible results, difficult regeneration steps remain primary challenges to the commercialization of these biosensors. This review summarizes electrochemical (amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric and conductometric) biosensors for hormone detection for the first time in the literature. After a brief description of the hormones, the immobilization steps and analytical performance of these biosensors are summarized. Linear ranges, LODs, reproducibilities, regenerations of developed biosensors are compared. Future outlooks in this area are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  20. Zinc oxide nanostructures for electrochemical cortisol biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Kaushik, Ajeet; Tracy, Kathryn; Bhansali, Shekhar; Pala, Nezih

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report on fabrication of a label free, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical cortisol immunosensors using one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) and two dimensional nanoflakes (ZnO-NFs) as immobilizing matrix. The synthesized ZnO nanostructures (NSs) were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selective area diffraction (SAED) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) which showed that both ZnO-NRs and ZnO-NFs are single crystalline and oriented in [0001] direction. Anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-Cab) are used as primary capture antibodies to detect cortisol using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The charge transfer resistance increases linearly with increase in cortisol concentration and exhibits a sensitivity of 3.078 KΩ. M-1 for ZnO-NRs and 540 Ω. M -1 for ZnO-NFs. The developed ZnO-NSs based immunosensor is capable of detecting cortisol at 1 pM. The observed sensing parameters are in physiological range. The developed sensors can be integrated with microfluidic system and miniaturized potentiostat to detect cortisol at point-of-care.

  1. Electrochemical characterization of aminated acrylic conducting polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Norma Mohammad; Heng, Lee Yook; Ling, Tan Ling

    2015-09-25

    New attempt has been made to synthesize aminated acrylic conducting polymer (AACP) using precursor of phenylvinylsulfoxide (PVS). The process was conducted via the integration of microemulsion and photopolymerization techniques. It has been utilized for covalent immobilization of amino groups by the adding of N-achryiloxisuccinimide (NAS). Thermal eliminating of benzene sulfenic acids from PVS has been done at 250 °C to form electroactive polyacetylene (PA) segment. Characterization of AACP has been conducted using fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and linear sweep cyclic voltammetry (CV). A range of 0.3-1.25μm particle size obtained from SEM characterization. A quasi-reversible system performed as shown in electrochemical study.

  2. Tough germanium nanoparticles under electrochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wentao; Yang, Hui; Fan, Feifei; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiao Hua; Huang, Jian Yu; Zhu, Ting; Zhang, Sulin

    2013-04-23

    Mechanical degradation of the electrode materials during electrochemical cycling remains a serious issue that critically limits the capacity retention and cyclability of rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Here we report the highly reversible expansion and contraction of germanium nanoparticles under lithiation-delithiation cycling with in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). During multiple cycles to the full capacity, the germanium nanoparticles remained robust without any visible cracking despite ∼260% volume changes, in contrast to the size-dependent fracture of silicon nanoparticles upon the first lithiation. The comparative in situ TEM study of fragile silicon nanoparticles suggests that the tough behavior of germanium nanoparticles can be attributed to the weak anisotropy of the lithiation strain at the reaction front. The tough germanium nanoparticles offer substantial potential for the development of durable, high-capacity, and high-rate anodes for advanced lithium-ion batteries.

  3. Preparation of silver tips for scanning tunneling microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwami, M.; Uehara, Y.; Ushioda, S.

    1998-11-01

    A simple reliable preparation method of silver tips for scanning tunneling microscopy imaging with atomic resolution is presented. The procedure is based on two-step electrochemical processing; ac electropolishing and subsequent dc electroetching. The quality of the tip is improved by applying high bias voltage pulses while the tip is within tunneling range. This indicates that the end of the tips are sharpened by field evaporation of silver ions.

  4. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the

  5. Electrochemical sensor for monitoring electrochemical potentials of fuel cell components

    DOEpatents

    Kunz, Harold R.; Breault, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor comprised of wires, a sheath, and a conduit can be utilized to monitor fuel cell component electric potentials during fuel cell shut down or steady state. The electrochemical sensor contacts an electrolyte reservoir plate such that the conduit wicks electrolyte through capillary action to the wires to provide water necessary for the electrolysis reaction which occurs thereon. A voltage is applied across the wires of the electrochemical sensor until hydrogen evolution occurs at the surface of one of the wires, thereby forming a hydrogen reference electrode. The voltage of the fuel cell component is then determined with relation to the hydrogen reference electrode.

  6. Superresolution microscopy for microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Coltharp, Carla; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review provides a practical introduction to superresolution microscopy from the perspective of microbiological research. Because of the small sizes of bacterial cells, superresolution methods are particularly powerful and suitable for revealing details of cellular structures that are not resolvable under conventional fluorescence light microscopy. Here we describe the methodological concepts behind three major categories of super-resolution light microscopy: photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and stimulated emission-depletion (STED) microscopy. We then present recent applications of each of these techniques to microbial systems, which have revealed novel conformations of cellular structures and described new properties of in vivo protein function and interactions. Finally, we discuss the unique issues related to implementing each of these superresolution techniques with bacterial specimens and suggest avenues for future development. The goal of this review is to provide the necessary technical background for interested microbiologists to choose the appropriate super-resolution method for their biological systems, and to introduce the practical considerations required for designing and analysing superresolution imaging experiments. PMID:22947061

  7. Super resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Achieving a spatial resolution that is not limited by the diffraction of light, recent developments of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques allow the observation of many biological structures not resolvable in conventional fluorescence microscopy. New advances in these techniques now give them the ability to image three-dimensional (3D) structures, measure interactions by multicolor colocalization, and record dynamic processes in living cells at the nanometer scale. It is anticipated that super-resolution fluorescence microscopy will become a widely used tool for cell and tissue imaging to provide previously unobserved details of biological structures and processes. PMID:19489737

  8. Electrochemical oxidation of methylenedioxyamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Squella, J A; Cassels, B K; Arata, M; Bavestrello, M P; Nuñez-Vergara, L J

    1993-09-01

    Four amphetamine derivatives bearing a methylenedioxy group at positions 3 and 4 of the benzene ring and differing in their substitution at C(6) were studied by differential pulse voltammetry in aqueous media. These experiments showed a single oxidation peak for the C(6)-H, -Br and -Cl compounds, while the C(6)-NO(2) analogue was not oxidized. The oxidation peak is interpreted as due to the removal of one electron from the aromatic electrophore with formation of a radical cation stabilized by the dioxole ring. The linear relationship between the peak current and the concentration of the derivatives is appropriate for development of a quantitative method for their determination. pK' values were determined using both electrochemical and spectrophotometric methods.

  9. Electrochemical cell design

    DOEpatents

    Arntzen, John D.

    1978-01-01

    An electrochemical cell includes two outer electrodes and a central electrode of opposite polarity, all nested within a housing having two symmetrical halves which together form an offset configuration. The outer electrodes are nested within raised portions within the side walls of each housing half while the central electrode sealingly engages the perimetric margins of the side-wall internal surfaces. Suitable interelectrode separators and electrical insulating material electrically isolate the central electrode from the housing and the outer electrodes. The outer electrodes are electrically connected to the internal surfaces of the cell housing to provide current collection. The nested structure minimizes void volume that would otherwise be filled with gas or heavy electrolyte and also provides perimetric edge surfaces for sealing and supporting at the outer margins of frangible interelectrode separator layers.

  10. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  11. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, B.; Kleinschmager, H.

    1980-12-16

    An electrochemical storage cell or battery with an anode space for an alkali metal as the anolyte and with a cathode space for a sulfur-containing catholyte substance, which are separated from each other by an alkali-ion-conducting solid electrolyte and are confined by a cell wall of metal, particularly of a light metal or steel is described. Long-life corrosion protection of the metal cell wall is provided by a protective layer by applying to at least that part of the metal cell wall in contact with the catholyte substance, a foil of corrosion-resistant material 0.01 to 0.2 mm thick by means of a conductive adhesive which retains its adhesive properties at operating temperatures.

  12. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Langpape, R.

    1984-06-05

    The invention relates to an electrochemical storage cell on the basis of alkali metal and chalcogen, particularly sodium and sulfur. The storage cell has an anode space for receiving the anolyte and a cathode space for receiving the catholyte. The two spaces are separated from each other by a cup-shaped solid electrolyte. The solid electrolyte is surrounded in the region of the anode space by a capillary structure over the entire length. The capillary structure has at least one widened portion which is formed by an outward-pointing bulge of the capillary structure. The widened portion extends over the entire length of the capillary structure. Each widened portion is traversed in its interior by a canal. The cylinder surface of this canal is formed by a metal screen. The entrance opening of this canal is directly adjacent to the exit opening of a supply container for the sodium.

  13. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, Ludwig

    2016-01-21

    Conventional compressors have not been able to meet DOE targets for hydrogen refueling stations. They suffer from high capital cost, poor reliability and pose a risk of fuel contamination from lubricant oils. This project has significantly advanced the development of solid state hydrogen compressor technology for multiple applications. The project has achieved all of its major objectives. It has demonstrated capability of Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) technology to potentially meet the DOE targets for small compressors for refueling sites. It has quantified EHC cell performance and durability, including single stage hydrogen compression from near-atmospheric pressure to 12,800 psi and operation of EHC for more than 22,000 hours. Capital cost of EHC was reduced by 60%, enabling a path to meeting the DOE cost targets for hydrogen compression, storage and delivery ($2.00-2.15/gge by 2020).

  14. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  15. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

    1995-05-30

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

  16. Process for electrochemically gasifying coal

    DOEpatents

    Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.

    1985-10-25

    A process is claimed for electrochemically gasifying coal by establishing a flowing stream of coal particulate slurry, electrolyte and electrode members through a transverse magnetic field that has sufficient strength to polarize the electrode members, thereby causing them to operate in combination with the electrolyte to electrochemically reduce the coal particulate in the slurry. Such electrochemical reduction of the coal produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide at opposite ends of the polarized electrode members. Gas collection means are operated in conjunction with the process to collect the evolved gases as they rise from the slurry and electrolyte solution. 7 figs.

  17. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris B.

    1999-01-01

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery. The probe comprises an integrated membrane-sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s).

  18. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.B.

    1999-08-24

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery is described. The probe comprises an integrated membrane sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s). 19 figs.

  19. Direct electrochemical oxidation of polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Bellagamba, Riccardo; Comninellis, Christos; Vatistas, Nicolaos

    2002-10-01

    A promising elimination treatment of non-biodegradable organic pollutants is the direct electro-oxidation. In this work has been proposed the electrochemical elimination of polyacrylates by using boron-doped diamond (BDD) as anodic material. The complete elimination of organic contaminants has been obtained and this is the first case of successful electrochemical treatment of polymeric and bio-refractory species. The tests of the electrochemical oxidation have been conducted at constant current conditions and a complete elimination of organic species has been reached. The decrease of the COD value with time follows the behaviour of an ideal anode as in the case of low molecular organic compounds.

  20. Investigation and optimization of electrochemical treatment for daguerreotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canosa, Elyse

    Daguerreotypes, nineteenth century photographs made entirely of metal, tarnish easily when exposed to atmosphere or other corrosive environments. The removal of such corrosion products has always been a controversial issue due to the irreversibility and potential damage inflicted by the treatment process. When performed using the proper technique and tools, electrochemical cleaning has been shown to remediate daguerreotype corrosion without causing damage to the object. This investigation explores in detail the effects of electrochemically treating daguerreotypes to better comprehend the physical, chemical, and aesthetic changes which occur during tarnish remediation. Such analysis includes understanding the extent to which tarnish is removed from the object, whether the microstructure and surface roughness are altered, and whether deposits are formed on the surface as the result of cleaning. Before characterizing the effects of treatment, a reliable and consistent electrochemical cleaning method was optimized on modern, custom-made daguerreotype coupons. These coupons were tarnished in controlled settings to create silver sulfide or silver oxide, two commonly found daguerreotype corrosion products. They were then treated by the optimized electrochemical cleaning process, which involved immersing the object in a 0.1 M NaNO3 electrolyte and connecting it to a platinum counter electrode, an Hg/Hg2SO4 reference electrode, and a potentiostat. Tests were executed to determine the most effective voltage for removing each corrosion product. Full characterization of the modern coupons was performed prior to corrosion, after corrosion, and after electrochemical remediation to provide full understanding of the treatment effects. Characterization techniques include scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The optimized process

  1. Clinical specular microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, L.W.; Laing, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides the general ophthalmologist with a guide to the clinical applications of specular microscopy. Important material is included on laser injury, cataract surgery, corneal transplants, glaucoma, uveitis, and trauma.

  2. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane; Stolz, Christopher J.; Wu, Zhouling; Huber, Robert; Weinzapfel, Carolyn

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  3. Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Blom, Hans; Widengren, Jerker

    2017-06-14

    Despite its short history, diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy techniques have already made a substantial imprint in the biological sciences. In this review, we describe how stimulated emission depletion (STED) imaging originally evolved, how it compares to other optical super-resolution imaging techniques, and what advantages it provides compared to previous golden-standards for biological microscopy, such as diffraction-limited optical microscopy and electron microscopy. We outline the prerequisites for successful STED imaging experiments, emphasizing the equally critical roles of instrumentation, sample preparation, and photophysics, and describe major evolving strategies for how to push the borders of STED imaging even further in life science. Finally, we provide examples of how STED nanoscopy can be applied, within three different fields with particular potential for STED imaging experiments: neuroscience, plasma membrane biophysics, and subcellular clinical diagnostics. In these areas, and in many more, STED imaging can be expected to play an increasingly important role in the future.

  4. Intermittent contact hydration scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Aloisi, G; Bacci, F; Carlà, M; Dolci, D

    2010-07-01

    Hydration scanning probe microscopy is a technique similar to scanning tunneling microscopy, in which the probe current, sustained by the slight surface conduction of a thin hydration layer covering an insulating support surface, is essentially electrochemical in nature instead of electronic tunneling. Such a technique allows the imaging of a great variety of samples, including insulators, provided that they are hydrophilic, as well as the study of molecular samples of biological interest (such as DNA) fixed on a suitable supporting surface. The main problem to obtain stable and reproducible images comes from the very critical determination of the operating conditions under which the probe-hydration layer interaction does not lead to the formation of a relatively large water meniscus. It has been suggested that this issue can be removed by adding a high frequency oscillation to the probe movement, as in tapping atomic force microscopy. Meniscus formation and breakup have been investigated in order to determine the best values for the amplitude and the frequency of the oscillation. Results obtained in this mode are discussed in comparison with the usual continuous contact mode.

  5. Electrochemical biofilm control: a review.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Sujala T; Babauta, Jerome T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    One of the methods of controlling biofilms that has widely been discussed in the literature is to apply a potential or electrical current to a metal surface on which the biofilm is growing. Although electrochemical biofilm control has been studied for decades, the literature is often conflicting, as is detailed in this review. The goals of this review are: (1) to present the current status of knowledge regarding electrochemical biofilm control; (2) to establish a basis for a fundamental definition of electrochemical biofilm control and requirements for studying it; (3) to discuss current proposed mechanisms; and (4) to introduce future directions in the field. It is expected that the review will provide researchers with guidelines on comparing datasets across the literature and generating comparable datasets. The authors believe that, with the correct design, electrochemical biofilm control has great potential for industrial use.

  6. Electrochemical biofilm control: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Sujala T; Babauta, Jerome T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    One of the methods of controlling biofilms that has widely been discussed in the literature is to apply a potential or electrical current to a metal surface on which the biofilm is growing. Although electrochemical biofilm control has been studied for decades, the literature is often conflicting, as is detailed in this review. The goals of this review are to (1) present the current status of knowledge regarding electrochemical biofilm control, (2) establish a basis for a fundamental definition of electrochemical biofilm control and requirements for studying it, (3) discuss current proposed mechanisms, and (4) introduce future directions in the field. It is expected that the review will provide researchers with guidelines on comparing data sets across the literature and generating comparable data sets. The authors believe that, with the correct design, electrochemical biofilm control has great potential for industrial use. PMID:26592420

  7. Supported liquid membrane electrochemical separators

    DOEpatents

    Pemsler, J. Paul; Dempsey, Michael D.

    1986-01-01

    Supported liquid membrane separators improve the flexibility, efficiency and service life of electrochemical cells for a variety of applications. In the field of electrochemical storage, an alkaline secondary battery with improved service life is described in which a supported liquid membrane is interposed between the positive and negative electrodes. The supported liquid membranes of this invention can be used in energy production and storage systems, electrosynthesis systems, and in systems for the electrowinning and electrorefining of metals.

  8. Characterization of immobilization methods of antiviral antibodies in serum for electrochemical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huy, Tran Quang; Hanh, Nguyen Thi Hong; Van Chung, Pham; Anh, Dang Duc; Nga, Phan Thi; Tuan, Mai Anh

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we describes different methods to immobilize Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) antibodies in human serum onto the interdigitated surface of a microelectrode sensor for optimizing electrochemical detection: (1) direct covalent binding to the silanized surface, (2) binding to the silanized surface via a cross-linker of glutaraldehyde (GA), (3) binding to glutaraldehyde/silanized surface via goat anti-human IgG polyclonal antibody and (4) binding to glutaraldehyde/silanized surface via protein A (PrA). Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and fluorescence microscopy are used to verify the characteristics of antibodies on the interdigitated surface after the serum antibodies immobilization. The analyzed results indicate that the use of protein A is an effective choice for immobilization and orientation of antibodies in serum for electrochemical biosensors. This study provides an advantageous immobilization method of serum containing antiviral antibodies to develop electrochemical biosensors for preliminary screening of viruses in clinical samples from outbreaks.

  9. New supramolecular interactions for electrochemical sensors development: different cucurbit[8]uril sensing platform designs.

    PubMed

    Pozo, María del; Blanco, Elías; Fatás, Enrique; Hernández, Pedro; Quintana, Carmen

    2012-09-21

    Three different strategies for cucurbit[8]uril immobilization on a glassy carbon electrode have been assayed. The electrochemical properties of the resulting modified electrodes in solutions containing neutral, positively and negatively charged potential cucurbit[8]uril guests were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The comparison of the electrochemical behaviour exhibited by the unmodified electrodes against various probes, with respect to that of each modified electrode, resulted in an appropriate method to choose among different strategies for the development of electrochemical sensors. These sensors are based on the incorporation of the cucurbit[8]uril molecular selection properties that depend on the chemical characteristics of the potential analytes. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy was employed for the characterization of the different surfaces developed.

  10. Electrochemical loading of TEM grids used for the study of potential dependent morphology of polyaniline nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Bhadu, Gopala Ram; Paul, Anirban; Perween, Mosarrat; Gupta, Rajeev; Chaudhari, Jayesh C; Srivastava, Divesh N

    2016-03-01

    An electrochemical method for loading electroactive materials over the TEM grid is reported. The protocol has been demonstrated using polyaniline as an example. The electroactive polymer was directly deposited over the Au TEM grid, used as working electrode in a 3 electrode electrochemical cell. The undisturbed as-deposited morphologies under the influence of various counter ions and ex situ electrochemical states have been studied and compared. Contrary to behaviour in bulk the individual polyaniline fibre was found thinner at anodic potentials. The movement of counter ions as a function of the electrochemical state of the polymer was studied using STEM-EDX elemental mapping. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Fabrication of luminescent SrWO{sub 4} thin films by a novel electrochemical method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lianping Gao Yuanhong

    2007-10-02

    Highly crystallized SrWO{sub 4} thin films with single scheelite structure were prepared within 60 min by a cell electrochemical method. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that SrWO{sub 4} thin films have a tetragonal structure. Scanning electron microscopy examinations reveal that SrWO{sub 4} grains grow well in tetragonal tapers and grains like flowers or bunches, which can usually form by using the electrolysis electrochemical method, have disappeared under cell electrochemical conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectra and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis examinations demonstrate that the composition of the film is consistent with its stoichiometry. These SrWO{sub 4} films show a single blue emission peak (located at 460 nm) using an excitation wave of 230 nm. The speed of cell electrochemical method can be controlled by changing temperature. The optimum treatment temperature is about 50-60 deg. C.

  12. Size-controlled electrochemical growth of PbS nanostructures into electrochemically patterned self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nişancı, Fatma Bayrakçeken; Demir, Ümit

    2012-06-05

    1-Hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayers (HDT SAMs) on Au(111) were used as a molecular resist to fabricate nanosized patterns by electrochemical reductive partial desorption for subsequent electrodeposition of PbS from the same solution simultaneously. The influences of potential steps of variable pulse width and amplitude on the size and the number of patterns were investigated. The kinetics of pattern formation by reductive desorption appears to be instantaneous according to chronoamperometric and morphological investigations. PbS structures were deposited electrochemically into the patterns on HDT SAMs by a combined electrochemical technique, based on the codeposition from the same saturated PbS solution at the underpotential deposition of Pb and S. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements showed that all of the PbS deposits were disk shaped and uniformly distributed on Au(111) surfaces. Preliminary results indicated that the diameter and the density of PbS deposits can be controlled by controlling the pulse width and amplitude of potential applied at the reductive removal stage of HDT SAMs and the deposition time during the electrochemical deposition step.

  13. -based electrochemical metallization ReRAM application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Fun-Tat; Lin, Yu-Hsien; You, Hsin-Chiang; Yang, Wen-Luh; Lin, Li-Min; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Ko, Chum-Min; Chao, Tien-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    This study investigates an advanced copper (Cu) chemical displacement technique (CDT) with varying the chemical displacement time for fabricating Cu/SiO2-stacked resistive random-access memory (ReRAM). Compared with other Cu deposition methods, this CDT easily controls the interface of the Cu-insulator, the switching layer thickness, and the immunity of the Cu etching process, assisting the 1-transistor-1-ReRAM (1T-1R) structure and system-on-chip integration. The modulated shape of the Cu-SiO2 interface and the thickness of the SiO2 layer obtained by CDT-based Cu deposition on SiO2 were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The CDT-fabricated Cu/SiO2-stacked ReRAM exhibited lower operation voltages and more stable data retention characteristics than the control Cu/SiO2-stacked sample. As the Cu CDT processing time increased, the forming and set voltages of the CDT-fabricated Cu/SiO2-stacked ReRAM decreased. Conversely, decreasing the processing time reduced the on-state current and reset voltage while increasing the endurance switching cycle time. Therefore, the switching characteristics were easily modulated by Cu CDT, yielding a high performance electrochemical metallization (ECM)-type ReRAM.

  14. Characterization of Electrochemically Generated Silver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Niklas; Martinez, James; Carrier, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Silver biocide offers a potential advantage over iodine, the current state of the art in US spacecraft disinfection technology, in that silver can be safely consumed by the crew. Low concentrations of silver (<500 ppb) have been shown to kill bacteria in water systems and keep it safe for potability. Silver does not require hardware to remove it from a water system, and therefore can provide a simpler means for disinfecting water. The Russian segment of the International Space Station has utilized an electrochemically generated silver solution, which is colloidal in nature. To be able to reliably provide a silver biocide to drinking water by electrochemical means would reduce mass required for removing another biocide such as iodine from the water. This would also aid in crew time required to replace iodine removal cartridges. Future long term missions would benefit from electrochemically produced silver as the biocide could be produced on demand and requires only a small concentration to be effective. Since it can also be consumed safely, there is less mass in removal hardware and little consumables required for production. The goal of this project initially is to understand the nature of the electrochemically produced silver, the particle sizes produced by the electrochemical cell and the effect that voltage adjustment has on the particle size. In literature, it has been documented that dissolved oxygen and pH have an effect on the ionization of the electrochemical silver so those parameters would be measured and possibly adjusted to understand their effect on the silver.

  15. Antitumor effects of electrochemical treatment

    PubMed Central

    González, Maraelys Morales; Zamora, Lisset Ortíz; Cabrales, Luis Enrique Bergues; Sierra González, Gustavo Victoriano; de Oliveira, Luciana Oliveira; Zanella, Rodrigo; Buzaid, Antonio Carlos; Parise, Orlando; Brito, Luciana Macedo; Teixeira, Cesar Augusto Antunes; Gomes, Marina das Neves; Moreno, Gleyce; Feo da Veiga, Venicio; Telló, Marcos; Holandino, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical treatment is an alternative modality for tumor treatment based on the application of a low intensity direct electric current to the tumor tissue through two or more platinum electrodes placed within the tumor zone or in the surrounding areas. This treatment is noted for its great effectiveness, minimal invasiveness and local effect. Several studies have been conducted worldwide to evaluate the antitumoral effect of this therapy. In all these studies a variety of biochemical and physiological responses of tumors to the applied treatment have been obtained. By this reason, researchers have suggested various mechanisms to explain how direct electric current destroys tumor cells. Although, it is generally accepted this treatment induces electrolysis, electroosmosis and electroporation in tumoral tissues. However, action mechanism of this alternative modality on the tumor tissue is not well understood. Although the principle of Electrochemical treatment is simple, a standardized method is not yet available. The mechanism by which Electrochemical treatment affects tumor growth and survival may represent more complex process. The present work analyzes the latest and most important research done on the electrochemical treatment of tumors. We conclude with our point of view about the destruction mechanism features of this alternative therapy. Also, we suggest some mechanisms and strategies from the thermodynamic point of view for this therapy. In the area of Electrochemical treatment of cancer this tool has been exploited very little and much work remains to be done. Electrochemical treatment constitutes a good therapeutic option for patients that have failed the conventional oncology methods. PMID:23592904

  16. Investigations into the electrochemical etching process of p-type silicon using ethanol-surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Sivakumar; Gun'ko, Yurii K.; Swiegers, Gerhard F.; Perova, Tatiana S.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the electrochemical etching of p-type silicon was performed in aqueous ethanol-surfactant solutions and the dependence of morphology and luminescent properties of porous silicon with respect to the etching parameters and silicon resistivities have been studied. The obtained porous silicon structures have been studied using various characterisation techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy.

  17. Nanoparticle shape evolution and proximity effects during tip-induced electrochemical processes

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Sangmo; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Noh, Tae Won; ...

    2016-01-08

    The voltage spectroscopies in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques are widely used to investigate the electrochemical processes in nanoscale volumes, which are important for current key applications, such as batteries, fuel cells, catalysts, and memristors. The spectroscopic measurements are commonly performed on a grid of multiple points to yield spatially resolved maps of reversible and irreversible electrochemical functionalities. Hence, the spacing between measurement points is an important parameter to be considered, especially for irreversible electrochemical processes. Here, we report nonlocal electrochemical dynamics in chains of Ag particles fabricated by the SPM tip on a silver ion solid electrolyte. When themore » grid spacing is small compared with the size of the formed Ag particles, anomalous chains of unequally sized particles with double periodicity evolve. This behavior is ascribed to a proximity effect during the tip-induced electrochemical process, specifically, size-dependent silver particle growth following the contact between the particles. In addition, fractal shape evolution of the formed Ag structures indicates that the growth-limiting process changes from Ag+/Ag redox reaction to Ag+-ion diffusion with the increase in the applied voltage and pulse duration. Our study shows that characteristic shapes of the electrochemical products are good indicators for determining the underlying growth-limiting process, and emergence of complex phenomena during spectroscopic mapping of electrochemical functionalities.« less

  18. Nanoparticle shape evolution and proximity effects during tip-induced electrochemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Sangmo; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Noh, Tae Won; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Strelcov, Evgheni

    2016-01-08

    The voltage spectroscopies in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques are widely used to investigate the electrochemical processes in nanoscale volumes, which are important for current key applications, such as batteries, fuel cells, catalysts, and memristors. The spectroscopic measurements are commonly performed on a grid of multiple points to yield spatially resolved maps of reversible and irreversible electrochemical functionalities. Hence, the spacing between measurement points is an important parameter to be considered, especially for irreversible electrochemical processes. Here, we report nonlocal electrochemical dynamics in chains of Ag particles fabricated by the SPM tip on a silver ion solid electrolyte. When the grid spacing is small compared with the size of the formed Ag particles, anomalous chains of unequally sized particles with double periodicity evolve. This behavior is ascribed to a proximity effect during the tip-induced electrochemical process, specifically, size-dependent silver particle growth following the contact between the particles. In addition, fractal shape evolution of the formed Ag structures indicates that the growth-limiting process changes from Ag+/Ag redox reaction to Ag+-ion diffusion with the increase in the applied voltage and pulse duration. Our study shows that characteristic shapes of the electrochemical products are good indicators for determining the underlying growth-limiting process, and emergence of complex phenomena during spectroscopic mapping of electrochemical functionalities.

  19. Quartz tuning fork based microwave impedance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yong-Tao; Ma, Eric Yue; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-06-01

    Microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), a near-field microwave scanning probe technique, has become a powerful tool to characterize local electrical responses in solid state samples. We present the design of a new type of MIM sensor based on quartz tuning fork and electrochemically etched thin metal wires. Due to a higher aspect ratio tip and integration with tuning fork, such design achieves comparable MIM performance and enables easy self-sensing topography feedback in situations where the conventional optical feedback mechanism is not available, thus is complementary to microfabricated shielded stripline-type probes. The new design also enables stable differential mode MIM detection and multiple-frequency MIM measurements with a single sensor.

  20. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  1. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art methods in high-resolution three-dimensional optical microscopy require that the focus be scanned through the entire region of interest. However, an analysis of the physics of the light–sample interaction reveals that the Fourier-space coverage is independent of depth. Here we show that, by solving the inverse scattering problem for interference microscopy, computed reconstruction yields volumes with a resolution in all planes that is equivalent to the resolution achieved only at the focal plane for conventional high-resolution microscopy. In short, the entire illuminated volume has spatially invariant resolution, thus eliminating the compromise between resolution and depth of field. We describe and demonstrate a novel computational image-formation technique called interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). ISAM has the potential to broadly impact real-time three-dimensional microscopy and analysis in the fields of cell and tumour biology, as well as in clinical diagnosis where in vivo imaging is preferable to biopsy. PMID:25635181

  2. Electrochemical hydrogen termination of boron-doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Rene; Kriele, Armin; Obloh, Harald; Hees, Jakob; Wolfer, Marco; Smirnov, Waldemar; Yang Nianjun; Nebel, Christoph E.

    2010-08-02

    Boron-doped diamond is a promising transducer material for numerous devices which are designed for contact with electrolytes. For optimized electron transfer the surface of diamond needs to be hydrogen terminated. Up to now H-termination of diamond is done by plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques. In this paper, we show that boron-doped diamond can be H-terminated electrochemically by applying negative voltages in acidic solutions. Electrochemical H-termination generates a clean surface with virtually no carbon-oxygen bonds (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), a reduced electron affinity (scanning electron microscopy), a highly hydrophobic surface (water contact angle), and a fast electron exchange with Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup -3/-4} (cyclic voltammetry).

  3. Surface Modification of Nitinol by Chemical and Electrochemical Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhendi; Wei, Xiaojin; Cao, Peng; Gao, Wei

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, Nitinol, an equiatomic binary alloy of nickel and titanium, was surface modified for its potential biomedical applications by chemical and electrochemical etching. The main objective of the surface modification is to reduce the nickel content on the surface of Nitinol and simultaneously to a rough surface microstructure. As a result, better biocompatibility and better cell attachment would be achieved. The effect of the etching parameters was investigated, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). The corrosion property of modified Nitinol surfaces was investigated by electrochemical work station. After etching, the Ni content in the surface layer has been reduced and the oxidation of Ti has been enhanced.

  4. Lithium-assisted electrochemical welding in silicon nanowire battery electrodes.

    PubMed

    Karki, Khim; Epstein, Eric; Cho, Jeong-Hyun; Jia, Zheng; Li, Teng; Picraux, S Tom; Wang, Chunsheng; Cumings, John

    2012-03-14

    From in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, we present direct evidence of lithium-assisted welding between physically contacted silicon nanowires (SiNWs) induced by electrochemical lithiation and delithiation. This electrochemical weld between two SiNWs demonstrates facile transport of lithium ions and electrons across the interface. From our in situ observations, we estimate the shear strength of the welded region after delithiation to be approximately 200 MPa, indicating that a strong bond is formed at the junction of two SiNWs. This welding phenomenon could help address the issue of capacity fade in nanostructured silicon battery electrodes, which is typically caused by fracture and detachment of active materials from the current collector. The process could provide for more robust battery performance either through self-healing of fractured components that remain in contact or through the formation of a multiconnected network architecture. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  5. Electrochemical synthesis of highly ordered magnetic multilayered nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Kuan-Ying; Ng, Inn-Khuan; Saidin, Nur Ubaidah; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Bustamam, Farah Khuwailah Ahmad; Shaari, Abdul Halim

    2012-06-01

    Electrochemical deposition is a versatile technique that has been employed to synthesize various types of onedimensional nanostructures such as nanorods, nanotubes and nanowires to meet different requirements for applications. Magnetic nanowires in the form of multilayered structures, such as Co/Cu and permalloy (Ni80Fe20)/Cu, with ferromagnetic materials alternating with non-magnetic materials exhibit giant magnetoresistance (GMR) property that can be utilized in sensors and mass memory devices. This study focuses on the synthesis of highly ordered magnetic multilayered nanowire arrays using template-directed electrochemical deposition technique. The nanowires were electrodeposited within the nanopores of anodized alumina from sulphate baths via pulse potential technique. The structures and compositions of the wires were characterized using various microscopy and probe-based techniques. Magnetoresistance measurement was performed on the multilayered nanowire arrays.

  6. Electrochemical polishing of notches

    DOEpatents

    Kephart, A.R.; Alberts, A.H.

    1989-02-21

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for the selective electrochemical polishing of a lateral tip of a deep longitudinal notch in a work piece used to test crack initiation properties of materials. A DC power source is connected to the work piece and to an electrode disposed laterally along the distal end of an insulated body which is inserted in the longitudinal notch. The electrode and distal end of the body are disposed along the tip of the notch, but are spaced from the notch so as to provide a lateral passage for an electrolyte. The electrolyte is circulated through the passage so that the electrolyte only contacts the work piece adjacent the passage. Conveniently, the electrolyte is circulated by use of an inlet tube and an outlet tube provided at opposite ends of the passage. These tubes are preferably detachably located adjacent the ends of the passage and suitable seals are provided. A holding device including arms to which the tubes are attached is conveniently used to rapidly and easily locate the test specimen with the passage aligned with the tubes. The electrode is preferably a wire which is located in grooves along the distal end of the insulated body and up one side of the body or a plastic sheath insulated thin metal strip. 4 figs.

  7. Electrochemical polishing of notches

    DOEpatents

    Kephart, Alan R.; Alberts, Alfred H.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for the selective electrochemical polishing of a lateral tip of a deep longitudinal notch in a work piece used to test crack initiation properties of materials. A DC power source is connected to the work piece and to an electrode disposed laterally along the distal end of an insulated body which is inserted in the longitudinal notch. The electrode and distal end of the body are disposed along the tip of the notch, but are spaced from the notch so as to provide a lateral passage for an electrolyte. The electrolyte is circulated through the passage so that the electrolyte only contacts the work piece adjacent the passage. Conveniently, the electrolyte is circulated by use of an inlet tube and an outlet tube provided at opposite ends of the passage. These tubes are preferably detachably located adjacent the ends of the passage and suitable seals are provided. A holding device including arms to which the tubes are attached is conveniently used to rapidly and easily locate the test specimen with the passage aligned with the tubes. The electrode is preferably a wire which is located in grooves along the distal end of the insulated body and up one side of the body or a plastic sheath insulated thin metal strip.

  8. Electrochemical incineration of wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaba, L.; Hitchens, G. D.; Bockris, J. OM.

    1989-01-01

    The disposal of domestic organic waste in its raw state is a matter of increasing public concern. Earlier, it was regarded as permissible to reject wastes into the apparently infinite sink of the sea but, during the last 20 years, it has become clear that this is environmentally unacceptable. On the other hand, sewage farms and drainage systems for cities and for new housing developments are cumbersome and expensive to build and operate. New technology whereby waste is converted to acceptable chemicals and pollution-free gases at site is desirable. The problems posed by wastes are particularly demanding in space vehicles where it is desirable to utilize treatments that will convert wastes into chemicals that can be recycled. In this situation, the combustion of waste is undesirable due to the inevitable presence of oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide in the effluent gases. Here, in particular, electrochemical techniques offer several advantages including the low temperatures which may be used and the absence of any NO and CO in the evolved gases. Work done in this area was restricted to technological papers, and the present report is an attempt to give a more fundamental basis to the early stages of a potentially valuable technology.

  9. Electrochemical valorisation of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Simões, Mário; Baranton, Stève; Coutanceau, Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The worldwide glycerol stocks are increasing; to make the biodiesel industry sustainable economically, this chemical could be used as a secondary primary raw material. Electric energy or hydrogen and added-value-chemical cogeneration becomes more and more an important research topic for increasing economical and industrial interests towards electrochemical technologies. Studies on glycerol electrooxidation for fuel or electrolysis cell applications are scarce. The valorisation of glycerol is generally performed by organic chemistry reactions forming, for example, esters, glycerol carbonates, ethers, acetals or ketals. Glycerol oxidation is made up of complex pathway reactions that can produce a large number of useful intermediates or valuable fine chemicals with presently limited market impact due to expensive production processes. Many of these chemical oxidation routes lead to significant amounts of undesired by-products, and enzymatic processes are limited. Converse to classical heterogeneous processes, electrocatalytic oxidation processes can be tuned by controlling the nature, composition and structure of the electrocatalyts as well as the electrode potential. Such control may lead to very high selectivity and activity, avoiding or limiting product separation steps. The coupling of glycerol oxidation to produce chemicals with the oxygen reduction reaction in a fuel cell or water reduction reaction in an electrolysis cell on Pt-free catalysts results either in coproduction of electrical energy or hydrogen for energy storage. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Experimental and theoretical study of the electrochemical synthesis of silver nanoparticles using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanzhi; Zhu, Anfeng; Song, Yang; Cheng, Zhipeng; Zhou, Jianfeng

    2013-06-01

    Electrochemical synthesis of silver nanoparticles on the surface of glassy carbon electrode using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent are prepared. The silver nanoparticles are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and infrared spectrometry. The electrochemical catalysis of AgNPs for sodium sulfide was demonstrated. The relationship between the molecular structure of ampicillin and the dispersion of GNPs on the surface of GCE as well as the catalysis of GNPs for sodium sulfide was discussed.

  11. Facile and novel electrochemical preparation of a graphene-transition metal oxide nanocomposite for ultrasensitive electrochemical sensing of acetaminophen and phenacetin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lin; Gu, Shuqing; Ding, Yaping; Jiang, Feng; Zhang, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A facile and novel preparation strategy based on electrochemical techniques for the fabrication of electrodeposited graphene (EGR) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocomposite was developed. The morphology and structure of the EGR-based nanocomposite were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. Meanwhile, the electrochemical performance of the nanocomposite was demonstrated with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Due to the synergistic effect of EGR and ZnO nanoparticles, an ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor for acetaminophen (AC) and phenacetin (PCT) was successfully fabricated. The linearity ranged from 0.02 to 10 μM for AC and 0.06 to 10 μM for PCT with high sensitivities of 54 295.82 μA mM-1 cm2 for AC and 21 344.66 μA mM-1 cm2 for PCT, respectively. Moreover, the practical applicability was validated to be reliable and desirable in pharmaceutical detections. The excellent results showed the promise of the proposed preparation strategy of EGR-transition metal oxide nanocomposite in the field of electroanalytical chemistry.A facile and novel preparation strategy based on electrochemical techniques for the fabrication of electrodeposited graphene (EGR) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocomposite was developed. The morphology and structure of the EGR-based nanocomposite were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. Meanwhile, the electrochemical performance of the nanocomposite was demonstrated with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Due to the synergistic effect of EGR and ZnO nanoparticles, an ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor for acetaminophen (AC) and phenacetin (PCT) was successfully fabricated. The linearity ranged from 0.02 to 10 μM for AC and 0.06 to 10

  12. Optical imaging. Expansion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W; Boyden, Edward S

    2015-01-30

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. We discovered that by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable superresolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with apparent ~70-nanometer lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color superresolution imaging of ~10(7) cubic micrometers of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope.

  13. Electrochemical Ion Transfer with Thin Films of Poly(3-octylthiophene).

    PubMed

    Cuartero, Maria; Acres, Robert G; De Marco, Roland; Bakker, Eric; Crespo, Gastón A

    2016-07-05

    We report on the limiting conditions for ion-transfer voltammetry between an ion-exchanger doped and plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane and an electrolyte solution that was triggered via the oxidation of a poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) solid-contact (SC), which was unexpectedly related to the thickness of the POT SC. An electropolymerized 60 nm thick film of POT coated with a plasticized PVC membrane exhibited a significant sodium transfer voltammetric signal whereas a thicker film (180 nm) did not display a measurable level of ion transfer due to a lack of oxidation of thick POT beneath the membrane film. In contrast, this peculiar phenomenon was not observed when the POT film was in direct contact with an organic solvent-based electrolyte. This evidence is indicative of three key points: (i) the coated membrane imposes a degree of rigidity to the system, which restricts the swelling of the POT film and its concomitant p-doping; (ii) this phenomenon is exacerbated with thicker POT films due to an initial morphology (rougher comprising a network of large POT nanoparticles), which gives rise to a diminished surface area and electrochemical reactivity in the POT SC; (iii) the rate of sodium transfer is higher with a thin POT film due to a smoother surface morphology made up of a network of smaller POT nanoparticles with an increased surface area and electrochemical reactivity. A variety of techniques including cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and synchrotron radiation-X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS) were used to elucidate the mechanism of the POT thickness/POT surface roughness dependency on the electrochemical reactivity of the PVC/POT SC system.

  14. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tearney, G.J.; Webb, R.H.; Bouma, B.E.

    1998-08-01

    An endoscope-compatible, submicrometer-resolution scanning confocal microscopy imaging system is presented. This approach, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), uses a quasi-monochromatic light source and a transmission diffraction grating to detect the reflectivity simultaneously at multiple points along a transverse line within the sample. Since this method does not require fast spatial scanning within the probe, the equipment can be miniaturized and incorporated into a catheter or endoscope. Confocal images of an electron microscope grid were acquired with SECM to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Optical Society of America}

  15. Conventional transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winey, Mark; Meehl, Janet B.; O'Toole, Eileen T.; Giddings, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to make contributions to cell biology for well over 50 years, and TEM continues to be an important technology in our field. We briefly present for the neophyte the components of a TEM-based study, beginning with sample preparation through imaging of the samples. We point out the limitations of TEM and issues to be considered during experimental design. Advanced electron microscopy techniques are listed as well. Finally, we point potential new users of TEM to resources to help launch their project. PMID:24482357

  16. Structure, Electronic Properties, and Electrochemical Behavior of a Boron-Doped Diamond/Quartz Optically Transparent Electrode.

    PubMed

    Wächter, Naihara; Munson, Catherine; Jarošová, Romana; Berkun, Isil; Hogan, Timothy; Rocha-Filho, Romeu C; Swain, Greg M

    2016-05-31

    The morphology, microstructure, chemistry, electronic properties, and electrochemical behavior of a boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD) thin film grown on quartz were evaluated. Diamond optically transparent electrodes (OTEs) are useful for transmission spectroelectrochemical measurements, offering excellent stability during anodic and cathodic polarization and exposure to a variety of chemical environments. We report on the characterization of a BDD OTE by atomic force microscopy, optical spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopic mapping, alternating-current Hall effect measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical methods. The results reported herein provide the first comprehensive study of the relationship between the physical and chemical structure and electronic properties of a diamond OTE and the electrode's electrochemical activity.

  17. Surface-dependent self-assembly of conducting polypyrrole nanotube arrays in template-free electrochemical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jingwen; Wu, Shuilin; Yin, Zhaoyi; Huang, Shishu; Ning, Chengyun; Tan, Guoxin; Chu, Paul K

    2014-07-23

    One-dimensional conducting polymer nanostructure arrays could provide short ion transport paths, thus delivering superior chemical/physical performance and having large potential as intelligent switching materials. In this work, in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy is employed to monitor the self-assembly of conducting polypyrrole nanotube arrays in template-free electrochemical polymerization. The specific spreading behavior of pyrrole micelles on the conductive substrate is important to large-area self-assembly of conducting polypyrrole nanotube arrays and the insight into self-assembly of conducting polypyrrole nanotube arrays is discussed. Moreover, compared with unoriented nanostructured polypyrrole, the conducting polypyrrole nanotube arrays possess enhanced electrical and electrochemical performances.

  18. Spatially-resolved mapping of history-dependent coupled electrochemical and electronical behaviors of electroresistive NiO

    DOE PAGES

    Sugiyama, Issei; Kim, Yunseok; Jesse, Stephen; ...

    2014-10-22

    Bias-induced oxygen ion dynamics underpins a broad spectrum of electroresistive and memristive phenomena in oxide materials. Although widely studied by device-level and local voltage-current spectroscopies, the relationship between electroresistive phenomena, local electrochemical behaviors, and microstructures remains elusive. Here, the interplay between history-dependent electronic transport and electrochemical phenomena in a NiO single crystalline thin film with a number of well-defined defect types is explored on the nanometer scale using an atomic force microscopy-based technique. A variety of electrochemically-active regions were observed and spatially resolved relationship between the electronic and electrochemical phenomena was revealed. The regions with pronounced electroresistive activity were furthermore » correlated with defects identified by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Using fully coupled mechanical-electrochemical modeling, we illustrate that the spatial distribution of strain plays an important role in electrochemical and electroresistive phenomena. In conclusion, these studies illustrate an approach for simultaneous mapping of the electronic and ionic transport on a single defective structure level such as dislocations or interfaces, and pave the way for creating libraries of defect-specific electrochemical responses.« less

  19. Spatially-resolved mapping of history-dependent coupled electrochemical and electronical behaviors of electroresistive NiO

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Issei; Kim, Yunseok; Jesse, Stephen; Strelcov, Evgheni; Kumar, Amit; Tselev, Alexander; Rahani, Ehasan Kabiri; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-10-22

    Bias-induced oxygen ion dynamics underpins a broad spectrum of electroresistive and memristive phenomena in oxide materials. Although widely studied by device-level and local voltage-current spectroscopies, the relationship between electroresistive phenomena, local electrochemical behaviors, and microstructures remains elusive. Here, the interplay between history-dependent electronic transport and electrochemical phenomena in a NiO single crystalline thin film with a number of well-defined defect types is explored on the nanometer scale using an atomic force microscopy-based technique. A variety of electrochemically-active regions were observed and spatially resolved relationship between the electronic and electrochemical phenomena was revealed. The regions with pronounced electroresistive activity were further correlated with defects identified by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Using fully coupled mechanical-electrochemical modeling, we illustrate that the spatial distribution of strain plays an important role in electrochemical and electroresistive phenomena. In conclusion, these studies illustrate an approach for simultaneous mapping of the electronic and ionic transport on a single defective structure level such as dislocations or interfaces, and pave the way for creating libraries of defect-specific electrochemical responses.

  20. Electrochemical performance and biosensor application of TiO2 nanotube arrays with mesoporous structures constructed by chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinwen; Xu, Guangqing; Zhang, Xu; Lv, Jun; Zhang, Xinyi; Zheng, Zhixiang; Wu, Yucheng

    2015-04-28

    Novel mesoporous TiO2 nanotube arrays (TiO2 NTAs) were synthesized by an anodization method combined with chemical etching in HF solution, and the electrochemical performance was studied. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized on the mesoporous TiO2 NTAs to achieve an efficient biosensor for amperometric detection of glucose. The morphology, structure, component and electrochemical performance of mesoporous TiO2 NTAs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and an electrochemical workstation, respectively. The influence of the mesoporous structure on the electrochemical performance is discussed in detail by comparing the cyclic voltammograms and electrochemical impedance spectrum of TiO2 and mesoporous TiO2 NTAs in different conditions. High electrochemical active surface area and electron transfer rate play key roles in enhancing the electrochemical performance of mesoporous TiO2 NTAs. When used as the basis of a biosensor, the amperometric response of glucose on a GOx/TiO2-0.5 NTAs electrode is linearly proportion to the glucose concentration in the range from 0.1 to 6 mM with a sensitivity of 0.954 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), which is 14.3 times that of un-etched GOx/TiO2 NTAs.

  1. Imaging Local Electric Field Distribution by Plasmonic Impedance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixian; Shan, Xiaonan; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian; Blanchard, Pierre-Yves; Hu, Keke; Mirkin, Michael V

    2016-02-02

    We report on imaging of local electric field on an electrode surface with plasmonic electrochemical impedance microscopy (P-EIM). The local electric field is created by putting an electrode inside a micropipet positioned over the electrode and applying a voltage between the two electrodes. We show that the distribution of the surface charge as well as the local electric field at the electrode surface can be imaged with P-EIM. The spatial distribution and the dependence of the local charge density and electric field on the distance between the micropipet and the surface are measured, and the results are compared with the finite element calculations. The work also demonstrates the possibility of integrating plasmonic imaging with scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and other scanning probe microscopies.

  2. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  3. Electrochemical incineration of wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, R. C.; Sharma, D. K.; Bockris, J. OM.

    1990-01-01

    The novel technology of waste removal in space vehicles by electrochemical methods is presented to convert wastes into chemicals that can be eventually recycled. The important consideration for waste oxidation is to select a right kind of electrode (anode) material that should be stable under anodic conditions and also a poor electrocatalyst for oxygen and chlorine evolution. On the basis of long term electrolysis experiments on seven different electrodes and on the basis of total organic carbon reduced, two best electrodes were identified. The effect of redox ions on the electrolyte was studied. Though most of the experiments were done in mixtures of urine and waste, the experiments with redox couples involved 2.5 M sulfuric acid in order to avoid the precipitation of redox ions by urea. Two methods for long term electrolysis of waste were investigated: (1) the oxidation on Pt and lead dioxide electrodes using the galvanostatic methods; and (2) potentiostatic method on other electrodes. The advantage of the first method is the faster rate of oxidation. The chlorine evolution in the second method is ten times less then in the first. The accomplished research has shown that urine/feces mixtures can be oxidized to carbon dioxide and water, but current densities are low and must be improved. The perovskite and Ti4O7 coated with RuO2 are the best electrode materials found. Recent experiment with the redox agent improves the current density, however, sulphuric acid is required to keep the redox agent in solution to enhance oxidation effectively. It is desirable to reduce the use of acid and/or find substitutes.

  4. Electrochemical incineration of wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, R. C.; Sharma, D. K.; Bockris, J. Om.

    1990-08-01

    The novel technology of waste removal in space vehicles by electrochemical methods is presented to convert wastes into chemicals that can be eventually recycled. The important consideration for waste oxidation is to select a right kind of electrode (anode) material that should be stable under anodic conditions and also a poor electrocatalyst for oxygen and chlorine evolution. On the basis of long term electrolysis experiments on seven different electrodes and on the basis of total organic carbon reduced, two best electrodes were identified. The effect of redox ions on the electrolyte was studied. Though most of the experiments were done in mixtures of urine and waste, the experiments with redox couples involved 2.5 M sulfuric acid in order to avoid the precipitation of redox ions by urea. Two methods for long term electrolysis of waste were investigated: (1) the oxidation on Pt and lead dioxide electrodes using the galvanostatic methods; and (2) potentiostatic method on other electrodes. The advantage of the first method is the faster rate of oxidation. The chlorine evolution in the second method is ten times less then in the first. The accomplished research has shown that urine/feces mixtures can be oxidized to carbon dioxide and water, but current densities are low and must be improved. The perovskite and Ti4O7 coated with RuO2 are the best electrode materials found. Recent experiment with the redox agent improves the current density, however, sulphuric acid is required to keep the redox agent in solution to enhance oxidation effectively. It is desirable to reduce the use of acid and/or find substitutes.

  5. Video Telescope Operating Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Exotic pet veterinarians frequently have to operate on small animals, and magnification is commonly used. Existing endoscopy equipment can be used with a mechanical arm and telescope to enable video telescope operating microscopy. The additional equipment items and their specifics are described, and several case examples are provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  7. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability. PMID:20696933

  8. Principles of multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kenneth W; Young, Pamela A

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy is a powerful, important tool in biomedical research that offers low photon toxicity and higher spatial and temporal resolution than other in vivo imaging modalities. The capability to collect images hundreds of micrometers into biological tissues provides an invaluable tool for studying cellular and subcellular processes in the context of tissues and organs in living animals. Multiphoton microscopy is based upon two-photon excitation of fluorescence that occurs only in a sub-femtoliter volume at the focus; by scanning the focus through a sample, 2- and 3-dimensional images can be collected. The complex 3-dimensional organization of the kidney makes it especially appropriate for multiphoton microscopic analysis, which has been used to characterize numerous aspects of renal physiology and pathophysiology in living rats and mice. However, the ability to collect fluorescence images deep into biological tissues raises unique problems not encountered in other forms of optical microscopy, including issues of probe access, and tissue optics. Future improvements in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy will involve optimizing objectives for the unique characteristics of multiphoton fluorescence imaging, improving the speed at which images may be collected and extending the depth to which imaging may be conducted. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Light microscopy digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Joubert, James; Sharma, Deepak

    2011-10-01

    This unit presents an overview of digital imaging hardware used in light microscopy. CMOS, CCD, and EMCCDs are the primary sensors used. The strengths and weaknesses of each define the primary applications for these sensors. Sensor architecture and formats are also reviewed. Color camera design strategies and sensor window cleaning are also described in the unit.

  10. Photoacoustic computed microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lei; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is emerging as a powerful technique for imaging microvasculature at depths beyond the ~1 mm depth limit associated with confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy and optical coherence tomography. PAM, however, is currently qualitative in nature and cannot quantitatively measure important functional parameters including oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhemoglobin (HbR), oxygen saturation (sO2), blood flow (BF) and rate of oxygen metabolism (MRO2). Here we describe a new photoacoustic microscopic method, termed photoacoustic computed microscopy (PACM) that combines current PAM technique with a model-based inverse reconstruction algorithm. We evaluate the PACM approach using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate its in vivo imaging ability of quantifying HbO2, HbR, sO2, cerebral BF and cerebral MRO2 at the small vessel level in a rodent model. This new technique provides a unique tool for neuroscience research and for visualizing microvasculature dynamics involved in tumor angiogenesis and in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24828539

  11. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    David P. Bloomfield; Brian S. MacKenzie

    2006-05-01

    The Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor EHC was evaluated against DOE applications for compressing hydrogen at automobile filling stations, in future hydrogen pipelines and as a commercial replacement for conventional diaphragm hydrogen compressors. It was also evaluated as a modular replacement for the compressors used in petrochemical refineries. If the EHC can be made inexpensive, reliable and long lived then it can satisfy all these applications save pipelines where the requirements for platinum catalyst exceeds the annual world production. The research performed did not completely investigate Molybdenum as a hydrogen anode or cathode, it did show that photoetched 316 stainless steel is inadequate for an EHC. It also showed that: molybdenum bipolar plates, photochemical etching processes, and Gortex Teflon seals are too costly for a commercial EHC. The use of carbon paper in combination with a perforated thin metal electrode demonstrated adequate anode support strength, but is suspect in promoting galvanic corrosion. The nature of the corrosion mechanisms are not well understood, but locally high potentials within the unit cell package are probably involved. The program produced a design with an extraordinary high cell pitch, and a very low part count. This is one of the promising aspects of the redesigned EHC. The development and successful demonstration of the hydraulic cathode is also important. The problem of corrosion resistant metal bipolar plates is vital to the development of an inexpensive, commercial PEM fuel cell. Our research suggests that there is more to the corrosion process in fuel cells and electrochemical compressors than simple, steady state, galvanic stability. It is an important area for scientific investigation. The experiments and analysis conducted lead to several recommended future research directions. First, we need a better understanding of the corrosion mechanisms involved. The diagnosis of experimental cells with titration to

  12. Novel nanoarchitectures for electrochemical biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Michelle M.

    Sensitive, real-time detection of biomarkers is of critical importance for rapid and accurate diagnosis of disease for point-of-care (POC) technologies. Current methods, while sensitive, do not adequately allow for POC applications due to several limitations, including complex instrumentation, high reagent consumption, and cost. We have investigated two novel nanoarchitectures, the nanocoax and the nanodendrite, as electrochemical biosensors towards the POC detection of infectious disease biomarkers to overcome these limitations. The nanocoax architecture is composed of vertically-oriented, nanoscale coaxial electrodes, with coax cores and shields serving as integrated working and counter electrodes, respectively. The dendritic structure consists of metallic nanocrystals extending from the working electrode, increasing sensor surface area. Nanocoaxial- and nanodendritic-based electrochemical sensors were fabricated and developed for the detection of bacterial toxins using an electrochemical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Proof-of-concept was demonstrated for the detection of cholera toxin (CT). Both nanoarchitectures exhibited levels of sensitivity that are comparable to the standard optical ELISA used widely in clinical applications. In addition to matching the detection profile of the standard ELISA, these electrochemical nanosensors provide a simple electrochemical readout and a miniaturized platform with multiplexing capabilities toward POC implementation. Further development as suggested in this thesis may lead to increases in sensitivity, enhancing the attractiveness of the architectures for future POC devices.

  13. Understanding materials challenges for rechargeable ion batteries with in situ transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yifei; Amine, Khalil; Lu, Jun; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2017-01-01

    An in-depth understanding of material behaviours under complex electrochemical environment is critical for the development of advanced materials for the next-generation rechargeable ion batteries. The dynamic conditions inside a working battery had not been intensively explored until the advent of various in situ characterization techniques. Real-time transmission electron microscopy of electrochemical reactions is one of the most significant breakthroughs poised to enable radical shift in our knowledge on how materials behave in the electrochemical environment. This review, therefore, summarizes the scientific discoveries enabled by in situ transmission electron microscopy, and specifically emphasizes the applicability of this technique to address the critical challenges in the rechargeable ion battery electrodes, electrolyte and their interfaces. New electrochemical systems such as lithium–oxygen, lithium–sulfur and sodium ion batteries are included, considering the rapidly increasing application of in situ transmission electron microscopy in these areas. A systematic comparison between lithium ion-based electrochemistry and sodium ion-based electrochemistry is also given in terms of their thermodynamic and kinetic differences. The effect of the electron beam on the validity of in situ observation is also covered. This review concludes by providing a renewed perspective for the future directions of in situ transmission electron microscopy in rechargeable ion batteries.

  14. Distance effects in electrochemical micromachining

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lizhong; Pan, Yue; Zhao, Chuanjun

    2016-01-01

    Considering exponential dependence of currents on double-layer voltage and the feedback effect of the electrolyte resistance, a distance effect in electrochemical micromachining is found, namely that both time constant and double-layer voltage depend on the separation of electrodes. The double-layer voltage is the real voltage used in processing. Under DC voltage, the apparent voltages between two electrodes are constant for different separations, but the real voltages change with the separations. Small separations exert substantial effects on the real voltages. Accordingly, a DC-voltage small-separation electrochemical micromachining technique was proposed. The double-layer voltage drops sharply as the small separation increases. Thus, the electrochemical reactions are confined to electrode regions in very close proximity even under DC voltage. The machining precision can be significantly enhanced by reducing the voltage and separation between electrodes. With this technique, the machining of conducting materials with submicrometre precision was achieved. PMID:27581708

  15. Apoptosis Evaluation by Electrochemical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian; Miao, Peng

    2016-03-04

    Apoptosis has close relevance to pathology, pharmacology, and toxicology. Accurate and convenient detection of apoptosis would be beneficial for biological study, clinical diagnosis, and drug development. Based on distinct features of apoptotic cells, a diversity of analytical techniques have been exploited for sensitive analysis of apoptosis, such as surface plasmon resonance, electrochemical methods, flow cytometry, and some imaging assays. Among them, the features of simplicity, easy operation, low cost, and high sensitivity make electrochemical techniques powerful tools to investigate electron-transfer processes of in vitro biological systems. In this contribution, a general overview of current knowledge on various technical approaches for apoptosis evaluation is provided. Furthermore, recently developed electrochemical biosensors for detecting apoptotic cells and their advantages over traditional methods are summarized. One of the main considerations focuses on designing the recognition elements based on various biochemical events during apoptosis.

  16. Space Electrochemical Research and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of NASA's fourth Space Electrochemical Research and Technology (SERT) Conference, held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on April 14-15, 1993. The objective of the conference was to assess the present status and general thrust of research and development in those areas of electrochemical technology required to enable NASA missions into the next century. The conference provided a forum for the exchange of ideas and opinions of those actively involved in the field, in order to define new opportunities for the application of electrochemical processes in future NASA missions. Papers were presented in three technical areas: advanced secondary batteries, fuel cells, and advanced concepts for space power. This document contains the papers presented.

  17. Influence of sodium chloride content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin

    PubMed Central

    Eldarrat, Aziza; High, Alec; Kale, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sodium chloride (NaCl) content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin by employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Materials and Methods: Dentin samples were prepared from extracted molars. Electrochemical impedance measurements were carried out over a wide frequency range (0.01Hz-10MHz). After measurements, samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Results: Electrochemical impedance measurements showed that the mean values of dentin electrical resistance were 4284, 2062, 1336, 53 and 48kΩ at different NaCl contents in electrolyte solution. One-way ANOVA test of mean values of dentin electrical resistance revealed a significant difference (P < 0.0001) as a function of NaCl content in electrolyte solution. Comparing electrical resistance values of dentin samples at 0.05% w/v and 0.9% w/v concentrations were found to be significantly different (P < 0.05 at 95% confidence level). Scanning electron microscopy revealed structure of dentin sample with intertubular dentin matrix and distribution of patent dentinal tubules. Conclusion: This in vitro study indicated, through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, that electrical resistance of dentin was affected by the concentration of NaCl in electrolyte solution. It is clear from the current study that NaCl concentration in electrolyte solution has a marked influence on dentin electrical resistance. Therefore, this baseline data need to be considered in any future study on dental samples. PMID:28348614

  18. Influence of sodium chloride content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Eldarrat, Aziza; High, Alec; Kale, Girish

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sodium chloride (NaCl) content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin by employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Dentin samples were prepared from extracted molars. Electrochemical impedance measurements were carried out over a wide frequency range (0.01Hz-10MHz). After measurements, samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical impedance measurements showed that the mean values of dentin electrical resistance were 4284, 2062, 1336, 53 and 48kΩ at different NaCl contents in electrolyte solution. One-way ANOVA test of mean values of dentin electrical resistance revealed a significant difference (P < 0.0001) as a function of NaCl content in electrolyte solution. Comparing electrical resistance values of dentin samples at 0.05% w/v and 0.9% w/v concentrations were found to be significantly different (P < 0.05 at 95% confidence level). Scanning electron microscopy revealed structure of dentin sample with intertubular dentin matrix and distribution of patent dentinal tubules. This in vitro study indicated, through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, that electrical resistance of dentin was affected by the concentration of NaCl in electrolyte solution. It is clear from the current study that NaCl concentration in electrolyte solution has a marked influence on dentin electrical resistance. Therefore, this baseline data need to be considered in any future study on dental samples.

  19. ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATIONOF 2-CHLOROBIPHENYL IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents electrochemical dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-CI BP) in aqueous environment using palladium modified granular graphite electrodes. 2-CI BP, the PCB congener that requires the highest reduction potential, was effectively dechlorinated in electrochemical...

  20. APPLICATIONS OF ELECTROCHEMICAL IMMUNOSENSORS TO ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses basic electrochemical immunoassay technology. Factors limiting the practical application of antibodies to anlaytical problems are also presented. It addresses the potential use of immunoassay methods based on electrochemical detection for the analysis of env...

  1. ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATIONOF 2-CHLOROBIPHENYL IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents electrochemical dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-CI BP) in aqueous environment using palladium modified granular graphite electrodes. 2-CI BP, the PCB congener that requires the highest reduction potential, was effectively dechlorinated in electrochemical...

  2. Polarized Light Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  3. Quad stereo-microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Rebecca F.; Gibson, Graham M.; Lee, Michael P.; Padgett, Miles J.; Phillips, David B.

    2014-09-01

    Stereo-microscopy is a technique that enables a sample to be imaged from two directions simultaneously, allowing the tracking of microscopic objects in three dimensions. This is achieved by illuminating the sample from different directions, each illumination direction producing an individual image. These images are superimposed in the image plane but can be easily separated using a diffractive optical element in the Fourier plane of the imaging arm. Therefore this enables 3-dimensional coordinates to be reconstructed using simple 2-dimensional image tracking and parallax. This is a powerful technique when combined with holographic optical tweezers (HOT), where multiple objects can be trapped and tracked simultaneously in three dimensions. In this work, we extend this concept to four different illumination directions: quad stereo-microscopy. This allows us to measure the accuracy of tracking in three dimensions, and to optimise the system.

  4. Quantitative deconvolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    The light microscope is an essential tool for the study of cells, organelles, biomolecules, and subcellular dynamics. A paradox exists in microscopy whereby the higher the needed lateral resolution, the more the image is degraded by out-of-focus information. This creates a significant need to generate axial contrast whenever high lateral resolution is required. One strategy for generating contrast is to measure or model the optical properties of the microscope and to use that model to algorithmically reverse some of the consequences of high-resolution imaging. Deconvolution microscopy implements model-based methods to enable the full diffraction-limited resolution of the microscope to be exploited even in complex and living specimens.

  5. Multimodal Nonlinear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuhua; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Because each nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging modality is sensitive to specific molecules or structures, multimodal NLO imaging capitalizes the potential of NLO microscopy for studies of complex biological tissues. The coupling of multiphoton fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has allowed investigation of a broad range of biological questions concerning lipid metabolism, cancer development, cardiovascular disease, and skin biology. Moreover, recent research shows the great potential of using CARS microscope as a platform to develop more advanced NLO modalities such as electronic-resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing, stimulated Raman scattering, and pump-probe microscopy. This article reviews the various approaches developed for realization of multimodal NLO imaging as well as developments of new NLO modalities on a CARS microscope. Applications to various aspects of biological and biomedical research are discussed. PMID:24353747

  6. Blind digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Patrick N.; Wiegandt, Florian; Treacher, Daniel J.; Mang, Matthias M.; Gianani, Ilaria; Schiavi, Andrea; Lloyd, David T.; O'Keeffe, Kevin; Hooker, Simon M.; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2017-03-01

    A blind variant of digital holographic microscopy is presented that removes the requirement for a well-characterized, highly divergent reference beam. This is achieved by adopting an off-axis recording geometry where a sequence of holograms is recorded as the reference is tilted, and an iterative algorithm that estimates the amplitudes and phases of both beams while simultaneously enhancing the numerical aperture. Numerical simulations have demonstrated the accuracy and robustness of this approach when applied to the coherent imaging problem.

  7. Spatial Resolution in Scanning Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Without a Specimen Vacuum Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Kayla X.; Holtz, Megan E.; Richmond-Decker, Justin; Muller, David A.

    2016-07-25

    Abstract

    A long-standing goal of electron microscopy has been the high-resolution characterization of specimens in their native environment. However, electron optics require high vacuum to maintain an unscattered and focused probe, a challenge for specimens requiring atmospheric or liquid environments. Here, we use an electron-transparent window at the base of a scanning electron microscope’s objective lens to separate column vacuum from the specimen, enabling imaging under ambient conditions, without a specimen vacuum chamber. We demonstrate in-air imaging of specimens at nanoscale resolution using backscattered scanning electron microscopy (airSEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy. We explore resolution and contrast using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical models. We find that nanometer-scale resolution can be obtained at gas path lengths up to 400μm, although contrast drops with increasing gas path length. As the electron-transparent window scatters considerably more than gas at our operating conditions, we observe that the densities and thicknesses of the electron-transparent window are the dominant limiting factors for image contrast at lower operating voltages. By enabling a variety of detector configurations, the airSEM is applicable to a wide range of environmental experiments including the imaging of hydrated biological specimens andin situchemical and electrochemical processes.

  8. Spatial Resolution in Scanning Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Without a Specimen Vacuum Chamber.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kayla X; Holtz, Megan E; Richmond-Decker, Justin; Muller, David A

    2016-08-01

    A long-standing goal of electron microscopy has been the high-resolution characterization of specimens in their native environment. However, electron optics require high vacuum to maintain an unscattered and focused probe, a challenge for specimens requiring atmospheric or liquid environments. Here, we use an electron-transparent window at the base of a scanning electron microscope's objective lens to separate column vacuum from the specimen, enabling imaging under ambient conditions, without a specimen vacuum chamber. We demonstrate in-air imaging of specimens at nanoscale resolution using backscattered scanning electron microscopy (airSEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy. We explore resolution and contrast using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical models. We find that nanometer-scale resolution can be obtained at gas path lengths up to 400 μm, although contrast drops with increasing gas path length. As the electron-transparent window scatters considerably more than gas at our operating conditions, we observe that the densities and thicknesses of the electron-transparent window are the dominant limiting factors for image contrast at lower operating voltages. By enabling a variety of detector configurations, the airSEM is applicable to a wide range of environmental experiments including the imaging of hydrated biological specimens and in situ chemical and electrochemical processes.

  9. Electrochemical Enzyme Immunoassay for Detection of Toxins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    developed a new biosensor design that combines advantages of immunoassay with electrochemical response for this purpose. The technology permits developing... amperometric enzyme immunoelectrode for immunoassays of small chemical molecules, based on the principle of coupling the immunochemical reaction to the electrode...response by using a soluble electrochemically active mediator. Toxin detection; Electrochemical; Enzyme immunoassay; Biosensor ; Biological sample.

  10. Fundamental Studies Connected with Electrochemical Energy Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, E.; Sen, R.

    1974-01-01

    Papers are presented which deal with electrochemical research activities. Emphasis is placed on electrochemical energy storage devices. Topics discussed include: adsorption of dendrite inhibitors on zinc; proton discharge process; electron and protron transfer; quantum mechanical formulation of electron transfer rates; and theory of electrochemical kinetics in terms of two models of activation; thermal and electrostatic.

  11. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  12. Multimodal multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Légaré, François; Pfeffer, Christian P.; Ganikhanov, Feruz

    2009-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful technique for high spatial resolution thick tissue imaging. In its simple version, it uses a high repetition rate femtosecond oscillator laser source focussed and scanned across biological sample that contains fluorophores. However, not every biological structure is inherently fluorescent or can be stained without causing biochemical changes. To circumvent these limitations, other non-invasive nonlinear optical imaging approaches are currently being developed and investigated with regard to different applications. These techniques are: (1) second harmonic generation (SHG), (2) third harmonic generation (THG), and (3) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The main advantage of the above mentioned techniques is that they derive their imaging contrast from optical nonlinearities that do not involve fluorescence process. As a particular application example we investigated collagen arrays. We show that combining SHG-THG-CARS onto a single imaging platform provides complementary information about the sub-micron architecture of the tissue. SHG microscopy reveals the fibrillar architecture of collagen arrays and confirm a rather high degree of heterogeneity of χ(2) within the focal volume, THG highlights the boundaries between the collagen sheets, and CH2 spectroscopic contrast with CARS.

  13. Nanoscale electrochemical patterning reveals the active sites for catechol oxidation at graphite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha N; McKelvey, Kim; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-12-19

    Graphite-based electrodes (graphite, graphene, and nanotubes) are used widely in electrochemistry, and there is a long-standing view that graphite step edges are needed to catalyze many reactions, with the basal surface considered to be inert. In the present work, this model was tested directly for the first time using scanning electrochemical cell microscopy reactive patterning and shown to be incorrect. For the electro-oxidation of dopamine as a model process, the reaction rate was measured at high spatial resolution across a surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Oxidation products left behind in a pattern defined by the scanned electrochemical cell served as surface-site markers, allowing the electrochemical activity to be correlated directly with the graphite structure on the nanoscale. This process produced tens of thousands of electrochemical measurements at different locations across the basal surface, unambiguously revealing it to be highly electrochemically active, with step edges providing no enhanced activity. This new model of graphite electrodes has significant implications for the design of carbon-based biosensors, and the results are additionally important for understanding electrochemical processes on related sp(2)-hybridized materials such as pristine graphene and nanotubes.

  14. Capsid protein oxidation in feline calicivirus using an electrochemical inactivation treatment.

    PubMed

    Shionoiri, Nozomi; Nogariya, Osamu; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic viral infections are an international public health concern, and viral disinfection has received increasing attention. Electrochemical treatment has been used for treatment of water contaminated by bacteria for several decades, and although in recent years several reports have investigated viral inactivation kinetics, the mode of action of viral inactivation by electrochemical treatment remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated the inactivation of feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for human noroviruses, by electrochemical treatment in a developed flow-cell equipped with a screen-printed electrode. The viral infectivity titer was reduced by over 5 orders of magnitude after 15 min of treatment at 0.9V vs. Ag/AgCl. Proteomic study of electrochemically inactivated virus revealed oxidation of peptides located in the viral particles; oxidation was not observed in the non-treated sample. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed that viral particles in the treated sample had irregular structures. These results suggest that electrochemical treatment inactivates FCV via oxidation of peptides in the structural region, causing structural deformation of virus particles. This first report of viral protein damage through electrochemical treatment will contribute to broadening the understanding of viral inactivation mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrochemical preparation of poly(methylene blue)/graphene nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Erçarıkcı, Elif; Dağcı, Kader; Topçu, Ezgi; Alanyalıoğlu, Murat

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Poly(MB)/graphene thin films are prepared by a simple electrochemical approach. • Graphene layers in the film show a broad band in visible region of absorbance spectra. • Morphology of composite films indicates both disordered and ordered regions. • XRD reveals that nanocomposite films include rGO layers after electropolymerization process. • Chemically prepared graphene is better than electrochemically prepared graphene for electrooxidation of nitrite. - Abstract: Poly(methylene blue)/graphene nanocomposite thin films were prepared by electropolymerization of methylene blue in the presence of graphene which have been synthesized by two different methods of a chemical oxidation process and an electrochemical approach. Synthesized nanocomposite thin films were characterized by using cyclic voltammetry, UV–vis. absorption spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy techniques. Electrocatalytical properties of prepared poly(methylene blue)/graphene nanocomposite films were compared toward electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimized conditions, electrocatalytical effect of nanocomposite films of chemically prepared graphene through electrochemical oxidation of nitrite was better than that of electrochemically prepared graphene.

  16. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, F. Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Zhang, F.; Pan, J.; Carlà, F.; Nilsson, J.-O.

    2014-07-21

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  17. Synthesis of Ru/multiwalled carbon nanotubes by microemulsion for electrochemical supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Shancheng; Qu Peng; Wang Haitao; Tian Tian; Xiao Zhongdang

    2008-10-02

    An efficient way to decorate multiwalled carbon nanotubes with Ru had been developed. In this method, Ru nanoparticles were prepared by water-in-oil reverse microemulsion, and the produced Ru anchored on MWCNTs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) result showed that RuO{sub 2} nanoparticles had the uniform size distribution after electrochemical oxidation. Energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) spectra elucidated the presence of ruthenium oxide in the as-prepared composites after electrochemical oxidation. Cyclic voltammetry result demonstrated that a specific capacitance of deposited ruthenium oxide electrode was significantly greater than that of the pristine MWCNTs electrode in the same medium.

  18. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  19. Electrochemical processing of solid waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockris, John OM.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of electrochemical waste treatment methods suitable for closed, or partially closed, life support systems for manned space exploration is discussed. The technique being investigated involves the electrolysis of solid waste where the aim is to upgrade waste material (mainly fecal waste) to generate gases that can be recycled in a space station or planetary space environment.

  20. Recognized Leader in Electrochemical Purification

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Eric

    2013-11-20

    PNNL scientists developed an electrochemical method for purifying copper, a key material that makes possible radiation detection systems of unprecedented sensitivity. The method begins with the purest copper materials available, and results in the lowest-background copper in the world. Chemist Eric Hoppe explains the process.

  1. Electrochemical Machining Removes Deep Obstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catania, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) is effective way of removing obstructing material between two deep holes supposed to intersect but do not because of misalignment of drilling tools. ECM makes it possible to rework costly castings otherwise scrapped. Method fast even for tough or hard alloys and complicated three-dimensional shapes.

  2. Thin Film Inorganic Electrochemical Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-01

    determined that thin film cathodes of LiCoO2 can be readily performed by either spray pyrolysis or spin coating . These cathodes are electrochemically...active. We have also determined that thin film anodes of Li4Ti5O12 can be prepared by spray pyrolysis or spin coating . These anodes are also

  3. Separator material for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Cieslak, W.R.; Storz, L.J.

    1991-03-26

    An electrochemical cell is characterized as utilizing an aramid fiber as a separator material. The aramid fibers are especially suited for lithium/thionyl chloride battery systems. The battery separator made of aramid fibers possesses superior mechanical strength, chemical resistance, and is flame retardant.

  4. Electrolytes for magnesium electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Sa, Niya; Proffit, Danielle Lee; Lipson, Albert; Liao, Chen; Vaughey, John T.; Ingram, Brian J.

    2017-07-04

    An electrochemical cell includes a high voltage cathode configured to operate at 1.5 volts or greater; an anode including Mg.sup.0; and an electrolyte including an ether solvent and a magnesium salt; wherein: a concentration of the magnesium salt in the ether is 1 M or greater.

  5. Recognized Leader in Electrochemical Purification

    ScienceCinema

    Hoppe, Eric

    2016-07-12

    PNNL scientists developed an electrochemical method for purifying copper, a key material that makes possible radiation detection systems of unprecedented sensitivity. The method begins with the purest copper materials available, and results in the lowest-background copper in the world. Chemist Eric Hoppe explains the process.

  6. Electrochemical cell with calcium anode

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Hosmer, Pamela K.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1979-01-01

    An electrochemical cell comprising a calcium anode and a suitable cathode in an alkaline electrolyte consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of an hydroxide and a chloride. Specifically disclosed is a mechanically rechargeable calcium/air fuel cell with an aqueous NaOH/NaCl electrolyte.

  7. Orientation Insensitivity for Electrochemical Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromer, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Using a wettable polypropylene wick, performance of an electro-chemical hydrazine sensor is made independent of its orientation. Wick keeps all electrodes in constant contact with electrolyte solution so that one or more of the electrodes do not become isolated from the electrolyte if the sensor is tilted or vibrated.

  8. [Electrochemical immunoanalysis of cardiac myoglobin].

    PubMed

    Shumiantseva, V V; Bulko, T V; Vagin, M Iu; Suprun, E V; Archakov, A I

    2010-01-01

    Method targeting the direct monitoring of myoglobin based on analysis of electrochemical parameters of modified electrodes were proposed. Method of direct detection is based on interaction of myoglobin with anti-myoglobin with subsequent electrochemical registration of hemeprotein. Myocardial infarction biomarker myoglobin was quantified at biological level using screen printed electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles stabilized with didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) and antibodies. Proposed method did not require signal enhancement and amplification and also labeled secondary antibodies. Electro analysis has high specificity and sensitivity. Myoglobin -antibodies interaction was studied also with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Sensor has low detection limit and broad diapason of working concentrations (17.8 ng/ml-1780 ng/ml; 1 nM-10 nM). Method based on gold nanoparticles detection on the surface of electrodes was treated for myoglobin identification. AuNP worked as an electrochemical sensing platform: the oxidation of gold surface (resulted in gold oxide formation) upon polarization served as a basis for analytical response. The difference of cathodic peak area and peak high of gold oxide reduction in the case of electrodes with antibodies and electrodes with antibodies-myoglobin complex, was registered.

  9. Electrochemical Machining Removes Deep Obstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catania, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) is effective way of removing obstructing material between two deep holes supposed to intersect but do not because of misalignment of drilling tools. ECM makes it possible to rework costly castings otherwise scrapped. Method fast even for tough or hard alloys and complicated three-dimensional shapes.

  10. Combining microfluidics and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Rosaria; Pittet, Patrick; Stephan, Khaled; Léca-Bouvier, Béatrice; Galvan, Jean-Marc; Renaud, Louis; Morin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes two configurations that integrate electrochemical detection into microfluidic devices. The first configuration is a low-cost approach based on the use of PCB technology. This device was applied to electrochemiluminescence detection. The second configuration was used to carry out amperometric quantification of electroactive species using a serial dilution microfluidic system.

  11. Electrochemical Deposition Of Conductive Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Distefano, Salvador; Liang, Ranty H.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show electrically conductive films are deposited on glassy carbon or indium tin oxide substrates by electrochemical polymerization of N-{(3-trimethoxy silyl) propyl} pyrrole or copolymerization with pyrrole. Copolymers of monomer I and pyrrole exhibit desired electrical conductivity as well as desired adhesion and other mechanical properties. When fully developed, new copolymerization process useful in making surface films of selectable conductivity.

  12. Electrochemical Genosensing of Circulating Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Susana; Yáñez-Sedeño, Paloma; Pingarrón, José Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Management and prognosis of diseases requires the measurement in non- or minimally invasively collected samples of specific circulating biomarkers, consisting of any measurable or observable factors in patients that indicate normal or disease-related biological processes or responses to therapy. Therefore, on-site, fast and accurate determination of these low abundance circulating biomarkers in scarcely treated body fluids is of great interest for health monitoring and biological applications. In this field, electrochemical DNA sensors (or genosensors) have demonstrated to be interesting alternatives to more complex conventional strategies. Currently, electrochemical genosensors are considered very promising analytical tools for this purpose due to their fast response, low cost, high sensitivity, compatibility with microfabrication technology and simple operation mode which makes them compatible with point-of-care (POC) testing. In this review, the relevance and current challenges of the determination of circulating biomarkers related to relevant diseases (cancer, bacterial and viral infections and neurodegenerative diseases) are briefly discussed. An overview of the electrochemical nucleic acid–based strategies developed in the last five years for this purpose is given to show to both familiar and non-expert readers the great potential of these methodologies for circulating biomarker determination. After highlighting the main features of the reported electrochemical genosensing strategies through the critical discussion of selected examples, a conclusions section points out the still existing challenges and future directions in this field. PMID:28420103

  13. Materials for electrochemical device safety

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Daniel R.; Amine, Khalil; Thackeray, Michael M.; Kahaian, Arthur J.; Johnson, Christopher S.

    2015-04-07

    An electrochemical device includes a thermally-triggered intumescent material or a gas-triggered intumescent material. Such devices prevent or minimize short circuits in a device that could lead to thermal run-away. Such devices may include batteries or supercapacitors.

  14. Sheet electrode for electrochemical systems

    DOEpatents

    Tsien, Hsue C.; Newby, Kenneth R.; Grimes, Patrick G.; Bellows, Richard J.

    1983-04-12

    An electrochemical cell construction features a novel co-extruded plastic electrode in an interleaved construction with a novel integral separator-spacer. Also featured is a leak and impact resistant construction for preventing the spill of corrosive materials in the event of rupture.

  15. Electrochemical Thin Layers in Nanostructures for Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Noked, Malachi; Liu, Chanyuan; Hu, Junkai; Gregorczyk, Keith; Rubloff, Gary W; Lee, Sang Bok

    2016-10-18

    Conventional electrical energy storage (EES) electrodes, such as rechargeable batteries, are mostly based on composites of monolithic micrometer sized particles bound together with polymeric and conductive carbon additives and binders. The kinetic limitations of these monolithic chunks of material are inherently linked to their electrical properties, the kinetics of ion insertion through their interface and ion migration in and through the composite phase. Redox chemistry of nanostructured materials in EES systems offer vast gains in power and energy. Furthermore, due to their thin nature, ion and electron transport is dramatically increased, especially when thin heterogeneous conducting layers are employed synergistically. However, since the stability of the electrode material is dictated by the nature of the electrochemical reaction and the accompanying volumetric and interfacial changes from the perspective of overall system lifetime, research with nanostructured materials has shown often indefinite conclusions: in some cases, an increase in unwanted side-reactions due to the high surface area (bad). In other cases, results have shown significantly better handling of mechanical stress that results from lithiation/delithiation (good). Despite these mixed results, scientifically informed design of thin electrode materials, with carefully chosen architectures, is considered a promising route to address many limitations witnessed in EES systems by reducing and protecting electrodes from parasitic reactions, accommodating mechanical stress due to volumetric changes from electrochemical reactions, and optimizing charge carrier mobilities from both the "ionic" and "electronic" points of view. Furthermore, precise nanoscale control over the electrode structure can enable accurate measurement through advanced spectroscopy and microscopy techniques. This Account summarizes recent findings related to thin electrode materials synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and

  16. Materials analyses and electrochemical impedance of implantable metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Howlader, Matiar M R; Ul Alam, Arif; Sharma, Rahul P; Deen, M Jamal

    2015-04-21

    Implantable electrodes with high flexibility, high mechanical fixation and low electrochemical impedance are desirable for neuromuscular activation because they provide safe, effective and stable stimulation. In this paper, we report on detailed materials and electrical analyses of three metal implantable electrodes - gold (Au), platinum (Pt) and titanium (Ti) - using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning acoustic microscopy, drop shape analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We investigated the cause of changes in electrochemical impedance of long-term immersed Au, Pt and Ti electrodes on liquid crystal polymers (LCPs) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). We analyzed the surface wettability, surface and interface defects and the elemental depth profile of the electrode-adhesion layers on the LCP. The impedance of the electrodes decreased at lower frequencies, but increased at higher frequencies compared with that of the short-term immersion. The increase of impedances was influenced by the oxidation of the electrode/adhesion-layers that affected the double layer capacitance behavior of the electrode/PBS. The oxidation of the adhesion layer for all the electrodes was confirmed by XPS. Alkali ions (sodium) were adsorbed on the Au and Pt surfaces, but diffused into the Ti electrode and LCPs. The Pt electrode showed a higher sensitivity to surface and interface defects than that of Ti and Au electrodes. These findings may be useful when designing electrodes for long-term implantable devices.

  17. A Renewable Electrochemical Magnetic Immunosensor Based on Gold Nanoparticle Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-05-24

    A particle-based renewable electrochemical magnetic immunosensor was developed by using magnetic beads and a gold nanoparticle label. Anti-IgG antibody-modified magnetic beads were attached to a renewable carbon paste transducer surface by magnets that were fixed inside the sensor. A gold nanoparticle label was capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads by sandwich immunoassay. Highly sensitive electrochemical stripping analysis offers a simple and fast method to quantify the capatured gold nanoparticle tracer and avoid the use of an enzyme label and substrate. The stripping signal of gold nanoparticle is related to the concentration of target IgG in the sample solution. A transmission electron microscopy image shows that the gold nanoparticles were successfully capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads through sandwich immunoreaction events. The parameters of immunoassay, including the loading of magnetic beads, the amount of gold nanoparticle conjugate, and the immunoreaction time, were optimized. The detection limit of 0.02 μg ml-1of IgG was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. Such particle-based electrochemical magnetic immunosensors could be readily used for simultaneous parallel detection of multiple proteins by using multiple inorganic metal nanoparticle tracers and are expected to open new opportunities for disease diagnostics and biosecurity.

  18. A renewable electrochemical magnetic immunosensor based on gold nanoparticle labels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-07-01

    A particle-based renewable electrochemical magnetic immunosensor was developed by using magnetic beads and gold nanoparticle labels. Anti-IgG antibody-modified magnetic beads were attached to a renewable carbon paste transducer surface by magnet that was fixed inside the sensor. Gold nanoparticle labels were capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads by sandwich immunoassay. Highly sensitive electrochemical stripping analysis offers a simple and fast method to quantify the capatured gold nanoparticle tracers and avoid the use of an enzyme label and substrate. The stripping signal of gold nanoparticles is related to the concentration of target IgG in the sample solution. A transmission electron microscopy image shows that the gold nanoparticles were successfully capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads through sandwich immunoreaction events. The parameters of immunoassay, including the loading of magnetic beads, the amount of gold nanoparticle conjugate, and the immunoreaction time, were optimized. The detection limit of 0.02 microg ml(-1) of IgG was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. Such particle-based electrochemical magnetic immunosensors could be readily used for simultaneous parallel detection of multiple proteins by using multiple inorganic metal nanoparticle tracers and are expected to open new opportunities for disease diagnostics and biosecurity.

  19. Light Microscopy Microscope Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-04

    Ground testing for the first confocal Light Microscopy Microscope (LMM) Experiment. Procter and Gamble is working with NASA Glenn scientists to prepare for a study that examines product stabilizers in a microgravity environment. The particles in the tube glow orange because they have been fluorescently tagged with a dye that reacts to green laser lights to allow construction of a 3D image point by point. The experiment, which will be sent to the ISS later this year, will help P&G develop improved product stabilizers to extend shelf life and develop more environmentally friendly packaging.

  20. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  1. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries. PMID:26400671

  2. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Finally, our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.

  3. Parallel Optical and Electrochemical DNA Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Wolfgang; Liu, Jianyun; Niu, Lifang; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Tiefenauer, Louis

    This contribution introduces strategies for the sensitive detection of oligonucleotides as bio-analytes binding from solution to a variety of probe architectures assembled at the (Au-) sensor surface. Detection principles based on surface plasmon optics and electrochemical techniques are compared. In particular, cyclic- and square wave voltammetry (SWV) are applied for the read-out of ferrocene redox labels conjugated to streptavidin that binds to the (biotinylated) DNA targets after hybridizing to the interfacial probe matrix of either DNA or peptide nucleic acid (PNA) strands. By employing streptavidin modified with fluorophores the identical sensor architecture can be used for the recording of hybridization reactions by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). The Langmuir isotherms determined by both techniques, i.e., by SWV and SPFS, give virtually identical affinity constants KA, confirming that the mode of detection has no influence on the hybridization reaction. By using semiconducting nanoparticles as luminescence labels that can be tuned in their bandgap energies over a wide range of emission wavelengths surface plasmon fluorescence microscopy allows for the parallel read-out of multiple analyte binding events simultaneously.

  4. Electrochemical chloride extraction: efficiency and side effects

    SciTech Connect

    Orellan, J.C.; Escadeillas, G.; Arliguie, G

    2004-02-01

    Some specimens of reinforced concrete cast with an alkali-resistant aggregate, previously maintained in a solution of NaCl, were subjected to an electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). The chloride profiles before and after treatment were determined. Likewise, alkali ions profiles before and after treatment were determined. After treatment, some specimens were stored in a controlled atmosphere (60 deg. C and 100% RH) in order to accelerate the alkali-silica reaction, if any. Results of chloride content after treatment show that about 40% of the initial chloride is removed within 7 weeks. About one-half of the chloride close to steel was removed, but at the same time, significant amounts of alkali ions were observed around the steel. Microstructural observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that after treatment, new cementitious phases containing higher concentrations of sodium, aluminum and potassium were formed. Moreover, alkali-silica gel was observed in the specimens stored at 60 deg. C and 100% RH. It may be possible that the ECE accumulates locally high amounts of alkali ions that stimulate the alkali-silica reaction even though the concrete contained nominally inert siliceous aggregates. The specimen expansions were not recorded, but no cracks were observed.

  5. Electrochemical binding and wiring in battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejovnik, S.; Dominko, R.; Bele, M.; Gaberscek, M.; Jamnik, J.

    Binders in battery electrodes not only provide mechanical cohesiveness during battery operation but can also affect the electrode properties via the surface modification. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we study the surface structuring of three binders: polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and gelatin. We try to find correlation between the observed structures and the measured electrochemical charge-discharge characteristics. We further measure the binding ability of gelatin adsorbed from solutions of different pHs. While the best binding ability of gelatin is obtained at pH about 9, the least polarization is observed at pH 12. Both properties are explained based on the observed gelatin structuring as a function of pH. In the second part of this study, gelatin is used as a surface agent that dictates the organization of nanometre-sized carbon black particles around micrometre-sized cathodic active particles. Using microcontact impedance measurements on polished pellets we show that using gelatin-forced carbon black deposition the average electronic resistance around LiMn 2O 4 particles is decreased by more than two orders of magnitude. We believe that it is this decrease in resistance that improves significantly the rate performance of various cathode materials, such as LiMn 2O 4 and LiCoO 2.

  6. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; ...

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratiomore » is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Finally, our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.« less

  7. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Finally, our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.

  8. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; ...

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratiomore » is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Finally, our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.« less

  9. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro-chemo-mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.

  10. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of NiO nanospindles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hai; Lv, Baoliang; Xu, Yao; Wu, Dong

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: NiO nanospindles with a different electrochemical activity as compared to those previous reports were synthesized via an agglomeration–dissolution–recrystallization growth process without the addition of any surfactant. - Highlights: • NiO nanospindles were synthesized without the addition of any surfactant. • The agglomeration–dissolution–recrystallization growth process was used to explain the precursors’ formation process of the spindle-like NiO. • As-obtained spindle-like NiO showed a different electrochemical activity as compared to those previous reports. - Abstract: NiO nanospindles were successfully synthesized via a hydrothermal and post-treatment method. The as-synthesized nanospindles were about several hundred nanometers in width and about one micrometer in length. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the spindle-like structure was cubic NiO phase crystalline. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis indicated that these NiO nanospindles were of single crystal nature. On the basis of time-dependent experiments, a possible agglomeration–dissolution–recrystallization growth process was proposed to explain the formation process of the spindle-like precursors. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement showed that the as-prepared spindle-like NiO exhibited a pseudo-capacitance behavior.

  11. Graphene-MnO 2 and graphene asymmetrical electrochemical capacitor with a high energy density in aqueous electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lingjuan; Zhu, Gang; Wang, Jianfang; Kang, Liping; Liu, Zong-Huai; Yang, Zupei; Wang, Zenglin

    The graphene-manganese oxide hybrid material has been prepared by solution-phase assembly of aqueous dispersions of graphene nanosheets and manganese oxide nanosheets at room temperature. The morphology and structure of the obtained material are examined by scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and N 2 adsorption-desorption. Electrochemical properties are characterized by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. An asymmetric electrochemical capacitor with high energy and power densities based on the graphene-manganese oxide hybrid material as positive electrode and graphene as negative electrode in a neutral aqueous Na 2SO 4 solution as electrolyte is assembled. The asymmetrical electrochemical capacitor could cycle reversibly in a voltage of 0-1.7 V and give an energy density of 10.03 Wh kg -1 even at an average power density of 2.53 kW kg -1. Moreover, the asymmetrical electrochemical capacitor exhibit excellent cycle stability, and the capacitance retention of the asymmetrical electrochemical capacitor is 69% after repeating the galvanostatic charge-discharge test at the constant current density of 2230 mA g -1 for 10,000 cycles.

  12. Electrochemical synthesis of nanostructured materials for electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Gao-Ren; Xu, Han; Lu, Xue-Feng; Feng, Jin-Xian; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2013-05-21

    Electrochemical synthesis represents a highly efficient method for the fabrication of nanostructured energy materials, and various nanostructures, such as nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes, nanosheets, dendritic nanostructures, and composite nanostructures, can be easily fabricated with advantages of low cost, low synthetic temperature, high purity, simplicity, and environmental friendliness. The electrochemical synthesis, characterization, and application of electrochemical energy nanomaterials have advanced greatly in the past few decades, allowing an increasing understanding of nanostructure-property-performance relationships. Herein, we highlight some recent progress in the electrochemical synthesis of electrochemical energy materials with the assistance of additives and templates in solution or grafted onto metal or conductive polymer supports, with special attention to the effects on surface morphologies, structures and, more importantly, electrochemical performance. The methodology for preparing novel electrochemical energy nanomaterials and their potential applications has been summarized. Finally, we outline our personal perspectives on the electrochemical synthesis and applications of electrochemical energy nanomaterials.

  13. Silver stain for electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Ammoniacal silver stain used for light microscopy was adapted advantageously for use with very thin biological sections required for electron microscopy. Silver stain can be performed in short time, has more contrast, and is especially useful for low power electron microscopy.

  14. Multi-pass microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Juffmann, Thomas; Klopfer, Brannon B.; Frankort, Timmo L.I.; Haslinger, Philipp; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Microscopy of biological specimens often requires low light levels to avoid damage. This yields images impaired by shot noise. An improved measurement accuracy at the Heisenberg limit can be achieved exploiting quantum correlations. If sample damage is the limiting resource, an equivalent limit can be reached by passing photons through a specimen multiple times sequentially. Here we use self-imaging cavities and employ a temporal post-selection scheme to present full-field multi-pass polarization and transmission micrographs with variance reductions of 4.4±0.8 dB (11.6±0.8 dB in a lossless setup) and 4.8±0.8 dB, respectively, compared with the single-pass shot-noise limit. If the accuracy is limited by the number of detected probe particles, our measurements show a variance reduction of 25.9±0.9 dB. The contrast enhancement capabilities in imaging and in diffraction studies are demonstrated with nanostructured samples and with embryonic kidney 293T cells. This approach to Heisenberg-limited microscopy does not rely on quantum state engineering. PMID:27670525

  15. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  16. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  17. Multi-pass microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Klopfer, Brannon B.; Frankort, Timmo L. I.; Haslinger, Philipp; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    Microscopy of biological specimens often requires low light levels to avoid damage. This yields images impaired by shot noise. An improved measurement accuracy at the Heisenberg limit can be achieved exploiting quantum correlations. If sample damage is the limiting resource, an equivalent limit can be reached by passing photons through a specimen multiple times sequentially. Here we use self-imaging cavities and employ a temporal post-selection scheme to present full-field multi-pass polarization and transmission micrographs with variance reductions of 4.4+/-0.8 dB (11.6+/-0.8 dB in a lossless setup) and 4.8+/-0.8 dB, respectively, compared with the single-pass shot-noise limit. If the accuracy is limited by the number of detected probe particles, our measurements show a variance reduction of 25.9+/-0.9 dB. The contrast enhancement capabilities in imaging and in diffraction studies are demonstrated with nanostructured samples and with embryonic kidney 293T cells. This approach to Heisenberg-limited microscopy does not rely on quantum state engineering.

  18. Electrochemical glucose biosensor of platinum nanospheres connected by carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Jonathan C; Kim, Sungwon S; Haque, Aeraj Ul; Artiles, Mayra S; Porterfield, D Marshall; Fisher, Timothy S

    2010-03-01

    Glucose biosensors comprised of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and metallic nanoparticles offer enhanced electrochemical performance that produces highly sensitive glucose sensing. This article presents a facile biosensor fabrication and biofunctionalization procedure that utilizes CNTs electrochemically decorated with platinum (Pt) nanospheres to sense glucose amperometrically with high sensitivity. Carbon nanotubes are grown in situ by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) and electro-chemically decorated with Pt nanospheres to form a CNT/Pt nanosphere composite biosensor. Carbon nanotube electrodes are immobilized with fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and analyzed with fluorescence microscopy to demonstrate their biocompatibility. The enzyme glucose oxidase (GO(X)) is immobilized onto the CNT/Pt nanosphere biosensor by a simple drop-coat method for amperometric glucose sensing. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrates the biofunctionalization capability of the sensor by portraying adsorption of fluorescently labeled BSA unto MPCVD-grown CNT electrodes. The subsequent GO(X)-CNT/Pt nanosphere biosensor demonstrates a high sensitivity toward H(2)O(2) (7.4 microA/mM/cm(2)) and glucose (70 microA/mM/cm(2)), with a glucose detection limit and response time of 380 nM (signal-to-noise ratio = 3) and 8 s (t(90%)), respectively. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (0.64 mM) of the biosensor also reflects the improved sensitivity of the immobilized GO(X)/nanomaterial complexes. The GO(X)-CNT/Pt nanosphere biosensor outperforms similar CNT, metallic nanoparticle, and more conventional carbon-based biosensors in terms of glucose sensitivity and detection limit. The biosensor fabrication and biofunctionalization scheme can easily be scaled and adapted for microsensors for physiological research applications that require highly sensitive glucose sensing. (c) 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  19. Electrochemical Glucose Biosensor of Platinum Nanospheres Connected by Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, Jonathan C.; Kim, Sungwon S.; Haque, Aeraj ul; Artiles, Mayra S.; Porterfield, D. Marshall; Fisher, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucose biosensors comprised of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and metallic nanoparticles offer enhanced electrochemical performance that produces highly sensitive glucose sensing. This article presents a facile biosensor fabrication and biofunctionalization procedure that utilizes CNTs electrochemically decorated with platinum (Pt) nanospheres to sense glucose amperometrically with high sensitivity. Method Carbon nanotubes are grown in situ by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) and electro-chemically decorated with Pt nanospheres to form a CNT/Pt nanosphere composite biosensor. Carbon nanotube electrodes are immobilized with fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and analyzed with fluorescence microscopy to demonstrate their biocompatibility. The enzyme glucose oxidase (GOX) is immobilized onto the CNT/Pt nanosphere biosensor by a simple drop-coat method for amperometric glucose sensing. Results Fluorescence microscopy demonstrates the biofunctionalization capability of the sensor by portraying adsorption of fluorescently labeled BSA unto MPCVD-grown CNT electrodes. The subsequent GOX–CNT/Pt nanosphere biosensor demonstrates a high sensitivity toward H2O2 (7.4 μA/mM/cm2) and glucose (70 μA/mM/cm2), with a glucose detection limit and response time of 380 nM (signal-to-noise ratio = 3) and 8 s (t90%), respectively. The apparent Michaelis–Menten constant (0.64 mM) of the biosensor also reflects the improved sensitivity of the immobilized GOX/nanomaterial complexes. Conclusions The GOX–CNT/Pt nanosphere biosensor outperforms similar CNT, metallic nanoparticle, and more conventional carbon-based biosensors in terms of glucose sensitivity and detection limit. The biosensor fabrication and biofunctionalization scheme can easily be scaled and adapted for microsensors for physiological research applications that require highly sensitive glucose sensing. PMID:20307391

  20. Enhanced Electrochemical Catalytic Efficiencies of Electrochemically Deposited Platinum Nanocubes as a Counter Electrode for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Wu, Hsuan-Chung; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Tsai, Chuen-Horng; Hsieh, Chien-Kuo

    2015-12-01

    Platinum nanocubes (PtNCs) were deposited onto a fluorine-doped tin oxide glass by electrochemical deposition (ECD) method and utilized as a counter electrode (CE) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). In this study, we controlled the growth of the crystalline plane to synthesize the single-crystal PtNCs at room temperature. The morphologies and crystalline nanostructure of the ECD PtNCs were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The surface roughness of the ECD PtNCs was examined by atomic force microscopy. The electrochemical properties of the ECD PtNCs were analyzed by cyclic voltammetry, Tafel polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectra. The Pt loading was examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The DSSCs were assembled via an N719 dye-sensitized titanium dioxide working electrode, an iodine-based electrolyte, and a CE. The photoelectric conversion efficiency (PCE) of the DSSCs with the ECD PtNC CE was examined under the illumination of AM 1.5 (100 mWcm-2). The PtNCs in this study presented a single-crystal nanostructure that can raise the electron mobility to let up the charge-transfer impedance and promote the charge-transfer rate. In this work, the electrocatalytic mass activity (MA) of the Pt film and PtNCs was 1.508 and 4.088 mAmg-1, respectively, and the MA of PtNCs was 2.71 times than that of the Pt film. The DSSCs with the pulse-ECD PtNC CE showed a PCE of 6.48 %, which is higher than the cell using the conventional Pt film CE (a PCE of 6.18 %). In contrast to the conventional Pt film CE which is fabricated by electron beam evaporation method, our pulse-ECD PtNCs maximized the Pt catalytic properties as a CE in DSSCs. The results demonstrated that the PtNCs played a good catalyst for iodide/triiodide redox couple reactions in the DSSCs and provided a potential strategy for electrochemical catalytic applications.

  1. Thin-film Electrochemistry of Single Prussian Blue Nanoparticles Revealed by Surface Plasmon Resonance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dan; Sun, Linlin; Liu, Tao; Wang, Wei

    2017-10-06

    Electrochemical behaviors of Prussian blue (PB) have been intensively studied for decades because it not only serves as a model electro-active nanomaterial in fundamental electrochemistry, but also a promising metal-ion storage electrode material for developing rechargeable batteries. Traditional electrochemical studies are mostly based on bulk materials, leading to an averaged property of billions of PB nanoparticles. In the present work, we employed surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) to resolve the optical cyclic voltammograms of single PB nanoparticles during electrochemical cycling. It was found that the electrochemical behavior of single PB nanoparticles nicely followed a classical thin-film electrochemistry theory. While kinetic controlled electron transfer was observed at slower scan rates, intra-particle diffusion of K+ ions began to take effect when the scan rate was higher than 60 mV/s. We further found that the electrochemical activity among individual PB nanoparticles was very heterogeneous and such a phenomenon has not been previously observed in the bulk measurements. The present work not only demonstrates the thin-film electrochemical feature of single electro-active nanomaterials for the first time, it also validates the applicability of SPRM technique to investigate a variety of metal ion-storage battery materials, with implications in both fundamental nano-electrochemistry and electro-active materials for sensing and battery applications.

  2. Development of carbon electrodes for electrochemistry, solid-state electronics and multimodal atomic force microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Kirstin Claire

    Carbon is one of the most remarkable elements due to its wide abundance on Earth and its many allotropes, which include diamond and graphite. Many carbon allotropes are conductive and in recent decades scientists have discovered and synthesized many new forms of carbon, including graphene and carbon nanotubes. The work in this thesis specifically focuses on the fabrication and characterization of pyrolyzed parylene C (PPC), a conductive pyrocarbon, as an electrode material for diodes, as a conductive coating for atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes and as an ultramicroelectrode (UME) for the electrochemical interrogation of cellular systems in vitro. Herein, planar and three-dimensional (3D) PPC electrodes were microscopically, spectroscopically and electrochemically characterized. First, planar PPC films and PPC-coated nanopipettes were utilized to detect a model redox species, Ru(NH3) 6Cl3. Then, free-standing PPC thin films were chemically doped, with hydrazine and concentrated nitric acid, to yield p- and n-type carbon films. Doped PPC thin films were positioned in conjunction with doped silicon to create Schottky and p-n junction diodes for use in an alternating current half-wave rectifier circuit. Pyrolyzed parylene C has found particular merit as a 3D electrode coating of AFM probes. Current sensing-atomic force microscopy imaging in air of nanoscale metallic features was undertaken to demonstrate the electronic imaging applicability of PPC AFM probes. Upon further insulation with parylene C and modification with a focused ion beam, a PPC UME was microfabricated near the AFM probe apex and utilized for electrochemical imaging. Subsequently, scanning electrochemical microscopy-atomic force microscopy imaging was undertaken to electrochemically quantify and image the spatial location of dopamine exocytotic release, elicited mechanically via the AFM probe itself, from differentiated pheochromocytoma 12 cells in vitro.

  3. Electrochemically Controlled Ion-exchange Property of Carbon Nanotubes/Polypyrrole Nanocomposite in Various Electrolyte Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Daiwon; Zhu, Chengzhou; Fu, Shaofang; Du, Dan; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-09-15

    The electrochemically controlled ion-exchange properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT)/electronically conductive polypyrrole (PPy) polymer composite in the various electrolyte solutions have been investigated. The ion-exchange behavior, rate and capacity of the electrochemically deposited polypyrrole with and without carbon nanotube (CNT) were compared and characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It has been found that the presence of carbon nanotube backbone resulted in improvement in ion-exchange rate, stability of polypyrrole, and higher anion loading capacity per PPy due to higher surface area, electronic conductivity, porous structure of thin film, and thinner film thickness providing shorter diffusion path. Chronoamperometric studies show that electrically switched anion exchange could be completed more than 10 times faster than pure PPy thin film. The anion selectivity of CNT/PPy film is demonstrated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  4. Study on synthesis and electrochemical properties of hematite nanotubes for energy storage in supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, D. Muthu Gnana Theresa; Sagayaraj, P.

    2015-06-01

    Hematite nanotubes (α-Fe2O3 NTs) are synthesized via a cost-effective and environmental-friendly hydrothermal technique. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction analyses reveal the formation of α-Fe2O3 NTs with high crystallinity and purity. Optical behavior of α-Fe2O3 NTs is studied employing UV-visible spectroscopy. Electrochemical properties of the as-prepared electrode material are investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in a three electrode cell. The synthesized α-Fe2O3 NTs present enhanced pseudocapacitive performance with high specific capacity of 230 Fg-1 at current density of 1 Ag-1. The prepared α-Fe2O3 NTs can be utilized as a potential electrode material for electrochemical capacitor applications.

  5. Electrochemical performance of zinchydroxide Zn(OH)2 nanosheet for supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasirekha, C.; Arumugam, S.

    2017-05-01

    Zn(OH)2 nanosheet was synthesized using Zinc acetate as precursor and Sucrose as a capping agent. The structure and morphology of the prepared Zn(OH)2 were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern indicated the orthorhombic structure of the Zn(OH)2 nanosheet. The average particle size of the prepared Zn(OH)2 sample was found to be 28 nm. The surface morphology shows a nanosheet-like structure. The electrochemical performance was analyzed using CHI 660 D Electrochemical workstation. Electrochemical studies indicate that the Zn(OH)2 nanosheet exhibit maximum specific capacitance of 126 F g-1 at a current density of 0.1 A g-1.

  6. Electrochemical Polishing Applications and EIS of a Novel Choline Chloride-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wixtrom, Alex I.; Buhler, Jessica E.; Reece, Charles E.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2013-06-01

    Minimal surface roughness is a critical feature for high-field superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used to engineer particle accelerators. Current methods for polishing Niobium cavities typically utilize solutions containing a mixture of concentrated sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid. Polishing processes such as these are effective, yet there are many hazards and costs associated with the use (and safe disposal) of the concentrated acid solutions. An alternative method for electrochemical polishing of the cavities was explored using a novel ionic liquid solution containing choline chloride. Potentiostatic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to analyze the ionic polishing solution. Final surface roughness of the Nb was found to be comparable to that of the acid-polishing method, as assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This indicates that ionic liquid-based electrochemical polishing of Nb is a viable replacement for acid-based methods for preparation of SRF cavities.

  7. Study on synthesis and electrochemical properties of hematite nanotubes for energy storage in supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, D. Muthu Gnana Theresa; Sagayaraj, P.

    2015-06-24

    Hematite nanotubes (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NTs) are synthesized via a cost-effective and environmental-friendly hydrothermal technique. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction analyses reveal the formation of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NTs with high crystallinity and purity. Optical behavior of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NTs is studied employing UV-visible spectroscopy. Electrochemical properties of the as-prepared electrode material are investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in a three electrode cell. The synthesized α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NTs present enhanced pseudocapacitive performance with high specific capacity of 230 Fg{sup −1} at current density of 1 Ag{sup −1}. The prepared α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NTs can be utilized as a potential electrode material for electrochemical capacitor applications.

  8. Electrochemically deposited gold nanoparticles on a carbon paste electrode surface for the determination of mercury.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Srikant; Satpati, Ashis Kumar; Reddy, Annareddy Venkata Ramana

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical method was developed for the determination of Hg at ultratrace levels using an Au nanoparticle (AuNP) array modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) by anodic stripping voltammetry. Scanning electron microscopy measurements imaged the size and shape of AuNPs on the CPE substrate; it was possible to tune the size and the NP density by changing the deposition time and medium. Electrochemical characterization of the AuNP modified CPE was carried out using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance measurements. Interferences due to some commonly occurring metal ions and surfactants on the stripping peak of Hg were also investigated. The 3σ detection limit for Hg using the AuNP modified electrode was as 0.24 μg/L. This method was applied to determine Hg in soil samples.

  9. Electrochemical assisted photocatalytic degradation of salicylic acid with highly ordered TiO2 nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Zhu, Jinwei; Wang, Ying; Feng, Jiangtao; Yan, Wei; Xu, Hao

    2014-07-01

    To explore the kinetics of photoelectrocatalytic degradation of salicylic acid, one of the important PPCPs, highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTs) were prepared by the electrochemical anodization and characterized with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The effect of TiO2 NTs properties, bias potential, initial salicylic acid concentration and solution pH on the degradation efficiency was studied and carefully analyzed. The results revealed that the salicylic acid degradation follows quasi-first order kinetics in the photoelectrocatalytic process, and the fastest decay kinetics was achieved in acidic environment (pH 2). The result was further interpreted through the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is confirmed that the electrochemical assisted photocatalysis is a synergetic approach to combat stable organic substances with improved efficiency.

  10. In situ characterization of localized corrosion of stainless steel by scanning electrochemical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yuehua; Niu, Lin; Lu, Min; Guo, Weikuan; Chen, Shenhao

    2009-08-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) area scan measurements have been performed to investigate the localized corrosion of type 304 stainless steel in neutral chloride solution. Variations in the Faradaic current measured at selected tip potential values can be related to changes in the local concentration and electrochemical activities of electroactive species involved in corrosion reactions occurring at the substrate as a function of immersion times of the substrate and polarized currents or potentials applied on the substrate. To further verify the results acquired from cyclic voltammetric experiments, SECM measurements were employed to in situ study the compositions and electrochemical activity distribution profile of the pitting corrosion products of stainless steel. It has been demonstrated that the combination of feedback current mode with generation-collection (G-C) mode of SECM is suitable to elucidate the possible reaction mechanisms and paths involved in the localize corrosion of stainless steel in neutral chloride solution.

  11. Corrosion monitoring system based on measurement and analysis of electrochemical noise

    SciTech Connect

    Legat, A.; Dolecek, V.

    1995-04-01

    A corrosion monitoring system using electrochemical noise measurements and their numerical analysis was developed. Electrochemical noise was measured in a freely corroding system containing three identical metal electrodes. A voltage signal generated by the first pair of electrodes and a current signal generated by the second pair were measured, and the data were fed into a computer. A mathematical model that included signal processing and pattern recognition was implemented using computer software. Analysis of the electrochemical noise enabled determination of the corrosion rate and the corrosion type. The reliability of the corrosion monitoring system was tested against various reference methods (visual inspection, scanning electron microscopy, current-vs-potential curves, and electrical resistance). Tests were performed on steel and aluminum in aqueous solutions of various pH and conductivity values.

  12. Electrochemical characteristics and impedance spectroscopy studies of nano-cobalt silicate hydroxide for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhao, Yong-Qing; Tao, Feng; Li, Hu-Lin

    Cobalt silicate hydroxide (Co 3[Si 2O 5] 2[OH] 2) was prepared by chemical method for use in electrochemical capacitors. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests indicate that the material was pure hexagonal phase with uniform nanometer size distribution. Cyclic voltammeter (CV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements show that the cobalt silicate hydroxide-based electrode has stable electrochemical capacitor properties between potential range of 0.1-0.55 V with a maximum specific capacitance of 237 F g -1 in alkaline solution and 95% of capacity efficiency was reached after 150 cycles. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) investigation illustrates that the capacitance of the test electrode was mainly consisted of pseudo-capacitance, which was caused by underpotential deposition of H 3O + at the electrode surface.

  13. Chitosan/graphene oxide nanocomposite films with enhanced interfacial interaction and their electrochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Linghao; Wang, Hongfang; Xia, Guangmei; Sun, Jing; Song, Rui

    2014-09-01

    A series of chitosan (CS) nanocomposites incorporated with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were facilely prepared by sonochemical method. Characterized by scanning electron microscopy, the obtained nanocomposites showed fine dispersion of GO in the CS matrix. Meanwhile, a marked interfacial interaction was also revealed as the values of glass transition temperature, the decomposition temperature and the storage modulus were significantly increased with the addition of GO. Furthermore, the well dispersed GO nanosheets could significantly improve the electrochemical activity of the CS as demonstrated by the electrochemical behaviors of pure CS and the GO/CS composite electrodes. Hence, the GO/CS nanocomposites film could be a promising candidate in the fabrication of electrochemical biosensors.

  14. Image Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksa, Indrajith

    In this thesis we describe an enhancement to the Atomic force microscope (AFM) to simultaneously gather topographic features and spectroscopic information .Compared to the current state of the art of near-field excitation and far-field detection AFM imaging techniques our system uses a radical new approach near-field excitation and near-field detection. By placing the detector in the near-field we achieve high signal to noise and single molecular resolution. The origin of our near-field detector signal is the image force gradient due to the interaction of the stimulated molecular dipole with its image on the metal probe. We designed and built an optical and electronic system to capture this signal and simultaneously image nano-scale surface topography and optical image force gradient. By varying the wavelength of the excitation beam we measure the induced optical image force gradient spectra of molecules on surface. These spectra show good agreement with the absorption spectra of the bulk molecules measured by conventional absorption spectroscopy. We show that image force gradient is directly proportional to the optical absorption dipole strength. Using Finite Element 3D electromagnetic simulations and using Lorentz model for the excited molecular dipole we showed that the image force gradient has a decay length of 1nm, making the theoretical resolution of this microscopy technique approximately 1 nm. This rapid decay was measured experimentally .This resolution was seen by the high contrasting spectroscopic images of molecules on the surface. In follow on experiments this technique was extended to provide surface Raman spectroscopy and microscopy at molecular resolution. We create an image force gradient interaction through optical parametric down conversion between stimulated Raman excited molecules on a surface and a cantilevered nanometer scale probe brought very close to it. Spectroscopy and microscopy on clusters of molecules have been performed. Single

  15. Applications of subsurface microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Farahi, Rubye H; Voy, Brynn H; Thundat, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Exploring the interior of a cell is of tremendous importance in order to assess the effects of nanomaterials on biological systems. Outside of a controlled laboratory environment, nanomaterials will most likely not be conveniently labeled or tagged so that their translocation within a biological system cannot be easily identified and quantified. Ideally, the characterization of nanomaterials within a cell requires a nondestructive, label-free, and subsurface approach. Subsurface nanoscale imaging represents a real challenge for instrumentation. Indeed the tools available for high resolution characterization, including optical, electron or scanning probe microscopies, mainly provide topography images or require taggants that fluoresce. Although the intercellular environment holds a great deal of information, subsurface visualization remains a poorly explored area. Recently, it was discovered that by mechanically perturbing a sample, it was possible to observe its response in time with nanoscale resolution by probing the surface with a micro-resonator such as a microcantilever probe. Microcantilevers are used as the force-sensing probes in atomic force microscopy (AFM), where the nanometer-scale probe tip on the microcantilever interacts with the sample in a highly controlled manner to produce high-resolution raster-scanned information of the sample surface. Taking advantage of the existing capabilities of AFM, we present a novel technique, mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM), which has the ability to probe subsurface structures such as non-labeled nanoparticles embedded in a cell. In MSAFM mechanical actuators (PZTs) excite the probe and the sample at different frequencies as depicted in the first figure of this chapter. The nonlinear nature of the tip-sample interaction, at the point of contact of the probe and the surface of the sample, in the contact mode AFM configuration permits the mixing of the elastic waves. The new dynamic system comprises new

  16. Preparation and electrochemistry of one-dimensional nanostructured MnO 2/PPy composite for electrochemical capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Cui, Li; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2010-04-01

    One-dimensional nanostructured manganese dioxide/polypyrrole (MnO 2/PPy) composite was prepared by in situ chemical oxidation polymerization of pyrrole in the host of inorganic matrix of MnO 2, using complex of methyl orange (MO)/FeCl 3 as a reactive self-degraded soft-template. The morphology and structure of the composite were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR) X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the MnO 2/PPy composite consists of α-MnO 2 and PPy with nanotube-like structure. Electrochemical properties of the composite demonstrated the material showed good electrochemical reversibility after 500 charge-discharge cycles in the potential range of -0.4 to 0.6 V, the tube-like nanocomposite has the potential application in electrochemical capacitor.

  17. Graphene oxide functionalized with silver nanoparticles as conducting electrodes for solar cells and electrochemical energy storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Kakarla Raghava; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando

    2017-06-01

    We present the development of novel electrochemical supercapacitor and sensor based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles coated graphene oxide (GO). 10-20 nm diameter of Ag nanoparticles were well dispersed on the surface of graphene oxide through the chemical reduction method. Ag-coated GO nanohybrids were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, electrical and an electrochemical analysis for the energy storage (supercapacitors), energy conversion (solar cells) and sensor applications. It is found that nanohybrid electrodes showed good specific capacitance and electrochemical sensing performance in comparison to pristine GO. The improvement in the electrochemical characteristics can be attributed to the sensitizing effect between Ag nanparticles and GO. These GO/Ag hybrid transparent conducting films also show low resistance and good transmittance, suggesting they are good electrodes for the opto-electronic devices (e.g. solar cells).

  18. Electrochemical Behavior of Pure Copper in Phosphate Buffer Solutions: A Comparison Between Micro- and Nano-Grained Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imantalab, O.; Fattah-alhosseini, A.; Keshavarz, M. K.; Mazaheri, Y.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, electrochemical behavior of annealed (micro-) and nano-grained pure copper (fabricated by accumulative roll bonding process) in phosphate buffer solutions of various pH values ranging from 10.69 to 12.59 has been studied. Before any electrochemical measurements, evaluation of microstructure was obtained by optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy. To investigate the electrochemical behavior of the samples, the potentiodynamic polarization, Mott-Schottky analysis, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were carried out. Potentiodynamic polarization plots and EIS measurements revealed that as a result of grain refinement, the passive behavior of the nano-grained sample was improved compared to that of annealed pure copper. Also, Mott-Schottky analysis indicated that the passive films behaved as p-type semiconductors and grain refinement did not change the semiconductor type of passive films.

  19. Structure and opto-electrochemical properties of ZnO nanowires grown on n-Si substrate.

    PubMed

    Ladanov, Mikhail; Ram, Manoj K; Matthews, Garrett; Kumar, Ashok

    2011-07-19

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures have attracted great attention as a promising functional material with unique properties suitable for applications in UV lasers, light emitting diodes, field emission devices, sensors, field effect transistors, and solar cells. In the present work, ZnO nanowires have been synthesized on an n-type Si substrate using a hydrothermal method where surfactant acted as a modifying and protecting agent. The surface morphology, electrochemical properties, and opto-electrochemical properties of ZnO nanowires are investigated by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), cyclic voltammetry, and impedance spectroscopy techniques. The cycling characteristics and rate capability of the ZnO nanowires are explored through electrochemical studies performed under varying electrolytes. The photo response is observed using UV radiation. It is demonstrated that crystallinity, particle size, and morphology all play significant roles in the electrochemical performance of the ZnO electrodes.

  20. Electrochemical Performance Estimation of Anodized AZ31B Magnesium Alloy as Function of Change in the Current Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girón, L.; Aperador, W.; Tirado, L.; Franco, F.; Caicedo, J. C.

    2017-06-01

    The anodized AZ31B magnesium alloys were synthesized via electrodeposition processes. The aim of this work was to determine the electrochemical behavior of magnesium alloys by using anodized alloys as a protective coating. The anodized alloys were characterized by x-ray diffraction, exhibiting the crystallography orientation for Mg and MgO phases. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the chemical composition of anodized magnesium alloys. By using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Tafel curves, it was possible to estimate the electrochemical behavior of anodized AZ31B magnesium alloys in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). Scanning electron microscopy was performed to analyze chemical changes and morphological surface changes on anodized Mg alloys due to the reaction in HBSS/anodized magnesium surface interface. Electrochemical behavior in HBSS indicates that the coatings may be a promising material for biomedical industry.

  1. Electrochemical Performance Estimation of Anodized AZ31B Magnesium Alloy as Function of Change in the Current Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girón, L.; Aperador, W.; Tirado, L.; Franco, F.; Caicedo, J. C.

    2017-08-01

    The anodized AZ31B magnesium alloys were synthesized via electrodeposition processes. The aim of this work was to determine the electrochemical behavior of magnesium alloys by using anodized alloys as a protective coating. The anodized alloys were characterized by x-ray diffraction, exhibiting the crystallography orientation for Mg and MgO phases. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the chemical composition of anodized magnesium alloys. By using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Tafel curves, it was possible to estimate the electrochemical behavior of anodized AZ31B magnesium alloys in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). Scanning electron microscopy was performed to analyze chemical changes and morphological surface changes on anodized Mg alloys due to the reaction in HBSS/anodized magnesium surface interface. Electrochemical behavior in HBSS indicates that the coatings may be a promising material for biomedical industry.

  2. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Darling, Seth B.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  3. Electrochemical corrosion of metallic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Pourbaix, M

    1984-05-01

    Methods of electrochemical thermodynamics (electrode potential-pH equilibrium diagrams) and electrochemical kinetics (polarization curves) may help to understand and predict the corrosion behaviour of metals and alloys in the presence of body fluids. A short review of the literature is given concerning some applications of such methods, both in vitro and in vivo, relating to surgical implants (stainless steels, chromium-cobalt-molybdenum alloys, titanium and titanium alloys) and to dental alloys (silver-tin-copper amalgams, silver-base and gold-base casting alloys, nickel-base casting alloys). Attention is drawn to the necessity of more basic research on crevice- and fretting-corrosion of surgical implant materials and dental alloys, and to the toxicity of corrosion products. A perfect understanding of the exact significance of electrode-potentials is essential for the success of such a task.

  4. Electrochemically driven mechanical energy harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangtae; Choi, Soon Ju; Zhao, Kejie; Yang, Hui; Gobbi, Giorgia; Zhang, Sulin; Li, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Efficient mechanical energy harvesters enable various wearable devices and auxiliary energy supply. Here we report a novel class of mechanical energy harvesters via stress–voltage coupling in electrochemically alloyed electrodes. The device consists of two identical Li-alloyed Si as electrodes, separated by electrolyte-soaked polymer membranes. Bending-induced asymmetric stresses generate chemical potential difference, driving lithium ion flux from the compressed to the tensed electrode to generate electrical current. Removing the bending reverses ion flux and electrical current. Our thermodynamic analysis reveals that the ideal energy-harvesting efficiency of this device is dictated by the Poisson's ratio of the electrodes. For the thin-film-based energy harvester used in this study, the device has achieved a generating capacity of 15%. The device demonstrates a practical use of stress-composition–voltage coupling in electrochemically active alloys to harvest low-grade mechanical energies from various low-frequency motions, such as everyday human activities. PMID:26733282

  5. A Parylene Bellows Electrochemical Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Po-Ying; Sheybani, Roya; Gutierrez, Christian A.; Kuo, Jonathan T. W.; Meng, Ellis

    2011-01-01

    We present the first electrochemical actuator with Parylene bellows for large-deflection operation. The bellows diaphragm was fabricated using a polyethylene-glycol-based sacrificial molding technique followed by coating in Parylene C. Bellows were mechanically characterized and integrated with a pair of interdigitated electrodes to form an electrochemical actuator that is suitable for low-power pumping of fluids. Pump performance (gas generation rate and pump efficiency) was optimized through a careful examination of geometrical factors. Overall, a maximum pump efficiency of 90% was achieved in the case of electroplated electrodes, and a deflection of over 1.5 mm was demonstrated. Real-time wireless operation was achieved. The complete fabrication process and the materials used in this actuator are bio-compatible, which makes it suitable for biological and medical applications. PMID:21318081

  6. Electrochemical treatment of liquid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.

    1996-10-01

    Electrochemical treatment processes are being evaluated and developed for the destruction of organic compounds and nitrates/nitrites and the removal of other hazardous species from liquid wastes stored throughout the DOE complex. This activity consists of five major tasks: (1) evaluation of different electrochemical reactors for the destruction and removal of hazardous waste components, (2) development and validation of engineering process models, (3) radioactive laboratory-scale tests, (4) demonstration of the technology in an engineering-scale size reactor, and (5) analysis and evaluation of testing data. The development program team is comprised of individuals from federal, academic, and private industry. Work is being carried out in DOE, academic, and private industrial laboratories.

  7. Electrochemically driven mechanical energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangtae; Choi, Soon Ju; Zhao, Kejie; Yang, Hui; Gobbi, Giorgia; Zhang, Sulin; Li, Ju

    2016-01-06

    Efficient mechanical energy harvesters enable various wearable devices and auxiliary energy supply. Here we report a novel class of mechanical energy harvesters via stress-voltage coupling in electrochemically alloyed electrodes. The device consists of two identical Li-alloyed Si as electrodes, separated by electrolyte-soaked polymer membranes. Bending-induced asymmetric stresses generate chemical potential difference, driving lithium ion flux from the compressed to the tensed electrode to generate electrical current. Removing the bending reverses ion flux and electrical current. Our thermodynamic analysis reveals that the ideal energy-harvesting efficiency of this device is dictated by the Poisson's ratio of the electrodes. For the thin-film-based energy harvester used in this study, the device has achieved a generating capacity of 15%. The device demonstrates a practical use of stress-composition-voltage coupling in electrochemically active alloys to harvest low-grade mechanical energies from various low-frequency motions, such as everyday human activities.

  8. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  9. Electrochemical oxidation of chemical weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Surma, J.E.

    1994-05-01

    Catalyzed electrochemical oxidation (CEO), a low-temperature electrochemical oxidation technique, is being examined for its potential use in destroying chemical warfare agents. The CEO process oxidizes organic compounds to form carbon dioxide and water. A bench-scale CEO system was used in three separate tests sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Intelligence and National Security through the Advanced Concepts Program. The tests examined the effectiveness of CEO in destroying sarin (GB), a chemical nerve agent. The tests used 0.5 mL, 0.95 mL, and 1.0 mL of GB, corresponding to 544 mg, 816 mg, and 1,090 mg, respectively, of GB. Analysis of the off gas showed that, under continuous processing of the GB agent, destruction efficiencies of better than six 9s (99.9999% destroyed) could be achieved.

  10. Theory of electrochemical pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoph, J.; Eiswirth, M.

    2002-03-01

    The spatial coupling in electrochemical systems is mediated by ion migration under the influence of the electric field. Since field effects spread very rapidly, every point of an electrode can communicate with every other one practically instantaneously through migration coupling. Based on mathematical potential theory we present the derivation of a generally applicable reaction-migration equation, which describes the coupling via an integral over the whole electrode area. The corresponding coupling function depends only on the geometry of the electrode setup and has been computed for commonly used electrode shapes (such as ring, disk, ribbon or rectangle). The pattern formation observed in electrochemical systems in the bistable, excitable and oscillatory regime can be reproduced in computer simulations, and the types of patterns occurring under different geometries can be rationalized.

  11. Electrochemically driven mechanical energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangtae; Choi, Soon Ju; Zhao, Kejie; Yang, Hui; Gobbi, Giorgia; Zhang, Sulin; Li, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Efficient mechanical energy harvesters enable various wearable devices and auxiliary energy supply. Here we report a novel class of mechanical energy harvesters via stress-voltage coupling in electrochemically alloyed electrodes. The device consists of two identical Li-alloyed Si as electrodes, separated by electrolyte-soaked polymer membranes. Bending-induced asymmetric stresses generate chemical potential difference, driving lithium ion flux from the compressed to the tensed electrode to generate electrical current. Removing the bending reverses ion flux and electrical current. Our thermodynamic analysis reveals that the ideal energy-harvesting efficiency of this device is dictated by the Poisson's ratio of the electrodes. For the thin-film-based energy harvester used in this study, the device has achieved a generating capacity of 15%. The device demonstrates a practical use of stress-composition-voltage coupling in electrochemically active alloys to harvest low-grade mechanical energies from various low-frequency motions, such as everyday human activities.

  12. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  13. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens.

  14. Microscopy of photoionisation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseyev, S. A.; Mironov, B. N.; Minogin, V. G.; Cherkun, Aleksandr P.; Chekalin, Sergei V.

    2013-04-01

    A method is demonstrated which combines the ionisation of free molecules by a sharply focused femtosecond laser beam and projection microscopy in a divergent electric field. The electric field is produced in vacuum between a metallic tip and a flat positionsensitive charged particle detector. The method enables investigation of photoionisation processes in low-density gases with a subdiffraction spatial resolution and can be used as well in profile measurements for sharply focused, intense laser beams. In a demonstration experiment, a femtosecond laser beam with a peak intensity of ~1014 W cm-2 was focused to a 40-μm-diameter waist in vacuum near a millimetre-size tip and ~2-μm spatial resolution was achieved. According to our estimates, the use of a sharper tip will ensure a submicron spatial resolution, which is a crucial condition for the spatial diagnostics of sharply focused short-wavelength VUV radiation and X-rays.

  15. Waveguide optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Alexandre A.

    1997-08-01

    The theoretical aspects of the light scattering on the statistical irregularities of the planar optical waveguide are described. The analysis of direct and inverse light scattering problems is accomplished. The theoretical investigation predicts: the lateral resolution can attain approximately 20 nm and the vertical resolution (in rms height) can attain approximately 1 angstrom. The limiting lateral resolution is a approximately 15-times less than Abbe's diffraction limit. Thus the superresolution may be accomplished by the waveguide optical microscopy (WOM). The increasing of WOM's resolution depends on a-priori information of the irregularities and on a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. A possible using of WOM for bioecological researchers has been mentioned.

  16. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O.; Huisken, Jan

    2015-09-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos.

  17. Photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goudonnet, J.P.; Salomon, L.; De Fornel, F.; Chabrier, G. . Lab. de Physique du Solide); Warmack, R.J.; Ferrell, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (PSTM) is the photon analogue of the electron Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). It uses the evanescent field due to the total internal reflection of a light beam in a Total Internal Reflection (TIR) prism. The sample, mounted on the base of the prism, modulates the evanescent field. A sharpened optical fiber probes this field, and the collected light is processed to generate an image of the topography and the chemical composition of the surface. We give, in this paper, a description of the microscope and discuss the influence of several parameters such as -- polarization of light, angle of incidence, shape of the end of the fiber -- on the resolution. Images of various samples -- glass samples, teflon spheres -- are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Sensitivity of photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Building on its high spatial resolution, deep penetration depth and excellent image contrast, 3D photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has grown tremendously since its first publication in 2005. Integrating optical excitation and acoustic detection, PAM has broken through both the optical diffusion and optical diffraction limits. PAM has 100% relative sensitivity to optical absorption (i.e., a given percentage change in the optical absorption coefficient yields the same percentage change in the photoacoustic amplitude), and its ultimate detection sensitivity is limited only by thermal noise. Focusing on the engineering aspects of PAM, this Review discusses the detection sensitivity of PAM, compares the detection efficiency of different PAM designs, and summarizes the imaging performance of various endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. It then describes representative PAM applications with high detection sensitivity, and outlines paths to further improvement. PMID:25302158

  19. [Confocal laser scanning microscopy].

    PubMed

    Ulrich, M

    2015-07-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows the in vivo evaluation of melanocytic and nonmelanocytic skin tumours with high sensitivity and specificity. RCM represents an optical imaging technique, which enables us to examine the skin at high resolution. Today, RCM represents not only an interesting tool for dermatologic research but has also been introduced as a diagnostic tool in every day clinical practice. As such, RCM is applied for improvement of skin cancer diagnosis adjunct to clinical and dermatoscopic examination. In combination with dermatoscopy RCM has shown an increased specificity with similar sensitivity. In this regard RCM helps to decrease the rate of unnecessary biopsies of benign lesions. Despite its use in dermatooncology RCM may also be used for diagnosis and monitoring of inflammatory diseases. Future developments include technical improvements, teledermatology solutions and the application of ex vivo RCM in Moh's micrographic surgery.

  20. Interference reflection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barr, Valarie A; Bunnell, Stephen C

    2009-12-01

    Interference reflection microscopy (IRM) is an optical technique used to study cell adhesion or cell mobility on a glass coverslip. The interference of reflected light waves generates images with high contrast and definition. IRM can be used to examine almost any cell that will rest upon a glass surface, although it is most useful in examining sites of close contact between a cell and substratum. This unit presents methods for obtaining IRM images of cells with particular emphasis on IRM imaging with a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), as most LSCM are already capable of recording these images without any modification of the instrument. Techniques are presented for imaging fixed and live cells, as well as simultaneous multi-channel capture of fluorescence and reflection images. Copyright 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.